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Sample records for immiscible elements ag-fe

  1. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  2. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  3. Rare earth element selenochemistry of immiscible liquids and zircon at Apollo 14 - An ion probe study of evolved rocks on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of trace-element analyses of three lunar zircons. The major-element and REE compositions were determined using electron microprobes, and a correction was made for zircon for Zr-Si-O molecular interferences in the La to Pr mass region. The three zircons were found to exhibit similar REE abundances and patterns. Results of the analyses confirm earlier studies (Hess et al., 1975; Watson, 1976; Neal and Taylor, 1989) on the partitioning behavior of trace elements in immiscible liquid-liquid pairs. The results also support the postulated importance of silicate liquid immiscibility in the differentiation of the upper mantle and crust of the moon.

  4. Partitioning of elements between silicate melt and immiscible fluoride, chloride, carbonate, phosphate and sulfate melts, with implications to the origin of natrocarbonatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Dulski, Peter; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Jeffries, Teresa; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-02-01

    Liquid-liquid partitioning of 42 elements between synthetic silicate melts and immiscible fluoride, chloride, carbonate, phosphate and sulfate liquids was studied at temperatures of 650-1100 °C, pressures 72-100 MPa, with 0-11 wt.% H2O. One series of experiments was performed in a rotating internally-heated autoclave where separation of the immiscible liquids was assisted by centrifugal forces. An analogous series of experiments was done in static rapid-quench cold-seal pressure vessels. The experimentally determined liquid-liquid distribution coefficients (D's) vary over several orders of magnitude, as a result of variable Coulombic interactions between cations and anions. For alkaline, alkaline earth and rare earth elements ther is a strong and systematic dependence of the liquid/liquid D values on the ionic potential Z/r for all the examined systems. In contrast, highly charged cations (e.g., HFSE) show no systematic relationships between the D's and Z/r. New experimental constraints on the carbonate/silicate liquid-liquid D values presented here confirm that rare metals such as Nb, Zr, REE, Th and U concentrate in silicate liquids, and therefore carbonatites that carry economical rare metal mineralization are not likely to have formed by liquid immiscibility. The comparison between experimentally-determined carbonate-silicate liquid-liquid D values and bulk-rock natrocarbonatite vs. nephelinite compositions at the Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania reveals significant discrepancies for Cs, Rb, Ba, Be, Zn, heavy REE, Ti, Mo and W, thus rendering a simple, one-stage immiscibility model for Oldoinyo Lengai questionable.

  5. Late-magmatic immiscibility during batholith formation: assessment of B isotopes and trace elements in tourmaline from the Land's End granite, SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivenes, Kristian; Larsen, Rune B.; Müller, Axel; Sørensen, Bjørn E.; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Raanes, Morten P.

    2015-06-01

    Quartz-tourmaline orbicules are unevenly distributed in the roof segment of the Land's End granite, SW England. This study shows that the orbicules formed from an immiscible hydrous borosilicate melt produced during the late stages of crystallization, and differentiates tourmaline formed by dominantly magmatic and dominantly hydrothermal processes. Trace elements and boron isotope fractionation can be tracked in tourmaline, and create a timeline for crystallization. Tourmaline from the granite matrix has higher V, Cr and Mg content and is isotopically heavier than the later crystallizing inner orbicule tourmaline. Overgrowths of blue tourmaline, occurring together with quartz showing hydrothermal cathodoluminescence textures, crystallized from an aqueous fluid during the very last crystallization, and are significantly higher in Sr and Sn, and isotopically heavier. Tourmaline associated with Sn mineralization is also high in Sr and Sn, but has boron isotopic compositions close to that of the magmatic tourmaline, and is not formed by the same fluids responsible for the blue overgrowths. The ore-forming fluids precipitating tourmaline and cassiterite are likely derived from the same magma source as the granite, but exsolved deeper in the magma chamber, and at a later stage than orbicule formation. Tourmaline from massive quartz-tourmaline rocks is concentrically zoned, with major and trace element compositions indicating crystallization from a similar melt as for the orbicules, but shows a more evolved signature.

  6. Gamma ray irradiated AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles with enhanced gas sensor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiuhua; Shi, Zhijie; Yao, Shangwu; Liao, Fan; Ding, Juanjuan; Shao, Mingwang

    2014-11-15

    AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and irradiated by various doses of gamma ray. The products were characterized with X-ray powder diffraction, UV–vis absorption spectrum and transmission electron microscope. The results revealed that the crystal structure, morphology and size of the samples remained unchanged after irradiation, while the intensity of UV–Vis spectra increased with irradiation dose increasing. In addition, gamma ray irradiation improved the performance of gas sensor based on the AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles including the optimum operating temperature and sensitivity, which might be ascribed to the generation of defects. - Graphical abstract: Gamma ray irradiation improved the performance of gas sensor based on the AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles including sensitivity and optimum operating temperature, which might be ascribed to the generation of defects. - Highlights: • AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized and irradiated with gamma ray. • AgFeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were employed to fabricate gas sensors to detect ethanol. • Gamma ray irradiation improved the sensitivity and optimum operating temperature.

  7. One-dimensional immiscible displacement experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, N. R.; Graham, D. N.; Farquhar, G. J.

    1992-08-01

    In recent years, a great deal of attention has focused on the development of various methods to predict the fate of immiscible contaminants (NAPL's) in soils. In an attempt to satisfy this requirement, a host of numerical models has been developed. Unfortunately, there exist little experimental data to verify the assumptions used in the derivation of these immiscible flow models. One objective of this paper is to report on a non-destructive measurement technique which was used to capture the relative organic-phase saturation variations in a number of two-phase flow displacement experiments. The data obtained from these experiments were compared to results obtained from a one-dimensional, finite-element based, two-phase flow model. The experiments consisted of five separate trials using three different immiscible liquids (hydraulic oil, kerosene and hexane) in a water-saturated column. Irregular immiscible liquid infiltration fronts were observed in four of the five experiments, indicating that very small-scale heterogeneities control the infiltration of immiscible liquids into soil. Independent of the column experiments, saturation-capillary pressure curves were determined for the various liquids. In general, the simulated NAPL saturation vs. time profiles agreed very well with the observations for all five of the trials.

  8. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Ag/Fe3O4 nanocomposites synthesized using starch.

    PubMed

    Ghaseminezhad, Seyedeh Masumeh; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-06-25

    Ag/Fe3O4 nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by a facile and cost-effective method using starch. Starch acts as both a biocompatible capping agent for Fe3O4 nanoparticles and a reducing agent for the reduction of silver ions in an alkaline medium. Samples were characterized using several analytical techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The vibrating sample magnetometer revealed that the nanocomposites were superparamagnetic. The Ag/Fe3O4 nanocomposites demonstrated a high-antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli as evaluated by means of minimum inhibitory concentration. The characteristics and antibacterial activity of the nanocomposites were significantly influenced by the concentration of silver nitrate and pH. PMID:27083838

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Ag/Fe3O4 electromagnetic shielding particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichuan; Zhou, Zunning; Zhang, Tonglai; Jiang, Guotao; Su, Ruyi

    2014-05-01

    Ag/Fe3O4 nano-composites are synthesized by electroless silver plating technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscope, magnetic measurement equipment and vector network analyzer. They show the silver layer coated on the surface of the particles successfully, and which can enhance the dielectricity and permeability properties of the ferromagnetic particles. The dielectric loss values of the composites are more than 1.0 in the almost whole test frequency range and the imaginary part of permeability of Ag/Fe3O4 is higher than real part in 2-5 GHz. The value of Hc is increased to 165.2 Oe due to the extended relaxation time of magnetic domain deflection of the magnetic powders which covered by silver layer. And the calculated microwave loss is more than 20 dB in the whole frequency range. As a result, the Ag/Fe3O4 nano-composites are expected to be used as electromagnetic shielding particle material in multiband smoke agent.

  10. Bifunctional Ag/Fe/N/C Catalysts for Enhancing Oxygen Reduction via Cathodic Biofilm Inhibition in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Chan, Yingzi; Jiang, Baojiang; Wang, Lei; Zou, Jinlong; Pan, Kai; Fu, Honggang

    2016-03-23

    Limitation of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (SC-MFCs) is considered an important hurdle in achieving their practical application. The cathodic catalysts faced with a liquid phase are easily primed with the electrolyte, which provides more surface area for bacterial overgrowth, resulting in the difficulty in transporting protons to active sites. Ag/Fe/N/C composites prepared from Ag and Fe-chelated melamine are used as antibacterial ORR catalysts for SC-MFCs. The structure-activity correlations for Ag/Fe/N/C are investigated by tuning the carbonization temperature (600-900 °C) to clarify how the active-constituents of Ag/Fe and N-species influence the antibacterial and ORR activities. A maximum power density of 1791 mW m(-2) is obtained by Ag/Fe/N/C (630 °C), which is far higher than that of Pt/C (1192 mW m(-2)), only having a decline of 16.14% after 90 days of running. The Fe-bonded N and the cooperation of pyridinic N and pyrrolic N in Ag/Fe/N/C contribute equally to the highly catalytic activity toward ORR. The ·OH or O2(-) species originating from the catalysis of O2 can suppress the biofilm growth on Ag/Fe/N/C cathodes. The synergistic effects between the Ag/Fe heterojunction and N-species substantially contribute to the high power output and Coulombic efficiency of Ag/Fe/N/C catalysts. These new antibacterial ORR catalysts show promise for application in MFCs. PMID:26938657

  11. Studies on immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1976-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of immiscible liquids of different densities in zero-gravity and to determine the rate of coalescence like droplets, a demonstration experiment was performed on the Skylab 4 mission. Dispersions of oil-in-water and of water-in-oil were prepared by the astronauts and their appearance photographed over a time span of 10 hours. The experiment indicated that all emulsions were stable over this period and that the coalescent rate was at least 3 times 10 to the 5th power times smaller on Skylab than on earth. The recorded melting of a cylindrical piece of ice on Skylab 3 is used to study the mode of heat transfer for the latent heat of melting in low-gravity.

  12. Magnetic hyperthermia in brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brollo, M. E. F.; Orozco-Henao, J. M.; López-Ruiz, R.; Muraca, D.; Dias, C. S. B.; Pirota, K. R.; Knobel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Heating efficiency of multifunctional Ag@Fe3O4 brick-like nanoparticles under alternating magnetic field was investigated by means of specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements, and compared with equivalent measurements for plain magnetite and dimer heteroparticles. The samples were synthesized by thermal decomposition reactions and present narrow size polydispersity and high degree of crystallinity. The SAR values are analyzed using the superparamagnetic theory, in which the basic morphology, size and dispersion of sizes play key roles. The results suggest that these novel brick-like nanoparticles are good candidates for hyperthermia applications, displaying heating efficiencies comparable with the most efficient plain nanoparticles.

  13. Ag/FeCo/Ag core/shell/shell magnetic nanoparticles with plasmonic imaging capability.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mari; Mohan, Priyank; Nakade, Akiko; Higashimine, Koichi; Mott, Derrick; Hamada, Tsutomu; Matsumura, Kazuaki; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Maenosono, Shinya

    2015-02-24

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to separate various species such as bacteria, cells, and proteins. In this study, we synthesized Ag/FeCo/Ag core/shell/shell NPs designed for magnetic separation of subcellular components like intracellular vesicles. A benefit of these NPs is that their silver metal content allows plasmon scattering to be used as a tool to observe detection by the NPs easily and semipermanently. Therefore, these NPs are considered a potential alternative to existing fluorescent probes like dye molecules and colloidal quantum dots. In addition, the Ag core inside the NPs suppresses the oxidation of FeCo because of electron transfer from the Ag core to the FeCo shell, even though FeCo is typically susceptible to oxidation. The surfaces of the Ag/FeCo/Ag NPs were functionalized with ε-poly-L-lysine-based hydrophilic polymers to make them water-soluble and biocompatible. The imaging capability of the polymer-functionalized NPs induced by plasmon scattering from the Ag core was investigated. The response of the NPs to a magnetic field using liposomes as platforms and applying a magnetic field during observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy was assessed. The results of the magnetophoresis experiments of liposomes allowed us to calculate the magnetic force to which each liposome was subjected. PMID:25614919

  14. Rapid degradation of hexachlorobenzene by micron Ag/Fe bimetal particles.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xianwei; Yue, Dongbei

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of the rapid degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) by micron-size silver (Ag)/iron (Fe) particles was investigated. Ag/Fe particles with different ratios (0, 0.05%, 0.09%, 0.20%, and 0.45%) were prepared by electroless silver plating on 300 mesh Fe powder, and were used to degrade HCB at different pH values and temperatures. The dechlorination ability of Fe greatly increased with small Ag addition, whereas too much added Ag would cover the Fe surface and reduce the effective reaction surface, thereby decreasing the extent of dechlorination. The optimal Ag/Fe ratio was 0.09%. Tafel polarization curves showed that HCB was rapidly degraded at neutral or acidic pH, whereas low pH levels severely intensified H2 production, which consumed the reducing electrons needed for the HCB degradation. HCB degradation was more sensitive to temperature than pH. The rate constant of HCB dechlorination was 0.452 min- at 85 degrees C, 50 times higher than that at 31 degrees C. HCB was degraded in a successive dechlorination pathway, yielding the main products 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene within 2 hr. PMID:23923419

  15. Excitation of plasmons in Ag/Fe/W structure by spin-polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, Sergey N.; Kostylev, Mikhail; Williams, J. F.; Artamonov, Oleg M.; Baraban, Alexander P.; Guagliardo, Paul

    2015-09-07

    Using Spin-polarized Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy (SPEELS), the plasmon excitations were probed in a few atomic layers thick Ag film deposited on an Fe layer or on a single crystal of W(110). The measurements were performed at two specular geometries with either a 25° or 72° angle of incidence. On a clean Fe layer (10 atomic layers thick), Stoner excitation asymmetry was observed, as expected. Deposition of a silver film on top of the Fe layer dramatically changed the asymmetry of the SPEELS spectra. The spin-effect depends on the kinematics of the scattering: angles of incidence and detection. The spin-dependence of the plasmon excitations in the silver film on the W(110) surface and on the ferromagnetic Fe film is suggested to arise from the spin-active Ag/W or Ag/Fe interfaces.

  16. Physical properties of immiscible polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The demixing of immiscible polymers in low gravity is discussed. Applications of knowledge gained in this research will provide a better understanding of the role of phase segregation in determining the properties of polymer blends made from immiscible polymers. Knowledge will also be gained regarding the purification of biological materials by partitioning between the two liquid phases formed by solution of the polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran in water. Testing of new apparatus for space flight, extension of affinity phase partitioning, refinement of polymer chemistry, and demixing of isopycnic polymer phases in a one gravity environment are discussed.

  17. The nature and barium partitioning between immiscible melts - A comparison of experimental and natural systems with reference to lunar granite petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Elemental partitioning between immiscible melts has been studied using experimental liquid-liquid Kds and those determined by analysis of immiscible glasses in basalt mesostases in order to investigate lunar granite petrogenesis. Experimental data show that Ba is partitioned into the basic immiscible melt, while probe analysis results show that Ba is partitioned into the granitic immiscible melt. It is concluded that lunar granite of significant size can only occur in a plutonic or deep hypabyssal environment.

  18. Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Lu, X; Nakajima, K; Sakanakura, H; Matsubae, K; Bai, H; Nagasaka, T

    2012-06-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected. PMID:22370049

  19. Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H.; Matsubae, K.; Bai, H.; Nagasaka, T.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

  20. Influence of biocompatible metal ions (Ag, Fe, Y) on the surface chemistry, corrosion behavior and cytocompatibility of Mg-1Ca alloy treated with MEVVA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Bian, Dong; Wu, Yuanhao; Li, Nan; Qiu, Kejin; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Mg-1Ca samples were implanted with biocompatible alloy ions Ag, Fe and Y respectively with a dose of 2×10(17)ionscm(-2) by metal vapor vacuum arc technique (MEVVA). The surface morphologies and surface chemistry were investigated by SEM, AES and XPS. Surface changes were observed after all three kinds of elemental ion implantation. The results revealed that the modified layer was composed of two sublayers, including an outer oxidized layer with mixture of oxides and an inner implanted layer, after Ag and Fe ion implantation. Y ion implantation induced an Mg/Ca-deficient outer oxidized layer and the distribution of Y along with depth was more homogeneous. Both electrochemical test and immersion test revealed accelerated corrosion rate of Ag-implanted Mg-1Ca and Fe-implanted Mg-1Ca, whereas Y ion implantation showed a short period of protection since enhanced corrosion resistance was obtained by electrochemical test, but accelerated corrosion rate was found by long period immersion test. Indirect cytotoxicity assay indicated good cytocompatibility of Y-implanted Mg-1Ca. Moreover, the corresponding corrosion mechanisms involving implanting ions into magnesium alloys were proposed, which might provide guidance for further application of plasma ion implantation to biodegradable Mg alloys. PMID:26094143

  1. Thermal Annealing Effect on Structural, Morphological, and Sensor Performance of PANI-Ag-Fe Based Electrochemical E. coli Sensor for Environmental Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Naim, Norshafadzila; Abdullah, H; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Abdul Hamid, Aidil; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2015-01-01

    PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films based electrochemical E. coli sensor was developed with thermal annealing. PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films were prepared by oxidative polymerization of aniline and the reduction process of Ag-Fe bimetallic compound with the presence of nitric acid and PVA. The films were deposited on glass substrate using spin-coating technique before they were annealed at 300 °C. The films were characterized using XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and FESEM to study the structural and morphological properties. The electrochemical sensor performance was conducted using I-V measurement electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The sensitivity upon the presence of E. coli was measured in clean water and E. coli solution. From XRD analysis, the crystallite sizes were found to become larger for the samples after annealing. UV-Vis absorption bands for samples before and after annealing show maximum absorbance peaks at around 422 nm-424 nm and 426 nm-464 nm, respectively. FESEM images show the diameter size for nanospherical Ag-Fe alloy particles increases after annealing. The sensor performance of PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films upon E. coli cells in liquid medium indicates the sensitivity increases after annealing. PMID:26078996

  2. Studies of Model Immiscible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives are to use model transparent monotectics to obtain fundamental information applicable to two-phase systems in general, to apply this understanding to materials of interest in the Microgravity Science and Applications program, and to interpret results of flight experimental involving monotectic alloys. A number of model immiscible systems are in use to study various aspects of two-phase behavior within the miscibility gap and during solidification. Particle growth, coalescence and particle motions are under investigation using a holographic microscopy system. The system is capable of working with particle densities up to 10 to the 7th power particles/cubic centimeters through a 100 micron depth and can resolve particles of the order of 2 to 3 micron in diameter throughout the entire cell volume. Particle size, distribution changes with respect to time and temperature are observable from sequential holograms. Initial experiments using diethylene glycol/ethyl salicylate (DEG/ES) have demonstrated the usefulness of the technique. The thermal system controls temperature to at least plus or minus 0.001 K over the course of an experiment. A time-lapse film, made from holograms, of a succinonitrile/water solution shows particle size and number distribution changes with time under isothermal conditions. The observations are consistent with Ostwald ripening theory.

  3. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine. PMID:25354532

  4. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  5. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by imaging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  6. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Lee H.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by iamging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  7. Formation of AgFeO2, α-FeOOH, and Ag2O from mixed Fe(NO3)3-AgNO3 solutions at high pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2013-07-01

    Precipitation of ternary oxide silver ferrite (AgFeO2), iron oxyhydroxide goethite (α-FeOOH) and silver(I) oxide (Ag2O) from mixed Fe(NO3)3-AgNO3 solutions in a whole [Ag+]:[Fe3+] concentration ratio range at high pH was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer, FT-IR and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopies and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Strong alkalis organic tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) or inorganic NaOH were used as precipitating agents. Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH particles were formed from a pure Fe(NO3)3 solution. The presence of Ag+ ions influenced the formation of the delafossite-type ternary oxide AgFeO2 beside α-FeOOH. The positions of XRD and Mössbauer lines did not suggest any significant incorporation of Ag+ ions into the α-FeOOH structure. AgFeO2 was formed in the precipitation system with the equimolar initial [Ag+]:[Fe3+] concentration ratio. The size and shape of AgFeO2 particles, as well as their structural polytype (2H or 3R), were dependent on reaction temperature, aging time and alkali used. In systems with an excess of Ag+ ions mixtures of AgFeO2 and Ag2O were formed. Single phase Ag2O precipitated from a pure AgNO3 solution.

  8. Exchange bias in Ag/FeCo/Ag core/shell/shell nanoparticles due to partial oxidation of FeCo intermediate shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Mari; Mohan, Priyank; Mott, Derrick M.; Maenosono, Shinya

    2016-03-01

    Recently we developed magnetic-plasmonic Ag/FeCo/Ag core/shell/shell nanoparticles for the purpose of biological applications. In these heterostructured nanoparticles, exchange bias is observed as a result of the formation of an interface between ferromagnetic FeCo and antiferromagnetic CoxFe1-xO due to the partial oxidation of the FeCo intermediate shell. In this study we thoroughly characterized the surface oxide layer of the FeCo shell by XPS, XRD and SQUID magnetometer.

  9. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek K; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, J Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:23836703

  10. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:24201322

  11. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  12. Low gravity containerless processing of immiscible gold rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry

    1986-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedementation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. However, under low-g conditions it should be possible to form a dispersion of the two immiscible liquids and maintain this dispersed structure during solidification. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the Marshall Space Flight Center 105 meter drop tube in order to investigate the influence of low gravity, containerless solidification on their microstructure. Hypermonotectic alloys composed of 65 atomic % rhodium exhibited a tendency for the gold rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the containerless processed samples. This tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. However, well dispersed microstructures consisting of 2 to 3 micron diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix were produced in 23.4 atomic % rhodium alloys. This is one of the best dispersions obtained in research on immiscible alloy-systems to data.

  13. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    incompatible elements.

  14. Dissociation of dilute immiscible copper alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, K.; Lucadamo, G. A.; Cabral, C.; Lavoie, C.; Harper, J. M. E.

    2000-03-01

    The dissociation behavior of dilute, immiscible Cu-alloy thin films is found to fall into three broad categories that correlate most closely with the form of the Cu-rich end of the binary alloy phase diagrams. Available thermodynamic and tracer diffusion data shed further light on alloy behavior. Eight alloying elements were selected for these studies, with five elements from groups 5 and 6, two from group 8, and one from group 11 of the periodic table. They are respectively V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, Fe, Ru, and Ag. The progress of precipitation in approximately 500-nm-thick alloy films, containing 2.5-3.8 at. % solute, was followed with in situ resistance and stress measurements as well as with in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. In addition, texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the evolution of microstructure and texture of Cu(Ta) and Cu(Ag). For all eight alloys, dissociation occurred upon heating, with the rejection of solute and evolution of microstructure often occurring in multiple steps that range over several hundred degrees between approximately 100 and 900 °C. However, in most cases, substantial reductions in resistivity of the films took place below 400 °C, at temperatures of interest to copper metallization schemes for silicon chip technology.

  15. On Theories for Reacting Immiscible Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-11-05

    On some small scale each constituent of an immiscible mixture occupies a separate region of space. Given sufficient time and computing power, we could solve the continuum field equations and boundary conditions for this het erogenous system. This usually represents an enormously difficult task that is well beyond today's computational ca- pabilities. Mixture theories approximate this complex heterogeneous formulation with a set of field equations for an equivalent homoge- neous mat erial. In this work, we compare the theory for immiscible mixtures by Drumheller and Bedford with the theory of Passman, Nunziato, and Walsh. We describe the conditions under which these theories reduce to an equivalent formulation, and we also investigate the differences in their microinertial descriptions. Two variables play special roles in both theories. They are t he true material density and the volume fraction. Here we use a kinematical approach based on two new variables-t he true deformation gradient and the distention gradient. We show how the true deformation gra- dient is connected to the true material density and, in the absence of chemical reactions, the volume fraction is the inverse of the deter- minant of the distention gradient. However, when chemical reactions occur, the distention gradient and the volume fraction are not directly connected. We ako present a mixture model for a granuIar expIosive. This model is based upon the work of Baer and Nunziato, but our theory differs from their work in that we Present a three-dimension-al rnodd, `.. ` - - we cast the constitutive postulates in terms of the distention gradient rather than the volume fraction, and we incorporate elastic-plastic effects into the constitutive description of the solid granules.

  16. Effect of Organoclays on Immiscible Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2011-03-01

    The effect of adding organoclays on the phase behavior, rheological properties and bulk mechanical properties of immiscible polymer blends of polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is investigated. Traditional organoclays, prepared using alkyl ammonium chains, display a preference to segregate to the PS phase for high PS volume fraction blends where the PS forms the continuous matrix. On the other hand, for blends with low PS volume fractions, the organoclay segregates to the interface between the PS and PMMA domains and leads to a decrease in the domain size that does not change much with organoclay concentration variations from 0.1 to 2 wt %. Linear dynamic rheological data of these samples show significant increase in the low-frequency modulus of the blends with added organoclay. A thermodynamic model for estimating the interfacial modulus is proposed and the results agree well with the interfacial modulus calculated by Palierne's emulsion model. The toughness of the blends increases at low concentrations of added organoclays with the optimal improvements observed for less than 0.5 wt % added organoclay.

  17. Highly efficient and recyclable triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts for degradation of organic pollutants and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yunxia; Xu, Sichao; Wang, Shuan; Ding, Hualin; Pan, Shusheng; Wang, Guozhong; Li, Guanghai; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2 (P25), pure TiO2 microspheres, Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 and annealed Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanocomposites, the as-obtained amorphous triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 hierarchical nanospheres exhibit a markedly enhanced visible light or sunlight photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of methylene blue and photoreduction of hexavalent chromium ions in wastewater. The outstanding photocatalytic activities of the plasmonic photocatalyst are mainly due to the enhanced light harvesting, reduced transport paths for both mass and charge transport, reduced recombination probability of photogenerated electrons/holes, near field electromagnetic enhancement and efficient scattering from the plasmonic nanostructure, increased surface-to-volume ratio and active sites in three dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructures, and improved photo/chemical stability. More importantly, the hierarchical nanostructured Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts could be easily collected and separated by applying an external magnetic field and reused at least five times without any appreciable reduction in photocatalytic efficiency. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability, in combination with the magnetic recyclability, make these multifunctional nanostructures promising candidates to remediate aquatic contaminants and meet the demands of future environmental issues.Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2

  18. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    DOEpatents

    Spauschus, Hans O.; Starr, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    A method of separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed.

  19. Effect of wettability on adverse mobility immiscible floods

    SciTech Connect

    Vives, M.T.; Chang, Y.C.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Many immiscible displacements in reservoirs occur at adverse mobility. Effect of wettability on these displacements is not well understood and often ignored in reservoir simulation. Recent macroscopic theories of viscous fingering treat adverse immiscible flows similar to miscible flows, the mixing in the fingered region being controlled by a Todd-Longstaff-type functional form. The wettability of the medium is taken into account only through the use of appropriate relative permeabilities. The goal of this paper is to understand the macroscopic bypassing in adverse mobility immiscible floods. Immiscible displacements are conducted in a quarter 5-spot model in both drainage and imbibition modes at similar effective mobility ratios and viscous-to-gravity numbers. The level of bypassing and gravity override is visualized and measured. Tertiary water-alternating-gas (WAG) displacements are also conducted at various WAG ratios and viscosity ratios. Fractional flow analysis and numerical simulation are used to understand these displacements. Experiments show that macroscopic viscous fingering is present in adverse viscosity immiscible displacements where no saturation shock is expected from 1-D fractional flow theory. Bypassing due to both fingering and gravity override is higher in the drainage mode than in the imbibition mode, with other key parameters being the same. Optimum WAG ratio in water-wet rock is a function of oil/solvent viscosity ratio. The macroscopic flow theory needs to include capillarity and viscous fingering to match these experimental findings.

  20. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  1. Mixing of immiscible polymers using nanoporous coordination templates

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takashi; Kaseda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yotaro; Inukai, Munehiro; Toriyama, Takaaki; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of methodologies for the mixing of immiscible substances is highly desirable to facilitate the development of fundamental science and materials technology. Herein we describe a new protocol for the compatibilization of immiscible polymers at the molecular level using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) as removable templates. In this process, the typical immiscible polymer pair of polystyrene (PSt) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was prepared via the successive homopolymerizations of their monomers in a PCP to distribute the polymers inside the PCP particles. Subsequent dissolution of the PCP frameworks in a chelator solution affords a PSt/PMMA blend that is homogeneous in the range of several nanometers. Due to the unusual compatibilization, the thermal properties of the polymer blend are remarkably improved compared with the conventional solvent-cast blend. This method is also applicable to the compatibilization of PSt and polyacrylonitrile, which have very different solubility parameters. PMID:26130294

  2. Containerless low gravity processing of glass forming and immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Briggs, Craig; Robinson, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedimentation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the 100 meter drop tube under low gravity, containerless conditions to determine the feasibility of producing dispersed structures. Three alloy compositions were utilized. Alloys containing 10 percent by volume of the gold-rich hypermonotectic phase exhibited a tendency for the gold-rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the samples. This wetting tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. Alloys containing 80 and 90 percent by volume of the gold-rich phase possessed completely different microstructures from the 10 percent samples when processed under low-g, containerless conditions. Several samples exhibited microstructures consisting of well dispersed 2 to 3 microns diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix.

  3. Mixing of immiscible polymers using nanoporous coordination templates.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takashi; Kaseda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yotaro; Inukai, Munehiro; Toriyama, Takaaki; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of methodologies for the mixing of immiscible substances is highly desirable to facilitate the development of fundamental science and materials technology. Herein we describe a new protocol for the compatibilization of immiscible polymers at the molecular level using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) as removable templates. In this process, the typical immiscible polymer pair of polystyrene (PSt) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was prepared via the successive homopolymerizations of their monomers in a PCP to distribute the polymers inside the PCP particles. Subsequent dissolution of the PCP frameworks in a chelator solution affords a PSt/PMMA blend that is homogeneous in the range of several nanometers. Due to the unusual compatibilization, the thermal properties of the polymer blend are remarkably improved compared with the conventional solvent-cast blend. This method is also applicable to the compatibilization of PSt and polyacrylonitrile, which have very different solubility parameters. PMID:26130294

  4. Hydrogenation with monolith reactor under conditions of immiscible liquid phases

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved for the hydrogenation of an immiscible mixture of an organic reactant in water. The immiscible mixture can result from the generation of water by the hydrogenation reaction itself or, by the addition of, water to the reactant prior to contact with the catalyst. The improvement resides in effecting the hydrogenation reaction in a monolith catalytic reactor from 100 to 800 cpi, at a superficial velocity of from 0.1 to 2 m/second in the absence of a cosolvent for the immiscible mixture. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrogenation is carried out using a monolith support which has a polymer network/carbon coating onto which a transition metal is deposited.

  5. Water and hydrogen are immiscible in Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Bali, Enikő; Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2013-03-14

    In the deep, chemically reducing parts of Earth's mantle, hydrous fluids contain significant amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2). Thermodynamic models of fluids in Earth's mantle so far have always assumed that molecular hydrogen and water are completely miscible. Here we show experimental evidence that water and hydrogen can coexist as two separate, immiscible phases. Immiscibility between water and hydrogen may be the cause of the formation of enigmatic, ultra-reducing domains in the mantle that contain moissanite (SiC) and other phases indicative of extremely reducing conditions. Moreover, the immiscibility between water and hydrogen may provide a mechanism for the rapid oxidation of Earth's upper mantle immediately following core formation. PMID:23486061

  6. Highly efficient and recyclable triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts for degradation of organic pollutants and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yunxia; Xu, Sichao; Wang, Shuan; Ding, Hualin; Pan, Shusheng; Wang, Guozhong; Li, Guanghai; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-05-21

    Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2 (P25), pure TiO2 microspheres, Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 and annealed Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanocomposites, the as-obtained amorphous triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 hierarchical nanospheres exhibit a markedly enhanced visible light or sunlight photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of methylene blue and photoreduction of hexavalent chromium ions in wastewater. The outstanding photocatalytic activities of the plasmonic photocatalyst are mainly due to the enhanced light harvesting, reduced transport paths for both mass and charge transport, reduced recombination probability of photogenerated electrons/holes, near field electromagnetic enhancement and efficient scattering from the plasmonic nanostructure, increased surface-to-volume ratio and active sites in three dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructures, and improved photo/chemical stability. More importantly, the hierarchical nanostructured Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts could be easily collected and separated by applying an external magnetic field and reused at least five times without any appreciable reduction in photocatalytic efficiency. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability, in combination with the magnetic recyclability, make these multifunctional nanostructures promising candidates to remediate aquatic contaminants and meet the demands of future environmental issues. PMID:24710730

  7. Electroanalytical Ventures at Nanoscale Interfaces Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigan, Damien W. M.; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Ion transfer at the interface between immiscible electrolyte solutions offers many benefits to analytical chemistry, including the ability to detect nonredox active ionized analytes, to detect ions whose redox electrochemistry is accompanied by complications, and to separate ions based on electrocontrolled partition. Nanoscale miniaturization of such interfaces brings the benefits of enhanced mass transport, which in turn leads to improved analytical performance in areas such as sensitivity and limits of detection. This review discusses the development of such nanoscale interfaces between immiscible liquids and examines the analytical advances that have been made to date, including prospects for trace detection of ion concentrations.

  8. Experimental confirmation of high temperature silicate liquid immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, T.; Veksler, I. V.

    2014-12-01

    The existence of stable, super-liquidus silicate liquid immiscibility at temperatures up to 1200 °C has been proposed for some multicomponent ferrobasaltic-ferroandesitic compositions on the basis of centrifuge experiments (Veksler et al., 2007) but the evidence and interpretation of experimental results were challenged by Philpotts (2008) who argued that the products of centrifuge experiments were metastable phases formed during quenching. Here we report the results of static reverse experiments, which were aimed at resolving the debate. The idea of the reverse experiments was to test miscibility between pre-synthesized pairs of silica-rich and Fe-rich immiscible melts at static conditions and long exposure times. Three pairs of the potentially immiscible compositions were taken from the original study by Veksler et al. (2007) and one more pair was taken from a recent report of liquid immiscibility in the Panzhihua intrusion in China. Experiments were carried out in one-atmosphere gas-mixing furnace (Ar-H2-CO2 gas mixture) at 1150 and 1200 °C and oxygen fugacity corresponding to that of the QFM buffer. Pairs of the silica-rich and Fe-rich starting compositions were loaded in Pt wire loops, fused separately at 1200 °C, and then brought in contact and kept at constant experimental temperature for more than 24 hours. Three pairs of compositions out of four used in this study did not mix. Some temperature-dependent chemical re-equilibration was observed in the Fe-rich melts but, in the cases of immiscibility, two liquids remained compositionally distinct and showed sharp compositional gradients at contacts. One pair of liquids crystallized some tridymite, whereas the other compositions were clearly above liquidus. Overall, the results of the reverse experiments are in good agreement with the earlier centrifugation study and confirm the existence of stable, super-liquids immiscibility in some Fe-rich basaltic-andesitic compositions at temperatures up to 1200

  9. Electrified microscopic and conventional interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanysek, Petr

    1991-06-01

    Transport studies on interfaces between immiscible phases bridges the field of heterogeneous electrode electrochemistry and that of homogeneous solution chemistry. Early work on liquid/liquid boundary was concerned with large area (order of a square centimeter) interfaces. Recent studies investigate phenomena on interfaces rendered in pores, capillaries, and small holes. The behavior of such interfaces in the presence of dodecyl sulfate, forming micelles, is investigated. Voltammetry and amperometry on these small interfaces reveals that the accompanying voltammetric characteristics are similar to that of metal ultramicroelectrodes. Potentiometric studies of dodecyl sulfate on water/nitrobenzene and aqueous polymer immiscible interfaces allow determination of critical micelle concentration.

  10. Electroanalytical Ventures at Nanoscale Interfaces Between Immiscible Liquids.

    PubMed

    Arrigan, Damien W M; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-12

    Ion transfer at the interface between immiscible electrolyte solutions offers many benefits to analytical chemistry, including the ability to detect nonredox active ionized analytes, to detect ions whose redox electrochemistry is accompanied by complications, and to separate ions based on electrocontrolled partition. Nanoscale miniaturization of such interfaces brings the benefits of enhanced mass transport, which in turn leads to improved analytical performance in areas such as sensitivity and limits of detection. This review discusses the development of such nanoscale interfaces between immiscible liquids and examines the analytical advances that have been made to date, including prospects for trace detection of ion concentrations. PMID:27049634

  11. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Heavin, Leonard J.; King, Edward E.; Milliron, Dennis L.

    1982-10-26

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  12. Interfacial and gravitational convection in immiscible liquid layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, A.; Koster, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid encapsulation of electronic melts is currently being investigated by several materials science research groups. Pertinent fluid dynamics of immiscible liquid layers is the objective of this investigation. First results on convective flow in double liquid layers, in preparation for a spaceflight experiment aboard the International Microgravity Laboratory, IML-2, are discussed.

  13. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  14. Ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membranes by immiscible solvents treatment

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.

    1989-01-01

    Improved semipermeable asymmetric fluid separation membranes useful in gas, vapor and liquid separations are disclosed. The membranes are prepared by substantially filling the pores of asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membranes having a finely porous layer on one side thereof with a water immiscible organic liquid, followed by contacting the finely porous layer with water.

  15. Ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membranes by immiscible solvents treatment

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.

    1989-11-28

    Improved semipermeable asymmetric fluid separation membranes useful in gas, vapor and liquid separations are disclosed. The membranes are prepared by substantially filling the pores of asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membranes having a finely porous layer on one side thereof with a water immiscible organic liquid, followed by contacting the finely porous layer with water.

  16. Silicate-natrocarbonatite liquid immiscibility in 1917 eruption combeite-wollastonite nephelinite, Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano, Tanzania: Melt inclusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharygin, Victor V.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.; Kamenetsky, Maya B.

    2012-11-01

    Primary silicate-melt and carbonate-salt inclusions occur in the phenocrysts (nepheline, fluorapatite, wollastonite, clinopyroxene) in the 1917 eruption combeite-wollastonite nephelinite at Oldoinyo Lengai. Silicate-melt inclusions in nepheline clearly show liquid immiscibility phenomena expressed in the presence of carbonate globules in silicate glass. The coexistence of inclusions with markedly different proportions of silicate glass + vapor-carbonate globule in the core of nepheline phenocrysts, the presence of carbonate-salt inclusions in fluorapatite and our heating experiments strongly suggest that their entrapment began at temperatures higher than 1130 °C in an intermediate chamber when initial carbonated nephelinite melt was heterogeneous and represented a mixture of immiscible liquids. Silicate-natrocarbonatite melt immiscibility took place at high temperature and immiscible nephelinite and carbonatite liquids coexisted over a wide temperature range from ≥ 1130 °C to 600 °C. Homogenization of a carbonate globule (dissolution of the gas bubble in carbonate melt) at 900-940 °C indicates that after separation from silicate magma the natrocarbonatite represented homogeneous liquid in the 900-1130 °C temperature range, whereas below these temperatures immiscible melts of different composition and fluid phase have separated from it. The bulk composition of homogeneous natrocarbonatite melt may be estimated as ≈ 20% CaF2, 40-60% (Na,K)2CO3 and 20-40% CaCO3 based on the coexistence of nyerereite, calcite and fluorite and the rapid phase transition (carbonate aggregate → carbonate liquid) at 550-570 °C observed in vapor-carbonate globules of nepheline-hosted silicate-melt inclusions and on the Na2CO3-CaCO3-CaF2 phase diagram. Silicate glasses of nepheline-hosted immiscible inclusions drastically differ from host nephelinite in the abundance of major and trace elements. They are high peralkaline ((Na + K)/Al — up to 9.5) and virtually free of water (H2

  17. Compositions of magmas and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovova, I. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Kogarko, L. N.; Kononkova, N. N.; Stoppa, F.; Rosatelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a study of melt and fluid inclusions in minerals of an olivine-leucite phonolitic nephelinite bomb from the Monticchio Lake Formation, Vulture. The rock contains 50 vol.% clinopyroxene, 12% leucite, 10% alkali feldspars, 8% hauyne/sodalite, 7.5% nepheline, 4.5% apatite, 3.2% olivine, 2% opaques, 2.6% plagioclase, and < 1% amphibole. We distinguished three generations of clinopyroxene differing in composition and morphology. All the phenocrysts bear primary and secondary melt and fluid inclusions, which recorded successive stages of melt evolution. The most primitive melts were found in the most magnesian olivine and the earliest clinopyroxene phenocrysts. The melts are near primary mantle liquids and are rich in Ca, Mg and incompatible and volatile elements. Thermometric experiments with the melt inclusions suggested that melt crystallization began at temperatures of about 1200 °C. Because of the partial leakage of all primary fluid inclusions, the pressure of crystallization is constrained only to minimum of 3.5 kbar. Combined silicate-carbonate melt inclusions were found in apatite phenocrysts. They are indicative of carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility, which occurred during magma evolution. Large hydrous secondary melt inclusions were found in olivine and clinopyroxene. The inclusions in the phenocrysts recorded an open-system magma evolution during its rise towards the surface including crystallization, degassing, oxidation, and liquid immiscibility processes.

  18. The role of liquid immiscibility in the genesis of carbonatites — An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freestone, I. C.; Hamilton, D. L.

    1980-07-01

    The two-liquid field between alkali-carbonate liquids and phonolite or nephelinite magmas from the Oldoinyo Lengai volcano has been determined between 0.7 and 7.6 kb and 900° 1,250° C. The miscibility gap expands with increase in P_{CO_2 } and decrease in temperature. Concomitantly there is a rotation of tie-lines so that the carbonate liquids become richer in CaO. The element distribution between the melts indicates that a carbonate liquid equivalent in composition to Oldoinyo Lengai natrocarbonatite lava would have separated from a phonolitic rather than a nephelinitic magma. CO2-saturated nephelinites coexist with carbonate liquids much richer in CaO than the Lengai carbonatites, but even so these liquids have high alkali concentrations. If the sövites of hypabyssal and plutonic ijolite-carbonatite complexes originated by liquid immiscibility, then large quantities of alkalis have been lost, as is suggested by fenitization and related phenomena. The miscibility gap closes away from Na2O-rich compositions, so that the tendency to exsolve a carbonatite melt is greater in salic than in mafic silicate magmas. The two-liquid field does not approach kimberlitic compositions over the range of pressures studied, suggesting that the globular textures observed in many kimberlite sills and dykes may be the result of processes other than liquid immiscibility at crustal pressures.

  19. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Streaming potential-modulated capillary filling dynamics of immiscible fluids.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-02-21

    The pressure driven transport of two immiscible electrolytes in a narrow channel with prescribed surface potential (zeta potential) is considered under the influence of a flow-induced electric field. The latter consideration is non-trivially and fundamentally different from the problem of electric field-driven motion (electroosmosis) of two immiscible electrolytes in a channel in a sense that in the former case, the genesis of the induced electric field, termed as streaming potential, is the advection of ions in the absence of any external electric field. As the flow occurs, one fluid displaces the other. Consequently, in cases where the conductivities of the two fluids differ, imbibition dynamically alters the net conductivity of the channel. We emphasize, through numerical simulations, that the alteration in the net conductivity has a significant impact on the contact line dynamics and the concomitant induced streaming potential. The results presented herein are expected to shed light on multiphase electrokinetics devices. PMID:26758228

  1. Covalent Fusion of layered Incompatible Gels in Immiscible Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santidan; Singh, Awaneesh; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to model a two layered stackable gel where the gels are incompatible and are present in immiscible solvent. The bottom layer of the gel is created first and then a solution of new initiators, monomers and cross-linkers is introduced on top of it. These components then undergo polymerization and form the second gel layer. We study all possible combinations of free radical polymerization (FRP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanisms with the two layers of the gel. For example, the bottom layer gel is created via ATRP, whereas the top layer gel follows FRP. Our focus is to do a systematic study of all these combinations and find out the factors responsible for combining two incompatible gels in immiscible solvents.

  2. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  3. Electric-Field-Assisted Droplet Dispensing on Immiscible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, In Seok

    2014-11-01

    Dispensing tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in numerous practical applications, such as printed electronics, DNA microarray, and digital microfluidics. The precise positioning with demanded size of droplets is the main issue of dispensing tiny droplets. Furthermore, capability of dispensing charged droplets on the immiscible fluids could bring out more utilities. In this work, we demonstrate the droplet dispensing on immiscible fluids by means of electrical charge concentration (ECC). This results from the fact that the droplet is generated by electric force caused by electric induction between the surface of droplet and the immiscible fluid. The temporal evolution of the droplet-dispensing process was observed consecutively with a high-speed camera. In addition, the relationship between the size of dispensed droplet and the parameters, such as physical properties of fluids and electrical field strength, is established. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Grant Number: 2013R1A1A2011956).

  4. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    DOEpatents

    Spauschus, H.O.; Starr, T.L.

    1999-03-30

    A method is described for separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  5. A nanoglass alloying immiscible Fe and Cu at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Wang, Di; Feng, Tao; Kruk, Robert; Yao, Ke-Fu; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V; Hahn, Horst; Gleiter, Herbert

    2015-04-21

    Synthesized from ultrafine particles with a bottom-up approach, nanoglasses are of particular importance in pursuing unique properties. Here, we design a metallic nanoglass alloy from two components of ∼Cu64Sc36 and ∼Fe90Sc10 nanoglasses. With nanoalloying mutually immiscible Fe and Cu, the properties of the nanoglass alloys can be tuned by varying the proportions of the ∼Fe90Sc10 component. This offers opportunity to create novel metallic glass nanocomposites and sheds light on building a structure-property correlation for the nanoglass alloys. PMID:25792519

  6. NMR imaging of immiscible displacements in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, P.D.; Li, P.; Peters, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    We introduce a rapid, quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) technique to resolve and measure multiple fluid phases in porous media. Liquids are resolved on the basis of their NMR spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, and their intensities are corrected via attenuation analysis. The spatially resolved and corrected NMRI intensities are normalized to yield fluid saturations. In-situ saturation measurements are presented for three immiscible (oil and water) displacements in the same Berea sandstone core. NMRI and effluent recovery methods were compared. T{sub 2} of the displacement fluids were observed to be sensitive to displacement conditions.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of immiscible fluids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, H.; Mitrovic, D.; Nordbotten, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The time development of an interface separating two immiscible fluids of different densities in heterogeneous two-dimensional porous media is studied. The governing equations are simplified with the help of approximate Green's functions which allow computation of the shape of the interface directly without resolving the fluid flow in the entire domain. The new formulation is amenable to numerical approximation, and the reduction in dimension leads to a significant gain in efficiency in the numerical simulation of the interfacial dynamics. Several test cases are investigated, and the numerical solutions are compared to known exact solutions and experimental data.

  8. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  9. Immiscible Lattice Gas with Long-Range Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumaya, Akira; Ohashi, Hirotada

    We developed a new LGA model which has the applicability for simulation of immiscible two phases with wide difference in density. We introduced long-range interparticle forces into the Rothman and Keller's ILG model to represent density difference between phases. We attempted some simulations of phase separation using our new model. Two-phase interfaces are stably made with density distribution coinciding with particle color distribution. Furthermore, the two-phase interface is clearer than that obtained by the Appert and Zaleski's LG model.

  10. The evolution of immiscible silicate and fluoride melts: Implications for REE ore-genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, O.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mid-Proterozoic peralkaline Strange Lake pluton (Québec-Labrador, Canada) exhibits extreme enrichment in high field strength elements (HFSE), including the rare earth elements (REE), particularly in pegmatites. On the basis of a study of melt inclusions, we proposed recently that fluoride-silicate melt immiscibility played an important and perhaps dominant role in concentrating the REE within the pluton. Here we present further evidence for silicate-fluoride immiscibility at Strange Lake from a sample of the hypersolvus granite, which contains an inclusion composed largely of REE and HFSE minerals. The inclusion (∼5 cm in diameter) comprises a narrow rim containing chevkinite-(Ce) and zircon in a fluorite matrix, a core of fluorbritholite-(Ce) and bastnäsite-(Ce) and a transition zone between the rim and the core consisting of a fine-grained intergrowth of bastnäsite-(Ce), gagarinite-(Y) and fluorite. We propose that the inclusion formed as a result of silicate-fluoride immiscibility, which occurred early in the emplacement history of the Strange Lake pluton, and that it represents the fluoride melt. After separation of the two melts, the boundary between them acted as a locus of crystallisation, where crystals formed repeatedly due to heterogeneous (surface catalysed) nucleation. Zircon crystallised shortly after melt phase separation, and was followed by the growth of perthite together with arfvedsonite and quartz. As a result, the silicate melt surrounding the fluoride inclusion became enriched in volatiles that facilitated crystallisation of progressively larger crystals in the inclusion; large crystals of arfvedsonite and perthite were succeeded by even larger crystals of quartz. Massive crystallisation of chevkinite-(Ce) followed, forming the rim of the inclusion. The fluoride melt, which constituted the matrix to the silicate minerals and chevkinite-(Ce), crystallised after chevkinite-(Ce), forming fluorbritholite-(Ce) and fluorite. Aqueous fluid

  11. Spatio-temporal fluctuations in immiscible polymeric binary mixtures: towards the realization of a signal/information processing device with hierarchical instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Ryota; Asakawa, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    A design of a bio-inspired signal/information processing device and the fabrication of a stochastic delay-derivative element (SDDE) using an immiscible polymer binary mixture of poly(L-lactic acid) with poly(ɛ-caprolactone) are described. A functional aspect of bio-inspired signal/information processing using both analogue electric circuits and numerical simulations are shown. Nano-thin films of polymeric binary mixtures were explored to realize the SDDE.

  12. Seismoelectric couplings in a poroelastic material containing two immiscible fluid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardani, A.; Revil, A.

    2015-08-01

    A new approach of seismoelectric imaging has been recently proposed to detect saturation fronts in which seismic waves are focused in the subsurface to scan its heterogeneous nature and determine saturation fronts. Such type of imaging requires however a complete modelling of the seismoelectric properties of porous media saturated by two immiscible fluid phases, one being usually electrically insulating (for instance water and oil). We combine an extension of Biot dynamic theory, valid for porous media containing two immiscible Newtonian fluids, with an extension of the electrokinetic theory based on the notion of effective volumetric charge densities dragged by the flow of each fluid phase. These effective charge densities can be related directly to the permeability and saturation of each fluid phase. The coupled partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method. We also derive analytically the transfer function connecting the macroscopic electrical field to the acceleration of the fast P wave (coseismic electrical field) and we study the influence of the water content on this coupling. We observe that the amplitude of the co-seismic electrical disturbance is very sensitive to the water content with an increase in amplitude with water saturation. We also investigate the seismoelectric conversions (interface effect) occurring at the water table. We show that the conversion response at the water table can be identifiable only when the saturation contrasts between the vadose and saturated zones are sharp enough. A relatively dry vadose zone represents the best condition to identify the water table through seismoelectric measurements. Indeed, in this case, the coseismic electrical disturbances are vanishingly small compared to the seismoelectric interface response.

  13. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis; Horwitz, Jeremy A.

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  14. Intrusive rocks viewed from fitness landscape diagrams: Evolution and immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    We introduce the hard-soft acid-base concepts to magma evolution. Those concepts and their derived chemical parameters provide a new insight into mantle- and continental-derived magmas. Hence magma evolution represents a free suite of chemical reactions, thus showing natural chemical trends. They should be controlled by the principles of maximum hardness and minimum electrophilicity that rule chemical reactions. When plotting into a fitness landscape diagram, rocks suites define two major tendencies. Mantle-derived rocks present all character of an closed chemical system. Conversely, rocks contaminated within the continental crust define two other trends, depending on whether they have affinities toward a silica pole or an alkaline one. They both show the character of an open chemical system. When plotting major igneous minerals onto that diagram shows the importance of olivine, silica and alkali-bearing oxides. It points to the development of immiscibility, depending on the path along which magmas evolve. It thus provides explanation to experimentally observed immiscibility.

  15. The rotating movement of three immiscible fluids - A benchmark problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakker, M.; Oude, Essink G.H.P.; Langevin, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    A benchmark problem involving the rotating movement of three immiscible fluids is proposed for verifying the density-dependent flow component of groundwater flow codes. The problem consists of a two-dimensional strip in the vertical plane filled with three fluids of different densities separated by interfaces. Initially, the interfaces between the fluids make a 45??angle with the horizontal. Over time, the fluids rotate to the stable position whereby the interfaces are horizontal; all flow is caused by density differences. Two cases of the problem are presented, one resulting in a symmetric flow field and one resulting in an asymmetric flow field. An exact analytical solution for the initial flow field is presented by application of the vortex theory and complex variables. Numerical results are obtained using three variable-density groundwater flow codes (SWI, MOCDENS3D, and SEAWAT). Initial horizontal velocities of the interfaces, as simulated by the three codes, compare well with the exact solution. The three codes are used to simulate the positions of the interfaces at two times; the three codes produce nearly identical results. The agreement between the results is evidence that the specific rotational behavior predicted by the models is correct. It also shows that the proposed problem may be used to benchmark variable-density codes. It is concluded that the three models can be used to model accurately the movement of interfaces between immiscible fluids, and have little or no numerical dispersion. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular dynamics of immiscible fluids in chemically patterned nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chain molecules are used to elucidate physical phenomena involved in flows of dense immiscible fluids in nanochannels. We first consider a force driven flow in which the channel walls are homogeneous and wetting to one fluid and nonwetting to the other fluid. The coating of the walls by the wetting fluid provides a fluctuating surface that confines the flow of the nonwetting fluid. The resulting dissipation yields stationary Poiseuille-like flows in contrast to the accelerating nature of flow in the absence of the coating. We then consider walls consisting of patches whose wetting preferences to a fluid alternate along the walls. In the resulting flow, the immiscible components exhibit periodic structures in their velocity fields such that the crests are located at the wettability steps in contrast to the behavior of a single fluid for which the crest occurs in the wetting region. We demonstrate that for a single fluid, the modulated velocity field scales with the size of the chain molecules.

  17. Silicate liquid immiscibility in magmas and in the system K2O-FeO-AI2O3-SiO2: an example of serendipity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1978-01-01

    system, compositions near it show a number of phase changes and large amounts of crystallization with small temperature changes, generally in the range 1100-1150 C. Similar low-temperature, high-alkali immiscibility was discovered in a few exploratory runs in the equivalent systems with Rb or Cs substituting for K. But not in those with Li or Na. A review of the compositions and general behavior of systems involving immiscibility, both stable and metastable, and of the evidence for natural immiscibility. indicates that it may be a much more common feature than generally thought. Several examples of natural immiscibility are detailed; most yield a felsic. alkali-aluminosilicate melt and a mafic melt. from a wide variety of generally basaltic parental magmas, both under- and over saturated. Unfortunately, the best line of evidence for immiscibility in terrestrial rocks, a sharply defined meniscus between two compositionally disparate glasses, is by its very nature self-destructing, since it is effectively eliminated by either crystallization or gravitative separation and coalescence into separate magmas. Verification of operation of the exosolutionor 'splitting' process on a large scale will probably require careful study of isotopic and trace element partitioning in both laboratory and field. ?? 1978.

  18. Immiscibility of magmatic fluids and their relation to Mo and Cu mineralization at the Bangpu porphyry deposit, Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Maocheng; Tang, Juxing; Mao, Jingwen; Wang, Liqiang; Chen, Wei; Leng, Qiufeng

    2015-05-01

    The coexistence of aqueous fluid inclusions and silicate melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from porphyrites at the Bangpu porphyry Mo-Cu deposit, Tibet, China were examined to characterize the immiscibility processes during the magmatic to hydrothermal transition. The physical and chemical environment during crystallization of the magmas has been reconstructed on the basis of microthermometric experiments and trace element microanalysis. Compositions of melt and brine fluid phases are determined using Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis, SEM-EDS and Laser Raman spectroscopy analyses. Brine fluids were directly exsolved by a crystallizing melt, and the simultaneous entrapment of volatile-rich (brine fluid) and volatile-poor immiscible phases (silicate melt) occurred at 670-700 °C and 1.6-1.95 kbar when the magma had H2O contents between 5 and 6 wt% and crystal contents of 60-80%. A later low-density fluid with a higher Mo concentration exsolved after about 80-90% crystallization had occurred. This fluid contained significant concentrations of Cl, Na, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and small amounts of Mn, Br and Pb. Immiscibility of magmatic fluids can lead to different metal partitioning behaviors between residual melt and volatile phases, which generate variable metal ratios. Copper was partitioned preferentially into the brine phase, in contrast to the behavior observed in other porphyry Cu deposits. Ore deposition by a dense brine could explain the partially deep Cu mineralization. Condensation of brine from a later low-density parental fluid could be an efficient mechanism to concentrate shallow Cu mineralization and broadly distributed Mo mineralization. The source of the Mo mineralizing fluids probably was a particularly large magma chamber that crystallized and fractionated at depth greater than upper continental crust level.

  19. Long term stability of immiscible ferrofluid/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouin, Bernard; Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2010-11-01

    Recently we have demonstrated pinned-contact, coupled droplet pairs of aqueous ferrofluids in air that can form electromagnetically-activated capillary switches and oscillators. The great variety of available ferrofluids, however, enables the use of immiscible oil-based ferrofluid droplets in a water environment to obtain the same behavior. Such immersed ferrofluid oscillators exhibit natural frequencies (for 5 mm devices) of about 10 Hz. Here we report on the observation of a gradual increase in the resonant frequency of the system in time. Experimental observations suggest that the drift in the natural frequency is a consequence of changes occurring at the ferrofluid/water interface. The interfacial structure of such a complex system (water, oil, surfactant, iron particles) is examined along with its evolution in time, using various microscopy techniques.

  20. A novel coarsening mechanism of droplets in immiscible fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    In our daily lives, after shaking a salad dressing, we see the coarsening of oil droplets suspended in vinegar. Such a demixing process is observed everywhere in nature and also of technological importance. For a case of high droplet density, domain coarsening proceeds with inter-droplet collisions and the resulting coalescence. This phenomenon has been explained primarily by the so-called Brownian-coagulation mechanism: stochastic thermal forces exerted by molecules induce random motion of individual droplets, causing accidental collisions and subsequent interface-tension-driven coalescence. Contrary to this, here we demonstrate that the droplet motion is not random, but hydrodynamically driven by the composition Marangoni force due to an interfacial tension gradient produced in each droplet as a consequence of composition correlation among droplets. This alters our physical understanding of droplet coarsening in immiscible liquid mixtures on a fundamental level.

  1. Detachment of Sessile Droplets in Immiscible Fluids Using Electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiwoo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    The detachment (or removal) of droplets from a solid surface is an indispensable process in numerous practical applications. Here we firstly detach sessile droplets in immiscible fluids from a hydrophobic surface by electrowetting. The critical conditions for droplet detachment are determined by exploring the retracting dynamics for a wide range of driving voltages and physical properties of fluids. The relationships between physical parameters and dynamic characteristics of retracting and jumping droplets, such as contact time and jumping height, are also established. The threshold voltage for droplet detachment in oil with high viscosity is largely reduced by electrowetting actuations with a square pulse. Finally, by using DC and AC electrowetting actuations, we demonstrate the detachment of oil droplets with very low contact angle on a hydrophobic surface in water.

  2. Flow behaviour of negatively buoyant jets in immiscible ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Mier-Torrecilla, M.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid. Experiments are carried out by injecting a jet of dyed fresh water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. The fountain inlet flow rate and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Richardson Ri (8 × 10-4 < Ri < 1.98), Reynolds Re (467 < Re < 5,928) and Weber We (2.40 < We < 308.56) numbers. Based on the Re, Ri and We values for the experiments, we have determined a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of the observed flow types. Whereas Ri plays a stronger role when determining the maximum penetration height, the effect of the Reynolds number is stronger predicting the flow behaviour for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity.

  3. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G. A.; Schwarz, C. E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments were performed with nonreactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies were performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model.

  4. Abnormal alloying behaviour observed in an immiscible Zr Nb system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. L.; Liang, S. H.; Li, J. H.; Tai, K. P.; Liu, B. X.

    2008-05-01

    For the immiscible Zr-Nb system characterized by a positive heat of formation (+6 kJ mol-1), thermodynamic calculation showed that the Gibbs free energy of the properly designed Zr-Nb multilayered films could be elevated to a higher level than that of the corresponding amorphous phase as well as the supersaturated solid solutions. Accordingly, nano-sized Zr-Nb multilayered films were prepared and then irradiated by 200 keV xenon ions. It was found that amorphous phases could be obtained within a composition range 12-92 at% of Nb. Also, two metastable crystalline phases of fcc structures with different lattice parameters were also obtained. Molecular dynamic simulation was carried out, based on a proven realistic Zr-Nb potential, to reveal the atomistic mechanism of the solid-state crystal-to-amorphous transition. A brief discussion on the formation of the two metastable crystalline phases is presented.

  5. Thermocapillary convection in two immiscible liquid layers with free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, Takao; Koster, Jean N.

    1993-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection is studied in two immiscible liquid layers with one free surface, one liquid/liquid interface, and differential heating applied parallel to the interfaces. An analytical solution is introduced for infinite horizontal layers. The defining parameter for the flow pattern is lambda, the ratio of the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension to that of the surface tension. Four different flow patterns exist under zero gravity conditions. 'Halt' conditions which halt the fluid motion in the lower encapsulated liquid layer have been found. A numerical experiment is carried out to study effects of vertical end walls on the double layer convection in a 2D cavity. The halt condition obtained from the analytical study is found to be valid in the limit of small Reynolds numbers. The flow in the encapsulated liquid layer can be suppressed substantially.

  6. Study on processing immiscible materials in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reger, J. L.; Mendelson, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate mixing immiscible metal combinations under several process conditions. Under one-gravity, these included thermal processing, thermal plus electromagnetic mixing, and thermal plus acoustic mixing. The same process methods were applied during free fall on the MSFC drop tower facility. The design is included of drop tower apparatus to provide the electromagnetic and acoustic mixing equipment, and a thermal model was prepared to design the specimen and cooling procedure. Materials systems studied were Ca-La, Cd-Ga and Al-Bi; evaluation of the processed samples included the morphology and electronic property measurements. The morphology was developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and microprobe analyses. Electronic property characterization of the superconducting transition temperatures were made using an impedance change-tuned coil method.

  7. Partitioning of Nb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Pb, Th and U between immiscible carbonate and silicate liquids: Evaluating the effects of P2O5,F, and carbonate composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Walker, D.

    1993-01-01

    Previously we have reported carbonate liq./silicate liq. partition coefficients (D) for a standard suite of trace elements (Nb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Pb, Th, and U) and Ra and Pa as well. In brief, we have found that immiscible liquid partitioning is a strong function of temperature. As the critical temperature of the carbonate-silicate solvus is approached, all partition coefficients approach unity. Additionally, for the overwhelming majority of the partitioning elements, InD is a linear function of 'ionic field strength,' z/r, where z is the charge of the partitioned cation and r is its ionic radius.

  8. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  9. Field and modelling studies of immiscible fluid flow above a contaminated water-table aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkelrath, W.N.; Essaid, H.I.; Hess, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring the spatial distribution of immiscible liquid contaminants in the subsurface. Fluid saturation distributions measured at a crude-oil spill site were used to test a numerical multiphase flow model.

  10. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  11. Capillary pinning of immiscible gravity currents in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.; Huppert, H. E.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity currents in porous media have attracted interest recently in the context of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, where supercritical CO2 is captured from the flue gas of power plants and injected underground into deep saline aquifers. Capillarity can be important in the spreading and migration of the buoyant CO2 after injection because the typical pore size is very small (~10-100 microns), but the impact of capillarity on these flows is not well understood. Here, we study the impact of capillarity on the buoyant spreading of a finite gravity current of non-wetting fluid into a dense, wetting fluid in a vertically confined, horizontal aquifer. We show via simple, table-top experiments using glass bead packs that capillary pressure hysteresis pins a portion of the fluid-fluid interface. The horizontal extent of the pinned portion of the interface grows over time and this is responsible for ultimately stopping the spreading of the buoyant current after a finite distance. In addition, capillarity blunts the leading edge of the buoyant current. We demonstrate through micromodel experiments that the characteristic height of the nose of the current is controlled by the pore throat size distribution and the balance between capillarity and gravity. We develop a theoretical model that captures the evolution of immiscible gravity currents and predicts the maximum migration distance. Our work suggests that capillary pinning and capillary blunting exert an important control on finite-release gravity currents in the context of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Gravity driven flow of a buoyant, nonwetting fluid (air) over a dense, wetting fluid (propylene glycol). Starting with a vertical interface between the fluids, the flow first undergoes a lock-exchange process. The process models a finite release problem after the dense fluid hits the left boundary. In contrast to finite release of a miscible current that spreads indefinitely, spreading of an immiscible

  12. Liquid immiscibility between silicate, carbonate and sulfide melts in melt inclusions hosted in co-precipitated minerals from Kerimasi volcano (Tanzania): evolution of carbonated nephelinitic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmics, Tibor; Mitchell, Roger H.; Szabó, Csaba; Berkesi, Márta; Milke, Ralf; Ratter, Kitti

    2012-07-01

    The evolution of a carbonated nephelinitic magma can be followed by the study of a statistically significant number of melt inclusions, entrapped in co-precipitated perovskite, nepheline and magnetite in a clinopyroxene- and nepheline-rich rock (afrikandite) from Kerimasi volcano (Tanzania). Temperatures are estimated to be 1,100°C for the early stage of the melt evolution of the magma, which formed the rock. During evolution, the magma became enriched in CaO, depleted in SiO2 and Al2O3, resulting in immiscibility at ~1,050°C and crustal pressures (0.5-1 GPa) with the formation of three fluid-saturated melts: an alkali- and MgO-bearing, CaO- and FeO-rich silicate melt; an alkali- and F-bearing, CaO- and P2O5-rich carbonate melt; and a Cu-Fe sulfide melt. The sulfide and the carbonate melt could be physically separated from their silicate parent and form a Cu-Fe-S ore and a carbonatite rock. The separated carbonate melt could initially crystallize calciocarbonatite and ultimately become alkali rich in composition and similar to natrocarbonatite, demonstrating an evolution from nephelinite to natrocarbonatite through Ca-rich carbonatite magma. The distribution of major elements between perovskite-hosted coexisting immiscible silicate and carbonate melts shows strong partitioning of Ca, P and F relative to FeT, Si, Al, Mn, Ti and Mg in the carbonate melt, suggesting that immiscibility occurred at crustal pressures and plays a significant role in explaining the dominance of calciocarbonatites (sövites) relative to dolomitic or sideritic carbonatites. Our data suggest that Cu-Fe-S compositions are characteristic of immiscible sulfide melts originating from the parental silicate melts of alkaline silicate-carbonatite complexes.

  13. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ57Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ57Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ57Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted.

  14. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ57Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ57Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ57Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted. PMID:26620121

  15. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ(57)Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ(57)Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ(57)Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted. PMID:26620121

  16. Experimental development of processes to produce homogenized alloys of immiscible metals, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reger, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental drop tower package was designed and built for use in a drop tower. This effort consisted of a thermal analysis, container/heater fabrication, and assembly of an expulsion device for rapid quenching of heated specimens during low gravity conditions. Six gallium bismuth specimens with compositions in the immiscibility region (50 a/o of each element) were processed in the experimental package: four during low gravity conditions and two under a one gravity environment. One of the one gravity processed specimens did not have telemetry data and was subsequently deleted for analysis since the processing conditions were not known. Metallurgical, Hall effect, resistivity, and superconductivity examinations were performed on the five specimens. Examination of the specimens showed that the gallium was dispersed in the bismuth. The low gravity processed specimens showed a relatively uniform distribution of gallium, with particle sizes of 1 micrometer or less, in contrast to the one gravity control specimen. Comparison of the cooling rates of the dropped specimens versus microstructure indicated that low cooling rates are more desirable.

  17. The immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Xu, Xiaoqing; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Ji, Zesheng; Meng, Yulin; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    We have used two models based on the valence force field and the regular solution model to study the immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy, and have got the spinodal and binodal curves of InAlN. Analyzing the spinodal decomposition curves, we obtain the appropriate concentration region for the epitaxial growth of the InN-AlN pseudobinary alloy. At a temperature most common for the epitaxial growth of InAlN (1000 K), the solubility of InN is about 10%. Then we introduce the mismatch strain item into the Gibbs free energy, and the effect of different substrates is taken into consideration. Considering Si, Al2O3, InN, GaN, AlN as a substrate respectively, it is found that all the five systems are stabilized with the upper critical solution temperature largely reduced. Finally, InN and GaN are potential substrates for In-rich InAlN, while AlN and GaN substrates are recommended in the Al-rich region. Si and Al2O3 may be ideal substrates for thin InAlN film. PMID:27221345

  18. Thermally induced collision of droplets in an immiscible outer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanlou, Ashkan; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-05-01

    Micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) have attracted wide attention and are identified as a promising solution for sample transport, filtration, chemical reactions, separation and detection. Despite their popularity, the selection of an appropriate mechanism for droplet transport and coalescence has always been a challenge. This paper investigates the use of Marangoni flow as a mechanism for levitating and transporting droplets on immiscible liquid films at higher speeds than is possible currently. For the first time, we show that it is possible to realize the natural coalescence of droplets through Marangoni effect without any external stimulation, and deliver the coalesced droplet to a certain destination through the use of surface tension gradients. The effects of shape and size on collision outcome are studied. Regions of coalescence and stretching separation of colliding droplets are delineated based on Weber number and impact number. In addition, the effect of viscosity on post collision regimes is studied. The findings in this fundamental study can be beneficial to many applications such as welding, drug delivery and microfluidics devices in controlling small droplets and targeting them to various locations.

  19. Characteristic impedance of a microchannel with two immiscible microfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo Raquejo, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Consider the case of a microcapillary of radius R with two microfluidic immiscible. The micro-capillary region 0 < r < R1 is occupied by the microfluidic less dense and less viscous; while the microcapillary region R1 <0 < R is occupied by the microfluidic more dense and more viscous. Determine the characteristic impedance of the microcapillary in this case when both microfluidics are driven by the same pressure gradient as the boundary condition at the wall of the microcapillary is of the non-Newtonian slip. The Navier Stokes equation is solved for both microfluidic methods using the Laplace transform. The velocity profiles are expressed in terms of Bessel functions. Similarly, the characteristic impedance of the microcapillary is expressed by a complex formula Bessel functions. Obtain the analytical results are important for designing engineering microdevices with applications in pharmaceutical, food engineering, nanotechnology and biotechnology in general in particular. For future research it is interesting to consider the case of boundary conditions with memory effects.

  20. Electrically induced displacement transport of immiscible oil in saline sediments.

    PubMed

    Pamukcu, Sibel; Shrestha, Reena A; Ribeiro, Alexandra B; Mateus, Eduardo P

    2016-08-01

    Electrically assisted mitigation of coastal sediment oil pollution was simulated in floor-scale laboratory experiments using light crude oil and saline water at approximately 1/10 oil/water (O/W) mass ratio in pore fluid. The mass transport of the immiscible liquid phases was induced under constant direct current density of 2A/m(2), without water flooding. The transient pore water pressures (PWP) and the voltage differences (V) at and in between consecutive ports lined along the test specimen cell were measured over 90days. The oil phase transport occurred towards the anode half of the test specimen where the O/W volume ratio increased by 50% over its initial value within that half-length of the specimen. In contrast, the O/W ratio decreased within the cathode side half of the specimen. During this time, the PWP decreased systematically at the anode side with oil bank accumulation. PWP increased at the cathode side of the specimen, signaling increased concentration of water there as it replaced oil in the pore space. Electrically induced transport of the non-polar, non-conductive oil was accomplished in the opposing direction of flow by displacement in absence of viscous coupling of oil-water phases. PMID:27064863

  1. Immiscibility in the Nickel Ferrite-Zinc Ferrite Spinel Binary

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; AR Gaddipati; PC Sander; SB Rice

    2006-06-21

    Immiscibility in the trevorite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) - franklinite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel binary is investigated by reacting 1:1:2 molar ratio mixtures of NiO, ZnO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a molten salt solvent at temperatures in the range 400-1000 C. Single phase stability is demonstrated down to about 730 C (the estimated consolute solution temperature, T{sub cs}). A miscibility gap/solvus exists below Tcs. The solvus becomes increasingly asymmetric at lower temperatures and extrapolates to n - values = 0.15, 0.8 at 300 C. A thermodynamic analysis, which accounts for changes in configurational and magnetic ordering entropies during cation mixing, predicts solvus phase compositions at room temperature in reasonable agreement with those determined by extrapolation of experimental results. The delay between disappearance of magnetic ordering above T{sub C} = 590 C (for NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and disappearance of a miscibility gap at T{sub cs} is explained by the persistence of long-range ordering correlations in a quasi-paramagnetic region above T{sub C}.

  2. Collision between immiscible drops with large surface tension difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Immiscible drop collision, as occurring in fuel-oxidizer sprays or in the release of certain fire-extinguishing agents, tends to exhibit a much richer behavior with respect to miscible drops collision thanks to the formation of a liquid-liquid interface during impact. For instance, in near-head-on diesel-water drop collisions, ``overlaying'' may occur in which the diesel oil flows from the collision point around the water drop to gather at the opposite location of the drop. To simulate this class of multi-material flows, the combined volume-of-fluid / level set methodology that sharply captures a single liquid-gas interface (Sussman et al, J. of Comp. Phys., 2007) needs to be duplicated for a second, independent interface. In this presentation, we will show that simulation results are not affected by the reconstruction order of the interfaces, as in other surface capturing methods. We will also propose different numerical solutions to treat surface tension in the triple point computational cells, and examine the characteristics of the flow developing at the contact line between the two liquids and air in overlaying head-on collisions.

  3. Immiscible Front Evolution in Randomly Heterogeneous Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Tartakovsky; S. P. Neuman; R. J. Lenhard

    2003-11-01

    The evolution of a sharp interface between two immiscible fluids in a randomly heterogeneous porous medium is investigated analytically using a stochastic moment approach. The displacing fluid is taken to be at constant saturation and to have a much larger viscosity than does the displaced fluid, which is therefore effectively static. Capillary pressure at the interface is related to porosity and permeability via the Leverett J-function. Whereas porosity is spatially uniform, permeability forms a spatially correlated random field. Displacement is governed by stochastic integro-differential equations defined over a three-dimensional domain bounded by a random interface. The equations are expanded and averaged in probability space to yield leading order recursive equations governing the ensemble mean and variance of interface position, rate of propagation and pressure gradient within the displacing fluid. Solutions are obtained for one-dimensional head- and flux-driven displacements in statistically homogeneous media and found to compare well with numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The manner in which medium heterogeneity affects the mean pressure gradient is indicative of how it impacts the stability of the mean interface. Capillary pressure at the interface is found to have a potentially important effect on its mean dynamics and stability.

  4. The immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guijuan; Xu, Xiaoqing; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Ji, Zesheng; Meng, Yulin; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    We have used two models based on the valence force field and the regular solution model to study the immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy, and have got the spinodal and binodal curves of InAlN. Analyzing the spinodal decomposition curves, we obtain the appropriate concentration region for the epitaxial growth of the InN-AlN pseudobinary alloy. At a temperature most common for the epitaxial growth of InAlN (1000 K), the solubility of InN is about 10%. Then we introduce the mismatch strain item into the Gibbs free energy, and the effect of different substrates is taken into consideration. Considering Si, Al2O3, InN, GaN, AlN as a substrate respectively, it is found that all the five systems are stabilized with the upper critical solution temperature largely reduced. Finally, InN and GaN are potential substrates for In-rich InAlN, while AlN and GaN substrates are recommended in the Al-rich region. Si and Al2O3 may be ideal substrates for thin InAlN film. PMID:27221345

  5. Predicting liquid immiscibility in multicomponent nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.R.

    1994-04-01

    Taylor`s model for predicting amorphous phase separation in complex, multicomponent systems has been applied to high-level (simulated) radioactive waste glasses at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford site. Taylor`s model is primarily based on additions of modifying cations to a Na{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (NBS) submixture of the multicomponent glass. The position of the submixture relative to the miscibility dome defines the development probability of amorphous phase separation. Although prediction of amorphous phase separation in Hanford glasses (via experimental SEM/TEM analysis) is the primary thrust of this work; reported durability data is also provides limited insight into the composition/durability relationship. Using a modified model similar to Taylor`s, the results indicate that immiscibility may be predicted for multicomponent waste glasses by the addition of Li{sub 2}O to the ``alkali`` corner of the NBS submixture.

  6. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  7. Rebound of continuous droplet streams from an immiscible liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, William J.; Laiacona, Danielle M.; German, Guy K.; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the rebound of high velocity continuous water droplet streams from the surface of an immiscible oil pool. The droplets have diameters and velocities of less than 90 μm and 15 m/s, respectively, and were created at frequencies up to 60 kHz. The impact and rebound of continuous droplet streams at this scale and velocity have been largely unexplored. This regime bridges the gap between single drop and jet impacts. The impinging droplets create a divot at the surface of the oil pool that had a common characteristic shape across a wide-range of droplet and oil properties. After impact, the reflected droplets maintain the same uniformity and periodicity of the incoming droplets but have significantly lower velocity and kinetic energy. This was solely attributed to the generation of a flow induced in the viscous oil pool by the impacting droplets. Unlike normally directed impact of millimeter-scale droplets with a solid surface, our results show that an air film does not appear to be maintained beneath the droplets during impact. This suggests direct contact between the droplets and the surface of the oil pool. A ballistic failure limit, correlated with the Weber number, was identified where the rebound was suppressed and the droplets were driven through the oil surface. A secondary failure mode was identified for aperiodic incoming streams. Startup effects and early time dynamics of the rebounding droplet stream were also investigated.

  8. The immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guijuan; Xu, Xiaoqing; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Ji, Zesheng; Meng, Yulin; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-05-01

    We have used two models based on the valence force field and the regular solution model to study the immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy, and have got the spinodal and binodal curves of InAlN. Analyzing the spinodal decomposition curves, we obtain the appropriate concentration region for the epitaxial growth of the InN-AlN pseudobinary alloy. At a temperature most common for the epitaxial growth of InAlN (1000 K), the solubility of InN is about 10%. Then we introduce the mismatch strain item into the Gibbs free energy, and the effect of different substrates is taken into consideration. Considering Si, Al2O3, InN, GaN, AlN as a substrate respectively, it is found that all the five systems are stabilized with the upper critical solution temperature largely reduced. Finally, InN and GaN are potential substrates for In-rich InAlN, while AlN and GaN substrates are recommended in the Al-rich region. Si and Al2O3 may be ideal substrates for thin InAlN film.

  9. Chain entanglements and fracture energy in interfaces between immiscible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Leonardo; Brown, Hugh R.; Carrà, Stefano; Carrà, Sergio

    2003-10-01

    It is a very well-known experimental fact that the toughness of interfaces obtained by joining pairs of immiscible glassy polymers is strongly correlated to the interfacial width. Several models have been proposed in the literature to estimate the fracture energy of these interfaces, but the agreement displayed with the experimental data cannot be considered satisfactory. In this paper a new model is proposed for polymers with molecular weight higher than the critical value for the onset of entanglements. The model is based on a precise and realistic calculation of the areal density of entangled strands across the interface, that is the crucial parameter determining the toughness of the glassy joints. In this paper a new fracture regime is also introduced, called "partial crazing," corresponding to a situation where, due to the fact that some of the load-bearing strands are broken during plastic deformation, the craze can start, but not fully develop. Model predictions are then compared with a series of literature fracture energy experimental data, showing excellent agreement.

  10. Optical limiting based on liquid-liquid immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Ferris, Kim F.; Samuels, William D.; Owings, Robert R.

    2003-05-01

    Nonionic surfactants are used to stabilize a dispersed droplet phase in a continuous liquid phase when two immiscible liquids are mixed. As both liquid phases approach the index-matched condition, interfacial scattering is suppressed, and the mixture takes on the characteristics of a Christiansen-Shelyubskii filter. If, in addition, one of the liquids exhibits a substantial nonlinear optical response, then interfacial light scattering can be reversibly turned on when a laser beam incident upon the filter exceeds a critical fluence. To demonstrate this effect, an organic phase (dichloroethane) was dispersed in an aqueous phase containing sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) using an alkyl end-capped polyethylene glycol ether. Optical limiting was observed through this transparent medium under conditions where the focused second-harmonic output of a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser was on the order of about 50 mJ/cm2. An open-aperture z-scan technique was used to quantify the limiting behavior. Since the thiocyanate anion is both isostructural and isoelectronic with carbon disulfide which exhibits a large optical nonlinearity, the mechanism of optical limiting is proposed to be associated with a nonlinear shift in the aqueous fluid index of refraction, resulting in an index mismatch between the disparate phases at high laser fluence. Index mismatch between the two phases leads to multiple reflections, loss of coherence, and a significant transmission decrease due to Tyndall scattering. Fundamental studies of such systems are used to verify theoretical predictions of the limiting effect, and aid in the design and development of improved sub nanosecond limiters based upon this optical deflection approach.

  11. Synthesis of new metastable nanoalloys of immiscible metals with a pulse laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska-Warkocka, Zaneta; Pyatenko, Alexander; Krok, Franciszek; Jany, Benedykt R.; Marszalek, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nanoalloys of immiscible metals is still a challenge using conventional methods. However, because these materials are currently attracting much attention, alternative methods are needed. In this article, we demonstrate a simple but powerful strategy for the generation of a new metastable alloy of immiscible metals. Au1−xNix 3D structures with 56 at% of nickel in gold were successfully manufactured by the pulsed laser irradiation of colloidal nanoparticles. This technology can be used for preparing different metastable alloys of immiscible metals. We hypothesise that this technique leads to the formation of alloy particles through the agglomerations of nanoparticles, very fast heating, and fast cooling/solidification. Thus, we expect that our approach will be applicable to a wide range of inorganic solids, yielding even new metastable solids that fail to be stable in the bulk systems, and therefore do not exist in Nature. PMID:25952016

  12. Identification of Gravity-Related Effects on Crystal Growth From Melts With an Immiscibility Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S.

    1999-01-01

    This work involves an experimental-numerical approach to study the effects of natural and Marangoni convections on solidification of single crystals from a silicate melt with a liquid-liquid immiscibility gap. Industrial use of crystals grown from silicate melts is becoming increasingly important in electronic, optical, and high temperature structural applications. Even the simplest silicate systems like Al203-SiO2 have had, and will continue to have, a significant role in the development of traditional and advanced ceramics. A unique feature of crystals grown from the silicate systems is their outstanding linear electro-optic properties. They also exhibit exceptionally high optical rotativity. As a result, these crystals are attractive materials for dielectric, optical, and microwave applications. Experimental work in our laboratory has indicated that directional solidification of a single crystal mullite appears to be preceded by liquid-liquid phase separation in the melt. Disruption of the immiscible state results in crystallization of a two phase structure. There is also evidence that mixing in the melt caused by density-driven convection can significantly affect the stability of the immiscible liquid layers and result in poly-crystalline growth. On earth, the immiscible state has only been observed for small diameter crystals grown in float zone systems where natural convection is almost negligible. Therefore, it is anticipated that growth of large single crystals from silicate melts would benefit from microgravity conditions because of the reduction of the natural convective mixing. The main objective of this research is to determine the effects of transport processes on the phase separation in the melt during growth of a single crystal while addressing the following issues: (1) When do the immiscible layers form and are they real?; (2) What are the main physical characteristics of the immiscible liquids?; and (3) How mixing by natural or Marangoni convection

  13. Why are blue zhamanshinites blue Liquid immiscibility in an impact melt

    SciTech Connect

    Zolensky, M.E. ); Koeberl, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors report here a study of the cause of the coloration of blue zhamanshinites, which are glassy impact melt rocks from the Zhamanshin crater in the USSR. They find that the blue color results from Rayleigh scattering from spherical, 100 nm-diameter inclusions of a separate Ca-Fe-Mg-P-rich silicate glass. These observations can best be explained by the operation of liquid immiscibility in the zhamanshinite melt, and suggest that liquid immiscibility may have a more general role in impactite evolution.

  14. Why are blue zhamanshinites blue? Liquid immiscibility in an impact melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Koeberl, Christian

    1991-01-01

    A study of the cause of the coloration of blue zhamanshinites, which are glassy impact melt rocks from the Zhamanshin crater in the USSR are reported. It is found that the blue color results from Rayleigh scattering from spherical, 100 nm-diameter inclusions of a separate Ca-Fe-Mg-P-rich silicate glass. These observations can best be explained by the operation of liquid immiscibility in the zhamanshinite melt, and suggest that liquid immiscibility may have a more general role in impactite evolution.

  15. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  16. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  17. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwood; Grugel, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    Uniform microstructural development during solidification of immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Experimental results to evaluate microstructural phase distributions, based on other liquid-liquid immiscibility systems, will also be presented.

  18. Silicate liquid immiscibility in isothermal crystallization experiments. [lunar-evolution simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.

    1990-01-01

    The role of silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) in the petrogenesis of lunar granites was investigated in experiments in which four glasses were synthesized from reagent-grade oxides and carbonates with the compositions of two of the sets of coexisting liquids reported by Hess et al. (1975): a KREEP basalt derivative and a mare basalt derivative. Isothermal crystallization experiments showed that SLI is a stable phenomenon in residual lunar liquids saturated with plagioclase, and is likely to produce large compositional separations. The results indicate that controlled-cooling-rate experiments of Rutherford et al. (1974), and Hess et al. (1975, 1978) were substantially correct analogs of the natural process of liquid immiscibility.

  19. The role of liquid-liquid immiscibility and crystal fractionation in the genesis of carbonatite magmas: insights from Kerimasi melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmics, Tibor; Zajacz, Zoltán; Mitchell, Roger H.; Szabó, Csaba; Wälle, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We have reconstructed the compositional evolution of the silicate and carbonate melt, and various crystalline phases in the subvolcanic reservoir of Kerimasi Volcano in the East African Rift. Trace element concentrations of silicate and carbonate melt inclusions trapped in nepheline, apatite and magnetite from plutonic afrikandite (clinopyroxene-nepheline-perovskite-magnetite-melilite rock) and calciocarbonatite (calcite-apatite-magnetite-perovskite-monticellite-phlogopite rock) show that liquid immiscibility occurred during the generation of carbonatite magmas from a CO2-rich melilite-nephelinite magma formed at relatively high temperatures (1,100 °C). This carbonatite magma is notably more calcic and less alkaline than that occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai. The CaO-rich (32-41 wt%) nature and alkali-"poor" (at least 7-10 wt% Na2O + K2O) nature of these high-temperature (>1,000 °C) carbonate melts result from strong partitioning of Ca (relative to Mg, Fe and Mn) in the immiscible carbonate and the CaO-rich nature (12-17 wt%) of its silicate parent (e.g., melilite-nephelinite). Evolution of the Kerimasi carbonate magma can result in the formation of natrocarbonatite melts with similar composition to those of Oldoinyo Lengai, but with pronounced depletion in REE and HFSE elements. We suggest that this compositional difference results from the different initial parental magmas, e.g., melilite-nephelinite at Kerimasi and a nephelinite at Oldoinyo Lengai. The difference in parental magma composition led to a significant difference in the fractionating mineral phase assemblage and the element partitioning systematics upon silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility. LA-ICP-MS analysis of coeval silicate and carbonate melt inclusions provides an opportunity to infer carbonate melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for a wide range of elements. These data show that Li, Na, Pb, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, all REE (except Sc), U, V, Nb, Ta, P, Mo, W and S are partitioned into the carbonate

  20. Dual origin of Fe-Ti-P gabbros by immiscibility and fractional crystallization of evolved tholeiitic basalts in the Sept Iles layered intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard; Holness, Marian B.

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed study of two ca. 200 m-thick apatite-bearing ferrogabbro horizons of the Sept Iles layered intrusion (Canada). These rocks are the most evolved cumulates of the megacyclic units (MCU) I and II, and mark the transition between basaltic and silicic magmatism. They are made up of plagioclase (An55-34), olivine (Fo66-21), clinopyroxene (Mg#75-55), ilmenite, magnetite, apatite, ± pigeonite and are a significant source of Fe-Ti-P ore. Ferrogabbros have relatively uniform bulk-rock compositions in MCU I but are bimodal in MCU II. The liquid lines of descent for major elements in equilibrium with cumulates of MCU I and II have been calculated using a forward model formalism. Both trends evolve towards SiO2-enrichment and FeOt-depletion after saturation in Fe-Ti oxides. However, because of magma mixing in MCU II, they do not follow the same path. Evolved liquids from MCU II are shown to enter the experimentally-determined two liquid stability field, while MCU I liquids do not. Immiscibility in MCU II and its absence in MCU I are supported by the presence of contrasted reactive symplectites in cumulate rocks. Apatite-bearing ferrogabbros in MCU II have crystallized from distinct immiscible Fe-rich and Si-rich silicate melts which have physically segregated in the slow-cooling magma chamber. Two different types of cumulate rocks are thus produced: leucocratic and melanocratic gabbros. This is consistent with the presence of Si-rich and Fe-rich melt inclusions in apatite. In contrast, homogeneous ferrogabbros from MCU I were produced by simple fractional crystallization of a homogeneous liquid. Our data suggest that immiscibility could also explain the large geochemical variability of ferrogabbros in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex (South Africa).

  1. Quartz-tourmaline orbicules: Record of magmatic melt immiscibility in the Land's End granite, SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivenes, Kristian; Larsen, Rune; Müller, Axel; Sorensen, Bjorn; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Raanes, Morten

    2014-05-01

    Spherical quartz-tourmaline aggregations are a common sight throughout the Cornubian batholith in SW England. In the outer parts of the Land's End granite smaller rounded orbicules occur in a coarse-grained megacrystic biotite granite. The interior parts of the orbicules show poikilittic textures with fine-grained euhedral quartz chadacrysts enclosed by skeletal tourmaline oikocrysts, with outer zones showing typical replacement textures. Cathodoluminescence of quartz show at least two growth stages after the megacrystic stage. The quartz phenocrysts show an even, concentric zoning pattern, sometimes with a darker core indicating growth during stable physiochemical conditions. The orbicular quartz is strongly zoned with bright cores and darker rims, similar to the fine-grained quartz in the granite matrix. Ti content of quartz corresponds to the CL zoning, with 125 - 180 µg/g in the bright cores and 60 - 80 in the darker main stage orbicular quartz. Tourmaline in the orbicules is weakly zoned form dark to pale brown, but the zoning is more pronounced compared to tourmaline in the granite matrix. Chemically, both are well within the schorl field, and cannot be differentiated based on major elements. The B-isotope signature is also overlapping. Matrix tourmaline has higher Sc and V content, but lower Nb, Ta and Sn, and matrix and orbicule tourmaline can be distinguished using trace elements. The geometry and composition of the orbicules is difficult to explain by fractional crystallization alone, since the total FeO content of the granite is low, and Fe is bound primarily to magmatic phases such as ilmenite and biotite. A prolonged fractional crystallization sequence would have depleted the magma in respect to Fe, and Fe derived from breakdown of nearby biotite is not sufficient to stabilize orbicule tourmaline. Orbicular tourmaline is conspicuously different, both chemically and texturally, from the typical hydrothermal tourmaline in the area, and replacement by an

  2. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Probst, Hubert B.

    1988-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloys with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liqud phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  3. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  4. Morphology Evolution of Polypropylene in Immiscible Polymer Blends for Fabrication of Nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and isotactic polypropylenes (iPPs) with different melting index were extruded through a two-strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios by controlling the drawing speed. The morphologies of iPP fibers e...

  5. BEHAVIOR OF DENSE, IMMISCIBLE SOLVENTS IN FRACTURED CLAY-RICH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments on the behavior of dense, immiscible solvents (commonly referred to as DNAPL's) in large diameter, undisturbed columns of fractured clay till and highly weathered and fractured shale saprolite are proposed. The lab studies will focus on th...

  6. Immiscible liquid-liquid pressure-driven flow in capillary tubes: Experimental results and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Edson J.; Thompson, Roney L.; Niero, Debora C.

    2015-08-01

    The immiscible displacement of one viscous liquid by another in a capillary tube is experimentally and numerically analyzed in the low inertia regime with negligible buoyancy effects. The dimensionless numbers that govern the problem are the capillary number Ca and the viscosity ratio of the displaced to the displacing fluids Nμ. In general, there are two output quantities of interest. One is associated to the relation between the front velocity, Ub, and the mean velocity of the displaced fluid, U ¯ 2 . The other is the layer thickness of the displaced fluid that remains attached to the wall. We compute these quantities as mass fractions in order to make them able to be compared. In this connection, the efficiency mass fraction, me, is defined as the complement of the mass fraction of the displaced fluid that leaves the tube while the displacing fluid crosses its length. The geometric mass fraction, mg, is defined as the fraction of the volume of the layer that remains attached to the wall. Because in gas-liquid displacement, these two quantities coincide, it is not uncommon in the literature to use mg as a measure of the displacement efficiency for liquid-liquid displacements. However, as is shown in the present paper, these two quantities have opposite tendencies when we increase the viscosity of the displacing fluid, making this distinction a crucial aspect of the problem. Results from a Galerkin finite element approach are also presented in order to make a comparison. Experimental and numerical results show that while the displacement efficiency decreases, the geometrical fraction increases when the viscosity ratio decreases. This fact leads to different decisions depending on the quantity to be optimized. The quantitative agreement between the numerical and experimental results was not completely achieved, especially for intermediate values of Ca. The reasons for that are still under investigation. The experiments conducted were able to achieve a wide range

  7. Melt immiscibility in Apollo 15 KREEP - Origin of Fe-rich mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollister, L. S.; Crawford, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) is investigated in terms of chemistry and occurrence in two KREEP-rich Apollo 15 basalts. The two samples have different cooling histories but the same composition. In the first sample, SLI occurred at the time of 58% crystallization. In the second sample, SLI occurred after 20% had crystallized. It is noted that SLI could be initiated as soon as plagioclase (out of a total composition which also included zircon, FeS, SiO2, whitlockite, and ilmenite) alone had crystallized. Attention is given to Fe-rich immiscible melts, and it is suggested that SLI may play an important role in the formation of the source regions of Fe-rich mare basalts. The analytical technique used for the assays was an energy dispersive analysis system with a resolution of 167 eV.

  8. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  9. Numerical simulations of immiscible displacement in the cavities via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hong; Chai, Zhenhua; Shi, Baochang; Guo, Zhaoli; Li, Qiuxiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the immiscible displacements in the different cavities are studied by the pseudo-potential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. We first validate the model with a two-dimensional (2D) layered flow, and find that the numerical results agree well with the corresponding analytical solutions. Then, we perform some numerical simulations to study the immiscible displacements in the cavities, and focus on the effects of the surface wettability, capillary number and density ratio on the displacement efficiency. The numerical results show that the displacement efficiency increases with the increase of the capillary number at first and then presents a decrease with the capillary number when it is large enough. The increase of the contact angle θ1 or decrease of the density ratio increases the displacement efficiency but decreases the critical capillary number. Finally, it is also found that both the size and geometry of cavity have a significant influence on the displacement efficiency.

  10. Structures of immiscible Al-In alloys solidified under microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potard, C.

    1981-01-01

    Four samples of the immiscible Al-In system having monotectic and hypermonotectic compositions were solidified under microgravity during the NASA-SPAR IX flight of January 20th, 1981. The experimental thermal and physico-chemical conditions actually achieved have been analysed. Radiographic and metallographic observations of the samples show a non-regular dispersed primary phase inside the monotectic matrix. These observations are commented on the basis of capillarity and solidification aspects.

  11. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich liquids in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lennart A.; Wang, Meng; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Roberts, R. James; Veksler, Ilya V.; Cawthorn, R. Grant; Holtz, François

    2016-06-01

    The Bushveld Complex (South Africa) is the largest layered intrusion on Earth and plays a considerable role in our understanding of magmatic differentiation and ore-forming processes. In this study, we present new geochemical data for apatite-hosted multiphase inclusions in gabbroic cumulates from the Bushveld Upper Zone. Inclusions re-homogenized at high-temperature (1060-1100 °C) display a range of compositions in each rock sample, from iron-rich (35 wt.% FeOtot; 28 wt.% SiO2) to silica-rich (5 wt.% FeOtot; 65 wt.% SiO2). This trend is best explained by an immiscible process and trapping of contrasted melts in apatite crystals during progressive cooling along the binodal of a two-liquid field. The coexistence of both Si-rich and Fe-rich immiscible melts in single apatite grains is used to discuss the ability of immiscible melts to segregate from each other, and the implications for mineral and bulk cumulate compositions. We argue that complete separation of immiscible liquids did not occur, resulting in crystallization of similar phases from both melts but in different proportions. However, partial segregation in a crystal mush and the production of contrasting phase proportions from the Fe-rich melt and the Si-rich melt can be responsible for the cyclic evolution from melanocratic (Fe-Ti-P-rich) to leucocratic (plagioclase-rich) gabbros which is commonly observed in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex where it occurs at a vertical scale of 50 to 200 m.

  12. Classical solvability of the stationary free boundary problem describing the interface formation between two immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Stationary free boundary problems related to the formation of the interface between two immiscible fluids are investigated. The corresponding models were introduced originally by Shikhmurzaev to remove singularities arising in contact-line problems. We consider two models which are derived under different assumptions for the structure of the interfacial layer, and prove the existence of rotationally symmetric solutions in Hölder spaces for a sufficiently small rotationally symmetric external force.

  13. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Rabia; Ahmed, Sohail; Mazhar, Muhammad; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad; Khan, Nawazish Ali; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2} and [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2}, and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals.

  14. Sol-gel auto-combustion synthesis of totally immiscible NiAg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yuwen; Yang, Shaoguang; Hua, Zhenghe; Gong, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Xiaoning

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemically synthesized immiscible NiAg alloy nanoparticles without protecting matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A chemical method providing both a nonequilibrium thermal process and a good mixing of precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observation of extinction planes in NiAg alloy. -- Abstract: Immiscible crystalline NiAg alloy was successfully synthesized by the newly developed sol-gel auto-combustion method. The structure and composition were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). All evidence supports that homogeneous NiAg alloy with FCC structure was synthesized. The differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry (DTA-TG) measurement shows that the alloy has a good thermal stability until 315 Degree-Sign C. Unusually some extinction planes are observed in the XRD pattern and HRTEM images. The random distribution of atoms and the large difference between Ni and Ag atom form factors should be regarded as the main reasons for the observation of the extinction planes. The quenching like nonequilibrium thermal process in the combustion is taken as the key factor in the synthesis of immiscible alloy. And the addition of ethylene glycol in the precursors is found to benefit the formation of NiAg alloy.

  15. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  16. Tin-carbon clusters and the onset of microscopic level immiscibility: Experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J.; Landau, A.; Zemel, E.; Kolodney, E.

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental observation and computational analysis of the binary tin-carbon gas phase species. These novel ionic compounds are generated by impact of C60 - anions on a clean tin target at some kiloelectronvolts kinetic energies. Positive SnmCn+ (m = 1-12, 1 ≤ n ≤ 8) ions were detected mass spectrometrically following ejection from the surface. Impact induced shattering of the C60 - ion followed by sub-surface penetration of the resulting atomic carbon flux forces efficient mixing between target and projectile atoms even though the two elements (Sn/C) are completely immiscible in the bulk. This approach of C60 - ion beam induced synthesis can be considered as an effective way for producing novel metal-carbon species of the so-called non-carbide forming elements, thus exploring the possible onset of molecular level miscibility in these systems. Sn2C2+ was found to be the most abundant carbide cluster ion. Its instantaneous formation kinetics and its measured kinetic energy distribution while exiting the surface demonstrate a single impact formation/emission event (on the sub-ps time scale). Optimal geometries were calculated for both neutral and positively charged species using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for identifying global minima, followed by density functional theory (DFT) structure optimization and energy calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] level. The calculated structures reflect two distinct binding tendencies. The carbon rich species exhibit polyynic/cummulenic nature (tin end capped carbon chains) while the more stoichiometrically balanced species have larger contributions of metal-metal bonding, sometimes resulting in distinct tin and carbon moieties attached to each other (segregated structures). The Sn2Cn (n = 3-8) and Sn2Cn+ (n = 2-8) are polyynic/cummulenic while all neutral SnmCn structures (m = 3-4) could be described as small tin clusters (dimer, trimer, and tetramer

  17. Tin-carbon clusters and the onset of microscopic level immiscibility: Experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, J; Landau, A; Zemel, E; Kolodney, E

    2015-09-21

    We report the experimental observation and computational analysis of the binary tin-carbon gas phase species. These novel ionic compounds are generated by impact of C60(-) anions on a clean tin target at some kiloelectronvolts kinetic energies. Positive Sn(m)C(n)(+) (m = 1-12, 1 ≤ n ≤ 8) ions were detected mass spectrometrically following ejection from the surface. Impact induced shattering of the C60(-) ion followed by sub-surface penetration of the resulting atomic carbon flux forces efficient mixing between target and projectile atoms even though the two elements (Sn/C) are completely immiscible in the bulk. This approach of C60(-) ion beam induced synthesis can be considered as an effective way for producing novel metal-carbon species of the so-called non-carbide forming elements, thus exploring the possible onset of molecular level miscibility in these systems. Sn2C2(+) was found to be the most abundant carbide cluster ion. Its instantaneous formation kinetics and its measured kinetic energy distribution while exiting the surface demonstrate a single impact formation/emission event (on the sub-ps time scale). Optimal geometries were calculated for both neutral and positively charged species using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for identifying global minima, followed by density functional theory (DFT) structure optimization and energy calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] level. The calculated structures reflect two distinct binding tendencies. The carbon rich species exhibit polyynic/cummulenic nature (tin end capped carbon chains) while the more stoichiometrically balanced species have larger contributions of metal-metal bonding, sometimes resulting in distinct tin and carbon moieties attached to each other (segregated structures). The Sn2C(n) (n = 3-8) and Sn2C(n)(+) (n = 2-8) are polyynic/cummulenic while all neutral Sn(m)C(n) structures (m = 3-4) could be described as small tin clusters (dimer

  18. Complex nanoprecipitate structures induced by irradiation in immiscible alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shipeng; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the fundamentals of compositional patterning induced by energetic particle irradiation in model A-B substitutional binary alloys using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The study focuses on a type of nanostructure that was recently observed in dilute Cu-Fe and Cu-V alloys, where precipitates form within precipitates, a morphology that we term “cherry-pit” structures. The simulations show that the domain of stability of these cherry-pit structures depends on the thermodynamic and kinetic asymmetry between the A and B elements. In particular, both lower solubilities and diffusivities of A in B compared to those of B in A favor the stabilization of these cherry-pit structures for A-rich average compositions. The simulation results are rationalized by extending the analytic model introduced by Frost and Russell for irradiation-induced compositional patterning so as to include the possible formation of pits within precipitates. The simulations indicate also that the pits are dynamical structures that undergo nearly periodic cycles of nucleation, growth, and absorption by the matrix.

  19. Liquid immiscibility between arsenide and sulfide melts: evidence from a LA-ICP-MS study in magmatic deposits at Serranía de Ronda (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, R.; Gervilla, F.; Barnes, S.-J.; Ortega, L.; Lunar, R.

    2015-03-01

    The chromite-Ni arsenide (Cr-Ni-As) and sulfide-graphite (S-G) deposits from the Serranía de Ronda (Málaga, South Spain) contain an arsenide assemblage (nickeline, maucherite and nickeliferous löllingite) that has been interpreted to represent an arsenide melt and a sulfide-graphite assemblage (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite and graphite) that has been interpreted to represent a sulfide melt, both of which have been interpreted to have segregated as immiscible liquids from an arsenic-rich sulfide melt. We have determined the platinum-group element (PGE), Au, Ag, Se, Sb, Bi and Te contents of the arsenide and sulfide assemblages using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to establish their partitioning behaviour during the immiscibility of an arsenide melt from a sulfide melt. Previous experimental work has shown that PGE partition more strongly into arsenide melts than into sulfide melts and our results fit with this observation. Arsenide minerals are enriched in all PGE, but especially in elements with the strongest affinity for the arsenide melt, including Ir, Rh and Pt. In contrast and also in agreement with previous studies, Se and Ag partition preferentially into the sulfide assemblage. The PGE-depleted nature of sulfides in the S-G deposits along with the discordant morphologies of the bodies suggest that these sulfides are not mantle sulfides, but that they represent the crystallization product of a PGE-depleted sulfide melt due to the sequestering of PGE by an arsenide melt.

  20. MASS-REMOVAL AND MASS-FLUX-REDUCTION BEHAVIOR FOR IDEALIZED SOURCE ZONES WITH HYDRAULICALLY POORLY-ACCESSIBLE IMMISCIBLE LIQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Difilippo, Erica L.; marble, justin C.; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-04-01

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate aqueous dissolution and mass-removal behavior for systems wherein immiscible liquid was non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous source zones. The study focused specifically on characterizing the relationship between mass flux reduction and mass removal for systems for which immiscible liquid is poorly accessible to flowing water. Two idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. The results showed that significant reductions in mass flux occurred at relatively moderate mass-removal fractions for all systems. Conversely, minimalmass flux reduction occurred until a relatively large fraction of mass (>80%) was removed for the control experiment, which was designed to exhibit ideal mass removal. In general, mass flux reduction was observed to follow an approximately one-to-one relationship with mass removal. Two methods for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, one based on system-indicator parameters (ganglia-to-pool ratio) and the other a simple mass-removal function, were used to evaluate the measured data. The results of this study illustrate the impact of poorly accessible immiscible liquid on mass-removal and mass-flux processes, and the difficulties posed for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior.

  1. Capillary pinning and blunting of immiscible gravity currents in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher W.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Juanes, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    Gravity-driven flows in the subsurface have attracted recent interest in the context of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, where supercritical CO2 is captured from the flue gas of power plants and injected underground into deep saline aquifers. After injection, the CO2 will spread and migrate as a buoyant gravity current relative to the denser, ambient brine. Although the CO2 and the brine are immiscible, the impact of capillarity on CO2 spreading and migration is poorly understood. We previously studied the early time evolution of an immiscible gravity current, showing that capillary pressure hysteresis pins a portion of the macroscopic fluid-fluid interface and that this can eventually stop the flow. Here we study the full lifetime of such a gravity current. Using tabletop experiments in packings of glass beads, we show that the horizontal extent of the pinned region grows with time and that this is ultimately responsible for limiting the migration of the current to a finite distance. We also find that capillarity blunts the leading edge of the current, which contributes to further limiting the migration distance. Using experiments in etched micromodels, we show that the thickness of the blunted nose is controlled by the distribution of pore-throat sizes and the strength of capillarity relative to buoyancy. We develop a theoretical model that captures the evolution of immiscible gravity currents and predicts the maximum migration distance. By applying this model to representative aquifers, we show that capillary pinning and blunting can exert an important control on gravity currents in the context of geological CO2 storage.

  2. Nonequilibrium dynamics induced by miscible–immiscible transition in binary Bose–Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Yujiro; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kunimi, Masaya; Saito, Hiroki; Hirano, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We have observed and characterized the nonequilibrium spatial dynamics of a two-component 87Rb Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) that is controllable switched back and forth between the miscible and immiscible phases of the phase separation transition by changing the internal states of the 87Rb atoms. The subsequent evolution exhibits large scale oscillations of the spatial structure that involve component mixing and separation. We show that the larger total energy of the miscible system results in a higher oscillation frequency. This investigation introduces a new technique to control the miscibility and the spatial degrees of freedom in atomic BECs.

  3. The influence of gravity level during directional solidification of immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.; Schmale, A. L.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    During directional solidification of immiscible (hypermonotectic) alloys it is theoretically possible to establish a stable macroscopically-planar solidification front, and thus avoid sedimentation. Unfortunately, convective instabilities often occur which interfere with the directional solidification process. In this paper, stability conditions are discussed and results presented from directional solidification studies carried out aboard NASA's KC-135 zero-g aircraft. Samples were directionally solidified while the effective gravity level was varied from approximately 0.01 g for 25 s to 1.8 g for 45 s. Dramatic variations in microstructure were observed with gravity level during solidification.

  4. A new insight into interfaces of immiscible binary polymer blends from the free volume approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, P.; Meghala, D.; Pasang, T.; Raj, J. M.; Chandrashekara, M. N.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2012-06-01

    The interface width in an immiscible (PVC/PS) polymer blend is determined using hydrodynamic interaction parameter (α) derived from free volume data measured using Positron lifetime spectrometer. CONTIN program has been employed to get the free volume hole size distribution. A new definition of interface width is presented, which originates from the Kirkwood-Riseman theory and friction coefficient as per Stokes equation. Friction at the interface of a binary blend decides how close the surfaces come or stay farther resulting in narrow or broad interface width respectively.

  5. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kim, S.

    2001-01-01

    Uniform microstructural distribution during solidification of immiscible liquids (e.g., oil and water; aluminum and lead) on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of a modeling effort will also be presented,

  6. Surrogate immiscible liquid pairs with refractive indexes matchable over a wide range of density and viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, Rajat; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2015-08-01

    In liquid-liquid flows, use of optical diagnostics is limited by interphase refractive index mismatch, which leads to optical distortion and complicates data interpretation, and sometimes also by opacity. Both problems can be eliminated using a surrogate pair of immiscible index-matched transparent liquids, whose density and viscosity ratios match corresponding ratios for the original liquid pair. We show that a wide range of density and viscosity ratios is accessible using aqueous solutions of 1,2-propanediol and CsBr (for which index, density, and viscosity are available), and solutions of light and heavy silicone oils and 1-bromooctane (for which we measured the same properties at 119 compositions). For each liquid phase, polynomials in the composition variables, least-squares fitted to index and density and to the logarithm of kinematic viscosity, were used to determine accessible density and viscosity ratios for each matchable index. Index-matched solution pairs can be prepared with density and viscosity ratios equal to those for water-liquid CO2 at 0 °C over a range of pressure (allowing water-liquid CO2 behavior at inconveniently high pressure to be simulated by 1-bar experiments), and for water-crude oil and water-trichloroethylene (avoiding opacity and toxicity problems, respectively), each over a range of temperature. For representative index-matched solutions, equilibration changes index, density, and viscosity only slightly, and mass spectrometry and elemental analysis show that no component of either phase has significant interphase solubility. Finally, procedures are described for iteratively reducing the residual index mismatch in surrogate solution pairs prepared on the basis of approximate polynomial fits to experimental data, and for systematically dealing with nonzero interphase solubility.

  7. Flow of two immiscible fluids in a periodically constricted tube: Transitions to stratified, segmented, churn, spray, or segregated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraggedakis, D.; Kouris, Ch.; Dimakopoulos, Y.; Tsamopoulos, J.

    2015-08-01

    We study the flow of two immiscible, Newtonian fluids in a periodically constricted tube driven by a constant pressure gradient. Our volume-of-fluid algorithm is used to solve the governing equations. First, the code is validated by comparing its predictions to previously reported results for stratified and pulsing flow. Then, it is used to capture accurately all the significant topological changes that take place. Initially, the fluids have a core-annular arrangement, which is found to either remain the same or change to a different arrangement depending on the fluid properties, the pressure driving the flow, or the flow geometry. The flow-patterns that appear are the core-annular, segmented, churn, spray, and segregated flow. The predicted scalings near pinching of the core fluid concur with similarity predictions and earlier numerical results [I. Cohen et al., "Two fluid drop snap-off problem: Experiments and theory," Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1147-1150 (1999)]. Flow-pattern maps are constructed in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. Our result provides deeper insights into the mechanism of the pattern transitions and is in agreement with previous studies on core-annular flow [Ch. Kouris and J. Tsamopoulos, "Core-annular flow in a periodically constricted circular tube, I. Steady state, linear stability and energy analysis," J. Fluid Mech. 432, 31-68 (2001) and Ch. Kouris et al., "Comparison of spectral and finite element methods applied to the study of interfacial instabilities of the core-annular flow in an undulating tube," Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 39(1), 41-73 (2002)], segmented flow [E. Lac and J. D. Sherwood, "Motion of a drop along the centreline of a capillary in a pressure-driven flow," J. Fluid Mech. 640, 27-54 (2009)], and churn flow [R. Y. Bai et al., "Lubricated pipelining—Stability of core annular-flow. 5. Experiments and comparison with theory," J. Fluid Mech. 240, 97-132 (1992)].

  8. Immiscible Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckelmann, Jens; Luning, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    layers of liquids. The setup of both demonstrations is such that one homogeneous layer in a multiphasic mixture separates into two new layers upon shaking. The solvents used are methanol, toluene, petroleum ether or "n"-pentane, silicone oil, perfluoroheptanes,…

  9. Preparation and friction force microscopy measurements of immiscible, opposing polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  10. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble growth. Comparisons between miscible and immiscible mixing layer distributions are made from the resulting interface concentration profiles.

  11. Peralkaline nephelinite-natrocarbonatite immiscibility and carbonatite assimilation at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.

    2009-11-01

    This study presents petrographic and compositional data for coexisting peralkaline silicate glass and quenched natrocarbonatite melt in nepheline phenocrysts from the 24 September 2007 and July 2008 eruptions of the natrocarbonatite volcano Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania). Data are also given for peralkaline residual glass in combeite nephelinite ash clasts occurring in the March-April 2006 large volume natrocarbonatite flow. These data are considered to demonstrate the occurrence of liquid immiscibility between strongly peralkaline Fe-rich nephelinite melt and natrocarbonatite at Oldoinyo Lengai. Compositional data for coexisting silicate-carbonate pairs in conjunction with previous experimental studies suggest that the size of the field of liquid immiscibility for carbonated nephelinitic magmas is a function of their peralkalinity. It is shown that peralkaline combeite wollastonite nephelinite was present at Oldoinyo Lengai prior to, and during, the 24 September 2007 ash eruption. It is postulated that the driving force for this major eruption was assimilation and decomposition of previously emplaced solid natrocarbonatite. Assimilation resulted in the formation of the unusual hybrid nepheline-andradite-melilite-combeite-phosphate magma represented by the 24 September 2007 ash.

  12. Liquid immiscibility and core-shell morphology formation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, R.; Zhang, J.F.; Zhang, S.G. Li, J.G.

    2013-07-15

    The effects of composition on liquid immiscibility, macroscopic morphology, microstructure and phase transformation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys were investigated. Three types of morphology, the core-shell type, the stochastic droplet type and uniform dispersion type, of Al–Bi–Sn particles prepared by a jet breakup process were distinguished, and the relationships between which were discussed. The phase transformation behaviors of the Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied by thermal analysis, in agreement with the microstructural observation and microanalysis. The liquid immiscibility and formation of the core-shell morphology in Al–Bi–Sn alloys are easily achieved when the composition lies in the liquid miscibility gap. The particles exhibit a high melting point Al-rich core with a low melting point Sn–Bi-rich solder shell, showing promise for application as high-density electronic packaging materials. - Highlights: • The liquid demixing, morphology and microstructure in Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied. • Three types of morphology were classified and discussed. • The conditions for formation of the core-shell morphology were obtained. • The phase transition behaviors agree with the microstructure characterization. • The Al/Sn–Bi core-shell particles show promise for use in electronic packaging.

  13. Preparation and Friction Force Microscopy Measurements of Immiscible, Opposing Polymer Brushes

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  14. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Chin, Emily N; Jackson, Shawn S; Strotman, Lindsay N; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E; Alexander, Caroline M; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R; Beebe, David J

    2014-02-15

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, which gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes compared to current wash-based protocols, which require reequilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible-phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of nonspecific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  15. A new lattice Boltzmann model for interface reactions between immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Palma, Paolo Roberto; Huber, Christian; Viotti, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a lattice Boltzmann model to simulate chemical reactions taking place at the interface between two immiscible fluids. The phase-field approach is used to identify the interface and its orientation, the concentration of reactant at the interface is then calculated iteratively to impose the correct reactive flux condition. The main advantages of the model is that interfaces are considered part of the bulk dynamics with the corrective reactive flux introduced as a source/sink term in the collision step, and, as a consequence, the model's implementation and performance is independent of the interface geometry and orientation. Results obtained with the proposed model are compared to analytical solution for three different benchmark tests (stationary flat boundary, moving flat boundary and dissolving droplet). We find an excellent agreement between analytical and numerical solutions in all cases. Finally, we present a simulation coupling the Shan Chen multiphase model and the interface reactive model to simulate the dissolution of a collection of immiscible droplets with different sizes rising by buoyancy in a stagnant fluid.

  16. Generalized Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes equations for numerical simulations of multicomponent immiscible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    By using the second-law of thermodynamics and the Onsager reciprocal method for irreversible processes, we have developed a set of physically consistent multicomponent compressible generalized Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes (CGCHNS) equations from basic thermodynamics. The new equations can describe not only flows with pure miscible and pure immiscible materials but also complex flows in which mass diffusion and surface tension or Korteweg stresses effects may coexist. Furthermore, for the first time, the incompressible generalized Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes (IGCHNS) equations are rigorously derived from the incompressible limit of the CGCHNS equations (as the infinite sound speed limit) and applied to the immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem. Extensive good agreements between numerical results and the linear stability theory (LST) predictions for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are achieved for a wide range of wavenumber, surface tension, and viscosity values. The late-time results indicate that the IGCHNS equations can naturally capture complex interface topological changes including merging and breaking-up and are free of singularity problems.

  17. Matter-wave solitons in the counterflow of two immiscible superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitoura, F.; Achilleos, V.; Malomed, B. A.; Yan, D.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    We study formation of solitons induced by counterflows of immiscible superfluids. Our setting is based on a quasi-one-dimensional binary Bose-Einstein condensate, composed of two immiscible components with large and small numbers of atoms in them. Assuming that the “small” component moves with constant velocity, either by itself, or being dragged by a moving trap, and intrudes into the “large” counterpart, the following results are obtained. Depending on the velocity, and on whether the small component moves in the absence or in the presence of the trap, two-component dark-bright solitons, scalar dark solitons, or multiple dark solitons may emerge, the last outcome taking place due to breakdown of the superfluidity. We present two sets of analytical results to describe this phenomenology. In an intermediate velocity regime, where dark-bright solitons form, a reduction of the two-component Gross-Pitaevskii system to an integrable Mel'nikov system is developed, demonstrating that solitary waves of the former are very accurately described by analytically available solitons of the latter. In the high-velocity regime, where the breakdown of the superfluidity induces the formation of dark solitons and multisoliton trains, an effective single-component description, in which a strongly localized wave packet of the “small” component acts as an effective potential for the “large” one, allows us to estimate the critical velocity beyond which the coherent structures emerge in good agreement with the numerical results.

  18. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; Chin, Emily N.; Jackson, Shawn S.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, that gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes as compared to current wash-based protocols, which require re-equilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of non-specific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb) to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein-binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  19. Deformation of a partially engulfed compound drop slowly moving in an immiscible viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, L.; Lavrenteva, O. M.; Spivak, R.; Nir, A.

    2011-02-01

    Compound drops are comprised of two or more immiscible phases, one of which entirely or partially engulfs the others. In this work, we consider a partially engulfed compound drop comprised of two immiscible incompressible fluids, dispersed in an isothermal liquid, and that moved under the action of gravity and buoyancy. The contact angles between the three phases are determined by three interfacial tensions associated with the different fluids comprising the compound drop. The surfaces deform as the drop moves through the ambient fluid. If the capillary number is small (Ca≪1), corrections to the shapes of the undeformable case (Ca=0) are constructed, making use of a perturbation technique. We report on stationary drops' deformation for a variety of the physical parameters involved, such as volume ratio and surface tension of each interface, which determine the unperturbed configuration and the distribution of density between the two phases of the drop. Several examples of various transient behaviors of highly deformable compound drops are computed using FLUENT software and are presented as well.

  20. Design concepts of a heavy-oil recovery process by an immiscible CO/sub 2/ application

    SciTech Connect

    Kantar, K.; Issever, K.; Karaoguz, D.; Vrana, L.

    1985-02-01

    Bati Raman oil field, in southeast Turkey, represents Turkey's biggest single oil reserve. The rapid production decline of the field and increases in the price of crude oil has led Turkish Petroleum Corp. (TPAO) to consider intervening with EOR techniques. Since 1967, various recovery schemes have been attempted, including steam and water injection. Extensive laboratory, modeling, and comparative engineering studies of various immiscible CO/sub 2/ application techniques resulted. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of immiscible CO/sub 2/ application as applied to Bati Raman oil field.

  1. Real-Time Observation on Evolution of Droplets Morphology Affected by Electric Current Pulse in Al-Bi Immiscible Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Tongmin; Cao, Fei; Fu, Hongwang; Fu, Yanan; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of Bi-rich droplets morphology in a solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloy was directly observed using a synchrotron microradiography technique. The electric current pulse (ECP) was applied to control the solidification process of Al-Bi immiscible alloy. It was found that the electromagnetic pinch force and Marangoni force induced by ECP and temperature gradient, respectively, can significantly affect the distribution of Bi-rich droplets. The electromagnetic pinch force drove the droplets from the center to side; meanwhile, the Marangoni force lifted the droplets from the bottom to the top. As a result, the droplets finally distributed with a manner of "inverted triangle."

  2. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  3. Multiple (immiscible) melt phases of mafic composition in Chicxulub impact ejecta from northeastern Mexico: New constraints on target lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P.; Stinnesbeck, W.; Kontny, A.; Stüben, D.; Kramar, U.; Harting, M.

    2002-12-01

    Proximal ejecta deposits in sections from NE Mexico (Rancho Nuevo, La Sierrita, El Peñon, El Mimbral) have been investigated by backscattered electron imaging, wave-length dispersive electron microprobe analyses, and cathodoluminiscence, in order to characterize target lithologies, and ejecta mixing, fractionation, and distribution mechanisms. Additional investigations included magnetic properties (Kontny et al, this meeting) and trace element analyses (Harting et al, this meeting). Petrological features of these ejecta deposits are extraordinarily well preserved. They consist of mm-cm sized vesiculated spherical to drop-shaped spherules and angular to filamentous (ejecta-) fragments, as well as carbonate clasts, marl clasts, and rare benthic foraminifera floating in a carbonaceous matrix. Occasionally, spherules and fragments show welding-amalgamation features and enclose other components, thus resulting in a foam-like texture. An origin from the Chicxulub impact is suggested by geographical proximity and morphologically similarity to spherules found in other K-T sites in North to Central America and the Atlantic. The far distribution of such coarse-grained, foamy, and fragile ejecta-clasts as well as welding features suggest ignimbrite-like transport mechanisms or nearby secondary impacts. Several silicic ejecta phases have been observed that occur as distinct phases, even within one ejecta particle with textures indicative of liquid immiscibility: (1) Fe- (25-35 wt%), Mg- (10-15 wt%) rich phases with <25 wt% SiO2, altered to chlorite, (2) K- (5-8 wt.%) and Al- (25-30 wt%) rich hydrated glass with 45-50 wt% SiO2, and (3) rare SiO2- (>60 wt%) rich andesitic glasses. In addition to these silicic phases, abundant carbonate characterizes all studied ejecta deposits. It occurs within spherules and fragments and as clasts and globules, and shows textures indicative of either liquid immiscibility and/or quenching (`feathery calcite'). Quenched carbonates are enriched

  4. Effects of nanoclay and conductive carbon black on morphology development in chaotic mixing of immiscible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharaiya, Dhawal

    Chaotic mixing of immiscible polymer blends has been known to produce morphological features such as lamellas, fibrils and droplets. In this research work, we studied the effect of fillers, such as carbon black (CB) and organically treated nanoclay, on morphology development in an immiscible polymer system, consisting of polyamide 6 (PA6) and polypropylene (PP) in a chaotic mixer. Operating conditions were chosen such that chaotic mixing was widespread inside the mixer. The filler particles were mixed with minor component PP before blending with PA6. It was found that continuous lamellar and fibrillar morphology of PP formed early in mixing produced double percolating conductive networks with only 1 wt% CB particles. The conductive networks sustained their existence even after fibrils broke into droplets. This was attributed to migration of CB particles from the bulk of PP droplets and selective localization at the interfaces of closely spaced PP droplets. It was also found that much smaller PP droplets resulted in the presence of CB particles. Prior reports in literature indicated that organically treated nanoclay particles can act as compatibilizer of immiscible polymer blends, although no study showed that how nanoclay would influence morphology development. In this study, we showed that clay particles helped produce PP droplets of much smaller size and with narrower size distribution due to their direct influence on breakup of PP domains. The clay particles reduced interfacial tension between PP and PA6 phases. Consequently, the PP domains sustained lamellar and fibrillar forms and significantly thin fibrils were formed. These thin fibrils in turn broke rapidly into smaller droplets. It was also found that a large fraction of clay particles migrated into PA6 phase and contained intercalated PA6 chains in their galleries. This indicated that clay particles did not participate in compatibilization in this system. The effect of degradation of surface treatment of

  5. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  6. Fabrication of Tunable Submicro- or Nano-structured Polyethylene Materials form Immiscible Blends with Cellulose Acetate Butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was prepared into micro- or submicro-spheres or nanofibers via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The sizes of the PE spheres or fibers can be successfully controlled by varyi...

  7. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terphthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  8. Liquid-liquid phase equilibrium and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Jia, Peng; Sun, Xiaofei; Geng, Haoran; Zuo, Min; Zhao, Degang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the liquid-phase separation of ternary immiscible Al45Bi19.8Sn35.2 and Al60Bi14.4Sn25.6 melts was studied with resistivity and thermal analysis methods at different temperature. The resistivity-temperature curves appear abrupt and anomalously change with rising temperature, corresponding to the anomalous and low peak of melting process in DSC curves, indicative of the occurrence of the liquid-phase separation. The anomalous behavior of the resistivity temperature dependence is attributable to concentration-concentration fluctuations. The effect of composition and melt temperature on the liquid-phase separation and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys was studied. The liquid-phase separation and formation of the core-shell structure in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys are readily acquired when the alloy compositions fall into liquid miscibility gap. What's more, the cross-sectional structure changes from irregular, dispersed to core-type shapes under the actions of Marangoni motion with increasing melt temperature. This study provides some clues for the preparation of core-shell microspheres of immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys via liquid-phase separation.

  9. Facile synthesis of carbon dots in an immiscible system with excitation-independent emission and thermally activated delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hou, Juan; Wang, Long; Zhang, Ping; Xu, Yuan; Ding, Lan

    2015-12-28

    Herein, we present a one-pot microwave-assisted preparative method for water-soluble carbon dots (CDs) in an immiscible system. CDs demonstrated uniform morphology, high quantum yield and excitation-independent fluorescence emission. Moreover, we first reported the observation of thermally activated delayed fluorescence from CDs. PMID:26498875

  10. Modeling of Two-Phase Immiscible Flow with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Alsaud, Moataz; Soulaine, Cyprien; Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi; Stanford University Collaboration; University of Maryland, College Park Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A new numerical method based on the implicit interface approach on Cartesian grids is proposed for modeling two-phase immiscible flow with moving contact lines. The reinitialization of level-set function by computing the minimum distance to linearly reconstructed interface to obtain signed distance function is extended to include the contact angle boundary condition. The physics of contact line dynamics is implemented using the Cox-Voinov hydrodynamic theory that efficiently captures the effect of the microscopic contact line region. The numerical method is validated through various examples. Parasitic currents are studied in the case of static and constantly advected parabolic interface intersecting the domain boundary with an imposed contact angle. Moving contact line in the viscous dominated regime is studied and verified through comparison with experiments.

  11. Capillary foams: highly stable bubbles formed by synergistic action of particles and immiscible liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Carson; Zhang, Yi; Behrens, Sven

    2015-03-01

    Liquid foams are a familiar part of everyday life from beer and frothed milk to bubble baths; they also play important roles in enhanced oil recovery, lightweight packaging, and insulation. We report a new class of foams, obtained by frothing a suspension of colloidal particles in the presence of a small amount of an immiscible secondary liquid. A unique aspect of the new foams, termed capillary foams, is that suspended particles mediate spreading of a minority liquid around gas bubbles. The resulting mixed particle/liquid coating can stabilize bubbles against coalescence even when the particles alone cannot. We demonstrate the generality of capillary foams by forming them from a diverse set of particle/liquid combinations and rationalize the results with a simple free energy model. In addition to many applications as liquid foams, capillary foams can serve as precursors for hierarchically-structured solids with porosity on different length scales and with significant application potential.

  12. Stochastic growth dynamics and composite defects in quenched immiscible binary condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-K.; Pattinson, R. W.; Billam, T. P.; Gardiner, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.; Huang, T.-M.; Lin, W.-W.; Gou, S.-C.; Parker, N. G.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2016-02-01

    We study the sensitivity of coupled condensate formation dynamics on the history of initial stochastic domain formation in the context of instantaneously quenched elongated harmonically trapped immiscible two-component atomic Bose gases. The spontaneous generation of defects in the fastest condensing component, and subsequent coarse-graining dynamics, can lead to a deep oscillating microtrap into which the other component condenses, thereby establishing a long-lived composite defect in the form of a dark-bright solitary wave. We numerically map out diverse key aspects of these competing growth dynamics, focusing on the role of shot-to-shot fluctuations and global parameter changes (initial state choices, quench parameters, and condensate growth rates), with our findings also qualitatively confirmed by realistic finite-duration quenches. We conclude that phase-separated structures observable on experimental time scales are likely to be metastable states whose form is influenced by the stability and dynamics of the spontaneously emerging dark-bright solitary wave.

  13. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Stabilization of liquid foams through the synergistic action of particles and an immiscible liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wu, Jie; Wang, Hongzhi; Meredith, J Carson; Behrens, Sven H

    2014-12-01

    Liquid foams are familiar from beer, frothed milk, or bubble baths; foams in general also play important roles in oil recovery, lightweight packaging, and insulation. Here a new class of foams is reported, obtained by frothing a suspension of colloidal particles in the presence of a small amount of an immiscible secondary liquid. A unique aspect of these foams, termed capillary foams, is the particle-mediated spreading of the minority liquid around the gas bubbles. The resulting mixed particle/liquid coating can stabilize bubbles against coalescence even when the particles alone cannot. The coated bubbles are further immobilized by entrapment in a network of excess particles connected by bridges of the minority liquid. Capillary foams were prepared with a diverse set of particle/liquid combinations to demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon. The observed foam stability correlates with the particle affinity for the liquid interface formed by spreading the minority liquid at the bubble surface. PMID:25284445

  15. Analysis of heavy-oil immiscible CO/sub 2/ tertiary coreflood data

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Earlougher, R.C. Sr.; Spivak, A.; Costa, A.

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes the results of a series of tertiary, immiscible, CO/sub 2/ corefloods of Wilmington field Pliocene reservoir rock containing heavy oil (+- 14/sup 0/ API (+-0.97 g/cm/sup 3/) and +-480 cp (+-480 mPa . s)). An initial set of corefloods defined the recovery potential of the CO/sub 2/ injection, while a series of later tests served to define the process more accurately as applied in the field. In an attempt to understand the displacement mechanism, simulator matching of one of the later, more refined groups of corefloods was performed. The corefloods and simulator work indicate that the incremental recovery is more than can be accounted for by oil-viscosity reduction and crude-oil swelling. The improved performance is attributed to more favorable displacement characteristics and the presence of a free gas saturation in the cores.

  16. Immiscible fluids (CO 2-brines) in optical fluorite, Nordvik-Taimyr, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokof'ev, Vsevolod Y.; Baksheev, Ivan A.; Korytov, Feodor Y.; Touret, Jacques

    2006-07-01

    Fluid inclusion investigations in optical fluorite from the Nordvik salt dome caprock (Khatanga Gulf, Taimyr Peninsula, Russia) show that the fluorite has been formed at a temperature of about 300 °C, from CO 2-brine immiscible hydrothermal fluids. Unmixing occurred at a depth of several kilometres, resulting in the liberation of dense CO 2-rich fluids, which played a significant role in helping the diapir to reach its intrusive character. Compared to other optical fluorite deposits in Russia, the exceptional quality of the Nordvik occurrence is due to a relatively high formation temperature, as well as a high salinity (30-35 wt% NaCl eq.) of hydrothermal aqueous fluids. To cite this article: V.Y. Prokof'ev et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  17. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Composite Growth in Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation and mathematical modeling for immiscible alloys subjected to ultrasonic influence are presented. It is known that in inoculated light alloy melts, ultrasonic treatment creates a new type of cast structure with extremely fine grains of uniform composition. This effect is produced across a wide range of freezing rates and technologies. However, it has not been demonstrated that the process can be successfully applied during controlled directional solidification processing. In this work we present the results from a set of directional solidification experiments and suggest describing the droplet size versus ultrasonic frequency and amplitude using an energy approach, followed with a more detailed analysis through numerical modeling of the ultrasonic field.

  18. Analysis of convection in immiscible liquid layers with novel particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, J. N.; Prakash, A.; Campbell, T. A.; Pline, A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem under study is convective flow in immiscible liquid layers with one or two horizontal interfaces. In one-g the flow results primarily from the buoyancy force acting perpendicular to the interfaces. This creates a fluid mechanical system in which the coupling of the fluid layers across an interface plays a fundamental role. The contribution of two horizontal interface tension forces is marginal. Interface tension driven flow requires testing in microgravity. A flight experiment on the Bubble, Drop, and Particle Unit (BDPU) is planned for the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission onboard the Shuttle in 1994. The flow velocity fields will be analyzed by a whole-field Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) velocimetry technique. The capabilities of this technique to address fundamental issues, such as those regarding the flow stucture, will be discussed with a few sample experiments. Experimental and numerical flow patterns are compared.

  19. Interface pinning of immiscible gravity-exchange flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher W.; Szulczewski, Michael L.; Neufeld, Jerome A.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-02-01

    We study the gravity-exchange flow of two immiscible fluids in a porous medium and show that, in contrast with the miscible case, a portion of the initial interface remains pinned at all times. We elucidate, by means of micromodel experiments, the pore-level mechanism responsible for capillary pinning at the macroscale. We propose a sharp-interface gravity-current model that incorporates capillarity and quantitatively explains the experimental observations, including the x˜t1/2 spreading behavior at intermediate times and the fact that capillarity stops a finite-release current. Our theory and experiments suggest that capillary pinning is potentially an important, yet unexplored, trapping mechanism during CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers.

  20. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  1. Dynamics of Pinch-Off in Immiscible Liquid/Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Lowengrub, J. S.

    1997-11-01

    The behavior of glycerine/water jets flowing into a nearly immiscible ambient of Dow Corning 200 fluid is investigated using laser induced fluorescence flow visualization and particle image velocimetry. Clear images are obtained by matching the index of refraction in the glycerine/water solution with the index of refraction in the surrounding Dow Corning fluid. Jet Reynolds numbers are on the order of 100. The pinch-off of the jet column into droplets can be made repeatable by periodic forcing, and several pinch-off modes are examined. These modes are produced by varying the forcing frequency and amplitude, fluid viscosity ratio, and jet Reynolds number. The details of the pinch-off, including local variations in concentration near the transition location and the associated velocity fields will be discussed. The experimental results will be compared with numerical simulations that allow limited chemical mixing across the finite-thickness interface.

  2. Flux-dependent percolation transition in immiscible two-phase flows in porous media.

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Thomas; Hansen, Alex; Oren, Pål-Eric

    2009-03-01

    Using numerical simulations, we study immiscible two-phase flow in a pore network reconstructed from Berea sandstone under flow conditions that are statistically invariant under translation. Under such conditions, the flow is a state function which is not dependent on initial conditions. We find a second-order phase transition resembling the phase inversion transition found in emulsions. The flow regimes under consideration are those of low surface tension-hence high capillary numbers Ca-where viscous forces dominate. Nevertheless, capillary forces are imminent, we observe a critical stage in saturation where the transition takes place. We determine polydispersity critical exponent tau=2.27+/-0.08 and find that the critical saturation depends on how fast the fluids flow. PMID:19392052

  3. Generalization of the DLA process with different immiscible components by time-scale coarse graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.; Ryabov, A. B.; Loskutov, A.

    2007-10-01

    In the framework of the mean-field approximation we propose a new approach to the description of the growth of fractal structures which are formed as a result of the process of diffusion limited aggregation. Our approach is based on the coarse graining of the time scale which takes into account the property of discreteness of such structures. The obtained system of partial differential equations allows us to evaluate numerically the fractal dimension and the cluster density depending on the distance from the cluster center. The results are in a quite good agreement with values found by the direct numerical simulations. The proposed approach is generalized for the case of the cluster description with different immiscible particles.

  4. A Three-dimensional Numerical Study of Immiscible Droplet Deformation in a right angle bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Purushotam; Horwitz, Jeremy; Vanka, Surya

    2013-11-01

    We present a numerical study of deformation of an immiscible droplet in a right angle bend. We have used volume-of-fluid method to track the interface and variable density Navier-Stokes equations to solve for the flow field. A second-order accurate fractional step algorithm is used to integrate the equations. The VOF is also coupled to a level-set method to get a smoothed interface shape for surface tension calculations. We study the effects of density and viscosity ratios (between droplet and carrier fluids), Reynolds number, Capillary number and aspect ratio between droplet and duct size on the deformation characteristics. We investigate the elongation of the droplet in axial direction and the stretching or contraction of the droplet in the lateral direction. Depending on the value of above mentioned parameters droplet can take different shapes, namely, spherical, bullet and parachute. At moderately higher Reynolds numbers we also observe satellite droplet breaking from the original droplet.

  5. Study of miscible and immiscible flows in a microchannel using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Akpa, Belinda S; Matthews, Sinéad M; Sederman, Andrew J; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C; Johns, Michael L; Gladden, Lynn F

    2007-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive technique that can be used to visualize mixing processes in optically opaque systems in up to three dimensions. Here, MRI has been used for the first time to obtain both cross-sectional velocity and concentration maps of flow through an optically opaque Y-shaped microfluidic sensor. Images of 23 micromx23 microm resolution were obtained for a channel of rectangular cross section (250 micromx500 microm) fed by two square inlets (250 micromx250 microm). Both miscible and immiscible liquid systems have been studied. These include a system in which the coupling of flow and mass transfer has been observed, as the diffusion of the analyte perturbs local hydrodynamics. MRI has been shown to be a versatile tool for the study of mixing processes in a microfluidic system via the multidimensional spatial resolution of flow and mass transfer. PMID:17630718

  6. Fluid-fluid interaction during miscible and immiscible displacement under ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, T.; Babadagli, T.

    2007-12-01

    This paper aims at identifying and analyzing the influence of high-frequency, high-intensity ultrasonic radiation at the interface between immiscible (different types of oils and aqueous solutions) and miscible (different types of oil and solvent) fluids. An extensive set of Hele-Shaw type experiments were performed for several viscosity ratios, and interfacial tension. Fractal analysis techniques were applied to quantify the degree of fingering and branching. This provided a rough assessment of the degree of perturbation generated at the interface when the capillary forces along with the viscous forces are effective. Miscible Hele-Shaw experiments were also presented to isolate the effect of viscous forces. We found that ultrasound acts to stabilize the interfacial front, and that such effect is most pronounced at low viscosity ratios.

  7. Natural damped frequencies of an infinitely long column of immiscible viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, H. F.

    Extended space flights and manned earth-orbiting space laboratories provide for manufacturing processes and experiments conditions which are not found on the surface of the earth. The availability of conditions involving highly reduced or zero gravity are of interest for many engineering disciplines, taking into account fluid mechanics, materials sciences, and crystal growth. Thus, floating zone melting under zero gravity conditions has great advantages. However, there are also certain difficulties. The floating zone has, for instance, a free liquid surface which is susceptible to dynamic disturbances. The stability problems which arise have been studied by a number of authors. The present investigation is concerned with infinitely long systems which consist of immiscible liquids of different densities and viscosities. Approaches for determining the natural damped frequencies and the decay of the motion of surface waves are discussed.

  8. An Experimental Study on the Influence of Viscosity Ratio During Immiscible Displacements in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, K. A.; Duchateau, C.; Kovscek, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Geological sequestration in saline aquifers is a process that reduces carbon dioxide emissions and has become increasingly significant because it may help to mitigate global climate change and enhance energy sustainability. Understanding the flow behavior and stability of partially miscible fluids - such as carbon dioxide and water - in porous media is the main goal of this research. Additionally, prediction of unstable flows in porous media presents an ongoing challenge for engineers and scientists; therefore, this research also has positive implications in areas such as enhanced oil recovery and the development of chemical reactors. In order to improve the knowledge base of this intricate problem, stability and flow characteristics must be examined experimentally in three ways: (i) immiscible flows in homogeneous porous media, (ii) effects of heterogeneity, and (iii) the impact of partial miscibility of the fluids. This study focused specifically on immiscible flows and was accomplished by saturating a 2-D homogeneous, silicon-etched micromodel with UV sensitive dyed water and subsequently injecting heptane to displace the water. Heptane is more viscous than carbon dioxide; therefore various concentrations of glycerin were added to the aqueous phase to alter the viscosity ratio so that the heptane-water displacement in the micromodel was comparable to the carbon dioxide-water displacement in an aquifer. As the heptane moved through the micromodel, a high-speed camera system imaged the gradual displacement changes, seen due to the color changes in the UV dyed water. The extent of fingering in the micromodel is the physical characteristic used to determine stability. It is found that high flow rates and glycerin concentrations cause viscous fingering while low flow rates and glycerin concentrations result in capillary fingering.

  9. Molecular dynamics study on effect of elongational flow on morphology of immiscible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Chau; Kalra, Vibha

    2014-04-01

    We studied the effect of elongational flow on structure and kinetics of phase separation in immiscible blends using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different blend systems have been investigated—binary blend of polymers and binary mixture of molecular fluids. The interaction potential parameters in both material systems were chosen to ensure complete phase-separation in equilibrium. We found that elongational flow, beyond a certain rate, significantly alters the steady state morphology in such immiscible mixtures. For the case of polymer blends, perpendicular lamellar morphology was formed under elongation rates (dot \\varepsilon) from 0.05 to 0.5 MD units possibly due to the interplay of two opposing phenomena—domain deformation/rupture under elongation and aggregation of like-domains due to favorable energetic interactions. The elongation timescale at the critical rate of transition from phase-separated to the lamellar structure (dot \\varepsilon = 0.05) was found to be comparable to the estimated polymer relaxation time, suggesting a cross-over to the elongation/rupture-dominant regime. Under strong elongational flow rate, dot \\varepsilon > 0.5, the formation of disordered morphology was seen in polymer blend systems. The kinetics of phase separation was monitored by calculating domain size as a function of time for various elongational flow rates. The domain growth along the vorticity-axis was shown to follow a power law, Rz(t) ˜ t α. A growth exponent, α of 1/3 for the polymer blend and 0.5-0.6 for the fluid molecular mixture was found under elongation rates from 0.005 to 0.1. The higher growth exponent in the fluid mixture is a result of its faster diffusion time scale compared to that of polymer chains. The steady state end-to-end distance of polymer chains and viscosity of the polymer blend were examined and found to depend on the steady state morphology and elongation rate.

  10. Molecular dynamics study on effect of elongational flow on morphology of immiscible mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chau; Kalra, Vibha

    2014-04-01

    We studied the effect of elongational flow on structure and kinetics of phase separation in immiscible blends using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different blend systems have been investigated-binary blend of polymers and binary mixture of molecular fluids. The interaction potential parameters in both material systems were chosen to ensure complete phase-separation in equilibrium. We found that elongational flow, beyond a certain rate, significantly alters the steady state morphology in such immiscible mixtures. For the case of polymer blends, perpendicular lamellar morphology was formed under elongation rates (ε̇) from 0.05 to 0.5 MD units possibly due to the interplay of two opposing phenomena-domain deformation/rupture under elongation and aggregation of like-domains due to favorable energetic interactions. The elongation timescale at the critical rate of transition from phase-separated to the lamellar structure (ε̇ = 0.05) was found to be comparable to the estimated polymer relaxation time, suggesting a cross-over to the elongation/rupture-dominant regime. Under strong elongational flow rate, ε̇ > 0.5, the formation of disordered morphology was seen in polymer blend systems. The kinetics of phase separation was monitored by calculating domain size as a function of time for various elongational flow rates. The domain growth along the vorticity-axis was shown to follow a power law, Rz(t) ∼ t( α). A growth exponent, α of 1/3 for the polymer blend and 0.5-0.6 for the fluid molecular mixture was found under elongation rates from 0.005 to 0.1. The higher growth exponent in the fluid mixture is a result of its faster diffusion time scale compared to that of polymer chains. The steady state end-to-end distance of polymer chains and viscosity of the polymer blend were examined and found to depend on the steady state morphology and elongation rate. PMID:24712811

  11. Optofluidic restricted imaging, spectroscopy and counting of nanoparticles by evanescent wave using immiscible liquids.

    PubMed

    Liang, L; Zuo, Y F; Wu, W; Zhu, X Q; Yang, Y

    2016-08-21

    Conventional flow cytometry (FC) suffers from the diffraction limit for the detection of nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm, whereas traditional total internal reflection (TIR) microscopy can only detect few samples near the solid-liquid interface mostly in static states. Here we demonstrate a novel on-chip optofluidic technique using evanescent wave sensing for single nanoparticle real time detection by combining hydrodynamic focusing and TIR using immiscible flows. The immiscibility of the high-index sheath flow and the low-index core flow naturally generate a smooth, flat and step-index interface that is ideal for the TIR effect, whose evanescent field can penetrate the full width of the core flow. Hydrodynamic focusing can focus on all the nanoparticles in the extreme centre of the core flow with a width smaller than 1 μm. This technique enables us to illuminate every single sample in the running core flow by the evanescent field, leaving none unaffected. Moreover, it works well for samples much smaller than the diffraction limit. We have successfully demonstrated the scattering imaging and counting of 50 nm and 100 nm Au nanoparticles and also the fluorescence imaging and counting of 200 nm beads. The effective counting speeds are estimated as 1500, 2300 and 2000 particles per second for the three types of nanoparticles, respectively. The optical scattering spectra were also measured to determine the size of individual Au nanoparticles. This provides a new technique to detect nanoparticles and we foresee its application in the detection of molecules for biomedical analyses. PMID:26984126

  12. Immiscible Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Fluids Under Subduction Zone Conditions and Implications for the Deep Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Daniel, I.; Cardon, H.; Montagnac, G.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Subducting slabs recycle rocks into the deep Earth releasing fluids which may cause partial melting and possible oxidation of the mantle wedge. Recent theoretical studies1 indicate that at pressures greater than about 3.0 GPa these fluids could contain high concentrations of organic and inorganic C-species with a wide range of C-oxidation states at equilibrium. If so, such fluids could play an important role in the deep carbon cycle, including the formation of diamond. However, direct experimental observations of the speciation in the fluids are needed. We studied 1.0 M aqueous Na-formate and 1.0 M Na-acetate solutions in the diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy at 300 ºC and 3.0 GPa for up to 60 hours. Our preliminary results indicate that formate rapidly decomposed to bicarbonate/carbonate species and methane, with no detectable H2. Acetate decomposed much more slowly. Within the first two hours of heating, crystals of Na2CO3 precipitated in the fluid, and kept growing while immiscible droplets of hydrocarbon appeared and persisted throughout the experiments at elevated temperature and pressure. In the aqueous fluid, acetate and HCO3- were present during the first 6 hours, and then CO32- and acetate after 20 hours of heating. The final HCO3- /CO32- ratio was constant indicating a constant pH. This is the first in situ observation of persistent immiscible fluid hydrocarbons formed from an aqueous precursor at upper mantle pressures. Our results suggest that Earth's subduction zone fluids at high pressures might involve fluid hydrocarbon species as well as inorganic and organic aqueous C-species, which considerably broadens the picture of deep carbon sources, cycles and sinks. [1] Sverjensky et at. (2014), Nat. Geosci. 7, 909-913.

  13. International Conference on Finite Elements in Flow Problems, 7th, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989, Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-10-01

    Topics presented include the finite element analysis of confined turbulent swirling flows, compressible viscous flow calculations using compatible finite element approximations, the equilibrium and stability of Tokamaks, and a coupled finite element solution of biharmonic problems for vector potentials. Also presented are the Godunov-mixed methods for immiscible displacement, the iterative adaptive implicit-explicit methods for flow problems, finite element methods for one-dimensional combustion problems, and a technique for analyzing finite element methods for viscous incompressible flow.

  14. Determination of local atomic arrangements in a bulk-immiscible surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Kristine Rose

    Surface alloys are two-dimensional phases confined to near-surface regions, and are known to form from atomic species that are immiscible in the bulk. In order to achieve a better understanding of this phenomenon, it is necessary to be able to accurately determine the bond lengths present within the surface alloy. The present work focuses on surface alloying in the bulk-immiscible Au-Ni system, which forms surface alloy phases that are amongst the most studied to date. First principles electronic density functional theory calculations were conducted for both "monomer" (single Au atom), and "dimer" (pair of Au atoms) surface alloying models for the Au-Ni(110) surface. Both of the models exhibited surface interlayer contractions and expansions similar to those reported for a Ni(110) surface. The resulting atomic positions corresponded to Au-Ni bond lengths of 2.61-2.80 A in the monomer model and 2.54-2.84 A in the dimer model. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) measurements were taken from Au-Co11Ni89(110) surface alloys. The software program FEFF8 was used in combination with the first principles calculated atomic positions for the surface alloy models to simulate the SEXAFS from each of the surface alloy models. Fits were conducted from these models resulting in the determination of Au-Ni bond lengths of 2.55-2.74 A with the monomer model, and 2.46-2.76 A with the dimer model. The present work features the first theoretical first principles study of all of the sub-monolayer structures of the Au-Ni(110) system. This work was also the first to employ DFT calculated atomic positions as initial models for simulating theoretical SEXAFS spectra to assist in the fitting of experimental measurements. In doing this, the theoretical calculations allowed for a much better starting point in the fits, while the results from the fits gave an indication to the strengths and weaknesses of the surface calculations, since they highlighted an apparent slight

  15. Nanoscale Phase Immiscibility in High-ZT Bulk Lead Telluride Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Steven Neal

    Renewable energy initiatives have increased interest in thermoelectric materials as an option for inexpensive and environmentally friendly waste heat-to-power generation. Unfortunately, low efficiencies have limited their wide-scale utilization. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bulk nanostructured thermoelectric materials wherein natural phase immiscibility is manipulated to selectively generate nanoscale inclusions of a second phase that improve their efficiency through reductions in lattice thermal conductivity. The PbTe-PbS system exhibits natural phase separation by nucleation and growth or spinodal decomposition phase transformations depending on composition and temperature treatment. Through rapid quenching, nearly ideal solid solution alloys of PbTe-PbS are observed by powder X-ray diffraction. However, characterization by solid-state NMR and IR reflectivity show that solid solutions are obtained for rapidly quenched samples within the nucleation and growth region of the phase diagram, but samples within the spinodal decomposition region exhibit very slight phase immiscibility. We report the temperatures of phase separation using high temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Microscopy reveals that phase separation in PbTe-PbS naturally produces nanoinclusions. A decrease in lattice thermal conductivity is observed as a result of the solid solution-to-nanostructured phase transformation in this materials system, increasing thermoelectric figure of merit. Sn addition to PbTe-PbS produces a pseudobinary system of PbTe-PbSnS 2. This materials system produces microscale lamellae that effectively reduce lattice thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, the PbSnS2 inclusions also scatter electrons, reducing electrical conductivity and producing only a minimal increase in thermoelectric figure of merit. We additionally investigate PbSnS2 as prepared through Bridgman crystal growth. PbTe-PbS doped with Na appears to increase the kinetic rate of

  16. A Study of Undercooling Behavior Of Immiscible Metal Alloys in the Absence of Crucible-Induced Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Li, Delin; Workman, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the question: Would eliminating the crucible eliminate the wall-induced nucleation of one of the liquid phases in an immiscible alloy and result in undercooling of the liquid into the metastable region thereby producing significant differences in the separation process and the microstructure upon solidification. Another primary objective of this research is to study systems with a metastable miscibility gap and to directly determine the metastable liquid miscibility gap by undercooling experiments. Nucleation and growth of droplets in these undercooled metallic liquid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Results of this investigation indicate that containerless processing of immiscibles may not promote the undercooling of the single-phase liquid into the metastable region. Although no recalescence event was observed for this liquid-liquid transition, undercooling did occur across the miscibility gap for the solidification of the Ti phase that eventually separated.

  17. Silicate-carbonate-salt liquid immiscibility and origin of the sodalite-haüyne rocks: study of melt inclusions in olivine foidite from Vulture volcano, S. Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, Liya; Stoppa, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Melt inclusions in clinopyroxenes of olivine foidite bombs from Serra di Constantinopoli pyroclastic flows of the Vulture volcano (Southern Italy) were studied in detail. The rocks contain abundant zoned phenocrysts and xenocrysts of clinopyroxene, scarce grains of olivine, leucite, haüyne, glass with microlites of plagioclase and K-feldspar. The composition of clinopyroxene in xenocrysts (Cpx I), cores (Cpx II), and in rims (Cpx III) of phenocrysts differs in the content of Mg, Fe, Ti, and Al. All clinopyroxenes contain two types of primary inclusion-pure silicate and of silicate-carbonate-salt composition. This fact suggests that the phenomena of silicate-carbonate immiscibility took place prior to crystallization of clinopyroxene. Homogenization of pure silicate inclusions proceeded at 1 225 - 1 190°C. The composition of conserved melts corresponded to that of olivine foidite in Cpx I, to tephrite-phonolite in Cpx II, and phonolite-nepheline trachyte in Cpx III. The amount of water in them was no more than 0.9 wt.%. Silicate-carbonate inclusions decrepitated on heating. Salt globules contained salts of alkali-sulphate, alkali-carbonate, and Ca-carbonate composition somewhat enriched in Ba and Sr. This composition is typical of carbonatite melts when decomposed into immiscible fractions. The formation of sodalite-haüyne rocks from Vulture is related to the presence of carbonate-salt melts in magma chamber. The melts conserved in clinopyroxenes were enriched in incompatible elements, especially in Cpx III. High ratios of La, Nb, and Ta in melts on crystallization of Cpx I and Cpx II suggest the influence of a carbonatite melt as carbonatites have extremely high La/Nb and Nb/Ta and this is confirmed by the appearance of carbonatite melts in magma chamber. Some anomalies in the concentrations and relatives values of Eu and especially Ga seems typical of Italian carbonatite related melts. The mantle source for initial melts was, most likely, rather uniform

  18. APPLICATION OF A LUMPED-PROCESS MATHEMATICAL MODEL TO DISSOLUTION OF NON-UNIFORMLY DISTRIBUTED IMMISCIBLE LIQUID IN HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J. C.; DiFilippo, E. L.; Zhang, Z.; Tick, G. R.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    The use of a lumped-process mathematical model to simulate the complete dissolution of immiscible liquid non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous porous-media systems was investigated. The study focused specifically on systems wherein immiscible liquid was poorly accessible to flowing water. Two representative, idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. As expected, effluent concentrations were significantly less than aqueous solubility due to dilution and by-pass flow effects. The measured data were simulated with two mathematical models, one based on a simple description of the system and one based on a more complex description. The permeability field and the distribution of the immiscible-liquid zones were represented explicitly in the more complex, distributed-process model. The dissolution rate coefficient in this case represents only the impact of local-scale (and smaller) processes on dissolution, and the parameter values were accordingly obtained from the results of experiments conducted with one-dimensional, homogeneously-packed columns. In contrast, the system was conceptualized as a pseudo-homogeneous medium with immiscible liquid uniformly distributed throughout the system for the simpler, lumped-process model. With this approach, all factors that influence immiscible-liquid dissolution are incorporated into the calibrated dissolution rate coefficient, which in such cases serves as a composite or lumped term. The calibrated dissolution rate coefficients obtained from the simulations conducted with the lumped-process model were approximately two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the independently-determined values used for the simulations conducted with the

  19. Facile and rapid DNA extraction and purification from food matrices using IFAST (immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension).

    PubMed

    Strotman, Lindsay N; Lin, Guangyun; Berry, Scott M; Johnson, Eric A; Beebe, David J

    2012-09-01

    Extraction and purification of DNA is a prerequisite to detection and analytical techniques. While DNA sample preparation methods have improved over the last few decades, current methods are still time consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate a technology termed IFAST (Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension), that relies on immiscible phase filtration to reduce the time and effort required to purify DNA. IFAST replaces the multiple wash and centrifugation steps required by traditional DNA sample preparation methods with a single step. To operate, DNA from lysed cells is bound to paramagnetic particles (PMPs) and drawn through an immiscible fluid phase barrier (i.e. oil) by an external handheld magnet. Purified DNA is then eluted from the PMPs. Here, detection of Clostridium botulinum type A (BoNT/A) in food matrices (milk, orange juice), a bioterrorism concern, was used as a model system to establish IFAST's utility in detection assays. Data validated that the DNA purified by IFAST was functional as a qPCR template to amplify the bont/A gene. The sensitivity limit of IFAST was comparable to the commercially available Invitrogen ChargeSwitch® method. Notably, pathogen detection via IFAST required only 8.5 μL of sample and was accomplished in five-fold less time. The simplicity, rapidity and portability of IFAST offer significant advantages when compared to existing DNA sample preparation methods. PMID:22814365

  20. Flow of immiscible ferrofluids in a planar gap in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Bhumika; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for the steady, fully developed flow of two layers of immiscible ferrofluids of different thicknesses between two parallel plates. Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balance relations are derived for the case when there is a ferrofluid-ferrofluid interface to obtain the translational and spin velocity profiles in the gap. As expected for the limit of low applied field amplitude, the magnitude of the translational velocity is directly proportional to the frequency of the applied magnetic field and to the square of the magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the velocity profiles are obtained for the zero spin viscosity and non-zero spin viscosity cases and the effect of applied pressure gradient on the flows is studied. The spin velocity in both ferrofluid phases is in the direction of the rotating magnetic field, except for cases of extreme applied pressure gradients for which the fluid vorticity opposes the spin. We find that for the case of non-zero spin viscosity, flow reversals are predicted using representative ferrofluid property values and field conditions. The unique predictions of the solution with non-zero spin viscosity could be used to experimentally test the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and the validity of previously reported values of the so-called spin viscosity.

  1. Indications of fluid immiscibility in glass from West Clearwater Lake impact crater, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dence, M. R.; Von Engelhardt, W.; Plant, A. G.; Walter, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Glass from the West Clearwater Lake hypervelocity impact crater contains numerous spheroids, 10 to 500 microns across, which appear to have formed at high temperatures as fluids immiscible in the enclosing melt. The spheroids are distinguished from small, normal, largely void gas vesicles, which are also present, by being completely filled in all cases; by having fillings which vary in composition from spheroid to spheroid, even between spheroids in close association; and by indications that the present fillings are representative of the contents present before the matrix melt chilled. Most of the spheroids are classified petrographically into three types. The preservation of spheroids in the West Clearwater Lake glass is attributed mainly to the position of the glass masses within the breccias lining the crater floor. It is considered that the glass in this location did not achieve free flight but, as part of a large mass, cooled relatively slowly through the high temperature regime in which the spheroids were generated, and then, when detached, chilled rapidly to preserve a record of this transient stage in their history.

  2. Flow of immiscible ferrofluids in a planar gap in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sule, Bhumika; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-07-15

    Analytical solutions are obtained for the steady, fully developed flow of two layers of immiscible ferrofluids of different thicknesses between two parallel plates. Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balance relations are derived for the case when there is a ferrofluid-ferrofluid interface to obtain the translational and spin velocity profiles in the gap. As expected for the limit of low applied field amplitude, the magnitude of the translational velocity is directly proportional to the frequency of the applied magnetic field and to the square of the magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the velocity profiles are obtained for the zero spin viscosity and non-zero spin viscosity cases and the effect of applied pressure gradient on the flows is studied. The spin velocity in both ferrofluid phases is in the direction of the rotating magnetic field, except for cases of extreme applied pressure gradients for which the fluid vorticity opposes the spin. We find that for the case of non-zero spin viscosity, flow reversals are predicted using representative ferrofluid property values and field conditions. The unique predictions of the solution with non-zero spin viscosity could be used to experimentally test the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and the validity of previously reported values of the so-called spin viscosity.

  3. HIV Viral RNA Extraction in Wax Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension (IFAST) Devices

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; LaVanway, Alex J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Anderson, Meghan A.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of viral load is critical for proper management of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive patients. Unfortunately, in the developing world, significant economic and geographical barriers exist, limiting access to this test. The complexity of current viral load assays makes them expensive and their access limited to advanced facilities. We attempted to address these limitations by replacing conventional RNA extraction, one of the essential processes in viral load quantitation, with a simplified technique known as immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). Furthermore, these devices were produced via the embossing of wax, enabling local populations to produce and dispose of their own devices with minimal training or infrastructure, potentially reducing the total assay cost. In addition, IFAST can be used to reduce cold chain dependence during transportation. Viral RNA extracted from raw samples stored at 37°C for 1 week exhibited nearly complete degradation. However, IFAST-purified RNA could be stored at 37°C for 1 week without significant loss. These data suggest that RNA isolated at the point of care (eg, in a rural clinic) via IFAST could be shipped to a central laboratory for quantitative RT-PCR without a cold chain. Using this technology, we have demonstrated accurate and repeatable measurements of viral load on samples with as low as 50 copies per milliliter of sample. PMID:24613822

  4. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  5. Exchange flow of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varges, Priscilla; Nascentes, Fernanda; Fonseca, Bruno; de Souza Mendes, Paulo Roberto; Naccache, Monica

    2015-11-01

    Plug cementing is an essential operation performed under a variety of well conditions. The cement plugs are rarely placed at the intended depth because the cement slurry usually is heavier than the well fluid. Failures are due primarily to migration of the denser fluid downward through the drilling fluid at the top of which it is discharged. The aim of the research is to better understand the process of plugging operation in vertical wells. To this end, we performed an experimental and theoretical study of the buoyancy-driven flow of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical tube such that the heavier and more viscous fluid is placed on top. Since both fluids are Newtonian, the situation is always unstable, i.e. the fluid on top will always flow downward and displace the bottom fluid upwards, so that the relative positioning tends to invert. The influence of the governing parameters on the speed of inversion was investigated. Flow visualization was performed with a digital camera, and inversion velocities were obtained through image analysis. Preliminary results show that inversion speed decreases as the tube diameter is increased, increases as the viscosity ratio is increased, and also increases as the density ratio is increased.

  6. Interfacial dynamics of two immiscible fluids in spatially periodic porous media: The role of substrate wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-07-01

    We delineate the contact line dynamics of two immiscible fluids in a medium having spatially periodic porous structures. The flow is driven by an external applied pressure gradient. We bring out the combined consequences of the solid fraction distribution and the substrate wettability on the resulting dynamics of the contact line, by employing phase-field formalism. We capture the sequence of spatiotemporal events leading to formation of liquid bridges by trapping a small amount of displaced phase fluid between two consecutive porous blocks, as dictated by the combinations of substrate wettability and solid fraction. We also demonstrate the existence of a regime of complete interfacial recovery, depending on the parametric space of the governing parameters under concern. Our results essentially demonstrate the intricate mechanisms by virtue of which the wettabilities of the substrates alter the dynamical evolutions of interfaces and the subsequent shapes and sizes of the adsorbed dispersed phases, bearing far-ranging consequences in several practical applications ranging from oil recovery to groundwater flow.

  7. In situ study of heavy ion irradiation response of immiscible Cu/Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, N.; Bufford, D. C.; Li, J.; Hattar, K.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies show that immiscible metallic multilayers with incoherent interfaces can effectively reduce defect density in ion irradiated metals by providing active defect sinks that capture and annihilate radiation induced defect clusters. Although it is anticipated that defect density within the layers should vary as a function of distance to the layer interface, there is, to date, little in situ TEM evidence to validate this hypothesis. In this study monolithic Cu films and Cu/Fe multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, of 100 and 5 nm were subjected to in situ Cu ion irradiation at room temperature to nominally 1 displacement-per-atom inside a transmission electron microscope. Rapid formation and propagation of defect clusters were observed in monolithic Cu, whereas fewer defects with smaller dimensions were generated in Cu/Fe multilayers with smaller h. Furthermore in situ video shows that the cumulative defect density in Cu/Fe 100 nm multilayers indeed varies, as a function of distance to the layer interfaces, supporting a long postulated hypothesis.

  8. Effect of elongational flow on immiscible polymer blend/nanoparticle composites: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Shebert, George L; Lak Joo, Yong

    2016-07-13

    Using coarse-grained nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, the dynamics of a blend of the equal ratio of immiscible polymers mixed with nanoparticles (NP) are simulated. The simulations are conducted under planar elongational flow, which affects the dispersion of the NPs and the self-assembly morphology. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of planar elongational flow on the nanocomposite blend system as well as to thoroughly compare the blend to an analogous symmetric block copolymer (BCP) system to understand the role of the polymer structure on the morphology and NP dispersion. Two types of spherical NPs are considered: (1) selective NPs that are attracted to one of the polymer components and (2) nonselective NPs that are neutral to both components. A comparison of the blend and BCP systems reveals that for selective NP, the blend system shows a much broader NP distribution in the selective phase than the BCP phase. This is due to a more uniform distribution of polymer chain ends throughout the selective phase in the blend system than the BCP system. For nonselective NP, the blend and BCP systems show similar results for low elongation rates, but the NP peak in the BCP system broadens as elongation rates approach the order-disorder transition. In addition, the presence of NP is found to affect the morphology transitions of both the blend and BCP systems, depending on the NP type. PMID:27356215

  9. SPAR 5 experiment no. 74-30 agglomeration in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S.; Markworth, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of gravity, cooling rate, and composition on the macro-and microstructure of liquid phase immiscible alloys were researched. Aluminum indium alloys of compositions 30, 40, 70, and 90 weight percent indium were processed aboard two sounding rocket flights, SPAR 2 and SPAR 5. Radiographic and metallographic examination of the SPAR 2 flight and ground base samples showed the expected separation at lg of the ground base alloys into indium rich and aluminum rich layers. The flight alloys produced an aluminum rich core surrounding by indium rich metal. The results obtained from the SPAR 5 40 and 70 weight percent indium alloys were essentially identical to those from SPAR 2. The 30 and 90 weight percent indium alloys also showed massive separation into configuration similar to the 40 and 70 weight percent indium alloys. The 90 weight percent indium alloy showed additional evidence that surface tension induced droplet migration had occurred in this alloy which could at least in part account for the observed structures.

  10. Suppression of phase coarsening in immiscible, co-continuous polymer blends under high temperature quiescent annealing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Qiang; Li, Ruo-Han; Bao, Rui-Ying; Jiang, Wen-Rou; Yang, Wei; Xie, Bang-Hu; Yang, Ming-Bo

    2014-05-28

    The properties of polymer blends greatly depend on the morphologies formed during processing, and the thermodynamic non-equilibrium nature of most polymer blends makes it important to maintain the morphology stability to ensure the performance stability of structural materials. Herein, the phase coarsening of co-continuous, immiscible polyamide 6 (PA6)-acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) blends in the melt state was studied and the effect of introduction of nano-silica particles on the stability of the phase morphology was examined. It was found that the PA6-ABS (50/50 w) blend maintained the co-continuous morphology but coarsened severely upon annealing at 230 °C. The coarsening process could be divided into two stages: a fast coarsening process at the initial stage of annealing and a second coarsening process with a relatively slow coarsening rate later. The reduction of the coarsening rate can be explained from the reduction of the global curvature of the interface. With the introduction of nano-silica, the composites also showed two stages of coarsening. However, the coarsening rate was significantly decreased and the phase morphology was stabilized. Rheological measurements indicated that a particle network structure was formed when the concentration of nano-silica particles was beyond 2 wt%. The particle network inhibited the movement of molecular chains and thus suppressed the coarsening process. PMID:24663286

  11. A planar lens based on the electrowetting of two immiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Xuan; Park, Jihwan; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports the development and characterization of a planar liquid lens based on electrowetting. The working concept of electrowetting two immiscible liquids is demonstrated with measurement and characterization of contact angles with regard to externally applied electric voltages. Consequently, a planar liquid lens is designed and implemented based on this competitive electrowetting. A droplet of silicone oil confined in an aqueous solution (1% KCl) works as a liquid lens. Electrowetting then controls the shape of the confined silicone oil and the focal length of the liquid lens varies depending upon an applied dc voltage. A unique feature of this lens design is the double-ring planar electrodes beneath the hydrophobic substrate. While an outer ring electrode provides an initial boundary for the silicone oil droplet, an inner ring works as the actuation electrode for the lens. Further, the planar electrodes, instead of vertical or out-of-plane wall electrodes, facilitate the integration of liquid lenses into microfluidic systems. With the voltage applied in the range of 50-250 V, the confined silicone oil droplet changed its shape and the optical magnification of a 3 mm-diameter liquid lens was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, focal lengths of liquid lenses with diameters of 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm were characterized, respectively. The obtained results suggest that a larger lens diameter yields a longer focal length and a wider range of focal length change in response to voltage. The demonstrated liquid lens has a simple structure and is easy to fabricate.

  12. NONIDEAL BEHAVIOR DURING COMPLETE DISSOLUTION OF ORGANIC IMMISCIBLE LIQUID IN NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Russo, A.E.; Mahal, M.K.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the complete dissolution of organic immiscible liquid residing within natural porous media. Organic-liquid dissolution was investigated by conducting experiments with homogeneously packed columns containing a residual saturation of organic liquid (trichloroethene). The porous media used comprised different textures (ranges of particle-size distributions) and organic-carbon contents. The dissolution behavior that was observed for the soil and aquifer sediment systems deviated from the behavior typically observed for systems composed of ideal sands. Specifically, multi-step elution curves were observed, with multiple extended periods of relatively constant contaminant flux. This behavior was more pronounced for the two media with larger particle-size distributions. Conversely, this type of dissolution behavior was not observed for the control system, which consisted of a well-sorted sand. It is hypothesized that the pore-scale configuration of the organic liquid and of the flow field is more complex for the poorly sorted media, and that this greater complexity constrains dissolution dynamics, leading to the observed nonideal behavior. PMID:19643542

  13. Zener Pinning of Grain Boundaries and Structural Stability of Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, R. K.; Darling, K. A.; Kecskes, L. J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Immiscible Cu-Ta alloys produced by mechanical alloying are currently the subject of intensive research due to their mechanical strength combined with extraordinary structural stability at high temperatures. Previous experimental and simulation studies suggested that grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu-Ta alloys are stabilized by Ta nano-clusters coherent with the Cu matrix. To better understand the stabilization effect of Ta, we performed atomistic computer simulations of GB-cluster interactions in Cu-Ta alloys with various compositions and GB velocities. The study focuses on a single plane GB driven by an applied shear stress due to the shear-coupling effect. The results of the simulations are in close quantitative agreement with the Zener model of GB pinning. This agreement and the large magnitude of the unpinning stress confirm that the structural stability of these alloys is due to the drastically decreased GB mobility rather than a reduction in GB energy. For comparison, we simulated GB motion in a random solid solution. While the latter also reduces the GB mobility, the effect is not as strong as in the presence of Ta clusters. GB motion in the random solution itself induces precipitation of Ta clusters due to short-circuit diffusion of Ta in GBs, suggesting a possible mechanism of cluster formation inside the grains.

  14. Unconditionally convergent nonlinear solver for immiscible two-phase flow dominated by buoyancy and capillary forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchelepi, H. A.; Wang, X.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a Newton-based nonlinear solver for immiscible two-phase Darcy flow and transport in the presence of significant viscous, buoyancy, and capillary forces. The evolution of CO2 plumes in heterogeneous saline aquifers, especially during the post-injection period, is an important example of this class of problem. The total flux (fractional flow) function is split into two parts: one part accounts for the viscous and buoyancy forces, and the other part accounts for capillarity. These flux functions, which are strongly nonlinear functions of saturation, are divided into trust regions. The delineation of the regions is dictated by the inflection, sonic, and end points present in the two flux functions. Within each trust region, the standard Newton iterative scheme is guaranteed to converge. For problems where the dynamics are dominated by buoyancy and capillary forces, the proposed scheme allows for taking much larger time steps than existing Newton based solvers. The nonlinear solver is demonstrated using challenging CO2-brine problems in heterogeneous domains with emphasis on the post-injection period.

  15. Blob population dynamics during immiscible two-phase flows in reconstructed porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiotis, A. G.; Talon, L.; Salin, D.

    2013-03-01

    We study the dynamics of nonwetting liquid blobs during immiscible two-phase flows in stochastically reconstructed porous domains predominantly saturated by a wetting fluid. The flow problem is solved explicitly using a Lattice-Boltzmann model that captures both the bulk phase and interfacial dynamics of the process. We show that the nonwetting blobs undergo a continuous life cycle of dynamic breaking up and coalescence producing two populations of blobs, a mobile and a stranded one, that exchange continuously mass between them. The process reaches a “steady state” when the rates of coalescence and breaking up become equal, and the macroscopic flow variables remain practically constant with time. At steady state, mass partitioning between mobile and immobile populations depends strongly on the applied Bond number Bo and the initial nonwetting phase distributions. Three flow regimes are identified: a single-phase flow Darcy-type regime at low Bo numbers, a non-Darcy two-phase flow regime at intermediate values of Bo, where the capillary number scales as Ca∝Bo2, and a Darcy-type two-phase flow regime at higher values of Bo. Our numerical results are found to be in good agreement with recent experimental and theoretical works.

  16. Immiscible fluids in mixed wet porous media: the role of wettability correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murison, Julie; Semin, Benoit; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schroeter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Various phenomena observed during immiscible displacement in a porous medium can be related to pore wall wettability. Petroleum engineers traditionally quantify the overall wettability of a rock sample in terms of the Ammot-Harvey or USBM index. To establish a link between these gloabl quantities and the pore-scale distribution of surface energies, we developed a series of model porous media. Using a variety of preparation methods, we are able to create dense beds of glass beads with the same average surface energy, differing only in the typical extension of the wetting and non-wetting surface domains. Experimental measurements of capillary pressure saturation curves for repeated imbibition and drainage show that the work dissipated in a complete cycle is monotonically increasing with the correlation length ξ of the surface energies. To test whether capillary hysteresis can be linked to specific features of the front morphology, we visualized the distribution of liquids by means of X-ray microtomography. The Minkowski measures volume, surface area, and Euler number are employed to characterize the interfacial shape. Differences of the front morphology during imbibition and drainage match with trends observed for the hysteresis loop opening.

  17. Zener Pinning of Grain Boundaries and Structural Stability of Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, R. K.; Darling, K. A.; Kecskes, L. J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Immiscible Cu-Ta alloys produced by mechanical alloying are currently the subject of intensive research due to their mechanical strength combined with extraordinary structural stability at high temperatures. Previous experimental and simulation studies suggested that grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu-Ta alloys are stabilized by Ta nano-clusters coherent with the Cu matrix. To better understand the stabilization effect of Ta, we performed atomistic computer simulations of GB-cluster interactions in Cu-Ta alloys with various compositions and GB velocities. The study focuses on a single plane GB driven by an applied shear stress due to the shear-coupling effect. The results of the simulations are in close quantitative agreement with the Zener model of GB pinning. This agreement and the large magnitude of the unpinning stress confirm that the structural stability of these alloys is due to the drastically decreased GB mobility rather than a reduction in GB energy. For comparison, we simulated GB motion in a random solid solution. While the latter also reduces the GB mobility, the effect is not as strong as in the presence of Ta clusters. GB motion in the random solution itself induces precipitation of Ta clusters due to short-circuit diffusion of Ta in GBs, suggesting a possible mechanism of cluster formation inside the grains.

  18. TWOLIQ.FOR: a FORTRAN77 program for simulating immiscibility in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Hu, Y.; Fang, T.

    1999-03-01

    The program TWOLIQ.FOR is designed for predicting immiscibility in silicate liquids, by the thermodynamic criterion: ∑( Ai/ T+ CiP/ T) XiHo≥-∑(∑ DiXiHo- Bi) XiHo and for calculating compositions and amounts of the conjugate liquids from oxide partition coefficients between the coexisting Si- and Fe-rich melts, expressed as: ln( XiSi/ XiFe)= ai/ T+ bi+ ciP/ T+∑ diXiHo. Where T and P denote temperature (in Kelvin) and pressure (in GPa), respectively, X i mole fraction of oxide i, Ho, Si and Fe refer to homogeneous, Si- and Fe-rich melt phases, respectively and A i to D i, a i to d i are constants. Uncertainties of calculated oxide compositions in the liquids are 3.0-4.0 mol% for SiO 2, Al 2O 3 and FeO, less than 1.0 mol% for the other oxides and predicted amounts around 1.0 mol% for the coexisting two liquids. Ore-forming processes of magnetite-apatite deposits, therefore, can be numerically simulated by the program.

  19. An overview of instability and fingering during immiscible fluid flow in porous and fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Neuman, S.P.; Taniguchi, M.

    1995-04-01

    Wetting front instability is an important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils and rocks. It causes the development of fingers which travel faster than would a uniform front and thus bypass much of the medium. Water saturation and solute concentration in such fingers tend to be higher than in the surrounding medium. During infiltration, fingering may cause unexpectedly rapid arrival of water and solute at the water-table. This notwithstanding, most models of subsurface flow and transport ignore instability and fingering. In this report, we survey the literature to assess the extent to which this may or may not be justified. Our overview covers experiments, theoretical studies, and computer simulations of instability and fingering during immiscible two-phase flow and transport, with emphasis on infiltration into soils and fractured rocks. Our description of instability in an ideal fracture (Hele-Shaw cell) includes an extension of existing theory to fractures and interfaces having arbitrary orientations in space. Our discussion of instability in porous media includes a slight but important correction of existing theory for the case of an inclined interface. We conclude by outlining some potential directions for future research. Among these, we single out the effect of soil and rock heterogeneities on instability and preferential flow as meriting special attention in the context of nuclear waste storage in unsaturated media.

  20. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Sun, C.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation, which gets larger with increasing impact velocity, before surface tension drives its recession. This recession can promote the fragmentation by two different mechanisms: At moderate impact velocity, the drop recession converges to the axis of symmetry to form a jet which then fragments by a Plateau-Rayleigh mechanism. At higher velocity the edge of the receding drop destabilizes and shapes into radial ligaments which subsequently fragment. For this latter mechanism the number N∝We3 and the size distribution of the daughter drops p(d)∝d-4 as a function of the impact Weber number We are explained on the basis of the observed spreading of the drop. The universality of this model for the fragmentation of receding liquid sheets might be relevant for other configurations.

  1. Detaching droplets in immiscible fluids from a solid substrate with the help of electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiwoo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-02-01

    The detachment (or removal) of droplets from a solid surface is an indispensable process in numerous practical applications which utilize digital microfluidics, including cell-based assay, chip cooling, and particle sampling. When a droplet that is fully stretched by impacting or electrowetting is released, the conversion of stored surface energy to kinetic energy can lead to the departure of the droplet from a solid surface. Here we firstly detach sessile droplets in immiscible fluids from a hydrophobic surface by electrowetting. The physical conditions for droplet detachment depend on droplet volume, viscosity of ambient fluid, and applied voltage. Their critical conditions are determined by exploring the retracting dynamics for a wide range of driving voltages and physical properties of fluids. The relationships between physical parameters and dynamic characteristics of retracting and jumping droplets, such as contact time and jumping height, are also established. The threshold voltage for droplet detachment in oil with high viscosity is largely reduced (~70%) by electrowetting actuations with a square pulse. To examine the applicability of three-dimensional digital microfluidic (3D-DMF) platforms to biological applications such as cell culture and cell-based assays, we demonstrate the detachment of droplets containing a mixture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and collagen (concentration of 4 × 10(4) cells mL(-1)) in silicone oil with a viscosity of 0.65 cSt. Furthermore, to complement the technical limitations due to the use of a needle electrode and to demonstrate the applicability of the 3D-DMF platform with patterned electrodes to chemical analysis and synthesis, we examine the transport, merging, mixing, and detachment of droplets with different pH values on the platform. Finally, by using DC and AC electrowetting actuations, we demonstrate the detachment of oil droplets with a very low contact angle (<~13°) in water on a hydrophobic

  2. Interfacial tension measurement of immiscible liq uids using a capillary tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, D.

    1992-01-01

    The interfacial tension of immiscible liquids is an important thermophysical property that is useful in the behavior of liquids both in microgravity (Martinez et al. (1987) and Karri and Mathur (1988)) and in enhanced oil recovery processes under normal gravity (Slattery (1974)). Many techniques are available for its measurement, such as the ring method, drop weight method, spinning drop method, and capillary height method (Adamson (1960) and Miller and Neogi (1985)). Karri and Mathur mention that many of the techniques use equations that contain a density difference term and are inappropriate for equal density liquids. They reported a new method that is suitable for both equal and unequal density liquids. In their method, a capillary tube forms one of the legs of a U-tube. The interfacial tension is related to the heights of the liquids in the cups of the U-tube above the interface in the capillary. Our interest in this area arose from a need to measure small interfacial tension (around 1 mN/m) for a vegetable oil/silicon oil system that was used in a thermocapillary drop migration experiment (Rashidnia and Balasubramaniam (1991)). In our attempts to duplicate the method proposed by Karri and Mathur, we found it quite difficult to anchor the interface inside the capillary tube; small differences of the liquid heights in the cups drove the interface out of the capillary. We present an alternative method using a capillary tube to measure the interfacial tensions of liquids of equal or unequal density. The method is based on the combined capillary rises of both liquids in the tube.

  3. Deformation and Break-up of Suspension Droplets Sheared in an Immiscible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desse, Melinda; Hill, Sandra E.; Mitchell, John R.; Wolf, Bettina; Budtova, Tatiana

    2008-07-01

    The deformation and break-up behaviour of suspension droplets immersed in an immiscible fluid has not been widely studied albeit such systems are frequently encountered in every day multiphase products such as foods and cosmetics. Starch is a common thickener used in the food industry. Starch suspensions have shown to offer better flavour perception than polymer thickened solutions; a better understanding of their behaviour under flow would be beneficial in terms of advancement on product formulation. Deformation and break-up of a droplet of swollen-in-water starch granules placed in high viscosity silicon oil was visualised using a counter-rotating parallel-plate shear cell. The silicon oil had a high viscosity to induce shear stresses high enough to deform the droplet; it is also transparent and inert towards the studied system. The starch suspension was prepared to have a volume fraction of 100% swollen granules, i.e. that all water was bound within the swollen starch granules. The shear flow behaviour of this starch suspension is characterised by an apparent yield stress, shear-thinning and first normal stress differences. The rheo-optical experiments were conducted as start-up flow experiments applying shear stresses above the apparent yield stress. A constant shear stress throughout the experiment allows a constant viscosity of the droplet and therefore rules out the shear thinning aspect. Analysis showed droplet break-up at critical Capillary numbers close to those reported for Newtonian fluids. The results demonstrate that the droplet break-up behaviour in a complex emulsion system submitted to shear flow may not be fully described by the rheology of the individual phases alone but may require a microstructure component.

  4. Physical formulation and numerical algorithm for simulating N immiscible incompressible fluids involving general order parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, S.

    2015-02-15

    We present a family of physical formulations, and a numerical algorithm, based on a class of general order parameters for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids with given densities, dynamic viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The N-phase formulations stem from a phase field model we developed in a recent work based on the conservations of mass/momentum, and the second law of thermodynamics. The introduction of general order parameters leads to an extremely strongly-coupled system of (N−1) phase field equations. On the other hand, the general form enables one to compute the N-phase mixing energy density coefficients in an explicit fashion in terms of the pairwise surface tensions. We show that the increased complexity in the form of the phase field equations associated with general order parameters in actuality does not cause essential computational difficulties. Our numerical algorithm reformulates the (N−1) strongly-coupled phase field equations for general order parameters into 2(N−1) Helmholtz-type equations that are completely de-coupled from one another. This leads to a computational complexity comparable to that for the simplified phase field equations associated with certain special choice of the order parameters. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method developed herein using several test problems involving multiple fluid phases and large contrasts in densities and viscosities among the multitude of fluids. In particular, by comparing simulation results with the Langmuir–de Gennes theory of floating liquid lenses we show that the method using general order parameters produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases.

  5. Droplet Impact onto an Immiscible, Floating Oil Layer: Splash Behavior and Droplet Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Li, Cheng; D'Albignac, Vincent; Morra, David; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The high speed impact of a raindrop on a fluid surface at Wed = ρ u2d/ σ>2000 affects environmental processes like marine aerosol production. High speed imaging shows that a floating immiscible oil layer, such as a crude oil slick, modifies the splash behavior. Tests performed for a wide range of layer thicknesses (h), viscosities, and surface and interfacial tensions facilitate behavioral categorization in terms of Weh =ρh u2h/σh and ReFrh =ρd u3d/μhgh, where h and d subscripts refer to layer and droplet properties, respectively. Included are multi-layer/level crowns, and due to the high Oh = μ /(ρσ d)1/2 of oil, formation of an intact ejecta sheet within 50 μs after impact, which subsequently ruptures to form aerosolized oil droplets. High speed holographic microscopy provides the size and spatial distributions of airborne droplets, which are bimodal with peaks at 50 and 225 μm. Small droplets (50 μm) are ejected primarily at shallow angles and remain at low elevation by microligament breakup within the first 50 μs of impact. Larger droplets (225 μm) are ejected at a steeper angle and produced later by breakup of larger ligaments protruding vertically from the splash crown. Small droplet frequency at high elevation increases when crude oil is introduced, mostly as satellite droplets resulting from the large ligament breakup. Funding provided by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  6. Generation of micro- and nano-droplets containing immiscible solutions in view of optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasa, V.; Karapantsios, T.; Samaras, K.; Dafnopatidou, E.; Pradines, V.; Miller, R.; Pascu, M. L.

    2010-08-01

    The multiple resistances to treatment, developed by bacteria and malignant tumors require finding alternatives to the existing medicines and treatment procedures. One of them is strengthening the effects of cytostatics by improving the delivery method. Such a method is represented by the use of medicines as micro/nano-droplets. This method can reduce the substance consumption by generating drug micro-droplets incorporated in substances that can favour a faster localization, than the classical mode of medicine administration, to the tumor tissues. This paper contains the results concerning the generation and study of micro/nano-droplets and the generation of micro-droplets with an inner core (medicine) and a thin layer covering it. We have measured the surface tension at water/air interface and water/oil interface for a medicine (Vancomycin) and we have generated and measured droplets of medicine containing a layer of Vitamin A by using a double capillary system. The micro/nano-droplets may be produced by mixing of two immiscible solutions in particular conditions (high rotating speed and/or high pressure difference). For this we have studied the generation of emulsions of vitamin A diluted in sunflower oil and a solution of a surfactant Tween 80 in distilled water. The concentration of surfactant in water was typically 4*10-5M. We have studied in a batch stirred tank system the dependence of the droplet dimensions in emulsion, function of the mixing rotation speed, agitation time and components ratio. The droplet diameters were measured using a Malvern light scattering instrument type Mastersizer Hydro 2000M. We have obtained droplets with diameters smaller than 100 nm; the diameters distribution exhibited a peak at 65 nm.

  7. Effects of shear during the cooling on the rheology and morphology of immiscible polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammani, S.; Moulai-Mostefa, N.; Benyahia, L.; Tassin, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was the generation of a microfibrillar structure in immiscible polymer blends using a new technique. The blend polymer model is the emulsion formed by a mixture of polypropylene (PP) with polystyrene (PS) in the proportion of PP10/PS90. In the first case the pellets of polystyrene and polypropylene were blended on the twin-screw mini extruder in the classical manner with different shear rates. In the second case, the same blend was prepared in the same way followed by a dynamic cooling at different shear rates. The phase morphologies of PP in the blend were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy on two directions (transversal and longitudinal direction to the flow). In the two cases, the dispersed phase size decreased with the increase of the shear rate in the extruder. An anomaly was registered in the classical method at 200 rpm, where the size of the dispersed phase increases with the increase of the shear rate. The dynamic cooling technique recorded smaller diameters (4 to 5 times) of the dispersed phase compared to the conventional technique. In addition, the reappearance of the microfilaments at 200rpm was observed. The rheological properties were determined by RS100 (Thermo Scientific Haake). Using this new technique, it was noticed that he elastic modulus increases with one decade compared to the classical method and the complex viscosity decreases with the increase of the shear rate. An anomaly was registered in the classical technique, where the dynamic viscosity at 200rpm increases with increasing the shear rate in the extruder.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  9. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  10. Stochastic analysis of immiscible displacement of the fluids with arbitrary viscosities and its dependence on support scale of hydrological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Huang, Hai

    2004-12-01

    Stochastic analysis is commonly used to address uncertainty in the modeling of flow and transport in porous media. In the stochastic approach, the properties of porous media are treated as random functions with statistics obtained from field measurements. Several studies indicate that hydrological properties depend on the scale of measurements or support scales, but most stochastic analysis does not address the effects of support scale on stochastic predictions of subsurface processes. In this work we propose a new approach to study the scale dependence of stochastic predictions. We present a stochastic analysis of immiscible fluid-fluid displacement in randomly heterogeneous porous media. While existing solutions are applicable only to systems in which the viscosity of one phase is negligible compare with the viscosity of the other (water-air systems for example), our solutions can be applied to the immiscible displacement of fluids having arbitrarily viscosities such as NAPL-water and water-oil. Treating intrinsic permeability as a random field with statistics dependant on the permeability support scale (scale of measurements) we obtained, for one-dimensional systems, analytical solutions for the first moments characterizing unbiased predictions (estimates) of system variables, such as the pressure and fluid-fluid interface position, and we also obtained second moments, which characterize the uncertainties associated with such predictions. Next we obtained empirically scale dependent exponential correlation function of the intrinsic permeability that allowed us to study solutions of stochastic equations as a function of the support scale. We found that the first and second moments converge to asymptotic values as the support scale decreases. In our examples, the statistical moments reached asymptotic values for support scale that were approximately 1/10000 of the flow domain size. We show that analytical moment solutions compare well with the results of Monte

  11. Silica Transport and Distribution in Saline, Immiscible Fluids: Application to Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Macinnis, M.; Bodnar, R. J.; Lowell, R.; Rimstidt, J. D.

    2009-05-01

    Quartz is a nearly ubiquitous gangue mineral in hydrothermal mineral deposits, most often constituting the bulk of hydrothermal mineralization. The dissolution, transport and precipitation of quartz is controlled by the solubility of silica; in particular, in hot hydrothermal fluids in contact with quartz, silica saturation can generally be assumed, as rates of dissolution and precipitation are generally much faster than fluid flow rates. The solubility of silica in aqueous fluids can be used to understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems by tracing the silica distribution in these systems through time. The solubility of quartz in an aqueous fluid is dependent upon the pressure, temperature and composition (PTX) of the fluid. Silica solubility in pure water as a function of pressure and temperature is well understood. However, natural fluids contain variable amounts of dissolved ionic species, thus it is necessary to include the effects of salinity on silica solubility to accurately predict quartz distribution in hydrothermal systems. In particular, addition of NaCl results in enhanced quartz solubility over a wide range of PT conditions. Furthermore, if phase separation occurs in saline fluids, silica is preferentially partitioned into the higher salinity brine phase; if vapor is removed from the system, the bulk salinity in the system evolves towards the brine end member, and overall silica solubility is enhanced. There is abundant evidence from natural fluid inclusions for fluid immiscibility in hydrothermal ore deposits. Additionally, recent hydrothermal models that include fluid phase equilibria effects predict that phase separation may be an important control on the distribution of dissolved components in seafloor hydrothermal systems. An empirical equation describing the solubility of silica in salt-bearing hydrothermal solutions over a wide range of PTX conditions has been incorporated into a multiphase fluid flow model for seafloor hydrothermal

  12. In situ synchrotron study of liquid phase separation process in Al-10 wt.% Bi immiscible alloys by radiography and small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. Q.; Zhang, S. G.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid phase separation process of immiscible alloys has been repeatedly tuned to create special structure for developing materials with unique properties. However, the fundamental understanding of the liquid phase separation process is still under debate due to the characteristics of immiscible alloys in opacity and high temperature environment of alloy melt. Here, the liquid phase separation process in solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloys was investigated by synchrotron radiography and small angle X-ray scattering. We provide the first direct evidence of surface segregation prior to liquid decomposition and present that the time dependence on the number of Bi droplets follows Logistic curve. The liquid decomposition results from a nucleation and growth process rather than spinodal decomposition mechanism because of the positive deviation from Porod's law. We also found that the nanometer-sized Bi-rich droplets in Al matrix melt present mass fractal characteristics.

  13. Clast assemblages of possible deep-seated /77517/ and immiscible-melt /77538/ origins in Apollo 17 breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Mansker, W. L.; Keil, K.

    1978-01-01

    Breccia samples 77517 and 77538 are composed of abundant mineral and lithic clasts set in porous, poorly sintered matrices. Clast assemblages in the two rocks are of contrasting composition and origin. Breccia 77517 has Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene and calcic plagioclase clasts, indicating limited, almost exclusively ANT-suite parentage. A significant feature is the presence of an assemblage (aluminous enstatite, forsterite, anorthite, aluminous spinel) corresponding to spinel cataclasite, a rock type of deep-seated (about 60 km) crustal origin. Breccia 77538 contains Fe-rich pyroxene and rather sodic plagioclase clasts, indicative of predominantly KREEP and/or mare derivation. An important feature is the occurrence of high-K and high-Fe lithic clasts whose compositions resemble those of immiscible-melts produced during late-stage magmatic crystallization, and which probably originated via silicate liquid immiscibility in a KREEP or mare basalt magma. Both rocks contain numerous fine-grained breccia clasts which represent material that has been modified by impact processes at or very near the moon's surface.

  14. A study of pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids using a multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redapangu, Prasanna; Vanka, Pratap; Sahu, Kirti

    2012-11-01

    The pressure-driven displacement of two immiscible fluids in an inclined channel in the presence of viscosity and density gradients is investigated using a multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach. The effects of viscosity ratio, Atwood number, Froude number, capillary number and channel inclination are investigated through flow structures, front velocities and fluid displacement rates. Our results indicate that increasing viscosity ratio between the fluids decreases the displacement rate. We observe that increasing the viscosity ratio has a non-monotonic effect on the velocity of the leading front; however, the velocity of the trailing edge decreases with increasing the viscosity ratio. The displacement rate of the thin-layers formed at the later times of the displacement process increases with increasing the angle of inclination because of the increase in the intensity of the interfacial instabilities. Our results also predict the front velocity of the lock-exchange flow of two immiscible fluids in the exchange flow dominated regime. Department of Science and Technology, India.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the rise and dissolution of two-dimensional immiscible droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2009-10-01

    We used a coupled multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model to simulate the dissolution of immiscible liquid droplets in another liquid during the rising process resulting from buoyancy. It was found that there existed a terminal rise velocity for each droplet, and there was a power law relationship between the Eötvös (Eo) number and the terminal Reynolds (Re) number. Our simulation results were in agreement with the empirical correlation derived for predicting bubble rise. When more than two identical droplets rose simultaneously in a close proximity, the average terminal rise velocity was lower than that of a single droplet with the same size because of the mutual resistant interactions. The droplet trajectories at the noncentral positions were not straight because of the nonzero net horizontal forces acting on the droplets. The Damkohler (Da) and Peclet (Pe) numbers were varied to investigate the coupling between droplet size, flow field, dissolution at the interface, and solute transport. For a given Pe, increasing Da led to a higher dissolution rate. For a given Da, increasing Pe led to a higher dissolution rate. For a large Da and a small Pe, the process near the interface was diffusion limited, and the advective flow relative to the droplet resulting from droplet rise was unable to move the accumulated solute away from the interface quickly. In this case, it was favorable to split the single droplet into as many small ones as possible in order to increase the interface area per unit mass and consequently enhance the whole dissolution process. For a small Da and a large Pe, the process was dissolution limited near the interface. The mass of accumulated solute near the interface was little, so the advective flow at the top side of the droplet was able to clean the solute quickly. In this case it was favorable to keep the droplet as a single one in order to obtain a high rise velocity and consequently enhance the whole dissolution process. By studying the

  16. Progress and investigation on lattice Boltzmann modeling of multiple immiscible fluids or components with variable density and viscosity ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Sébastien Reggio, Marcelo; Trépanier, Jean-Yves

    2013-08-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models for simulating multiphase flows are relatively new, and much work remains to be done to demonstrate their ability to solve fundamental test cases before they are considered for engineering problems. From this perspective, a hydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann model for simulating immiscible multiphase flows with high density and high viscosity ratios, up to O(1000) and O(100) respectively, is presented and validated against analytical solutions. The method is based on a two phase flow model with operators extended to handle N immiscible fluids. The current approach is O(N) in computational complexity for the number of different gradient approximations. This is a major improvement, considering the O(N{sup 2}) complexity found in most works. A sequence of systematic and essential tests have been conducted to establish milestones that need to be met by the proposed approach (as well as by other methods). First, the method is validated qualitatively by demonstrating its ability to address the spinodal decomposition of immiscible fluids. Second, the model is quantitatively verified for the case of multilayered planar interfaces. Third, the multiphase Laplace law is studied for the case of three fluids. Fourth, a quality index is developed for the three-phase Laplace–Young’s law, which concerns the position of the interfaces between the fluids resulting from the different surface tensions. The current model is compatible with the analytical solution, and is shown to be first order accurate in terms of this quality index. Finally, the multilayered Couette’s flow is studied. In this study, numerical results can recover the analytical solutions for all the selected test cases, as long as unit density ratios are considered. For high density and high viscosity ratios, the analytical solution is recovered for all tests, except that of the multilayered Couette’s flow. Numerical results and a discussion are presented for this unsuccessful test case

  17. FIELD TEST OF CYCLODEXTRIN FOR ENHANCED IN-SITU FLUSHING OF MULTIPLE-COMPONENT IMMISCIBLE ORGANIC LIQUID CONTAMINATION: PROJECT OVERVIEW AND INITIAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and the initial results of a pilot-scale experiment designated to test the use of cyclodextrin for enhanced in-situ flushing of an aquifer contaminated by immiscible liquid. This is the first field test of this technology, terme...

  18. Spout States in the Selective Withdrawal of Immiscible Fluids through a Nozzle Suspended above a Two-Fluid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Sarah C.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    2007-03-01

    In selective withdrawal, fluid is withdrawn through a nozzle suspended above the flat interface separating two immiscible, density-separated fluids of viscosities νupper and νlower=λνupper. At low withdrawal rates, the interface gently deforms into a hump. At a transition withdrawal rate, a spout of the lower fluid becomes entrained with the flow of the upper one into the nozzle. When λ=0.005, the spouts at the transition are very thin with features that are over an order of magnitude smaller than any observed in the humps. When λ=20, there is an intricate pattern of hysteresis and a spout appears which is qualitatively different from those seen at lower λ. No corresponding qualitative difference is seen in the hump shapes.

  19. A General Strategy for the Separation of Immiscible Organic Liquids by Manipulating the Surface Tensions of Nanofibrous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Yong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    Oil/water separation membranes with different wettability towards water are attractive for their economic efficiency and convenience. The key factor for the separation process is the roughness-enhanced wettability of membranes based on the intrinsic wetting threshold (IWT) of water, that is, the limitation of the wettability caused by hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. However, the separation of organic liquids (OLs) remains a challenge. Herein, we manipulate the surface tensions of nanofibrous membranes to lie between the IWTs of the two OLs to be separated so that the nanofibrous membranes can be endowed with superlyophobicity and superlyophilicity for the two liquids, and thus lead to successful separation. Our investigations provide a general strategy to separate any immiscible liquids efficiently, and may lead to the development of membranes with a large capacity, high flux, and high selectivity for organic reactions or liquid extraction in chemical engineering. PMID:26492856

  20. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, Carl D.

    1983-03-29

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  1. Dynamic evolution process of multilayer core-shell microstructures within containerlessly solidifying Fe(50)Sn(50) immiscible alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Geng, D L; Wei, B

    2016-03-01

    Multilayer core-shell structures are frequently formed in polymers and alloys when temperature and concentration fields are well symmetrical spatially. Here we report that two- to five-layer core-shell microstructures were the dominant structural morphology of a binary Fe(50)Sn(50) immiscible alloy solidified under the containerless and microgravity states within a drop tube. Three dimensional phase field simulation reveals that both the uniformly dispersive structure and the multilayer core-shells are the various metastable and transitional states of the liquid phase separation process. Only the two-layer core-shell is the most stable microstructure with the lowest chemical potential. Because of the suppression of Stokes motion, solutal Marangoni migration becomes important to drive the evolution of core-shell structures. PMID:27078410

  2. Dynamic evolution process of multilayer core-shell microstructures within containerlessly solidifying F e50S n50 immiscible alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2016-03-01

    Multilayer core-shell structures are frequently formed in polymers and alloys when temperature and concentration fields are well symmetrical spatially. Here we report that two- to five-layer core-shell microstructures were the dominant structural morphology of a binary F e50S n50 immiscible alloy solidified under the containerless and microgravity states within a drop tube. Three dimensional phase field simulation reveals that both the uniformly dispersive structure and the multilayer core-shells are the various metastable and transitional states of the liquid phase separation process. Only the two-layer core-shell is the most stable microstructure with the lowest chemical potential. Because of the suppression of Stokes motion, solutal Marangoni migration becomes important to drive the evolution of core-shell structures.

  3. The formation of metal/metal-matrix nano-composites by the ultrasonic dispersion of immiscible liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, V.M.; Mandrus, D.; Boatner, L.A.; Rankin, J.

    1996-12-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been used to disperse one liquid metallic component in a second immiscible liquid metal, thereby producing a metallic emulsion. Upon lowering the temperature of this emulsion below the mp of the lowest-melting constituent, a metal/metal-matrix composite is formed. This composite consists of sub-micron-to-micron- sized particles of the minor metallic phase that are embedded in a matrix consisting of the major metallic phase. Zinc-bismuth was used as a model system, and ultrasonic dispersion of a minor Bi liquid phase was used to synthesize metal/metal-matrix composites. These materials were characterized using SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

  4. Poly(L-lactide) and poly(butylene succinate) immiscible blends: from electrospinning to biologically active materials.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Nikoleta; Paneva, Dilyana; Mincheva, Rosica; Toncheva, Antoniya; Manolova, Nevena; Dubois, Philippe; Rashkov, Iliya

    2014-08-01

    For the first time the preparation of defect-free fibers from immiscible blends of high molar mass poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) in the whole range of the polyester weight ratios is shown. Electrospinning using the solvent-nonsolvent approach proved most appropriate. Moreover, electrospinning revealed crucial for the obtaining of PLA/PBS materials maintaining integrity. DSC and XRD analyses attested for a plasticizing effect and for increased PLA crystallinity at PBS addition to PLA. The mechanical properties of the PLA/PBS mats were controlled by the alignment of the fibers and changed from plastic to brittle materials upon increasing the PBS content. Drug loading and tests against pathogenic microorganisms suggested that the obtained mats can find application as antibacterial fibrous materials. PMID:24907744

  5. Mixing Efficiency, Coarsening, and Self-Compatibilization in Immiscible Polymer Blends Processed via Solid-State Shear Pulverization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, Albert; Khait, Klementina; Torkelson, John

    2000-03-01

    Solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP) is a continuous, mechanical alloying process employing simultaneous effects of high pressure and shear deformation to pulverize and mix polymers. Under certain conditions SSSP can result in limited chain scission and polymeric radical formation. In immiscible blends, these radicals may be able to recombine in interfacial regions or regions of high mixing resulting in block copolymer formation and compatibilization. The effects of SSSP on amorphous polyamide (PA)/polystyrene (PS) and PS/low density polyethylene (LDPE) blends have been studied. As compared to melt-mixed blends, SSSP yields blends with enhanced blend morphology refinement or dispersion, and in certain cases enhanced bulk mechanical properties, particularly elongation at break and impact strength. Comparisons of dispersed-phase coarsening during high temperature, liquid-state annealing of the SSSP - processed and conventionally melt-mixed blends will be discussed in terms of the potential for achieving effective compatibilization of particular blends via SSSP.

  6. Carbonate-silicate immiscibility and extremely peralkaline silicate glasses from Nasira cone and recent eruptions at Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.; Dawson, J. Barry

    2012-11-01

    Phenocrysts of garnet, pyroxene and nepheline in peralkaline nephelinite from the Nasira parasitic cones at Oldoinyo Lengai contain quenched immiscible silicate (peralkalinity = 2-13) and Na-Ca-carbonate melts. Their bulk compositions further define the limits of liquid immiscibility for peralkaline carbonated nephelinite magmas and confirm this process was operative at Oldoinyo Lengai during older stages of activity. Groundmass glasses in Nasira nephelinites are peralkaline (peralkalinity = 5.5-9.5) but less evolved than melt inclusion glasses (peralkalinity = 8-13) in nepheline phenocrysts, implying that these magmas are hybrids formed by magma mixing. Groundmass glass in diverse peralkaline combeite nephelinite ash clasts with and without melilite and/or wollastonite formed in the January-June 2008 eruptions of Oldoinyo Lengai are also exceptionally peralkaline. Two trends in their compositions are evident: (1) increasing peralkalinity from 6 to 10 with SiO2 decreasing from 42 to 33 wt.%; (2) increasing peralkalinity from 6 to 16 with SiO2 decreasing from 45 to 40 wt.%. All recent glasses are considered to be more evolved than groundmass glass in Nasira combeite nephelinite. These data indicate that several varieties of nephelinite exist at Oldoinyo Lengai. Their parental magmas are considered to have been initially enriched in alkalis during partial melting of their metasomatized asthenospheric sources and further by subsequent assimilation, or re-solution, of previously exsolved natrocarbonatite melt in the magma chamber(s) underlying Oldoinyo Lengai. On this basis, none of the bulk compositions of peralkaline stage II lavas at Oldoinyo Lengai, including Nasira, are considered to represent those of liquids as their compositions are determined by rheological factors (phenocryst accumulation; cumulate disruption) and assimilation processes. The formation of combeite is considered to be a consequence of natrocarbonatite melt assimilation.

  7. In situ stabilization of entrapped elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Devasena, M; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2013-11-30

    Elemental mercury is a dense immiscible fluid which gets entrapped as residual mercury in the pore spaces of the subsurface during improper disposals and accidental spills. This paper investigates in situ stabilization of entrapped elemental mercury to mercury sulphide using aqueous sodium polysulphide solution. Batch experiments showed 100% conversion efficiency of elemental mercury to mercury sulphide in a period of 96 h with sodium polysulphide/elemental mercury molar ratio of 1. XRD analysis identified the precipitate formed as mercury sulphide. Micromodel experiments, with glass beads as porous media, further demonstrated in situ stabilization of entrapped mercury under different residual mercury saturations. It was found that in a period of 10 days, 10% of entrapped mercury was stabilized as mercury sulphide, 0.088% was removed as dissolved mercury and the remaining elemental mercury was retained in porous media encapsulated by the newly formed mercury sulphide precipitate. However, there was no leaching of mercury from the micromodel effluent once stabilization was achieved. PMID:24080327

  8. Large-scale liquid immiscibility and fractional crystallization in the 1780 Ma Taihang dyke swarm: Implications for genesis of the bimodal Xiong'er volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Wang, Xinping; Lai, Yong; Wang, Chong; Windley, Brian F.

    2015-11-01

    Immiscibility is a potential mechanism for the formation of high-Fe-Ti-P rocks; however, whether large-scale segregation and eruption of high-Si lavas can occur in nature has yet to be proven. In this study, we investigate the possibility of immiscibility between the cogenetic 1780 Ma high-Fe-Ti-P-bearing Taihang dykes and the 'bimodal' Xiong'er volcanics in North China. The compositions of silicate melt inclusions in plagioclase megacrysts of the dykes provide a new approach to obtain the primary liquid. Mineral and bulk-rock compositions reveal that large compositional variations in the dykes are the result of plagioclase- and clinopyroxene-dominated fractional crystallization and of density-driven mineral sorting, which together caused the liquids to be poor in Ca-Al but rich in Fe-Ti-P-K, and thus chemically immiscible. Conjugate interstitial granophyric and ilmenite-rich intergrowths and reactive microstructures especially olivine coronas in the dykes, and Si-/Fe-Ti-rich globules in the volcanics, provide petrographic evidence for the presence of two coeval, coexisting liquids in equilibrium separated by a miscibility gap, and thus for immiscibility and segregation/migration. The fractional crystallization and subsequent segregation were responsible for the compositional diversity of the Taihang dykes and also of the 'bimodal' Xiong'er volcanics. Accordingly, the dacite and rhyolite lavas are potentially the high-Si counterparts of the high-Ti dykes, and the basalt and andesite lavas are the erupted equivalents of the relatively low-Ti dykes. It is likely that the sustained plagioclase- and clinopyroxene-dominated fractional crystallization, and the enhanced fO2 were responsible for the immiscibility. The segregation probably took place during the ascent of the liquid in the pumping system (feeder dykes). This likely represents one natural example of crust-scale immiscibility from which many high-Ti dykes and silicic lavas (~ 1/3 volume of the Xiong

  9. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  10. Simulation results for a multirate mass transfer modell for immiscible displacement of two fluids in highly heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecklenburg, Jan; Neuweiler, Insa; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Geiger, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Flow processes in geotechnical applications do often take place in highly heterogeneous porous media, such as fractured rock. Since, in this type of media, classical modelling approaches are problematic, flow and transport is often modelled using multi-continua approaches. From such approaches, multirate mass transfer models (mrmt) can be derived to describe the flow and transport in the "fast" or mobile zone of the medium. The porous media is then modeled with one mobile zone and multiple immobile zones, where the immobile zones are connected to the mobile zone by single rate mass transfer. We proceed from a mrmt model for immiscible displacement of two fluids, where the Buckley-Leverett equation is expanded by a sink-source-term which is nonlocal in time. This sink-source-term models exchange with an immobile zone with mass transfer driven by capillary diffusion. This nonlinear diffusive mass transfer can be approximated for particular imbibition or drainage cases by a linear process. We present a numerical scheme for this model together with simulation results for a single fracture test case. We solve the mrmt model with the finite volume method and explicit time integration. The sink-source-term is transformed to multiple single rate mass transfer processes, as shown by Carrera et. al. (1998), to make it local in time. With numerical simulations we studied immiscible displacement in a single fracture test case. To do this we calculated the flow parameters using information about the geometry and the integral solution for two phase flow by McWorther and Sunnada (1990). Comparision to the results of the full two dimensional two phase flow model by Flemisch et. al. (2011) show good similarities of the saturation breakthrough curves. Carrera, J., Sanchez-Vila, X., Benet, I., Medina, A., Galarza, G., and Guimera, J.: On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects, Hydrogeology Journal, 6, 178-190, 1998. Flemisch, B., Darcis, M