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Sample records for imaging contrast based

  1. Contrast-based image fusion using the discrete wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Tian; Ni, GuoGiang

    2000-08-01

    We introduce a contrast-based image fusion method using the wavelet multiresolution analysis. This method includes three steps. First, the multiresolution architectures of the two original input images are obtained using the discrete wavelet transform. A new concept called directive contrast is presented. Second, the multiresolution architecture of the fused image can be achieved by selecting the corresponding subband signals of each input image based on the directive contrast. Finally, the fused image is reconstructed using the inverse wavelet transform. This algorithm is relevant to visual sensitivity and is tested by merging visual and IR images. The result shows that the fused image can integrate the details of each original image. The visual aesthetics and the computed SNRs of the fused images show that the new approaches can provide better fusion results than some previous multiresolution fusion methods.

  2. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  3. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  4. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  5. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  6. Contrast sensitivity function calibration based on image quality prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Cai, Yunze

    2014-11-01

    Contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) describe visual stimuli based on their spatial frequency. However, CSF calibration is limited by the size of the sample collection and this remains an open issue. In this study, we propose an approach for calibrating CSFs that is based on the hypothesis that a precise CSF model can accurately predict image quality. Thus, CSF calibration is regarded as the inverse problem of image quality prediction according to our hypothesis. A CSF could be calibrated by optimizing the performance of a CSF-based image quality metric using a database containing images with known quality. Compared with the traditional method, this would reduce the work involved in sample collection dramatically. In the present study, we employed three image databases to optimize some existing CSF models. The experimental results showed that the performance of a three-parameter CSF model was better than that of other models. The results of this study may be helpful in CSF and image quality research.

  7. Dynamic contrast-based quantization for lossy wavelet image compression.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Damon M; Hemami, Sheila S

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a contrast-based quantization strategy for use in lossy wavelet image compression that attempts to preserve visual quality at any bit rate. Based on the results of recent psychophysical experiments using near-threshold and suprathreshold wavelet subband quantization distortions presented against natural-image backgrounds, subbands are quantized such that the distortions in the reconstructed image exhibit root-mean-squared contrasts selected based on image, subband, and display characteristics and on a measure of total visual distortion so as to preserve the visual system's ability to integrate edge structure across scale space. Within a single, unified framework, the proposed contrast-based strategy yields images which are competitive in visual quality with results from current visually lossless approaches at high bit rates and which demonstrate improved visual quality over current visually lossy approaches at low bit rates. This strategy operates in the context of both nonembedded and embedded quantization, the latter of which yields a highly scalable codestream which attempts to maintain visual quality at all bit rates; a specific application of the proposed algorithm to JPEG-2000 is presented. PMID:15825476

  8. Image contrast enhancement based on a local standard deviation model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Dah-Chung; Wu, Wen-Rong

    1996-12-31

    The adaptive contrast enhancement (ACE) algorithm is a widely used image enhancement method, which needs a contrast gain to adjust high frequency components of an image. In the literature, the gain is usually inversely proportional to the local standard deviation (LSD) or is a constant. But these cause two problems in practical applications, i.e., noise overenhancement and ringing artifact. In this paper a new gain is developed based on Hunt`s Gaussian image model to prevent the two defects. The new gain is a nonlinear function of LSD and has the desired characteristic emphasizing the LSD regions in which details are concentrated. We have applied the new ACE algorithm to chest x-ray images and the simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. An improved image sharpness assessment method based on contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Tian, Yan; Yin, Yili

    2015-10-01

    An image sharpness assessment method based on the property of Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) was proposed to realize the sharpness assessment of unfocused image. Firstly, image was performed the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), and intermediate frequency coefficients and high frequency coefficients are divided into two parts respectively. Secondly the four parts were performed the inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT) to obtain subimages. Thirdly, using Range Function evaluates the four sub-image sharpness value. Finally, the image sharpness is obtained through the weighted sum of the sub-image sharpness value. In order to comply with the CSF characteristics, weighting factor is setting based on the Contrast Sensitivity Function. The new algorithm and four typical evaluation algorithm: Fourier, Range , Variance and Wavelet are evaluated based on the six quantitative evaluation index, which include the width of steep part of focusing curve, the ration of sharpness, the steepness, the variance of float part of focusing curve, the factor of local extreme and the sensitivity. On the other hand, the effect of noise, and image content on algorithm is analyzed in this paper. The experiment results show that the new algorithm has better performance of sensitivity, anti-nose than the four typical evaluation algorithms. The evaluation results are consistent with human visual characteristics.

  10. Adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm for point-based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping P.

    2015-03-01

    Surgical simulation is a major application in computer graphics and virtual reality, and most of the existing work indicates that interactive real-time cutting simulation of soft tissue is a fundamental but challenging research problem in virtual surgery simulation systems. More specifically, it is difficult to achieve a fast enough graphic update rate (at least 30 Hz) on commodity PC hardware by utilizing traditional triangle-based rendering algorithms. In recent years, point-based rendering (PBR) has been shown to offer the potential to outperform the traditional triangle-based rendering in speed when it is applied to highly complex soft tissue cutting models. Nevertheless, the PBR algorithms are still limited in visual quality due to inherent contrast distortion. We propose an adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm as a postprocessing module for PBR, providing high visual rendering quality as well as acceptable rendering efficiency. Our approach is based on a perceptible image quality technique with automatic parameter selection, resulting in a visual quality comparable to existing conventional PBR algorithms. Experimental results show that our adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm produces encouraging results both visually and numerically compared to representative algorithms, and experiments conducted on the latest hardware demonstrate that the proposed PBR framework with the postprocessing module is superior to the conventional PBR algorithm and that the proposed contrast enhancement algorithm can be utilized in (or compatible with) various variants of the conventional PBR algorithm.

  11. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T O; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes. PMID:26417525

  12. Automatic optic disc segmentation based on image brightness and contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shijian; Liu, Jiang; Lim, Joo Hwee; Zhang, Zhuo; Tan, Ngan Meng; Wong, Wing Kee; Li, Huiqi; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Untreated glaucoma leads to permanent damage of the optic nerve and resultant visual field loss, which can progress to blindness. As glaucoma often produces additional pathological cupping of the optic disc (OD), cupdisc- ratio is one measure that is widely used for glaucoma diagnosis. This paper presents an OD localization method that automatically segments the OD and so can be applied for the cup-disc-ratio based glaucoma diagnosis. The proposed OD segmentation method is based on the observations that the OD is normally much brighter and at the same time have a smoother texture characteristics compared with other regions within retinal images. Given a retinal image we first capture the ODs smooth texture characteristic by a contrast image that is constructed based on the local maximum and minimum pixel lightness within a small neighborhood window. The centre of the OD can then be determined according to the density of the candidate OD pixels that are detected by retinal image pixels of the lowest contrast. After that, an OD region is approximately determined by a pair of morphological operations and the OD boundary is finally determined by an ellipse that is fitted by the convex hull of the detected OD region. Experiments over 71 retinal images of different qualities show that the OD region overlapping reaches up to 90.37% according to the OD boundary ellipses determined by our proposed method and the one manually plotted by an ophthalmologist.

  13. Hepatobiliary MR Imaging with Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brown, Jeffrey J.; Merkle, Elmar M.; Nagle, Scott K.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of gadolinium-based “hepatobiliary” contrast agents offers new opportunities for diagnostic MRI and has triggered a great interest for innovative imaging approaches to the liver and bile ducts. In this review article we will discuss the imaging properties of the two gadolinium-based hepatobiliary contrast agents currently available in the USA, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoxetic acid, as well as important pharmacokinetic differences that affect their diagnostic performance. We will review potential applications, protocol optimization strategies, as well as diagnostic pitfalls. A variety of illustrative case examples will be used to demonstrate the role of these agents in detection and characterization of liver lesions as well as for imaging the biliary system. Changes in MR protocols geared towards optimizing workflow and imaging quality will also be discussed. It is our aim that the information provided in this article will facilitate the optimal utilization of these agents, and will stimulate the reader‘s pursuit of new applications for future benefit. PMID:22334493

  14. Contrast enhancement of propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Adam; Xu, Ling; Petruccelli, Jon C.; Gupta, Rajiv; Barbastathis, George

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) technique derived from propagation dependent phase change. We assume that the absorption and phase components are correlated and solve the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The experimental setup is simple compared to other XPCI techniques; the only requirements are a micro-focus X-ray source with sufficient temporal coherence and an X-ray detector of sufficient spatial resolution. This method was demonstrated in three scenarios, the first of which entails identification of an index-matched sphere. A rubber and nylon sphere were immersed in water and imaged. While the rubber sphere could be plainly seen on a radiograph, the nylon sphere was only visible in the phase reconstruction. Next, the technique was applied to differentiating liquid samples. In this scenario, three liquid samples (acetone, water, and hydrogen peroxide) were analyzed using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and phase contrast CT. While conventional CT was capable of differentiating between acetone and the other two liquids, it failed to distinguish between water and hydrogen peroxide; only phase CT was capable of differentiating all three samples. Finally, the technique was applied to CT imaging of a human artery specimen with extensive atherosclerotic plaque. This scenario demonstrated the increased sensitivity to soft tissue compared to conventional CT; it also uncovered some drawbacks of the method, which will be the target of future work. In all cases, the signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast was greatly enhanced relative to conventional attenuation-based imaging.

  15. Luminosity and contrast normalization in color retinal images based on standard reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2016-03-01

    Color retinal images are used manually or automatically for diagnosis and monitoring progression of a retinal diseases. Color retinal images have large luminosity and contrast variability within and across images due to the large natural variations in retinal pigmentation and complex imaging setups. The quality of retinal images may affect the performance of automatic screening tools therefore different normalization methods are developed to uniform data before applying any further analysis or processing. In this paper we propose a new reliable method to remove non-uniform illumination in retinal images and improve their contrast based on contrast of the reference image. The non-uniform illumination is removed by normalizing luminance image using local mean and standard deviation. Then the contrast is enhanced by shifting histograms of uniform illuminated retinal image toward histograms of the reference image to have similar histogram peaks. This process improve the contrast without changing inter correlation of pixels in different color channels. In compliance with the way humans perceive color, the uniform color space of LUV is used for normalization. The proposed method is widely tested on large dataset of retinal images with present of different pathologies such as Exudate, Lesion, Hemorrhages and Cotton-Wool and in different illumination conditions and imaging setups. Results shows that proposed method successfully equalize illumination and enhances contrast of retinal images without adding any extra artifacts.

  16. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo. PMID:24938638

  17. Optimization of grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Shafer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) technology has emerged over the last decade as a novel imaging technique capable of probing phase characteristics of an object as complimentary information to conventional absorption properties. In this work, we identified and provided a rationale for optimization of key parameters that determine the performance of a Talbot-Lau PCI system. The study used the Fresnel wave propagation theory and system geometry to predict optimal grating alignment conditions necessary for producing maximum-phase contrast. The moiré fringe pattern frequency and angular orientation produced in the X-ray detector plane were studied as functions of the gratings' axial rotation. The effect of axial displacement between source-to-phase (L) and phase-to-absorption (d) gratings, on system contrast, was discussed in detail. The L-d regions of highest contrast were identified, and the dependence of contrast on the energy of the X-ray spectrum was also studied. The predictions made in this study were tested experimentally and showed excellent agreement. The results indicated that the PCI system performance is highly sensitive to alignment. The rationale and recommendations made should serve as guidance in design, development, and optimization of Talbot-Lau PCI systems.

  18. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23896957

  19. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  20. Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, A.; Beckmann, F.; Lytaev, P.; Greving, I.; Lottermoser, L.; Dose, T.; Kirchhof, R.; Burmester, H.; Schreyer, A.; Herzen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Conventional absorption-based imaging often lacks in good contrast at special applications like visualization of soft tissue or weak absorbing material in general. To overcome this limitation, several new X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods have been developed at synchrotron radiation facilities. Our aim was to establish the possibility of different phase-contrast imaging modalities at the Imaging Beamline (IBL, P05) and the High Energy Material Science beamline (HEMS, P07) at Petra III (DESY, Germany). Here we present the instrumentation and the status of the currently successfully established phase-contrast imaging techniques. First results from measurements of biomedical samples will be presented as demonstration.

  1. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  2. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:25321797

  3. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based “nanobubble” contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:25321797

  4. A contrast correction method for dental images based on histogram registration

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, TL; Asvestas, PA; Matsopoulos, GK; Gröndahl, K; Gröndahl, H-G

    2010-01-01

    Contrast correction is often required in digital subtraction radiography when comparing medical data acquired over different time periods owing to dissimilarities in the acquisition process. This paper focuses on dental radiographs and introduces a novel approach for correcting the contrast in dental image pairs. The proposed method modifies the subject images by applying typical registration techniques on their histograms. The proposed histogram registration method reshapes the histograms of the two subject images in such a way that these images are matched in terms of their contrast deviation. The method was extensively tested over 4 sets of dental images, consisting of 72 registered dental image pairs with unknown contrast differences as well as 20 dental pairs with known contrast differences. The proposed method was directly compared against the well-known histogram-based contrast correction method. The two methods were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated for all 92 available dental image pairs. The two methods were compared in terms of the contrast root mean square difference between the reference image and the corrected image in each case. The obtained results were also verified statistically using appropriate t-tests in each set. The proposed method exhibited superior performance compared with the well-established method, in terms of the contrast root mean square difference between the reference and the corrected images. After suitable statistical analysis, it was deduced that the performance advantage of the proposed approach was statistically significant. PMID:20587655

  5. Synchrotron-based phase-contrast images of zebrafish and its anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Donepudi, Venkateswara; Melumai, Bhaskaraiah; Thallapaka, Balasaidulu; Sandeep, Konam; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Zhong, Zhong; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tohoru; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2014-08-01

    Images of vertebrates (zebrafish and zebrafish eye) have been obtained by using an X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, namely, synchrotron-based diffraction-enhanced imaging (SY-DEI) (or analyzer based imaging) and synchrotron-based diffraction imaging in tomography mode (SY-DEI-CT). Due to the limitations of the conventional radiographic imaging in visualizing the internal complex feature of the sample, we utilized the upgraded SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT systems to acquire the images at 20, 30 and 40 keV, to observe the enhanced contrast. SY-DEI and SY-DEI-CT techniques exploits the refraction properties, and have great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, in particular for low (Z) elements, such as, C, H, O and N, which constitutes the soft tissue. Recently, these techniques are characterized by its extraordinary image quality, with improved contrast, by imaging invertebrates. We have chosen the vertebrate sample of zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism widely used in developmental biology and oncology. For biological imaging, these techniques are most sensitive to enhance the contrast. For the present study, images of the sample, in planar and tomography modes offer more clarity on the contrast enhancement of anatomical features of the eye, especially the nerve bundle, swim bladder, grills and some internal organs in gut with more visibility.

  6. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  7. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. PMID:23453793

  8. Modified Sigmoid Function Based Gray Scale Image Contrast Enhancement Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Pal, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of an image enhancement is to improve eminence by maximizing the information content in the test image. Conventional contrast enhancement techniques either often fails to produce reasonable results for a broad variety of low-contrast and high contrast images, or cannot be automatically applied to different images, because they are parameters dependent. Hence this paper introduces a novel hybrid image enhancement approach by taking both the local and global information of an image. In the present work, sigmoid function is being modified on the basis of contrast of the images. The gray image enhancement problem is treated as nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints and solved by particle swarm optimization. The entropy and edge information is included in the objective function as quality measure of an image. The effectiveness of modified sigmoid function based enhancement over conventional methods namely linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization are better revealed by the enhanced images and further validated by statistical analysis of these images.

  9. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 μarc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  10. Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangting; Wang, Yujie; Ding, Bei; Shi, Chen; Liu, Huanhuan; Tang, Rongbiao; Sun, Jianqi; Yan, Fuhua; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI) technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents. Methods We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and compared with histological sections. Results Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape. Conclusions Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases. PMID:25811626

  11. In-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Xiao, Yongshun; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2014-08-01

    Thomson scattering x-ray sources can produce ultrashort, energy tunable x-ray pulses characterized by high brightness, quasi-monochromatic, and high spatial coherence, which make it an ideal source for in-line phase-contrast imaging. We demonstrate the capacity of in-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. Clear edge enhancement effect has been observed in the experiment. PMID:25173262

  12. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  13. Time-domain imaging with quench-based fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Solomon, Metasebya; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Time-domain diffuse optical imaging was performed to assess the FRET and quenching in living mice with orthotopic breast cancer. Tumor contrast enhancement was accompanied by increased fluorescence lifetime after administration of quenched probes selective for matrix metalloproteinases while no significant change was observed for non-quenched probes for integrin receptors. These results demonstrate the utility of timedomain imaging for detection of cancer-related enzyme activity in vivo.

  14. Cuckoo search algorithm based satellite image contrast and brightness enhancement using DWT-SVD.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A K; Soni, V; Kumar, A; Singh, G K

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a new contrast enhancement approach which is based on Cuckoo Search (CS) algorithm and DWT-SVD for quality improvement of the low contrast satellite images. The input image is decomposed into the four frequency subbands through Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), and CS algorithm used to optimize each subband of DWT and then obtains the singular value matrix of the low-low thresholded subband image and finally, it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying IDWT. The singular value matrix employed intensity information of the particular image, and any modification in the singular values changes the intensity of the given image. The experimental results show superiority of the proposed method performance in terms of PSNR, MSE, Mean and Standard Deviation over conventional and state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24893835

  15. Diffraction-Based Techniques For High Contrast X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerzada, Lubna Naseem

    Two X-ray diffraction based techniques for high contrast were explored to improve contrast in radiology: diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) and coherent scatter imaging. DEI produces contrast in images based upon the difference in the X-ray refractive indices of materials or tissues. Two DEI systems were devised. Both were comprised of a conventional polychromatic copper X-ray source, polycapillary collimating optics and two silicon crystals.Lucite step phantoms and nylon tubing were imaged. No fringe effects were observed. The lack of observable edge enhancement may have been due to the optic structure which obscured refraction effects. Better results might have been achieved if a higher resolution detector or phantom of larger step size or larger diameter thin walled tubing had been used. The second technique was coherent scatter X-ray imaging. The purpose of this work was to differentiate between healthy and diseased human breast tissues. For instance, breast carcinoma is known to have a peak coherent scattering angle at 12.2° for Mo Ka radiation at 17.5 keV, whereas fatty tissue peaks around 9°. A system which would be compatible with screening mammography was developed. The system was expanded to include sample scanning to allow for a larger image area. The modulation transfer function was computed for static and scanned images of a resolution phantom. These showed good agreement, indicating that the scanning was properly aligned and timed. Static and scanned images of phantoms were taken and the contrast was calculated for a series of experimental parameters including, grid tilt angle. A complex phantom was also then imaged. It was possible to distinguish tissue-equivalent phantom types. Good contrast resolution scanned images were obtained which is promising for a diagnostic system.

  16. Energy weighting in grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzer, Georg; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Bayer, Florian; Campbell, Michael; Haas, Wilhelm; Horn, Florian; Llopart Cudie, Xavi; Michel, Norbert; Mollenbauer, Uwe; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Ritter, Ina; Wölfel, Stefan; Wong, Winnie S.; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo

    2014-03-01

    With energy-resolving photon-counting detectors in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging it is possible to reduce the dose needed and optimize the imaging chain towards better performance. The advantage of photon- counting detector's linear energy response and absence of electronic noise in attenuation based imaging is known. The access to the energy information of the photons counted provides even further potential for optimization by applying energy weighting factors. We have evaluated energy weighting for grating-based phase-contrast imaging. Measurements with the hybrid photon-counting detector Dosepix were performed. The concept of energy binning implemented in the pixel electronics allows individual storing of the energy information of the incoming photons in 16 energy bins for each pixel. With this technique the full spectral information can be obtained pixel wise from one single acquisition. On the differential phase-contrast data taken, we applied different types of energy weighting factors. The results presented in this contribution demonstrate the advantages of energy-resolved photon-counting in differential phase-contrast imaging. Using a x-ray spectrum centred significantly above the interferometers design energy leads to poor image quality. But with the proposed method and detector the quality was enhanced by 2.8 times in signal-to-noise ratio squared. As this is proportional to dose, energy- resolved photon-counting might be valuable especially for medical applications.

  17. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Willner, M; Herzen, J; Grandl, S; Auweter, S; Mayr, D; Hipp, A; Chabior, M; Sarapata, A; Achterhold, K; Zanette, I; Weitkamp, T; Sztrókay, A; Hellerhoff, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method's prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. PMID:24614413

  18. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  19. Infrared and multi-type images fusion algorithm based on contrast pyramid transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yujing; Qian, Yunsheng

    2016-09-01

    A fusion algorithm for infrared and multi-type images based on contrast pyramid transform (CPT) combined with Otsu method and morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, two sharpened images are combined to the first fused image based on information entropy weighted scheme. Afterwards, two enhanced images and the first fused one are decomposed into a series of images with different dimensions and spatial frequencies. To the low-frequency layer, the Otsu method is applied to calculate the optimal segmentation threshold of the first fused image, which is subsequently used to determine the pixel values in top layer fused image. With respect to the high-frequency layers, the top-bottom hats morphological transform is employed to each layer before maximum selection criterion. Finally, the series of decomposed images are reconstructed and then superposed with the enhanced image processed by morphological gradient operation as a second fusion to get the final fusion image. Infrared and visible images fusion, infrared and low-light-level (LLL) images fusion, infrared intensity and infrared polarization images fusion, and multi-focus images fusion are discussed in this paper. Both experimental results and objective metrics demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm over the conventional ones used to compare.

  20. Optimum wavelet based masking for the contrast enhancement of medical images using enhanced cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Anitha, J

    2016-04-01

    Unsharp masking techniques are a prominent approach in contrast enhancement. Generalized masking formulation has static scale value selection, which limits the gain of contrast. In this paper, we propose an Optimum Wavelet Based Masking (OWBM) using Enhanced Cuckoo Search Algorithm (ECSA) for the contrast improvement of medical images. The ECSA can automatically adjust the ratio of nest rebuilding, using genetic operators such as adaptive crossover and mutation. First, the proposed contrast enhancement approach is validated quantitatively using Brain Web and MIAS database images. Later, the conventional nest rebuilding of cuckoo search optimization is modified using Adaptive Rebuilding of Worst Nests (ARWN). Experimental results are analyzed using various performance matrices, and our OWBM shows improved results as compared with other reported literature. PMID:26945462

  1. Feasibility study of hidden flow imaging based on laser speckle technique using multiperspectives contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Moshe, Tomer

    2014-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the insertion of lens array in the front of a CCD camera in a laser speckle imaging (LSI) like-technique to acquire multiple speckle reflectance projections for imaging blood flow in an intact biological tissue. In some of LSI applications, flow imaging is obtained by thinning or removing of the upper tissue layers to access blood vessels. In contrast, with the proposed approach flow imaging can be achieved while the tissue is intact. In the system, each lens from an hexagonal lens array observed the sample from slightly different perspectives and captured with a CCD camera. In the computer, these multiview raw images are converted to speckled contrast maps. Then, a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm is employed for processing yields high contrast flow information. The method is experimentally validated first with a plastic tube filled with scattering liquid running at different controlled flow rates hidden in a biological tissue and then extensively tested for imaging of cerebral blood flow in an intact rodent head experience different conditions. A total of fifteen mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=5) consisted of injured mice experience hypoxic ischemic brain injury monitored for ~40 min. Group 2 (n=5) injured mice experience anoxic brain injury monitored up to 20 min. Group 3 (n=5) experience functional activation monitored up to ~35 min. To increase tissue transparency and the penetration depth of photons through head tissue layers, an optical clearing method was employed. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time the use of lens array in LSI scheme.

  2. Chemical-contrast imaging with pulse-shaping based pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse-shaping techniques are providing new modes of contrast for the field of multiphoton microscopy. Endogenous species such as heme proteins show rich nonlinear spectroscopic signatures of excited state absorption, stimulated emission and ground-state bleaching. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillators offer new opportunities for imaging based on pump-probe contrast. Spatial light modulators take advantage of this large bandwidth, shaping pulses of light to selectively excite molecular structures with similar spectral properties. We present two-color pump-probe imaging of heme proteins solutions and red blood cells.

  3. Co-registration and distortion correction of diffusion and anatomical images based on inverse contrast normalization.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Haldar, Justin P; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Shattuck, David W; Leahy, Richard M

    2015-07-15

    Diffusion MRI provides quantitative information about microstructural properties which can be useful in neuroimaging studies of the human brain. Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, which are frequently used for acquisition of diffusion images, are sensitive to inhomogeneities in the primary magnetic (B0) field that cause localized distortions in the reconstructed images. We describe and evaluate a new method for correction of susceptibility-induced distortion in diffusion images in the absence of an accurate B0 fieldmap. In our method, the distortion field is estimated using a constrained non-rigid registration between an undistorted T1-weighted anatomical image and one of the distorted EPI images from diffusion acquisition. Our registration framework is based on a new approach, INVERSION (Inverse contrast Normalization for VERy Simple registratION), which exploits the inverted contrast relationship between T1- and T2-weighted brain images to define a simple and robust similarity measure. We also describe how INVERSION can be used for rigid alignment of diffusion images and T1-weighted anatomical images. Our approach is evaluated with multiple in vivo datasets acquired with different acquisition parameters. Compared to other methods, INVERSION shows robust and consistent performance in rigid registration and shows improved alignment of diffusion and anatomical images relative to normalized mutual information for non-rigid distortion correction. PMID:25827811

  4. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  5. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  6. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  7. A high-contrast imaging polarimeter with a stepped-transmission filter based coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Chao; Ren, De-Qing; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Dou, Jiang-Pei; Guo, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The light reflected from planets is polarized mainly due to Rayleigh scattering, but starlight is normally unpolarized. Thus it provides an approach to enhance the imaging contrast by inducing the imaging polarimetry technique. In this paper, we propose a high-contrast imaging polarimeter that is optimized for the direct imaging of exoplanets, combined with our recently developed stepped-transmission filter based coronagraph. Here we present the design and calibration method of the polarimetry system and the associated test of its high-contrast performance. In this polarimetry system, two liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVRs) act as a polarization modulator, which can extract the polarized signal. We show that our polarimeter can achieve a measurement accuracy of about 0.2% at a visible wavelength (632.8 nm) with linearly polarized light. Finally, the whole system demonstrates that a contrast of 10‑9 at 5λ/D is achievable, which can be used for direct imaging of Jupiter-like planets with a space telescope.

  8. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretzke, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent x-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near-field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only at a single detector distance and illumination wavelength. We also deduce a uniqueness criterion for phase contrast tomography, which may be applied to resolve the three-dimensional structure of micro- and nano-scale samples. Moreover, our results may have some significance to electronic imaging methods due to the equivalence of paraxial wave propagation and Schrödinger’s equation.

  9. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  10. Fourier transform image processing techniques for grid-based phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-09-01

    A recently developed technique for phase imaging using table top sources is to use multiple fine-pitch gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerences and precise alignment required have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we employ a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al.1 that ultilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Phase is extracted using Fourier processing on a single raw image taken using a focused mammography grid. The effects on the final image of varying grid, object, and detector distances, window widths, and of a variety of windowing functions, used to separate the harmonics, were investigated.

  11. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  12. Synchrotron- and laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging for imaging mouse articular cartilage in the absence of radiopaque contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Borges, Patricia Das Neves; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Vincent, Tonia L.; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA) has been recognized as the most promising research tool for the identification of new OA therapeutic targets. However, this model is currently limited by poor throughput, dependent on the extremely time-consuming histopathology assessment of the articular cartilage (AC). We have recently shown that AC in the rat tibia can be imaged both in air and in saline solution using a laboratory system based on coded-aperture X-ray phase-contrast imaging (CAXPCi). Here, we explore ways to extend the methodology for imaging the much thinner AC of the mouse, by means of gold-standard synchrotron-based phase-contrast methods. Specifically, we have used analyser-based phase-contrast micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for its high sensitivity to faint phase changes, coupled with a high-resolution (4.5 μm pixel) detector. Healthy, diseased (four weeks post induction of OA) and artificially damaged mouse AC was imaged at the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste, Italy, using the above method. For validation, we used conventional micro-CT combined with radiopaque soft-tissue staining and standard histomorphometry. We show that mouse cartilage can be visualized correctly by means of the synchrotron method. This suggests that: (i) further developments of the laboratory-based CAXPCi system, especially in terms of pushing the resolution limits, might have the potential to resolve mouse AC ex vivo and (ii) additional improvements may lead to a new generation of CAXPCi micro-CT scanners which could be used for in vivo longitudinal pre-clinical imaging of soft tissue at resolutions impossible to achieve by current MRI technology. PMID:24470419

  13. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara Assoufid, Lahsen Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2014-01-15

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  14. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Assoufid, Lahsen; Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W; Butler, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact. PMID:24517772

  15. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  16. Orientation based segmentation for phase-contrast microscopic image of confluent cell.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Yuasa, T; Sasaki, H; Kato, R

    2013-01-01

    In this research, we propose a novel segmentation method for image of cultured cell at a confluent state, obtained by phase-contrast microscope, based on the orientation. First, we assign to each pixel in the image the direction of an eigenvector corresponding to a smaller eigenvalue of the 2 by 2 Hessian matrix with respect to brightness. Next, we define the orientation at a certain pixel as the histograms of the direction at pixels in the surrounding regions. Then, we evaluate deviation of histograms in the individual regions by entropy, and regard the series of entropy as a multi-dimensional vector, the dimension of which corresponds with the number of regions. We suppose that the vector is assigned to the pixel of interest. Finally, we segment the image based on the multi-dimensional vector using K-means method. We investigate the efficacy of the proposed method using an actual human confluent fibroblast image acquired by phase-contrast microscopy. PMID:24110439

  17. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Tükenmez Ergene, Lale; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  18. Covariance of lucky images for increasing objects contrast: diffraction-limited images in ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Images of stars adopt shapes far from the ideal Airy pattern due to atmospheric density fluctuations. Hence, diffraction-limited images can only be achieved by telescopes without atmospheric influence, e.g. spatial telescopes, or by using techniques like adaptive optics or lucky imaging. In this paper, we propose a new computational technique based on the evaluation of the COvariancE of Lucky Images (COELI). This technique allows us to discover companions to main stars by taking advantage of the atmospheric fluctuations. We describe the algorithm and we carry out a theoretical analysis of the improvement in contrast. We have used images taken with 2.2-m Calar Alto telescope as a test bed for the technique resulting that, under certain conditions, telescope diffraction limit is clearly reached.

  19. A robust background correction algorithm for forensic bloodstain imaging using mean-based contrast adjustment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wee Chuen; Khoo, Bee Ee; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2016-05-01

    Background correction algorithm (BCA) is useful in enhancing the visibility of images captured in crime scenes especially those of untreated bloodstains. Successful implementation of BCA requires all the images to have similar brightness which often proves a problem when using automatic exposure setting in a camera. This paper presents an improved background correction algorithm (BCA) that applies mean-based contrast adjustment as a pre-correction step to adjust the mean brightness of images to be similar before implementing BCA. The proposed modification, namely mean-based adaptive BCA (mABCA) was tested on various image samples captured under different illuminations such as 385 nm, 415 nm and 458 nm. We also evaluated mABCA of two wavelengths (415 nm and 458 nm) and three wavelengths (415 nm, 380 nm and 458 nm) in enhancing untreated bloodstains on different surfaces. The proposed mABCA is found to be more robust in processing images captured in different brightness and thus overcomes the main issue faced in the original BCA. PMID:27162018

  20. Brief Communication: Contrast-stretching- and histogram-smoothness-based synthetic aperture radar image enhancement for flood map generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, F.; Riaz, M. M.; Ghafoor, A.; Arif, F.

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic-aperture-radar-image-based flood map generation is usually a challenging task (due to degraded contrast). A three-step approach (based on adaptive histogram clipping, histogram remapping and smoothing) is proposed for generation of a more visualized flood map image. The pre- and post-flood images are adaptively histogram equalized. The hidden details in difference image are enhanced using contrast-based enhancement and histogram smoothing. A fast-ready flood map is then generated using equalized pre-, post- and difference images. Results (evaluated using different data sets) show significance of the proposed technique.

  1. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  2. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample. PMID:25173319

  3. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Töpperwien, Mareike; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  4. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support. PMID:23471751

  5. Engineered Iron-Oxide-Based Nanoparticles as Enhanced T1 Contrast Agents for Efficient Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Lirong; Chi, Xiaoqin; Bao, Jianfeng; Yang, Lijiao; Zhao, Wenxiu; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Jinhao

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small-sized zwitterion-coated gadolinium-embedded iron oxide (GdIO) nanoparticles, which exhibit a strong T1 contrast effect for tumor imaging through enhanced permeation and retention effect and the ability to clear out of the body in living subjects. The combination of spin-canting effects and the collection of gadolinium species within small-sized GdIO nanoparticles led to a significantly enhanced T1 contrast effect. For example, GdIO nanoparticles with a diameter of ~4.8 nm exhibited a high r1 relaxivity of 7.85 mM−1 · S−1 and a low r2/r1 ratio of 5.24. After being coated with zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate molecules, the 4.8 nm GdIO nanoparticles showed a steady hydrodynamic diameter (~5.2 nm) in both PBS buffer and fetal bovine serum solution, indicating a low nonspecific protein absorption. This study provides a valuable strategy for the design of highly sensitive iron-oxide-based T1 contrast agents with relatively long circulation half-lives (~50 min), efficient tumor passive targeting (SKOV3, human ovarian cancer xenograft tumor as a model), and the possibility of rapid renal clearance after tumor imaging. PMID:23473444

  6. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  7. Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama S.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic carbon-based nanostructures are presented as contrast agents (CAs) for advanced imaging applications such as cellular and molecular imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gadolinium-loaded, ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (gadonanotubes; GNTs) are shown to have extremely high r1 relaxivities (contrast enhancement efficacy), especially at low-magnetic field strengths. The inherent lipophilicity of GNTs provides them the ability to image cells at low magnetic field strength. A carboxylated dextran-coated GNT (GadoDex) has been synthesized and proposed as a new biocompatible high-performance MRI CA. The r1 relaxivity is ca. 20 times greater than for other paramagnetic Gd-based CAs. This enhanced relaxivity for GadoDex is due to the synergistic effects of an increased molecular tumbling time (tauR) and a faster proton exchange rate (taum). GNTs also exhibit very large transverse relaxivities (r2) at high magnetic fields (≥ 3 T). The dependence of the transverse relaxation rates (especially R2*) of labeled cells on GNT concentration offers the possibility to quantify cell population in vivo using R2* mapping. The cell-labeling efficiency and high transverse relaxivities of GNTs has enabled the first non-iron oxide-based single-cell imaging using MRI. The residual metal catalyst particles of SWNT materials also have transverse relaxation properties. All of the SWNT materials exhibit superior transverse relaxation properties. However, purified SWNTs and US-tubes with less residual metal content exhibit better transverse relaxivities (r2), demonstrating the importance of the SWNT structure for enhanced MRI CA performance. A strategy to improve the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CAs by geometrically confining them within porous silicon particles (SiMPs) has been investigated. The enhancement in relaxivity is attributed to the slow diffusion of water molecules through the pores and the increase in the molecular tumbling time of the nanoconstruct

  8. Contrast-enhanced continuous-terahertz-wave imaging based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zuo, Shasha; Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-04-18

    We present a novel contrast-enhanced continuous-terahertz-wave imaging modality based on magnetic induction heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), which yields a highly sensitive increment in the reflection terahertz (THz) signal in SPIO solution upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field. In the differential and relative refection change focal-plane images before and after alternating magnetic field exposure, a dramatic contrast is demonstrated between water with and without SPIOs. This low-cost, simple, and stable contrast-enhanced continuous-THz-wave imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and real-time imaging application. PMID:27137233

  9. Closed loop, DM diversity-based, wavefront correction algorithm for high contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-09-17

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(-10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling. PMID:19547602

  10. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  11. A fusion method for visible and infrared images based on contrast pyramid with teaching learning based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Haiyan; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel image fusion scheme based on contrast pyramid (CP) with teaching learning based optimization (TLBO) for visible and infrared images under different spectrum of complicated scene. Firstly, CP decomposition is employed into every level of each original image. Then, we introduce TLBO to optimizing fusion coefficients, which will be changed under teaching phase and learner phase of TLBO, so that the weighted coefficients can be automatically adjusted according to fitness function, namely the evaluation standards of image quality. At last, obtain fusion results by the inverse transformation of CP. Compared with existing methods, experimental results show that our method is effective and the fused images are more suitable for further human visual or machine perception.

  12. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used. PMID:23938672

  13. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  14. Quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images based on Bayesian P-splines.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Volker J; Whitcher, Brandon; Padhani, Anwar R; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is an important tool for detecting subtle kinetic changes in cancerous tissue. Quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI typically involves the convolution of an arterial input function (AIF) with a nonlinear pharmacokinetic model of the contrast agent concentration. Parameters of the kinetic model are biologically meaningful, but the optimization of the nonlinear model has significant computational issues. In practice, convergence of the optimization algorithm is not guaranteed and the accuracy of the model fitting may be compromised. To overcome these problems, this paper proposes a semi-parametric penalized spline smoothing approach, where the AIF is convolved with a set of B-splines to produce a design matrix using locally adaptive smoothing parameters based on Bayesian penalized spline models (P-splines). It has been shown that kinetic parameter estimation can be obtained from the resulting deconvolved response function, which also includes the onset of contrast enhancement. Detailed validation of the method, both with simulated and in vivo data, is provided. PMID:19272996

  15. Speckle-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a laboratory source and the scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tunhe; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H; Hertz, Hans M; Pfeiffer, Franz; Burvall, Anna

    2015-06-15

    The speckle-based scanning method for x-ray phase-contrast imaging is implemented with a liquid-metal-jet source. Using the two-dimensional scanning technique, the phase shift introduced by the object is retrieved in both transverse orientations, and the limitations on spatial resolution inherent to the speckle-tracking technique are avoided. This method opens up possibilities of new high-resolution multimodal applications for lab-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging. PMID:26076271

  16. Contrast based band selection for optimized weathered oil detection in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levaux, Florian; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Neyt, Xavier

    2012-09-01

    Hyperspectral imagery offers unique benefits for detection of land and water features due to the information contained in reflectance signatures such as the bi-directional reflectance distribution function or BRDF. The reflectance signature directly shows the relative absorption and backscattering features of targets. These features can be very useful in shoreline monitoring or surveillance applications, for example to detect weathered oil. In real-time detection applications, processing of hyperspectral data can be an important tool and Optimal band selection is thus important in real time applications in order to select the essential bands using the absorption and backscatter information. In the present paper, band selection is based upon the optimization of target detection using contrast algorithms. The common definition of the contrast (using only one band out of all possible combinations available within a hyperspectral image) is generalized in order to consider all the possible combinations of wavelength dependent contrasts using hyperspectral images. The inflection (defined here as an approximation of the second derivative) is also used in order to enhance the variations in the reflectance spectra as well as in the contrast spectrua in order to assist in optimal band selection. The results of the selection in term of target detection (false alarms and missed detection) are also compared with a previous method to perform feature detection, namely the matched filter. In this paper, imagery is acquired using a pushbroom hyperspectral sensor mounted at the bow of a small vessel. The sensor is mechanically rotated using an optical rotation stage. This opto-mechanical scanning system produces hyperspectral images with pixel sizes on the order of mm to cm scales, depending upon the distance between the sensor and the shoreline being monitored. The motion of the platform during the acquisition induces distortions in the collected HSI imagery. It is therefore

  17. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  18. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-Image Radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging method (ABI), which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to

  19. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  20. Perceived contrast in complex images

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Andrew M.; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    To understand how different spatial frequencies contribute to the overall perceived contrast of complex, broadband photographic images, we adapted the classification image paradigm. Using natural images as stimuli, we randomly varied relative contrast amplitude at different spatial frequencies and had human subjects determine which images had higher contrast. Then, we determined how the random variations corresponded with the human judgments. We found that the overall contrast of an image is disproportionately determined by how much contrast is between 1 and 6 c/°, around the peak of the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We then employed the basic components of contrast psychophysics modeling to show that the CSF alone is not enough to account for our results and that an increase in gain control strength toward low spatial frequencies is necessary. One important consequence of this is that contrast constancy, the apparent independence of suprathreshold perceived contrast and spatial frequency, will not hold during viewing of natural images. We also found that images with darker low-luminance regions tended to be judged as having higher overall contrast, which we interpret as the consequence of darker local backgrounds resulting in higher band-limited contrast response in the visual system. PMID:24190908

  1. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C.; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm2. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  2. SU-E-J-16: Automatic Image Contrast Enhancement Based On Automatic Parameter Optimization for Radiation Therapy Setup Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J; Li, H. Harlod; Zhang, T; Yang, D; Ma, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In RT patient setup 2D images, tissues often cannot be seen well due to the lack of image contrast. Contrast enhancement features provided by image reviewing software, e.g. Mosaiq and ARIA, require manual selection of the image processing filters and parameters thus inefficient and cannot be automated. In this work, we developed a novel method to automatically enhance the 2D RT image contrast to allow automatic verification of patient daily setups as a prerequisite step of automatic patient safety assurance. Methods: The new method is based on contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and high-pass filtering algorithms. The most important innovation is to automatically select the optimal parameters by optimizing the image contrast. The image processing procedure includes the following steps: 1) background and noise removal, 2) hi-pass filtering by subtracting the Gaussian smoothed Result, and 3) histogram equalization using CLAHE algorithm. Three parameters were determined through an iterative optimization which was based on the interior-point constrained optimization algorithm: the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor, the CLAHE algorithm block size and clip limiting parameters. The goal of the optimization is to maximize the entropy of the processed Result. Results: A total 42 RT images were processed. The results were visually evaluated by RT physicians and physicists. About 48% of the images processed by the new method were ranked as excellent. In comparison, only 29% and 18% of the images processed by the basic CLAHE algorithm and by the basic window level adjustment process, were ranked as excellent. Conclusion: This new image contrast enhancement method is robust and automatic, and is able to significantly outperform the basic CLAHE algorithm and the manual window-level adjustment process that are currently used in clinical 2D image review software tools.

  3. Super-Gaussian apodization in ground based telescopes for high contrast coronagraph imaging.

    PubMed

    Cagigas, Miguel A; Valle, Pedro J; Cagigal, Manuel P

    2013-05-20

    We introduce the use of Super-Gaussian apodizing functions in the telescope pupil plane and/or the coronagraph Lyot plane to improve the imaging contrast in ground-based coronagraphs. We describe the properties of the Super-Gaussian function, we estimate its second-order moment in the pupil and Fourier planes and we check it as an apodizing function. We then use Super-Gaussian function to apodize the telescope pupil, the coronagraph Lyot plane or both of them. The result is that a proper apodizing masks combination can reduce the exoplanet detection distance up to a 45% with respect to the classic Lyot coronagraph, for moderately aberrated wavefronts. Compared to the prolate spheroidal function the Super-Gaussian apodizing function allows the planet light up to 3 times brighter. An extra help to increase the extinction rate is to perform a frame selection (Lucky Imaging technique). We show that a selection of the 10% best frames will reduce up to a 20% the detection angular distance when using the classic Lyot coronagraph but that the reduction is only around the 5% when using an apodized coronagraph. PMID:23736492

  4. In vivo confirmation of hydration based contrast mechanisms for terahertz medical imaging using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Nowroozi, Bryan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Ennis, Daniel B.; Alger, Jeffery; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2014-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) detection has been proposed and applied to a variety of medical imaging applications in view of its unrivaled hydration profiling capabilities. Variations in tissue dielectric function have been demonstrated at THz frequencies to generate high contrast imagery of tissue, however, the source of image contrast remains to be verified using a modality with a comparable sensing scheme. To investigate the primary contrast mechanism, a pilot comparison study was performed in a burn wound rat model, widely known to create detectable gradients in tissue hydration through both injured and surrounding tissue. Parallel T2 weighted multi slice multi echo (T2w MSME) 7T Magnetic Resonance (MR) scans and THz surface reflectance maps were acquired of a full thickness skin burn in a rat model over a 5 hour time period. A comparison of uninjured and injured regions in the full thickness burn demonstrates a 3-fold increase in average T2 relaxation times and a 15% increase in average THz reflectivity, respectively. These results support the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for measuring in vivo burn tissue water content and the use of this modality to verify and understand the hydration sensing capabilities of THz imaging for acute assessments of the onset and evolution of diseases that affect the skin. A starting point for more sophisticated in vivo studies, this preliminary analysis may be used in the future to explore how and to what extent the release of unbound water affects imaging contrast in THz burn sensing.

  5. Image Contrast in Holographic Reconstructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, B. R.

    1969-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of holography are explained using elementary wave ideas. Discusses wavefront reconstruction and contrast in hemigraphic images. The consequence of recording only the intensity at a given surface and using an oblique reference wave is shown to be an incomplete reconstruction resulting in image of low contrast. (LC)

  6. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Wu, Yao; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Chen, Yang; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Lu, Zhentai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR) images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML) is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP) of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images. PMID:25028970

  7. Improved contrast of materials based on multi-voltage images decomposition in X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiaotong; Han, Yan; Chen, Ping

    2016-02-01

    A polychromatic X-ray beam results in hardening artefacts and contrast reduction in the reconstructed image, increasing the difficulty of distinguishing materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients. For this reason, a model is proposed to decompose multi-voltage X-ray images into many ‘narrow-energy-width’ X-ray images by minimizing the weighted sum of the squared error in decomposition. This approach requires no change of hardware in the typical computed tomography imaging system. The ‘narrow-energy-width’ projection is obtained directly from the decomposition and is used to reconstruct the image. The distinction among materials with approximately linear attenuation coefficients is enlarged in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image. A cylinder composed of aluminium and silicon is used in the verification experiment. The contrast of silicon and aluminium is improved, and there is a significant difference between silicon and aluminium in the ‘narrow-energy-width’ reconstructed image, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Physicochemical characterization of a novel graphene-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Button, Terry; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel carbon nanostructure-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (MRI CA); graphene nanoplatelets intercalated with manganese (Mn2+) ions, functionalized with dextran (GNP-Dex); and the in vitro assessment of its essential preclinical physicochemical properties: osmolality, viscosity, partition coefficient, protein binding, thermostability, histamine release, and relaxivity. The results indicate that, at concentrations between 0.1 and 100.0 mg/mL, the GNP-Dex formulations are hydrophilic, highly soluble, and stable in deionized water, as well as iso-osmolar (upon addition of mannitol) and iso-viscous to blood. At potential steady-state equilibrium concentrations in blood (0.1–10.0 mg/mL), the thermostability, protein-binding, and histamine-release studies indicate that the GNP-Dex formulations are thermally stable (with no Mn2+ ion dissociation), do not allow non-specific protein adsorption, and elicit negligible allergic response. The r1 relaxivity of GNP-Dex was 92 mM−1s−1 (per-Mn2+ ion, 22 MHz proton Larmor frequency); ~20- to 30-fold greater than that of clinical gadolinium (Gd3+)- and Mn2+-based MRI CAs. The results open avenues for preclinical in vivo safety and efficacy studies with GNP-Dex toward its development as a clinical MRI CA. PMID:23946653

  9. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  10. Micro Soft Tissues Visualization Based on X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2011-01-01

    The current imaging methods have a limited ability to visualize microstructures of biological soft tissues. Small lesions cannot be detected at the early stage of the disease. Phase contrast imaging (PCI) is a novel non-invasive imaging technique that can provide high contrast images of soft tissues by the use of X-ray phase shift. It is a new choice in terms of non-invasively revealing soft tissue details. In this study, the lung and hepatic fibrosis models of mice and rats were used to investigate the ability of PCI in microstructures observation of soft tissues. Our results demonstrated that different liver fibrosis stages could be distinguished non-invasively by PCI. The three-dimensional morphology of a segment of blood vessel was constructed. Noteworthy, the blood clot inside the vessel was visualized in three dimensions which provided a precise description of vessel stenosis. Furthermore, the whole lung airways including the alveoli were obtained. We had specifically highlighted its use in the visualization and assessment of the alveoli. To our knowledge, this was the first time for non-invasive alveoli imaging using PCI. This finding may offer a new perspective on the diagnosis of respiratory disease. All the results confirmed that PCI will be a valuable tool in biological soft tissues imaging. PMID:21892370

  11. Rapid contrast evaluation method based on affinity beads and backscattered electron imaging for the screening of electron stains.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroki; Inoue, Kanako; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Park, Pyoyun; Ikeda, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl salts are toxic and radioactive; therefore, several studies have been conducted to screen for substitutes of electron stains. In this regard, the contrast evaluation process is time consuming and the results obtained are inconsistent. In this study, we developed a novel contrast evaluation method using affinity beads and a backscattered electron image (BSEI), obtained using scanning electron microscopy. The contrast ratios of BSEI in each electron stain treatment were correlated with those of transmission electron microscopic images. The affinity beads bound to cell components independently. Protein and DNA samples were enhanced by image contrast treated with electron stains; however, this was not observed for sugars. Protein-conjugated beads showed an additive effect of image contrast when double-stained with lead. However, additive effect of double staining was not observed in DNA-conjugated beads. The varying chemical properties of oligopeptides showed differences in image contrast when treated with each electron stain. This BSEI-based evaluation method not only enables screening for alternate electron stains, but also helps analyze the underlying mechanisms of electron staining of cellular structures. PMID:26199255

  12. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system.

  13. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  14. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A; Millard, Thomas P; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  15. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis with nanoparticle-based fluorinated MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Palekar, Rohun U; Jallouk, Andrew P; Lanza, Gregory M; Pan, Hua; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    As atherosclerosis remains one of the most prevalent causes of patient mortality, the ability to diagnose early signs of plaque rupture and thrombosis represents a significant clinical need. With recent advances in nanotechnology, it is now possible to image specific molecular processes noninvasively with MRI, using various types of nanoparticles as contrast agents. In the context of cardiovascular disease, it is possible to specifically deliver contrast agents to an epitope of interest for detecting vascular inflammatory processes, which serve as predecessors to atherosclerotic plaque development. Herein, we review various applications of nanotechnology in detecting atherosclerosis using MRI, with an emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and fluorine imaging, along with theranostic prospects of nanotechnology in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26080701

  16. Measurements and simulations analysing the noise behaviour of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Bartl, P.; Durst, J.; Haas, W.; Michel, T.; Ritter, A.; Anton, G.

    2011-08-01

    In the last decades, phase-contrast imaging using a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer is possible even with a low-brilliance X-ray source. With the potential of increasing the soft-tissue contrast, this method is on its way into medical imaging. For this purpose, the knowledge of the underlying physics of this technique is necessary.With this paper, we would like to contribute to the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging by presenting results on measurements and simulations regarding the noise behaviour of the differential phases.These measurements were done using a microfocus X-ray tube with a hybrid, photon-counting, semiconductor Medipix2 detector. The additional simulations were performed by our in-house developed phase-contrast simulation tool “SPHINX”, combining both wave and particle contributions of the simulated photons.The results obtained by both of these methods show the same behaviour. Increasing the number of photons leads to a linear decrease of the standard deviation of the phase. The number of used phase steps has no influence on the standard deviation, if the total number of photons is held constant.Furthermore, the probability density function (pdf) of the reconstructed differential phases was analysed. It turned out that the so-called von Mises distribution is the physically correct pdf, which was also confirmed by measurements.This information advances the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and can be used to improve image quality.

  17. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  18. A flexible patch based approach for combined denoising and contrast enhancement of digital X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Irrera, Paolo; Bloch, Isabelle; Delplanque, Maurice

    2016-02-01

    Denoising and contrast enhancement play key roles in optimizing the trade-off between image quality and X-ray dose. However, these tasks present multiple challenges raised by noise level, low visibility of fine anatomical structures, heterogeneous conditions due to different exposure parameters, and patient characteristics. This work proposes a new method to address these challenges. We first introduce a patch-based filter adapted to the properties of the noise corrupting X-ray images. The filtered images are then used as oracles to define non parametric noise containment maps that, when applied in a multiscale contrast enhancement framework, allow optimizing the trade-off between improvement of the visibility of anatomical structures and noise reduction. A significant amount of tests on both phantoms and clinical images has shown that the proposed method is better suited than others for visual inspection for diagnosis, even when compared to an algorithm used to process low dose images in clinical routine. PMID:26716719

  19. A user-friendly LabVIEW software platform for grating based X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this study, we introduced an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly software platform dedicated to the new grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the University of Science and Technology of China. The control of 21 motorized stages, of a piezoelectric stage and of an X-ray tube are achieved with this software, it also covers image acquisition with a flat panel detector for automatic phase stepping scan. Moreover, a data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features are in principle available. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions in one software package, this platform greatly facilitate users' activities during experimental runs with this grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging setup. PMID:25882730

  20. Increasing the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings.

    PubMed

    Meiser, J; Willner, M; Schröter, T; Hofmann, A; Rieger, J; Koch, F; Birnbacher, L; Schüttler, M; Kunka, D; Meyer, P; Faisal, A; Amberger, M; Duttenhofer, T; Weber, T; Hipp, A; Ehn, S; Walter, M; Herzen, J; Schulz, J; Pfeiffer, F; Mohr, J

    2016-03-17

    Grating based X-ray differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) allows for high contrast imaging of materials with similar absorption characteristics. In the last years' publications, small animals or parts of the human body like breast, hand, joints or blood vessels have been studied. Larger objects could not be investigated due to the restricted field of view limited by the available grating area. In this paper, we report on a new stitching method to increase the grating area significantly: individual gratings are merged on a carrier substrate. Whereas the grating fabrication process is based on the LIGA technology (X-ray lithography and electroplating) different cutting and joining methods have been evaluated. First imaging results using a 2×2 stitched analyzer grating in a Talbot-Lau interferometer have been generated using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. The image quality and analysis confirm the high potential of the stitching method to increase the field of view considerably. PMID:27257876

  1. Ultrasound Contrast Plane Wave Imaging Based on Bubble Wavelet Transform: In Vitro and In Vivo Validations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Zong, Yujin; Yang, Xuan; Hu, Hong; Wan, Jinjin; Zhang, Lei; Bouakaz, Ayache; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to develop an ultrasound contrast plane wave imaging (PWI) method based on pulse-inversion bubble wavelet transform imaging (PIWI) to improve the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images. A pair of inverted "bubble wavelets" with plane waves was constructed according to the modified Herring equation. The original echoes were replaced by the maximum wavelet correlation coefficients obtained from bubble wavelet correlation analysis. The echoes were then summed to distinguish microbubbles from tissues. In in vivo experiments on rabbit kidney, PIWI improved the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images up to 4.5 ± 1.5 dB, compared with that obtained in B-mode (p < 0.05), through use of a pair of inverted plane waves. The disruption rate and infusion time of microbubbles in PIWI-based PWI were then quantified using two perfusion parameters, area under the curve and half transmit time estimated from time-intensity curves, respectively. After time-intensity curves were denoised by detrended fluctuation analysis, the average area under the curve and half transit time of PIWI-based PWI were 55.94% (p < 0.05) and 20.51% (p < 0.05) higher than those of conventional focused imaging, respectively. Because of its high contrast-to-tissue ratio and low disruption of microbubbles, PIWI-based PWI has a long infusion time and is therefore beneficial for transient monitoring and perfusion assessment of microbubbles circulating in vessels. PMID:27067280

  2. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analysis of the performance of this new algorithm is desirable. In this work, we systematically compared the performance of this algorithm with other two widely used phase retrieval algorithms, namely the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) algorithm. The systematical comparison is conducted by analyzing phase retrieval performances with a digital breast specimen model. We show that the proposed algorithm converges faster than the GS algorithm in the Fresnel diffraction regime, and is more robust against image noise than the TIE algorithm. These results suggest the significance of the proposed algorithm for future medical applications with the x-ray phase contrast imaging technique. PMID:20720992

  3. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  4. High-contrast active cavitation imaging technique based on multiple bubble wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shukuan; Xu, Shanshan; Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a unique method that combines the ultrafast active cavitation imaging technique with multiple bubble wavelet transform (MBWT) for improving cavitation detection contrast was presented. The bubble wavelet was constructed by the modified Keller-Miksis equation that considered the mutual effect among bubbles. A three-dimensional spatial model was applied to simulate the spatial distribution of multiple bubbles. The effects of four parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cavitation images were evaluated, including the following: initial radii of bubbles, scale factor in the wavelet transform, number of bubbles, and the minimum inter-bubble distance. And the other two spatial models and cavitation bubble size distributions were introduced in the MBWT method. The results suggested that in the free-field experiments, the averaged SNR of images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 7.16 ± 0.09 dB and 3.14 ± 0.14 dB compared with the values of images acquired by the B-mode and single bubble wavelet transform (SBWT) methods. In addition, in the tissue experiments, the averaged cavitation-to-tissue ratio of cavitation images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 4.69 ± 0.25 dB and 1.74± 0.29 dB compared with that of images acquired by B-mode and SBWT methods. PMID:27586732

  5. Contrast-guided image interpolation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhe; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper a contrast-guided image interpolation method is proposed that incorporates contrast information into the image interpolation process. Given the image under interpolation, four binary contrast-guided decision maps (CDMs) are generated and used to guide the interpolation filtering through two sequential stages: 1) the 45(°) and 135(°) CDMs for interpolating the diagonal pixels and 2) the 0(°) and 90(°) CDMs for interpolating the row and column pixels. After applying edge detection to the input image, the generation of a CDM lies in evaluating those nearby non-edge pixels of each detected edge for re-classifying them possibly as edge pixels. This decision is realized by solving two generalized diffusion equations over the computed directional variation (DV) fields using a derived numerical approach to diffuse or spread the contrast boundaries or edges, respectively. The amount of diffusion or spreading is proportional to the amount of local contrast measured at each detected edge. The diffused DV fields are then thresholded for yielding the binary CDMs, respectively. Therefore, the decision bands with variable widths will be created on each CDM. The two CDMs generated in each stage will be exploited as the guidance maps to conduct the interpolation process: for each declared edge pixel on the CDM, a 1-D directional filtering will be applied to estimate its associated to-be-interpolated pixel along the direction as indicated by the respective CDM; otherwise, a 2-D directionless or isotropic filtering will be used instead to estimate the associated missing pixels for each declared non-edge pixel. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed contrast-guided image interpolation is superior to other state-of-the-art edge-guided image interpolation methods. In addition, the computational complexity is relatively low when compared with existing methods; hence, it is fairly attractive for real-time image applications. PMID:23846469

  6. Evaluation of a novel gadolinium-based contrast agent for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Wu, Genevieve N.; Chow, Rayland; Kim, Sung-Yop; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether Motexafin Gadolinium (MGd) could serve as an efficient intraoperative contrast agent avoiding problems that arise with surgically-induced intracranial enhancement. F98 orthotopic brain tumors or surgical lesions were induced in Fisher rats. T1-weighted MRI studies were performed with either a single or multiple daily doses of MGd. The last contrast dose was administered either 7 or 24 h prior to scanning in both tumor-bearing and surgically treated animals. Animals receiving either 30 or 60 mg/kg MGd i.v. developed clinical signs of impaired motor activity, and increasing lethargy. MGd given i.p. was tolerated up to a dose of 140 mg/kg. Despite multiple dosages, and several administration modes (i.p. and i.v.), no significant enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 7 or 24 h following the last MGd dose. Clear enhancement was observed if the scans were performed 30 min. following MGd administration. Scans of necrotic lesions were positive 7 h post MGd injection. MGd scans showed no significant enhancement following surgically-induced lesions while scans with conventional contrast agents showed both meningeal and intraparenchymal enhancement. This study suggests that MGd is not sequestered in viable tumor for the necessary time interval required to allow delayed imaging in this model. The agent does seem to remain in necrotic tissue for longer time intervals. MGd therefore would not be suitable as a contrast agent in iMRI for the detection of residual tumor tissue during surgery.

  7. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  8. Contrast-enhanced refraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher J.; Rogers, Keith D.; Lewis, Rob A.; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Siu, Karen K.; Benci, A.; Kitchen, M.; Pillon, Alessandra; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Andrew J.; Hufton, Alan P.; Evans, Andrew; Pinder, Sarah E.; Evans, S.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made, for the first time, to extend the capabilities of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) using low concentrations of a contrast agent. A phantom has been constructed to accommodate a systematic series of diluted bromine deoxyuridase (BrDU) samples in liquid form. This was imaged using a conventional DEI arrangement and at a range of energies traversing the Br K-edge. The images were analyzed to provide a quantitative measure of contrast as a function of X-ray energy and (BrDU) concentration. The results indicate that the particular experimental arrangement was not optimized to exploit the potential of this contrast enhancement and several suggestions are discussed to improve this further.

  9. 3D-MAD: A Full Reference Stereoscopic Image Quality Estimator Based on Binocular Lightness and Contrast Perception.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chandler, Damon M

    2015-11-01

    Algorithms for a stereoscopic image quality assessment (IQA) aim to estimate the qualities of 3D images in a manner that agrees with human judgments. The modern stereoscopic IQA algorithms often apply 2D IQA algorithms on stereoscopic views, disparity maps, and/or cyclopean images, to yield an overall quality estimate based on the properties of the human visual system. This paper presents an extension of our previous 2D most apparent distortion (MAD) algorithm to a 3D version (3D-MAD) to evaluate 3D image quality. The 3D-MAD operates via two main stages, which estimate perceived quality degradation due to 1) distortion of the monocular views and 2) distortion of the cyclopean view. In the first stage, the conventional MAD algorithm is applied on the two monocular views, and then the combined binocular quality is estimated via a weighted sum of the two estimates, where the weights are determined based on a block-based contrast measure. In the second stage, intermediate maps corresponding to the lightness distance and the pixel-based contrast are generated based on a multipathway contrast gain-control model. Then, the cyclopean view quality is estimated by measuring the statistical-difference-based features obtained from the reference stereopair and the distorted stereopair, respectively. Finally, the estimates obtained from the two stages are combined to yield an overall quality score of the stereoscopic image. Tests on various 3D image quality databases demonstrate that our algorithm significantly improves upon many other state-of-the-art 2D/3D IQA algorithms. PMID:26186775

  10. Subject-specific patch-based denoising for contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lorraine; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Pop, Mihaela

    2016-03-01

    Many patch-based techniques in imaging, e.g., Non-local means denoising, require tuning parameters to yield optimal results. In real-world applications, e.g., denoising of MR images, ground truth is not generally available and the process of choosing an appropriate set of parameters is a challenge. Recently, Zhu et al. proposed a method to define an image quality measure, called Q, that does not require ground truth. In this manuscript, we evaluate the effect of various parameters of the NL-means denoising on this quality metric Q. Our experiments are based on the late-gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac MR images that are inherently noisy. Our described exhaustive evaluation approach can be used in tuning parameters of patch-based schemes. Even in the case that an estimation of optimal parameters is provided using another existing approach, our described method can be used as a secondary validation step. Our preliminary results suggest that denoising parameters should be case-specific rather than generic.

  11. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    SciTech Connect

    Heekeren, Joop van; Kostenko, Alexander; Hanashima, Takayasu; Yamada, Hironari; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Offerman, S. Erik; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 {mu}m does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  12. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  13. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  14. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing. PMID

  15. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging.

    PubMed

    Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Yaroshenko, Andre; Müller, Mark; Paprottka, Philipp; Ingrisch, Michael; Cyran, Clemens C; Auweter, Sigrid D; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography. PMID:26134130

  16. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Yaroshenko, Andre; Müller, Mark; Paprottka, Philipp; Ingrisch, Michael; Cyran, Clemens C.; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography. PMID:26134130

  17. Tensor-based tracking of the aorta in phase-contrast MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Yoo-Jin; Malsam, Anton; Ley, Sebastian; Rengier, Fabian; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2014-03-01

    The velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is a valuable technique to measure the blood flow velocity in terms of time-resolved 3D vector fields. For diagnosis, presurgical planning and therapy control monitoring the patient's hemodynamic situation is crucial. Hence, an accurate and robust segmentation of the diseased vessel is the basis for further methods like the computation of the blood pressure. In the literature, there exist some approaches to transfer the methods of processing DT-MR images to PC-MR data, but the potential of this approach is not fully exploited yet. In this paper, we present a method to extract the centerline of the aorta in PC-MR images by applying methods from the DT-MRI. On account of this, in the first step the velocity vector fields are converted into tensor fields. In the next step tensor-based features are derived and by applying a modified tensorline algorithm the tracking of the vessel course is accomplished. The method only uses features derived from the tensor imaging without the use of additional morphology information. For evaluation purposes we applied our method to 4 volunteer as well as 26 clinical patient datasets with good results. In 29 of 30 cases our algorithm accomplished to extract the vessel centerline.

  18. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  19. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  20. Construction and evaluation of a high-energy grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Seifert, Maria; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Weber, Thomas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Interferometric x-ray imaging becomes more and more attractive for applications such as medical imaging or non-destructive testing, because it provides the opportunity to obtain additional information on the internal structure of radiographed objects.12 Therefore, three types of images are acquired: An attenuation image like in conventional x-ray imaging, an image of the differential phase-shift generated by the object and the so called dark-field image, which contains information about the object's granularity even on sub-pixel scale.3 However, most experiments addressing grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with polychromatic sources are restricted to energies up to about 40 keV. For the application of this imaging method to thicker objects like human specimens or dense components, higher tube voltages are required. This is why we designed and constructed a laboratory setup for high energies, which is able to image larger objects.4 To evaluate the performance of the setup, the mean visibility of the field of view was measured for several tube voltages. The result shows that the mean visibility has a peak value of 23% at a tube voltage of 60 kV and is constantly greater than 16% up to a tube voltage of 120 kV. Thus, good image quality is provided even for high energies. To further substantiate the performance of the setup at high energies, a human ex-vivo foot was examined at a tube voltage of 75 kV. The interferometric x-ray images show a good image quality and a promising diagnostic power.

  1. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  2. Multi-contrast magnetic resonance image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Chen, Yunmei; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    In clinical exams, multi-contrast images from conventional MRI are scanned with the same field of view (FOV) for complementary diagnostic information, such as proton density- (PD-), T1- and T2-weighted images. Their sharable information can be utilized for more robust and accurate image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a novel model and an efficient algorithm for joint image reconstruction and coil sensitivity estimation in multi-contrast partially parallel imaging (PPI) in MRI. Our algorithm restores the multi-contrast images by minimizing an energy function consisting of an L2-norm fidelity term to reduce construction errors caused by motion, a regularization term of underlying images to preserve common anatomical features by using vectorial total variation (VTV) regularizer, and updating sensitivity maps by Tikhonov smoothness based on their physical property. We present the numerical results including T1- and T2-weighted MR images recovered from partially scanned k-space data and provide the comparisons between our results and those obtained from the related existing works. Our numerical results indicate that the proposed method using vectorial TV and penalties on sensitivities can be made promising and widely used for multi-contrast multi-channel MR image reconstruction.

  3. Anti-biofouling polymer-decorated lutetium-based nanoparticulate contrast agents for in vivo high-resolution trimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Dong, Kai; Liu, Jianhua; Han, Xueli; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-25

    Nanomaterials have gained considerable attention and interest in the development of novel and high-resolution contrast agents for medical diagnosis and prognosis in clinic. A classical urea-based homogeneous precipitation route that combines the merits of in situ thermal decomposition and surface modification is introduced to construct polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG)-decorated hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles (PEG-UCNPs). By utilizing the admirable optical and magnetic properties of the yielded PEG-UCNPs, in vivo up-conversion luminescence and T1 -enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of small animals are conducted, revealing obvious signals after subcutaneous and intravenous injection, respectively. Due to the strong X-ray absorption and high atomic number of lanthanide elements, X-ray computed-tomography imaging based on PEG-UCNPs is then designed and carried out, achieving excellent imaging outcome in animal experiments. This is the first example of the usage of hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles as effective nanoprobes. Furthermore, biodistribution, clearance route, as well as long-term toxicity are investigated in detail after intravenous injection in a murine model, indicating the overall safety of PEG-UCNPs. Compared with previous lanthanide fluorides, our nanoprobes exhibit more advantages, such as facile construction process and nearly total excretion from the animal body within a month. Taken together, these results promise the use of PEG-UCNPs as a safe and efficient nanoparticulate contrast agent for potential application in multimodal imaging. PMID:24610806

  4. Optical Image Contrast Reversal Using Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Li; Yao, Bao-Li; Menke, Neimule; Zheng, Yuan; Lei, Ming; Chen, Guo-Fu

    2005-05-01

    The implementation of image contrast reversal by using a photochromic material of Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films is demonstrated with two methods based on the optical properties of BR. One is based on the absorption difference between the B and M states. Images recorded by green light can be contrast reversed readout by violet light. The other is based on the photoinduced anisotropy of BR when it is excited by linear polarization light. By placing the BR film between two crossed polarizers (i.e. a polarizer and an analyser), the difference of polarization states of the recorded area and the unrecorded area can be detected, and thus different contrast images can be obtained by rotating the polarization axis of the analyser.

  5. Photoacoustic phasoscopy super-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-05-26

    Phasoscopy is a recently proposed concept correlating electromagnetic (EM) absorption and scattering properties based on energy conservation. Phase information can be extracted from EM absorption induced acoustic wave and scattered EM wave for biological tissue characterization. In this paper, an imaging modality, termed photoacoustic phasoscopy imaging (PAPS), is proposed and verified experimentally based on phasoscopy concept with laser illumination. Both endogenous photoacoustic wave and scattered photons are collected simultaneously to extract the phase information. The PAPS images are then reconstructed on vessel-mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissues to show significantly improved contrast than conventional photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  7. a Laboratory-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging Scanner with Applications in Biomedical and Non-Medical Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Munro, P. R. T.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Millard, T. P.; Speller, R.; Olivo, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) provides a much higher visibility of low-absorbing details than conventional, attenuation-based radiography. This is due to the fact that image contrast is determined by the unit decrement of the real part of the complex refractive index of an object rather than by its imaginary part (the absorption coefficient), which can be up to 1000 times larger for energies in the X-ray regime. This finds applications in many areas, including medicine, biology, material testing, and homeland security. Until lately, XPCi has been restricted to synchrotron facilities due to its demanding coherence requirements on the radiation source. However, edge illumination XPCi, first developed by one of the authors at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Italy, substantially relaxes these requirements and therefore provides options to overcome this problem. Our group has built a prototype scanner that adapts the edge-illumination concept to standard laboratory conditions and extends it to large fields of view. This is based on X-ray sources and detectors available off the shelf, and its use has led to impressive results in mammography, cartilage imaging, testing of composite materials and security inspection. This article presents the method and the scanner prototype, and reviews its applications in selected biomedical and non-medical disciplines.

  8. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  9. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  10. Heart wall velocimetry and exogenous contrast-based cardiac flow imaging in Drosophila melanogaster using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-09-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a central organism in biology and is becoming increasingly important in the cardiovascular sciences. Prior work in optical imaging of the D. melanogaster heart has focused on static and dynamic structural anatomy. In the study, it is demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography can quantify dynamic heart wall velocity and hemolymph flow in adult D. melanogaster. Since hemolymph is optically transparent, a novel exogenous contrast technique is demonstrated to increase the backscatter-based intracardiac Doppler flow signal. The results presented here open up new possibilities for functional cardiovascular phenotyping of normal and mutant D. melanogaster.

  11. Laser speckle contrast imaging in biomedical optics

    PubMed Central

    Boas, David A.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    First introduced in the 1980s, laser speckle contrast imaging is a powerful tool for full-field imaging of blood flow. Recently laser speckle contrast imaging has gained increased attention, in part due to its rapid adoption for blood flow studies in the brain. We review the underlying physics of speckle contrast imaging and discuss recent developments to improve the quantitative accuracy of blood flow measures. We also review applications of laser speckle contrast imaging in neuroscience, dermatology and ophthalmology. PMID:20210435

  12. Image contrast enhancement using Chebyshev wavelet moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaev, Dm. V.; Uchaev, D. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for image contrast enhancement in the Chebyshev moment transform (CMT) domain is introduced. This algorithm is based on a contrast measure that is defined as the ratio of high-frequency to zero-frequency content in the bands of CMT matrix. Our algorithm enables to enhance a large number of high-spatial-frequency coefficients, that are responsible for image details, without severely degrading low-frequency contributions. To enhance high-frequency Chebyshev coefficients we use a multifractal spectrum of scaling exponents (SEs) for Chebyshev wavelet moment (CWM) magnitudes, where CWMs are multiscale realization of Chebyshev moments (CMs). This multifractal spectrum is very well suited to extract meaningful structures on images of natural scenes, because these images have a multifractal character. Experiments with test images show some advantages of the proposed algorithm as compared to other widely used image enhancement algorithms. The main advantage of our algorithm is the following: the algorithm very well highlights image details during image contrast enhancement.

  13. A multi-channel image reconstruction method for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of an advanced multi-channel (MC) image reconstruction algorithm for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (GB-XPCT). The MC reconstruction method we have developed operates by concurrently, rather than independently as is done conventionally, reconstructing tomographic images of the three object properties (absorption, small-angle scattering, refractive index). By jointly estimating the object properties by use of an appropriately defined penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) estimator, the 2nd order statistical properties of the object property sinograms, including correlations between them, can be fully exploited to improve the variance vs. resolution tradeoff of the reconstructed images as compared to existing methods. Channel-independent regularization strategies are proposed. To solve the MC reconstruction problem, we developed an advanced algorithm based on the proximal point algorithm and the augmented Lagrangian method. By use of experimental and computer-simulation data, we demonstrate that by exploiting inter-channel noise correlations, the MC reconstruction method can improve image quality in GB-XPCT.

  14. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-based High-contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, β Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple

  15. ESTIMATES OF THE PLANET YIELD FROM GROUND-BASED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OBSERVATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, {beta} Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether

  16. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods. PMID:26656497

  17. Visualization of small lesions in rat cartilage by means of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Das Neves Borges, Patricia; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    Being able to quantitatively assess articular cartilage in three-dimensions (3D) in small rodent animal models, with a simple laboratory set-up, would prove extremely important for the development of pre-clinical research focusing on cartilage pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). These models are becoming essential tools for the development of new drugs for OA, a disease affecting up to 1/3 of the population older than 50 years for which there is no cure except prosthetic surgery. However, due to limitations in imaging technology, high-throughput 3D structural imaging has not been achievable in small rodent models, thereby limiting their translational potential and their efficiency as research tools. We show that a simple laboratory system based on coded-aperture x-ray phase contrast imaging (CAXPCi) can correctly visualize the cartilage layer in slices of an excised rat tibia imaged both in air and in saline solution. Moreover, we show that small, surgically induced lesions are also correctly detected by the CAXPCi system, and we support this finding with histopathology examination. Following these successful proof-of-concept results in rat cartilage, we expect that an upgrade of the system to higher resolutions (currently underway) will enable extending the method to the imaging of mouse cartilage as well. From a technological standpoint, by showing the capability of the system to detect cartilage also in water, we demonstrate phase sensitivity comparable to other lab-based phase methods (e.g. grating interferometry). In conclusion, CAXPCi holds a strong potential for being adopted as a routine laboratory tool for non-destructive, high throughput assessment of 3D structural changes in murine articular cartilage, with a possible impact in the field similar to the revolution that conventional microCT brought into bone research.

  18. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  19. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  20. A Novel Procedure for Rapid Imaging of Adult Mouse Brains with MicroCT Using Iodine-Based Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan; Maga, A. Murat

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been the primary modality for obtaining 3D cross-sectional anatomical information in animals for soft tissue, particularly brain. However, costs associated with MRI can be considerably high for large phenotypic screens for gross differences in the structure of the brain due to pathology and/or experimental manipulations. MicroCT (mCT), especially benchtop mCT, is becoming a common laboratory equipment with throughput rates equal or faster than any form of high-resolution MRI at lower costs. Here we explore adapting previously developed contrast based mCT to image adult mouse brains in-situ. We show that 2% weight per volume (w/v) iodine-potassium iodide solution can be successfully used to image adult mouse brains within 48 hours post-mortem when a structural support matrix is used. We demonstrate that hydrogel can be effectively used as a perfusant which limits the tissue shrinkage due to iodine. PMID:26571123

  1. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  2. Myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are an excellent intravascular tracer, and both the rate of myocardial opacification (analogous to coronary microvascular perfusion) and contrast intensity (analogous to myocardial blood volume) provide unique insights into myocardial perfusion. A strong evidence base has been accumulated to show comparability with nuclear perfusion imaging and incremental diagnostic and prognostic value relative to wall motion analysis. This technique also provides the possibility to measure myocardial perfusion at the bedside. Despite all of these advantages, the technique is complicated, technically challenging, and has failed to scale legislative and financial hurdles. The development of targeted imaging and therapeutic interventions will hopefully rekindle interest in this interesting modality. PMID:25817740

  3. Dendrimer-Based Responsive MRI Contrast Agents (G1-G4) for Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Hyder, Fahmeed; Ali, Meser M

    2015-12-16

    Biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS) is a molecular imaging platform for magnetic resonance that utilizes unique properties of low molecular weight paramagnetic monomers by detecting hyperfine-shifted nonexchangeable protons and transforming the chemical shift information to reflect its microenvironment (e.g., via temperature, pH, etc.). To optimize translational biosensing potential of BIRDS we examined if this detection scheme observed with monomers can be extended onto dendrimers, which are versatile and biocompatible macromolecules with modifiable surface for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we report on feasibility of paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS. The results show that BIRDS is resilient with paramagnetic dendrimers up to the fourth generation (i.e., G1-G4), where the model dendrimer and chelate were based on poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA(4-)) complexed with thulium ion (Tm(3+)). Temperature sensitivities of two prominent signals of Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA(-))x (where n = 1-4, x = 6-39) were comparable to that of prominent signals in TmDOTA(-). Transverse relaxation times of the coalesced nonexchangeable protons on Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA(-))x were relatively short to provide signal-to-noise ratio that was comparable to or better than that of TmDOTA(-). A fluorescent dye, rhodamine, was conjugated to a G2-PAMAM-(TmDOTA)12 to create a dual-modality nanosized contrast agent. BIRDS properties of the dendrimer were unaltered with rhodamine conjugation. Purposely designed paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS in conjunction with novel macromolecular surface modification for functional ligands/drugs could potentially be used for biologically compatible theranostic sensors. PMID:26497087

  4. Dendrimer-Based Responsive MRI Contrast Agents (G1-G4) for Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Hyder, Fahmeed; Ali, Meser M.

    2016-01-01

    Biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS) is a molecular imaging platform for magnetic resonance that utilizes unique properties of low molecular weight paramagnetic monomers by detecting hyperfine-shifted nonexchangeable protons and transforming the chemical shift information to reflect its microenvironment (e.g., via temperature, pH, etc.). To optimize translational biosensing potential of BIRDS we examined if this detection scheme observed with monomers can be extended onto dendrimers, which are versatile and biocompatible macromolecules with modifiable surface for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we report on feasibility of paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS. The results show that BIRDS is resilient with paramagnetic dendrimers up to the fourth generation (i.e., G1-G4), where the model dendrimer and chelate were based on poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA4−) complexed with thulium ion (Tm3+). Temperature sensitivities of two prominent signals of Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x (where n = 1–4, x = 6–39) were comparable to that of prominent signals in TmDOTA−. Transverse relaxation times of the coalesced nonexchangeable protons on Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x were relatively short to provide signal-to-noise ratio that was comparable to or better than that of TmDOTA−. A fluorescent dye, rhodamine, was conjugated to a G2-PAMAM-(TmDOTA)12 to create a dual-modality nanosized contrast agent. BIRDS properties of the dendrimer were unaltered with rhodamine conjugation. Purposely designed paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS in conjunction with novel macromolecular surface modification for functional ligands/drugs could potentially be used for biologically compatible theranostic sensors. PMID:26497087

  5. Noise correlation-based adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast enhancement of a polarized beacon in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    We show the use of a simplified snapshot polarimetric camera along with an adaptive image processing for optimal detection of a polarized light beacon through fog. The adaptive representation is derived using theoretical noise analysis of the data at hand and is shown to be optimal in the Maximum likelihood sense. We report that the contrast enhancing optimal representation that depends on the background noise correlation differs in general from standard representations like polarimetric difference image or polarization filtered image. Lastly, we discuss a detection strategy to reduce the false positive counts.

  6. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  7. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-06-14

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3 (-) and I5 (-)). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn(2+) solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents. PMID:24999431

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3− and I5−). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn2+ solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents. PMID:24999431

  10. Fast, high-contrast imaging of animal development with scanned light sheet-based structured-illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Keller, Philipp J; Schmidt, Annette D; Santella, Anthony; Khairy, Khaled; Bao, Zhirong; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2010-08-01

    Recording light-microscopy images of large, nontransparent specimens, such as developing multicellular organisms, is complicated by decreased contrast resulting from light scattering. Early zebrafish development can be captured by standard light-sheet microscopy, but new imaging strategies are required to obtain high-quality data of late development or of less transparent organisms. We combined digital scanned laser light-sheet fluorescence microscopy with incoherent structured-illumination microscopy (DSLM-SI) and created structured-illumination patterns with continuously adjustable frequencies. Our method discriminates the specimen-related scattered background from signal fluorescence, thereby removing out-of-focus light and optimizing the contrast of in-focus structures. DSLM-SI provides rapid control of the illumination pattern, exceptional imaging quality and high imaging speeds. We performed long-term imaging of zebrafish development for 58 h and fast multiple-view imaging of early Drosophila melanogaster development. We reconstructed cell positions over time from the Drosophila DSLM-SI data and created a fly digital embryo. PMID:20601950

  11. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  12. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  13. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures.

    PubMed

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V; Liebscher, Christian H; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. PMID:25840371

  14. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  15. Characterization of a photon counting EMCCD for space-based high contrast imaging spectroscopy of extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; McElwain, Michael W.; Norton, Timothy J.; Rauscher, Bernie J.; Rothe, Johannes F.; Malatesta, Michael; Hilton, George M.; Bubeck, James R.; Grady, Carol A.; Lindler, Don J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the progress of characterization of a low-noise, photon counting Electron Multiplying Charged Coupled Device (EMCCD) operating in optical wavelengths and demonstrate possible solutions to the problems of Clock-Induced Charge (CIC) and other trapped charge through sub-bandgap illumination. Such a detector will be vital to the feasibility of future space-based direct imaging and spectroscopy missions for exoplanet characterization, and is scheduled to y on-board the AFTA-WFIRST mission. The 512×512 EMCCD is an e2v detector housed and clocked by a Nüvü Cameras controller. Through a multiplication gain register, this detector produces as many as 5000 electrons for a single, incident-photon-induced photoelectron produced in the detector, enabling single photon counting operation with read noise and dark current orders of magnitude below that of standard CCDs. With the extremely high contrasts (Earth-to-Sun flux ratio is ~ 10-10) and extremely faint targets (an Earth analog would measure 28th - 30th magnitude or fainter), a photon-counting EMCCD is absolutely necessary to measure the signatures of habitability on an Earth-like exoplanet within the timescale of a mission's lifetime, and we discuss the concept of operations for an EMCCD making such measurements.

  16. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  17. Imaging Contrast Effects in Alginate Microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Nina; Hester-Reilly, Holly

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated the use of alginate gel microbeads as contrast agents for the study of suspension flows in complex geometries using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. These deformable particles can provide imaging contrast to rigid polymer particles in a bimodal suspension (two particle sizes). Microbeads were formed of crosslinked alginate gel, with or without trapped oil droplets. Crosslinking of the aqueous sodium alginate solution or the continuous phase of an oil-in-water emulsion occurred rapidly at gentle processing conditions. The alginate microbeads exhibit both spin-spin relaxation time (T2) contrast and diffusion contrast relative to both the suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles. Large alginate emulsion microbeads flowing in the abrupt, axisymmetric expansion geometry can be clearly distinguished from the suspending fluid and from rigid polymer particles in both spin-echo and diffusion weighted imaging. The alginate microbeads, particularly those containing trapped emulsion droplets, offer potential as a positive contrast agent in multiple NMR imaging applications.

  18. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  19. Preliminary comparison of grating-based and in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for mouse kidney at TOMCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Liu, P.; Irvine, S.; Pinzer, B.; Stampanoni, M.; Xu, L. X.

    2013-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be advantageous in revealing detailed structures inside biological specimens without contrast agents. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) and in-line phase contrast (ILPC) X-ray imaging are the two modalities frequently used at the beamline of TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In this paper, we preliminarily compared the abilities of two types of phase contrast imaging in distinguishing micro structures in mouse kidneys. The 3D reconstructions showed that the microstructures in kidney, such as micro vessels and renal tubules, were displayed clearly with both imaging modalities. The two techniques may be viewed as complementary. For larger features with very small density variations DPC is the desirable method. In cases where dose and time limits may prohibit the multiple steps required for DPC, and when the focus is on finer features, the ILPC method may be considered as a more viable alternative. Moreover, high resolution ILPC images are comparable with histological results.

  20. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  1. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  2. Microscopic identification of Chinese medicinal materials based on X-ray phase contrast imaging: from qualitative to quantitative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Liang, Z.; Tan, H.; Ni, L.; Zhao, Z.; Xiao, T.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    Although a variety of methods, ranging from simple morphological examination to physical and chemical analysis, and DNA molecular biology, exist for authenticating Chinese medicinal materials(CMMs), no methods can achieve both the source species identification and quality evaluation of CMMs simultaneously. Furthermore, the methods that are currently available for the identification of CMMs, including both optical and electronic microscopy, usually entail strict requirements for sample preparation or testing environment, such as the slicing of super-thin sections, or processing with specific chemical reagents. These treatments not only damage the CMMs but may also cause some of the original microstructures to be missed. Additionally, they may even yield false results. Owing to the unique penetrating character of X-rays, X-ray phase contrast imaging(XPCI) can be used to realize the inner microstructures of CMMs through nondestructive imaging. With the higher flux and luminance of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facility, XPCI can provides clearer and finer microstructures of CMMs, which are mainly composed of C, H, O, and N elements, with better spatial and density resolutions. For more than ten years, the X-ray imaging group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has investigated the microstructures of CMMs by XPCI and they have established and developed a quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT for investigating the characteristic microstructures of CMMs. During this period, a variety of typical CMMs have been investigated, from two-dimensional (2D) radiography to three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT, from qualitative to quantitative. Taken together, these results verify that quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT is a practical tool for the microscopic investigation of CMMs. Additionally, further efforts are being made to find the relationship between the microstructures' quantitative factors and active chemical components. At present

  3. Dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application.

    PubMed

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-11

    A new type of dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd(3+) ((8)S7/2) plays an important role in T1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy(3+) ((6)H15/2) has the potential to be used in T2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy2O3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T1 and T2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (davg = 1.0 nm) showed large r1 and r2 values (r2/r1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R1 and R2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T1 and T2 MR images. PMID:26291827

  4. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  5. Phase contrast imaging of buccal mucosa tissues-Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, A.; Tripathi, S.; Shripathi, T.; Kulkarni, V. K.; Banda, N. R.; Agrawal, A. K.; Sarkar, P. S.; Kashyap, Y.; Sinha, A.

    2015-06-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) technique has been used to interpret physical parameters obtained from the image taken on the normal buccal mucosa tissue extracted from cheek of a patient. The advantages of this method over the conventional imaging techniques are discussed. PCI technique uses the X-ray phase shift at the edges differentiated by very minute density differences and the edge enhanced high contrast images reveal details of soft tissues. The contrast in the images produced is related to changes in the X-ray refractive index of the tissues resulting in higher clarity compared with conventional absorption based X-ray imaging. The results show that this type of imaging has better ability to visualize microstructures of biological soft tissues with good contrast, which can lead to the diagnosis of lesions at an early stage of the diseases.

  6. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  7. Real-time visualization of low contrast targets from high-dynamic range infrared images based on temporal digital detail enhancement filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frederic; Schockaert, Cedric; Mirbach, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    An image detail enhancement method to effectively visualize low contrast targets in high-dynamic range (HDR) infrared (IR) images is presented regardless of the dynamic range width. In general, high temperature dynamics from real-world scenes used to be encoded in a 12 or 14 bits IR image. However, the limitations of the human visual perception, from which no more than 128 shades of gray are distinguishable, and the 8-bit working range of common display devices make necessary an effective 12/14 bits HDR mapping into the 8-bit data representation. To do so, we propose to independently treat the base and detail image components that result from splitting the IR image using two dedicated guided filters. We also introduce a plausibility mask from which those regions that are prominent to present noise are accurately defined to be explicitly tackled to avoid noise amplification. The final 8-bit data representation results from the combination of the processed detail and base image components and its mapping to the 8-bit domain using an adaptive histogram-based projection approach. The limits of the histogram are accommodated through time in order to avoid global brightness fluctuations between frames. The experimental evaluation shows that the proposed noise-aware approach preserves low contrast details with an overall contrast enhancement of the image. A comparison with widely used HDR mapping approaches and runtime analysis is also provided. Furthermore, the proposed mathematical formulation enables a real-time adjustment of the global contrast and brightness, letting the operator adapt to the visualization display device without nondesirable artifacts.

  8. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  9. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-06-12

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized (13)C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized (13)C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  10. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  11. Automated segmentation of mammary gland regions in non-contrast torso CT images based on probabilistic atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Kan, M.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Sugisaki, K.; Yokoyama, R.; Lee, G.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-03-01

    The identification of mammary gland regions is a necessary processing step during the anatomical structure recognition of human body and can be expected to provide the useful information for breast tumor diagnosis. This paper proposes a fully-automated scheme for segmenting the mammary gland regions in non-contrast torso CT images. This scheme calculates the probability for each voxel belonging to the mammary gland or other regions (for example pectoralis major muscles) in CT images and decides the mammary gland regions automatically. The probability is estimated from the location of the mammary gland and pectoralis major muscles in CT images. The location (named as a probabilistic atlas) is investigated from the pre-segmentation results in a number of different CT scans and the CT number distribution is approximated using a Gaussian function. We applied this scheme to 66 patient cases (female, age: 40-80) and evaluated the accuracy by using the coincidence rate between the segmented result and gold standard that is generated manually by a radiologist for each CT case. The mean value of the coincidence rate was 0.82 with the standard deviation of 0.09 for 66 CT cases.

  12. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed.

  13. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M L; Hallin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed. PMID:26183486

  14. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed. PMID:26183486

  15. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  16. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  17. Role of Contrast in MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Tushar; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents have been widely used over the last 3 decades in routine clinical practice. Paul Lauterbur recognized the presence of these contrast agents, which act as paramagnetic catalysts that accelerate the T1 relaxation process. The first MR contrast agent to be approved for clinical use was in 1988, and since then, it is estimated that 200 million doses have been administered worldwide. These contrast agents have diverse clinical as well as research applications, involving almost all the body organs. This review will cover some existing as well as many new applications that have emerged over the last few decades. MR imaging now has the potential of being used to monitor enzymatic activity, gene expression, metal ion homeostasis, and cell death in vivo. In future, newer contrast agents will develop and become commercially available, expanding the current clinical applications of MR contrast media. PMID:27367311

  18. Contrast enhancement of mail piece images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong-Chul; Sridhar, Ramalingam; Demjanenko, Victor; Palumbo, Paul W.; Hull, Jonathan J.

    1992-08-01

    A New approach to contrast enhancement of mail piece images is presented. The contrast enhancement is used as a preprocessing step in the real-time address block location (RT-ABL) system. The RT-ABL system processes a stream of mail piece images and locates destination address blocks. Most of the mail pieces (classified into letters) show high contrast between background and foreground. As an extreme case, however, the seasonal greeting cards usually use colored envelopes which results in reduced contrast osured by an error rate by using a linear distributed associative memory (DAM). The DAM is trained to recognize the spectra of three classes of images: with high, medium, and low OCR error rates. The DAM is not forced to make a classification every time. It is allowed to reject as unknown a spectrum presented that does not closely resemble any that has been stored in the DAM. The DAM was fairly accurate with noisy images but conservative (i.e., rejected several text images as unknowns) when there was little ground and foreground degradations without affecting the nondegraded images. This approach provides local enhancement which adapts to local features. In order to simplify the computation of A and (sigma) , dynamic programming technique is used. Implementation details, performance, and the results on test images are presented in this paper.

  19. Ionic contrast terahertz near field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallot, Guilhem

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated the direct and noninvasive imaging of functional neurons by Ionic Contrast Terahertz (ICT) near-field microscopy. This technique provides quantitative measurements of ionic concentrations in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments and opens the way to direct noninvasive imaging of neurons during electrical, toxin, or thermal stresses. Furthermore, neuronal activity results from both a precise control of transient variations in ionic conductance and a much less studied water exchange between the extracellular matrix and the intraaxonal compartment. The developed ICT technique associated with a full three-dimensional simulation of the axon-aperture near-field system allows a precise measurement of the axon geometry and therefore the direct visualization of neuron swelling induced by temperature change or neurotoxin poisoning. We also developed Terahertz Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) devices perfectly suited for studying cell layers. Inserted in a terahertz time-domain system, and using a high resistivity low loss silicon prism to couple the terahertz wave into the sample, the detection scheme is based on the relative differential spectral phase of two orthogonal polarizations. Biological sample imaging as well as subwavelength (λ/16) longitudinal resolution are demonstrated.

  20. Translation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Phase-Contrast CT Imaging from Synchrotron Radiation to a Conventional Lab-Based X-Ray Source

    PubMed Central

    Saam, Tobias; Herzen, Julia; Hetterich, Holger; Fill, Sandra; Willner, Marian; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Schüller, Ulrich; Auweter, Sigrid; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Phase-contrast imaging is a novel X-ray based technique that provides enhanced soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing human carotid arteries by grating-based phase-contrast tomography (PC-CT) at two different experimental set-ups: (i) applying synchrotron radiation and (ii) using a conventional X-ray tube. Materials and Methods Five ex-vivo carotid artery specimens were examined with PC-CT either at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using a monochromatic X-ray beam (2 specimens; 23 keV; pixel size 5.4 µm), or at a laboratory set-up on a conventional X-ray tube (3 specimens; 35-40 kVp; 70 mA; pixel size 100 µm). Tomographic images were reconstructed and compared to histopathology. Two independent readers determined vessel dimensions and one reader determined signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) between PC-CT and absorption images. Results In total, 51 sections were included in the analysis. Images from both set-ups provided sufficient contrast to differentiate individual vessel layers. All PCI-based measurements strongly predicted but significantly overestimated lumen, intima and vessel wall area for both the synchrotron and the laboratory-based measurements as compared with histology (all p<0.001 with slope >0.53 per mm2, 95%-CI: 0.35 to 0.70). Although synchrotron-based images were characterized by higher SNRs than laboratory-based images; both PC-CT set-ups had superior SNRs compared to corresponding conventional absorption-based images (p<0.001). Inter-reader reproducibility was excellent (ICCs >0.98 and >0.84 for synchrotron and for laboratory-based measurements; respectively). Conclusion Experimental PC-CT of carotid specimens is feasible with both synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources, producing high-resolution images suitable for vessel characterization and atherosclerosis research. PMID:24039969

  1. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  2. Contrast dispersion imaging for cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer growth is associated with angiogenic processes in many types of cancer. Several imaging strategies have therefore been developed that target angiogenesis as a marker for cancer localization. To this end, intravascular and extravascular tissue perfusion is typically assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) ultrasound (US) and MRI. All the proposed strategies, however, overlook important changes in the microvascular architecture that result from angiogenic processes. To overcome these limitations, we have recently introduced a new imaging strategy that analyzes the intravascular dispersion kinetics of contrast agents spreading through the microvasculature. Contrast dispersion is mainly determined by microvascular multi-path trajectories, reflecting the underlying microvascular architecture. This paper reviews the results obtained for prostate cancer localization by US and MRI dispersion imaging, also presenting the latest new developments and future perspectives. PMID:25570935

  3. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  4. Vessel contrast enhancement in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgan, Asgeir; Denstedt, Martin; Milanič, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging of vessel structures can be useful for investigation of endothelial function, angiogenesis and hyper-vascularization. This can be challenging for hyperspectral tissue imaging due to photon scattering and absorption in other parts of the tissue. Real-time processing techniques for enhancement of vessel contrast in hyperspectral tissue images were investigated. Wavelet processing and an inverse diffusion model were employed, and compared to band ratio metrics and statistical methods. A multiscale vesselness filter was applied for further enhancement. The results show that vessel structures in hyperspectral images can be enhanced and characterized using a combination of statistical, numerical and more physics informed models.

  5. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward. PMID:26970556

  6. Geometric feature-based multimodal image registration of contrast-enhanced cardiac CT with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jonghye; Slomka, Piotr J.; Dey, Damini; Cheng, Victor Y.; Hong, Byung-Woo; Ramesh, Amit; Berman, Daniel S.; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Germano, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provide clinically complementary information in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fused anatomical and physiological data acquired sequentially on separate scanners can be coregistered to accurately diagnose CAD in specific coronary vessels. Methods: A fully automated registration method is presented utilizing geometric features from a reliable segmentation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) volumes, where regions of myocardium and blood pools are extracted and used as an anatomical mask to de-emphasize the inhomogeneities of intensity distribution caused by perfusion defects and physiological variations. A multiresolution approach is employed to represent coarse-to-fine details of both volumes. The extracted voxels from each level are aligned using a similarity measure with a piecewise constant image model and minimized using a gradient descent method. The authors then perform limited nonlinear registration of gated MPS to adjust for phase differences by automatic cardiac phase matching between CT and MPS. For phase matching, they incorporate nonlinear registration using thin-plate-spline-based warping. Rigid registration has been compared with manual alignment (n=45) on 20 stress/rest MPS and coronary CTA data sets acquired from two different sites and five stress CT perfusion data sets. Phase matching was also compared to expert visual assessment. Results: As compared with manual alignment obtained from two expert observers, the mean and standard deviation of absolute registration errors of the proposed method for MPS were4.3±3.5, 3.6±2.6, and 3.6±2.1mm for translation and 2.1±3.2°, 0.3±0.8°, and 0.7±1.2° for rotation at site A and 3.8±2.7, 4.0±2.9, and 2.2±1.8mm for translation and 1.1±2.0°, 1.6±3.1°, and 1.9±3.8° for rotation at site B. The results for CT perfusion were 3.0±2.9, 3.5±2.4, and 2.8±1.0mm for translation and 3

  7. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  8. Enhancement of fluoroscopic images with varying contrast.

    PubMed

    Ozanian, T O; Phillips, R

    2001-04-01

    A heuristic algorithm for enhancement of fluoroscopic images of varying contrast is proposed. The new technique aims at identifying a suitable type of enhancement for different locations in an image. The estimation relies on simple preliminary classification of image parts into one of the following types: uniform, sharp (with sufficient contrast), detail-containing (structure present) and unknown (for the cases where it is difficult to make a decision). Different smoothing techniques are applied locally in the different types of image parts. For those parts that are classified as detail-containing, probable object boundaries are identified and local sharpening is carried out to increase the contrast at these places. The adopted approach attempts to improve the quality of an image by reducing available noise and simultaneously increasing the contrast at probable object boundaries without increasing the overall dynamic range. In addition, it allows noise to be cleaned, that at some locations is stronger than the fine structure at other locations, whilst preserving the details. PMID:11223147

  9. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of microstructure and fatigue-crack propagation in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husseini, Naji Sami

    Single-crystal nickel-base superalloys are ubiquitous in demanding turbine-blade applications, and they owe their remarkable resilience to their dendritic, hierarchical microstructure and complex composition. During normal operations, they endure rapid low-stress vibrations that may initiate fatigue cracks. This failure mode in the very high-cycle regime is poorly understood, in part due to inadequate testing and diagnostic equipment. Phase-contrast imaging with coherent synchrotron x rays, however, is an emergent technique ideally suited for dynamic processes such as crack initiation and propagation. A specially designed portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, coupled with x-ray radiography, allows real-time, in situ imaging while simulating service conditions. Three contrast mechanisms - absorption, diffraction, and phase contrast - span the immense breadth of microstructural features in superalloys. Absorption contrast is sensitive to composition and crack displacements, and diffraction contrast illuminates dislocation aggregates and crystallographic misorientations. Phase contrast enhances electron-density gradients and is particularly useful for fatigue-crack studies, sensitive to internal crack tips and openings less than one micrometer. Superalloy samples were imaged without external stresses to study microstructure and mosaicity. Maps of rhenium and tungsten concentrations revealed strong segregation to the center of dendrites, as manifested by absorption contrast. Though nominally single crystals, dendrites were misoriented from the bulk by a few degrees, as revealed by diffraction contrast. For dynamic studies of cyclic fatigue, superalloys were mounted in the portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, subjected to a mean tensile stress of ˜50-150 MPa, and cycled in tension to initiate and propagate fatigue cracks. Radiographs were recorded every thousand cycles over the multimillion-cycle lifetime to measure micron-scale crack growth. Crack

  10. Joint reconstruction of absorption and refractive properties in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography via a non-linear image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujia; Wang, Kun; Gursoy, Doga; Soriano, Carmen; De Carlo, Francesco; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (XPCT) provides the opportunity to image weakly absorbing objects and is being explored actively for a variety of important pre-clinical applications. Quantitative XPCT image reconstruction methods typically involve a phase retrieval step followed by application of an image reconstruction algorithm. Most approaches to phase retrieval require either acquiring multiple images at different object-to-detector distances or introducing simplifying assumptions, such as a single-material assumption, to linearize the imaging model. In order to overcome these limitations, a non-linear image reconstruction method has been proposed previously that jointly estimates the absorption and refractive properties of an object from XPCT projection data acquired at a single propagation distance, without the need to linearize the imaging model. However, the numerical properties of the associated non-convex optimization problem remain largely unexplored. In this study, computer simulations are conducted to investigate the feasibility of the joint reconstruction problem in practice. We demonstrate that the joint reconstruction problem is ill-posed and sensitive to system inconsistencies. Particularly, the method can generate accurate refractive index images only if the object is thin and has no phase-wrapping in the data. However, we also observed that, for weakly absorbing objects, the refractive index images reconstructed by the joint reconstruction method are, in general, more accurate than those reconstructed using methods that simply ignore the object's absorption.

  11. Caspase-responsive smart gadolinium-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of drug-induced apoptosis†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Pandit, Prachi; Brewer, Kimberly D.; Tee, Sui Seng; Cui, Lina; Tikhomirov, Grigory

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive detection of caspase-3/7 activity in vivo has provided invaluable predictive information regarding tumor therapeutic efficacy and anti-tumor drug selection. Although a number of caspase-3/7 targeted fluorescence and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probes have been developed, there is still a lack of gadolinium (Gd)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that enable high spatial resolution detection of caspase-3/7 activity in vivo. Here we employ a self-assembly approach and develop a caspase-3/7 activatable Gd-based MRI probe for monitoring tumor apoptosis in mice. Upon reduction and caspase-3/7 activation, the caspase-sensitive nano-aggregation MR probe (C-SNAM: 1) undergoes biocompatible intramolecular cyclization and subsequent self-assembly into Gd-nanoparticles (GdNPs). This results in enhanced r1 relaxivity—19.0 (post-activation) vs. 10.2 mM−1 s−1 (pre-activation) at 1 T in solution—and prolonged accumulation in chemotherapy-induced apoptotic cells and tumors that express active caspase-3/7. We demonstrate that C-SNAM reports caspase-3/7 activity by generating a significantly brighter T1-weighted MR signal compared to non-treated tumors following intravenous administration of C-SNAM, providing great potential for high-resolution imaging of tumor apoptosis in vivo. PMID:25429349

  12. Spontaneous brain tumor imaging of aged rat by crystal X-ray interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Akio; Hara, Atsuko; Ohbu, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Taguchi, Masaya; Esashi, Shogo; Matsushima, Tsubasa; Terazaki, Kei; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-01-01

    Background Crystal X-ray interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (C-PCCT) enables the depiction of internal structures of biological tissue without contrast agents. Purpose To determine the advantage of this technique in visualizing detailed morphological structures of a rare spontaneous brain tumor in an aged rat. Material and Methods An aged rat’s spontaneous brain tumor was imaged by C-PCCT without contrast agent. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the tumor microvasculature were reconstructed and compared with pathological pictures. Results C-PCCT depicted the tumor’s various pathological features clearly, e.g. its cell density and vasculature, and blood clots caused by hemorrhaging and/or hematomas. The obtained images resembled pathological pictures with a magnification of ×20 and were used to reconstruct 3D images of the tumor vascularity up to approximately 26 µm in diameter. Conclusion Since C-PCCT is able to depict various pathological conditions, it might be useful for cancer research. PMID:26962462

  13. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  14. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  15. Gd(DOTAlaP): Exploring the Boundaries of Fast Water Exchange in Gadolinium-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of the single amino acid chelator DOTAlaP and four of its derivatives. The corresponding gadolinium(III) complexes were investigated for their kinetic inertness, relaxometric properties at a range of fields and temperatures, water exchange rate, and interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). Derivatives with one inner-sphere water (q = 1) were determined to have a mean water residency time between 8 and 6 ns in phoshate-buffered saline at 37 °C. The corresponding europium complexes were also formed and used to obtain information on the hydration number of the corresponding coordination complexes. Two complexes capable of binding HSA were also synthesized, of which one, Gd(5b), contains no inner-sphere water, while the other derivative, Gd(4b), is a mixture of ca. 15% q =1 and 85% q = 0. In the presence of HSA, the latter displayed a very short mean water residency time (τM310 = 2.4 ns) and enhanced relaxivity at intermediate and high fields. The kinetic inertness of Gd(4b) with respect to complex dissociation was decreased compared to its DOTAla analogue but still 100-fold more inert than [Gd(BOPTA)(H2O)]2–. Magnetic resonance imaging in mice showed that Gd(4b) was able to provide 38% better vessel to muscle contrast compared to the clinically used HSA binding agent MS-325. PMID:24922178

  16. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  17. Adaptive contrast imaging: transmit frequency optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménigot, Sébastien; Novell, Anthony; Voicu, Iulian; Bouakaz, Ayache; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since the introduction of ultrasound (US) contrast imaging, the imaging systems use a fixed emitting frequency. However it is known that the insonified medium is time-varying and therefore an adapted time-varying excitation is expected. We suggest an adaptive imaging technique which selects the optimal transmit frequency that maximizes the acoustic contrast. Two algorithms have been proposed to find an US excitation for which the frequency was optimal with microbubbles. Methods and Materials: Simulations were carried out for encapsulated microbubbles of 2 microns by considering the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation for 2 MHz transmit frequency and for various pressure levels (20 kPa up to 420kPa). In vitro experiments were carried out using a transducer operating at 2 MHz and using a programmable waveform generator. Contrast agent was then injected into a small container filled with water. Results and discussions: We show through simulations and in vitro experiments that our adaptive imaging technique gives: 1) in case of simulations, a gain of acoustic contrast which can reach 9 dB compared to the traditional technique without optimization and 2) for in vitro experiments, a gain which can reach 18 dB. There is a non negligible discrepancy between simulations and experiments. These differences are certainly due to the fact that our simulations do not take into account the diffraction and nonlinear propagation effects. Further optimizations are underway.

  18. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  19. Is image quality a function of contrast perception?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haun, Andrew M.; Peli, Eli

    2013-03-01

    In this retrospective we trace in broad strokes the development of image quality measures based on the study of the early stages of the human visual system (HVS), where contrast encoding is fundamental. We find that while presenters at the Human Vision and Electronic Imaging meetings have frequently strived to find points of contact between the study of human contrast psychophysics and the development of computer vision and image quality algorithms. Progress has not always been made on these terms, although indirect impact of vision science on more recent image quality metrics can be observed.

  20. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  1. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  2. Experimental setup and the system performance for single-grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) with a microfocus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Park, Chulkyu; Woo, Taeho; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Jinsoo; Chung, Nagkun; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Jinguk

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we investigated a simplified approach to phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) by using a single antiscatter grid and a microfocus x-ray tube, which has potential to open the way to further widespread use of PCXI into the related application areas. We established a table-top setup for PCXI studies of biological and non-biological samples and investigated the system performance. The PCXI system consists of a focused-linear grid having a strip density of 200 lines/in. (JPI Healthcare Corp.), a microfocus x-ray tube having a focal spot size of about 5 μm (Hamamatsu, L7910), and a high-resolution CMOS imaging detector having a pixel size of 48 μm (Rad-icon Imaging Corp., Shad-o-Box 2048). By using our prototype system, we successfully obtained attenuation, scattering, and differential phase-contrast x-ray images of improved visibility from the raw images of several samples at x-ray tube conditions of 50 kVp and 6 mAs. Our initial results indicate that the single-grid-based approach seems a useful method for PCXI with great simplicity and minimal requirements on the setup alignment.

  3. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    PubMed

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  4. Variational contrast enhancement guided by global and local contrast measurements for single-image defogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li; Bi, Du-Yan; He, Lin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The visibility of images captured in foggy conditions is impaired severely by a decrease in the contrasts of objects and veiling with a characteristic gray hue, which may limit the performance of visual applications out of doors. Contrast enhancement together with color restoration is a challenging mission for conventional fog-removal methods, as the degrading effect of fog is largely dependent on scene depth information. Nowadays, people change their minds by establishing a variational framework for contrast enhancement based on a physically based analytical model, unexpectedly resulting in color distortion, dark-patch distortion, or fuzzy features of local regions. Unlike previous work, our method treats an atmospheric veil as a scattering disturbance and formulates a foggy image as an energy functional minimization to estimate direct attenuation, originating from the work of image denoising. In addition to a global contrast measurement based on a total variation norm, an additional local measurement is designed in that optimal problem for the purpose of digging out more local details as well as suppressing dark-patch distortion. Moreover, we estimate the airlight precisely by maximization with a geometric constraint and a natural image prior in order to protect the faithfulness of the scene color. With the estimated direct attenuation and airlight, the fog-free image can be restored. Finally, our method is tested on several benchmark and realistic images evaluated by two assessment approaches. The experimental results imply that our proposed method works well compared with the state-of-the-art defogging methods.

  5. High contrast imaging polarimetry of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas Cabrera, H.

    2011-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis is based on the analysis of the results produced by ExPo, the Extreme Polarimeter. ExPo is an imaging polarimeter that has been designed and built by the group of prof. Christoph Keller, at Utrecht University. The purpose of this instrument is to use polarimetry to detect and characterize the circumstellar environments around different types of stars. In this work I focus on the polarized features that are produced by scattering by dust grains. Depending on the properties of the particles producing the scattering (size, shape...) and the scattering angle (forward, backward scattering), the light becomes polarized in higher or lower degree. The main problem when studying circumstellar environments is the high contrast ratios that are faced. For example, a young star is typically four orders of magnitude (10000 times) brighter than its protoplanetary disk. On the other hand, the light emitted by the star is largely unpolarized, while the light that is scattered (by the protoplanetary disk in this example) is polarized. Therefore, polarimetry offers a very elegant way to remove most of the starlight, allowing the detection of only the polarized photons. Furthermore, and as explained before, by studying the polarization of the light that we measure we can learn more about the properties of the circumstellar environments (dust composition, geometry, etc.). ExPo has produced a wealth of data, combining observations of very different targets such as protoplanetary disks, post-AGB stars, comets and planets of our Solar System (Venus and Saturn).

  6. Global Contrast Based Salient Region Detection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Ming; Mitra, Niloy J; Huang, Xiaolei; Torr, Philip H S; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-03-01

    Automatic estimation of salient object regions across images, without any prior assumption or knowledge of the contents of the corresponding scenes, enhances many computer vision and computer graphics applications. We introduce a regional contrast based salient object detection algorithm, which simultaneously evaluates global contrast differences and spatial weighted coherence scores. The proposed algorithm is simple, efficient, naturally multi-scale, and produces full-resolution, high-quality saliency maps. These saliency maps are further used to initialize a novel iterative version of GrabCut, namely SaliencyCut, for high quality unsupervised salient object segmentation. We extensively evaluated our algorithm using traditional salient object detection datasets, as well as a more challenging Internet image dataset. Our experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm consistently outperforms 15 existing salient object detection and segmentation methods, yielding higher precision and better recall rates. We also show that our algorithm can be used to efficiently extract salient object masks from Internet images, enabling effective sketch-based image retrieval (SBIR) via simple shape comparisons. Despite such noisy internet images, where the saliency regions are ambiguous, our saliency guided image retrieval achieves a superior retrieval rate compared with state-of-the-art SBIR methods, and additionally provides important target object region information. PMID:26353262

  7. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  8. Contrast Driven Elastica for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    El-Zehiry, Noha Youssry; Grady, Leo

    2016-06-01

    Minimization of boundary curvature is a classic regularization technique for image segmentation in the presence of noisy image data. Techniques for minimizing curvature have historically been derived from gradient descent methods which could be trapped by a local minimum and, therefore, required a good initialization. Recently, combinatorial optimization techniques have overcome this barrier by providing solutions that can achieve a global optimum. However, curvature regularization methods can fail when the true object has high curvature. In these circumstances, existing methods depend on a data term to overcome the high curvature of the object. Unfortunately, the data term may be ambiguous in some images, which causes these methods also to fail. To overcome these problems, we propose a contrast driven elastica model (including curvature), which can accommodate high curvature objects and an ambiguous data model. We demonstrate that we can accurately segment extremely challenging synthetic and real images with ambiguous data discrimination, poor boundary contrast, and sharp corners. We provide a quantitative evaluation of our segmentation approach when applied to a standard image segmentation data set. PMID:27019488

  9. Imaging features of rhinosporidiosis on contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Irodi, Aparna; Khiangte, Hannah L; Rupa, V; Naina, P

    2013-01-01

    Context: Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease endemic in certain regions of India. Computed tomography (CT) imaging appearances of rhinosporidiosis have not been previously described in the literature. Aims: To study imaging features in rhinosporidiosis with contrast-enhanced CT and elucidate its role in the evaluation of this disease. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with pathologically proven rhinosporidiosis were included in the study. Contrast-enhanced CT images were analyzed retrospectively and imaging findings were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: A total of 29 lesions were found and evaluated. On contrast-enhanced CT, rhinosporidiosis was seen as moderately enhancing lobulated or irregular soft tissue mass lesions in the nasal cavity (n = 13), lesions arising in nasal cavity and extending through choana into nasopharynx (n = 5), pedunculated polypoidal lesions arising from the nasopharyngeal wall (n = 5), oropharyngeal wall (n = 2), larynx (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), skin and subcutaneous tissue (n = 2). The inferior nasal cavity comprising nasal floor, inferior turbinate, and inferior meatus was the most common site of involvement (n = 13). Surrounding bone involvement was seen in the form of rarefaction (n = 6), partial (n = 3) or complete erosion (n = 3) of inferior turbinate, thinning of medial maxillary wall (n = 2), and septal erosion (n = 2). Nasolacrimal duct involvement was seen in four cases. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT has an important role in delineating the site and extent of the disease, as well as the involvement of surrounding bone, nasolacrimal duct and tracheobronchial tree. This provides a useful roadmap prior to surgery. PMID:24347850

  10. Noise analysis in laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Yu; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is becoming an established method for full-field imaging of blood flow dynamics in animal models. A reliable quantitative model with comprehensive noise analysis is necessary to fully utilize this technique in biomedical applications and clinical trials. In this study, we investigated several major noise sources in LSCI: periodic physiology noise, shot noise and statistical noise. (1) We observed periodic physiology noise in our experiments and found that its sources consist principally of motions induced by heart beats and/or ventilation. (2) We found that shot noise caused an offset of speckle contrast (SC) values, and this offset is directly related to the incident light intensity. (3) A mathematical model of statistical noise was also developed. The model indicated that statistical noise in speckle contrast imaging is related to the SC values and the total number of pixels used in the SC calculation. Our experimental results are consistent with theoretical predications, as well as with other published works.

  11. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography.

    PubMed

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. PMID:26459771

  12. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  13. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Millard, T. P.; Endrizzi, M.; Everdell, N.; Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Menk, R. H.; Stride, E.; Olivo, A.

    2015-01-01

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities. PMID:26219661

  14. Towards An Advanced Graphene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent: Sub-acute Toxicity and Efficacy Studies in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Hoang, Dung Minh; Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lee, Stephen; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical Gd3+-based T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) are suboptimal or unsuitable, especially at higher magnetic fields (>1.5 Tesla) for advanced MRI applications such as blood pool, cellular and molecular imaging. Herein, towards the goal of developing a safe and more efficacious high field T1 MRI CA for these applications, we report the sub-acute toxicity and contrast enhancing capabilities of a novel nanoparticle MRI CA comprising of manganese (Mn2+) intercalated graphene nanoparticles functionalized with dextran (hereafter, Mangradex) in rodents. Sub-acute toxicology performed on rats intravenously injected with Mangradex at 1, 50 or 100 mg/kg dosages 3 times per week for three weeks indicated that dosages ≤50 mg/kg could serve as potential diagnostic doses. Whole body 7 Tesla MRI performed on mice injected with Mangradex at a potential diagnostic dose (25 mg/kg or 455 nanomoles Mn2+/kg; ~2 orders of magnitude lower than the paramagnetic ion concentration in a typical clinical dose) showed persistent (up to at least 2 hours) contrast enhancement in the vascular branches (Mn2+ concentration in blood at steady state = 300 ppb, per voxel = 45 femtomoles). The results lay the foundations for further development of Mangradex as a vascular and cellular/ molecular MRI probe. PMID:26625867

  15. Weighted contrast metric for imaging system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.

    2012-06-01

    There have been significant improvements in the image quality metrics used in the NVESD model suite in recent years. The introduction of the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric to replace the Johnson criteria yielded significantly more accurate predictions for under-sampled imaging systems in particular. However, there are certain cases which cause the TTP metric to predict optimistic performance. In this paper a new metric for predicting performance of imaging systems is described. This new weighted contrast metric is characterized as a hybrid of the TTP metric and Johnson criteria. Results from a number of historical perception studies are presented to compare the performance of the TTP metric and Johnson criteria to the newly proposed metric.

  16. Bacterial cell identification in differential interference contrast microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microscopy image segmentation lays the foundation for shape analysis, motion tracking, and classification of biological objects. Despite its importance, automated segmentation remains challenging for several widely used non-fluorescence, interference-based microscopy imaging modalities. For example in differential interference contrast microscopy which plays an important role in modern bacterial cell biology. Therefore, new revolutions in the field require the development of tools, technologies and work-flows to extract and exploit information from interference-based imaging data so as to achieve new fundamental biological insights and understanding. Results We have developed and evaluated a high-throughput image analysis and processing approach to detect and characterize bacterial cells and chemotaxis proteins. Its performance was evaluated using differential interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy images of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Conclusions Results demonstrate that the proposed approach provides a fast and robust method for detection and analysis of spatial relationship between bacterial cells and their chemotaxis proteins. PMID:23617824

  17. Contrast vs noise effects on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadar, Ofer; Corse, N.; Rotman, Stanley R.; Kopeika, Norman S.

    1996-11-01

    Low noise images are contract-limited, and image restoration techniques can improve resolution significantly. However, as noise level increases, resolution improvements via image processing become more limited because image restoration increases noise. This research attempts to construct a reliable quantitative means of characterizing the perceptual difference between target and background. A method is suggested for evaluating the extent to which it is possible to discriminate an object which has merged with its surroundings, in noise-limited and contrast limited images, i.e., how hard it would be for an observer to recognize the object against various backgrounds as a function of noise level. The suggested model will be a first order model to begin with, using a regular bar-chart with additive uncorrelated Gaussian noise degraded by standard atmospheric blurring filters. The second phase will comprise a model dealing with higher-order images. This computational model relates the detectability or distinctness of the object to measurable parameters. It also must characterize human perceptual response, i.e. the model must develop metrics which are highly correlated to the ease or difficulty which the human observer experiences in discerning the target from its background. This requirement can be fulfilled only by conducting psychophysical experiments quantitatively comparing the perceptual evaluations of the observers with the results of the mathematical model.

  18. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  19. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal (r1) and transverse relaxivity (r2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r2/r1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r2/r1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r2/r1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r2/r1 ratio of previous PEGylation (r2/r1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging. PMID:23033866

  20. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Rafiei, Behrooz; Gorji, Ensieh

    2012-10-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal ( r 1) and transverse relaxivity ( r 2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r 2/ r 1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r 2/ r 1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r 2/ r 1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r 2/ r 1 ratio of previous PEGylation ( r 2/ r 1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging.

  1. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  2. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  3. TAILORING X-RAY BEAM ENERGY SPECTRUM TO ENHANCE IMAGE QUALITY OF NEW RADIOGRAPHY CONTRAST AGENTS BASED ON GD OR OTHER LANTHANIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    DILMANIAN,F.A.; WEINMANN,H.J.; ZHONG,Z.; BACARIAN,T.; RIGON,L.; BUTTON,T.M.; REN,B.; WU,X.Y.; ZHONG,N.; ATKINS,H.L.

    2001-02-17

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin Germany, in use in clinical MPI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-my beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a ''truly'' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's Ku line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with {approximately} twice higher output become available.

  4. Algorithm of contrast enhancement for visual document images with underexposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-zeng; Hao, Yong; Ha, Ming-hu; Tian, Xue-dong; Ha, Yan

    2008-03-01

    The visual document image is the electronic image about newspapers, books or magazines taken by the digital camera, the digital vidicon etc. Whose getting is more convenient than got from the scanner. Along with the development of OCR technology, visual document images could be recognized by OCR. Affected by some factors, digital image will be degraded during its acquisition, processing, transmission. One of the main problems affecting image quality, leading to unpleasant pictures, comes from improper exposure to light. So preprocessing is becoming much more significant before recognition in order to get an appropriate image satisfied recognition requirements. For the low contrast images with underexposure, according to the visual document image's characteristic, a new algorithm, based on image background separation, for image object enhance is proposed, The proposed method calculate the threshold of separation firstly, And different processing be taken on foreground and background: Various gray values in image background will be merged into unitary gray value, whereas the contrast of foreground will be enhanced. The proposed algorithm implemented in Visual C++ 6.0, and compared the result of proposed algorithm with the results of Otsu's method and histogram equalization. The experimental results show clearly that this algorithm could enhance the details of image object adequately, increase the recognition rate, and avoid the block effect at the same time.

  5. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  6. VIP: Vortex Image Processing pipeline for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Absil, Olivier; Mawet, Dimitri

    2016-03-01

    VIP (Vortex Image Processing pipeline) provides pre- and post-processing algorithms for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Written in Python, VIP provides a very flexible framework for data exploration and image processing and supports high-contrast imaging observational techniques, including angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. Several post-processing algorithms for PSF subtraction based on principal component analysis are available as well as the LLSG (Local Low-rank plus Sparse plus Gaussian-noise decomposition) algorithm for angular differential imaging. VIP also implements the negative fake companion technique coupled with MCMC sampling for rigorous estimation of the flux and position of potential companions.

  7. Modified natural nanoparticles as contrast agents for medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel and effective contrast agents is one of the drivers of the ongoing improvement in medical imaging. Many of the new agents reported are nanoparticle-based. There are a variety of natural nanoparticles known, e.g. lipoproteins, viruses or ferritin. Natural nanoparticles have advantages as delivery platforms such as biodegradability. In addition, our understanding of natural nanoparticles is quite advanced, allowing their adaptation as contrast agents. They can be labeled with small molecules or ions such as Gd3+ to act as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, 18F to act as positron emission tomography contrast agents or fluorophores to act as contrast agents for fluorescence techniques. Additionally, inorganic nanoparticles such as iron oxide, gold nanoparticles or quantum dots can be incorporated to add further contrast functionality. Furthermore, these natural nanoparticle contrast agents can be rerouted from their natural targets via the attachment of targeting molecules. In this review, we discuss the various modified natural nanoparticles that have been exploited as contrast agents. PMID:19900496

  8. Dual-frequency transducer for nonlinear contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Guiroy, Axel; Novell, Anthony; Ringgaard, Erling; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Abellard, André-Pierre; Zawada, Tomasz; Bouakaz, Ayache; Levassort, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Detection of high-order nonlinear components issued from microbubbles has emerged as a sensitive method for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the detection of these high-frequency components, including the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, remains challenging because of the lack of transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. In this context, we propose a new design of imaging transducer based on a simple fabrication process for high-frequency nonlinear imaging. The transducer is composed of two elements: the outer low-frequency (LF) element was centered at 4 MHz and used in transmit mode, whereas the inner high-frequency (HF) element centered at 14 MHz was used in receive mode. The center element was pad-printed using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) paste. The outer element was molded using a commercial PZT, and curved porous unpoled PZT was used as backing. Each piezoelectric element was characterized to determine the electromechanical performance with thickness coupling factor around 45%. After the assembly of the two transducer elements, hydrophone measurements (electroacoustic responses and radiation patterns) were carried out and demonstrated a large bandwidth (70% at -3 dB) of the HF transducer. Finally, the transducer was evaluated for contrast agent imaging using contrast agent microbubbles. The results showed that harmonic components (up to the sixth harmonic) of the microbubbles were successfully detected. Moreover, images from a flow phantom were acquired and demonstrated the potential of the transducer for high-frequency nonlinear contrast imaging. PMID:24297028

  9. Color contrast enhancement method of infrared polarization fused image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Xie, Chen

    2015-10-01

    As the traditional color fusion method based on color transfer algorithm has an issue that the color of target and background is similar. A kind of infrared polarization image color fusion method based on color contrast enhancement was proposed. Firstly the infrared radiation intensity image and the polarization image were color fused, and then color transfer technology was used between color reference image and initial fused image in the YCbCr color space. Secondly Otsu segmentation method was used to extract the target area image from infrared polarization image. Lastly the H,S,I component of the color fusion image which obtained by color transfer was adjusted to obtain the final fused image by using target area in the HSI space. Experimental results show that, the fused result which obtained by the proposed method is rich in detail and makes the contrast of target and background more outstanding. And then the ability of target detection and identification can be improved by the method.

  10. Efficient Hilbert transform-based alternative to Tofts physiological models for representing MRI dynamic contrast-enhanced images in computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Kevin M.; Wang, Shijun; Burtt, Karen E.; Turkbey, Baris; Weisenthal, Samuel; Pinto, Peter; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    In computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for prostate cancer, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging is useful for distinguishing cancerous and benign tissue. The Tofts physiological model is a commonly used representation of the DCE image data, but the parameters require extensive computation. Hence, we developed an alternative representation based on the Hilbert transform of the DCE images. The time maximum of the Hilbert transform, a binary metric of early enhancement, and a pre-DCE value was assigned to each voxel and appended to a standard feature set derived from T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. A cohort of 40 patients was used for training the classifier, and 20 patients were used for testing. The AUC was calculated by pooling the voxel-wise prediction values and comparing with the ground truth. The resulting AUC of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]) is not significantly different from an AUC calculated using Tofts physiological models of 0.92 (95% CI [0.87 0.97]), as validated by a Wilcoxon signed rank test on each patient's AUC (p = 0.19). The time required for calculation and feature extraction is 11.39 seconds (95% CI [10.95 11.82]) per patient using the Hilbert-based feature set, two orders of magnitude faster than the 1319 seconds (95% CI [1233 1404]) required for the Tofts parameter-based feature set (p<0.001). Hence, the features proposed herein appear useful for CAD systems integrated into clinical workflows where efficiency is important.

  11. Contrast agents in diagnostic imaging: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Caschera, Luca; Lazzara, Angelo; Piergallini, Lorenzo; Ricci, Domenico; Tuscano, Bruno; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Specific contrast agents have been developed for x ray examinations (mainly CT), sonography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Most of them are extracellular agents which create different enhancement on basis of different vascularization or on basis of different interstitial network in tissues, but some can be targeted to a particular cell line (e.g. hepatocyte). Microbubbles can be used as carrier for therapeutic drugs which can be released in specific targets under sonographic guidance, decreasing systemic toxicity and increasing therapeutic effect. Radiologists have to choose a particular contrast agent knowing its physical and chemical properties and the possibility of adverse reactions and balancing them with the clinical benefits of a more accurate diagnosis. As for any drug, contrast agents can cause adverse events, which are more frequent with Iodine based CA, but also with Gd based CA and even with sonographic contrast agents hypersensitivity reaction can occur. PMID:27168225

  12. Safety of the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Focusing in Part on Their Accumulation in the Brain and Especially the Dentate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2016-05-01

    The established class of intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging is the gadolinium chelates, more generally referred to as the gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). These can be differentiated on the basis of stability in vivo, with safety and tolerability of the GBCAs dependent upon chemical and biologic inertness. This review discusses first the background in terms of development of these agents and safety discussions therein, and second their relative stability based both on in vitro studies and clinical observations before and including the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This sets the stage for the subsequent focus of the review, the current knowledge regarding accumulation of gadolinium in the brain and specifically the dentate nucleus after intravenous administration of the GBCAs and differentiation among agents on this basis. The information available to date, from the initial conception of these agents in 1981 to the latest reports concerning safety, demonstrates a significant difference between the macrocyclic and linear chelates. The review concludes with a discussion of the predictable future, which includes, importantly, a reassessment of the use of the linear GBCAs or a subset thereof. PMID:26945278

  13. Adaptive windowing in contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Martin, K Heath; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is one of the most commonly-used interventional imaging techniques and has seen recent innovations which attempt to characterize the risk posed by atherosclerotic plaques. One such development is the use of microbubble contrast agents to image vasa vasorum, fine vessels which supply oxygen and nutrients to the walls of coronary arteries and typically have diameters less than 200μm. The degree of vasa vasorum neovascularization within plaques is positively correlated with plaque vulnerability. Having recently presented a prototype dual-frequency transducer for contrast agent-specific intravascular imaging, here we describe signal processing approaches based on minimum variance (MV) beamforming and the phase coherence factor (PCF) for improving the spatial resolution and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in IVUS imaging. These approaches are examined through simulations, phantom studies, ex vivo studies in porcine arteries, and in vivo studies in chicken embryos. In phantom studies, PCF processing improved CTR by a mean of 4.2dB, while combined MV and PCF processing improved spatial resolution by 41.7%. Improvements of 2.2dB in CTR and 37.2% in resolution were observed in vivo. Applying these processing strategies can enhance image quality in conventional B-mode IVUS or in contrast-enhanced IVUS, where signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low and resolution is at a premium. PMID:27161022

  14. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  15. In vivo imaging with near-infrared fluorescence lifetime contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a mainstay of biomedical research, allowing detection of molecular events in both fixed and living cells, tissues and whole animals. Such high resolution fluorescence imaging is hampered by unwanted signal from intrinsic background fluorescence and scattered light. The signal to background ratio can be improved by using extrinsic contrast agents and greatly enhanced by multispectral imaging methods. Unfortunately, these methods are insufficient for deep tissue imaging where high contrast and speedy acquisition are necessary. Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is an inherent characteristic of each fluorescent species that can be independent of intensity and spectral properties. Accordingly, FLT-based detection provides an additional contrast mechanism to optical measurements. This contrast is particularly important in the near-infrared (NIR) due to relative transparency of tissue as well as the broad absorption and emission spectra of dyes that are active in this region. Here we report comparative analysis of signal distribution of several NIR fluorescent polymethine dyes in living mice and their correlations with lifetimes obtained in vitro using solution models. The FLT data obtained from dyes dissolved in serum albumin solution correlated well with FLTs measured in vivo. Thus the albumin solution model could be used as a good predictive model for in vivo FLT behavior of newly developed fluorescent reporters. Subsequent experiments in vivo, including monitoring slow release kinetics and detecting proteinuria, demonstrate the complementary nature of FLT for fluorescence intensity imaging.

  16. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Lewis, Rob A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-01

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 μm), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  17. Width determination of SiO2-films in Si-based devices using low-loss EFTEM: image contrast as a function of sample thickness.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Bernhard; Grogger, Werner; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2003-01-01

    Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) has become one of the most efficient tools for specimen characterization at nanometer length scales. EFTEM imaging is most often carried out in the core-loss region but image intensity becomes more and more a limiting factor with decreasing feature size. Alternatively, it is possible to record EFTEM images in the low-loss region, where intensities are essentially higher and where in many cases the images contain material specific contrasts. In this paper we investigate the influence of the important parameters on the material contrast between silicon and silicon dioxide, e.g. specimen thickness, specimen orientation, energy-loss and energy selecting slit width. We show that sample thickness plays an important role and present two methods to calculate material contrast as a function of energy-loss and sample thicknesses. The first method uses spectra taken from both materials at different sample thickness by electron energy-loss spectroscopy, the second calculates contrast directly from a series of energy filtered images. From the results we determine the ideal acquisition parameters for the Si/SiO(2) system and demonstrate imaging at sufficient resolution below 2nm with a test sample of thin SiO(2) layers on Si. PMID:12694852

  18. Advances in engineering of high contrast CARS imaging endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Paquet, Alex; Paré, Claude; Zheng, Huimin; Doucet, Michel; Gay, David; Poirier, Michel; Cormier, Jean-François; Mermut, Ozzy; Wilson, Brian C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    The translation of CARS imaging towards real time, high resolution, chemically selective endoscopic tissue imaging applications is limited by a lack of sensitivity in CARS scanning probes sufficiently small for incorporation into endoscopes. We have developed here a custom double clad fiber (DCF)-based CARS probe which is designed to suppress the contaminant Four-Wave-Mixing (FWM) background generated within the fiber and integrated it into a fiber based scanning probe head of a few millimeters in diameter. The DCF includes a large mode area (LMA) core as a first means of reducing FWM generation by ~3 dB compared to commercially available, step-index single mode fibers. A micro-fabricated miniature optical filter (MOF) was grown on the distal end of the DCF to block the remaining FWM background from reaching the sample. The resulting probe was used to demonstrate high contrast images of polystyrene beads in the forward-CARS configuration with > 10 dB suppression of the FWM background. In epi-CARS geometry, images exhibited lower contrast due to the leakage of MOF-reflected FWM from the fiber core. Improvements concepts for the fiber probe are proposed for high contrast epi-CARS imaging to enable endoscopic implementation in clinical tissue assessment contexts, particularly in the early detection of endoluminal cancers and in tumor margin assessment. PMID:25401538

  19. Filtering and detection of low contrast structures on ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Quintero, Lorena; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Arámbula, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a detection method of low contrast structures in medical ultrasound images. Since noise speckle makes difficult the analysis of ultrasound images, two approaches based on the wavelet and Hermite-transforms for enhancement and noise reduction are compared. These techniques assume that speckle pattern is a random signal characterized by a Rayleigh distribution and affects the image as a multiplicative noise. For the wavelet-based approach, a Bayesian estimator at subband level for pixel classification is used. All the estimation parameters are calculated using an adjustment method derived from the first and second order statistical moments. The Hermite method computes a mask to find those pixels that are corrupted by speckle. In this work, we consider a statistical detection model that depends on the variable size and contrast of the image speckle. The algorithms have been evaluated using several real and synthetic ultrasound images. Combinations of the implemented methods can be helpful for automatic detection applications of tumors in mammographic ultrasound images. The employed filtering techniques are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with other previously published methods applied on ultrasound medical images.

  20. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  1. Selective imaging of adherent targeted ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, S; Kruse, D E; Ferrara, K W; Dayton, P A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of ultrasonic molecular imaging is the detection of targeted contrast agents bound to receptors on endothelial cells. We propose imaging methods that can distinguish adherent microbubbles from tissue and from freely circulating microbubbles, each of which would otherwise obscure signal from molecularly targeted adherent agents. The methods are based on a harmonic signal model of the returned echoes over a train of pulses. The first method utilizes an ‘image–push–image’ pulse sequence where adhesion of contrast agents is rapidly promoted by acoustic radiation force and the presence of adherent agents is detected by the signal change due to targeted microbubble adhesion. The second method rejects tissue echoes using a spectral high-pass filter. Free agent signal is suppressed by a pulse-to-pulse low-pass filter in both methods. An overlay of the adherent and/or flowing contrast agents on B-mode images can be readily created for anatomical reference. Contrast-to-tissue ratios from adherent microbubbles exceeding 30 dB and 20 dB were achieved for the two methods proposed, respectively. The performance of these algorithms is compared, emphasizing the significance and potential applications in ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:17404455

  2. Imaging microvascular flow characteristics using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Rege, Abhishek; Murari, Kartikeya; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has classically been used to image regional blood flow changes in animal models. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of LSCI for elucidating blood flow characteristics in individual microvessels with diameters as small as 24µm. We extracted profiles of speckle contrast values within individual vessels, both along their diameters and along their lengths and inferred that they could be attributed to the flow within the vessel. Profiles along the diameter of vessels revealed maxima at the center of vessels, consistent with fluid dynamics. These observed profiles could be fitted with parabolic curves with a mean coefficient of determination of 0.92. Similarly, analysis of speckle contrast values in the axial direction revealed profiles that progressively decreased in discreet quanta at branch points indicating blood flow bifurcations. Flow estimates obtained from speckle contrast values within branches of vessels obeyed the law of mass conservation with a mean error of only 3.5%. This allowed us to elucidate the percentage distribution of blood flow into each of the downstream branches. This ability of LSCI to resolve blood flow distribution in branching microvessel trees in a minimally invasive and dye free environment over a wide field of view promises to find application in both the neuroscience laboratory as well as intraoperative neurosurgery. PMID:21096787

  3. Pathologic Validation of a Model Based on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Tumor Delineation in the Prostate Peripheral Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Groenendaal, Greetje; Borren, Alie; Moman, Maaike R.; Monninkhof, Evelyn; Diest, Paul J. van; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Vulpen, Marco van; Heide, Uulke A. van der

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: For focal boost strategies in the prostate, the robustness of magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor delineations needs to be improved. To this end we developed a statistical model that predicts tumor presence on a voxel level (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm3) inside the peripheral zone. Furthermore, we show how this model can be used to derive a valuable input for radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The model was created on 87 radiotherapy patients. For the validation of the voxelwise performance of the model, an independent group of 12 prostatectomy patients was used. After model validation, the model was stratified to create three different risk levels for tumor presence: gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and low-risk CTV. Results: The model gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 for the prediction of tumor presence in the prostatectomy group. When the registration error between magnetic resonance images and pathologic delineation was taken into account, the area under the curve further improved to 0.89. We propose that model outcome values with a high positive predictive value can be used to define the GTV. Model outcome values with a high negative predictive value can be used to define low-risk CTV regions. The intermediate outcome values can be used to define a high-risk CTV. Conclusions: We developed a logistic regression with a high diagnostic performance for voxelwise prediction of tumor presence. The model output can be used to define different risk levels for tumor presence, which in turn could serve as an input for dose planning. In this way the robustness of tumor delineations for focal boost therapy can be greatly improved.

  4. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  5. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  6. A contrast enhancement technique for low light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ankita; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Digital Imagery systems are traditionally bad in low light conditions. In this paper, a new algorithm for contrast improvement is proposed. The algorithm consists of two stages. The first stage is decomposing the input image into four subbands by applying two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform and estimates the singular value matrix of sub band image. The second stage is that it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying the inverse DWT. The technique is compared with conventional image equalization technique such as standard General Histogram Equalization (GHE) and other state-of-the-art techniques such as Quadrant Dynamic Histogram Equalization (QDHE), Singular-Value-Wavelet based image Equalization (SVWE) and Singular Value Equalization (SVE) on the basis of their Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values. The simulation results indicated that the image contrast enhanced by the purposed method was higher than that of the images enhanced by the other conventional state-of-the-art techniques.

  7. Orientation contrast of secondary electron images from electropolished metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Chang, C P; Loretto, M H

    2015-09-01

    Orientation contrast obtained by an in-lens secondary electron detector in a scanning electron microscope from electropolished/etched metals is reported. The imaging conditions for obtaining such orientation contrast are defined. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the orientation contrast is explained, and an application example of this new imaging method is given. PMID:25980953

  8. Diffeomorphic Registration of Images with Variable Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Guillaume; Jacques, Laurent; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Geets, Xavier; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration is widely used to estimate tissue deformations in highly deformable anatomies. Among the existing methods, nonparametric registration algorithms such as optical flow, or Demons, usually have the advantage of being fast and easy to use. Recently, a diffeomorphic version of the Demons algorithm was proposed. This provides the advantage of producing invertible displacement fields, which is a necessary condition for these to be physical. However, such methods are based on the matching of intensities and are not suitable for registering images with different contrast enhancement. In such cases, a registration method based on the local phase like the Morphons has to be used. In this paper, a diffeomorphic version of the Morphons registration method is proposed and compared to conventional Morphons, Demons, and diffeomorphic Demons. The method is validated in the context of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients on several 4D respiratory-correlated CT scans of the thorax with and without variable contrast enhancement. PMID:21197460

  9. Examination of contrast mechanisms in optoacoustic imaging of thermal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christian; Spirou, Gloria; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Whelan, William M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2006-02-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging is based on the thermal expansion of tissue caused by a temperature rise due to absorption of short laser pulses. At constant laser fluence, optoacoustic image contrast is proportional to differences in optical absorption and the thermoacoustic efficiency, expressed by the Grueuneisen parameter, Γ. Γ is proportional to the thermal expansion coefficient, the sound velocity squared and the inverse heat capacity at constant pressure. In thermal therapies, these parameters may be modified in the treated area. In this work experiments were performed to examine the influence of these parameters on image contrast. A Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System (LOIS, Fairway Medical Technologies, Houston, Texas) was used to image tissue phantoms comprised of cylindrical Polyvinyl Chloride Plastisol (PVCP) optical absorbing targets imbedded in either gelatin or PVCP as the background medium. Varying concentrations of Black Plastic Color (BPC) and titanium dioxide (TiO II) were added to targets and background to yield desired tissue relevant optical absorption and effective scattering coefficients, respectively. In thermal therapy experiments, ex-vivo bovine liver was heated with laser fibres (805nm laser at 5 W for 600s) to create regions of tissue coagulation. Lesions formed in the liver tissue were visible using the LOIS system with reasonable correspondence to the actual region of tissue coagulation. In the phantom experiments, contrast could be seen with low optical absorbing targets (μ a of 0.50cm -1 down to 0.13cm-1) embedded in a gelatin background (see manuscript for formula). Therefore, the data suggest that small objects (< 5mm) with low absorption coefficients (in the range < 1cm -1) can be imaged using LOIS. PVCP-targets in gelatin were visible, even with the same optical properties as the gelatin, but different Γ. The enhanced contrast may also be caused by differences in the mechanical properties between the target and the surrounding medium

  10. Characterization of the in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging beam line developed at ALLS and based on laser driven betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Otani, K.; Saraf, A.; MacLean, S.; Wesolowski, M. J.; Babyn, P. S.; Hallin, E.; Krol, A.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    The 200TW ALLS laser system (30 fs, 5J) is used to accelerate electrons through laser wakefield and generate betatron emission in the 10keV range. Single shot phase contrast images of a series of nylon fibers with diameter ranging from 10μm to 400μm have been obtained in different geometries and are interpreted with a comprehensive model of x-ray propagation integrating the properties and geometries of the imaging beam line. A simple figure of merit, which can give indication on the interface sharpness of a phase object, is used to assess the quality of the imaging beam line.

  11. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  12. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  13. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  14. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  15. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  16. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  17. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  18. Microbubbles as contrast agent for in-line x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Xi Yan; Zhao Jun; Tang Rongbiao; Wang Yujie

    2011-07-04

    In the present study, we investigated the potential of gas-filled microbubbles as contrast agents for in-line x-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) in biomedical applications. When imaging parameters are optimized, the microbubbles function as microlenses that focus the incoming x-rays to form bright spots, which can significantly enhance the image contrast. Since microbubbles have been shown to be safe contrast agents in clinical ultrasonography, this contrast-enhancement procedure for PCI may have promising utility in biomedical applications, especially when the dose of radiation is a serious concern. In this study, we performed both numerical simulations and ex vivo experiments to investigate the formation of the contrast and the effectiveness of microbubbles as contrast agents in PCI.

  19. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suneet; Porwal, Rabins

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests the most appropriate measures for two of the medical images, namely, brain cancer images and breast cancer images. PMID:27127497

  20. Separation of Gd-humic complexes and Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent in river water with QAE-Sephadex A-25 for the fractionation analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-10-01

    Gadolinium complexed with naturally occurring, negatively charged humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) was collected from 500 mL of sample solution onto a column packed with 150 mg of a strongly basic anion-exchanger (QAE-Sephadex A-25). A Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetato aquo gadolinium(III), Gd-DTPA(2-)) was simultaneously collected on the same column. The Gd-DTPA complex was desorbed by anion-exchange with 50mM tetramethylammonium sulfate, leaving the Gd-humic complexes on the column. The Gd-humic complexes were subsequently dissociated with 1M nitric acid to desorb the humic fraction of Gd. The two-step desorption with small volumes of the eluting agents allowed the 100-fold preconcentration for the fractionation analysis of Gd at low ng L(-1) levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). On the other hand, Gd(III) neither complexed with humic substances nor DTPA, i.e., free species, was not sorbed on the column. The free Gd in the effluent was preconcentrated 100-fold by a conventional solid-phase extraction with an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin and determined by ICP-MS. The proposed analytical fractionation method was applied to river water samples. PMID:25059192

  1. Polarization enhancement of contrast in infrared ship/background imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, A. W.; Lentz, W. J.; Walker, P. L.; Chan, P. M.

    1995-02-01

    During the MAPTIP (Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance) experiment series in Dutch coastal waters in October 1993 shore-based polarized infrared images were recorded of air (fixed wing and helicopter) and sea targets in sea and air backgrounds, including a number of vertically and horizontally polarized image pairs of the Dutch oceanographic research vessel Hr Ms Tydeman. Complete characterization of the environmental conditions in the measurement area will be available through other MAPTIP participants. These images show no significant polarization features in ship images (less than 5%) or in sky background, but a considerable degree of vertical ('p') polarization in the sea background radiance at low emission (near grazing) angles, which is ascribed to surface emission polarization. This phenomenon for all observed times of day and sun positions, and more strongly in the LWIR than in the MWIR. A horizontal polarization filter provided 10 to 20% ship-to-sea contrast improvement due to suppression of sea background, and enhances horizon sea/sky contrast by up to 15%. These results are consistent with our previous measurements of polarization in the sun glint channel.

  2. Adaptive sigmoid function bihistogram equalization for image contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga-Garcia, Edgar F.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ruiz-Pinales, Jose; Garcia-Hernandez, Ma. de Guadalupe

    2015-09-01

    Contrast enhancement plays a key role in a wide range of applications including consumer electronic applications, such as video surveillance, digital cameras, and televisions. The main goal of contrast enhancement is to increase the quality of images. However, most state-of-the-art methods induce different types of distortion such as intensity shift, wash-out, noise, intensity burn-out, and intensity saturation. In addition, in consumer electronics, simple and fast methods are required in order to be implemented in real time. A bihistogram equalization method based on adaptive sigmoid functions is proposed. It consists of splitting the image histogram into two parts that are equalized independently by using adaptive sigmoid functions. In order to preserve the mean brightness of the input image, the parameter of the sigmoid functions is chosen to minimize the absolute mean brightness metric. Experiments on the Berkeley database have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of images and preserves their mean brightness. An application to improve the colorfulness of images is also presented.

  3. Contrast enhancement via texture region based histogram equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Vishwakarma, Dinesh K.; Singh Walia, Gurjit; Kapoor, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents two novel contrast enhancement approaches using texture regions-based histogram equalization (HE). In HE-based contrast enhancement methods, the enhanced image often contains undesirable artefacts because an excessive number of pixels in the non-textured areas heavily bias the histogram. The novel idea presented in this paper is to suppress the impact of pixels in non-textured areas and to exploit texture features for the computation of histogram in the process of HE. The first algorithm named as Dominant Orientation-based Texture Histogram Equalization (DOTHE), constructs the histogram of the image using only those image patches having dominant orientation. DOTHE categories image patches into smooth, dominant or non-dominant orientation patches by using the image variance and singular value decomposition algorithm and utilizes only dominant orientation patches in the process of HE. The second method termed as Edge-based Texture Histogram Equalization, calculates significant edges in the image and constructs the histogram using the grey levels present in the neighbourhood of edges. The cumulative density function of the histogram formed from texture features is mapped on the entire dynamic range of the input image to produce the contrast-enhanced image. Subjective as well as objective performance assessment of proposed methods is conducted and compared with other existing HE methods. The performance assessment in terms of visual quality, contrast improvement index, entropy and measure of enhancement reveals that the proposed methods outperform the existing HE methods.

  4. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Ting, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE) is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE) is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA), which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods. PMID:27338412

  5. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Ting, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE) is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE) is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA), which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods. PMID:27338412

  6. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  7. An adaptive algorithm for low contrast infrared image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-dong; Peng, Cheng-yuan; Wang, Ming-jia; Wu, Zhi-guo; Liu, Jia-qi

    2013-08-01

    An adaptive infrared image enhancement algorithm for low contrast is proposed in this paper, to deal with the problem that conventional image enhancement algorithm is not able to effective identify the interesting region when dynamic range is large in image. This algorithm begin with the human visual perception characteristics, take account of the global adaptive image enhancement and local feature boost, not only the contrast of image is raised, but also the texture of picture is more distinct. Firstly, the global image dynamic range is adjusted from the overall, the dynamic range of original image and display grayscale form corresponding relationship, the gray scale of bright object is raised and the the gray scale of dark target is reduced at the same time, to improve the overall image contrast. Secondly, the corresponding filtering algorithm is used on the current point and its neighborhood pixels to extract image texture information, to adjust the brightness of the current point in order to enhance the local contrast of the image. The algorithm overcomes the default that the outline is easy to vague in traditional edge detection algorithm, and ensure the distinctness of texture detail in image enhancement. Lastly, we normalize the global luminance adjustment image and the local brightness adjustment image, to ensure a smooth transition of image details. A lot of experiments is made to compare the algorithm proposed in this paper with other convention image enhancement algorithm, and two groups of vague IR image are taken in experiment. Experiments show that: the contrast ratio of the picture is boosted after handled by histogram equalization algorithm, but the detail of the picture is not clear, the detail of the picture can be distinguished after handled by the Retinex algorithm. The image after deal with by self-adaptive enhancement algorithm proposed in this paper becomes clear in details, and the image contrast is markedly improved in compared with Retinex

  8. Algorithms for contrast enhancement of electronic portal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez, S.; Sánchez, S.

    2015-11-01

    An implementation of two new automatized image processing algorithms for contrast enhancement of portal images is presented as suitable tools which facilitate the setup verification and visualization of patients during radiotherapy treatments. In the first algorithm, called Automatic Segmentation and Histogram Stretching (ASHS), the portal image is automatically segmented in two sub-images delimited by the conformed treatment beam: one image consisting of the imaged patient obtained directly from the radiation treatment field, and the second one is composed of the imaged patient outside it. By segmenting the original image, a histogram stretching can be independently performed and improved in both regions. The second algorithm involves a two-step process. In the first step, a Normalization to Local Mean (NLM), an inverse restoration filter is applied by dividing pixel by pixel a portal image by its blurred version. In the second step, named Lineally Combined Local Histogram Equalization (LCLHE), the contrast of the original image is strongly improved by a Local Contrast Enhancement (LCE) algorithm, revealing the anatomical structures of patients. The output image is lineally combined with a portal image of the patient. Finally the output images of the previous algorithms (NLM and LCLHE) are lineally combined, once again, in order to obtain a contrast enhanced image. These two algorithms have been tested on several portal images with great results.

  9. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  10. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  11. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  12. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569

  13. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  14. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  15. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  16. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully.

  17. Novel fluorescent contrast agents for optical imaging of in vivo tumors based on a receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaj, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel I.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-04-01

    We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated the efficacy of novel dye-peptide conjugates that are receptor specific. Contrary to the traditional approach of conjugating dyes to large proteins and antibodies, we used small peptide-dye conjugates that target over-expressed receptors on tumors. Despite the fact that the peptide and the dye probe have similar molecular mass, our results demonstrate that the affinity of the peptide for its receptor and the dye fluorescence properties are both retained. The use of small peptides has several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of compounds for potential combinatorial screening of new targets, reproducibility of high purity compounds, diffusiveness to solid tumors, and the ability to incorporate a variety of functional groups that modify the pharmacokinetics of the peptide-dye conjugates. The efficacy of these new fluorescent optical contrast agents was evaluated in vivo in well-characterized rat tumor lines expressing somatostatin (sst2) and bombesin receptors. A simple continuous wave optical imaging system was employed. The resulting optical images clearly show that successful specific tumor targeting was achieved. Thus, we have demonstrated that small peptide- dye conjugates are effective as contrast agents for optical imaging of tumors.

  18. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  19. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Contrast Dependent on Blood Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T. M.; Kay, A. R.; Tank, D. W.

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high fields, we demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complements other techniques that are attempting to provide positron emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  20. Revisiting an old friend: manganese-based MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Senpan, Angana; Schmieder, Ann H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive cellular and molecular imaging techniques are emerging as a multidisciplinary field that offers promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of disease at a molecular level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive technique due to the absence of radiation and high spatial resolution which makes it advantageous over techniques involving radioisotopes. Typically paramagnetic and superparamagnetic metals are used as contrast materials for MR based techniques. Gadolinium has been the predominant paramagnetic contrast metal until the discovery and association of the metal with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in some patients with severe renal or kidney disease. Manganese was one of the earliest reported examples of paramagnetic contrast material for MRI because of its efficient positive contrast enhancement. In this review manganese based contrast agent approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on nanoparticulate agents. We have discussed both classically used small molecule based blood pool contrast agents and recently developed innovative nanoparticle-based strategies highlighting a number of successful molecular imaging examples. PMID:20860051

  1. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  2. Endoluminal contrast for abdomen and pelvis magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mohit K; Khatri, Gaurav; Bailey, April; Pinho, Daniella F; Costa, Daniel; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis can be limited for assessment of different conditions when imaging inadequately distended hollow organs. Endoluminal contrast agents may provide improved anatomic definition and detection of subtle pathology in such scenarios. The available routes of administration for endoluminal contrast agents include oral, endorectal, endovaginal, intravesicular, and through non-physiologic accesses. Appropriate use of endoluminal contrast agents requires a thorough understanding of the clinical indications, available contrast agents, patient preparation, and interaction of the contrast agent with the desired MR imaging protocol. For example, biphasic oral enteric contrast agents are preferred in MR enterography as their signal properties on T1- and T2-weighted imaging allow for evaluation of both intraluminal and bowel wall pathology. In specific situations such as with MR enterography, MR defecography, and accurate local staging of certain pelvic tumors, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent is imperative in providing adequate diagnostic imaging. In other clinical scenarios, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent may serve as an indispensable problem-solving tool. PMID:26907710

  3. The optimal polarizations for achieving maximum contrast in radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, A. A.; Yueh, H. A.; Kong, J. A.; Novak, L. M.; Shin, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining the optimal polarizations that maximize contrast between two scattering classes in polarimetric radar images. A systematic approach is presented for obtaining the optimal polarimetric matched filter, i.e., that filter which produces maximum contrast between two scattering classes. The maximization procedure involves solving an eigenvalue problem where the eigenvector corresponding to the maximum contrast ratio is an optimal polarimetric matched filter. To exhibit the physical significance of this filter, it is transformed into its associated transmitting and receiving polarization states, written in terms of horizontal and vertical vector components. For the special case where the transmitting polarization is fixed, the receiving polarization which maximizes the contrast ratio is also obtained. Polarimetric filtering is then applies to synthetic aperture radar images obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is shown, both numerically and through the use of radar imagery, that maximum image contrast can be realized when data is processed with the optimal polarimeter matched filter.

  4. Molecular Optical Coherence Tomography Contrast Enhancement and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Applegate, Brian E.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Skala, Melissa C.; Kim, Jongsik; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Histochemistry began as early as the nineteenth century, with the development of synthetic dyes that provided spatially mapped chemical contrast in tissue [1]. Stains such as hematoxylin and eosin, which contrast cellular nuclei and cytoplasm, greatly aid in the interpretation of microscopy images. An analogous development is currently taking place in biomedical imaging, whereby techniques adapted for MRI, CT, and PET now provide in vivo molecular imaging over the entire human body, aiding in both fundamental research discovery and in clinical diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Because OCT offers a unique spatial scale that is intermediate between microscopy and whole-body biomedical imaging, molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) also has great potential for providing new insight into in vivo molecular processes. The strength of MCOCT lies in its ability to isolate signals from a molecule or contrast agent from the tissue scattering background over large scan areas at depths greater than traditional microscopy techniques while maintaining high resolution.

  5. Contrast improvement of terahertz images of thin histopathologic sections

    PubMed Central

    Formanek, Florian; Brun, Marc-Aurèle; Yasuda, Akio

    2011-01-01

    We present terahertz images of 10 μm thick histopathologic sections obtained in reflection geometry with a time-domain spectrometer, and demonstrate improved contrast for sections measured in paraffin with water. Automated segmentation is applied to the complex refractive index data to generate clustered terahertz images distinguishing cancer from healthy tissues. The degree of classification of pixels is then evaluated using registered visible microscope images. Principal component analysis and propagation simulations are employed to investigate the origin and the gain of image contrast. PMID:21326635

  6. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach. PMID:24211879

  7. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  8. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed. PMID:25530615

  9. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  10. Acoustic radiation pressure: A 'phase contrast' agent for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Hamilton, Theron J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2004-11-08

    We show that the radiation pressure exerted by a beam of ultrasound can be used for contrast enhancement in high-resolution x-ray imaging of tissue and soft materials. Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by imaging microscopic tumor phantoms embedded into tissue with a thickness typically presented in mammography. The detection limit of micrometer size masses exceeds the resolution of currently available mammography imaging systems. The directionality of the acoustic radiation force and its localization in space permits the imaging of ultrasound-selected tissue volumes. The results presented here suggest that the method may permit the detection of tumors in soft tissue in their early stage of development.

  11. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  12. SNR and Contrast Enhancement Techniques for the Photoacoustic Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two methods for photoacoustic signal enhancement in biological tissues. One such method is based on the fact that temperature can affect the signals of the photoacoustic radar. Therefore, thermally assisted methods have been used for photoacoustic imaging contrast improvement. Another method is based on harmonic wavelength modulation which results in a differential PA radar signal to strengthen early cancer detection. Two chirped waveforms modulated out-of-phase between 680 nm and 800 nm can effectively suppress the background noise, greatly enhance the SNR and detect small variations in hemoglobin oxygenation levels, thereby distinguishing pre-malignant tumors. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the frequency-modulated differential measurement with sheep blood at different hemoglobin oxygenation (S_tO2) levels.

  13. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging Signatures for Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract: Differential phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is a promising new radiographic technique providing three distinct contrast mechanisms - absorption, phase, and scatter (or dark field) - using a conventional x-ray tube source. We investigate the signatures available in these three contrast mechanisms with attention towards potential security applications. We find that the scatter mode in particular is sensitive to textured materials, enabling lowered detection limits than absorption for materials such as powders. We investigate the length scales to which our imaging system is sensitive.

  14. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  15. Image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Chung

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate a brand-new method for image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of different spatial frequencies. Fine characteristics of an image are well enhanced with negligible side effects. This method is easy to implement owing to its simple optical basis.

  16. The Thinker versus a Quilting Bee: Contrasting Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers the image of the quilting bee as a contrasting representation of critical thinking (or constructive thinking), comparing the two images, discussing a quilting bee representation of knowledge construction in terms of the tools used by quilters (knowers), and summarizing the transformation of critical thinking theory that a quilting bee image…

  17. Velocity Measurement in Carotid Artery: Quantitative Comparison of Time-Resolved 3D Phase-Contrast MRI and Image-based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Nasiraei Moghaddam, Abbas; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Firouznia, Kavous; Shakiba, Madjid; Ghanaati, Hossein; Wilkinson, Iain David; Frangi, Alejandro Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding hemodynamic environment in vessels is important for realizing the mechanisms leading to vascular pathologies. Objectives: Three-dimensional velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation is visualized using TR 3D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (TR 3D PC MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This study aimed to present a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the velocity vector field obtained by each technique. Subjects and Methods: MR imaging was performed on a 30-year old male normal subject. TR 3D PC MRI was performed on a 3 T scanner to measure velocity in carotid bifurcation. 3D anatomical model for CFD was created using images obtained from time-of-flight MR angiography. Velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation was predicted using CFD and PC MRI techniques. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the agreement between the two methods. Results: Although the main flow patterns were the same for the both techniques, CFD showed a greater resolution in mapping the secondary and circulating flows. Overall root mean square (RMS) errors for all the corresponding data points in PC MRI and CFD were 14.27% in peak systole and 12.91% in end diastole relative to maximum velocity measured at each cardiac phase. Bland-Altman plots showed a very good agreement between the two techniques. However, this study was not aimed to validate any of methods, instead, the consistency was assessed to accentuate the similarities and differences between Time-resolved PC MRI and CFD. Conclusion: Both techniques provided quantitatively consistent results of in vivo velocity vector fields in right internal carotid artery (RCA). PC MRI represented a good estimation of main flow patterns inside the vasculature, which seems to be acceptable for clinical use. However, limitations of each technique should be considered while interpreting results. PMID:26793288

  18. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  19. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  20. Material decomposition and virtual non-contrast imaging in photon counting computed tomography: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Kappler, S.; Pietsch, H.; Jost, G.; Hahn, K.; Schöck, F.; Sedlmair, M.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    The energy resolving capabilities of Photon Counting Detectors (PCD) in Computed Tomography (CT) facilitate energy-sensitive measurements. The provided image-information can be processed with Dual Energy and Multi Energy algorithms. A research PCD-CT firstly allows acquiring images with a close to clinical configuration of both the X-ray tube and the CT-detector. In this study, two algorithms (Material Decomposition and Virtual Non-Contrast-imaging (VNC)) are applied on a data set acquired from an anesthetized rabbit scanned using the PCD-CT system. Two contrast agents (CA) are applied: A gadolinium (Gd) based CA used to enhance contrasts for vascular imaging, and xenon (Xe) and air as a CA used to evaluate local ventilation of the animal's lung. Four different images are generated: a) A VNC image, suppressing any traces of the injected Gd imitating a native scan, b) a VNC image with a Gd-image as an overlay, where contrast enhancements in the vascular system are highlighted using colored labels, c) another VNC image with a Xe-image as an overlay, and d) a 3D rendered image of the animal's lung, filled with Xe, indicating local ventilation characteristics. All images are generated from two images based on energy bin information. It is shown that a modified version of a commercially available dual energy software framework is capable of providing images with diagnostic value obtained from the research PCD-CT system.

  1. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  2. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  3. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  4. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  5. An efficient method for accurate segmentation of LV in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana K., Venkata; Mitra, Abhishek; Srikrishnan, V.; Jo, Hyun Hee; Bidesi, Anup

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images is a challenging task because of high variability in the image intensity. This is due to a) wash-in and wash-out of the contrast agent over time and b) poor contrast around the epicardium (outer wall) region. Current approaches for segmentation of the endocardium (inner wall) usually involve application of a threshold within the region of interest, followed by refinement techniques like active contours. A limitation of this method is under-segmentation of the inner wall because of gradual loss of contrast at the wall boundary. On the other hand, the challenge in outer wall segmentation is the lack of reliable boundaries because of poor contrast. There are four main contributions in this paper to address the aforementioned issues. First, a seed image is selected using variance based approach on 4D time-frame images over which initial endocardium and epicardium is segmented. Secondly, we propose a patch based feature which overcomes the problem of gradual contrast loss for LV endocardium segmentation. Third, we propose a novel Iterative-Edge-Refinement (IER) technique for epicardium segmentation. Fourth, we propose a greedy search algorithm for propagating the initial contour segmented on seed-image across other time frame images. We have experimented our technique on five contrast-enhanced cardiac MR Datasets (4D) having a total of 1097 images. The segmentation results for all 1097 images have been visually inspected by a clinical expert and have shown good accuracy.

  6. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH. PMID:26942293

  7. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C

    2007-11-07

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  8. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; LaFreniere, D; Macintosh, B; Doyon, R

    2008-06-02

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  9. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  10. Polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Yokochi, Kaito; Nishikawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Takeda, Mitsuo; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-06-01

    We propose a novel, high-contrast imager called a polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph (PINC) for direct detection of extrasolar planets. The PINC uses achromatic half-wave plates (HWPs) installed in a fully symmetric beam combiner based on polarizing beam splitters. Jones calculus suggests that a stellar halo suppression level of 10(-10) can be achieved at 5 lambda/D for a broad wavelength range from 1.6 to 2.2 microm by using Fresnel-rhomb HWPs made of BK7. Laboratory experiments on the PINC used two laser light sources (wavelengths of lambda=532 and 671 nm), and we obtained a halo suppression level of approximately 10(-6) at 5 lambda/D for both wavelengths. PMID:20517351

  11. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  12. Sensitivity, noise and quantitative model of Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai

    based on our model. In our experimental results, we saw significant improvements in data analyses using our model and calibration procedure, though they are still not as large as we had hoped. (2) The major noise source affecting the quantitative model is CCD systematic noise, which can add additional contrast in the image. We studied this separately to understand its nature. We proposed several methods to reduce CCD noise based on our noise model. Beyond those studies, we also did the following: (1) we performed several studies of statistical properties of laser speckle image. Our results show that intensities in static speckle images and dynamic speckle patterns follow gamma probability distributions. (2) For future implantation and instrumentation of LSCI, we studied different approximation algorithms to speed the SC processing in software and hardware as well as the requirements of the camera. (3) The study of polarization effect shows that the experimental result is consistent with theoretical analyses. (4) By comparing different models, we found that Brownian motion model can be used as a general model for most biomedical applications and Durian's new model is slightly better than Briers' original model, though the latter is still applicable to general theory analyses. (5) The new technique combining LSCI with phosphorescence lifetime imaging (PLI) can provide simultaneous 2D maps of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The capability of the system was demonstrated by monitoring the propagation of cortical spreading depression (CSD) waves through the sealed cranial window. This technique has the potential to be a novel tool for quantitative analysis of the dynamic delivery of oxygen and brain tissue metabolism.

  13. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian; Lafrenière, David; Macintosh, Bruce; Doyon, René

    2008-01-01

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground- and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analyses have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follow a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil, this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fixed separation from the point-spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and noncoronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level (CL). In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding CL as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckle noise, a detection threshold up to 3 times higher is required to obtain a CL equivalent to that at 5 σ for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested on data acquired by simultaneous spectral differential imaging with TRIDENT and by angular differential imaging with NIRI. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. Finally, a power law is derived to predict the 1 - 3 × 10-7 CL detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of

  14. Counter-propagating wave interaction for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Bosch, J. G.; ten Kate, G. L.; Shamdasani, V.; Entrekin, R.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Most techniques for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging require linear propagation to detect nonlinear scattering of contrast agent microbubbles. Waveform distortion due to nonlinear propagation impairs their ability to distinguish microbubbles from tissue. As a result, tissue can be misclassified as microbubbles, and contrast agent concentration can be overestimated; therefore, these artifacts can significantly impair the quality of medical diagnoses. Contrary to biological tissue, lipid-coated gas microbubbles used as a contrast agent allow the interaction of two acoustic waves propagating in opposite directions (counter-propagation). Based on that principle, we describe a strategy to detect microbubbles that is free from nonlinear propagation artifacts. In vitro images were acquired with an ultrasound scanner in a phantom of tissue-mimicking material with a cavity containing a contrast agent. Unlike the default mode of the scanner using amplitude modulation to detect microbubbles, the pulse sequence exploiting counter-propagating wave interaction creates no pseudoenhancement behind the cavity in the contrast image.

  15. Automatic image equalization and contrast enhancement using Gaussian mixture modeling.

    PubMed

    Celik, Turgay; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive image equalization algorithm that automatically enhances the contrast in an input image. The algorithm uses the Gaussian mixture model to model the image gray-level distribution, and the intersection points of the Gaussian components in the model are used to partition the dynamic range of the image into input gray-level intervals. The contrast equalized image is generated by transforming the pixels' gray levels in each input interval to the appropriate output gray-level interval according to the dominant Gaussian component and the cumulative distribution function of the input interval. To take account of the hypothesis that homogeneous regions in the image represent homogeneous silences (or set of Gaussian components) in the image histogram, the Gaussian components with small variances are weighted with smaller values than the Gaussian components with larger variances, and the gray-level distribution is also used to weight the components in the mapping of the input interval to the output interval. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm produces better or comparable enhanced images than several state-of-the-art algorithms. Unlike the other algorithms, the proposed algorithm is free of parameter setting for a given dynamic range of the enhanced image and can be applied to a wide range of image types. PMID:21775265

  16. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  17. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  18. Extracellular gadolinium-based contrast media: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Marie-France; Van Der Molen, Aart J

    2008-05-01

    Increasing use is made of extracellular MRI contrast agents that alter the image contrast following intravenous administration; they predominantly shorten the T1 relaxation time of tissues. The degree and location of these changes provide substantial diagnostic information. However gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) are not inert drugs. They may cause acute non-renal adverse reactions (e.g. anaphylactoid reactions), acute renal adverse reactions (e.g. contrast induced nephropathy), delayed adverse reactions (nephrogenic systemic fibrosis) and problems at the site of injection (e.g. local necrosis). This review describes the current status of Gd-CA, their mechanism of action, chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, dosage, elimination, nephrotoxicity and adverse events. PMID:18358659

  19. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Walkey, Helen C; Barbur, John L; Harlow, J Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R; Taylor, Julie A F

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m(-2). A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2 = 0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry. PMID:15669611

  20. Effective contrast of colored stimuli in the mesopic range: a metric for perceived contrast based on achromatic luminance contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkey, Helen C.; Barbur, John L.; Harlow, J. Alister; Hurden, Antony; Moorhead, Ian R.; Taylor, Julie A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how color signals and cone- and rod-based luminance signals contribute to perceived contrast in the mesopic range. In this study the perceived contrast of colored, mesopic stimuli was matched with that of spatially equivalent achromatic stimuli. The objective was to develop a metric for perceived contrast in the mesopic range in terms of an equivalent achromatic luminance contrast, referred to here as effective contrast. Stimulus photopic luminance contrast, scotopic luminance contrast, and chromatic difference from the background all contributed to effective contrast over the mid-mesopic range, but their contributions were not independent and varied markedly with background luminance. Surprisingly, color made a significant contribution to effective contrast from 10 to approximately 0.003 cd m-2. A model describing this relationship is introduced (R2=0.89) and compared with predictions of mesopic luminance contrast obtained from a number of models proposed as systems of mesopic photometry.

  1. Macromolecular and Dendrimer Based Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20–25 years, a number of gadolinium based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed. PMID:20590365

  2. Managing the optical wavefront for high contrast exoplanet imaging with the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Krist, John E.; Moody, Dwight

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extreme high contrast astronomical imaging from space has inspired developments of new coronagraph methods for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. However, the requisite contrast, at levels of a billion to one or better for the direct imaging of cool mature exoplanets in reflected visible starlight, leads to challenging new requirements on the stability and control of the optical wavefront at levels currently beyond the reach of ground based telescopes. We briefly review the designs, laboratory validations, and science prospects for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet systems with an actively corrected Lyot coronagraph. We review exoplanet science performance predicted for NASA's WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to angular separations within 0.1 arcsec from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics are presented, including image contrast and spectral bandwidth, and laboratory validation experience.

  3. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine. PMID:27317202

  4. Diagnostic image quality of hysterosalpingography: ionic versus non ionic water soluble iodinated contrast media

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nor, H; Jayapragasam, KJ; Abdullah, BJJ

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic image quality between three different water soluble iodinated contrast media in hysterosalpingography (HSG). Material and method In a prospective randomised study of 204 patients, the diagnostic quality of images obtained after hysterosalpingography were evaluated using Iopramide (106 patients) and Ioxaglate (98 patients). 114 patients who had undergone HSG examination using Iodamide were analysed retrospectively. Image quality was assessed by three radiologists independently based on an objective set of criteria. The obtained results were statistically analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results Visualisation of fimbrial rugae was significantly better with Iopramide and Ioxaglate than Iodamide. All contrast media provided acceptable diagnostic image quality with regard to uterine, fallopian tubes outline and peritoneal spill. Uterine opacification was noted to be too dense in all three contrast media and not optimal for the assessment of intrauterine pathology. Higher incidence of contrast intravasation was noted in the Iodamide group. Similarly, the numbers of patients diagnosed with bilateral blocked fallopian tubes were also higher in the Iodamide group. Conclusion HSG using low osmolar contrast media (Iopramide and Ioxaglate) demonstrated diagnostic image qualities similar to HSG using conventional high osmolar contrast media (Iodamide). However, all three contrast media were found to be too dense for the detection of intrauterine pathology. Better visualisation of the fimbrial outline using Ioxaglate and Iopramide were attributed to their low contrast viscosity. The increased incidence of contrast media intravasation and bilateral tubal blockage using Iodamide are probably related to the high viscosity. PMID:21611058

  5. Image contrast enhancement in angular domain optical imaging of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2008-12-22

    Imaging structures within a turbid medium using Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter array to separate weakly scattered photons from those that are highly scattered. At high scattering coefficients, ADI contrast declines due to the large fraction of non-uniform background scattered light still within the acceptance angle. This paper demonstrates various methods to enhance the image contrast in ADI. Experiments where a wedge prism was used to deviate the laser source so that scattered photons could be imaged and subtracted from the image obtained by standard ADI provided the greatest improvement in image contrast. PMID:19104579

  6. Phase contrast imaging with micro focus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shovkun, V. Y.; Kumakhov, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    Now the phase-contrast (PC) radiography with monochromatic synchmtron radiation sources is very promising for use in non-destructive industrial control, medical and biological X-ray imaging. Unfortunately synchrotron sources are rather expensive for laboratory practice. We are developing a phase-contrast imaging with a micro focus X-ray tube. We performed numerical calculations with Fresnel-Kirchhgoff formalism to obtain values of PC-signals taking into account polychromatic nature of X-ray radiation, a finite size of a source, and a finite resolution of a detector including spectral sensitivity of the detector. We conducted experiments with a micro focus X-ray tube to find absolute values of PC signals for some models of biological tissue and technical materials in presence of scattering X-rays that emerge from the object. By means of simple set of the experimental arrangement it is possible to obtain the phase-contrast image map of the boundaries between regions with the density difference of order ~1 g/cm3. Under experimental conditions the minimal detected PC-signal is found for the plastic fiber 45 tm in diameter. Examples ofthe X-ray PC-images of fishes, images of air bubbles and ribs, slag inclusions in joint weld of Al-Li alloy materials, and images of sapphire microspheres for cellular metallic structures are presented.

  7. Ion mobility imaging and contrast mechanism of apparent conductivity in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Young Tae; Minhas, Atul; Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to produce high-resolution cross-sectional images of conductivity distribution inside the human body. Injected current into an imaging object induces a distribution of internal magnetic flux density, which is measured by using an MRI scanner. We can reconstruct a conductivity image based on its relation with the measured magnetic flux density. In this paper, we explain the contrast mechanism in MREIT by performing and analyzing a series of numerical simulations and imaging experiments. We built a stable conductivity phantom including a hollow insulating cylinder with holes. Filling both inside and outside the hollow cylinder with the same saline, we controlled ion mobilities to create a conductivity contrast without being affected by the ion diffusion process. From numerical simulations and imaging experiments, we found that slopes of induced magnetic flux densities change with hole diameters and therefore conductivity contrasts. Associating the hole diameter with apparent conductivity of the region inside the hollow cylinder with holes, we could experimentally validate the contrast mechanism in MREIT. Interpreting reconstructed apparent conductivity images of the phantom as ion mobility images, we discuss the meaning of the apparent conductivity seen by a certain probing method. In designing MREIT imaging experiments, the ion mobility imaging method using the proposed stable conductivity phantom will enable us to estimate a distinguishable conductivity contrast for a given set of imaging parameters. PMID:21411866

  8. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  9. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  10. Robust Automatic Focus Algorithm for Low Contrast Images Using a New Contrast Measure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Yinglin; Tang, Jinshan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Low contrast images, suffering from a lack of sharpness, are easily influenced by noise. As a result, many local false peaks may be generated in contrast measurements, making it difficult for the camera’s passive auto-focus system to perform its function of locating the focused peak. In this paper, a new passive auto-focus algorithm is proposed to address this problem. First, a noise reduction preprocessing is introduced to make our algorithm robust to both additive noise and multiplicative noise. Then, a new contrast measure is presented to bring in local false peaks, ensuring the presence of a well defined focused peak. In order to gauge the performance of our algorithm, a modified peak search algorithm is used in the experiments. The experimental results from an actual digital camera validate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:22164075

  11. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): Evolution and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W. C.; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H.; Menkens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov) to students, researchers and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as a CSV file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, preclinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at: micad@nlm.nih.gov PMID:21989943

  12. A coded-aperture technique allowing x-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Olivo, Alessandro; Speller, Robert

    2007-08-13

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) solves the basic limitation of x-ray imaging, i.e., poor image contrast resulting from small absorption differences. Up to now, it has been mostly limited to synchrotron radiation facilities, due to the stringent requirements on the x-ray source and detectors, and only one technique was shown to provide PCI images with conventional sources but with limits in practical implementation. The authors propose a different approach, based on coded apertures, which provides high PCI signals with conventional sources and detectors and imposes practically no applicability limits. They expect this method to cast the basis of a widespread diffusion of PCI.

  13. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  14. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500–1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths. PMID:24791129

  15. TECHNIQUE FOR ENHANCING DIGITAL COLOR IMAGES BY CONTRAST STRETCHING IN MUNSELL COLOR SPACE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruse, Fred A.; Raines, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    The Munsell color system can be used to further enhance the appearance of high-quality digital color-composite images. A color-balanced 'standard' color-composite image is first produced using any desired contrast stretching algorithm. The stretched digital data are then transformed into the cylindrical Munsell color space. An enhanced version of a color-composite image is produced by stretching the saturation parameter over the full digital range and inverting the modified Munsell coordinates to red-blue-green (tristimulus) data space. The resulting image has greater color-saturation contrast than the original image, without hue change. Contrast stretching in Munsell color space reduces the correlation between individual bands or ratios and is similar to decorrelation processing based on principal-components transforms. However, principal components are based on data variance, with less variance being explained by each higher order component.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of human lymph nodes with endogenous lipid and hemoglobin contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Allen, Thomas J.; Plumb, Andrew; Zhang, Edward Z.; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Punwani, Shonit; Beard, Paul C.

    2015-05-01

    Lymph nodes play a central role in metastatic cancer spread and are a key clinical assessment target. Abnormal node vascularization, morphology, and size may be indicative of disease but can be difficult to visualize with sufficient accuracy using existing clinical imaging modalities. To explore the potential utility of photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of lymph nodes, images of ex vivo samples were obtained at multiple wavelengths using a high-resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic scanner. These images showed that hemoglobin based contrast reveals nodal vasculature and lipid-based contrast reveals the exterior node size, shape, and boundary integrity. These two sources of complementary contrast may allow indirect observation of cancer, suggesting a future role for photoacoustic imaging as a tool for the clinical assessment of lymph nodes.

  17. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  18. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  19. Nonrigid registration and classification of the kidneys in 3D dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Ghafourian, Pegah; Sharma, Puneet; Salman, Khalil; Martin, Diego; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We have applied image analysis methods in the assessment of human kidney perfusion based on 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data. This approach consists of 3D non-rigid image registration of the kidneys and fuzzy C-mean classification of kidney tissues. The proposed registration method reduced motion artifacts in the dynamic images and improved the analysis of kidney compartments (cortex, medulla, and cavities). The dynamic intensity curves show the successive transition of the contrast agent through kidney compartments. The proposed method for motion correction and kidney compartment classification may be used to improve the validity and usefulness of further model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of kidney function.

  20. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  1. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  2. An innovative technique for contrast enhancement of computed tomography images using normalized gamma-corrected contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ameen, Zohair; Sulong, Ghazali; Rehman, Amjad; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah

    2015-12-01

    Image contrast is an essential visual feature that determines whether an image is of good quality. In computed tomography (CT), captured images tend to be low contrast, which is a prevalent artifact that reduces the image quality and hampers the process of extracting its useful information. A common tactic to process such artifact is by using histogram-based techniques. However, although these techniques may improve the contrast for different grayscale imaging applications, the results are mostly unacceptable for CT images due to the presentation of various faults, noise amplification, excess brightness, and imperfect contrast. Therefore, an ameliorated version of the contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) is introduced in this article to provide a good brightness with decent contrast for CT images. The novel modification to the aforesaid technique is done by adding an initial phase of a normalized gamma correction function that helps in adjusting the gamma of the processed image to avoid the common errors of the basic CLAHE of the excess brightness and imperfect contrast it produces. The newly developed technique is tested with synthetic and real-degraded low-contrast CT images, in which it highly contributed in producing better quality results. Moreover, a low intricacy technique for contrast enhancement is proposed, and its performance is also exhibited against various versions of histogram-based enhancement technique using three advanced image quality assessment metrics of Universal Image Quality Index (UIQI), Structural Similarity Index (SSIM), and Feature Similarity Index (FSIM). Finally, the proposed technique provided acceptable results with no visible artifacts and outperformed all the comparable techniques.

  3. Role of contrast enhanced ultrasound in hepatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhamija, Ekta; Paul, Shashi B

    2014-01-01

    Grey scale ultrasound (US) is the first line imaging modality used for the evaluation of liver by the radiologists and clinicians worldwide. It is a simple, inexpensive, safe and an easily available technique. US has the ability to delineate the hepatic parenchyma and differentiate the cystic from solid hepatic lesions. However, it has limited accuracy in the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions (FLL). CEUS is a major breakthrough in ultrasound imaging which evolved with the aim of overcoming these limitations of US. With the use of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), CEUS has the ability to detect the intranodular hemodynamics and thereby provide information of the enhancement pattern of the lesion resulting in reliable characterization of the FLL. This capability brings it at par with the cross sectional contrast enhanced imaging techniques of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. UCAs are safe, non-nephrotoxic and thus can be used to evaluate patients with renal failure as well. The technique of CEUS is simple, requires few minutes to perform, portable, lacks ionising radiation and above all is a cost-effective modality. These advantages have made CEUS an established modality for hepatic imaging. Besides detection and characterization of FLL, it also plays a vital role in the management and repeated follow up of treated patients of FLL. Newer clinical applications of CEUS with promising results are also being unravelled . This review highlights the multifaceted role of CEUS in hepatic imaging and its upcoming clinical applications. PMID:26012317

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and contrast enhancement. Scientific report

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.; Movius, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chapters II through VI of this report discuss: Relaxation of Nuclear Spins; Echo Techniques; Basic Imaging Pulse Sequences; Partial Saturation Recovery; Inversion Recovery; Spin Echo; Effects of Pulse Sequence on Image Contrast; Contrast Agents; Theoretical Aspects; Pharmacokinetics and Toxicity; and Physiological Rationale for Agent Selection. One of the major goals in all medical imaging techniques is to maximize one's ability to visualize and differentiate adjacent tissue regions in the body on the basis of differences in anatomy, physiology, or various pathological processes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers distinct advantages over conventional x-ray imaging because of the possibility of selecting specific pulse sequences that can differentiate adjacent structures on the basis of differences in proton density, T/sub 1/ or T/sub 2/ relaxation rates, or flow. As a result of applying these various pulse sequences, numerous images have been obtained of the brain and other organs that demonstrate considerably more-detailed anatomical structure than had previously been available with computerized tomography, ultrasound, or nuclear medicine techniques. In some situations it is clearly superior, such as in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  5. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  6. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  7. Tumor Characterization with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biodegradable Macromolecular Contrast Agents in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xueming; Feng, Yi; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Emerson, Lyska; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of polydisulfide-based biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents of different degradability and molecular weight for tumor characterization based on angiogenesis using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods Biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents, GDCC and GDCP, with molecular weight of 20 and 70 KDa were evaluated for tumor characterization. The DCE-MRI studies were performed in nude mice bearing MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 human prostate tumor xenografts. Tumor angiogenic kinetic parameters, endothelium transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and fractional tumor plasma volume (fPV), were calculated from the DCE-MRI data using a two-compartment model. Results There was no significant difference in the fPV values between two tumor models estimated with the same agent except for GDCC-70. The Ktrans values in both tumor models decreased with increasing molecular weight of the agents. GDCC-70 showed a higher Ktrans values than GDCP-70 due to high degradability of the former in both tumor models (p < 0.05). The Ktrans values of MDA PCa 2b tumors were significantly higher than those of PC-3 tumors estimated by Gd(DTPA-BMA), GDCC-20, GDCC-70, GDCP-70, and albumin-(Gd-DTPA) (p < 0.05). Conclusions The polydisulfide based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents are promising in tumor characterization with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. PMID:19597972

  8. Imaging contrast effects in alginate microbeads containing trapped emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester-Reilly, Holly J.; Shapley, Nina C.

    2007-09-01

    This study focuses on spherical microparticles made of cross-linked alginate gel and microcapsules composed of an oil-in-water emulsion where the continuous aqueous phase is cross-linked into an alginate gel matrix. We have investigated the use of these easily manufactured microbeads as contrast agents for the study of the flow properties of fluids using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrate that combined spin-spin ( T2) relaxation and diffusion contrast in proton NMR imaging can be used to distinguish among rigid polymer particles, plain alginate beads, and alginate emulsion beads. Multi-echo CPMG spin-echo imaging indicates that the average spin-lattice ( T1) and spin-spin ( T2) relaxation times of the plain alginate and alginate emulsion beads are comparable. Meanwhile, diffusion-weighted imaging produces sharp contrast between the two types of alginate beads, due to restricted diffusion inside the embedded oil droplets of the alginate emulsion beads. While the signal obtained from most materials is severely attenuated under applied diffusion gradients, the alginate emulsion beads maintain signal strength. The alginate emulsion beads were added to a suspension and imaged in an abrupt, annular expansion flow. The emulsion beads could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles, through either T2 relaxation or diffusion contrast. Such a capability allows future use of the alginate emulsion beads as tracer particles and as one particle type among many in a multimodal suspension where detailed concentration profiles or particle size separation must be quantified during flow.

  9. Imaging contrast effects in alginate microbeads containing trapped emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Hester-Reilly, Holly J; Shapley, Nina C

    2007-09-01

    This study focuses on spherical microparticles made of cross-linked alginate gel and microcapsules composed of an oil-in-water emulsion where the continuous aqueous phase is cross-linked into an alginate gel matrix. We have investigated the use of these easily manufactured microbeads as contrast agents for the study of the flow properties of fluids using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrate that combined spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and diffusion contrast in proton NMR imaging can be used to distinguish among rigid polymer particles, plain alginate beads, and alginate emulsion beads. Multi-echo CPMG spin-echo imaging indicates that the average spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation times of the plain alginate and alginate emulsion beads are comparable. Meanwhile, diffusion-weighted imaging produces sharp contrast between the two types of alginate beads, due to restricted diffusion inside the embedded oil droplets of the alginate emulsion beads. While the signal obtained from most materials is severely attenuated under applied diffusion gradients, the alginate emulsion beads maintain signal strength. The alginate emulsion beads were added to a suspension and imaged in an abrupt, annular expansion flow. The emulsion beads could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles, through either T(2) relaxation or diffusion contrast. Such a capability allows future use of the alginate emulsion beads as tracer particles and as one particle type among many in a multimodal suspension where detailed concentration profiles or particle size separation must be quantified during flow. PMID:17600742

  10. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  11. Laser speckle contrast imaging is sensitive to advective flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-07-01

    Unlike laser Doppler flowmetry, there has yet to be presented a clear description of the physical variables that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is sensitive to. Herein, we present a theoretical basis for demonstrating that LSCI is sensitive to total flux and, in particular, the summation of diffusive flux and advective flux. We view LSCI from the perspective of mass transport and briefly derive the diffusion with drift equation in terms of an LSCI experiment. This equation reveals the relative sensitivity of LSCI to both diffusive flux and advective flux and, thereby, to both concentration and the ordered velocity of the scattering particles. We demonstrate this dependence through a short series of flow experiments that yield relationships between the calculated speckle contrast and the concentration of the scatterers (manifesting as changes in scattering coefficient), between speckle contrast and the velocity of the scattering fluid, and ultimately between speckle contrast and advective flux. Finally, we argue that the diffusion with drift equation can be used to support both Lorentzian and Gaussian correlation models that relate observed contrast to the movement of the scattering particles and that a weighted linear combination of these two models is likely the most appropriate model for relating speckle contrast to particle motion.

  12. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  13. Towards the clinical application of X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Williams, I M; Siu, K K W; Gan, R; Runxuan, G; He, X; Hart, S A; Styles, C B; Lewis, R A

    2008-12-01

    Synchrotron-based propagation-based imaging, a type of phase contrast imaging, produces better soft tissue image contrast than conventional radiography. To determine whether the technique is directly transferable to the clinical environment for routine diagnostic or screening imaging, a micro-focus (100 microm spot-size) Molybdenum X-ray source with 0.03 mm molybdenum filtration was installed at a local hospital. Breast tissue samples, excised masses and mastectomies, were obtained directly from surgery and imaged at three geometries. The first geometry was optimised for visualizing phase contrast effects using a ray-line argument, the second was the same as that employed by Konica-Minolta in their commercial phase contrast system, and the third was the conventional contact arrangement. The three images taken of each tissue sample were comparatively scored in a pair-wise fashion. Scoring was performed by radiologist expert in mammography, general radiologists, associated clinicians and radiographers on high-resolution mammography rated monitors at two separate locations. Scoring indicated that the optimised and Konica geometries both outperformed the conventional mammographic geometry. An unexpected complication within the trial was the effect that the scoring platform and the associated display tools had on some of the scorer's responses. Additionally, the trial revealed that none of the conventional descriptors for image quality were adequate in the presence of phase contrast enhancements. PMID:18996661

  14. Intravenous Imaging Contrast Media Complications: The Basics That Every Clinician Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Rose, Trevor A; Choi, Jung W

    2015-09-01

    Intravenous contrast is commonly used in noninvasive imaging procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and can evaluate blood vessels and better characterize soft-tissue lesions. Although the incidence of adverse events after administration of contrast is low, it is important that clinicians and radiologists minimize risks and respond quickly and effectively when reactions occur. We will discuss a range of adverse events to iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast agents, including allergic-like reactions, nephrotoxicity, extravasation, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. We will review risk stratification for patients, as well as premedication and treatment of adverse events. PMID:25820169

  15. Optimizing magnetomotive contrast of SPIO-labeled platelets for thrombosis imaging in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Spivak, Dmitry; Wu, Gongting; Tsui, Frank; Fischer, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Rehydratable, lyophilized platelets loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) has the potential to provide magnetomotive imaging contrast to sites of vascular damage, including thrombosis complicating atherosclerosis and hemorrhage. Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) contrasts SPIO-platelets based on their nanoscale, magnetically-induced motion. We report improvements in MMOCT imaging contrast and sensitivity by optimizing the magnetic properties and SPIO loading of the platelets. SPIO-platelets have been shown to specifically adhere to sites of vascular damage in porcine arteries ex vivo. This may lead to new methods for detecting internal bleeding and monitoring the formation of blood clots using infused SPIO-platelets. PMID:22506092

  16. Optimizing magnetomotive contrast of SPIO-labeled platelets for thrombosis imaging in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Spivak, Dmitry; Wu, Gongting; Tsui, Frank; Fischer, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Rehydratable, lyophilized platelets loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) has the potential to provide magnetomotive imaging contrast to sites of vascular damage, including thrombosis complicating atherosclerosis and hemorrhage. Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) contrasts SPIO-platelets based on their nanoscale, magnetically-induced motion. We report improvements in MMOCT imaging contrast and sensitivity by optimizing the magnetic properties and SPIO loading of the platelets. SPIO-platelets have been shown to specifically adhere to sites of vascular damage in porcine arteries ex vivo. This may lead to new methods for detecting internal bleeding and monitoring the formation of blood clots using infused SPIO-platelets.

  17. Orbital lesions: proton spectroscopic phase-dependent contrast MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Atlas, S W; Grossman, R I; Axel, L; Hackney, D B; Bilaniuk, L T; Goldberg, H I; Zimmerman, R A

    1987-08-01

    Thirteen orbital lesions in 12 patients were evaluated with both conventional spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and phase-dependent proton spectroscopic imaging. This technique, which makes use of small differences in the resonant frequencies of water and fat protons, provides excellent high-resolution images with simultaneous chemical shift information. In this method, there is 180 degrees opposition of phase between fat protons and water protons at the time of the gradient echo, resulting in signal cancellation in voxels containing equal signals from fat and water. In this preliminary series, advantages of spectroscopic images in orbital lesions included better lesion delineation, with superior anatomic definition of orbital apex involvement; more specific characterization of high-intensity hemorrhage with a single pulse sequence; elimination of potential confusion from chemical shift misregistration artifact; further clarification of possible intravascular flow abnormalities; and improved apparent intralesional contrast. PMID:3602394

  18. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  19. Optical imaging via biological object internal structure contrasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Vorobiev, Nikolai S.; Tomilova, Larisa G.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1995-01-01

    For successful application of laser tomography methods for earlier medical diagnostics the signal-to-noise ratio (contrast) must be increased. For this purpose it is possible to use the absorbing dyes. We have theoretically investigated optical imaging conditions in high scattering medium on a model object. In our experiments a YAG:Nd laser generating picosecond pulses was employed. Output radiation has been recorded by a high speed streak camera with 1.5 ps temporal resolution. The high stability of the laser and of measurement scheme characteristics was provided. We looked for the contrasting substances having tropism with pathologically changed tissue of the tumor. For this purpose some dyphthalocyanines were synthesized. The experiments with laboratory animals have demonstrated that saturated dye concentrations were noticeably lower than toxicologic dangerous concentration values. We have demonstrated a possibility of the contrasting for a model object. The experimental temporal profile of scattered radiation can be explained by the nonstationary two-flow theory.

  20. Monochromatic verification of high-contrast imaging with an occulter.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Dan; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2013-12-30

    One of the most promising concepts of starlight suppression for direct imaging of exoplanets is flying a specially-shaped external occulter in formation with a space telescope. Here we present contrast performance verification of an occulter design scaled to laboratory-size using Fresnel numbers corresponding to the space design. Experimental design innovations include usage of an expanding beam to minimize phase aberrations, and an outer ring to minimize hard-edge diffraction effects. The apodizing performance of the optimized occulter edge is compared with a baseline case of a circular occulter and shown to result in contrast improvements. Experimental results in red monochromatic light show that the achieved laboratory contrast exceeds ten orders of magnitude, but with differences from the theoretical diffraction analysis limited by specular reflection from the mask edges. PMID:24514818

  1. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  2. Ionic versus nonionic MR imaging contrast media: operational definitions.

    PubMed

    Chang, C A; Sieving, P F; Watson, A D; Dewey, T M; Karpishin, T B; Raymond, K N

    1992-01-01

    An experimental rationale is provided to differentiate between the terms ionic and nonionic for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrast media such as gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine. Four independent types of physical measurements (electric conductivity, osmolality, electrophoresis, and ion exchange) were performed on a range of test compounds, including D-glucose, iohexol, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide. Iohexol, D-glucose, and gadodiamide are shown to be nonionic species at physiologic pH (7.4), not measurably dissociating in solution. A range of gadopentetate salts behave as electrolytes, dissociating into constituent charged ions in aqueous media. Operational definitions for the terms ionic and nonionic are provided, and the terms neutral and net zero charge are compared with nonionic for accuracy. The nomenclature nonionic and ionic is deemed appropriate for differentiating MR imaging contrast media. PMID:1623289

  3. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitz, Julia I.; Carnevale, Santino D.; De Graef, Marc; McComb, David W.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2016-08-01

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  4. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  5. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Rigon, Luigi; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Lopez, Frances C.M.; Dreossi, Diego; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail. PMID:23388958

  6. Laboratory Demonstrations of High-contrast Imaging for Space Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John; Giveon, Amir; Gordon, Brian; Kern, Brian; Krist, John; Kuhnert, Andreas; Moody, Dwight; Traub, Wes; Wilson, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) in the design and improvement of space coronagraphs. The objectives of the work are to: (1) Advance the technology readiness of space coronagraph hardware, techniques, algorithms, and predictive models; (2) Provide proof-of-concept demonstrations of coronagraph techniques; and (3) Support collaborations across the exoplanet community in pursuit of the optimal space coronagraph architecture.

  7. Molecular nanomagnets as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Elisenda; Roig, Anna; Molins, Elies; Arús, Carles; Cabañas, Miquel; Quintero, María Rosa; Cerdán, Sebastián; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2003-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive technique used in medicine to produce high quality images of human body slices. In order to enhance the contrast between different organs or to reveal altered portions of them such necrosis or tumors, the administration of a contrast agent is highly convenient. Currently Gd-DTPA, a paramagnetic complex, is the most widely administered compound. In this context, we have assayed molecular nanomagnets as MRI contrast agents. The complex [(tacn)_6Fe_8(μ_3-O)_2(μ_2-OH)_12]Br_8·9H_2O^1(Fe8 in brief) has been evaluated and shorter relaxation times, T1 and T_2, have been obtained for Fe8 than those obtained for the commercial Gd-DTPA. No toxic effects have been observed at concentrations up to 1 mM of Fe8 in cultured cells. Phantom studies with T_1-weighted MRI at 9.4 Tesla suggest that Fe8 can have potentiality as T_1-contrast agent. ^1Wieghardt K Angew Chem Intl Ed Engl 23 1 (1984) 77

  8. Laser speckle contrast imaging: theoretical and practical limitations.

    PubMed

    Briers, David; Duncan, Donald D; Hirst, Evan; Kirkpatrick, Sean J; Larsson, Marcus; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Stromberg, Tomas; Thompson, Oliver B

    2013-06-01

    When laser light illuminates a diffuse object, it produces a random interference effect known as a speckle pattern. If there is movement in the object, the speckles fluctuate in intensity. These fluctuations can provide information about the movement. A simple way of accessing this information is to image the speckle pattern with an exposure time longer than the shortest speckle fluctuation time scale-the fluctuations cause a blurring of the speckle, leading to a reduction in the local speckle contrast. Thus, velocity distributions are coded as speckle contrast variations. The same information can be obtained by using the Doppler effect, but producing a two-dimensional Doppler map requires either scanning of the laser beam or imaging with a high-speed camera: laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) avoids the need to scan and can be performed with a normal CCD- or CMOS-camera. LSCI is used primarily to map flow systems, especially blood flow. The development of LSCI is reviewed and its limitations and problems are investigated. PMID:23807512

  9. Simplified approach for quantitative digital holographic phase contrast imaging of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Vollmer, Angelika; Rommel, Christina E.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Bally, Gert Von

    2011-02-01

    Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require a separately generated coherent reference wave. This results in a low phase stability and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. To overcome these problems, the performance of a Michelson interferometer approach for digital holographic microscopy was analyzed that avoids a separately generated reference wave by superposition of different image areas. It is shown that this simplified arrangement yields improved phase stability. Furthermore, results from time-lapse investigations on living pancreas tumor cells demonstrate the capability of the method for reliable quantitative phase contrast imaging.

  10. On Detailed Contrast of Biomedical Object in X-ray Dark-Field Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami

    2007-01-19

    Over the past 10 years, refraction-based X-ray imaging has been studied together with a perspective view to clinical application. X-ray Dark-Field Imaging that utilizes a Laue geometry analyzer has recently been proposed and has the proven ability to depict articular cartilage in an intact human finger. In the current study, we researched detailed image contrast using X-ray Dark-Field Imaging by observing the edge contrast of an acrylic rod as a simple case, and found differences in image contrast between the right and left edges of the rod. This effect could cause undesirable contrast in the thin articular cartilage on the head of the phalanx. To avoid overlapping with this contrast at the articular cartilage, which would lead to a wrong diagnosis, we suggest that a joint surface on which articular cartilage is located should be aligned in the same sense as the scattering vector of the Laue case analyzer crystal. Defects of articular cartilage were successfully detected under this condition. When utilized under appropriate imaging conditions, X-ray Dark-Field Imaging will be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of arthropathy, as minute changes in articular cartilage may be early-stage features of this disease.

  11. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Zanette, I.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D.; Langner, O.; Coman, J.; Ruiz-Yaniz, M.

    2014-10-15

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  12. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, A; Chabior, M; Cozzini, C; Sperl, J I; Bequé, D; Langner, O; Coman, J; Zanette, I; Ruiz-Yaniz, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-10-01

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials. PMID:25362404

  13. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D.; Langner, O.; Coman, J.; Zanette, I.; Ruiz-Yaniz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-10-01

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  14. Local Force Interactions and Image Contrast Reversal on Graphite Observed with Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Goetzen, Jan; Altman, Eric; Schwarz, Udo

    Surface interactions of graphene-based nanostructures remain a topic of considerable interest in nanotechnology. Similarly, tip-dependent imaging contrasts have attracted attention as they allow conclusions to be made about the surface's chemical structure and local reactivity. In this talk, we present noncontact atomic force microscopy data recorded in the attractive regime on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite that reveals image contrast reversal for the first time. While larger tip-sample separations feature bright spots on atomic sites, the maximum of the tip-sample interaction flips to the hollow site positions upon further approach, which represents the contrast predominantly observed in previous studies during attractive-mode imaging. This cross over of the local chemical interaction is confirmed in force spectroscopy experiments. The results will be discussed in light of recent theoretical simulations that have predicted the occurrence of such contrast reversal for specific tip terminations.

  15. CW-THz image contrast enhancement using wavelet transform and Retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Min; Hu, Qi-fan; Huang, Ying-Xue; Liang, Hua-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To enhance continuous wave terahertz (CW-THz) scanning images contrast and denoising, a method based on wavelet transform and Retinex theory was proposed. In this paper, the factors affecting the quality of CW-THz images were analysed. Second, an approach of combination of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a designed nonlinear function in wavelet domain for the purpose of contrast enhancing was applied. Then, we combine the Retinex algorithm for further contrast enhancement. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in qualitative and quantitative, it was compared with the adaptive histogram equalization method, the homomorphic filtering method and the SSR(Single-Scale-Retinex) method. Experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm can effectively enhance the contrast of CW-THZ image and obtain better visual effect.

  16. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent Accumulation and Toxicity: An Update.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, J; Semelka, R C; Ramalho, M; Nunes, R H; AlObaidy, M; Castillo, M

    2016-07-01

    In current practice, gadolinium-based contrast agents have been considered safe when used at clinically recommended doses in patients without severe renal insufficiency. The causal relationship between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal insufficiency resulted in new policies regarding the administration of these agents. After an effective screening of patients with renal disease by performing either unenhanced or reduced-dose-enhanced studies in these patients and by using the most stable contrast agents, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been largely eliminated since 2009. Evidence of in vivo gadolinium deposition in bone tissue in patients with normal renal function is well-established, but recent literature showing that gadolinium might also deposit in the brain in patients with intact blood-brain barriers caught many individuals in the imaging community by surprise. The purpose of this review was to summarize the literature on gadolinium-based contrast agents, tying together information on agent stability and animal and human studies, and to emphasize that low-stability agents are the ones most often associated with brain deposition. PMID:26659341

  17. Dynamic imaging of the lungs using x-ray phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Kitchen, M. J.; Morgan, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Siu, K. K. W.; Pavlov, K.; Williams, I.; Uesugi, K.; Wallace, M. J.; Hall, C. J.; Whitley, J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2005-11-01

    High quality real-time imaging of lungs in vivo presents considerable challenges. We demonstrate here that phase contrast x-ray imaging is capable of dynamically imaging the lungs. It retains many of the advantages of simple x-ray imaging, whilst also being able to map weakly absorbing soft tissues based on refractive index differences. Preliminary results reported herein show that this novel imaging technique can identify and locate airway liquid and allows lung aeration in newborn rabbit pups to be dynamically visualized.

  18. Development and application of a multimodal contrast agent for SPECT/CT hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Jason M; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Zhuang, Zhen W; Papademetris, Xenophon; Simons, Michael; Sinusas, Albert J; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2011-09-21

    Hybrid or multimodality imaging is often applied in order to take advantage of the unique and complementary strengths of individual imaging modalities. This hybrid noninvasive imaging approach can provide critical information about anatomical structure in combination with physiological function or targeted molecular signals. While recent advances in software image fusion techniques and hybrid imaging systems have enabled efficient multimodal imaging, accessing the full potential of this technique requires development of a new toolbox of multimodal contrast agents that enhance the imaging process. Toward that goal, we report the development of a hybrid probe for both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging that facilitates high-sensitivity SPECT and high spatial resolution CT imaging. In this work, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a novel intravascular, multimodal dendrimer-based contrast agent for use in preclinical SPECT/CT hybrid imaging systems. This multimodal agent offers a long intravascular residence time (t(1/2) = 43 min) and sufficient contrast-to-noise for effective serial intravascular and blood pool imaging with both SPECT and CT. The colocalization of the dendritic nuclear and X-ray contrasts offers the potential to facilitate image analysis and quantification by enabling correction for SPECT attenuation and partial volume errors at specified times with the higher resolution anatomic information provided by the circulating CT contrast. This may allow absolute quantification of intramyocardial blood volume and blood flow and may enable the ability to visualize active molecular targeting following clearance from the blood. PMID:21851119

  19. Flux or speed? Examining speckle contrast imaging of vascular flows.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, S M Shams; Faraji, Ehssan; Davis, Mitchell A; Huang, Yu-Yen; Zhang, Xiaojing J; Dunn, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    Speckle contrast imaging enables rapid mapping of relative blood flow distributions using camera detection of back-scattered laser light. However, speckle derived flow measures deviate from direct measurements of erythrocyte speeds by 47 ± 15% (n = 13 mice) in vessels of various calibers. Alternatively, deviations with estimates of volumetric flux are on average 91 ± 43%. We highlight and attempt to alleviate this discrepancy by accounting for the effects of multiple dynamic scattering with speckle imaging of microfluidic channels of varying sizes and then with red blood cell (RBC) tracking correlated speckle imaging of vascular flows in the cerebral cortex. By revisiting the governing dynamic light scattering models, we test the ability to predict the degree of multiple dynamic scattering across vessels in order to correct for the observed discrepancies between relative RBC speeds and multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of inverse correlation times. The analysis reveals that traditional speckle contrast imagery of vascular flows is neither a measure of volumetric flux nor particle speed, but rather the product of speed and vessel diameter. The corrected speckle estimates of the relative RBC speeds have an average 10 ± 3% deviation in vivo with those obtained from RBC tracking. PMID:26203384

  20. Flux or speed? Examining speckle contrast imaging of vascular flows

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Faraji, Ehssan; Davis, Mitchell A.; Huang, Yu-Yen; Zhang, Xiaojing J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle contrast imaging enables rapid mapping of relative blood flow distributions using camera detection of back-scattered laser light. However, speckle derived flow measures deviate from direct measurements of erythrocyte speeds by 47 ± 15% (n = 13 mice) in vessels of various calibers. Alternatively, deviations with estimates of volumetric flux are on average 91 ± 43%. We highlight and attempt to alleviate this discrepancy by accounting for the effects of multiple dynamic scattering with speckle imaging of microfluidic channels of varying sizes and then with red blood cell (RBC) tracking correlated speckle imaging of vascular flows in the cerebral cortex. By revisiting the governing dynamic light scattering models, we test the ability to predict the degree of multiple dynamic scattering across vessels in order to correct for the observed discrepancies between relative RBC speeds and multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of inverse correlation times. The analysis reveals that traditional speckle contrast imagery of vascular flows is neither a measure of volumetric flux nor particle speed, but rather the product of speed and vessel diameter. The corrected speckle estimates of the relative RBC speeds have an average 10 ± 3% deviation in vivo with those obtained from RBC tracking. PMID:26203384

  1. Multiscale entropy study of medical laser speckle contrast images.

    PubMed

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mahé, Guillaume; Durand, Sylvain; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a noninvasive full-field optical imaging technique that gives a 2-D microcirculatory blood flow map of tissue. Due to novelty of commercial laser speckle contrast imagers, image processing of LSCI data is new. By opposition, the numerous signal processing works of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) data-that give a 1-D view of microvascular blood flow-have led to interesting physiological information. Recently, analysis of multiscale entropy (MSE) of LDF signals has been proposed. A nonmonotonic evolution of MSE with two distinctive scales-probably dominated by the cardiac activity-has been reported. We herein analyze MSE of LSCI data. We compare LSCI results with the ones of LDF signals obtained during the same experiment. We show that when time evolution of LSCI single pixels is studied, MSE presents a monotonic decreasing pattern, similar to the one of Gaussian white noises. By opposition, when the mean of LSCI pixel values is computed in a region of interest (ROI) and followed with time, MSE pattern becomes close to the one of LDF data, for ROI large enough. LSCI is gaining increased interest for blood flow monitoring. The physiological implications of our results require future study. PMID:22868525

  2. Contrast imaging ultrasound detects abnormalities in the marmoset ovary.

    PubMed

    Hastings, J M; Morris, K D; Allan, D; Wilson, H; Millar, R P; Fraser, H M; Moran, C M

    2012-12-01

    The development of a functional vascular tree within the primate ovary is critical for reproductive health. To determine the efficacy of contrast agents to image the microvascular environment within the primate ovary, contrast ultrasonography was performed in six reproductive-aged female common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) during the late luteal phase of the cycle, following injection of Sonovue™. Regions of interest (ROIs), representing the corpus luteum (CL) and noncorpus luteum ovarian tissue (NCLOT), were selected during gray-scale B-mode ultrasound imaging. The magnitude of backscatter intensity of CL and NCLOT ROIs were calculated in XnView, post hoc: subsequent gamma-variate modeling was implemented in Matlab to determine perfusion parameters. Histological analysis of these ovaries revealed a total of 11 CL, nine of which were identified during contrast ultrasonography. The median enhancement ratio was significantly increased in the CL (5.54AU; 95% CI -2.21-68.71) compared to the NCLOT (2.82AU; 95% CI 2.73-15.06; P < 0.05). There was no difference in time parameters between the CL and NCLOT. An additional avascular ROI was identified in the ovary of Animal 5, both histologically and by ultrasonography. This cystic ROI displayed a markedly lower enhancement ratio (0.79AU) and higher time parameters than mean CL and NCLOT, including time to peak and time to wash out. These data demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of commercially available contrast agents, to differentiate structures within the nonhuman primate ovary. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography has a promising future in reproductive medicine. PMID:22890799

  3. Immobilized Contrast Enhanced (ICE) MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR Contrast Enhancement of the Vein Graft Vessel Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T.; Campagna, Christina M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Ozaki, C. Keith; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance post-surgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent “labeling” of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified Gd-DTPA complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period. PMID:20859994

  4. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot–Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot–Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot–Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot–Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot–Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis

  5. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  6. Compressed X-ray phase-contrast imaging using a coded source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Xu, Ling; Nagarkar, Vivek; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-12-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great promise for medical X-ray imaging with high soft-tissue contrast. Obviating optical elements in the imaging chain, propagation-based XPCI (PB-XPCI) has definite advantages over other XPCI techniques in terms of cost, alignment and scalability. However, it imposes strict requirements on the spatial coherence of the source and the resolution of the detector. In this study, we demonstrate that using a coded X-ray source and sparsity-based reconstruction, we can significantly relax these requirements. Using numerical simulation, we assess the feasibility of our approach and study the effect of system parameters on the reconstructed image. The results are demonstrated with images obtained using a bench-top micro-focus XPCI system.

  7. Coded apertures allow high-energy x-ray phase contrast imaging with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Chana, D.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-07-01

    This work analyzes the performance of the coded-aperture based x-ray phase contrast imaging approach, showing that it can be used at high x-ray energies with acceptable exposure times. Due to limitations in the used source, we show images acquired at tube voltages of up to 100 kVp, however, no intrinsic reason indicates that the method could not be extended to even higher energies. In particular, we show quantitative agreement between the contrast extracted from the experimental x-ray images and the theoretical one, determined by the behavior of the material's refractive index as a function of energy. This proves that all energies in the used spectrum contribute to the image formation, and also that there are no additional factors affecting image contrast as the x-ray energy is increased. We also discuss the method flexibility by displaying and analyzing the first set of images obtained while varying the relative displacement between coded-aperture sets, which leads to image variations to some extent similar to those observed when changing the crystal angle in analyzer-based imaging. Finally, we discuss the method's possible advantages in terms of simplification of the set-up, scalability, reduced exposure times, and complete achromaticity. We believe this would helpful in applications requiring the imaging of highly absorbing samples, e.g., material science and security inspection, and, in the way of example, we demonstrate a possible application in the latter.

  8. Development of a phase contrast imaging system based on a yttrium aluminum garnet laser with folded beam for observations of density fluctuations in compact helical system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, K.; Uchida, N.; Kawakubo, M.; Iguchi, H.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Akiyama, T.

    2008-10-15

    A near-infrared laser phase contrast optical system incorporating a folded beam was developed in order to measure the distribution of density fluctuations in a high-temperature plasma. The coherent light source used was an yttrium aluminum garnet laser stabilized by a ring oscillator. The probe beam system separates and reflects the incident and exiting beams with a polarizer and a fully reflective mirror with a waveplate. This system was employed with a compact helical system to detect fluctuations at the plasma edge.

  9. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast—advances towards clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Herzen, J; Willner, M; Grandl, S; Scherer, K; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Pfeiffer, F; Hellerhoff, K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer constitutes about one-quarter of all cancers and is the leading cause of cancer death in women. To reduce breast cancer mortality, mammographic screening programmes have been implemented in many Western countries. However, these programmes remain controversial because of the associated radiation exposure and the need for improvement in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Phase-contrast imaging is a new X-ray-based technology that has been shown to provide enhanced soft-tissue contrast and improved visualization of cancerous structures. Furthermore, there is some indication that these improvements of image quality can be maintained at reduced radiation doses. Thus, X-ray phase-contrast mammography may significantly contribute to advancements in early breast cancer diagnosis. Feasibility studies of X-ray phase-contrast breast CT have provided images that allow resolution of the fine structure of tissue that can otherwise only be obtained by histology. This implies that X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also lead to the development of entirely new (micro-) radiological applications. This review provides a brief overview of the physical characteristics of this new technology and describes recent developments towards clinical implementation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast. PMID:24452106

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Patients: Review and Recommendations for Current Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ravi; Hahn, Gabriele; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Kim, Myung-Joon; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Olsen, Øystein E.; Stokland, Eira; Triulzi, Fabio; Vazquez, Elida

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), frequently with contrast enhancement, is the preferred imaging modality for many indications in children. Practice varies widely between centers, reflecting the rapid pace of change and the need for further research. Guide-line changes, for example on contrast-medium choice, require continued practice reappraisal. This article reviews recent developments in pediatric contrast-enhanced MRI and offers recommendations on current best practice. Nine leading pediatric radiologists from internationally recognized radiology centers convened at a consensus meeting in Bordeaux, France, to discuss applications of contrast-enhanced MRI across a range of indications in children. Review of the literature indicated that few published data provide guidance on best practice in pediatric MRI. Discussion among the experts concluded that MRI is preferred over ionizing-radiation modalities for many indications, with advantages in safety and efficacy. Awareness of age-specific adaptations in MRI technique can optimize image quality. Gadolinium-based contrast media are recommended for enhancing imaging quality. The choice of most appropriate contrast medium should be based on criteria of safety, tolerability, and efficacy, characterized in age-specific clinical trials and personal experience. PMID:25114547

  11. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  12. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: Basic principles, present situation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS. PMID:25400439

  13. X-ray Phase Contrast Allows Three Dimensional, Quantitative Imaging of Hydrogel Implants.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Jiang, Bin; Zhong, Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2016-03-01

    Three dimensional imaging techniques are needed for the evaluation and assessment of biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogels are a particularly popular class of materials for medical applications but are difficult to image in tissue using most available imaging modalities. Imaging techniques based on X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) have shown promise for tissue engineering applications due to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of XPC for imaging a model hydrogel and soft tissue structure. Porous fibrin loaded poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels were synthesized and implanted in a rodent subcutaneous model. Samples were explanted and imaged with an analyzer-based XPC technique and processed and stained for histology for comparison. Both hydrogel and soft tissues structures could be identified in XPC images. Structure in skeletal muscle adjacent could be visualized and invading fibrovascular tissue could be quantified. There were no differences between invading tissue measurements from XPC and the gold-standard histology. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for 3D imaging of hydrogel structure and local tissue response. PMID:26487123

  14. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. PMID:25580914

  15. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-15

    A ''synthetic diagnostic'' has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  16. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  17. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-01

    A "synthetic diagnostic" has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  18. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  19. Impact of image acquisition timing on image quality for dual energy contrast-enhanced breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Mainprize, James G.; Puong, Sylvie; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Iordache, Razvan; Muller, Serge; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (DE CE-DBT) image quality is affected by a large parameter space including the tomosynthesis acquisition geometry, imaging technique factors, the choice of reconstruction algorithm, and the subject breast characteristics. The influence of most of these factors on reconstructed image quality is well understood for DBT. However, due to the contrast agent uptake kinetics in CE imaging, the subject breast characteristics change over time, presenting a challenge for optimization . In this work we experimentally evaluate the sensitivity of the reconstructed image quality to timing of the low-energy and high-energy images and changes in iodine concentration during image acquisition. For four contrast uptake patterns, a variety of acquisition protocols were tested with different timing and geometry. The influence of the choice of reconstruction algorithm (SART or FBP) was also assessed. Image quality was evaluated in terms of the lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (LSDNR) in the central slice of DE CE-DBT reconstructions. Results suggest that for maximum image quality, the low- and high-energy image acquisitions should be made within one x-ray tube sweep, as separate low- and high-energy tube sweeps can degrade LSDNR. In terms of LSDNR per square-root dose, the image quality is nearly equal between SART reconstructions with 9 and 15 angular views, but using fewer angular views can result in a significant improvement in the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructions due to the shorter imaging time interval.

  20. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    SciTech Connect

    Golosio, Bruno; Carpinelli, Massimo; Masala, Giovanni Luca; Oliva, Piernicola; Stumbo, Simone; Delogu, Pasquale; Zanette, Irene; Stefanini, Arnaldo

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  1. Fluorine-19 MRI Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking and Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew S.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 (19F)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging stand to revolutionize imaging-based research and clinical trials in several fields of medical intervention. First, their use in characterizing in vivo cell behavior may help bring cellular therapy closer to clinical acceptance. Second, their use in lung imaging provides novel noninvasive interrogation of the ventilated airspaces without the need for complicated, hard-to-distribute hardware. This article reviews the current state of 19F-based cell tracking and lung imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and describes the link between the methods across these fields and how they may mutually benefit from solutions to mutual problems encountered when imaging 19F-containing compounds, as well as hardware and software advancements. PMID:27042089

  2. Local scattering property scales flow speed estimation in laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Peng; Chao, Zhen; Feng, Shihan; Yu, Hang; Ji, Yuanyuan; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2015-07-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has been widely used in in vivo blood flow imaging. However, the effect of local scattering property (scattering coefficient µ s ) on blood flow speed estimation has not been well investigated. In this study, such an effect was quantified and involved in relation between speckle autocorrelation time τ c and flow speed v based on simulation flow experiments. For in vivo blood flow imaging, an improved estimation strategy was developed to eliminate the estimation bias due to the inhomogeneous distribution of the scattering property. Compared to traditional LSCI, a new estimation method significantly suppressed the imaging noise and improves the imaging contrast of vasculatures. Furthermore, the new method successfully captured the blood flow changes and vascular constriction patterns in rats’ cerebral cortex from normothermia to mild and moderate hypothermia.

  3. Evaluation of imaging characteristics in CTDI phantom size on contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Seong-Su; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there have been several physics and clinical studies on the use of lower tube potentials in CT imaging, with the purpose of improving image quality or further reducing radiation dose. We investigated an experimental study using a series of different sized, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms, demonstrating the potential strategy for dose reduction and to distinguish component of plaque by imaging their energy responses using CT. We investigated the relationship between different sizes of cylinderic PMMA-equivalent phantoms with diameter of 12, 16, 20, 24, and 32 cm and used contrast at various tube voltages (80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp) using a 16-detector row CT scanner. The contrast represented CT numbers as different materials for the water, calcium chloride, and iodine. Phantom insertions also allow quantitative measures of image noise, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and figure of merit (FOM). When evaluating FOM, it was found that the lower kVp provided the better CNR. An experimental study was performed to demonstrate reduced dose for both dose efficient and practical feasibility for different patient sizes and diagnostic tasks by relating achievable CNR and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The use of spectra optimized to the specific application could provide further improvements of distinguishing iodine, calcium and plaque component for patient size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variations in image noise and contrast using different tube potentials in a CTDI phantom on contrast imaging.

  4. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images Based on Level Set Segmentation and ReliefF Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongmei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study established a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the classification of malignant and benign masses via breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI). A breast segmentation method consisting of a preprocessing step to identify the air-breast interfacing boundary and curve fitting for chest wall line (CWL) segmentation was included in the proposed CAD system. The Chan-Vese (CV) model level set (LS) segmentation method was adopted to segment breast mass and demonstrated sufficiently good segmentation performance. The support vector machine (SVM) classifier with ReliefF feature selection was used to merge the extracted morphological and texture features into a classification score. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity measurements for the leave-half-case-out resampling method were 92.3%, 98.2%, and 76.2%, respectively. For the leave-one-case-out resampling method, the measurements were 90.0%, 98.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. PMID:25628755

  5. Effect of irradiation distance on image contrast in epi-optoacoustic imaging of human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Akarçay, H. Günhan; Peeters, Sara; Frenz, Martin; Jaeger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In combined clinical optoacoustic (OA) and ultrasound (US) imaging, epi-mode irradiation and detection integrated into one single probe offers flexible imaging of the human body. The imaging depth in epi-illumination is, however, strongly affected by clutter. As shown in previous phantom experiments, the location of irradiation plays an important role in clutter generation. We investigated the influence of the irradiation geometry on the local image contrast of clinical images, by varying the separation distance between the irradiated area and the acoustic imaging plane of a linear ultrasound transducer in an automated scanning setup. The results for different volunteers show that the image contrast can be enhanced on average by 25% and locally by more than a factor of two, when the irradiated area is slightly separated from the probe. Our findings have an important impact on the design of future optoacoustic probes for clinical application. PMID:25426309

  6. Sensitivity of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Bravin, A.; Robinson, I. K.; Olivo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a theoretical model that can predict the signal-to-noise ratio for edge-like features in phase-contrast images. This model was then applied for the estimation of the sensitivity of three different X-ray phase-contrast techniques: propagation-based imaging, analyser-based imaging and grating interferometry. We show here how the same formalism can be used also in the case of the edge illumination (EI) technique, providing results that are consistent with those of a recently developed method for the estimation of noise in the retrieved refraction image. The new model is then applied to calculate, in the case of a given synchrotron radiation set-up, the optimum positions of the pre-sample aperture and detector edge to maximize the sensitivity. Finally, an example of the extremely high angular resolution achievable with the EI technique is presented. PMID:24470420

  7. Encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes for contrast ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shirshendu; Nahire, Rahul; Mallik, Sanku; Sarkar, Kausik

    2014-03-01

    Micron- to nanometer-sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes, are being developed for diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art of the mathematical models of the acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast microbubbles. We also present a review of the in vitro experimental characterization of the acoustic properties of microbubble based contrast agents undertaken in our laboratory. The hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling contrast agents we developed is demonstrated for a lipid coated (Sonazoid and a polymer shelled (poly D-L-lactic acid) contrast microbubbles. The acoustic and drug release properties of the newly developed echogenic liposomes are discussed for their use as simultaneous imaging and drug/gene delivery agents. Although echogenicity is conclusively demonstrated in experiments, its physical mechanisms remain uncertain. Addressing questions raised here will accelerate further development and eventual clinical approval of these novel technologies.

  8. Encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes for contrast ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shirshendu; Nahire, Rahul; Mallik, Sanku; Sarkar, Kausik

    2014-01-01

    Micron- to nanometer-sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes, are being developed for diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art of the mathematical models of the acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast microbubbles. We also present a review of the in vitro experimental characterization of the acoustic properties of microbubble based contrast agents undertaken in our laboratory. The hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling contrast agents we developed is demonstrated for a lipid coated (Sonazoid™) and a polymer shelled (poly D-L-lactic acid) contrast microbubbles. The acoustic and drug release properties of the newly developed echogenic liposomes are discussed for their use as simultaneous imaging and drug/gene delivery agents. Although echogenicity is conclusively demonstrated in experiments, its physical mechanisms remain uncertain. Addressing questions raised here will accelerate further development and eventual clinical approval of these novel technologies. PMID:26097272

  9. Modeled and measured image-plane polychromatic speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2016-02-01

    The statistical properties of speckle relevant to short- to medium-range (tactical) active tracking involving polychromatic illumination are investigated. A numerical model is developed to allow rapid simulation of speckled images including the speckle contrast reduction effects of illuminator bandwidth, surface slope, and roughness, and the polarization properties of both the source and the reflection. Regarding surface slope (relative orientation of the surface normal and illumination/observation directions), Huntley's theory for speckle contrast, which employs geometrical approximations to decrease computation time, is modified to increase accuracy by incorporation of a geometrical correction factor and better treatment of roughness and polarization. The resulting model shows excellent agreement with more exact theory over a wide range. An experiment is conducted to validate both the numerical model developed here and existing theory. A diode laser source with coherence length of 259±7 μm is reflected off of a silver-coated diffuse surface. Speckle data are gathered for 16 surface slope angles corresponding to speckle contrast between about 0.55 and 1. Taking the measured data as truth, both equations show error mean and standard deviation of less than 3%. Thus, the theory is validated over the range of this experiment.

  10. Fast grating-based X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    As an imaging technique with low radiation dose and improved contrast, digital x-ray tomosynthesis is widely used in clinical diagnoses. Based on the superior capability of x-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) techniques for imaging low density materials, the combination of X-ray tomosynthesis and PCI can potentially provide higher efficiency in the detection of soft tissues. The goal of this work was to develop a fast imaging method for phase-contrast tomosynthesis, called fast grating-based phase-contrast tomosynthesis (GPC-Tomo), which integrates tomosynthesis with a grating-based PCI technique. Following the interlaced phase-stepping (PS) data collection method, which is much faster than conventional PS method, we propose a novel image reconstruction method called inner-focusing (IF) reconstruction for the fast GPC-Tomo. The proposed IF reconstruction method was validated by real experiments and the results suggested its effectiveness in achieving a fast GPC-Tomo. PMID:24110189

  11. In-vivo dark-field and phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, M.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Pauwels, B.; Hostens, J.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-11-01

    Novel radiography approaches based on the wave nature of x-rays when propagating through matter have a great potential for improved future x-ray diagnostics in the clinics. Here, we present a significant milestone in this imaging method: in-vivo multi-contrast x-ray imaging of a mouse using a compact scanner. Of particular interest is the enhanced contrast in regions related to the respiratory system, indicating a possible application in diagnosis of lung diseases (e.g. emphysema).

  12. In-vivo dark-field and phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bech, M.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Pauwels, B.; Hostens, J.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-01-01

    Novel radiography approaches based on the wave nature of x-rays when propagating through matter have a great potential for improved future x-ray diagnostics in the clinics. Here, we present a significant milestone in this imaging method: in-vivo multi-contrast x-ray imaging of a mouse using a compact scanner. Of particular interest is the enhanced contrast in regions related to the respiratory system, indicating a possible application in diagnosis of lung diseases (e.g. emphysema). PMID:24220606

  13. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, A. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Paganin, D.; Wilkins, S. W.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Rau, C.; Snigireva, I.; Youn, H. S.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Garrett, R. F.; Cookson, D. J.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.

    2003-01-01

    Since Röntgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown.

  14. Phase contrast laminography based on Talbot interferometry.

    PubMed

    Altapova, Venera; Helfen, Lukas; Myagotin, Anton; Hänschke, Daniel; Moosmann, Julian; Gunneweg, Jan; Baumbach, Tilo

    2012-03-12

    Synchrotron laminography is combined with Talbot grating interferometry to address weakly absorbing specimens. Integrating both methods into one set-up provides a powerful x-ray diagnostical technique for multiple contrast screening of macroscopically large flat specimen and a subsequent non-destructive three-dimensional (3-D) inspection of regions of interest. The technique simultaneously yields the reconstruction of the 3-D absorption, phase, and the so-called dark-field contrast maps. We report on the theoretical and instrumental implementation of of this novel technique. Its broad application potential is exemplarily demonstrated for the field of cultural heritage, namely study of the historical Dead Sea parchment. PMID:22418532

  15. X-Ray Grating Interferometry for Phase-Contrast Imaging and Optics Metrology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Thüring, Thomas; Donath, Tilman; Stampanoni, Marco

    2010-04-01

    We report on a hard x-ray interferometry technique based on diffraction gratings fabricated using microlithography techniques. Compared to other x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods, the grating interferometer only has very moderate requirements in terms of coherence. This makes it possible to use the method with standard x-ray tubes, which opens up a huge range of applications e.g. in medical imaging.

  16. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  17. Infrared moving point target detection based on spatial-temporal local contrast filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lizhen; Zhu, Hu; Tao, Chao; Wei, Yantao

    2016-05-01

    Infrared moving point target detection is a challenging task. In this paper, we define a novel spatial local contrast (SLC) and a novel temporal local contrast (TLC) to enhance the target's contrast. Based on the defined spatial local contrast and temporal local contrast, we propose a simple but powerful spatial-temporal local contrast filter (STLCF) to detect moving point target from infrared image sequences. In order to verify the performance of spatial-temporal local contrast filter on detecting moving point target, different detection methods are used to detect the target from several infrared image sequences for comparison. The experimental results show that the proposed spatial-temporal local contrast filter has great superiority in moving point target detection.

  18. pH-induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, R. D.; Insana, M. F.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This paper focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time-domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced; however, the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability.

  19. The CHARIS IFS for high contrast imaging at Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Limbach, Mary Anne; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norman; Mede, Kyle; McElwain, Michael W.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS will take spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and AO188 adaptive optics systems.1, 2 The system is designed to detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. For characterization, CHARIS has a high-resolution prism providing an average spectral resolution of R82, R69, and R82 in J, H, and K bands respectively. The so-called discovery mode uses a second low-resolution prism with an average spectral resolution of R19 spanning 1.15-2.37 microns (J+H+K bands). This is unique compared to other high contrast IFS designs. It augments low inner working angle performance by reducing the separation at which we can rely on spectral differential imaging. The principal challenge for a high-contrast IFS is quasi-static speckles, which cause undue levels of spectral crosstalk. CHARIS has addressed this through several key design aspects that should constrain crosstalk between adjacent spectral features to be below 1%. Sitting on the Nasmyth platform, the alignment between the lenslet array, prism, and detector will be highly stable, key for the performance of the data pipeline. Nearly every component has arrived and the project is entering its final build phase. Here we review the science case, the resulting design, status of final construction, and lessons learned that are directly applicable to future exoplanet instruments.

  20. Color enhancement of highly correlated images. I - Decorrelation and HSI contrast stretches. [hue saturation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Kahle, Anne B.; Walker, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional enhancements for the color display of multispectral images are based on independent contrast modifications or 'stretches' of three input images. This approach is not effective if the image channels are highly correlated or if the image histograms are strongly bimodal or more complex. Any of several procedures that tend to 'stretch' color saturation while leaving hue unchanged may better utilize the full range of colors for the display of image information. Two conceptually different enhancements are discussed: the 'decorrelation stretch', based on principal-component (PC) analysis, and the 'stretch' of 'hue' - 'saturation' - intensity (HSI) transformed data. The PC transformation in scene-dependent, but the HSI transformation is invariant. Examples of images enhanced by conventional linear stretches, decorrelation stretch, and by stretches of HSI transformed data are compared. Schematic variation diagrams or two- and three-dimensional histograms are used to illustrate the 'decorrelation stretch' method and the effect of the different enhancements.

  1. A review of contrast pattern based data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shiwei; Ju, Meilong; Yu, Junfeng; Cai, Binlei; Wang, Aiping

    2015-07-01

    Contrast pattern based data mining is concerned with the mining of patterns and models that contrast two or more datasets. Contrast patterns can describe similarities or differences between the datasets. They represent strong contrast knowledge and have been shown to be very successful for constructing accurate and robust clusters and classifiers. The increasing use of contrast pattern data mining has initiated a great deal of research and development attempts in the field of data mining. A comprehensive revision on the existing contrast pattern based data mining research is given in this paper. They are generally categorized into background and representation, definitions and mining algorithms, contrast pattern based classification, clustering, and other applications, the research trends in future. The primary of this paper is to server as a glossary for interested researchers to have an overall picture on the current contrast based data mining development and identify their potential research direction to future investigation.

  2. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  3. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p'', of the same frequency f0 and the same amplitude P0 to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  4. Experimental and theoretical x-ray imaging performance comparison of iodine and lanthanide contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, H N; Holdsworth, D W; Drangova, M; Hobbs, B B; Fenster, A

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on the lanthanide elements gadolinium and holmium have recently been developed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the increased atomic number of these elements relative to iodine, these new compounds, used as x-ray contrast agents, may yield higher radiographic contrast, and hence improved x-ray image quality, relative to conventional iodinated compounds, for clinically useful x-ray spectra. This possibility has been investigated, in independent experimental and theoretical studies, for two x-ray imaging systems: a digital radiographic system, using an x-ray image intensifier (XRII) and charge-coupled device (CCD) detector; and a conventional screen/film system, using a Lanex Regular screen. Iodine, gadolinium, and holmium contrast agents were investigated over a wide range of concentration-thickness products (0.1-0.6 M cm) and diagnostic x-ray spectra (60-120 kVp). A simple theoretical model of x-ray detector response predicts the experimental radiographic contrast measurements with a mean absolute error of 8.0% for the XRII/CCD system and 5.9% for the screen/film system, and shows that the radiographic contrast for these two systems is representative of all XRII and screen/film systems. An index of image quality is defined, and its dependence on radiographic contrast, x-ray fluence per unit dose, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is shown. Theoretical values of the index, predicted by our model, are then used to compare the performance of the three contrast agents for the two systems investigated. In general, iodine performance decreases steadily with increasing kVp, gadolinium performance has a broad maximum near 85 kVp, and gadolinium outperforms holmium. Gadolinium outperforms iodine for spectra above (and vice versa below) about 72 kVp, depending slightly on spectrum filtration, object thickness, and detector type. Thus, raising the kVp to shorten exposure times or reduce x-ray tube heat loading results in a loss of

  5. Development of microperiodic mirrors for hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Moldovan, Nicolae

    2010-09-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging with hard x rays can have important applications in medicine, material sciences, and energy research. Phase-contrast methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, are particularly attractive because they allow the use of conventional x-ray tubes. To enable shearing interferometry with x rays up to 100 keV, we propose using grazing-incidence microperiodic mirrors. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors, based on the difference in grazing-incidence reflectivity between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Using this method, we produced prototype mirrors with 5-100 {mu}m periods and 90 mm active length. Experimental tests with x rays up to 60 keV indicate good microperiodic mirror reflectivity and high-contrast fringe patterns, encouraging further development of the proposed imaging concept.

  6. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Dammer, Jiri; Hanus, Robert; Holy, Tomas; Pospisil, Stanislav; Tykva, Richard; Uher, Josef; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2007-02-01

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences.

  7. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2016-05-19

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications. PMID:27159645

  8. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  9. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mikhail G; Westmeyer, Gil G; Romero, Philip A; Szablowski, Jerzy O; Küster, Benedict; Shah, Ameer; Otey, Christopher R; Langer, Robert; Arnold, Frances H; Jasanoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents sensitive to the neurotransmitter dopamine. The sensors were derived from the heme domain of the bacterial cytochrome P450-BM3 (BM3h). Ligand binding to a site near BM3h’s paramagnetic heme iron led to a drop in MRI signal enhancement and a shift in optical absorbance. Using an absorbance-based screen, we evolved the specificity of BM3h away from its natural ligand and toward dopamine, producing sensors with dissociation constants for dopamine of 3.3–8.9 μM. These molecules were used to image depolarization-triggered neurotransmitter release from PC12 cells and in the brains of live animals. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of molecular-level functional MRI using neural activity–dependent sensors, and our protein engineering approach can be generalized to create probes for other targets. PMID:20190737

  10. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  11. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T C; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  12. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  13. Construction and status of the CHARIS high contrast imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Limbach, Mary A.; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norm; Mede, Kyle; McElwain, Michael W.; Janson, Markus; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Princeton University is building the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), an integral field spectrograph (IFS) for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS is funded by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and is designed to take high contrast spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and the AO188 adaptive optics systems. The project is now in the build and test phase at Princeton University. Once laboratory testing has been completed CHARIS will be integrated with SCExAO and AO188 in the winter of 2016. CHARIS has a high-resolution characterization mode in J, H, and K bands. The average spectral resolution in J, H, and K bands are R82, R68, and R82 respectively, the uniformity of which is a direct result of a new high index material, L-BBH2. CHARIS also has a second low-resolution imaging mode that spans J,H, and K bands with an average spectral resolution of R19, a feature unique to this instrument. The field of view in both imaging modes is 2.07x2.07 arcseconds. SCExAO+CHARIS will detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. The primary challenge with exoplanet imaging is the presence of quasi-static speckles in the coronagraphic image. SCExAO has a wavefront control system to suppress these speckles and CHARIS will address their impact on spectral crosstalk through hardware design, which drives its optical and mechanical design. CHARIS constrains crosstalk to be below 1% for an adjacent source that is a full order of magnitude brighter than the neighboring spectra. Since CHARIS is on the Nasmyth platform, the optical alignment between the lenslet array and prism is highly stable. This improves the stability of the spectra and their orientation on the detector and results in greater stability in the wavelength solution for the data pipeline. This means less

  14. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, J. C.; Barré, S. F.; Mokso, R.; Haberthür, D.; Semmler-Behnke, M.; Kreyling, W. G.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-01

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential—especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  15. Image quality optimization, via application of contextual contrast sensitivity and discrimination functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Edward; Triantaphillidou, Sophie; Jarvis, John; Gupta, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    What is the best luminance contrast weighting-function for image quality optimization? Traditionally measured contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs), have been often used as weighting-functions in image quality and difference metrics. Such weightings have been shown to result in increased sharpness and perceived quality of test images. We suggest contextual CSFs (cCSFs) and contextual discrimination functions (cVPFs) should provide bases for further improvement, since these are directly measured from pictorial scenes, modeling threshold and suprathreshold sensitivities within the context of complex masking information. Image quality assessment is understood to require detection and discrimination of masked signals, making contextual sensitivity and discrimination functions directly relevant. In this investigation, test images are weighted with a traditional CSF, cCSF, cVPF and a constant function. Controlled mutations of these functions are also applied as weighting-functions, seeking the optimal spatial frequency band weighting for quality optimization. Image quality, sharpness and naturalness are then assessed in two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical tests. We show that maximal quality for our test images, results from cCSFs and cVPFs, mutated to boost contrast in the higher visible frequencies.

  16. Optical coherence tomography imaging of microfluidic pattern with different refractive index contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Hao, Bingtao; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology is analogous to ultrasound imaging, except that OCT employs light instead of sound. The non-invasive imaging method works by projecting light on test target and detecting the backscattering from the underlying layers. As the OCT technology is based on optical interference, the internal structural features and inhomogeneities induced by different refractive index contrast could be detected and displayed in the form of a gray scale or false color image. In this paper, a typical microfluidic device was produced and measured by a spectral domain OCT instrument. The internal dimensions of the lab-on-chip device were determined using the OCT imaging technology and were in agreement with results obtained with conventional confocal microscope. In order to study the effect of different refractive index contrast on OCT imaging, fluid with various refractive indexes was injected into the microfluidic channel respectively, and the acquired OCT images of the internal microfluidic channel were compared. The results demonstrate that optical coherence tomography could be used as a new metrology tool to determine the internal channel dimensions of lab-on-chip devices. Furthermore, the experiment results reveal the relations between the refractive index contrast and OCT image quality.

  17. Contrast enhancement in second harmonic imaging: discriminating between muscle and collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Artigas, David; Soria, Guadalupe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Torre, Iratxe; Gratacos, Eduard; Planas, Anna M.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this study, polarization second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is used and data analysis is developed to gain contrast and to discriminate with pixel resolution, in the same image, SHG source architectures. We use mammalian tissue in which both skeletal muscle and fibrilar collagen can be found. The images are fitted point by point using an algorithm based on a biophysical model, where the coefficient of determination is utilized as a filtering mechanism. For the whole image we retrieve for every pixel, the effective orientation, θe , of the SHG active structures. As a result a new image is formed which its contrast depends on the values of θe . Collagen presented in the forward direction for a predefined region of interest (ROI), peak distribution of angles θe centered in the region of ~45°, while muscle in the region of ~65°. Consequently, collagen and muscle are represented in different colors in the same image. Thus, here we show that it is possible to gain contrast and to discriminate between collagen and muscle without the use of any exogenous labeling or any co-localization with fluorescence imaging.

  18. Potential for Imaging Engineered Tissues with X-Ray Phase Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Alyssa; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    As the field of tissue engineering advances, it is crucial to develop imaging methods capable of providing detailed three-dimensional information on tissue structure. X-ray imaging techniques based on phase-contrast (PC) have great potential for a number of biomedical applications due to their ability to provide information about soft tissue structure without exogenous contrast agents. X-ray PC techniques retain the excellent spatial resolution, tissue penetration, and calcified tissue contrast of conventional X-ray techniques while providing drastically improved imaging of soft tissue and biomaterials. This suggests that X-ray PC techniques are very promising for evaluation of engineered tissues. In this review, four different implementations of X-ray PC imaging are described and applications to tissues of relevance to tissue engineering reviewed. In addition, recent applications of X-ray PC to the evaluation of biomaterial scaffolds and engineered tissues are presented and areas for further development and application of these techniques are discussed. Imaging techniques based on X-ray PC have significant potential for improving our ability to image and characterize engineered tissues, and their continued development and optimization could have significant impact on the field of tissue engineering. PMID:21682604

  19. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C M; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents. PMID:26969814

  20. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  1. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  2. Real-time contrast medium detection in x-ray images by mathematical morphology operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Dieu Sang; Beucher, Serge; Bilodeau, Michel

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a solution to contrast agent (CA) detection in angiograms by considering x-ray images as intensity images and applying mathematical morphology operators. We present two detection approaches, one based on the intensity infimum and the other based on the dual reconstruction. The evaluation using several data sets shows that both techniques are able to detect the presence of the contrast medium volume. Moreover, the dual reconstruction-based method is proven to be faster in processing time and more effective than the intensity infimum-based method in distinguishing the intensity change at the same location from the displacement of the same region. In addition, we show how to track the CA passage through a region of interest by observing the intensity evolution in successive submasks.

  3. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  4. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  5. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Jianbao; Zou, Jing; Rong, Junyan; Hu, Zhanli; Zhang, Qiyang; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2012-03-01

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 μm and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 μm. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  6. Dynamic manipulation of magnetic contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Congxian; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Seo, Chi Hyung; Hu, Xiaoge; Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used extensively ex vivo for cellular and molecular separations. We recently showed that a coupled nanoparticle combining a superparamagnetic core with a thin, isolated gold shell providing strong absorption in the near infrared can be used for magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging (mmPA), a new technique in which magnetic manipulation of the particle during PA imaging greatly enhances molecular contrast specificity. This particle can also be biologically targeted for in vivo applications, where mmPA imaging provides a spatially localized readout of magnetic manipulations. As an initial test of potential in vivo molecular assays and integrated molecular therapeutics using magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles, we present experiments demonstrating PA readout of trapped magnetic particles in a flow field. An aqueous solution containing a concentration of 0.05-mg/ml 10-μM superparamagnetic iron oxide particles flowed in a 1.65-mm diameter Zeus PTFE (Teflon) sublite wall tubing at three velocities of 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0-mm/s. Opposed permanent magnets separated by 40-mm were positioned on both sides of the tube. As expected, the targeted objects can be magnetically captured and accumulated locally. By translating the magnets, a dynamic magnetic field (0.1-0.3-T) was alternately generated on the side of the tube closest to one of the magnets and created a synchronous PA motion from accumulated targeted objects. This synchronized motion can be used to differentiate the stationary background or other PA sources moving asynchronously with magnetic manipulations (e.g., moving blood) from targeted cells moving synchronously with the magnetic field. This technology can potentially provide sensitive molecular assays of cellular targets travelling in the vasculature (e.g., metastatic tumor cells).

  7. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubiak, R. R.; Gamba, H. R.; Neves, E. B.; Peixoto, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in both

  8. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography.

    PubMed

    Jakubiak, R R; Gamba, H R; Neves, E B; Peixoto, J E

    2013-09-21

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in

  9. Dual Contrast Agent for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Hard Tissue Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Manuela; Sun, Yi; Rusu, Viorel; Laverman, Peter; Borm, Paul; Heerschap, Arend; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Boerman, Otto C.; Walboomers, X. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are commonly used bone substitute materials, which closely resemble the composition of the mineral phase of bone. However, this high similarity to natural bone also results in difficult discrimination from the bone tissue by common imaging modalities, that is, plain X-ray radiography and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT). In addition, new imaging techniques introduced for bone tissue visualization, like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), face a similar problem. Even at high MRI resolution, the lack of contrast between CPCs and surrounding bone is evident. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a dual contrast agent, traceable with both CT and MRI as enhancers of CPC/bone tissue contrast. Our formulation is based on the use of silica beads as vectors, which encapsulate and carry contrast-enhancing nanoparticles, in our case, colloidal Gold and Superparamagnetic Iron oxide particles (SPIO). The bead suspension was incorporated within a calcium phosphate powder. The resultant cements were then tested both in vitro and in vivo in a femoral condyle defect model in rats. Results showed that the mechanical properties of the cement were not significantly affected by the inclusion of the beads. Both in vitro and in vivo data proved the homogeneous incorporation of the contrast within the cement and its visual localization, characterized by a short-term CT contrast enhancement and a long-term MR effect recognizable by the characteristic blooming shape. Finally, no signs of adverse tissue reactions were noticed in vivo. In conclusion, this study proved the feasibility of a multimodal contrast agent as an inert and biocompatible enhancer of CaP cement versus bone tissue contrast. PMID:23259682

  10. New Colors for Histology: Optimized Bivariate Color Maps Increase Perceptual Contrast in Histological Images

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Schuster, Alexander K.; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of immunostained histological images is required for reproducible research in many different areas and forms the basis of many clinical decisions. The quality and efficiency of histopathological evaluation is limited by the information content of a histological image, which is primarily encoded as perceivable contrast differences between objects in the image. However, the colors of chromogen and counterstain used for histological samples are not always optimally distinguishable, even under optimal conditions. Methods and Results In this study, we present a method to extract the bivariate color map inherent in a given histological image and to retrospectively optimize this color map. We use a novel, unsupervised approach based on color deconvolution and principal component analysis to show that the commonly used blue and brown color hues in Hematoxylin—3,3’-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) images are poorly suited for human observers. We then demonstrate that it is possible to construct improved color maps according to objective criteria and that these color maps can be used to digitally re-stain histological images. Validation To validate whether this procedure improves distinguishability of objects and background in histological images, we re-stain phantom images and N = 596 large histological images of immunostained samples of human solid tumors. We show that perceptual contrast is improved by a factor of 2.56 in phantom images and up to a factor of 2.17 in sets of histological tumor images. Context Thus, we provide an objective and reliable approach to measure object distinguishability in a given histological image and to maximize visual information available to a human observer. This method could easily be incorporated in digital pathology image viewing systems to improve accuracy and efficiency in research and diagnostics. PMID:26717571

  11. Objectively measuring signal detectability, contrast, blur and noise in medical images using channelized joint observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To improve imaging systems and image processing techniques, objective image quality assessment is essential. Model observers adopting a task-based quality assessment strategy by estimating signal detectability measures, have shown to be quite successful to this end. At the same time, costly and time-consuming human observer experiments can be avoided. However, optimizing images in terms of signal detectability alone, still allows a lot of freedom in terms of the imaging parameters. More specifically, fixing the signal detectability defines a manifold in the imaging parameter space on which different "possible" solutions reside. In this article, we present measures that can be used to distinguish these possible solutions from each other, in terms of image quality factors such as signal blur, noise and signal contrast. Our approach is based on an extended channelized joint observer (CJO) that simultaneously estimates the signal amplitude, scale and detectability. As an application, we use this technique to design k-space trajectories for MRI acquisition. Our technique allows to compare the different spiral trajectories in terms of blur, noise and contrast, even when the signal detectability is estimated to be equal.

  12. Dynamic range reduction and contrast adjustment of infrared images in surveillance scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Acito, Nicola; Diani, Marco; Corsini, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    The high thermal sensitivity of modern infrared (IR) cameras allows us to distinguish objects with small temperature variations. In comparison with the dynamics of standard displays, the sensed IR images have a high dynamic range (HDR). In this context, suitable techniques to display HDR images are required in order to improve the visibility of the details without introducing distortions. In the recent literature of IR image processing, a common framework to perform HDR image visualization relies on DR reduction (DRR) with a cascaded processing for local contrast adjustment (CA). In this work, a novel method, named cluster-based DRR and contrast adjustment (CDCA) is introduced for the visualization of IR images. The CDCA method is composed of two cascaded steps: (1) DRR clustering-based approach and (2) a CA module specifically designed to account for IR image features. The effectiveness of the introduced technique is analyzed using IR images of surveillance scenarios collected in different operating conditions. The results are compared with those given by other IR-HDR visualization methods and show the benefits of the proposed CDCA in terms of details enhancement, robustness against the horizon effect and presence of hot objects.

  13. Machine vision based on the concept of contrast sensitivity of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzubik, Vitali; Belashenkov, Nikolai; Vdovin, Gleb

    2014-09-01

    The model of contrast sensitivity function (CSF) of machine vision system, based on the CSF of the human visual system is proposed. By analogy with the human eye, we employ the concept of ganglion cell receptive field to the artificial light-sensitive elements. By further following this concept, we introduced quantative metrics of local and global contrast of digital image. We suggested that the contrast sensitivity threshold forms an iso-line in the parameter space contrast - spatial frequency. The model, implemented in a computer vision system, has been compared to the results of contrast sensitivity research, conducted directly with the human visual system, and demonstrated a good match.

  14. Chain of evidence generation for contrast enhancement in digital image forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Messina, Giuseppe; Strano, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the images obtained by digital cameras has improved a lot since digital cameras early days. Unfortunately, it is not unusual in image forensics to find wrongly exposed pictures. This is mainly due to obsolete techniques or old technologies, but also due to backlight conditions. To extrapolate some invisible details a stretching of the image contrast is obviously required. The forensics rules to produce evidences require a complete documentation of the processing steps, enabling the replication of the entire process. The automation of enhancement techniques is thus quite difficult and needs to be carefully documented. This work presents an automatic procedure to find contrast enhancement settings, allowing both image correction and automatic scripting generation. The technique is based on a preprocessing step which extracts the features of the image and selects correction parameters. The parameters are thus saved through a JavaScript code that is used in the second step of the approach to correct the image. The generated script is Adobe Photoshop compliant (which is largely used in image forensics analysis) thus permitting the replication of the enhancement steps. Experiments on a dataset of images are also reported showing the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  15. Post-processing methods for high-contrast imaging in the context of the WFIRST-AFTA telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ygouf, Marie; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Macintosh, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Direct detection and characterization of Earth-like exoplanets with contrasts of 109 require space-based instruments optimized for high-contrast imaging. In this context, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope - Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) project will reach contrasts of about 108, using state-of-the-art starlight suppression and wavefront control techniques. A ten-fold contrast improvement to reach the required contrast of 109 is expected to come from post-processing. But the methods of point spread function (PSF) subtraction techniques currently used on both ground-based and space-based instruments have not yet been demonstrated at such high contrast level. In this communication, we explore new ways of implementing post-processing methods on AFTA-like simulated images, taking into account the presence of deformable mirrors, coronagraph and an IFS.

  16. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Whiteman, Suzanne C.; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; El Haj, Alicia J.; Spiteri, Monica A.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment.

  17. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  18. ASFNR recommendations for clinical performance of MR dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  19. Hue-preserving local contrast enhancement and illumination compensation for outdoor color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Monnin, David; Christnacher, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Real-time applications in the field of security and defense use dynamic color camera systems to gain a better understanding of outdoor scenes. To enhance details and improve the visibility in images it is required to per- form local image processing, and to reduce lightness and color inconsistencies between images acquired under different illumination conditions it is required to compensate illumination effects. We introduce an automatic hue-preserving local contrast enhancement and illumination compensation approach for outdoor color images. Our approach is based on a shadow-weighted intensity-based Retinex model which enhances details and compensates the illumination effect on the lightness of an image. The Retinex model exploits information from a shadow detection approach to reduce lightness halo artifacts on shadow boundaries. We employ a hue-preserving color transformation to obtain a color image based on the original color information. To reduce color inconsistencies between images acquired under different illumination conditions we process the saturation using a scaling function. The approach has been successfully applied to static and dynamic color image sequences of outdoor scenes and an experimental comparison with previous Retinex-based approaches has been carried out.

  20. High-Contrast NIR Polarization Imaging of MWC480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, M. W.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Tamura, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Werren, C.; Day, A. N.; Beerman, C.; Iye, M.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Brafford, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0".2-1"0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by HST / NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half angle for the disk to lie between 1.3 <= Theta <=2.2 deg. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only approx 30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R approx 0. 03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  1. A novel technique for the contrast-enhanced microCT imaging of murine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kevin H; Wu, Qi; Leib, Daniel J; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-10-01

    Disc degeneration is one of the leading factors that contribute to low back pain. Thus, the further understanding of the mechanisms contributing to degeneration of the intervertebral disc degeneration is critical for the development of therapies and strategies for treating low back pain. Rodent models are attractive for conducting mechanistic studies particularly because of the availability of genetically modified animals. However, current imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging, do not have the ability to resolve spatial features at the tens- to single- micrometer scale. We propose here a contrast-enhanced microCT technique to conduct high-resolution imaging of the rodent intervertebral discs at 10µm spatial resolution. Based on the iodinated-hydrophilic contrast agent Ioversol, we are able to conduct high resolution imaging on rat and mouse intervertebral discs. Leveraging the hydrophilic characteristic of the contrast agent, we are able to discriminate the annulus fibrosus from the water-rich nucleus pulposus. Moreover, this technique allows for the quantitative measurement of disc morphologies and volumes, and we demonstrate the versatility of this technique on cultured live intervertebral discs. Coupled with our semi-automated segmentation technique, we are able to quantify the intervertebral disc volumes with a high degree of reproducibility. The contrast-enhanced microCT images were qualitatively and quantitatively indistinguishable from the traditional histological assessment of the same sample. Furthermore, stereological measures compared well between histology and microCT images. Taken together, the results reveal that rat and mouse intervertebral discs can be imaged longitudinally in vitro at high resolutions, with no adverse effects on viability and features of the intervertebral disc. PMID:27341292

  2. Image reconstruction exploiting object sparsity in boundary-enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Sidky, Emil Y; Anastasio, Mark A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2010-05-10

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) seeks to reconstruct information regarding the complex-valued refractive index distribution of an object. In many applications, a boundary-enhanced image is sought that reveals the locations of discontinuities in the real-valued component of the refractive index distribution. We investigate two iterative algorithms for few-view image reconstruction in boundary-enhanced PCT that exploit the fact that a boundary-enhanced PCT image, or its gradient, is often sparse. In order to exploit object sparseness, the reconstruction algorithms seek to minimize the l(1)-norm or TV-norm of the image, subject to data consistency constraints. We demonstrate that the algorithms can reconstruct accurate boundary-enhanced images from highly incomplete few-view projection data. PMID:20588896

  3. Contrast-free diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease guided by integrated cardiac imaging: concept and first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Patrick T; Sumitsuji, Satoru; Kumada, Masahiro; Kaneda, Hideaki; Tachibana, Kouichi; Nanto, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    The use of iodinated contrast media (ICM) remains a potential hazard for patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac imaging and percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular patients with history of prior adverse reaction to a contrast agent are at a high risk in case of re-exposure, even if designated premedication is administered. Based on a patient with recurrent angina pectoris and history of systemic anaphylactic reaction to ICM, we describe the logical stepwise approach from diagnostic imaging to safe and successful imaging guided percutaneous coronary intervention without the use of contrast agent. PMID:25612793

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Phase Contrast Imaging Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. R.; Candy, J.; Burrell, K. H.

    2007-11-01

    The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic on DIII-D has been operated in several configurations over its lifetime. The beam path was changed in 2003 from tangential at the midplane LCFS to a path passing through the edge at an angle near 45 degrees and reaching typically r/a=0.8, and the maximum wavenumber has been increased from 7 to 30 cm-1. A synthetic diagnostic (SD) has been created to model all configurations of the PCI by post-processing the output of the GYRO gyrokinetic simulation. The SD includes line integration along the full path and models the detector to obtain the high- and low-k cutoffs. Modeling of a plasma discharge typical of DIII-D is used to interpret the PCI spectra S(k,f) in terms of turbulent ballooning modes and local S(kr,kθ,f). This allows us to identify parts of the PCI spectra with different plasma modes (ITG, TEM, ETG), separate effects of Doppler shift and intrinsic mode velocity in the measurement, and improve comparisons with other diagnostics. The SD will contribute to validation of the model through comparison between simulation and experiment.

  5. Improving image quality in poor visibility conditions using a physical model for contrast degradation.

    PubMed

    Oakley, J P; Satherley, B L

    1998-01-01

    In daylight viewing conditions, image contrast is often significantly degraded by atmospheric aerosols such as haze and fog. This paper introduces a method for reducing this degradation in situations in which the scene geometry is known. Contrast is lost because light is scattered toward the sensor by the aerosol particles and because the light reflected by the terrain is attenuated by the aerosol. This degradation is approximately characterized by a simple, physically based model with three parameters. The method involves two steps: first, an inverse problem is solved in order to recover the three model parameters; then, for each pixel, the relative contributions of scattered and reflected flux are estimated. The estimated scatter contribution is simply subtracted from the pixel value and the remainder is scaled to compensate for aerosol attenuation. This paper describes the image processing algorithm and presents an analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the resulting enhanced image. This analysis shows that the SNR decreases exponentially with range. A temporal filter structure is proposed to solve this problem. Results are presented for two image sequences taken from an airborne camera in hazy conditions and one sequence in clear conditions. A satisfactory agreement between the model and the experimental data is shown for the haze conditions. A significant improvement in image quality is demonstrated when using the contrast enhancement algorithm in conjuction with a temporal filter. PMID:18267391

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4–6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  7. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  8. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-15

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as micro-calcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  9. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form anmore » image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.« less

  10. X-ray scatter imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model using nanoparticle contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (<1 cm diameter) has proven elusive. Better, more specific, and more sensitive detection methods are therefore urgently needed. Here we discuss the application of a newly developed x-ray imaging technique called Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) for the early detection of HCC. SFHI uses x-rays scattered by an object to form an image and is more sensitive than conventional absorption-based x-radiography. We show that tissues labeled in vivo with gold nanoparticle contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. As a result, the enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  11. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early