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Sample records for imaging fecal incontinence

  1. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... control than formed stool, it is an added stress that can lead to fecal incontinence. Diagnosis & Tests How will my doctor diagnose the cause of fecal incontinence? Along with a physical exam, your doctor may want to do other tests ...

  2. [Update on fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Helena; Nocito, Antonio

    2014-10-29

    Fecal incontinence is defined as an accidental loss of stool or the inability to control defecation. There are three subtypes of fecal incontinence: passive incontinence, urge incontinence and soiling. About 8% of the adult population suffer from fecal incontinence, but only 1/3 consults a doctor. Beside the individual handicap, fecal incontinence has a huge socio-economic impact. Causes of fecal incontinence are changes in the quantity or quality of the stool and structural or functional disorders. Diagnostics encompass the medical history, clinical examination including the digital rectal examination, imaging (particularly endoanal ultrasound) as well as functional diagnostics (anal manometry and defecography). Nowadays, the most promising conservative treatment option consists of loperamide and biofeedback therapy. The most successful invasive method is the sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25351694

  3. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fecal Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  4. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of ...

  5. Surgical Management for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Anandam, Joselin L.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a socially debilitating condition that can lead to social isolation, loss of self-esteem and self-confidence, and depression in an otherwise healthy person. After the appropriate clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing, medical management is initially instituted to treat fecal incontinence. Once medical management fails, there are a few surgical procedures that can be considered. This article is devoted to the various surgical options for fecal incontinence including the history, technical details, and studies demonstrating the complication and success rate. PMID:25320569

  6. Recent concepts in fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J M; Smith, L E

    2001-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is an inability to defer release of gas or stool from the anus and rectum by mechanisms of voluntary control. It is an important medical disorder affecting the quality of life of more than 2% of the US population. The most common contributing factors include previous vaginal deliveries, pelvic or perineal trauma, previous anorectal surgery, and rectal prolapse. Many physicians lack experience and knowledge related to pelvic floor incontinence disorders, but advancing technology has improved this knowledge. Increased experience with endoanal ultrasound and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging have given us better understanding of the anatomy of the anal canal, and new techniques with muscle translocation and artificial neosphincters and neuromodulation have expanded our armamentarium of options for restoring continence. PMID:12112954

  7. Obstetrics and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) can be a debilitating condition for women following vaginal delivery. Operative vaginal delivery and anal sphincter laceration are important risk factors for the development of postpartum AI. Obtaining a comprehensive delivery history, along with a thorough physical examination of the perineum, vagina and rectum may aid the clinician in the diagnosis of an anal sphincter defect. Sonographic imaging can also assist in identifying sphincter defects. The treatment of AI may include a combination of dietary modification, medications that promote constipation, pelvic floor physical therapy, biofeedback, anal sphincteroplasty, and/or sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25320570

  8. Obstetrics and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kathleen

    2014-09-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) can be a debilitating condition for women following vaginal delivery. Operative vaginal delivery and anal sphincter laceration are important risk factors for the development of postpartum AI. Obtaining a comprehensive delivery history, along with a thorough physical examination of the perineum, vagina and rectum may aid the clinician in the diagnosis of an anal sphincter defect. Sonographic imaging can also assist in identifying sphincter defects. The treatment of AI may include a combination of dietary modification, medications that promote constipation, pelvic floor physical therapy, biofeedback, anal sphincteroplasty, and/or sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25320570

  9. Current Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Abbas, Maher A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the management of fecal incontinence, which affects more than 1 in 10 people and can have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. Methods: The medical literature between 1980 and April 2012 was reviewed for the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence. Results: A comprehensive history and physical examination are required to help understand the severity and type of symptoms and the cause of incontinence. Treatment options range from medical therapy and minimally invasive interventions to more invasive procedures with varying degrees of morbidity. The treatment approach must be tailored to each patient. Many patients can have substantial improvement in symptoms with dietary management and biofeedback therapy. For younger patients with large sphincter defects, sphincter repair can be helpful. For patients in whom biofeedback has failed, other options include injectable medications, radiofrequency ablation, or sacral nerve stimulation. Patients with postdefecation fecal incontinence and a rectocele can benefit from rectocele repair. An artificial bowel sphincter is reserved for patients with more severe fecal incontinence. Conclusion: The treatment algorithm for fecal incontinence will continue to evolve as additional data become available on newer technologies. PMID:24355892

  10. Surgical management of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Joshua I S; Kann, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    The surgical approach to treating fecal incontinence is complex. After optimal medical management has failed, surgery remains the best option for restoring function. Patient factors, such as prior surgery, anatomic derangements, and degree of incontinence, help inform the astute surgeon regarding the most appropriate option. Many varied approaches to surgical management are available, ranging from more conservative approaches, such as anal canal bulking agents and neuromodulation, to more aggressive approaches, including sphincter repair, anal cerclage techniques, and muscle transposition. Efficacy and morbidity of these approaches also range widely, and this article presents the data and operative considerations for these approaches. PMID:24280402

  11. Diagnostic Testing for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Craig H.

    2014-01-01

    Many tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and management of fecal incontinence. Imaging studies such as endoanal ultrasonography and defecography provide an anatomic and functional picture of the anal canal which can be useful, especially in the setting of planned sphincter repair. Physiologic tests including anal manometry and anal acoustic reflexometry provide objective data regarding functional values of the anal canal. The value of this information is of some debate; however, as we learn more about these methods, they may prove useful in the future. Finally, nerve studies, such as pudendal motor nerve terminal latency, evaluate the function of the innervation of the anal canal. This has been shown to have significant prognostic value and can help guide clinical decision making. Significant advances have also happened in the field, with the relatively recent advent of magnetic resonance defecography and high-resolution anal manometry, which provide even greater objective anatomic and physiologic information about the anal canal and its function. PMID:25320566

  12. Fecal Incontinence: Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Weiss, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a debilitating problem facing ~2.2% of the U.S. general population over 65 years of age. Etiologic factors include traumatic, neurologic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Most commonly, obstetric trauma causes fecal incontinence as well as poorly performed anorectal surgery or pelvic radiation. Several severity scores and quality of life indexes have been developed to quantify incontinent symptoms. There are several nonsurgical and surgical options for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Biofeedback is among the most successful nonoperative strategies. Depending on the cause, anal sphincter repair, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation are used to treat fecal incontinence with some success. Unfortunately, fecal incontinence is an extremely difficult problem to manage: there has not been one, single treatment option that has proven to be both safe and effective in long-term studies. PMID:22379407

  13. Endoanal ultrasonography in fecal incontinence: Current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2015-06-10

    Fecal incontinence has a profound impact in a patient's life, impairing quality of life and carrying a substantial economic burden due to health costs. It is an underdiagnosed condition because many affected patients are reluctant to report it and also clinicians are usually not alert to it. Patient evaluation with a detailed clinical history and examination is very important to indicate the type of injury that is present. Endoanal ultrasonography is currently the gold standard for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence and is a simple, well-tolerated and non-expensive technique. Most studies revealed 100% sensitivity in identifying sphincter defect. It is better than endoanal magnetic resonance imaging for internal anal sphincter defects, equivalent for the diagnosis of external anal sphincter defects, but with a lower capacity for assessment of atrophy of this sphincter. The most common cause of fecal incontinence is anal sphincter injury related to obstetric trauma. Only a small percentage of women are diagnosed with sphincter tears immediately after vaginal delivery, but endoanal ultrasonography shows that one third of these women have occult sphincter defects. Furthermore, in patients submitted to primary repair of these tears, ultrasound revealed a high frequency of persistent sphincter defects after surgery. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography is currently largely used and accepted for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence, improving diagnostic accuracy and our knowledge of physiologic and pathological sphincters alterations. Conversely, there is currently no evidence to support the use of elastography in fecal incontinence evaluation. PMID:26078826

  14. Endoanal ultrasonography in fecal incontinence: Current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence has a profound impact in a patient’s life, impairing quality of life and carrying a substantial economic burden due to health costs. It is an underdiagnosed condition because many affected patients are reluctant to report it and also clinicians are usually not alert to it. Patient evaluation with a detailed clinical history and examination is very important to indicate the type of injury that is present. Endoanal ultrasonography is currently the gold standard for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence and is a simple, well-tolerated and non-expensive technique. Most studies revealed 100% sensitivity in identifying sphincter defect. It is better than endoanal magnetic resonance imaging for internal anal sphincter defects, equivalent for the diagnosis of external anal sphincter defects, but with a lower capacity for assessment of atrophy of this sphincter. The most common cause of fecal incontinence is anal sphincter injury related to obstetric trauma. Only a small percentage of women are diagnosed with sphincter tears immediately after vaginal delivery, but endoanal ultrasonography shows that one third of these women have occult sphincter defects. Furthermore, in patients submitted to primary repair of these tears, ultrasound revealed a high frequency of persistent sphincter defects after surgery. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography is currently largely used and accepted for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence, improving diagnostic accuracy and our knowledge of physiologic and pathological sphincters alterations. Conversely, there is currently no evidence to support the use of elastography in fecal incontinence evaluation. PMID:26078826

  15. Ischemic fecal incontinence and rectal angina.

    PubMed

    Devroede, G; Vobecky, S; Massé, S; Arhan, P; Léger, C; Duguay, C; Hémond, M

    1982-11-01

    In 36 patients who consulted for fecal incontinence or rectal pain, or both, there was grossly visible scarring of the rectum and biopsy revealed mucosal atrophy and fibrosis. A steal from the hemorrhoidal arteries to the iliac vessels was demonstrated in 3 subjects. Maximum tolerable volumes within a rectal balloon were smaller than in control subjects, both in men (192 vs. 273 ml) and in women (142 vs. 217 ml) (p less than 0.01). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was abnormal in all but 1 patient. Specific abnormalities were a decreased amplitude or a prolonged duration of the reflex. It was totally absent in 2 patients. This study is compatible with the hypothesis that chronic ischemia of the rectum may cause fecal incontinence or rectal pain. PMID:7117809

  16. Fecal Incontinence: Epidemiology, Impact, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bochenska, Katarzyna; Boller, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a chronic and debilitating condition that carries a significant health, economic, and social burden. FI has a considerable psychosocial and financial impact on patients and their families. A variety of treatment modalities are available for FI including behavioral and dietary modifications, pharmacotherapy, pelvic floor physical therapy, bulking agents, anal sphincteroplasty, sacral nerve stimulation, artificial sphincters, magnetic sphincters, posterior anal sling, and colostomy. PMID:27582653

  17. Office-Based Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Costilla, Vanessa C.; Mayer, Anita P.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating disorder that is more prevalent than previously realized. FI is the involuntary loss of stool. Many factors contribute to the pathophysiology of FI, including advanced age, bowel irregularity, parity, and obesity. A detailed history and focused rectal examination are important to making the diagnosis and determining contributing causes. Although multiple diagnostic studies are available to assess the cause of FI, specific guidelines that delineate when testing should be done do not exist. Clinicians must weigh the risk, benefit, and burden of testing against the need for empiric treatment. All types of FI are initially managed in the same way, which includes lifestyle modification to reduce bowel derangements, improved access to toileting, and initiation of a bulking regimen to improve stool consistency. If initial conservative management fails, pharmaco-logic agents, biofeedback, or surgery may be indicated. PMID:23935551

  18. Fecal incontinence in men: Causes and clinical and manometric features

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Ciriza de los Ríos, Constanza; Muñoz-Garrido, Francisco; Vara, Jesús; Solís-Herruzo, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the causes and characteristics of fecal incontinence in men and to compare these features with those presented by a group of women with the same problem. METHODS: We analyzed the medical history, clinical and manometric data from 119 men with fecal incontinence studied in our unit and compared these data with those obtained from 645 women studied for the same problem. Response to treatment was evaluated after 6 mo of follow-up. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of patients studied in our unit for fecal incontinence were male. Men took longer than women before asking for medical help. Ano-rectal surgery was the most common risk factor for men related to fecal incontinence. Chronic diarrhea was present in more than 40% of patients in both groups. Decreased resting and external anal sphincter pressures were more frequent in women. No significant differences existed between the sexes regarding rectal sensitivity and recto-anal inhibitory reflex. In 17.8% of men, all presenting soiling, manometric findings did not justify fecal incontinence. Response to treatment was good in both groups, as 80.4% of patients improved and fecal incontinence disappeared in 13.2% of them. CONCLUSION: In our series, it was common that men waited longer in seeking medical help for fecal incontinence. Ano-rectal surgery was the major cause of this problem. Chronic diarrhea was a predisposing factor in both sexes. Manometric differences between groups were limited to an increased frequency of hypotony of the external anal sphincter in women. Fecal incontinence was controllable in most patients. PMID:24976729

  19. Update on the Management of Fecal Incontinence for the Gastroenterologist

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with fecal incontinence respond to conservative measures based upon a careful assessment and a multimodality approach that Is within the expertise of the practicing gastroenterologist. However, there Is a need for new and effective strategies when conservative therapy fails. This article reviews established therapies for fecal incontinence, such as biofeedback, as well as new therapies that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), such as sacral neuromodulation and an injectable bulking agent. Also reviewed are some of the newer approaches that have not yet been approved by the FDA or that have uncertain efficacy. PMID:27231444

  20. Update on the Management of Fecal Incontinence for the Gastroenterologist.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2016-03-01

    Many patients with fecal incontinence respond to conservative measures based upon a careful assessment and a multimodality approach that Is within the expertise of the practicing gastroenterologist. However, there Is a need for new and effective strategies when conservative therapy fails. This article reviews established therapies for fecal incontinence, such as biofeedback, as well as new therapies that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), such as sacral neuromodulation and an injectable bulking agent. Also reviewed are some of the newer approaches that have not yet been approved by the FDA or that have uncertain efficacy. PMID:27231444

  1. Pregnancy and postpartum bowel changes: constipation and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shin, Grace Hewon; Toto, Erin Lucinda; Schey, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are often associated with many gastrointestinal complaints, including nausea, vomiting, and heartburn; however, the most troublesome complaints in some women are defecatory disorders such as constipation and fecal incontinence, especially postpartum. These disorders are often multifactorial in etiology, and many studies have looked to see what risk factors lead to these complications. This review discusses the current knowledge of pelvic floor and anorectal physiology, especially during pregnancy, and reviews the current literature on causes and treatments of postpartum bowel symptoms of constipation and fecal incontinence. PMID:25803402

  2. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  3. Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction in Women: A Review.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alison; Menees, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction and fecal incontinence is a common and debilitating condition in women, particularly as women age, and often goes under-reported to health care providers. It is important for providers to ask patients about possible symptoms. An algorithm for evaluation and treatment is presented. Current and future therapies are described and discussed. PMID:27261895

  4. Review of the diagnosis, management and treatment of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Azadeh; Jakus-Waldman, Sharon; Abbas, Maher A; Yazdany, Tajnoos; Nguyen, John

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common problem affecting women but is underreported because of patients' reluctance to discuss their symptoms and an inconsistent use of screening tools by physicians. Obstetric injury from vaginal delivery is the principal cause of fecal incontinence among young women. Prevalence rates are highest in the elderly, especially those with declining cognitive function. There are multiple diagnostic tests including anal manometry, endosonography, defecography, and pudendal nerve latency testing to assist physicians in the workup of patients and aid in the selection of appropriate treatment options. After patient identification and workup, most patients can be offered conservative measures including dietary measures and biofeedback. Surgery is indicated for specific abnormalities such as rectal prolapse, fistula, and recent obstetrical sphincter injury repair. Management of refractory cases may include sacral nerve stimulation and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation. Fecal diversion or an artificial bowel sphincter may be considered when all else has failed. Primary care physicians, gynecologists, and specialists in female pelvic medicine should screen women for fecal incontinence. Initial conservative therapy may be directed by the primary health provider, and those resistant to this approach should be referred to specialist care. PMID:25185605

  5. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  6. Treatment strategies in obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Khaikin, Marat; Wexner, Steven D

    2006-01-01

    Obstructed defecation (OD) and fecal incontinence (FI) are challenging clinical problems, which are commonly encountered in the practice of colorectal surgeons and gastroenterologists. These disorders socially and psychologically distress patients and greatly impair their quality of life. The underlying anatomical and pathophysiological changes are complex, often incompletely understood and cannot always be determined. As a consequence, many medical, surgical, and behavioral approaches have been described, with no panacea. Over the past decade, advances in an understanding of these disorders together with rational and similar methods of evaluation in anorectal physiology laboratories (ARP), radiology studies, and new surgical techniques have led to promising results. In this brief review, we discuss treatment strategies and recent updates on clinical and therapeutic aspects of obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence. PMID:16718835

  7. Neuromodulation for fecal incontinence: an effective surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Palsson, Olafur S; Asteria, Corrado R; Whitehead, William E

    2013-11-01

    Fecal incontinence is a disabling symptom with medical and social implications, including fear, embarrassment, isolation and even depression. Most patients live in seclusion and have to plan their life around the symptom, with secondary impairment of their quality of life. Conservative management and biofeedback therapy are reported to benefit a good percentage of those affected. However, surgery must be considered in the non-responder population. Recently, sacral nerve electrostimulation, lately named neuromodulation, has been reported to benefit patients with fecal incontinence in randomized controlled trials more than placebo stimulation and conservative management, by some unknown mechanism. Neuromodulation is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of adverse events and apparently favorable cost-efficacy profile. This review is intended to expand knowledge about this effective intervention among the non-surgically skilled community who deals with this disabled group of patients. PMID:24222947

  8. Fecal incontinence: A review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Fejka, Michael David

    2016-09-01

    Fecal incontinence affects patients of all sexes, races, and ethnicities; however, those affected often are afraid or too embarrassed to ask for help. Attention to risk factors and directed physical examinations can help healthcare providers diagnose and formulate treatment plans. Numerous diagnostic tests are available. Diligent follow-up is needed to direct patients to second-line therapies such as sacral nerve stimulation or surgical procedures. PMID:27580000

  9. Artificial Muscle Devices: Innovations and Prospects for Fecal Incontinence Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Elisa; Brusa, Tobia; Gingert, Christian; Hieber, Simone E; Leung, Vanessa; Osmani, Bekim; Dominietto, Marco D; Büchler, Philippe; Hetzer, Franc; Müller, Bert

    2016-05-01

    Fecal incontinence describes the involuntary loss of bowel content, which is responsible for stigmatization and social exclusion. It affects about 45% of retirement home residents and overall more than 12% of the adult population. Severe fecal incontinence can be treated by the implantation of an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, are not part of everyday surgery due to long-term re-operation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. Such figures suggest that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter. This article reviews the artificial sphincters on the market and under development, presents their physical principles of operation and critically analyzes their performance. We highlight the geometrical and mechanical parameters crucial for the design of an artificial fecal sphincter and propose more advanced mechanisms of action for a biomimetic device with sensory feedback. Dielectric electro-active polymer actuators are especially attractive because of their versatility, response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence during daily activities. PMID:26926695

  10. The Differential Impact of Flatal Incontinence in Women With Anal Versus Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Isuzu; Tang, Ying; Szychowski, Jeff M; Richter, Holly E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The differential impact on quality of life (QOL) that leakage of both stool and flatus confers on women compared to stool only is unclear. Our aim was to characterize differences in symptom distress, impact on QOL, and anorectal testing among women with leakage of stool and flatus, stool only, and flatus only. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of women undergoing evaluation of at least monthly bowel incontinence symptoms. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: liquid/solid stool and flatus (anal incontinence, AI); liquid/solid stool only (fecal incontinence, FI); and flatal only (FL). Baseline assessment included the Modified Manchester Health Questionnaire (MMHQ) including the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI), Short Form-12 (SF-12), as well as anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound evaluations. Results Of 436 subjects, 381 had AI, 45 FI, and 10 FL. Significant between-group differences were noted in MMHQ (p=0.0002) and FISI total scores (p<0.0001) where women with AI reflected greater negative impact than women with FI. The SF-12 (PCS, MCS) scores were similar in all three groups (p=0.22, 0.08). Resting/squeeze pressures were significantly lower in AI and FI groups compared to FL (p=0.0004), whereas rectal capacity was similar in all three groups. Although exploratory, MMHQ scores were similar between FI and FL groups, although FISI scores were higher in the FI group (p<0.0001). Conclusions Women with AI have higher symptom specific distress and greater negative impact on QOL compared to women with FI. Treatment of all bowel incontinence symptoms is important to improve symptom-specific and general QOL. PMID:26506162

  11. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  12. Factors that Affect Consultation and Screening for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kunduru, Lalitha; Kim, Sung Min; Heymen, Steve; Whitehead, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Fecal incontinence (FI) affects 15% of people age 70 years and older, but only 10%–30% discuss FI with their physicians. We aimed to identify barriers that prevent people from consulting with their physicians, and physicians from screening for FI. Methods We performed structured interviews of 124 individuals with FI (mean 56 years old, 87.9% women) recruited from 6 medical offices at the University of North Carolina Hospitals from June 2012 through March 2013. The subjects completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale questionnaires. Interview questions aimed to determine which patients had consulted physicians for FI. Eleven of the 56 physicians with patients included in the study responded to the survey. Results Eighty-eight of the 124 participants consulted with their physicians about FI (consulters). These individuals had a higher incidence of depression than the 36 subjects who did not consult with their physicians about FI (non-consulters; P=.04), but similar Fecal Incontinence Severity Index scores. A smaller proportion of non-consulters were aware of available treatments than consulters (P<.01). Fifty-six percent of non-consulters said their FI was not serious enough to consult a physician. There was no difference between consulters and non-consulters in embarrassment in talking about FI. Among consulters, 88% initiated the conversation about FI with their physician. Seven of the 11 responding physicians screened for FI, and only screened high-risk patients. The 4 physicians who did not screen for FI were unaware of its prevalence, viewed FI as a low priority, or stated that patients were responsible for reporting their own symptoms. Conclusions Based on surveys of physicians and patients, many patients have insufficient knowledge about the availability and effectiveness of treatments for FI. Some people with FI do not discuss it with their physician because their symptoms are mild, and most

  13. Patients’ experience compared to physicians’ recommendations for the treatment of fecal incontinence: A qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To compare physician-recommended treatment options for fecal incontinence to patients’ knowledge of treatment options using qualitative methods. Our hypothesis was that physician recommendations were not being communicated well to patients’ and that this impaired patients’ ability to cope with fecal incontinence. Methods Cognitive interviews were conducted with physicians who routinely care for women with fecal incontinence. Physicians were asked to describe their typical non-surgical treatment recommendations and counseling for fecal incontinence. Women with bothersome fecal incontinence were recruited to participate in focus groups and asked about personal experience with fecal incontinence symptoms and treatments. For both the physician interviews and patient focus groups, qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology. Results Physicians identified several barriers patients face when seeking treatment: lack of physician interest towards fecal incontinence and patients’ embarrassment in discussing fecal incontinence. Physicians universally recommended fiber and pelvic floor exercise; they felt the majority (approximately 70–80%) of patients will improve with these therapies. Collectively, patients were able to identify all treatment recommendations given by physicians although many had discovered these treatments through personal experience. Three concepts emerged regarding treatment options that physicians did not identify but that patients felt were important in their treatment: hope for improvement, personal effort to control symptoms and encouragement to go on living life. Conclusions While physicians had treatment to offer women with fecal incontinence, women with fecal incontinence had found the best treatments through personal research and effort. Women want to hear a message of hope, encouragement and personal effort from providers. PMID:24573357

  14. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  15. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  16. Psychosocial co-morbidity affects treatment outcome in children with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    van Everdingen-Faasen, Els Q; Gerritsen, Bert J; Mulder, Paul G H; Fliers, Ellen A; Groeneweg, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common disorder in children. Many children with fecal incontinence have psychosocial co-morbidity. In this study, the effect of psychosocial co-morbidity on the treatment outcome of children with fecal incontinence was evaluated. One hundred and fifty children with fecal incontinence were treated in a multidisciplinary program. All children had been treated unsuccessfully for at least one year before entering the program. The treatment consisted of laxative treatment, psychosocial interventions, and biofeedback training. Psychosocial co-morbidity was classified according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). One hundred and forty-one children were completely analyzed (102 boys, mean age 9.6 (range 6.5-16.5) years). Of these, 31 (22%) children had fecal incontinence without constipation and 110 (78%) children had fecal incontinence associated with constipation. In 95% of children, at least one psychosocial co-morbidity was present. Treatment was successful at 12 months in 69% of patients. Treatment was less successful in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in children with parent-child relational problems, and in mentally retarded children. The results indicate that the early assessment and treatment of psychosocial co-morbidity might improve treatment response in children with fecal incontinence. Children with fecal incontinence are treated less successfully in the first year if they have ADHD, parent-child relational problems, or mental retardation. Psychosocial evaluation and the early assessment and treatment of psychosocial co-morbidity is indicated in order to improve response rate. Family counseling--aimed at improving parent-child relations--should be an integral part of a multidisciplinary treatment program for fecal incontinence. PMID:17952465

  17. Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a prevalent problem that can drastically affect quality of life. Pelvic floor rehabilitation is an important first-line treatment for patients with FI, and many published case reports and a small number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide limited evidence for its efficacy. Pelvic floor rehabilitation approaches to the treatment of FI include pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and volumetric training with rectal balloon catheters. Various forms of external electrical stimulation have also been described and may be of added benefit. Behavioral bowel retraining is an important part of a good rehabilitative approach as well. Pelvic floor rehabilitation treatment for FI is thought to be effective and safe, with reported success rates in a majority of studies at 50 to 80%. Many more high-quality RCTs are needed to define optimal treatment protocols. PMID:25320568

  18. Dietary Fiber Supplementation for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xioayan

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appear related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI. PMID:25155992

  19. A Controlled Trial of An Intervention to Improve Urinary/Fecal Incontinence and Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Schnelle, John F.; Leung, Felix W.; Rao, Satish SC; Beuscher, Linda; Keeler, Emmett; Clift, Jack W.; Simmons, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate effects of a multi component intervention on fecal (FI) and urinary incontinence (UI) outcomes Design Randomized controlled trial Setting Six nursing homes Participants One hundred and twelve Nursing Home (NH) residents Intervention Intervention subjects offered toileting assistance, exercise, and choice of food /fluid snacks every 2 hours for 8 hours per day over 3 months. Measurements Frequency of UI and FI and rate of appropriate toileting as determined by direct checks from research staff. Anorectal assessments were completed on subset of 29 residents. Results Intervention significantly increased physical activity, frequency of toileting and food/ fluid intake Urinary incontinence improved (p<.05) as did frequency of bowel movements (p<.01) and percent of bowel movements (p <.01) in toilet. The frequency of fecal incontinence did not change. Most subjects (89%) who underwent anorectal testing showed a dyssynergic voiding pattern which could explain the lack of efficacy of this intervention program alone on fecal incontinence. Conclusion The multi-component intervention significantly changed multiple risk factors associated with fecal incontinence and increased bowel movements without decreasing fecal incontinence. The dyssynergic voiding pattern and rectal hyposensitivity suggest that future interventions may have to be supplemented with bulking agents (fiber) and/or biofeedback therapy to improve bowel function. PMID:20653804

  20. Standard Compared With Mnemonic Counseling for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Murrietta, Ambroshia M; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether women who underwent mnemonic counseling had better recall of fecal incontinence therapies at 2 months and if mnemonic counseling resulted in greater satisfaction with physician counseling and improvement in quality of life when compared to a group who underwent standard counseling. Methods Counseling naive women with fecal incontinence were recruited from an academic Urogynecology clinic. Women underwent physical examinations, completed the Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction, recorded fecal incontinence treatment options they recalled, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Manchester Health Questionnaire immediately after counseling and again at 2 months. Results Ninety women consented to participate, were randomized and completed baseline questionnaires. At baseline women did not differ in age, ethnicity, education, fecal incontinence severity index or Manchester Health Questionnaire scores. After counseling the mnemonic group reported higher satisfaction on Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction (66.4± 6.5 vs 62.2 ± 10.7, p=0.03). Ninety percent (81/90) of women followed-up at 2 months. Our primary endpoint, two month recall of fecal incontinence treatments was not different between groups (2.3 ± 1.6 mnemonic counseling vs 1.8 ± 1.0 standard counseling; p=0.08). Secondary endpoints the mnemonic group reported greater improvement on total Manchester Health Questionnaire (p=0.02), emotional (p=0.03), sleep (0.045), role limitations (<0.01), and physical limitations (p=0.04) when compared to the standard group. Conclusions Fecal incontinence counseling with a mnemonic aid did not improve recall at 2 months but improved patient satisfaction and quality of life at 2 months. PMID:25932833

  1. What's New in the Toolbox for Constipation and Fecal Incontinence?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Constipation and fecal incontinence (FI) are common complaints predominantly affecting the elderly and women. They are associated with significant morbidity and high healthcare costs. The causes are often multi-factorial and overlapping. With the advent of new technologies, we have a better understanding of their underlying pathophysiology which may involve disruption at any levels along the gut-brain-microbiota axis. Initial approach to management should always be the exclusion of secondary causes. Mild symptoms can be approached with conservative measures that may include dietary modifications, exercise, and medications. New prokinetics (e.g., prucalopride) and secretagogues (e.g., lubiprostone and linaclotide) are effective and safe in constipation. Biofeedback is the treatment of choice for dyssynergic defecation. Refractory constipation may respond to neuromodulation therapy with colectomy as the last resort especially for slow-transit constipation of neuropathic origin. Likewise, in refractory FI, less invasive approach can be tried first before progressing to more invasive surgical approach. Injectable bulking agents, sacral nerve stimulation, and SECCA procedure have modest efficacy but safe and less invasive. Surgery has equivocal efficacy but there are promising new techniques including dynamic graciloplasty, artificial bowel sphincter, and magnetic anal sphincter. Despite being challenging, there are no short of alternatives in our toolbox for the management of constipation and FI. PMID:25705618

  2. Symptoms associated with dietary fiber supplementation over time in individuals with fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and upset and their association...

  3. Incontinence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - incontinence ... The following organizations are good resources for information on incontinence. Fecal incontinence : The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- www.acog.org/~/media/for%20patients/faq139.ashx ...

  4. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Uncontrollable passage of feces; Loss of bowel control; Fecal incontinence; Incontinence - bowel ... and weaken, leading to diarrhea and stool leakage. Fecal impaction . It is usually caused by chronic constipation. ...

  5. Fecal incontinence: a review of prevalence and obstetric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrea; Guess, Marsha; Connell, Kathleen; Powers, Kenneth; Lazarou, George; Mikhail, Magdy

    2006-05-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) is a significant problem that causes social and hygienic inconvenience. The true prevalence of AI is difficult to estimate due to inconsistencies in research methods, but larger studies suggest a rate of 2-6% for incontinence to stool. There is a significant association between sonographically detected anal sphincter defects and symptoms of AI. The intrapartum factors most consistently associated with a higher risk of AI include: forceps delivery, third or fourth degree tears, and length of the second stage of labor. Fetal weight of > 4,000 g is also associated with AI. Repair of the sphincter can be performed in either an overlapping or an end-to-end fashion, with similar results for both methods. The role of cesarean delivery for the prevention of AI remains unclear, and further study should be devoted to this question. PMID:15973465

  6. Validation of questionnaires to assess quality of life related to fecal incontinence in children with anorectal malformations and Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Arthur Loguetti; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Ferreira, Mariana Aparecida Elisei; Santos, Maria Mercês; Tannuri, Uenis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Surgical treatment of anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung's disease (HD) leads to alterations in bowel habits and fecal incontinence, with consequent quality of life impairment. The objectives were to create and validate a Questionnaire for the Fecal Incontinence Index (FII) based on the Holschneider score, as well as a Questionnaire for the Assessment of Quality of Life Related to Fecal Incontinence in Children and Adolescents (QQVCFCA), based on the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life. Methods: The questionnaires were applied to 71 children submitted to surgical procedure, in two stages. Validity was tested by comparing the QQVCFCA and a generic quality of life questionnaire (SF-36), and between QQVCFCA and the FII. A group of 59 normal children was used as control. Results: At two stages, 45.0% (32/71) and 42.8% (21/49) of the patients had fecal incontinence. It was observed that the QQVCFCA showed a significant correlation with the SF-36 and FII (Pearson's correlation 0.57), showing that the quality of life is directly proportional to improvement in fecal incontinence. Quality of life in patients with fecal incontinence is still globally impaired, when compared with control subjects (p<0.05, Student's t-test). There were also significant differences between the results of children with ARMs and children with HD. Conclusions: QQVCFCA and FII are useful tools to assess the quality of life and fecal incontinence in these groups of children. Children with ARMs submitted to surgical procedure and HD have similar quality of life impairment. PMID:26522822

  7. Urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in a population-based, racially diverse cohort. Prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    RORTVEIT, Guri; SUBAK, Leslee L.; THOM, David H.; CREASMAN, Jennifer M.; VITTINGHOFF, Eric; VAN DEN EEDEN, Stephen K.; BROWN, Jeanette S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for combinations of urinary incontinence (UI), fecal incontinence (FI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in racially diverse women over age 40. Methods The Reproductive Risks for Incontinence Study at Kaiser (RRISK) is a population-based study with data from 2106 women > 40 years. Pelvic floor conditions were determined by self-report. Risk factors were assessed by self-report, interview and record review. Independent risk factors were identified by multinomial logistic regression analysis. Results At least one pelvic floor condition was reported by 714 (34%) women. Of these, 494 (69%) had UI only, 60 (8%) POP only, and 46 (6%) had FI only. Both UI and FI were reported by 64 (9%), both UI and POP by 51 (7%). Among women with FI, 60% reported more than one condition. Corresponding figures for POP and UI were 49% and 18%. Estrogen use and constipation were shared risk factors for UI, FI and POP. BMI was a unique risk factor for UI only, diabetes for FI only and parity for POP only. No clear pattern could be found to support the hypothesis that risk factors for single conditions are more strongly associated with combined conditions. Conclusions Patients with FI or POP often have concomitant UI. These diseases both share and have unique risk factors in a complex pattern. PMID:22453506

  8. The magnetic anal sphincter: a new device in the management of severe fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mantoo, Surendra; Meurette, Guillaume; Podevin, Juliette; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2012-09-01

    The authors aim to report the concept and technique of implantation and the first results of the clinical use of the magnetic anal sphincter (MAS) in the management of fecal incontinence (FI). The MAS device is designed to augment the native anal sphincter. The implant is a series of titanium beads with magnetic cores linked together with independent titanium wires. To defecate, the force generated by straining separates the beads to open up the anal canal. The technique of implantation is simple with no requirement of adjustments. The MAS has a role in the management of severe FI. The device has acceptable and comparable adverse effects to other therapies. FI and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scores are significantly improved in the short term. The MAS offers a simple and less invasive option of anal reinforcement. It is one step further in the quest for an ideal artificial anal sphincter device. PMID:23116075

  9. Injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts in a dog model of fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Hye Seung; Lim, Jae-Young; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Sang Joon; Hong, Sa-Min; Jang, Je-Ho; Cho, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Sung-Min

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined whether bioengineering can improve fecal incontinence. This study designed to determine whether injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts improves sphincter function in a dog model of fecal incontinence. Methods The anal sphincter of dogs was injured and the dogs were observed without and with (n = 5) the injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts into the site of injury. Autologous myoblasts purified from the gastrocnemius muscles were transferred to the beads. Compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of the pudendal nerve, anal sphincter pressure, and histopathology were determined 3 months after treatment. Results The amplitudes of the CMAP in the injured sphincter were significantly lower than those measured before injury (1.22 mV vs. 3.00 mV, P = 0.04). The amplitudes were not different between dogs with and without the injection of autologous myoblast beads (P = 0.49). Resting and squeezing pressures were higher in dogs treated with autologous myoblast beads (2.00 mmHg vs. 1.80 mmHg; 6.13 mmHg vs. 4.02 mmHg), although these differences were not significant in analyses of covariance adjusted for baseline values. The injection site was stained for smooth muscle actin, but showed evidence of foreign body inflammatory reactions. Conclusion This was the first study to examine whether bioengineering could improve fecal incontinence. Although the results did not show definite evidence that injection of autologous myoblast beads improves sphincter function, we found that the dog model was suitable and reliable for studying the effects of a potential treatment modality for fecal incontinence. PMID:23577316

  10. Quality of Life Differences in Female and Male Patients with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Mundet, Lluís; Ribas, Yolanda; Arco, Sandra; Clavé, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To explore and compare quality of life (QoL) differences in female and male patients with fecal incontinence. Methods Ninety-one patients with fecal incontinence (60 women, mean (SD) age 64.13 (9.72) years; 31 men, mean (SD) age 63.61 (13.33) years) were assessed for pathophysiology (anorectal manometry and ultrasound), clinical severity (Wexner and Vaizey scales), QoL (Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Score [FIQL]) and health status (EQ-5D). Results External and internal anal sphincter impairment rates were 96.5% and 70.2%, respectively, in women, compared to 30% and 43.3% respectively in men (P < 0.05). Clinical severity was similar in both sexes, with mean (SD) Wexner scores of 10.95 (4.35) for women and 9.81 (4.30) for men, and mean (SD) Vaizey scores of 13.27 (4.66) for women and 11.90 (5.22) for men. Scores for women were significantly lower for all FIQL depression and coping subscales (P < 0.001) and the EQ-5D depression subscale (P < 0.01). EQ-5D index was 0.687 (0.20) for women and 0.835 (0.15) for men (P < 0.001). QoL was negatively affected by female gender (−1.336), anxiety/depression (−1.324) and clinical severity (−0.302), whereas age had a positive impact (0.055 per year) (P < 0.01). Conclusions The pathophysiology of fecal incontinence differed between the sexes. For similar severity scores, impact on QoL was higher in women. Gender had the highest impact on QoL compared to other factors. QoL measurements should be part of assessment and treatment protocols. PMID:26486375

  11. Rectal tone and compliance affected in patients with fecal incontinence after fistulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Richard Alexander; Camacho, Santiago; Flores, Francisco; Altamirano, Evelyn; García, Mario Antonio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anal sphincter and rectal factors that may be involved in fecal incontinence that develops following fistulotomy (FIAF). METHODS: Eleven patients with FIAF were compared with 11 patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence and with 11 asymptomatic healthy subjects (HS). All of the study participants underwent anorectal manometry and a barostat study (rectal sensitivity, tone, compliance and capacity). The mean time since surgery was 28 ± 26 mo. The postoperative continence score was 14 ± 2.5 (95%CI: 12.4-15.5, St Mark’s fecal incontinence grading system). RESULTS: Compared with the HS, the FIAF patients showed increased rectal tone (42.63 ± 27.69 vs 103.5 ± 51.13, P = 0.002) and less rectal compliance (4.95 ± 3.43 vs 11.77 ± 6.9, P = 0.009). No significant differences were found between the FIAF patients and the HS with respect to the rectal capacity; thresholds for the non-noxious stimuli of first sensation, gas sensation and urge-to-defecate sensation or the noxious stimulus of pain; anal resting pressure or squeeze pressure; or the frequency or percentage of relaxation of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex. No significant differences were found between the FIAF patients and the patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence. CONCLUSION: In patients with FIAF, normal motor anal sphincter function and rectal sensitivity are preserved, but rectal tone and compliance are impaired. The results suggest that FIAF is not due to alterations in rectal sensitivity and that the rectum is more involved than the anal sphincters in the genesis of FIAF. PMID:25852287

  12. Management of fecal incontinence - focus on a vaginal insert for bowel control.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence, also referred to as accidental bowel leakage, is a debilitating condition that impacts quality of life in a significant number of women. Current treatments for fecal incontinence include behavioral modification, biofeedback, drug therapy, and invasive surgical procedures. However, these treatments have suboptimal efficacy due to patient adherence, variability of presentation across patients, cost, and additional health risks. A vaginal bowel control system (Eclipse™ System) was developed to offer a low-risk, effective, and patient-managed approach to treating accidental bowel leakage. The vaginal bowel control system consists of a vaginal insert and user-controlled, pressure-regulated pump. Once inflated, the balloon of the vaginal insert is directed posteriorly to occlude the rectum, allowing the woman to immediately regain control of bowel function. This article will introduce the design evolution and feasibility studies of the Eclipse System. In addition, this review will discuss the results from a recent clinical trial that demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the vaginal bowel control system in managing fecal incontinence and other symptoms of bowel dysfunction. PMID:27274318

  13. Management of fecal incontinence – focus on a vaginal insert for bowel control

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence, also referred to as accidental bowel leakage, is a debilitating condition that impacts quality of life in a significant number of women. Current treatments for fecal incontinence include behavioral modification, biofeedback, drug therapy, and invasive surgical procedures. However, these treatments have suboptimal efficacy due to patient adherence, variability of presentation across patients, cost, and additional health risks. A vaginal bowel control system (Eclipse™ System) was developed to offer a low-risk, effective, and patient-managed approach to treating accidental bowel leakage. The vaginal bowel control system consists of a vaginal insert and user-controlled, pressure-regulated pump. Once inflated, the balloon of the vaginal insert is directed posteriorly to occlude the rectum, allowing the woman to immediately regain control of bowel function. This article will introduce the design evolution and feasibility studies of the Eclipse System. In addition, this review will discuss the results from a recent clinical trial that demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the vaginal bowel control system in managing fecal incontinence and other symptoms of bowel dysfunction. PMID:27274318

  14. Efficacy of Biofeedback Therapy before and after Sphincteroplasty for Fecal Incontinence because of Obstetric Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Mohammadipour, Mastoureh; Roshanravan, Reza; Hajihosseini, Fahimeh; Bananzadeh, Alimohammad; Izadpanah, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a challenging condition in that it exerts various psychosocial impacts on daily life. Different treatment modalities have been suggested for fecal incontinence. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in combination with surgery in the management of fecal incontinence. The present randomized controlled trial was performed on 27 women with a complaint of fecal incontinence because of delivery trauma. The patients underwent sphincteroplasty and levatorplasty via the same method by 2 colorectal surgeons. In Group I, biofeedback therapy was performed 3 months before and 6 months after the surgery; in Group II, biofeedback therapy was applied only 6 months after the surgery; and in Group III, only surgical management was performed. The results revealed a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative Wexner scores of incontinence in all the 3 groups. Additionally, the difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was significant only in Group I and Group III, but not in Group II. The reduction in the Wexner score was significantly less in Group III. However, no significant difference was observed between the 3 groups concerning the mean difference of preoperative and postoperative manometry. The present study revealed no significant role for biofeedback therapy alone in the improvement of manometric evaluation. However, the Wexner score, which is an indicator of patient satisfaction, increased with biofeedback therapy following sphincteroplasty. In general, surgical treatment is now reserved for selected patients with fecal incontinence and has recently been developed with biofeedback therapy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201206039936N1 PMID:26989283

  15. Late Fecal Incontinence After High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Better Prediction Using Longitudinal Definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Fellin, Gianni; Vavassori, Vittorio; Cagna, Emanuela; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Girelli, Giuseppe; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo Filippo; Tortoreto, Francesca; Delle Canne, Stefania; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To model late fecal incontinence after high-dose prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) in patients accrued in the AIROPROS (prostate working group of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) 0102 trial using different endpoint definitions. Methods and Materials: The self-reported questionnaires (before RT, 1 month after RT, and every 6 months for {<=}3 years after RT) of 586 patients were available. The peak incontinence (P{sub I}NC) and two longitudinal definitions (chronic incontinence [C{sub I}NC], defined as the persistence of Grade 1 or greater incontinence after any Grade 2-3 event; and mean incontinence score [M{sub I}NC], defined as the average score during the 3-year period after RT) were considered. The correlation between the clinical/dosimetric parameters (including rectal dose-volume histograms) and P{sub I}NC (Grade 2 or greater), C{sub I}NC, and M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 were investigated using multivariate logistic analyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve were used to assess the predictive value of the different multivariate models. Results: Of the 586 patients, 36 with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score before RT were not included in the present analysis. Of the 550 included patients, 197 (35.8%) had at least one control with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score (M{sub I}NC >0). Of these 197 patients, 37 (6.7%), 22 (4.0%), and 17 (3.1%) were scored as having P{sub I}NC, M{sub I}NC {>=}1, and C{sub I}NC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater acute incontinence was the only predictor of P{sub I}NC (odds ratio [OR], 5.9; p = .0009). Grade 3 acute incontinence was predictive of C{sub I}NC (OR, 9.4; p = .02), and percentage of the rectal volume receiving >40 Gy of {>=}80% was predictive of a M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 (OR, 3.8; p = .008) and of C{sub I}NC (OR, 3.6; p = .03). Previous bowel disease, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and the use of antihypertensive (protective factor

  16. Prospective study on Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity instrument for verifying its ability to predict the development of pressure ulcers in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee; Choi, Heejung

    2016-03-01

    Fecal incontinence with loose stools is a risk factor for skin damage that may develop into a pressure ulcer (PU). The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of applying the Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity (IADS) instrument to patients with fecal incontinence as a tool to predict PU development. This prospective study enrolled 120 intensive care unit patients with bowel incontinence of Bristol Stool type 5, 6, and 7. Trained nurses evaluated IADS scores and the occurrence of PUs daily for 7 days. Patients with higher IADS scores were significantly more likely to develop a PU (odds ratio = 1·22, 95% confidence interval = 1·12-1·33). The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the area under curve to be 0·790, suggesting that higher IADS scores are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a PU (sensitivity 72·5%, specificity 71·2%, using a cut-off value of 8/9). Our results suggest that the IADS instrument can serve as a tool for predicting the occurrence of PUs in patients with fecal incontinence. Patients with IADS scores that exceed eight points should be classified as being at risk of developing a PU, and placed under intensive care as a proactive measure to prevent PU development. PMID:26847935

  17. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of ...

  18. A 10-Year Follow-Up of Urinary and Fecal Incontinence among the Oldest Old in the Community: The Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostbye,Truls; Seim, Arnfinn; Krause, Katrina M.; Feightner, John; Hachinski, Vladimir; Sykes, Elizabeth; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is common in the elderly. The epidemiology of fecal and double (urinary and fecal) incontinence is less known. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) is a national study of elderly living in the community at baseline (n = 8,949) and interviewed in 1991-1992, 1996, and 2001. Using data from the CSHA, we report the…

  19. Symptoms Associated with Dietary Fiber Supplementation over Time in Individuals with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge about adverse symptoms over time from fiber supplementation is lacking. Purpose To compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and emotional upset and their association with study attrition and reducing fiber dose. Methods Subjects (N=189, 77% female, 92% white, (age = 58 years, SD = 14) with fecal incontinence were randomly assigned to placebo or a supplement of 16g total dietary fiber/day from one of three sources: gum arabic, psyllium, or carboxymethylcellulose. They reported GI symptoms daily during baseline (14 days), incremental fiber dosing (6 days), and two segments of steady full fiber dose (32 days total). Results Severity of symptoms in all groups was minimal. Adjusting for study segment and day, a greater feeling of fullness in the psyllium group was the only symptom that differed from symptoms in the placebo group. Odds of having greater severity of flatus, belching, fullness, and bloating were 1.2–2.0 times greater in the steady dose segment compared to baseline. There was a positive association between symptom severity and emotional upset. Subjects with a greater feeling of fullness or bloating or higher scores for total symptom severity or emotional upset were more likely to withdraw from the study sooner or reduce fiber dose. Conclusions Persons with fecal incontinence experience a variety of GI symptoms over time. Symptom severity and emotional upset appear to influence fiber tolerance and study attrition. Supplements seemed well tolerated. PMID:21543963

  20. Executive summary: A Quick Reference Guide for Managing Fecal Incontinence (FI).

    PubMed

    Willson, Margaret M; Angyus, Melissa; Beals, Dawn; Callan, Laurie; Francis, Kathleen; Kingan, Michael J; Porras, Opal Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article is an executive summary of A Quick Reference Guide for Managing Fecal Incontinence (FI), which was published September 2013 by the WOCN Society's Continence Committee. The quick reference guide provides an overview of fecal incontinence and how it is commonly managed. The information has been compiled so that nurses can quickly access a wide array of information in a single resource to facilitate patient care and patient/staff education. The topics include a definition of FI, epidemiologic data, psychosocial impact, costs, a brief description of bowel physiology, causes of FI, skin complications, assessment, management, patient education, and recommendations for future research. The complete quick reference guide also includes 5 appendices. The appendices provide additional information about predisposing factors for FI, assessment tools, medications and foods that affect gastric or colonic motility, and examples of FI management systems/collectors. The complete quick reference guide is available in the Members-Only library at the WOCN Society's Web site (http://www.wocn.org), and it can also be purchased from the online bookstore at the Society's Web site. This article provides a synopsis of the key features contained in the complete quick reference guide. PMID:24378693

  1. Survey of anal sphincter dysfunction using anal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence: a possible guide to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; DiMarino, Anthony J.; Moleski, Stephanie; Rattan, Satish; Cohen, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the surge of new medical and surgical approaches to treat fecal incontinence, the types of sphincter abnormalities in patients with incontinence have not been well characterized. We aimed to categorize anal sphincter dysfunction using anorectal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence as a potential guide for improved treatment. Methods A retrospective review of 162 consecutive patients with fecal incontinence referred for anorectal manometry was performed. Resting anal pressure and maximal squeeze pressure were considered as measures of internal anal sphincter and external anal sphincter function respectively. Results Mean age of the patients was 63 years (13-89); females (81.5%) and males (18.5%). 74% of the patients had sphincter dysfunction on anorectal manometry. Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 62% patients vs. external anal sphincter dysfunction present in 44% patients. 80% females had abnormal manometry vs. 44% in males (P<0.0001). Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 68% females vs. 37% in males (P=0.0026). Conclusions Overall, abnormal anorectal manometry studies revealed that internal anal sphincter dysfunction is the most common finding, alone or in combination with external anal sphincter dysfunction. We suggest that anorectal manometry may be important to delineate anal sphincter function prior to using newer therapeutic mechanical devices. Future studies using pharmacological agents to increase internal anal sphincter tone may be of clinical importance. Finally, the classification of fecal incontinence based on the type of sphincter dysfunction may be an improved guide in the selection of newer agents in treating fecal incontinence. PMID:26423466

  2. Rectal bleeding, fecal incontinence, and high stool frequency after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Normal tissue complication probability modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hart, Augustinus; Koper, Peter C.M.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether inclusion of predisposing clinical features in the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model improves the estimation of late gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: This study includes 468 prostate cancer patients participating in a randomized trial comparing 68 with 78 Gy. We fitted the probability of developing late toxicity within 3 years (rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence) with the original, and a modified LKB model, in which a clinical feature (e.g., history of abdominal surgery) was taken into account by fitting subset specific TD50s. The ratio of these TD50s is the dose-modifying factor for that clinical feature. Dose distributions of anorectal (bleeding and frequency) and anal wall (fecal incontinence) were used. Results: The modified LKB model gave significantly better fits than the original LKB model. Patients with a history of abdominal surgery had a lower tolerance to radiation than did patients without previous surgery, with a dose-modifying factor of 1.1 for bleeding and of 2.5 for fecal incontinence. The dose-response curve for bleeding was approximately two times steeper than that for frequency and three times steeper than that for fecal incontinence. Conclusions: Inclusion of predisposing clinical features significantly improved the estimation of the NTCP. For patients with a history of abdominal surgery, more severe dose constraints should therefore be used during treatment plan optimization.

  3. Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: clinical trial in fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). The Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, successfully enrolled 189 community-living adu...

  4. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... stool leaves the body. [ Top ] How does bowel control work? Bowel control relies on muscles and nerves ... Current Funding Opportunities Funded Grants & Grant History Funding Process Research Programs & Contacts Research Training & Career Development Research ...

  5. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... anus, the opening through which stool leaves the body. [ Top ] How does bowel control work? Bowel control relies on muscles and nerves ... such as after every meal. Over time, the body becomes used to a regular ... regular bowel control pattern can take weeks to months. Pelvic Floor ...

  6. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800μg/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure

  7. Impact of Fecal Incontinence and Its Treatment on Quality of Life in Women

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a physically and psychosocially debilitating disorder which negatively impacts quality of life (QOL). It bears a significant burden not only on patients but also on their families, caretakers, as well as society as a whole. Even though it is considered a somewhat common condition, especially as women age, the prevalence is often underestimated due to patients’ reluctance to report symptoms or seek care. The evaluation and treatment of FI can be also hindered by lack of understanding of the current management options among healthcare providers and how they impact on QOL. This article provides a comprehensive review on the impact of FI and its treatment on QOL in women. PMID:25776296

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Permacol Injection in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Jennifer; Ayantunde, Abraham; Praveen, Bandipalyam V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Permacol has been gaining popularity in recent times for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI). This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of anal submucosal Permacol injection in the treatment of FI. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent Permacol injection for FI over a 3-year period were included. Patients' data relating to obstetric history, anorectal/pelvic operations, type of FI, preoperative anorectal physiology results and follow-up details for outcome measures were collected. Preoperative and postoperative Cleveland Clinic Florida Incontinence Scores (CCFISs) were noted. Patients were surveyed by using a telephone questionnaire to assess the quality of life and other outcome measures. Data were analysed using SPSS ver.19.0. Results Thirty patients (28 females and 2 males) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. Of those patients, 37%, 50%, and 13% were noted to have passive, mixed and urge FI, respectively. Six of the patients (20%) had repeat Permacol injections, 5 of whom had sustained responses to the first Permacol injection for a mean of 11 months. There was a significant improvement in the CCFIS from a baseline median of 12.5, mean 12.8 interquartile range [IQR], 6–20), to a median of 3.5, mean 4.8 (IQR, 0–20), P < 0.001. Of the patients surveyed by telephone 89% were satisfied with their overall experience and the improvement in their symptoms following Permacol injections. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that Permacol injection for the treatment of FI is safe and effective and has no associated major complications. However, the results are not permanent; consequently, a significant proportion of the patients with an initial response may require repeat injections. PMID:27218098

  9. Obstetric Sphincter Injury Interacts with Diarrhea and Urgency to Increase the Risk of Fecal Incontinence in Women with IBS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Palsson, Olafur S; Geller, Elizabeth; Turner, Marsha; Parnell, Brent; Crane, Andrea; Jannelli, Mary; Wells, Ellen; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Lin, Feng-Chang; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To confirm that fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for fecal incontinence (FI), to identify obstetrical risk factors associated with FI in women with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and to determine whether obstetric anal sphincter injuries interact with diarrhea or urgency to explain the occurrence of FI. Methods The study is a supplement to a diary study of bowel symptoms in 164 female patients with IBS. Subjects completed daily bowel symptom diaries for 90 consecutive days and rated each bowel movement (BM) for stool consistency and presence of urgency, pain, and FI. All female participants from the parent study were invited to complete a telephone-administered 33-item bowel symptom and obstetric history questionnaire which included the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Results Out of 164 women in the parent study, 115 (70.1%) completed the interview. Seventy-four (45.1%) reported FI on their diary including 34 (29.6%) who reported at least one episode per month, 112 (97.4%) reported episodes of urgency, and 106 (92.2%) reported episodes of diarrhea. The mean FISI score was 13.9±9.7. Upon multivariable analysis, FI was significantly associated with parity (p=0.007), operative vaginal delivery (p=0.049), obstetrical sphincter lacerations (p=0.007), fecal urgency (p=0.005), diarrhea (p=0.008), and hysterectomy (p=0.004), but was not associated with episiotomy, pelvic organ prolapse, or urinary incontinence. The synergistic interactions of obstetric anal sphincter laceration with urgency (p=0.002) and diarrhea (p=0.004) were significant risk factors for FI. Conclusion Fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for FI, and they interact with obstetric anal sphincter laceration to amplify the risk of FI. PMID:23321658

  10. Malone antegrade continence enema (MACE) for fecal incontinence in imperforate anus improves quality of life.

    PubMed

    Mattix, Kelly D; Novotny, Nathan M; Shelley, Anita A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2007-12-01

    The MACE procedure has been used in patients with imperforate anus (IA) to improve fecal continence. Our aim was to assess the impact of the MACE on the quality of life (QOL) in children with IA and fecal incontinence. A retrospective review was performed of children with IA that underwent the MACE procedure between 1997 and 2004. Patients and their parents were contacted by telephone survey regarding continence and its psychosocial effects before and after MACE. The same survey was given to the patients' teachers. Responses to 15 questions were compiled and a QOL score calculated and significance evaluated by t-test (P < or = 0.05). IRB approval was obtained. Thirty-two patients were identified with a mean age at operation of 9 years (4-19 years) and mean follow-up of 3.8 years (7 months to 8 years). Four patients had a low malformation, 8 were intermediate, 15 were high, and 5 had a cloacal anomaly. Twenty patients had documented sacral/spinal anomalies, including five with tethered cord. Post-MACE complications included stenosis in 16 (50%), with 11 requiring an operative revision at a mean of 21.7 months (2 months to 6 years), takedown in one at 4 years and volvulus in one at 18 months. Prior to the MACE, 18/25 (72%) had poor QOL scores. Post-MACE QOL results were similar between patients, parents and teachers. Patients' mean QOL score improved from 59.9 to 26.3% (P < 0.001), with parents from 59.7 to 26.4% (P < 0.001). QOL score improved >50% in nine families, 25-50% in ten and <25% in six. All patients and parents interviewed reported an improvement in their QOL following the MACE. This procedure should be offered to children with IA with the expectation of significant improvement in QOL. PMID:17938937

  11. Eliciting Help-Seeking Behaviors in Patients With Fecal Incontinence: Supporting Timely Access to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, S Lana

    2016-09-01

    People with fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms often do not report their symptoms to their care providers, which may adversely impact their quality of life. Although the differential diagnosis for the cause of an individual's FI symptoms can be done by a family doctor, nurse practitioner, or a specialist, many other healthcare professionals have the training and education to competently screen patients for FI risk factors. Those individuals identified with FI symptoms can be supported to disclose this information to their healthcare professional in a timely manner. Healthcare professionals have a responsibility to encourage patients to seek medical treatment in order to ensure an accurate diagnosis for their FI symptoms, and to support clients through the process of managing symptoms including adhering to care plans to mitigate modifiable causes of FI. When clients actively seek medical help, it is referred to as help-seeking behavior. Given the sensitive nature of FI, with the associated stigma and taboo surrounding the topic, healthcare providers must conscientiously work to support each client with sensitivity and self-awareness. PMID:27580281

  12. Incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Langemo, Diane; Hanson, Darlene; Hunter, Susan; Thompson, Patricia; Oh, In Eui

    2011-03-01

    Incontinence is a prevalent problem and can lead to many complications. Both urinary and fecal incontinence can result in tissue breakdown, now commonly referred to as incontinence-associated dermatitis. This article addresses the types of incontinence, its etiology and pathophysiology, assessment, prevention and treatment, and the latest research. PMID:21326024

  13. HealthLines: Incontinent? You're Not Alone

    MedlinePlus

    ... or are injured. The three main disorders are urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse, which happens ... least one pelvic disorder; nearly 16 percent reported urinary incontinence; 9 percent had fecal incontinence; and nearly 3 ...

  14. Urinary, Fecal, and Dual Incontinence in Older U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jennifer M.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Vaughan, Camille P.; Markland, Alayne D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate the prevalence of urinary (UI), fecal (FI), and dual incontinence (DI) and to identify shared factors associated with each type of incontinence in older U.S. women and men. DESIGN Population-based cross-sectional study. SETTING National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2005–2010). PARTICIPANTS Women and men aged 50 and older. MEASUREMENTS UI was defined as moderate to severe (≥3 on a validated UI severity index, range 0–12); FI was at least monthly loss of solid, liquid, or mucus stool; and DI was the presence of UI and FI. RESULTS Women were more likely than men to report UI only and DI but not FI only (UI only, women 19.8%, men 6.4%; FI only, women 8.2%, men 8.4%; DI women, 6.0%, men 1.9%). In both sexes, prevalence increased with age. In regression models adjusted for parity and hysterectomy, DI in women was associated with non-Hispanic white race (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5–3.4), depression (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 2.0–11.1), comorbidities (OR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.9–9.6 for ≥3 comorbidities vs none), hysterectomy (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2–2.7), and diarrhea (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.5–5.0). In men, ADL impairment (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.2–4.9) and poorer self-rated health (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.5–5.30) were associated with DI. CONCLUSION UI, FI, and DI are common in older women and men. Factors associated with DI were distinct from those associated with UI and FI. There were also differences according to sex, with DI associated with depression and comorbid diseases in women and lack of functional ability and poorer self-rated health in men. PMID:25940401

  15. Free Antropyloric Valve Flap for End-Stage Fecal Incontinence as a Substitute to Permanent Colostomy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Brijesh; Chandra, Abhijeet; Gejje, Somashekar; Noushif, M; Upadhyay, Divya N; Mishra, Nalini

    2016-03-01

    Background Surgical removal of the anal canal and sphincter for carcinoma results in end-stage fecal incontinence (ESFI) and requires a permanent colostomy resulting in significant impact on quality of life. Presently, there are limited options for EFSI. The successful use of pedicled antropyloric valve (APV) based on left gastroepiploic artery as an alternative to permanent colostomy has previously been described. It is based on a long omental pedicle which at times is risky and is difficult to perform. A free APV flap could be the only solution in such cases. We assessed the vascular anatomy for the technical feasibility of a free APV flap, and report the first ever clinical application of free APV flap. Methods Bench dissection of 10 pancreaticoduodenectomy specimens was done to delineate the vessels of APV flap. It showed the consistent presence of right gastroepiploic and infrapyloric vessels in all specimens with sufficient diameters. After the technical feasibility, a free APV Flap transposition to perineum was done in a patient, where pedicled transposition was not feasible. Results The free APV flap with vagus nerve branch was harvested without extensive dissection along the greater curvature of stomach. A tension free anastomosis was achieved between the epiploic and left colic vessels. The flap survived well and had a definite tone on digital examination. It was evaluated by radiological and manometric methods. Conclusions APV flap for EFSI can be done as a free flap with distinct advantages and it has the potential of becoming popular options for EFSI. PMID:26473796

  16. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Evaluation, Diagnostic Assessment and Treatment of Fecal Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a debilitating disorder which negatively impacts quality of life. The etiology is often multifactorial and although most women with FI are able to be treated, many remain untreated because a significant proportion of women do not report their symptoms and seek care. The evaluation and treatment of FI can be also hindered by a lack of understanding of the mechanisms and current options. This article provides a review on the evidence-based evaluation and management for FI. PMID:25505643

  17. Adverse events of sacral neuromodulation for fecal incontinence reported to the federal drug administration

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the nature and severity of AE related to sacral neurostimulation (SNS). METHODS: Based on Pubmed and Embase searches, we identified published trials and case series of SNS for fecal incontinence (FI) and extracted data on adverse events, requiring an active intervention. Those problems were operationally defined as infection, device removal explant or need for lead and/or generator replacement. In addition, we analyzed the Manufacturer and User Device Experience registry of the Federal Drug Administration for the months of August - October of 2015. Events were included if the report specifically mentioned gastrointestinal (GI), bowel and FI as indication and if the narrative did not focus on bladder symptoms. The classification, reporter, the date of the recorded complaint, time between initial implant and report, the type of AE, steps taken and outcome were extracted from the report. In cases of device removal or replacement, we looked for confirmatory comments by healthcare providers or the manufacturer. RESULTS: Published studies reported adverse events and reoperation rates for 1954 patients, followed for 27 (1-117) mo. Reoperation rates were 18.6% (14.2-23.9) with device explants accounting for 10.0% (7.8-12.7) of secondary surgeries; rates of device replacement or explant or pocket site and electrode revisions increased with longer follow up. During the period examined, the FDA received 1684 reports of AE related to SNS with FI or GI listed as indication. A total of 652 reports met the inclusion criteria, with 52.7% specifically listing FI. Lack or loss of benefit (48.9%), pain or dysesthesia (27.8%) and complication at the generator implantation site (8.7%) were most commonly listed. Complaints led to secondary surgeries in 29.7% of the AE. Reoperations were performed to explant (38.2%) or replace (46.5%) the device or a lead, or revise the generator pocket (14.6%). Conservative management changes mostly involved changes in stimulation

  18. A prospective, randomized, controlled study of a suspension positioning system used with elderly bedridden patients with neurogenic fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Su, Mei-Yin; Lin, Shi-Quan; zhou, Ye-Wen; Zhou, Ye-Wen; Liu, Si-Ya; Lin, Ai; Lin, Xi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with acute neurological impairment are prone to severe disability, fecal incontinence (FI), and resultant complications. A suspension positioning system (SPS), based on the orthopedic suspension traction system commonly used for conservative treatment of pediatric femoral fracture and uncomplicated adult pelvic fracture, was developed to facilitate FI management in patients immobilized secondary to an acute neurological condition. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the system, a prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted between October 2009 and July 2012. Two hundred (200) elderly, bedridden, hospitalized patients with acute, nonchronic neurological impairment were randomly assigned to receive routine FI nursing care (ie, individualized dietary modification, psychological support, health education, and social support for caregivers and family members [control group]) or routine incontinence care plus the SPS (experimental group) during the day. Rates of perianal fecal contamination, skin breakdown, incontinence associated dermatitis, pressure ulcer development, and lower urinary tract infection (LUTI) were significantly lower in the SPS than in the control group (P <0.05). Length of hospitalization and costs of care were also lower in the SPS group (P <0.05). Patient quality-of-life (QoL) and FI QoL scores were similar at baseline but significantly higher (better) at the 6-month follow-up interview in the SPS than in the control group (P <0.05). In this study, the rate of FI-associated morbidities was lower and 6-month patient QoL scores were higher in the SPS than in the control group. No adverse events were observed, and all patients completed the study. Further clinical studies are needed to examine the long-term effects of SPS use among neurologically impaired FI patients. PMID:25581605

  19. The Relationship of 3D Translabial Ultrasound Anal Sphincter Complex Measurements to Postpartum Anal and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine whether ASC measurements on translabial ultrasound (TL-US) were related to anal incontinence (AI) or fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms six months postpartum. Methods A prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent TL-US six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). Muscle thickness was measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions of the external sphincter (EAS), the same four quadrants of the internal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels, and at the bilateral pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Measurements were correlated to AI and FI on the Wexner Fecal Incontinence Scale, with sub-analyses by mode of delivery. The odds ratio (OR) of symptoms was calculated for every one millimeter increase in muscle thickness (E1MIT). Results 423 women (299 VB, 124 CD) had TL-US six months postpartum. Decreased AI risk was associated with thicker measurements at the 6 o’clock (OR 0.74 E1MIT) and 9 o’clock proximal IAS (OR 0.71 E1MIT) in the entire cohort. For CD women, thicker measurements of the 9 o’clock proximal IAS were associated with decreased risk of AI (OR 0.56 E1MIT) and thicker distal 6 o’clock IAS measurements were related to a decreased risk of FI (OR 0.37 E1MIT). For VB women, no sphincter measurements were significantly related to symptoms, but thicker PVM measurements were associated with increased risk of AI (right side OR 1.32 E1MIT; left side OR 1.21 E1MIT). Conclusions ASC anatomy is associated with AI and FI in certain locations; these locations varybased on the patient’s mode of delivery. PMID:26085463

  20. Identifying factors associated with clinical success in patients treated with NASHA®/Dx injection for fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Howard; Barrett, Andrew C; Wolf, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Injection with the bulking agent consisting of non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid/dextranomer (NASHA®/Dx) is well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI); however, the patient population that may derive maximum benefit has not been established. This post hoc responder analysis assessed demographic and baseline characteristics predictive of responsiveness to NASHA/Dx treatment. Methods Adults with a Cleveland Clinic Florida fecal incontinence score (CCFIS) ≥10 were randomized to receive NASHA/Dx or sham treatment. The primary end point was response to treatment (ie, decrease from baseline of ≥50% in number of FI episodes) at 6 months; a prespecified secondary end point was change in fecal incontinence quality of life (FIQL) score at 6 months. Post hoc subgroup analyses were performed for baseline and demographic characteristics and prior FI treatments. Results Overall, response to treatment was significantly greater with NASHA/Dx versus sham injection (52.7% vs 32.1%; P=0.0089). All subgroups analyzed demonstrated evidence of improvement, favoring NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both response to treatment and change in the FIQL coping/behavior subscale score. For the primary end point, a significantly greater percentage of patients with CCFIS ≤15, FI symptoms ≤5 years’ duration, or obstetric causes of FI responded to NASHA/Dx treatment versus patients receiving sham treatment (51.1% vs 28.3%, P=0.0169; 55.4% vs 25.7%, P=0.0026; and 53.6% vs 23.1%, P=0.0191, respectively). The mean change in the FIQL coping/behavior score significantly favored NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for patients with CCFIS ≤15 (P=0.0371), FI symptoms ≤5 years’ duration (P=0.0289), or obstetric causes of FI (P=0.0384). Patients without a history of specific FI treatments (eg, antidiarrheal medications, biofeedback, surgery) were more likely to respond to NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both end points. Conclusion Although all

  1. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE: Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. METHODS: Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. RESULTS: Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. CONCLUSION: Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  2. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. Methods Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. Results Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. Conclusion Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  3. Hyperspectral Imaging of fecal contamination on chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    ProVision Technologies, a NASA research partnership center at Sternis Space Center in Mississippi, has developed a new hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system that is much smaller than the original large units used aboard remote sensing aircraft and satellites. The new apparatus is about the size of a breadbox. Health-related applications of HSI include scanning chickens during processing to help prevent contaminated food from getting to the table. ProVision is working with Sanderson Farms of Mississippi and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ProVision has a record in its spectral library of the unique spectral signature of fecal contamination, so chickens can be scanned and those with a positive reading can be separated. HSI sensors can also determine the quantity of surface contamination. Research in this application is quite advanced, and ProVision is working on a licensing agreement for the technology. The potential for future use of this equipment in food processing and food safety is enormous.

  4. Dynamic versus Adynamic Graciloplasty in Treatment of End-Stage Fecal Incontinence: Is the Implantation of the Pacemaker Really Necessary? 12-Month Follow-Up in a Clinical, Physiological, and Functional Study

    PubMed Central

    Walega, Piotr; Romaniszyn, Michal; Siarkiewicz, Benita; Zelazny, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study is to compare functional results of end-stage fecal incontinence treatment with dynamic graciloplasty and adynamic graciloplasty augmented with transanal conditioning of the transposed muscle. Methods. A total of 20 patients were qualified for graciloplasty procedure due to end-stage fecal incontinence. 7 patients underwent dynamic graciloplasty (DGP), whereas 13 patients were treated with adynamic graciloplasty, with transanal stimulation in the postoperative period (AGP). Clinical, functional, and quality of life assessments were performed 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedures. Results. There were no intraoperative or early postoperative complications. The detachment of gracilis muscle tendon was observed in one patient in DGP group and two in AGP group. There was a significant improvement of Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) and Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) scores in both groups 12 months after procedure. Anorectal manometry showed improvement regarding basal and squeeze pressures in both groups, with significantly better squeeze pressures in AGP group. Conclusions. The functional effects in the DGP and AGP groups were similar. Significantly lower price of the procedure and avoidance of implant-related complication risk suggest the attractiveness of the AGP method augmented by transanal stimulation. PMID:25861261

  5. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Chen, Suming; Chan, Diane E.

    2013-05-01

    Fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and vegetables have occurred more frequently in recent years in the United States. Among fruits, strawberry is one high-potential vector of fecal contamination and foodborne illnesses since the fruit is often consumed raw and with minimal processing. In the present study, line-scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques were applied for inspection of fecal material on strawberries, and the spectral characteristics and specific wavebands of strawberries were determined by detection algorithms. The results would improve the safety and quality of produce consumed by the public.

  6. Improved hyperspectral imaging system for fecal detection on poultry carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has developed imaging technology to detect fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses. The hyperspectral imaging system operates from about 400 to 1000 nm, but only a few wavelengths are used in a real-time multispectral system. Recently, the upgraded system, inc...

  7. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Urinary Incontinence What Is Urinary Incontinence? Urinary incontinence means a person leaks urine by ... about what you can do. Types of Urinary Incontinence There are different types of urinary incontinence. Stress ...

  8. Classification of Fecal Contamination on Leafy Greens by Hyperspectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was developed and used to obtain several two-waveband spectral ratios on leafy green vegetables, represented by romaine lettuce and baby spinach in this study. The ratios were analyzed to determine the proper one for detecting bovine fecal contamination on...

  9. Classification of fecal contamination on leafy greens by hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was developed and used to obtain several two-waveband spectral ratios on leafy green vegetables, represented by romaine lettuce and baby spinach in this study. The ratios were analyzed to determine the proper one for detecting bovine fecal contamination on...

  10. Classification of fecal contamination on leafy greens by hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Kang, Sukwon; Chan, Diane E.; Lefcourt, Alan

    2010-04-01

    This paper reported the development of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system using ultraviolet-A excitation (320-400 nm) for detection of bovine fecal contaminants on the abaxial and adaxial surfaces of romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves. Six spots of fecal contamination were applied to each of 40 lettuce and 40 spinach leaves. In this study, the wavebands at 666 nm and 680 nm were selected by the correlation analysis. The two-band ratio, 666 nm / 680 nm, of fluorescence intensity was used to differentiate the contaminated spots from uncontaminated leaf area. The proposed method could accurately detect all of the contaminated spots.

  11. [Incontinence - Etiology, diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Frieling, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined by the unintentional loss of solid or liquid stool, and anal incontinence includes leakage of gas and / or fecal incontinence. Anal-fecal incontinence is not a diagnosis but a symptom. Many patients hide the problem from their families, friends, and even their doctors. Epidemiologic studies indicate a prevalence between 7-15 %, up to 30 % in hospitals and up to 70 % in longterm care settings. Anal-fecal incontinence causes a significant socio-economic burden. There is no widely accepted approach for classifying anal-fecal incontinence available. Anal-fecal continence is maintained by anatomical factors, rectoanal sensation, and rectal compliance. The diagnostic approach comprises muscle and nerve injuries by iatrogenic, obstetric or surgical trauma, descending pelvic floor or associated diseases. A basic diagnostic workup is sufficient to characterize the different manifestations of fecal incontinence in most of the cases. This includes patient history with a daily stool protocol and digital rectal investigation. Additional investigations may include anorectal manometry, anal sphincter EMG, conduction velocity of the pudendal nerve, needle EMG, barostat investigation, defecography and the dynamic MRI. Therapeutic interventions are focused on the individual symptoms and should be provided in close cooperation with gastroenterologists, surgeons, gynecologists, urologists, physiotherapeutics and psychologists (nutritional-training, food fibre content, pharmacological treatment of diarrhea/constipation, toilet training, pelvic floor gymnastic, anal sphincter training, biofeedback). Surgical therapy includes the STARR operation for rectoanal prolapse and sacral nerve stimulation for chronic constipation and anal-fecal incontinence. Surgery should not be applied unless the diagnostic work-up is complete and all conservative treatment options failed. PMID:27557074

  12. Automatic identification of fungi under complex microscopic fecal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Yuan, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Lei, Haoting; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Juanxiu; Du, Xiaohui; Ni, Guangming; Liu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Automatic identification of fungi in microscopic fecal images provides important information for evaluating digestive diseases. To date, disease diagnosis is primarily performed by manual techniques. However, the accuracy of this approach depends on the operator's expertise and subjective factors. The proposed system automatically identifies fungi in microscopic fecal images that contain other cells and impurities under complex environments. We segment images twice to obtain the correct area of interest, and select ten features, including the circle number, concavity point, and other basic features, to filter fungi. An artificial neural network (ANN) system is used to identify the fungi. The first stage (ANN-1) processes features from five images in differing focal lengths; the second stage (ANN-2) identifies the fungi using the ANN-1 output values. Images in differing focal lengths can be used to improve the identification result. The system output accurately detects the image, whether or not it has fungi. If the image does have fungi, the system output counts the number of different fungi types.

  13. Management of Loose, Frequent Stools and Fecal Incontinence in a Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia Patient with Oral Serum-derived Bovine Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Good, Larry; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    AIM Chronic diarrhea with fecal incontinence (FI) is a severe, underreported, and intractable problem in many patients for which limited pharmaceutical options exist. METHODS A retrospective case history was collected after the administration of a prescription medical food composed of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) at 5 g once daily in a patient with chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) for chronic loose, frequent, and urgent stools. The patient was an 84-year-old white male with a 20-year history of progressively worsening chronic diarrhea with six to eight watery stools per day (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Type 7), urgency, nocturnal diarrhea, FI, and postprandial abdominal discomfort before administration of SBI. RESULTS After four weeks of SBI administration, the patient had two to three soft, semi-formed stools (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Types 4 and 5) per day with no nocturnal diarrhea, urgency, or FI, as well as full resolution of abdominal discomfort. In addition, the patient expressed an enhanced quality of life (QoL): able to travel, attend social events, and perform tasks not possible before therapy. CONCLUSION This case underscores how a safe, nutritional therapy may offer a new modality for physicians to address chronic loose, frequent stools with FI in patients with CMI in this difficult to manage gastrointestinal population. PMID:25674029

  14. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and classification of fecal incontinence: State of the Science Summary for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Dunivan, Gena; Goode, Patricia S.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Markland, Alayne D.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Mott, Louise; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Whitehead, William E.; Rao, Satish S.C.; Hamilton, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the National Institutes of Health sponsored a conference to address major gaps in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of fecal incontinence (FI) and to identify topics for future clinical research. This article is the first of a two-part summary of those proceedings. FI is a common symptom, with a prevalence that ranges from 7 to 15% in community-dwelling men and women, but is often underreported as providers seldom screen for FI and patients do not volunteer the symptom, even though the symptoms can have a devastating impact on quality of life. Rough estimates suggest that FI is associated with a substantial economic burden, particularly in patients who require surgical therapy. Bowel disturbances, particularly diarrhea, the symptom of rectal urgency, and burden of chronic illness are the strongest independent risk factors for FI in the community. Smoking, obesity, and inappropriate cholecystectomy are emerging, potentially modifiable risk factors. Other risk factors for FI include advanced age, female gender, disease burden (co-morbidity count, diabetes), anal sphincter trauma (obstetrical injury, prior surgery), and decreased physical activity. Neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, pelvic floor anatomical disturbances (rectal prolapse) are also associated with FI. The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for FI include diarrhea, anal and pelvic floor weakness, reduced rectal compliance, and reduced or increased rectal sensation; many patients have multi-faceted anorectal dysfunctions. The type (urge, passive or combined); etiology (anorectal disturbance, bowel symptoms or both); and severity of FI provide the basis for classifying FI; these domains can be integrated to comprehensively characterize the symptom. Several validated scales for classifying symptom severity and its impact on quality of life are available. Symptom severity scales should incorporate the frequency, volume, consistency

  15. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and classification of fecal incontinence: state of the science summary for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) workshop.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Dunivan, Gena; Goode, Patricia S; Lukacz, Emily S; Markland, Alayne D; Matthews, Catherine A; Mott, Louise; Rogers, Rebecca G; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Whitehead, William E; Rao, Satish S C; Hamilton, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the National Institutes of Health sponsored a conference to address major gaps in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of fecal incontinence (FI) and to identify topics for future clinical research. This article is the first of a two-part summary of those proceedings. FI is a common symptom, with a prevalence that ranges from 7 to 15% in community-dwelling men and women, but it is often underreported, as providers seldom screen for FI and patients do not volunteer the symptom, even though the symptoms can have a devastating impact on the quality of life. Rough estimates suggest that FI is associated with a substantial economic burden, particularly in patients who require surgical therapy. Bowel disturbances, particularly diarrhea, the symptom of rectal urgency, and burden of chronic illness are the strongest independent risk factors for FI in the community. Smoking, obesity, and inappropriate cholecystectomy are emerging, potentially modifiable risk factors. Other risk factors for FI include advanced age, female gender, disease burden (comorbidity count, diabetes), anal sphincter trauma (obstetrical injury, prior surgery), and decreased physical activity. Neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and pelvic floor anatomical disturbances (rectal prolapse) are also associated with FI. The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for FI include diarrhea, anal and pelvic floor weakness, reduced rectal compliance, and reduced or increased rectal sensation; many patients have multifaceted anorectal dysfunctions. The type (urge, passive or combined), etiology (anorectal disturbance, bowel symptoms, or both), and severity of FI provide the basis for classifying FI; these domains can be integrated to comprehensively characterize the symptom. Several validated scales for classifying symptom severity and its impact on the quality of life are available. Symptom severity scales should incorporate the frequency, volume

  16. Length Tension Function of Puborectalis Muscle: Implications for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Sheean, Geoff; Padda, Bikram S; Rajasekaran, Mahadevan R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims External anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PRM) play important role in anal continence function. Based on length-tension measurement, we recently reported that the human EAS muscle operates at short sarcomere length under physiological conditions. Goal of our study was to determine if PRM also operates at the short sarcomere length. Methods Length-tension relationship of the PRM muscle was studied in vivo in 10 healthy nullipara women. Length was altered by vaginal distension using custom-designed probes of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 mm diameters as well as by distending a polyethylene bag with different volumes of water. Probes were equipped with a reverse perfuse sleeve sensor to measure vaginal pressure (surrogate of PRM tension). PRM electromyogram (EMG) was recorded using wire electrodes. Three-dimensional ultra-sound images were obtained to determine effect of vaginal distension on PRM length. Results Ultrasound images demonstrate distension volume dependent increase in PRM length. Rest and squeeze pressures of vaginal bag increased with the increase in bag volume. Similarly, the change in vaginal pressure, which represents the PRM contraction increased with the increase in the probe size. Increase in probe size was not associated with an increase in EMG activity (a marker of neural drive) of the PRM. Conclusions Probe size dependent increase in PRM contraction pressure, in the presence of constant EMG (neural input) proves that the human PRM operates at short sarcomere length. Surgically adjusting the PRM length may represent a novel strategy to improve treat anal continence and possibly other pelvic floor disorders. PMID:25273124

  17. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoonsoo; O'Donnell, Colm P.

    2016-05-01

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer avoid harvesting fecal contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil, and spinach leaves are compared. A common aperture imager designed with two identical monochromatic cameras, a beam splitter, and optical filters was used to simultaneously capture two-spectral images of leaves contaminated with both fecal matter and soil. The optical filters where 10 nm full width half maximum bandpass filters, one at 690 nm and the second at 710 nm. These were mounted in front of the object lenses. New images were created using the ratio of these two spectral images on a pixel by pixel basis. Image analysis results showed that the fecal matter contamination could be distinguished from soil and leaf on the ratio images. The use of this technology has potential to allow detection of fecal contamination in produce fields which can be a source of foodbourne illnesses. It has the added benefit of mitigating cross-contamination during harvesting and processing.

  18. [Postpartum incontinence. Narrative review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Alós, Rafael; Carceller, M Soledad; Solana, Amparo; Frangi, Andrés; Ruiz, M Dolores; Lozoya, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The development of fecal incontinence after childbirth is a common event. This incontinence responds to a multifactorial etiology in which the most common element is external anal sphincter injury. There are several risk factors, and it is very important to know and avoid them. Sphincter injury may result from perineal tear or sometimes by incorrectly performing an episiotomy. It is very important to recognize the injury when it occurs and repair it properly. Pudendal nerve trauma may contribute to the effect of direct sphincter injury. Persistence of incontinence is common, even after sphincter repair. Surgical sphincteroplasty is the standard treatment of obstetric sphincter injuries, however, sacral or tibial electric stimulation therapies are being applied in patients with sphincter injuries not repaired with promising results. PMID:25467972

  19. Cross-sectional imaging following surgical interventions for stress urinary incontinence in females.

    PubMed

    Jung, Brian C; Tran, Ngoc-Anh; Verma, Sadhna; Dutta, Rahul; Tung, Paul; Mousa, Michael; Hernandez-Rangel, Eduardo; Nayyar, Megha; Lall, Chandana

    2016-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a condition in which the weakness of the pelvic floor muscles causes unintentional loss of urine. For patients who are unable to achieve symptomatic improvement from lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy, surgical placement of the pelvic slings or the use of urethral bulking agents has been shown to provide tremendous symptomatic improvement. Learning to recognize the pelvic slings and to identify their complications on imaging is invaluable; however, this is challenging because of the change in the local anatomy after surgical placement of the sling. In this paper, we present CT and MR imaging to demonstrate the surgical and non-surgical treatments of female SUI and their complications. Through this pictorial essay, our goal is to familiarize radiologists with recognizing the various forms of treatment for SUIs, the relevant pelvic anatomy, and complications that may occur secondary to the surgical placement of the pelvic slings. PMID:26934892

  20. Urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Loss of bladder control; Uncontrollable urination; Urination - uncontrollable; Incontinence - urinary ... Causes of urinary incontinence include: Blockage in the urinary system Brain or nerve problems Dementia or other mental health problems that make ...

  1. Effect of broiler carcass washing on fecal contaminant imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service has mandated that there be no fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses when the carcasses enter the chiller tank because of a risk of cross-contamination of pathogens. Since the inception of the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) mandate, th...

  2. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rectocele. This is occasionally performed to treat stress incontinence in women by supporting the bladder and urethra in its ... straining with bowel movements since this can cause stress on the incision.

  3. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time poultry fecal detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preliminary results demonstrated that high speed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system has a potential for real-time online fecal detection during poultry processing. To improve detection accuracy, fully calibrated images both spatially and spectrally were acquired for further processing. In ad...

  4. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time on-line poultry fecal detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preliminary results demonstrated that high speed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system has a potential for real-time online fecal detection during poultry processing. To improve detection accuracy, fully calibrated images both spatially and spectrally were acquired for further processing. In ad...

  5. Red to far-red multispectral fluorescence image fusion for detection of fecal contamination on apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research developed a multispectral algorithm derived from hyperspectral line-scan fluorescence imaging under violet/blue LED excitation for detection of fecal contamination on Golden Delicious apples. Using a hyperspectral line-scan imaging system consisting of an EMCCD camera, spectrograph, an...

  6. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on chicken carcasses was investigated. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging for inspection of agri...

  7. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  8. Hyperspectral imaging technique for detection of poultry fecal residues on food processing equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2005-11-01

    Emerging concerns about safety and security in current mass production of food products necessitate rapid and reliable inspection for contaminant-free products. Diluted fecal residues on poultry processing plant equipment surface, not easily discernable from water by human eye, are contamination sources for poultry carcasses. Development of sensitive detection methods for fecal residues is essential to ensure safe production of poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral imaging techniques have shown good potential for detecting of the presence of fecal and other biological substances on food and processing equipment surfaces. In this study, use of high spatial resolution hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging (with UV-A excitation) is presented as a tool for selecting a few multispectral bands to detect diluted fecal and ingesta residues on materials used for manufacturing processing equipment. Reflectance and fluorescence imaging methods were compared for potential detection of a range of diluted fecal residues on the surfaces of processing plant equipment. Results showed that low concentrations of poultry feces and ingesta, diluted up to 1:100 by weight with double distilled water, could be detected using hyperspectral fluorescence images with an accuracy of 97.2%. Spectral bands determined in this study could be used for developing a real-time multispectral inspection device for detection of harmful organic residues on processing plant equipment.

  9. Analysis of reflectance spectra from hyperspectral images of poultry carcasses for fecal and ingesta detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Smith, Doug P.; Poole, Gavin

    2002-11-01

    Identification and separation of poultry carcasses contaminated by feces and/or crop ingesta are very important to protect the consumer from a potential source of food poisoning. A transportable hyperspectral imaging system was developed to detect fecal and ingesta contamination on the surface of poultry carcasses. Detection algorithms used with the imaging system were developed from visible/near infrared monochromator spectra and with contaminates from birds fed a corn/soybean meal diet. The objectives of this study were to investigate using regions of interest reflectance spectra from hyperspectral images to determine optimal wavelengths for fecal detection algorithms from images of birds fed corn, wheat and milo diets. Spectral and spatial data between 400 and 900 nm with a 1.0 nm spectral resolution were acquired from uncontaminated and fecal and ingesta contaminated poultry carcasses. Regions of interest (ROIs) were defined for fecal and ingesta contaminated and uncontaminated skin (i.e. breast, thigh, and wing). Average reflectance spectra of the ROIs were extracted for analysis. Reflectance spectra of contaminants and uncontaminated skin differed. Spectral data pre-processing treatments with a single-term, linear regression program to select wavelengths for optimum calibration coefficients to detect contamination were developed. Fecal and ingesta detection models, specifically a quotient of 2 and/or 3-wavelengths was 100% successful in classification of contaminates.

  10. [Anal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Signorelli, I; Andreoni, G M; Capelli, G; Gozzini, P A

    1983-06-01

    The Authors describe the clinical rectal incontinence according to etiology, physiology and pathologic anatomy. They report a case of such rectal incontinence followed to hemorroidectom and treated by transplantation of gracilis muscle according to Pikrell technique, comparing this approach with other current surgical procedures. PMID:6680848

  11. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  12. Symptoms of Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  13. Incontinence Treatment: Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  14. Real-time multispectral imaging system for online poultry fecal inspection using UML

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection on broiler carcasses was developed and tested. The prototype system includes a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (517, 565 and 802-nm wavelength), which were selected and validated by...

  15. ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE SPECTRA FROM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES OF POULTRY CARCASSES FOR FECAL AND INGESTA DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and separation of poultry carcasses contaminated by feces and/or crop ingesta are very important to protect the consumer from a potential source of food poisoning. A transportable hyperspectral imaging system was developed to detect fecal and ingesta contamination on the surface of p...

  16. Real-Time Multispectral Imaging System for Online Poultry Fecal Inspection using Unified Modeling Language.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal detection on broiler carcasses has been developed. The prototype system included a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (517, 565 and 802-nm wavelength), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a...

  17. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is loss of bladder control. Symptoms can range from mild leaking to uncontrollable wetting. It can happen to anyone, but it becomes more common with age. Women experience ...

  18. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, birth defects, stroke, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and physical changes associated with aging. Pregnancy — Unborn babies push down ... incontinence in women. It is often caused by physical changes from pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. It can be ...

  19. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... you risk getting rashes, sores, skin infections and urinary tract infections. Also, you may find yourself avoiding friends and ... elderly and may be a sign of a urinary tract infection or an overactive bladder. Overflow incontinence This type ...

  20. An Overview of Bowel Incontinence: What Can Go Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Bowel incontinence, also called fecal incontinence, is the loss of control over liquid or solid stools. It can occur at any age--as a child, teenager, or adult. Severity can range from infrequent leakage of a small amount of stool to total loss of bowel control. Some persons might feel the urge to have a bowel movement but be unable to control it…

  1. Vesicorectal fistula detected on direct radionuclide cystography--importance of fecal matter imaging.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Atena; Sadeghi, Ramin; Saeedi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    We report an 11 year old male patient with the history of imperforate anus, which was repaired surgically 4 years ago. He has been complaining of intermittent passing of urine into the rectum recently. The vesicorectal fistula in this patient was proven by imaging of the fecal matter post direct radionuclide cystography study. Our case showed that nuclear medicine imaging can be extended to unanimated objects such as patients' excrements or fluids with important diagnostic yields. PMID:24610652

  2. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations. PMID:26943687

  3. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time poultry fecal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, G. W.; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin

    2010-04-01

    The ARS multispectral imaging system with three-band common aperture camera was able to inspect fecal contaminants in real-time mode during poultry processing. Recent study has demonstrated several image processing methods including binning, cuticle removal filter, median filter, and morphological analysis in real-time mode could remove false positive errors. The ARS research groups and their industry partner are now merging the fecal detection and systemically disease detection systems onto a common platform using line-scan hyperspectral imaging system. This system will aid in commercialization by creating one hyperspectral imaging system with user-defined wavelengths that can be installed in different locations of the processing line to solve significant food safety problems. Therefore, this research demonstrated the feasibility of line-scan hyperspectral imaging system in terms of processing speed and detection accuracy for a real-time, on-line fecal detection at current processing speed (140 birds per minute) of commercial poultry plant. The newly developed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system could improve Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)'s poultry safety inspection program significantly.

  4. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis between starch and fecal peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Winkler, E; Ravid-Megido, M; Rosin, D; Kuriansky, J; Yuditz, A; Horowitz, A; Orenstein, A; Shabtai, M; Ayalon, A

    2001-01-01

    Granulomatous peritonitis, caused by the starch from the surgeons' gloves, is a hypersensitivity reaction that can complicate abdominal surgery and mimic other causes of peritonitis. The diagnosis of this entity is difficult to make, and relies on a high index of suspicion. We suggest the use of magnetic resonance imaging to facilitate the diagnosis of this condition, based on an experimental animal model. 84 rats were subjected to laparotomy, and the abdominal cavity was exposed to either saline solution, talc solution, starch solution or fecal material by creating a cecal perforation. TI-weighted magnetic resonance images, with and without gadolinum enhancement, were taken after 3, 5 and 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the abdominal contents were evaluated both macroscopically and microscopically. Both talc and starch caused gross adhesions involving the entire abdominal viscera, and microscopy revealed signs of inflammation and fibrosis. Starch induced reactive granulomas. The adhesions in the cases of fecal peritonitis were confined to the area of the perforation. MR images of the starch peritonitis group was remarkable for a diffuse pathological process with enhancement of the omentum and the peritoneum after gadolinum injection. The MR readings of the fecal peritonitis group showed a localized process with no diffuse enhancement of the peritoneum. The striking differences between the magnetic resonance images of starch and fecal peritonitis in rats suggest that this modality is both sensitive and specific in diagnosing starch peritonitis in a rat model. Early non-invasive diagnosis of these separate entities would ease the establishment of the appropriate treatment. We are currently investigating the use of MRI imaging in suspected starch peritonitis in humans. PMID:12678128

  5. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:21838873

  6. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Charlotte M; Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Goecke, Tamme W; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Najjari, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  7. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  8. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Urinary Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  9. MedlinePlus: Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also in Spanish Stress incontinence Also in Spanish Suprapubic catheter care Also in Spanish Urge incontinence Also in ... catheterization - male Skin care and incontinence Stress incontinence Suprapubic catheter care Urge incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary catheters - what ...

  10. Stress urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - stress ... over 2 cups of urine in their bladder. Stress incontinence occurs when the muscles that control your ... area or the prostate (in men) Unknown causes Stress incontinence is the most common type in women. ...

  11. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  12. Real-time multispectral imaging system for online poultry fecal inspection using UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Kise, Michio; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.; Smith, Douglas P.; Thai, Chi N.

    2006-10-01

    A prototype real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection on broiler carcasses has been developed. The prototype system includes a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (517, 565 and 802-nm wavelength), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a hyperspectral imaging system with decision tree algorithm. The on-line testing results showed that the multispectral imaging technique can be used effectively for detecting feces (from duodenum, ceca, and colon) and ingesta on the surface of poultry carcasses with a processing speed of 140 birds per minute. This paper demonstrated both multispectral imaging hardware and real-time image processing software. For the software development, the Unified Modeling Language (UML) design approach was used for on-line application. The UML models included class, object, activity, sequence, and collaboration diagram. User interface model included seventeen inputs and six outputs. A window based real-time image processing software composed of eleven components, which represented class, architecture, and activity. Both hardware and software for a real-time fecal detection were tested at the pilot-scale poultry processing plant. The run-time of the software including online calibration was fast enough to inspect carcasses on-line with an industry requirement. Based on the preliminary test at the pilot-scale processing line, the system was able to acquire poultry images in real-time. According to the test results, the imaging system is reliable for the harsh environments and UML based image processing software is flexible and easy to be updated when additional parameters are needed for in-plant trials.

  13. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Hyunjeong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by highlighting contaminated food and food contact surfaces on a display monitor. It can be used under ambient lighting conditions in food processing plants. Critical components of the imaging device includes four 405-nm 10-W LEDs for fluorescence excitation, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, optical filter (670 nm used for this study), and Wi-Fi transmitter for broadcasting real-time video/images to monitoring devices such as smartphone and tablet. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of HFID in enhancing visual detection of fecal contamination on red meat, fat, and bone surfaces of beef under varying ambient luminous intensities (0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 foot-candles). Overall, diluted feces on fat, red meat and bone areas of beef surfaces were detectable in the 670-nm single-band fluorescence images when using the HFID under 0 to 50 foot-candle ambient lighting.

  14. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging using violet LEDs as excitation sources for fecal matter contaminate identification on spinach leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety in the production of fresh produce for human consumption is a worldwide issue and needs to be addressed to decrease foodborne illnesses and resulting costs. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for detection of fecal contaminates on spina...

  15. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  16. Digital bowel cleansing free detection method of colonic polyp from fecal tagging CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Takayama, Tetsuji; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Nawano, Shigeru

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a digital bowel cleansing (DBC) free detection method of colonic polyp from fecal tagging CT images. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) or CT colonography is a new colon diagnostic method to examine the inside of the colon. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, there is a risk of overlooking of lesions existing in blinded areas caused by haustra. Automated polyp detection from colonic CT images will reduce the risk of overlooking. Although many methods for polyp detection have been proposed, these methods needed DBC to detect polyps surrounded by tagged fecal material (TFM). However, DBC may changes shapes of polyps or haustra while removing TFM and it adversely affect polyp detection. We propose a colonic polyp detection method that enables us to detect polyps surrounded by either the air or the TFM simultaneously without any DBC processes. CT values inside polyps surrounded by the air and polyps surrounded by the TFM regions tend to gradually increase (blob structure) and decrease (inverse-blob structure) from outward to inward, respectively. We thus employ blob and inverse-blob structure enhancement filters based on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix to detect polyps using intensity characteristic of polyps. False positive elimination is performed using three feature values: the volume, maximum value of the filter outputs, and the standard deviation of CT values inside polyp candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 104 cases of abdominal CT images. Sensitivity for polyps >= 6 mm was 91.2% with 7.8 FPs/case.

  17. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren N; Anger, Jennifer T

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence affects women of all ages. History, physical examination, and certain tests can guide specialists in diagnosing stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. First line management includes lifestyle and behavior modification, as well as pelvic floor strength and bladder training. Drug therapy is helpful in the treatment of urgency incontinence that does not respond to conservative measures. In addition, sacral neuromodulation, intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injections, and posterior tibial nerve stimulation can be used in select patient populations with drug refractory urgency incontinence. Midurethral synthetic slings, including retropubic and transobturator approaches, are safe and efficacious surgical options for stress urinary incontinence and have replaced more invasive bladder neck slings that use autologous or cadaveric fascia. Despite controversy surrounding vaginal mesh for prolapse, synthetic slings for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence are considered safe and minimally invasive. PMID:25225003

  18. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    Retropubic suspension is surgery to help control stress incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... This procedure is done to treat stress incontinence . Before discussing ... medicines, or other options. If you tried these and are ...

  19. External incontinence devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... of products that are available in your area. URINARY INCONTINENCE DEVICES Urine collection devices are mainly used by ... urinary system References Payne CK. Conservative management of urinary incontinence: Behavioral and pelvic floor therapy, urethral and pelvic ...

  20. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007374.htm Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension To use the sharing features on ... may be because other problems are causing your urinary incontinence. Over time, some or all of the leakage ...

  1. Adaptive remapping procedure for electronic cleansing of fecal tagging CT colonography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Lia; Delsanto, Silvia; Campanella, Delia; Regge, Daniele; Bert, Alberto

    2009-02-01

    Fecal tagging preparations are attracting notable interest as a way to increase patients' compliance to virtual colonoscopy. Patient-friendly preparations, however, often result in less homogeneous tagging. Electronic cleansing algorithms should be capable of dealing with such preparations and yield good quality 2D and 3D images; moreover, successful electronic cleansing lays the basis for the application of Computer Aided Detection schemes. In this work, we present a cleansing algorithm based on an adaptive remapping procedure, which is based on a model of how partial volume affects both the air-tissue and the soft-tissue interfaces. Partial volume at the stool-soft tissue interface is characterized in terms of the local characteristics of tagged regions, in order to account for variations in tagging intensity throughout the colon. The two models are then combined in order to obtain a remapping equation relating the observed intensity to the that of the cleansed colon. The electronic cleansed datasets were then processed by a CAD scheme composed of three main steps: colon surface extraction, polyp candidate segmentation through curvature-based features, and linear classifier-based discrimination between true polyps and false alarms. Results obtained were compared with a previous version of the cleansing algorithm, in which a simpler remapping procedure was used. Performances are increased both in terms of the visual quality of the 2D cleansed images and 3D rendered volumes, and of CAD performances on a sameday FT virtual colonoscopy dataset.

  2. Indium-111-labeled autologous leukocyte imaging and fecal excretion. Comparison with conventional methods of assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leddin, D.J.; Paterson, W.G.; DaCosta, L.R.; Dinda, P.K.; Depew, W.T.; Markotich, J.; McKaigney, J.P.; Groll, A.; Beck, I.T.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging and fecal excretion in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. We compared these tests to various indices of disease activity in Crohn's disease, to Truelove's grading in ulcerative colitis, and to endoscopy, x-ray, and pathology in both diseases. Eleven controls, 16 patients with Crohn's disease, 13 with ulcerative colitis, and 3 with other types of acute bowel inflammation were studied (positive controls). Indium scanning was performed at 1, 4, and 24 hr. Fourteen of 16 patients with active Crohn's disease had positive scans but in only five was localization accurate. One patient had inactive ulcerative colitis, and the scan was negative. Of 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis, 10 had positive scans but disease localization was accurate in only four. Disease extent was correctly defined in 1 of the 3 Positive Controls. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of scanning at 1, 4, or 24 hr. /sup 111/In fecal excretion was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease than in controls, and there was correlation between /sup 111/In fecal excretion and most of the indices of disease activity in Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis, /sup 111/In fecal excretion did not correlate with Truelove's grading but reflected colonoscopic assessment of severity. In conclusion, /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scanning lacks sensitivity with respect to disease extent, but fecal excretion of /sup 111/In correlates well with disease severity as determined by other methods.

  3. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Time to Cure of Incontinence Present at Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Harms, Susan; Wyman, Jean F.

    2015-01-01

    As many as half of older people that are admitted to nursing homes (NHs) are incontinent of urine and/or feces. Not much is known about the rate of cure of incontinence present at NH admission, but available reports suggest the rate is low. There have been racial and ethnic disparities in incontinence treatment, but the role of disparities in the cure of incontinence is understudied. Using the Peters-Belson method and multilevel predictors, our findings showed that there were disparities in the time to cure of incontinence for Hispanic NH admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of older Hispanic admissions were observed to have their incontinence cured and cured later than expected had they been White. Reducing disparities in incontinence cure will improve health outcomes of Hispanic NH admissions. Significant predictors in our model suggest strategies to reduce the disparity including attention to managing fecal incontinence and incontinence in those with cognitive impairment, improving residents’ functional status, and increasing resources to NHs admitting older Hispanics with incontinence to develop innovative and cost effective ways to provide equitable quality care. PMID:26295010

  4. Stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Heit, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Stress urinary incontinence, the complaint of involuntary leakage during effort or exertion, occurs at least weekly in one third of adult women. The basic evaluation of women with stress urinary incontinence includes a history, physical examination, cough stress test, voiding diary, postvoid residual urine volume, and urinalysis. Formal urodynamics testing may help guide clinical care, but whether urodynamics improves or predicts the outcome of incontinence treatment is not yet clear. The distinction between urodynamic stress incontinence associated with hypermobility and urodynamic stress incontinence associated with intrinsic sphincter deficiency should be viewed as a continuum, rather than a dichotomy, of urethral function. Initial treatment should include behavioral changes and pelvic floor muscle training. Estrogen is not indicated to treat stress urinary incontinence. Bladder training, vaginal devices, and urethral inserts also may reduce stress incontinence. Bulking agents reduce leakage, but effectiveness generally decreases after 1-2 years. Surgical procedures are more likely to cure stress urinary incontinence than nonsurgical procedures but are associated with more adverse events. Based on available evidence at this time, colposuspension (such as Burch) and pubovaginal sling (including the newer midurethral synthetic slings) are the most effective surgical treatments. PMID:15339776

  5. The development of a line-scan imaging algorithm for the detection of fecal contamination on leafy geens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Chuang, Yung-Kun; Lee, Hoyoung

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports the development of a multispectral algorithm, using the line-scan hyperspectral imaging system, to detect fecal contamination on leafy greens. Fresh bovine feces were applied to the surfaces of washed loose baby spinach leaves. A hyperspectral line-scan imaging system was used to acquire hyperspectral fluorescence images of the contaminated leaves. Hyperspectral image analysis resulted in the selection of the 666 nm and 688 nm wavebands for a multispectral algorithm to rapidly detect feces on leafy greens, by use of the ratio of fluorescence intensities measured at those two wavebands (666 nm over 688 nm). The algorithm successfully distinguished most of the lowly diluted fecal spots (0.05 g feces/ml water and 0.025 g feces/ml water) and some of the highly diluted spots (0.0125 g feces/ml water and 0.00625 g feces/ml water) from the clean spinach leaves. The results showed the potential of the multispectral algorithm with line-scan imaging system for application to automated food processing lines for food safety inspection of leafy green vegetables.

  6. Hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence line-scan imaging system for online detection of fecal contamination on apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2006-10-01

    We have developed nondestructive opto-electronic imaging techniques for rapid assessment of safety and wholesomeness of foods. A recently developed fast hyperspectral line-scan imaging system integrated with a commercial apple-sorting machine was evaluated for rapid detection of animal feces matter on apples. Apples obtained from a local orchard were artificially contaminated with cow feces. For the online trial, hyperspectral images with 60 spectral channels, reflectance in the visible to near infrared regions and fluorescence emissions with UV-A excitation, were acquired from apples moving at a processing sorting-line speed of three apples per second. Reflectance and fluorescence imaging required a passive light source, and each method used independent continuous wave (CW) light sources. In this paper, integration of the hyperspectral imaging system with the commercial applesorting machine and preliminary results for detection of fecal contamination on apples, mainly based on the fluorescence method, are presented.

  7. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  8. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... following ways: Lengthen the amount of time between bathroom trips. Increase the amount of urine your bladder ... Kegel exercises may also help control urges. Scheduled bathroom trips: Some people control their incontinence by going ...

  9. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  10. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... and how improve living with these conditions . Publication Library Books of Interest Medical Definitions About IFFGD About us Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership IFFGD Symposium Report Industry Council Contact Us Living with Incontinence A Personal ...

  11. Anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh for rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sainio, A P; Halme, L E; Husa, A I

    1991-10-01

    Seventeen selected patients (mean age, 74 years)--14 with rectal prolapse and 3 with persisting anal incontinence after previous operations--underwent high anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh. There was no operative mortality. Prolapse recurred in 2 (15 percent) of the 13 patients followed up for 6 months or more (mean, 3.5 years). Three (27 percent) of the 11 patients with associated anal incontinence improved functionally, as did the three operated on for persisting incontinence, but only one patient regained normal continence. No breakage, cutting out, or infection related to the mesh was observed. Because of the risk of fecal impaction encountered in three of our patients, the procedure is not advocated for severely constipated patients. Despite the somewhat disappointing results regarding restoration of continence, we find this method useful in patients with rectal prolapse who are unfit for more extensive surgery, in controlling the prolapse to an acceptable degree. PMID:1914725

  12. Comorbidity of ADHD and incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    von Gontard, Alexander; Equit, Monika

    2015-02-01

    ADHD and incontinence are common childhood disorders which co-occur at much higher rates than expected by chance. The aim of this review was to provide an overview both of the comorbidity of nocturnal enuresis (NE), daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) and faecal incontinence (FI) in children with ADHD; and, vice versa, of the co-occurrence of ADHD in children with NE, DUI and FI. Most clinical studies have focussed on the association of ADHD and NE. Population-based studies have shown that children with DUI have an even greater risk for ADHD than those with NE. While children with FI have the highest overall comorbidity rates of psychological disorders, these are heterogeneous with a wide range of internalising and externalising disorders--not necessarily of ADHD. Genetic studies indicate that ADHD and NE, DUI and FI do not share the same genetic basis. The comorbidity is conferred by non-genetic factors. Possible aetiological and pathogenetic links between ADHD and incontinence are provided by neurophysiological, imaging and pharmacological studies. The co-occurrence has clinical implications: children with ADHD and NE, DUI and FI are more difficult to treat, show lower compliance and have less favourable treatment outcomes for incontinence. Therefore, both groups of disorders have to be assessed and treated specifically. PMID:24980793

  13. [Pharmacotherapy of stress incontinence].

    PubMed

    Jost, W H; Marsalek, P; Michel, M C

    2005-10-14

    Female urinary incontinence is a medical and social problem with a large prevalence. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common form of urinary incontinence and is responsible for 49 % of all incontinence, if mixed forms are included even for 78 %. As of yet, apart from "off-label" treatment, there is no pharmacological treatment available for stress urinary incontinence. For instance, estrogens are used in menopausal patients but a substantial effect in the treatment of SUI has not been demonstrated. a-Adrenergics, such as phenylpropanolamine and midodrine, and b-adrenergics, such as clenbuterol, are also used in "off-label" therapy. A recently conducted meta-analysis of 15 randomised studies with female patients who received a- und b-adrenergics as part of their therapy, failed to detect efficacy compared to placebo. Tricyclic antidepressives, such as imipramine and doxepine, which are used for the treatment of urge incontinence, are also used "off-label" in the treatment of SUI. However, no placebo-controlled studies have been conducted so far. The serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine represents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of SUI. It has shown positive effects on bladder and urethra in animal experiments, most likely through an effect on the Onuf's nucleus in the spinal cord. In randomised, placebo-controlled studies (phase II and III) in women with SUI, a significant and clinically relevant reduction in urinary incontinence episodes as well as an improvement in the quality of life compared to placebo was shown. PMID:16231235

  14. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... sling procedures are done to treat stress urinary incontinence. Before discussing surgery, your doctor will have you ...

  15. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education FAQs Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  16. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007376.htm Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures To use the sharing features ... are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ...

  17. Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000134.htm Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge To use the sharing features ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al; Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  18. Incontinence: The Potential Budget Buster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Someone who lives with incontinence, whether bowel, bladder, or both, knows the social stigma and personal toll on his life. Incontinence is the ever-present shadowy silhouette lurking over almost every decision, sometimes requiring complex preplanning. In this article, the author describes the challenges of incontinence and discusses how she…

  19. Fecal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Stool culture; Culture - stool ... stool tests are done in addition to the culture, such as: Gram stain of stool Fecal smear ... Giannella RA. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis and bacterial food poisoning. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  20. Longitudinal Study of Intestinal Symptoms and Fecal Continence in Patients With Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Keller, Monika; Astner, Sabrina T.; Heinrich, Christine; Scholz, Christian; Pehl, Christian; Kerndl, Simone; Prause, Nina; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the intestinal symptoms and fecal continence in patients who had undergone conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 men who had undergone definitive CRT for prostate cancer were evaluated. The patients were assessed before, during (treatment Weeks 4 and 6), and 2, 12, and 24 months after CRT completion. The intestinal symptoms and fecal continence were evaluated with comprehensive standardized questionnaires. Results: The intestinal symptoms were mostly intermittent, with only a small minority of patients affected daily. Defecation pain, fecal urge, and rectal mucous discharge increased significantly during therapy. Defecation pain and rectal mucous discharge had returned to baseline levels within 8 weeks and 1 year after CRT, respectively. However, fecal urge remained significantly elevated for {<=}1 year and then returned toward the pretreatment values. The prevalence of rectal bleeding was significantly elevated 2 years after CRT. Fecal continence deteriorated during CRT and remained impaired at 1 year after treatment. Incontinence was mostly minor, occurring less than once per week and predominantly affecting incontinence for gas. Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and fecal incontinence increased during prostate CRT. Except for rectal bleeding, the intestinal symptoms, including fecal incontinence, returned to baseline levels within 1-2 years after CRT. Thus, the rate of long-term late radiation-related intestinal toxicity was low.

  1. Faecal incontinence in the elderly : epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2005-01-01

    Faecal incontinence occurs in up to 10% of community dwelling persons > or = 65 years of age and approximately 50% of nursing home residents. It is a vastly under-reported problem that has a devastating effect on those who experience it as well as their spouses and caregivers. There are three broad categories of faecal incontinence among the elderly: (i) overflow incontinence; (ii) reservoir incontinence; and (iii) rectosphincteric incontinence. The first two can be diagnosed based upon the patient's history and physical examination and the response to dietary and pharmacological interventions. The third is assessed by careful physical examination supplemented by diagnostic tests directed towards evaluation of anorectal continence mechanisms. The most important of these is anorectal manometry, which can be supplemented by studies of structure (anal ultrasonography or pelvic floor magnetic resonance imaging) and neuromuscular function (electromyogram). A variety of therapeutic interventions are employed in patients with rectosphincteric incontinence; these include dietary, behavioural, pharmacological and surgical modalities chosen on the basis of the results of diagnostic testing. For isolated internal anal sphincter weakness, a cotton barrier in the anal canal is often effective. Acute sphincter injury is best treated with sphincteroplasty but, otherwise, surgical procedures are of uncertain benefit. Peripheral neurogenic incontinence may be treated with antidiarrhoeal agents, biofeedback techniques and dietary manipulations. Sacral spinal nerve stimulation is a promising new technique for selected patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence and is currently undergoing testing in the US and Europe. Significant improvement in quality of life can be achieved in most elderly persons with faecal incontinence. PMID:15733020

  2. MULTISPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM FOR FECAL AND INGESTA DETECTION ON POULTRY CARCASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multispectral imaging system including a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (515.4, 566.4 and 631 nm), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a hyperspectral imaging system, was developed for a real-time, on-line poultry inspection application. The al...

  3. A Qualitative Study of Family Caregiver Experiences of Managing Incontinence in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Yu, Po-Jui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Incontinence is a common problem faced by family caregivers that is recognized as a major burden and predictor of institutionalization. However, few studies have evaluated the experiences of family caregivers caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. Purpose To describe experiences of caregivers managing incontinence in stroke survivors. Design This qualitative descriptive study employed a grounded-theory approach. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten family caregivers of stroke survivors with incontinence were conducted during 2011. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Findings Data analysis identified four themes: chaos, hypervigilance, exhaustion, and creating a new life. There were nine related subcategories: fluster, dirtiness, urgency, fear of potential health-hazard, physically demanding and time-consuming, mentally draining, financial burden, learning by doing, and attitude adjustment. Together, these described a process of struggling to cope with the care of stroke survivors with urinary/fecal incontinence. Of the four categories, “creating a new life” developed gradually over time to orient caregivers to their new life, while the other three categories occurred in a chronological order. Conclusion The research highlighted unique caring experiences of family caregivers of stroke patients, which focused solely on the ‘incontinence issue’. Understanding these experiences may help nurses provide better support and resources for family caregivers when caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. PMID:26066345

  4. Incontinence in Elderly Cared for by Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noelker, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzed the consequences of incontinence for both the family members caring for the incontinent elderly and for the elderly. Found that incontinence was related to perceived negative affect in family relations and to considering an alternative care arrangement. Suggests that interventions directed to the management of incontinence may help to…

  5. Urogynecologic conditions: urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Robert; Garely, Alan D

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), the leakage of urine, is a condition that frequently goes untreated. There are many different types of UI, including stress and urge UI, and the etiology is multifactorial. Diagnosis can be made with a pertinent history, including use of a questionnaire; a pelvic examination; and direct observation. Additional testing can include physical maneuvers to elicit stress leakage and urodynamic studies. Treatment ranges from pelvic floor exercise to surgical support of the pelvic floor for stress UI and, typically, behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, starting with antimuscarinic drugs, for urge UI. PMID:25756372

  6. Sphincteroplasty for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Pescatori, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Sphincteroplasty (SP) is the operation most frequently performed in patients suffering from moderate-to-severe anal incontinence (AI) who do not respond to conservative treatment. Other costly surgeries, such as artificial bowel sphincter (ABS) and electro-stimulated graciloplasty, have been more or less abandoned due to their high morbidity rate. Minimally invasive procedures are widely used, such as sacral neuromodulation and injection of bulking agents, but both are costly and the latter may cure only mild incontinence. The early outcome of SP is usually good if the sphincters are not markedly denervated, but its effect diminishes over time. SP is more often performed for post-traumatic than for idiopathic AI. It may also be associated to the Altemeier procedure, aimed at reducing the recurrence rate of rectal prolapse, and may be useful when AI is due either to injury to the sphincter, or to a narrowed rectum following the procedure for prolapse and haemorrhoids (PPH) and stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR). The outcome of SP is likely to be improved with biological meshes and post-operative pelvic floor rehabilitation. SP is more effective in males than in multiparous women, whose sphincters are often denervated, and its post-operative morbidity is low. In conclusion, SP, being both low-cost and safe, remains a good option in the treatment of selected patients with AI. PMID:24759337

  7. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging system for real-time inspection of poultry carcasses with fecal material and ingesta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In poultry processing plants, fecal material and ingesta are the primary source of carcass contamination with microbial pathogens. The current practice of the poultry inspection in the United States is primarily human visual observations. Since the visual inspection is becoming more challenging in p...

  8. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences. PMID:8138472

  9. When you have urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... rub baking soda into the stain, and then vacuum off the baking powder. You can also use ... management of urinary incontinence: behavioral and pelvic floor therapy, urethral and pelvic devices. In: Wein AJ, ed. ...

  10. Urge incontinence: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, J S; Subak, L L; Gras, J; Brown, B A; Kuppermann, M; Posner, S F

    1998-12-01

    Urge incontinence has a profound effect on the day-to-day lives of women. The purpose of this study was to identify specific aspects of functioning and well-being affected by urge incontinence or mixed incontinence with a primary urge component. We conducted six focus groups of 65 racially and age diverse, community-dwelling women with urge incontinence. Transcripts of the focus groups were quantitatively analyzed for word use frequency with QSR NUD*IST software. Demographics, symptomatology, and the impact of incontinence on daily activities and feelings were assessed by questionnaire. Participants in the focus groups were on average 62 years of age; 52% were nonwhite, and 26% had a high school or less education. In the three identified broad domains, 52% of domain-related words were associated with feelings, 40% with activities, and 8% with relationships. Frequently identified references were bathroom availability (24%), loss of control (14%), anxiety (11%), and sleep disturbance (10%). Women under the age of 70 compared with older women more commonly identified feeling unattractive and low self-esteem (12% versus 2%, p < 0.007) and adverse effects on dating and sexual activity (45% versus 0%, p < 0.02). The effect of incontinence on quality of life correlated with frequency, nocturia, and pad use (Kendall's tau beta 0.02-0.32, p < 0.05). Urge incontinence affects many quality of life issues and contributes to limitation of activities, loss of control, and negative self-perception. Focus groups of diverse women with urge incontinence symptomatology are useful in understanding these effects. PMID:9929859

  11. Intractable incontinence in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ouslander, J G

    2000-05-01

    The number of people living into extreme old age is rising exponentially in the USA, Europe and other developed countries. Urinary incontinence is prevalent in this population. While many very old (age > 75 years) incontinent individuals are relatively healthy and respond well to various treatments, a substantial proportion has impaired cognitive function and impaired mobility. These impairments make urinary incontinence much more difficult to assess, manage and cure than in younger populations. Irrespective of age and disability, a basic assessment of incontinence should be carried out to identify potentially reversible causes and indications for further evaluation. The outcome of such an assessment may not be cure or improvement of incontinence, but better quality of life and the prevention of morbid and expensive medical conditions that may result from poorly managed incontinence. Incontinence in this population should generally not be considered 'intractable' until a trial of noninvasive therapy (i.e. behavioural and/or pharmacological) has been undertaken. Some very frail elderly respond well to a toileting programme such as prompted voiding, and a small but significant proportion benefit from the careful addition of a bladder relaxant drug to the toileting programme. Others, depending on their ability and willingness to toilet and their preferences for further treatment, may be candidates for surgical intervention. Pads and garments should not be used so that they foster dependency, or as a primary treatment until other specific interventions have been tried. Indwelling catheters should be used only for specific and well-documented indications, because of the risks of urinary tract infection and sepsis associated with their long-term use. The dictionary defines 'intractable' as 'not easily relieved or cured'. In the elderly, cure for incontinence, and most other chronic conditions, is the exception rather than rule. Relief (or amelioration), improvement in

  12. Optimal management of incontinence-associated dermatitis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), sometimes referred to as perineal dermatitis, is an inflammation of the skin associated with exposure to urine or stool. Elderly adults, and especially those in long-term care facilities, are at risk for urinary or fecal incontinence and IAD. Traditionally, IAD has received little attention as a distinct disorder, and it is sometimes confused with stage I or II pressure ulcers. However, a modest but growing body of research is beginning to provide insights into the epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology of IAD. In addition, recent changes in reimbursement policies from the US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services regarding pressure ulcer prevention has focused attention on the differential diagnosis of IAD versus pressure ulcer, and its influence on pressure ulcer risk. Color, location, depth, and the presence or absence of necrotic tissue are visual indicators used to differentiate IAD from pressure-related skin damage. Prevention is based on avoiding or minimizing exposure to stool or urine combined with a structured skin-care program based on principles of gentle cleansing, moisturization, preferably with an emollient, and application of a skin protectant. Treatment of IAD focuses on three main goals: (i) removal of irritants from the affected skin; (ii) eradication of cutaneous infections such as candidiasis; and (iii) containment or diversion of incontinent urine or stool. PMID:20131923

  13. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women. PMID:24585116

  14. Managing stress incontinence in postnatal women.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Tracy

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant impact on quality of life. This article explores the causes of stress urinary incontinence, and the impact of childbirth in particular, and discusses the importance of thorough assessment and treatment options. PMID:22708190

  15. Factors associated with urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed Central

    Yarnell, J W; Voyle, G J; Sweetnam, P M; Milbank, J; Richards, C J; Stephenson, T P

    1982-01-01

    Possible aetiological factors for urinary incontinence were examined in a prevalence study among a random sample of 1000 women aged 18 and over. Infective factors were not markedly associated with incontinence but mechanical factors such as parity and obesity were. No association was found, however, between a history of perineal damage at childbirth and incontinence. Women with incontinence had on average a higher score for a 'neuroticism' trait elicited by questionnaire than women without the disorder. PMID:7069357

  16. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  17. Fecal Fat: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Fat Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Qualitative or Quantitative Stool Fat; Stool Lipids; 72 Hour Fecal Fat; Fat Stain ...

  18. Female urinary incontinence rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, P

    2004-08-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation (PFR) is an important and recommended strategy for the treatment of many urogynecological disorders including urinary incontinence (UI). The recognised pioneer of PFR is the American gynecologist Arnold Kegel who, over 50 years ago, proposed pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) to prevent and/or treat female UI. Kegel's techniques were successfully used by others too, but as the years passed these techniques sank into unjustified oblivion. In the 1980s in Europe the medical world's interest in PFME techniques gained ground, contemporaneously with functional electrical stimulation (FES) and biofeedback (BFB). As a general rule, the least invasive and least dangerous procedure for the patient should be the first choice, and behavioural and rehabilitative techniques should be considered as the first line of therapy for UI. The behavioural approaches in women with UI and without cognitive deficits are tailored to the patient's underlying problem, such as bladder training or retraining (BR) for urge UI. BR has many variations but generally consists of education, scheduled voiding, and positive reinforcements. The rehabilitative approaches comprise BFB, FES, PFME, and vaginal cones (VC). BFB allows the subject to modify the unconscious physiological events, while FES is aimed at strengthening perineal awareness, increasing the tone and trophism of the pelvic floor, and inhibiting detrusor overactivity. PFME play an extremely important role in the conservative treatment of UI and overactive bladder, and many studies have demonstrated their effectiveness. Many authors have used the different methods for PFR in a heterogeneous manner: the best results were obtained when protocols requiring the contemporary use of 2 or more techniques were followed. PMID:15377984

  19. [Male Urinary Incontinence--a Taboo Issue].

    PubMed

    Kozomara-Hocke, Marko; Hermanns, Thomas; Poyet, Cédric

    2016-03-01

    Male urinary incontinence is an underestimated and frequently not broached issue. The urinary incontinence is divided into stress-, urge incontinence and hybrid forms as well as overflow incontinence. The fact that there are increasingly more men over 60 means that the prevalence of the urinary incontinence is up to 40%, and urinary incontinence will increasingly gain importance in daily routine practice. Many investigations and therapies can be realized by the general practitioner. Already simple therapy approaches can lead to a considerable clinical improvement of male urinary incontinence. If the initial therapy fails or pathological results (i. e. microhaematuria, recurrent urinary tract infections, raised residual urine and so on) are found, the patient should be referred to a urologist. PMID:26934011

  20. High Costs of Urinary Incontinence Among Women Electing Surgery to Treat Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Diokno, Ananias C.; Goode, Patricia S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kusek, John W.; Leng, Wendy W.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate costs for incontinence management, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement in women electing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS A total of 655 incontinent women enrolled in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial, a randomized surgical trial. Baseline out-of-pocket costs for incontinence management were calculated by multiplying self-report of resources used (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) by national resource costs ($2006). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined by using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS Mean age was 52±10 years, and mean number of weekly incontinence episodes was 22±21. Mean and median (25%, 75% interquartile range) estimated personal costs for incontinence management among all women were $14±$24 and $8 (interquartile range $3, $18) per week, and 617 (94%) women reported any cost. Costs increased significantly with incontinence frequency and mixed compared with stress incontinence. The mean and median Health Utilities Index Mark 3 scores were 0.73±0.25 and 0.84 (interquartile range 0.63, 0.92). Women were willing to pay a mean of $118±$132 per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased significantly with greater expected incontinence improvement, household income, and incontinent episode frequency. CONCLUSION Urinary incontinence is associated with substantial costs. Women spent nearly $750 per year out of pocket for incontinence management, had a significant decrement in quality of life, and were willing to pay nearly $1,400 per year for cure. PMID:18378749

  1. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a comprehensive review and update.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel; Beeckman, Dimitri; Bliss, Donna Z; Fader, Mandy; Logan, Susan; Junkin, Joan; Selekof, Joan; Doughty, Dorothy; Kurz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a multinational group of clinicians was charged with reviewing and evaluating the research base pertaining to incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and synthesizing this knowledge into best practice recommendations based on existing evidence. This is the first of 2 articles focusing on IAD; it updates current research and identifies persistent gaps in our knowledge. Our literature review revealed a small but growing body of evidence that provides additional insight into the epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology of IAD when compared to the review generated by the first IAD consensus group convened 5 years earlier. We identified research supporting the use of a defined skin care regimen based on principles of gentle perineal cleansing, moisturization, and application of a skin protectant. Clinical experience also supports application of an antifungal powder, ointment, or cream in patients with evidence of cutaneous candidiasis, aggressive containment of urinary or fecal incontinence, and highly selective use of a mild topical anti-inflammatory product in selected cases. The panel concluded that research remains limited and additional studies are urgently needed to enhance our understanding of IAD and to establish evidence-based protocols for its prevention and treatment. PMID:22193141

  2. Female urinary incontinence: effective treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, R A; Arruda, R M; Bortolini, M A T

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence is a dysfunction that tremendously affects women's quality of life, involving social, emotional and economic aspects. Although various treatments for urinary incontinence have been described, it is important to know which of them are truly effective. This review seeks to determine the current available therapies for women with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome, based on the best scientific evidence. PMID:25307986

  3. Psychosomatic Aspects of Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Debus, G.; Kästner, R.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary incontinence in women is a common problem. With increasing age its prevalence and severity of its manifestations increase. Among nursing home residents the frequency is between 43 and 77 %, 6 to 10 % of all admissions to nursing homes are due to urinary incontinence. The risk for urinary incontinence among women with cognitive deficits is 1.5- to 3.4-fold higher than for women without mental disorders. The most common form is stress incontinence (50 %), followed by mixed stress-urge incontinence (40 %) and purely urge incontinence (OAB = overactive bladder, 20 %). With regard to its cause, the latter remains unclarified in about 80 % of the cases. It is often difficult to treat. There are also cases in which urge incontinence is related to traumatic events. In such cases behavioural and psychotherapeutic options may be helpful. Almost inevitably every form of incontinence has psychological consequences: shame and insecurity are often results of uncontrolled loss of urine. Among others, in the long term, they lead to the avoidance of social contacts and possibly to depression and isolation. Consideration of the psychosomatics is important in the therapy for female urinary incontinence from three points of view: 1) the efficacy of treatment is better suited to the patient, 2) the treatment costs are lower, 3) the professional satisfaction of the responsible physician increases. PMID:25797959

  4. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  5. HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE AND FLUORESCENCE LINE-SCAN IMAGING SYSTEM FOR ONLINE DETECTION OF FECAL CONTAMINATION ON APPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists at the Instrumentation and Sensing Lab, USDA have developed nondestructive opto-electronic imaging techniques for rapid assessment of safety and wholesomeness of foods. A recently developed fast hyperspectral line-scan imaging system integrated with a commercial apple-sorting machine was...

  6. Fecal Pollution of Water.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  7. Fecal Pollution of Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  8. Incontinent Children Discover Hope at Camp Oakhurst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raps, Marvin A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes summer-camp experiences of young people who are incontinent because of spina bifida. Focuses on residential camp program as encouragement for youth to learn independent incontinence management. Describes self-catheterization program and process as minor inconvenience and positive alternative to soiled clothing and accompanying…

  9. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  10. Incidence and Predictors of Anal Incontinence after Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury in Primiparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E; Nager, Charles W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Whitworth, Ryan; Weidner, Alison C; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M; Norton, Peggy; Jelovsek, J Eric; Meikle, Susan F; Spino, Cathie; Gantz, Marie; Graziano, Scott; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the incidence of fecal incontinence (FI) at 6, 12 and 24 weeks postpartum, anal incontinence (AI) and fecal urgency at 24 weeks and identify predictors of AI in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI). Methods Primiparous women sustaining OASIs were identified at 8 clinical sites. Third degree OASIs were characterized using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, 3a (<50%) or 3b (>50%) tear through the sphincter. FI was defined as leakage of liquid/solid stool and/or mucus in the past month; AI was defined as leakage of liquid/solid stool and/or mucus and/or gas in the past month and was assessed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks postpartum using the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index. Logistic regression identified variables associated with AI. Results 343 women participated: 297 subjects sustained a third degree OASI, 168 type 3a, 98 type 3b and 31 indeterminant; 45 had a fourth degree OASI. Overall FI incidence at 6, 12 and 24 weeks was 7% (23/326, 95% CI: 4%,10%), 4% (6/145, 95% CI: 2%,9%) and 9% (13/138, 95% CI: 5%,16%), respectively. At 24 weeks AI incidence was 24% (95% CI: 17%,32%) and fecal urgency 21% (95% CI: 15%,29%). No significant differences in FI and AI rates were noted by 3rd degree type or between groups with 3rd and 4th OASI. Flatal incontinence was greater in women sustaining a 4th degree tear (35% vs 16%, p=0.04). Caucasian race (AOR 4.64, 95% CI: 1.35-16.02) and shorter duration of second stage (AOR 1.47 per 30 minute decrease, 95% CI: 1.12-1.92) were associated with AI at 24 weeks. Conclusions Overall 24-week incidence of FI is 9% (95% CI: 5%,16%) and AI is 24% (95% CI: 17%,32%). In women with OASI, Caucasian race and shorter second stage labor were associated with postpartum AI. PMID:25679358

  11. Constipation and Fecal Soiling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase fluids in the diet, especially water and water rich foods (which usually are fiber-rich). (continued on next page) Fecal Soiling continued 5. Increase physical activity. Exercise helps the colon move. 6. It is ...

  12. [Decubitus or incontinence-associated dermatitis?].

    PubMed

    Houwing, Ronald H; Koopman, Eddy S M

    2014-01-01

    A lack of understanding about the distinction between incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure sores leads to inadequate treatment and therefore a higher incidence of pressure sores. Pressure relief may not be adequately carried out due to concentration exclusively on treatment of incontinence. In this article we will discuss the multifactorial approach, based on 2 patient cases. In order to prevent pressure sores, the cause of incontinence has to be investigated and treated if possible. Appropriate pressure relief must be carried out, in addition to adequate skin care. PMID:25159696

  13. A budget impact analysis comparing use of a modern fecal management system to traditional fecal management methods in two canadian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Langill, Mike; Yan, Songkai; Kommala, Dheerendra; Michenko, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Research suggests that fecal management systems (FMS) offer advantages, including potential cost savings, over traditional methods of caring for patients with little or no bowel control and liquid or semi-liquid stool. A budget impact model accounting for material costs of managing fecal incontinence was developed, and 1 year of experiential data from two hospitals' ICUs were applied to it. Material costs were estimated for traditional methods (ie, use of absorbent briefs/pads, skin cleansers, moisturizers) and compared with material costs of using a modern FMS for both average (normal-range weight) and complex (bariatric with wounds) ICU patients at hospital 1 and any ICU patient at hospital 2. Reductions in daily material costs per ICU patient using FMS versus traditional methods were reported by hospital 1 ($93.74 versus $143.89, average patient; $150.55 versus $476.41, complex patient) and by hospital 2 ($61.15 versus $104.85 per patient). When extrapolated to the total number of patients expected to use FMS at each institution, substantial annual cost savings were projected (hospital 1: $57,216; hospital 2: $627,095). In addition, total nursing time per day for managing fecal incontinence (ie, changing, cleaning, repositioning patients, changing pads, linens, and the like) was estimated at hospital 1, showing substantial reductions with FMS (120 minutes versus 348 minutes for average patients; 240 minutes versus 760 minutes for complex). Nursing time was not included in cost calculations to keep the analysis conservative. Results of this study suggest the materials cost of using the FMS in ICU patients was substantially lower than the cost of traditional fecal incontinence management protocols of care in both hospitals. Comparative studies using patient level data, materials, and nursing time costs, as well as complication rates, are warranted. PMID:23221016

  14. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J., (Edited By); Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  15. Management of urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dowd, T C

    1993-01-01

    Control of micturition is a complex physiological and anatomical process which often fails in women. The sequelae of urinary incontinence in women range from inconvenience to social and psychological stigmatization. Surprisingly, many women are tolerant of often quite severe sequelae, despite a range of management techniques that exist to alleviate or cure incontinence. Some of the more successful techniques are well suited to general practice management and can be carried out by the patient under the supervision of her doctor, district nurse, practice nurse or midwife. This paper reviews the physiology of micturition, stress urinary incontinence and incontinence caused by detrusor instability, and the management techniques available to alleviate or cure the problem. PMID:8260222

  16. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... I use to clean a mattress? How much water or liquids should I drink every day? Which foods or liquids can make my urinary incontinence worse? Are there activities I should avoid that may cause problems with ...

  17. Factors influencing intact skin in women with incontinence using absorbent products: results of a cross-sectional, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Yoshie; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sanada, Hiromi; Konya, Chizuko; Sugama, Junko

    2010-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in elderly incontinent people. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted to examine and compare properties of intact skin on the buttocks and subumbilicus area in elderly people wearing absorbent products and to identify pad environment factors that affect skin properties. Study participants included 45 elderly (age range: 68 to 103 years) female residents of one nursing home who were incontinent of feces and urine (dual incontinence group--DIG, n = 35) or feces only (fecal incontinence group--FIG, n= 10). Skin pH and hydration were measured and factors believed to affect the perineal environment and contribute to the development of IAD were assessed. In both DIG and FIG, skin hydration levels and pH were higher in the coccygeal than in the subumbilical area. Skin hydration of the sacral region in the DIG was significantly higher than in the FIG (P = 0.019) and skin pH on the coccygeal region and sacral region in the DIG was significantly higher than in the FIG (coccygeal region, P = 0.013; sacral region, P = 0.023). Absorbent pad surface pH (P &0.01) and excessive sweating (P = 0.006) were significantly related to skin pH. Results show that properties of perineal skin in elderly women with incontinence are affected by occlusion with pads, increasing the risk of IAD. Studies comparing the effect of various types of pads and pad-change frequencies on skin properties are needed. PMID:21205991

  18. General practitioners and women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Grealish, M; O'Dowd, T C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence is a common problem for adult women. It results in a large financial and psychosocial cost. Much urinary incontinence goes unreported. Women with urinary incontinence can be successfully assessed and treated in general practice but studies have shown that many GPs manage the condition inadequately. AIM: This study aims to examine GPs' awareness of urinary incontinence in women and their management of, and attitudes to, female urinary incontinence. METHOD: A qualitative study was conducted with 21 GPs responding to semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was carried out on these interviews, with recurrent views and experiences being identified and grouped. RESULTS: The interviews of 11 male and nine female GPs were suitable for analysis. GPs were aware of the prevalence and under-reporting of urinary incontinence in women. Many were unhappy with their own management of the condition and with the management options available to them. Male GPs in particular were reluctant to carry out gynaecological examinations, and few GPs expressed enthusiasm for teaching pelvic floor exercises or bladder drills. Medications were frequently used but generally considered ineffective or intolerable. The services of both public health nurses and practice nurses were under-used, largely because of lack of training in this area. Although incontinence nurses were employed in the area, many GPs did not know of their availability and, of those who did, few referred to them more than infrequently. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that many GPs avoid dealing with the problem of urinary incontinence in women and that they find it to be a difficult, chronic problem to treat. Specialist options seem not to be useful in general practice. The findings need to be explored in other GP settings. PMID:9624768

  19. The management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R J

    1982-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the involuntary loss of urine which is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable. It is common in the general population and not all patients will report the presence of the problem because of, among other things, embarrassment. Assessment is important and should be multi-disciplinary. It includes a history, physical examination and some simple tests. A bladder chart kept by the patient aids assessment. Most patients can then be categorized and further testing planned. These tests are usually invasive and include urodynamic tests and electromyographic studies. With their conclusion treatment can be instituted, such as bladder training, drugs and various aids and appliances. PMID:7095985

  20. [Faecal incontinence - serious medical and social issue].

    PubMed

    Ihnát, Peter; Kozáková, Radka; Vávra, Petr; Pelikán, Anton; Zonča, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence presents gastrointestinal disorder with high prevalence (more than 2% of population) and serious impact on the quality of life. General practitioners, gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons play the principal role in screening, diagnostics and providing health care to patients who suffer from faecal incontinence. Insufficient knowledge about faecal incontinence and minimal training aimed at its diagnostics and therapy lead to the low quality of provided health care.Authors offer comprehensive up-to-date review focused on faecal incontinence - its definition, prevalence, seriousness, consequences, pathophysiology, diagnostics and management. Detailed anatomical and physiological assessment of each patient is fundamental in determining correct cause of faecal incontinence and consequent selection of the most appropriate therapeutic modality.Broad spectrum of available therapeutic options comprises conservative management (lifestyle modification, diet, medications, and absorbent tools), biofeedback and surgical interventions (sphincter augmentation, sphincter reconstruction, sacral nerve stimulation, sphincter substitution and stools diversion). Application of the most appropriate treatment can lead in majority of patients to significant improvement in faecal incontinence and quality of life. Early diagnosis prevents possible complications, which would possibly deteriorate patients quality of life. PMID:27256145

  1. Pad testing in incontinent women: a review.

    PubMed

    Ryhammer, A M; Djurhuus, J C; Laurberg, S

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on pad-weighing tests used for objectifying and quantifying incontinence in urinary incontinent women. The patients wear pads weighed before and after the test period. A weight gain is taken as a measure of the amount of urine loss. The tests are in principle of two different types: short-term office tests and long-term home tests, and measure different aspects of urinary control and dysfunction. Both have an inherent large intra- and interindividual variability. Pad weight gains obtained from patients referred for incontinence and those from self-reported continent controls overlap to a certain degree, and it is not possible to identify distinct numerical cut-off values separating continence from incontinence. This suggests that incontinence is a complex condition in which the amount of leakage, other sources of weight gain, and differences in the individual patients' personal characteristics influence the identification and quantification of the problem. In spite of the shortcomings the pad tests remain a valuable tool for both the clinician and the researcher. The home pad tests are superior to the office tests in terms of authenticity, and should be performed with a concomitant systematic registration of the participant's voidings, fluid intake and episodes of incontinence. PMID:10384973

  2. Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Test Common Questions Ask Us Related Pages The Test How is it used? When is it ordered? ...

  3. Urinary Incontinence Treatments for Women (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurogenic urinary incontinence: results of a single treatment, randomized, placebo controlled 6-month study. J Urol 2005; ... treatment of urge incontinence in older women: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2002; 288:2293. Herbison P, ...

  4. Urinary Incontinence Could Be Controlled by an Inflatable Penile Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung Ki; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to the increasing numbers of radical prostatectomies (RP) performed for prostate cancer, a substantial and increasing number of patients suffer from postoperative urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED). The objective of our study was to see whether an inflatable penile prosthesis implantation could control urinary incontinence for patients with the dual problems of ED and incontinence. Materials and Methods From March 2010 through May 2015, 25 post-RP patients were referred to our clinic with ED or incontinence. The degree of incontinence was classified according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. Inflatable penile prostheses were implanted in all 25 patients. Results For one month after implantation, partial or full inflation was performed progressively to control urine leakage. Of 18 patients, 13 patients were categorized with mild or moderate stress incontinence. All 13 patients obtained control of incontinence with partial inflation (30% to 60%) and all reported satisfactory outcomes. Five out of the 18 patients were categorized with severe total incontinence. Three of the 5 patients could tolerate incontinence with full inflation on and off. Thirteen patients out of the total of 18 (72.2%) had their incontinence controlled by an inflating penile prosthesis. Conclusions An inflatable penile prosthesis is highly recommended as an initial procedure, especially in patients with the dual problems of ED and incontinence. PMID:27169127

  5. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  6. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  7. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  8. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  9. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  10. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Alison

    Maintaining skin integrity in people with incontinence is challenging. Incontinence is common in older people and those compromised by medical or surgical comorbidities. Urinary and faecal incontinence can result in skin breakdown, which is characterised by erosion of the epidermis, creating a moist, macerated appearance to the skin. Incontinence and associated skin breakdown can have a considerable effect on an individual's physical and psychological wellbeing. This article discusses the aetiology of incontinence-associated dermatitis and considers the best options for the prevention, management and treatment of this condition. PMID:23940938

  11. Prevalence and Risk Indicators for Anal Incontinence among Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Sandvik, Leiv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of anal incontinence in an unselected pregnant population at second trimester. A survey of pregnant women attending a routine ultrasound examination was conducted in a university hospital in Oslo, Norway. A questionnaire consisting of 105 items concerning anal incontinence (including St. Mark's score), urinary incontinence, medication use, and comorbidity was posted to women when invited to the ultrasound examination. Results. Prevalence of self-reported anal incontinence (St. Mark's score ≥ 3) was the lowest in the group of women with a previous cesarean section only (6.4%) and the highest among women with a previous delivery complicated by obstetric anal sphincter injury (24.4%). Among nulliparous women the prevalence of anal incontinence was 7.7% and was associated to low educational level and comorbidity. Prevalence of anal incontinence increased with increasing parity. Urinary incontinence was associated with anal incontinence in all parity groups. Conclusions. Anal incontinence was most frequent among women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter injury. Other obstetrical events had a minor effect on prevalence of anal incontinence among parous women. Prevention of obstetrical sphincter injury is likely the most important factor for reducing bothersome anal incontinence among fertile women. PMID:23819058

  12. Management of patients with faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8–8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  13. Coping with the Impact of Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartley, Cheryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents Part 2 of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. In this article, the author contends that it is extremely important to teach children coping skills…

  14. Electrokinetic properties of incontinence nonwoven devices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the water transport properties of nonwoven incontinence devices is a prerequisite to the design of cotton-based nonwovens. A complete understanding of the interfacial moisture movement which occurs between the layers of coverstock, acquisition layer, distribution layer, absorbent...

  15. Management of patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8-8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  16. [Rare differential diagnosis of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Coutty, Nadège; Dubreucq, Sylvie; Delahousse, Guy; Cosson, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman with prolapse presenting a differential diagnosis of urinary incontinence: a peritoneo-vaginal fistula with serous discharge in a patient with ascites and a history of hysterectomy. The only cases of peritoneo-vaginal fistula reported in the literature were discovered during extra-uterine pregnancy after hysterectomy. PMID:12765075

  17. [Fecal microbiota transplantation: review].

    PubMed

    Barbut, F; Collignon, A; Butel, M-J; Bourlioux, P

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained an increasing medical interest, since the recognition of the role of disturbed microbiota in the development of various diseases. To date, FMT is an established treatment modality for multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI), despite lack of standardization of the procedure. Persisting normalization of the disturbed colonic microbiota associated with RCDI seems to be responsible for the therapeutic effect of FMT. For other diseases, FMT should be considered strictly experimental, only offered to patients in an investigational clinical setting. Although the concept of FMT is appealing, current expectations should be damped until future evidence arises. PMID:25577013

  18. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  19. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Walsham, Natalie E; Sherwood, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome share many symptoms. While irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder for which no specific treatment is available, the range of effective therapies for IBD is evolving rapidly. Accurate diagnosis of IBD is therefore essential. Clinical assessment, together with various imaging modalities and endoscopy, has been the mainstay of diagnosis for many years. Fecal biomarkers of gastrointestinal inflammation have appeared in the past decade, of which calprotectin, a neutrophil cytosolic protein, has been studied the most. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic remitting and relapsing diseases, and objective assessment of disease activity and response to treatment are important. This review focuses on the use of fecal calprotectin measurements in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with IBD. PMID:26869808

  20. Fecal Pellet Flux in the Mesopelagic Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koweek, D.; Shatova, O.; Conte, M. H.; Weber, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Oceanic Flux Program (OFP), located 75km SE of Bermuda, is the longest running sediment trap time-series of its kind, continually collecting deep sea particle flux since 1978. Recent application of digital microphotography to the size-fractionated OFP sediment trap material has generated a wealth of new quantitative visual information on particle flux composition, its changes with depth, and its temporal variability. We examined the fecal pellet flux at 1500m depth using image analysis of digital archives, in conjunction with data on the overlying surface ocean from the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) and the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) programs, to investigate the role of mesoscale physical forcing on mesopelagic particle flux variability. During 2007, a productive cyclonic eddy, a mode water eddy and an anticyclonic eddy passed over the OFP site. Fecal pellet flux was enhanced during passage of both the cyclonic and mode water eddies. Total mass flux (TMF) was also enhanced during the productive cyclonic eddy, but was not influenced by the passage of the mode water eddy. No increase in fecal pellet flux or TMF was apparent during passage of the anticyclonic eddy despite indications of increased zooplankton abundance from ADCP backscatter intensity. Fecal pellet size frequency distributions indicate the presence of two, and sometimes three, distinct size classes. No seasonal trend in mean size of fecal pellets was observed for any size class, implying that the size distribution of the zooplankton populations producing the pellets is relatively constant throughout the year. We also investigated fecal pellet flux changes with depth at 500, 1500 and 3200m. Fecal pellet flux, and the fecal pellet contribution to TMF, were greatest at 500m and decreased with depth. The use of quantitative image analysis holds great potential as a powerful analytical tool in studies of marine particulate flux.

  1. A modified inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire and the Vaizey Incontinence questionnaire are more sensitive measures of acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy than RTOG grading

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Usman; McGough, Camilla; Hackett, Claire; Blake, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Tait, Diana; Norman, Andrew R.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N. . E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Simple scales with greater sensitivity than Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading to detect acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy, could be clinically useful. Methods and Materials: Do questionnaires used in benign gastrointestinal diseases detect toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy? The patient-completed Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBDQ) and Vaizey Incontinence questionnaires were compared prospectively at baseline and at Week 5 to physician-completed RTOG grading. Results: A total of 107 patients, median age 63 years, were recruited. After 5 weeks of treatment, patients with gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer were more symptomatic than urologic patients (p 0.012; p = 0.014). Overall, 94% had altered bowel habits, 80% loose stool, 74% frequency, 65% difficult gas, 60% pain, >48% distress, 44% tenesmus, >40% restrictions in daily activity, 39% urgency, 37% fecal incontinence, and 40% required antidiarrheal medication. The median RTOG score was 1 (range, 0-2), median IBDQ score 204.5 (range, 74-224), and median Vaizey score 5 (range, 0-20). Chemotherapy preceding radiotherapy increased fecal incontinence (p 0.002). RTOG scores stabilized after 3 weeks, IBDQ scores peaked at Week 4, and Vaizey scores worsened throughout treatment. IBDQ and Vaizey scores distinguished between groups with different RTOG scores. Conclusion: The IBDQ and Vaizey questionnaires are reliable and sensitive, offering greater insight into the severity and range of symptoms compared with RTOG grading.

  2. MASD part 2: incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: a consensus.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce M; Gray, Mikel; Bliss, Donna Z; Kennedy-Evans, Karen L; Logan, Susan; Baharestani, Mona M; Colwell, Janice C; Goldberg, Margaret; Ratliff, Catherine R

    2011-01-01

    A consensus panel was convened to review current knowledge of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and to provide recommendations for prevention and management. This article provides a summary of the discussion and the recommendations in regards to 2 types of MASD: incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and intertriginous dermatitis (ITD). A focused history and physical assessment are essential for diagnosing IAD or ITD and distinguishing these forms of skin damage from other types of skin damage. Panel members recommend cleansing, moisturizing, and applying a skin protectant to skin affected by IAD and to the perineal skin of persons with urinary or fecal incontinence deemed at risk for IAD. Prevention and treatment of ITD includes measures to ensure that skin folds are dry and free from friction; however, panel members do not recommend use of bed linens, paper towels, or dressings for separating skin folds. Individuals with ITD are at risk for fungal and bacterial infections and these infections should be treated appropriately; for example, candidal infections should be treated with antifungal therapies. PMID:21747256

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in Chinese women: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xinyu; Wang, Quanyi; Lu, Yongxian

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the current prevalence rate of urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify risk factors in Chinese women, we conducted a population-based survey in 3058 women in Beijing, China, in 2009. The prevalence rate of UI was estimated to be 22.1%, with stress UI (12.9%) being more prevalent than urgency UI (1.7%) and mixed UI (7.5%). The prevalence rates of UI, urgency UI, and mixed UI increased with age, with the highest recorded in participants aged ≥70 years. However, stress UI was most commonly seen in participants aged 50 to 69 years. Risk factors for UI included aging, lower education background, older age of menarche, menstrual disorder, pregnancy history, episiotomy, chronic pelvic pain, gynecological disease, other chronic diseases, constipation, fecal incontinence, lower daily water intake, and frequency of high protein intake. UI is a common disorder in Chinese women, and many risk factors are able to affect the development of UI. PMID:22186396

  4. Risk Factors for Urinary Incontinence among Middle-aged Women

    PubMed Central

    DANFORTH, Kim N.; TOWNSEND, Mary K.; LIFFORD, Karen; CURHAN, Gary C.; RESNICK, Neil M.; GRODSTEIN, Francine

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Identify risk factors for urinary incontinence in middle-aged women. Study Design: Cross-sectional analysis of 83,355 Nurses' Health Study II participants. Since 1989, women have provided health information on mailed questionnaires; in 2001, at age 37-54 years, information on urinary incontinence was requested. We examined adjusted odds ratios of incontinence using logistic regression. Results: 43% of women reported incontinence. After adjustment, African-American (OR=0.49, 95% CI 0.40-0.60) and Asian-American women (OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.46-0.72) were at reduced odds of severe incontinence compared to Caucasians. Increased age, body mass index, and parity were all positively associated with incontinence, as were current smoking, type 2 diabetes, and hysterectomy. Women aged 50-54 years had 1.81 times the odds of severe incontinence compared to women <40 years (95% CI 1.66-1.97); women with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 had 3.10 times the odds of severe incontinence compared to BMI 22-24 kg/m2 (95% CI 2.91-3.30). Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is highly prevalent among these middle-aged women. Potential risk factors include age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, parity, smoking, diabetes, and hysterectomy. PMID:16458626

  5. Midurethral slings for stress urinary incontinence: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Beri; Barber, Matthew D

    2012-08-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the involuntary leakage of urine associated with an increase in intraabdominal pressure (coughing, laughing, and sneezing), affects 12.8% to 46.0% of women. SUI is the most common type of urinary incontinence in women younger than 60 years and accounts for at least half of incontinence in all women. Retropubic and transobturator midurethral sling procedures are safe and effective treatments for stress urinary incontinence but have different complication profiles. History, examination, and additional testing may assist in choosing the correct sling type. Appropriate counseling and managing patient expectation are necessary to optimize patient satisfaction. PMID:22877711

  6. [Diagnosis of urinary stress incontinence in men].

    PubMed

    Goepel, M

    2014-03-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) occur more frequently with increasing age. LUTS can either be caused by benign prostatic syndrome (BPS) and consecutive subvesical obstruction as well as detrusor hyperactivity. On the other hand, stress urinary incontinence is mostly seen after surgical intervention in the pelvis like radical prostatectomy. Also high volume centers report persisting incontinence rates of 2-4 % after radical prostatectomy.The diagnostic procedure in men with LUTS is divided in two steps: basic diagnostics, followed by a conservative treatment option, and extended diagnostic procedures including measurement of bladder pressure during filling and voiding. In addition, radiologic examinations, including voiding cystouretherogram, retrograde cystogram, CT scan, MRI scan, are added according to the severity of the symptoms and the scheduled surgical procedure. According to the guidelines of the DGU, EAU, AUA, and ICS, this extended examination is also mandatory prior to any surgical procedure like suburethral tapes, artificial sphincters, and sacral foramen neuronal stimulators. PMID:24615463

  7. Male urinary incontinence and the urinary sheath.

    PubMed

    Smart, Clare

    This article addresses the assessment and management of male incontinence with a specific focus on the use of the male external catheter (MEC) or urinary sheath. Education and expertise when dealing with a man with urinary incontinence, as well as a tactful and sensitive attitude towards this embarrassing problem, are essential for a successful outcome. The urinary sheath is often perceived by nurses and patients as a difficult product to master and is prone to failure owing to incorrect fitting and management. With correct usage it can make a great difference to a patient's quality of life and avoid problems often associated with urinary catheters and pads such as urinary infection and skin excoriation. Detailed assessment of the patient as well as his suitability for the MEC is essential for a successful outcome. PMID:24820510

  8. [Treatment of cystoceles with urinary stress incontinence].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Aboutaieb, R; Dakir, M; el Moussaoui, A; Rabii, R; Hafiani, M; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen women were operated for cystocele associated with urinary stress incontinence. Cystoceles were grade I in 6 cases, grade II in 6 cases and grade III in 1 case. Five patients underwent retropubic colposuspension according to Burch (3 cases) and M.M.K. (2 cases). Eight patients were treated by RAZ's technique associated with anterior colporaphy in order to reduce the cystocele. In this latter group, only one recurrence was observed and was treated by repeat colporaphy with good results. Colposuspension associated with anterior colporaphy is a reliable method for the treatment of cystocele with urinary stress incontinence, associated with low morbidity and short hospitalization. Its results are probably comparable to those of retropubic colposuspension, at least for a 6 months follow-up. PMID:9827204

  9. A Curious Case of Continuous Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Amanda; Roth, Christopher C

    2016-06-01

    Obstructed hemivagina, ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) is a rare Müllerian duct abnormality with renal manifestations. Classical presentation is an adolescent female with abdominal pain following menarche. Because of its rarity, diagnosis is often delayed. There have been <20 reported cases of prepubertal OHVIRA. We present a case of missed OHVIRA diagnosis that presented with continuous incontinence following incision of the obstructed hemivagina and discuss the current medical literature on this subject. PMID:26898899

  10. Slings in iatrogenic male incontinence: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabrizio; Schenone, M.; Giberti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The increasing number of prostatectomies entails an increasing number of patients suffering from iatrogenic incontinence despite improved surgical techniques. The severity of this problem often requires invasive treatments such as periurethral injection of bulking agents, artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, and sub-urethral sling positioning. The artificial urethral sphincter has represented, until today, the gold standard but, in the recent years, sling systems have been investigated as minimally invasive alternative options. Today, three different sling procedures are commonly performed: bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems. The aim of this review is to critically report the current status of sling systems in the treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched and all articles between 1974 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: With regard to bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems, cure rates ranged between 58.0% and 86.0%, 55.5% and 73.0%, and 40.0% and 63.0%, respectively, while major complication rates ranged between 0 and 14.5%, 10.0 and 22.2%, and 0 and 10.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Suburethral slings are the only alternative techniques which can be favorably compared with the AUS, showing more advantages with respect to AUS implantations which are mainly represented by a quick and less invasive approach, low morbidity, and low costs. In spite of the difficulty in identifying the most effective sling procedure, overall, sling systems can be recommended for patients with persistent mild or moderate incontinence. However, the indication can also be extended to patients with severe incontinence, after appropriate counseling, allowing AUS implantation in the event of sling failure. PMID:20877609

  11. Emerging surgical therapies for faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Peter J; Sagar, Peter M

    2014-05-01

    Faecal incontinence is a common condition and is associated with considerable morbidity and economic cost. The majority of patients are managed with conservative interventions. However, for those patients with severe or refractory incontinence, surgical treatment might be required. Over the past 20 years, numerous developments have been made in the surgical therapies available to treat such patients. These surgical therapies can be classified as techniques of neuromodulation, neosphincter creation (muscle or artificial) and injection therapy. Techniques of neuromodulation, particularly sacral nerve stimulation, have transformed the management of these patients with a minimally invasive procedure that offers good results and low morbidity. By contrast, neosphincter procedures are characterized by being more invasive and associated with considerable morbidity, although some patients will experience substantial improvements in their continence. Injection of bulking agents into the anal canal can improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with mild-to-moderate incontinence, and the use of autologous myoblasts might be a future therapy. Further research and development is required not only in terms of the devices and procedures, but also to identify which patients are likely to benefit most from such interventions. PMID:24275793

  12. FECAL COLIFORM INCREASE AFTER CENTRIFUGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bacte...

  13. The Management of Urinary Incontinence by Community-Living Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitteness, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored ways elderly people (N=30) manage urinary incontinence. Subjects tended to dismiss their urinary incontinence as a normal part of aging and used various behavioral and psychological strategies to maintain their independence, usually without any assistance from the health professions. Management strategies commonly involved some degree of…

  14. School Experiences of an Adolescent with Medical Complexities Involving Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie Gabler; Bishop, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The educational implications of chronic illnesses which involve incontinence are not well represented in the literature. The experiences of an adolescent with multiple complex illnesses, including incontinence, were explored via an intrinsic case study. Data were gathered from the adolescent, her mother, and teachers through interviews, email…

  15. [Conservative therapy of female urinary incontinence--potential and effect].

    PubMed

    Horcicka, L; Chmel, R; Novácková, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is not as effective as surgical methods but it is very successful in indicated cases. Rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises, vaginal cones, and electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles), drug treatment (alfa-mimetics, tricyclic antidepressives, estrogens, duloxetin), pessarotherapy and uretral obturator devices represent possibilities of conservative therapy of the stress incontinence. Conservative therapy is the method of choice in the treatment of urge incontinence. The most successful are anticholinergic drugs but they have very frequent serious side effects (dryness of the mucous membranes, accommodation disorders, constipation). Spasmolytics, estrogens and tricyclic antidepressives are the other popular used drugs. Life style modification, bladder training and electrostimulation represent very important parts of the conservative treatment. Effectiveness of the non-surgical treatment of both urge and stress urinary incontinence can not reach 100 percent but it helps very much in the quality of life improvement of incontinent women. PMID:15887395

  16. Office management of urinary incontinence among older patients

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Szlanta, Agata

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a guide to office management of urinary incontinence (UI) among older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane database were searched using the terms urinary incontinence, stress incontinence, overactive bladder, urge incontinence, elderly, and geriatrics. MAIN MESSAGE A variety of conditions affecting the nervous system and the lower urinary tract can affect bladder function and UI. Among older patients the effects of decreased cognition and impaired mobility can be substantial, and environmental barriers can play a role. When managing older patients with UI, emphasis on treating concurrent conditions, optimizing medications, and working on lifestyle and behavioural factors is at least as important as pharmacologic treatment. Medications are relevant, but the potential for adverse effects increases among older patients. CONCLUSION Various resources are available to support family physicians in office management of UI, and family physicians can improve symptoms and the quality of patients’ lives by screening for and helping patients to manage incontinence. PMID:21075990

  17. Urinary incontinence in the bitch: an update.

    PubMed

    Reichler, I M; Hubler, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), defined as the involuntary loss of urine during the filling phase of the bladder (Abrams et al. 2002), is a commonly seen problem in veterinary practice. Urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) after spaying is the most common micturition disorder, and its medical treatment is normally successful, even though the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood. Hormonal changes inducing structural and functional alterations in the bladder, as well as in the urethra composition, are discussed. To manage incontinent patients successfully, possible underlying abnormalities besides USMI should be ruled out. In the majority of cases, history, physical examination and simple tests including urinalysis and urine bacterial culture lead to a presumed aetiology. If USMI is the most likely cause, then the advantage of further diagnostic tests should be discussed with the owner before starting a trial therapy with alpha-adrenergic drugs. Potential side effects of this therapy have to be mentioned even though they rarely occur. It is important to thoroughly evaluate the success of the initial treatment. Its failure should lead to further diagnostic testing. Specialized clinical assessments may provide an aetiological diagnosis, and this could serve as a basis for discussing further treatment options. Surgical procedures, which may in rare cases cause irreversible side effects, may be instituted. If incontinence reoccurs after initial treatment was successfully performed, the diagnostic work-up including urinalysis should always be repeated. As results of urinalysis did not correlate well with results of bacterial culture, a urine culture is recommended (Comer and Ling 1981). Cystocentesis is the preferred method of urine collection (Bartges 2004). Equivocal results of quantitative cultures of urine samples obtained during midstream voiding or by catheterization require repeat collection by cystocentesis (Comer and Ling 1981

  18. [Significance of conservative treatment for faecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwandner, O

    2012-08-01

    Based on a variety of aetiological factors and combined disorders in faecal incontinence, a conservative treatment option as the primary treatment can be recommended. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy influencing stool consistency and stool passage, pelvic floor exercises and biofeedback as well as local treatment options. However, defining the role of conservative treatment concepts related to success or failure remains a challenging task. The lack of evidence derived from studies is related to a variety of reasons including inclusion criteria, patient selection, treatment standardisation, and the principal difficulty to objectively define functional success. PMID:22933004

  19. Stress Urinary Incontinence: Comparative Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Erin Seifert; Zyczynski, Halina M

    2016-03-01

    Women seeking relief from symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may choose from a broad array of treatment options. Therapies range from lifestyle/behavioral modification to surgical interventions, and differ in terms of both effectiveness and risk. Individualized treatment plans can be developed to address a patient's expectations and goals for treatment, as well as her tolerance for potential adverse events. This article reviews the highest-quality clinical trials comparing contemporary treatment options for women with SUI. Clinicians and patients can use this compendium to inform their treatment selection. PMID:26880507

  20. Paliperidone Palmitate-induced Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karslıoǧlu, Ersin Hatice; Özalp, Elvan; Çayköylü, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, although rarely reported, is one of the most important adverse effects of antipsychotic medication. It can be an embarrassing, distressing, and potentially treatment-limiting. Several antipsychotics, including both typical and atypical varieties, are known to induce urinary incontinence. Many antipsychotic drugs target the neural pathways controlling continence by binding to receptors of some neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine, and adrenaline. Pharmacological management of incontinence should be considered if there is a risk of cessation of the antipsychotic therapy or any decline in patients’ compliance. Amitriptyline, desmopressin, ephedrine, and anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl are the most frequently used agents to treat incontinence. We think that the frequency of incontinence is higher than reported in the literature, and that follow-up routines should include a form of standardized screening for all possible adverse effects, including incontinence, of any given antipsychotic. In this article, we report a case of urinary incontinence as an adverse effect of paliperidone palmitate use during maintenance therapy in a patient with schizophrenia. PMID:26792046

  1. Paliperidone Palmitate-induced Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karslıoǧlu, Ersin Hatice; Özalp, Elvan; Çayköylü, Ali

    2016-02-29

    Urinary incontinence, although rarely reported, is one of the most important adverse effects of antipsychotic medication. It can be an embarrassing, distressing, and potentially treatment-limiting. Several antipsychotics, including both typical and atypical varieties, are known to induce urinary incontinence. Many antipsychotic drugs target the neural pathways controlling continence by binding to receptors of some neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine, and adrenaline. Pharmacological management of incontinence should be considered if there is a risk of cessation of the antipsychotic therapy or any decline in patients' compliance. Amitriptyline, desmopressin, ephedrine, and anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl are the most frequently used agents to treat incontinence. We think that the frequency of incontinence is higher than reported in the literature, and that follow-up routines should include a form of standardized screening for all possible adverse effects, including incontinence, of any given antipsychotic. In this article, we report a case of urinary incontinence as an adverse effect of paliperidone palmitate use during maintenance therapy in a patient with schizophrenia. PMID:26792046

  2. Screening for incontinence in a secure psychiatric service for women.

    PubMed

    Long, Clive G; West, Rachel; Siddique, Rizwana; Rigg, Samantha; Banyard, Ellen; Stillman, Swee-Kit; Butler, Sarah; Dolley, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Incontinence is associated with mental illness and neuroleptic medications but diagnosis and treatment is often poor or non-existent. Problems of incontinence are compounded in secure psychiatric services for women by poor health, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. Addressing the physical health of this group necessitates a more accurate picture of the nature, incidence, and management of incontinence. A point-in-time survey of 108 women who agreed to be interviewed (93%) covered presence, frequency, and nature of incontinence, and information on management case note data was used to gather demographic and previous medical history, comparisons were made between patients with and without problems of incontinence. Findings indicate a problem of incontinence in 48% of women with a dominance of problems of stress and urge enuresis. Of modifiable factors that contribute to enuresis, the current study highlighted the contribution of obesity, smoking and clozapine medication. A further finding was the preference for managing rather than treating problems of incontinence. Actions to improve the detection and treatment of this problem are described. PMID:26146962

  3. Utilization of incontinence clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Roe, B; Moore, K N

    2001-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are evidence-based recommendations for best practice and have been developed with the assumption they will be embraced by practitioners; a further assumption is that clinical practice guidelines will improve the delivery of care. In this article, we provide a working definition of evidence-based practice, discuss the strengths and limitations of CPGs, describe the implementation of CPGs in the context of urinary incontinence, and consider the steps that the WOCN has taken to initiate evidence-based practice. Current issues are presented along with initiatives that have resulted in clinical practice guidelines on incontinence from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. On the basis of the current literature, it is concluded that clinical practice guidelines can play an important role in WOCN practice and that the implementation of guidelines may improve clinical practice. However, guidelines are only as valid as the evidence on which they are based and may not take into account gender or cultural differences or the effect that comorbid conditions can have on treatment outcomes. Finally, guidelines must follow a comprehensive approach that involves management and staff and includes education, facilitation, evaluation, feedback, and an understanding of change strategies. PMID:11707762

  4. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Mixed Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Laor, Leanna; Dunphy, Claire; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is a common clinical problem in the community and hospital setting. The broad definition of the term makes it difficult to diagnose, as well as determine effective treatment strategies. There are no current guidelines recommended for physicians. The estimated prevalence of this condition is approximately 30% in all women with incontinence. It has also been suggested that patients with MUI report more bothersome symptoms than either stress or urge incontinence; approximately 32% of 40- to 64-year-olds with MUI report symptoms of depression. The authors examine the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of patients with MUI. PMID:27222643

  5. Development of a Simple Multispectral Algorithm Using a Hyperspectral Line-Scan Imaging System for Detection of Fecal Contamination on Apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne diseases are of serious concern for public health. It is necessary to develop fast and reliable non-destructive detection methods to improve food product monitoring for the food industry. This research was conducted to investigate hyperspectral fluorescence imaging using violet/blue LED ex...

  6. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O

    2016-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient's gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26929784

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O.

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient’s gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26929784

  8. Home Use Tests: Fecal Occult Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Fecal Occult Blood Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... test kit to measure the presence of hidden (occult) blood in your stool (feces). What is fecal ...

  9. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  10. Informatics in Radiology: Dual-Energy Electronic Cleansing for Fecal-Tagging CT Colonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for the removal of tagged fecal materials at fecal-tagging computed tomographic (CT) colonography. However, existing EC methods may generate various types of artifacts that severely impair the quality of the cleansed CT colonographic images. Dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonography is regarded as a next-generation imaging modality. EC that makes use of dual-energy fecal-tagging CT colonographic images promises to be effective in reducing cleansing artifacts by means of applying the material decomposition capability of dual-energy CT. The dual-energy index (DEI), which is calculated from the relative change in the attenuation values of a material at two different photon energies, is a reliable and effective indicator for differentiating tagged fecal materials from various types of tissues on fecal-tagging CT colonographic images. A DEI-based dual-energy EC scheme uses the DEI to help differentiate the colonic lumen—including the luminal air, tagged fecal materials, and air-tagging mixture—from the colonic soft-tissue structures, and then segments the entire colonic lumen for cleansing of the tagged fecal materials. As a result, dual-energy EC can help identify partial-volume effects in the air-tagging mixture and inhomogeneous tagging in residual fecal materials, the major causes of EC artifacts. This technique has the potential to significantly improve the quality of EC and promises to provide images of a cleansed colon that are free of the artifacts commonly observed with conventional single-energy EC methods. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23479680