Science.gov

Sample records for immobilization plant wtp

  1. WASTE TREATMENT & IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP) HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) CANISTER PRODUCTION ESTIMATES TO SUPPORT ANALYSES BY THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    HAMEL, W.F.

    2004-09-09

    This document summarizes estimates of the range of chemical and radiochemical compositions for the immobilized HLW (IHLW) canisters to be generated from the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that will be operated at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. These estimates have been derived from DOE planning, WTP Project and Hanford tank waste characterization information. The IHLW canister composition estimates include three Cases that bound the expected number of IHLW canisters to be produced in the WTP (termed the WTP Program Case, WTP Planning Case and WTP Technology Case) and production of the maximum radionuclide content IHLW canister.

  2. Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Waste Feed Qualification Program Development Approach - 13114

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Jeffrey R.; Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Halverson, Thomas G.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, Connie C.; Peeler, David K.

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is a nuclear waste treatment facility being designed and constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (under contract DE-AC27-01RV14136 [1]) to process and vitrify radioactive waste that is currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. A wide range of planning is in progress to prepare for safe start-up, commissioning, and operation. The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the WTP design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring acceptance requirements can be met before the transfer of waste. The WTP Project has partnered with Savannah River National Laboratory to develop the waste feed qualification program. The results of waste feed qualification activities will be implemented using a batch processing methodology, and will establish an acceptable range of operator controllable parameters needed to treat the staged waste. Waste feed qualification program development is being implemented in three separate phases. Phase 1 required identification of analytical methods and gaps. This activity has been completed, and provides the foundation for a technically defensible approach for waste feed qualification. Phase 2 of the program development is in progress. The activities in this phase include the closure of analytical methodology gaps identified during Phase 1, design and fabrication of laboratory-scale test apparatus, and determination of the waste feed qualification sample volume. Phase 3 will demonstrate waste feed qualification testing in support of Cold Commissioning. (authors)

  3. Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Engineering Platform - 10173

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Barnes, Steven M.; Gilbert, Robert A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.

    2010-01-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Office of River Protection’s Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks at Richland, Washington. In support of this effort, engineering-scale tests at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) have been completed to confirm the process design and provide improved projections of system capacity. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale facility designed, constructed, and operated to test the integrated leaching and ultrafiltration processes being deployed at the WTP. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes with prototypic equipment and control strategies and non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The testing approach used a nonradioactive aqueous slurry simulant to demonstrate the unit operations of caustic and oxidative leaching, cross-flow ultrafiltration solids concentration, and solids washing. Parallel tests conducted at the laboratory scale with identical simulants provided results that allow scale-up factors to be developed between the laboratory and PEP performance. This paper presents the scale-up factors determined between the laboratory and engineering-scale results and presents arguments that extend these results to the full-scale process.

  4. US DOE Initiated Performance Enhancements to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low-activity Waste Vitrification (LAW) System

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, William F.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Holton, Langdon K.; Pegg, Ian L.; Bowen, Brad W.

    2006-03-03

    The U.S Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the treatment and vitrification of underground tank wastes stored at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The WTP comprises four major facilities: a pretreatment facility to separate the tank waste into high level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) process streams, a HLW vitrification facility to immobilize the HLW fraction; a LAW vitrification facility to immobilize the LAW fraction, and an analytical laboratory to support the operations of all four treatment facilities. DOE has established strategic objectives to optimize the performance of the WTP facilities and the LAW and HLW waste forms to reduce the overall schedule and cost for treatment and vitrification of the Hanford tank wastes. This strategy has been implemented by establishing performance expectations in the WTP contract for the facilities and waste forms. In addition, DOE, as owner-operator of the WTP facilities, continues to evaluate 1) the design, to determine the potential for performance above the requirements specified in the WTP contract; and 2) improvements in production of the LAW and HLW waste forms. This paper reports recent progress directed at improving production of the LAW waste form. DOE’s initial assessment, which is based on the work reported in this paper, is that the capacity of the WTP LAW vitrification facility can be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 with a combination of revised glass formulations, modest increases in melter glass operating temperatures, and a second-generation LAW melter with a larger surface area. Implementing these improvements in the LAW waste immobilization capability can benefit the LAW treatment mission by reducing both processing time and cost.

  5. Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was

  6. Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Arlin Olson

    2012-02-28

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

  7. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  8. Project Execution Plan for the River Protection Project Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    MELLINGER, G.B.

    2003-05-03

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Project W-530, is the cornerstone in the mission of the Hanford Site's cleanup of more than 50 million gallons of highly toxic, high-level radioactive waste contained in aging underground storage tanks.

  9. Glass fabrication and analysis literature review and method selection for WTP waste feed qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.

    2013-06-01

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) safety basis, technical basis, and design by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed Campaign prior to transfer from the Hanford Tank Farm to the WTP.

  10. Recent Improvements In Interface Management For Hanfords Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Pell, Michael J.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S.; Duncan, Garth M.; Harrington, Christopher C.

    2012-11-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

  11. Recent Improvements in Interface Management for Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S.; Duncan, Garth M.; Pell, Michael J.; Harrington, Christopher C.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which includes the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number of technical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. Partly in response to a DNFSB recommendation, the WTP interface management process managing these technical services has recently been improved through changes in organization and issue management. The changes are documented in an Interface Management Plan. The organizational improvement is embodied in the One System Integrated Project Team that was formed by integrating WTP and tank farms staff representing interfacing functional areas into a single organization. A number of improvements were made to the issue management process but most notable was the formal appointment of technical, regulatory and safety subject matter experts to ensure accurate identification of issues and open items. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule and accurately identify technical, regulatory and safety issues and open items. (authors)

  12. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-03-06

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the

  13. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant U. S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - 13460

    SciTech Connect

    Yanochko, Ronald M.; Corcoran, Connie

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix [1]. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility [2]. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling. This study [2] concluded that SBS direct disposal is a viable option to the WTP baseline. The results show: - Off-site transportation and disposal of the SBS condensate is achievable and cost effective. - Reduction of approximately 4,325 vitrified WTP Low Activity Waste canisters could be realized. - Positive WTP operational impacts; minimal WTP construction impacts are realized. - Reduction of mass flow from the LAW Facility to the Pretreatment Facility by 66%. - Improved Double Shell Tank (DST) space management is a benefit. (authors)

  14. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  15. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2009-08-19

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews

  16. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  17. GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; VIENNA JD; KIM DS; JAIN V

    2009-05-27

    A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.

  18. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W.; Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process

  19. Design-only conceptual design report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A A

    2000-05-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be located at the Savannah River Site pursuant to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, January 4, 2000. This document reflects a new facility using the ceramic immobilization technology and the can-in-canister approach. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium oxide from pit conversion and plutonium and plutonium oxide from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors; it must also be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses a new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will receive and store feed materials, convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize the plutonium oxide in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister. The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility is used for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infrastructure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. This design-only conceptual design report also provides the cost for a Plutonium Immobilization Plant which would process

  20. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Song, Chen

    2013-03-05

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated spray releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not accurately represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from a range of prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to very large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the aerosol generation rate increases with increasing the orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size.

  1. Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2009-11-20

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

  2. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant

  3. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-05-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification

  4. SRNL Review And Assessment Of WTP UFP-02 Sparger Design And Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Duignan, M. R.; Fink, S. D.; Steimke, J. L.

    2014-03-24

    During aerosol testing conducted by Parsons Constructors and Fabricators, Inc. (PCFI), air sparger plugging was observed in small-scale and medium-scale testing. Because of this observation, personnel identified a concern that the steam spargers in Pretreatment Facility vessel UFP-02 could plug during Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) operation. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide consultation on the evaluation of known WTP bubbler, and air and steam sparger issues. The authors used the following approach for this task: reviewed previous test reports (including smallscale testing, medium-scale testing, and Pretreatment Engineering Platform [PEP] testing), met with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) personnel to discuss sparger design, reviewed BNI documents supporting the sparger design, discussed sparger experience with Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Sellafield personnel, talked to sparger manufacturers about relevant operating experience and design issues, and reviewed UFP-02 vessel and sparger drawings.

  5. Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Connie C.

    2013-09-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the

  6. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13183

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Schonewill, P.P.; Bontha, J.R.; Blanchard, J.; Kurath, D.E.; Daniel, R.C.; Song, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate, and the release fraction which is the ratio of generation rate to spray flow rate, of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the release fraction decreases with increasing orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size. (authors)

  7. Preliminary Materials Transport Plan for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkison, J.M.; Dyches, G.M.; Randall, W.J.; Steed, J.H.

    2000-01-26

    This Materials Transport Plan defines the methodology for moving process and non-process materials within the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) operations. The scope of the plan includes the movement of materials between plant operational units (gloveboxes or operational areas/rooms within the plant). The movements of materials within the various plant operational units are described in the System Design Description prepared for the individual units. The plan provides a design concept for transporting each type of material including the containerization used during the movements. Further, the plan identifies the high-level functions and requirements for movements of the materials.

  8. 75 FR 81250 - Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SAFETY BOARD Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant AGENCY: Defense Nuclear... the use of pulse jet mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant located in Washington... to the Secretary of Energy Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  9. Immobilizing nitrogen to control plant invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Increased soil nitrogen (N) availability may often facilitate plant invasions. Therefore, lowering N availability might be expected to reduce those invasions and favor native species. Numerous studies have examined effects of low N availability on specific invaders, but a synthesis of these stu...

  10. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING & SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN PW

    2009-08-27

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Wells, Beric E.; Bao, Jie; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Chun, Jaehun; Karri, Naveen K.; Li, Huidong; Tran, Diana N.

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  12. Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in existing facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.

  13. Experimental Challenges and Successes in Measuring Aerosol Concentrations at Prototypic Spray Conditions Encountered at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13327

    SciTech Connect

    Bontha, J.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Adkins, H.E.; Enderlin, C.W.; Blanchard, J.; Daniel, R.C.; Song, C.; Schonewill, P.P.; Mahoney, L.A.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Boeringa, G.; Jenks, J.

    2013-07-01

    To date, majority of the work done on measuring aerosol releases from failure of process piping was done using simple Newtonian fluids and small engineered-nozzles that do not accurately represent the fluids and breaches postulated during accident analysis at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). In addition, the majority of the work conducted in this area relies on in-spray measurements that neglect the effect of splatter and do not yield any information regarding aerosol generation rates from this additional mechanism. In order to estimate aerosol generation rates as well as reduce the uncertainties in estimating the aerosol release fractions over a broad range of breaches, fluid properties and operating conditions encountered at the WTP, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has designed, commissioned, and tested two experimental test stands. The first test stand, referred to as the large-scale test stand, was designed specifically to measure aerosol concentrations and release fractions under prototypic conditions of flow and pressure for a range of breaches postulated in the hazard analysis for 0.076 m (3-inch) process pipes. However, the size of the large-scale test stand, anticipated fluid loss during a breach, experimental risks, and costs associated with hazardous chemical simulant testing limited the large-scale test stand utility to water and a few non-hazardous physical simulants that did not fully span the particle size and rheological properties of the fluids encountered at the WTP. Overcoming these limitations and extending the range of simulants used, required designing and building a smaller test stand, which was installed and operated in a fume hood. This paper presents some of the features of both test stands, the experimental challenges encountered, and successes in measuring aerosol concentration in both test stands over a range of test conditions. (authors)

  14. Dynamic (G2) Model Design Document, 24590-WTP-MDD-PR-01-002, Rev. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yueying; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Statement of Work (Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-01RV14136, Section C) requires the contractor to develop and use process models for flowsheet analyses and pre-operational planning assessments. The Dynamic (G2) Flowsheet is a discrete-time process model that enables the project to evaluate impacts to throughput from eventdriven activities such as pumping, sampling, storage, recycle, separation, and chemical reactions. The model is developed by the Process Engineering (PE) department, and is based on the Flowsheet Bases, Assumptions, and Requirements Document (24590-WTP-RPT-PT-02-005), commonly called the BARD. The terminologies of Dynamic (G2) Flowsheet and Dynamic (G2) Model are interchangeable in this document. The foundation of this model is a dynamic material balance governed by prescribed initial conditions, boundary conditions, and operating logic. The dynamic material balance is achieved by tracking the storage and material flows within the plant as time increments. The initial conditions include a feed vector that represents the waste compositions and delivery sequence of the Tank Farm batches, and volumes and concentrations of solutions in process equipment before startup. The boundary conditions are the physical limits of the flowsheet design, such as piping, volumes, flowrates, operation efficiencies, and physical and chemical environments that impact separations, phase equilibriums, and reaction extents. The operating logic represents the rules and strategies of running the plant.

  15. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  16. Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.

  17. Waste Handling Practices for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Severynse, T.F.

    2000-08-04

    Solid waste handling operations refers to all activities associated with the segregation, collection, packaging, assay, storage, and removal of solid radioactive waste from radiological facilities. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) is expected to generate the following types of radiological waste, as defined in WSRC Manual 1S, ''Waste Acceptance Criteria'': Low level waste; Mixed hazardous waste; TRU waste; and Mixed TRU waste. Historically, waste handling activities have been demanding proportionately larger amounts of labor, time, and space to effectively manage waste in accordance with increasing regulatory requirements. Since the PIP will be designed for an annual throughput of five metric tonnes plutonium, the facility waste handling operations can be expected to have at least twice the impact of such operations at existing facilities.

  18. Experimental Plan for Crystal Accumulation Studies in the WTP Melter Riser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Fowley, M.

    2015-04-28

    This experimental plan defines crystal settling experiments to be in support of the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of River Protection crystal tolerant glass program. The road map for development of crystal-tolerant high level waste glasses recommends that fluid dynamic modeling be used to better understand the accumulation of crystals in the melter riser and mechanisms of removal. A full-scale version of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melter riser constructed with transparent material will be used to provide data in support of model development. The system will also provide a platform to demonstrate mitigation or recovery strategies in off-normal events where crystal accumulation impedes melter operation. Test conditions and material properties will be chosen to provide results over a variety of parameters, which can be used to guide validation experiments with the Research Scale Melter at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and that will ultimately lead to the development of a process control strategy for the full scale WTP melter. The experiments described in this plan are divided into two phases. Bench scale tests will be used in Phase 1 (using the appropriate solid and fluid simulants to represent molten glass and spinel crystals) to verify the detection methods and analytical measurements prior to their use in a larger scale system. In Phase 2, a full scale, room temperature mockup of the WTP melter riser will be fabricated. The mockup will provide dynamic measurements of flow conditions, including resistance to pouring, as well as allow visual observation of crystal accumulation behavior.

  19. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  20. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans.

  1. Waste immobilization process development at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charlesworth, D L

    1986-01-01

    Processes to immobilize various wasteforms, including waste salt solution, transuranic waste, and low-level incinerator ash, are being developed. Wasteform characteristics, process and equipment details, and results from field/pilot tests and mathematical modeling studies are discussed.

  2. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  3. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  4. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; McCabe, D.

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  5. EIS Data Call Report: Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans.

  6. Cometabolic Degradation of Trichloroethene by Rhodococcus sp. Strain L4 Immobilized on Plant Materials Rich in Essential Oils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suttinun, Oramas; Müller, Rudolf; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2010-01-01

    The cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus sp. L4 was limited by the loss of enzyme activity during TCE transformation. This problem was overcome by repeated addition of inducing substrates, such as cumene, limonene, or cumin aldehyde, to the cells. Alternatively, Rhodococcus sp. L4 was immobilized on plant materials which contain those inducers in their essential oils. Cumin seeds were the most suitable immobilizing material, and the immobilized cells tolerated up to 68 μM TCE and degraded TCE continuously. The activity of immobilized cells, which had been inactivated partially during TCE degradation, could be reactivated by incubation in mineral salts medium without TCE. These findings demonstrate that immobilization of Rhodococcus sp. L4 on plant materials rich in essential oils is a promising method for efficient cometabolic degradation of TCE. PMID:20472723

  7. Improved Management of the Technical Interfaces Between the Hanford Tank Farm Operator and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 13383

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Garth M.; Saunders, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford site in Washington to treat and immobilize approximately 114 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (after all retrievals are accomplished). In order for the WTP to be designed and operated successfully, close coordination between the WTP engineering, procurement, and construction contractor, Bechtel National, Inc. and the tank farms operating contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, is necessary. To develop optimal solutions for DOE and for the treatment of the waste, it is important to deal with the fact that two different prime contractors, with somewhat differing contracts, are tasked with retrieving and delivering the waste and for treating and immobilizing that waste. The WTP and the TOC have over the years cooperated to manage the technical interface. To manage what is becoming a much more complicated interface as the WTP design progresses and new technical issues have been identified, an organizational change was made by WTP and TOC in November of 2011. This organizational change created a co-located integrated project team (IPT) to deal with mutual and interface issues. The Technical Organization within the One System IPT includes employees from both TOC and WTP. This team has worked on a variety of technical issues of mutual interest and concern. Technical issues currently being addressed include: - The waste acceptance criteria; - Waste feed delivery and the associated data quality objectives (DQO); - Evaluation of the effects of performing a riser cut on a single shell tank on WTP operations; - The disposition of secondary waste from both TOC and WTP; - The close coordination of the TOC double shell tank mixing and sampling program and the Large Scale Integrated Test (LSIT) program for pulse jet mixers at WTP along with the associated responses to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation

  8. Unexpected Different Binding of Mistletoe Lectins from Plant Extracts to Immobilized Lactose and N-acetylgalactosamine

    PubMed Central

    Hajtò, Tibor; Krisztina, Fodor; Ildikò, Aponyi; Zsolt, Pallai; Pèter, Balogh; Pèter, Németh; Pàl, Perjési

    2007-01-01

    Mistletoe Extracts (ME) are of growing interest to pharmacological research because of their apoptosis-inducing/cytostatic and immunomodulatory effects. The standardization of the three different groups of Mistletoe Isolectins (ML-I, II and III) is often rendered more difficult since the primary structures are nearly identical. Their classification is based on their Galactose- and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc)-specificity which was measured by various inhibitory assays. The aim of the present study was to improve the characterization of the direct binding activity of the isolectins from ME to immobilized lactose, GalNAc and to the oligosaccharide asialofetuin. After careful ultrafiltration of fresh ME, affinity chromatography was carried out using lactose- agarose, GalNAc—agarose and asialofetuin—affigel 15 columns. MLs were further purified by Sephadex G-100 or by cation exchange chromatography which was adapted to a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system. Proteins from both fresh plants and commercial ME were able to bind immobilized lactose to a considerable extent. The majority of this lectin has a B-chain with a Molecular Weight (MW) of 34kD and an A-chain with a MW of 29 kD (ML-I). Only a minor part of the lactose-binding proteins has a lower MW, namely 32kD and 27kD (MLII). However, neither MLs which were eluted from lactose columns, nor the proteins from fresh plant or ME showed a direct binding to the immobilized GalNAc. In spite of this deficiency, GalNAc was able to induce a considerable (25% and 32%) inhibitory effect on their binding to immobilized asialofetuin indicating a discrepancy between the lectin binding and inhibiting effects of GalNAC. Consequently, for an improved standardization of ME more specific sugar molecules are necessary. PMID:19662176

  9. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  10. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  11. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  12. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G; Segre, Carlo U; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6-5.8) conditions using U L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U-C bond distance at ∼2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands. PMID:25634067

  13. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  14. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  15. An integrated approach to safer plant production on metal contaminated soils using species selection and chemical immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Sik; Kim, Won-Il; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2016-09-01

    In order to examine the species specific accumulation of heavy metals in medicinal crops, seven different common medicinal plants were cultivated on a Cd (55mgkg(-1)) and Pb (1283mgkg(-1)) contaminated soil. Subsequently, the effect of various immobilizing agents, applied in isolation and in combination, on Cd and Pb uptake by two medicinal plant species was examined. Cadmium and Pb root concentrations in medicinal plants grown in the control soil varied between 0.5 and 2.6mgkg(-1) for Cd and 3.2 and 36.4mgkg(-1) for Pb. The highest accumulation occurred in Osterici Radix (Ostericum koreanum) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and the lowest in Yam (Dioscorea batatas). Application of immobilizing agents significantly reduced both Cd and Pb concentrations in all medicinal plants examined, where the most effective single immobilizing agent was lime fertilizer (LF). Application of combination treatments involving sorption agents such as compost together with lime further decreased Cd and Pb concentrations from 1.3 and 25.3mgkg(-1) to 0.2 and 4.3mgkg(-1), respectively, which was well below the corresponding WHO guidelines. Thus appropriate immobilizing agents in combination with species selection can be practically used for safer medicinal plant production. PMID:27213564

  16. Borehole Summary Report for C4997 Rotary Drilling, WTP Seismic Boreholes Project, CY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Difebbo, Thomas J.

    2007-02-28

    The following Final Geologic Borehole Report briefly describes the drilling of a single borehole at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford, Washington, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reservation. The location of the WTP is illustrated in Figure 1-1. The borehole was designated as “C4997”, and was drilled to obtain seismic and lithologic data for the Pretreatment Facility and High-Level Waste Vitrification Plant in the WTP. Borehole C4997 was drilled and logged to a total depth of 1428 ft below ground surface (bgs) on October 8, 2006, and was located approximately 150 ft from a recently cored borehole, designated as “C4998”. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) determined the locations for C4997, C4998, and other boreholes at the WTP in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Review Panel, and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The total depth of Borehole C4997 was also determined by PNNL.

  17. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  18. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2010-01-04

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

  19. Evaluation of Foaming and Antifoam Effectiveness During the WTP Oxidative Leaching Process

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P. R.; Jones, T. M.; White, T. L.; Crawford, C. L.; Calloway, T. B

    2005-10-11

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using a Hanford waste simulant subjected to air sparging during oxidative leaching. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated by SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming studies and in small scale air sparger studies. The commercial antifoam, Dow Corning Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators and in vessel equipped with pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels (HLP-VSL-00027A/B), the Ultrafiltration Vessels (UFP-VSL-00002A&B), and the HLW Feed Blend Vessel (HLPVSL-00028) to assist the performance of the Pulse Jet Mixers (PJM). The previous air sparger antifoam studies conducted by SRNL researchers did not evaluate the hydrogen generation rate expected from antifoam additions or the effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching or oxidative leaching. The fate of the various antifoam components and breakdown products in the WTP process under prototypic process conditions (temperature & radiation) was also not investigated. The effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching, expected hydrogen generation rate associated with antifoam addition, and the fate of various antifoam components are being conducted under separate SRNL research tasks.

  20. COMPARISON OF PROPOSED BARCT DESIGN FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT DEMONSTRACTION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (DBVS) WITH BARCT DESIGN ACCEPTED FOR WTP

    SciTech Connect

    SHUFORD, D.H.

    2004-09-16

    The US Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (ORP) has created aggressive initiatives to accelerate the closure of single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing mixed radioactive and dangerous waste at the Hanford Site. To meet the ''Hanford Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order'' milestones M-45-00 and M-62-00 for completing retrieval of SSTs by 2018 and completing tank waste treatment by 2028, ORP is evaluating optimizing the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification in addition to treating waste using bulk vitrification as a supplemental technology. Further testing using Hanford tank waste is needed to provide data to support the bulk vitrification supplemental technology efforts. The ORP is proposing to install and operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) project under a Research, Development, and Demonstration permit application. The DBVS will process up 1,355,500 L (300,000 gal) of LAW from Tank 241-S-109 located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. For all new construction of emission units, Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) shall be used in accordance with WAC 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. It was noted in a Washington State Department of Health review of the ''Radioactive Air Emissions Notice Of Construction For The Supplemental Treatment Test And Demonstration Facility'' that a BARCT assessment is required considering the magnitude of the supplemental treatment project. However, the agency indicated the BARCT assessment already completed for the WTP can be used for similar abatement control equipment, but the WTP assessment conclusions have to support the DBVS project. A comparison review of the proposed BARCT design for the DBVS project and the WTP BARCT assessment was completed as discussed herein. The conclusions reached from this comparison are: the DBVS and WTP radionuclide inventory to be processed are similar, the DBVS

  1. Immobilization of a Plant Lipase from Pachira aquatica in Alginate and Alginate/PVA Beads

    PubMed Central

    Bonine, Bárbara M.; Polizelli, Patricia Peres; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the immobilization of a new lipase isolated from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica, using beads of calcium alginate (Alg) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We evaluated the morphology, number of cycles of reuse, optimum temperature, and temperature stability of both immobilization methods compared to the free enzyme. The immobilized enzymes were more stable than the free enzyme, keeping 60% of the original activity after 4 h at 50°C. The immobilized lipase was reused several times, with activity decreasing to approximately 50% after 5 cycles. Both the free and immobilized enzymes were found to be optimally active between 30 and 40°C. PMID:24818012

  2. Ceramic process and plant design for high-level nuclear waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; De Wames, R.E.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the last 3 years, significant advances in ceramic technology for high-level nuclear waste solidification have been made. Product quality in terms of leach-resistance, compositional uniformity, structural integrity, and thermal stability promises to be superior to borosilicate glass. This paper addresses the process effectiveness and preliminary designs for glass and ceramic immobilization plants. The reference two-step ceramic process utilizes fluid-bed calcination (FBC) and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidation. Full-scale demonstration of these well-developed processing steps has been established at DOE and/or commercial facilities for processing radioactive materials. Based on Savannah River-type waste, our model predicts that the capital and operating cost for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste is about the same for the ceramic and glass options. However, when repository costs are included, the ceramic option potentially offers significantly better economics due to its high waste loading and volume reduction. Volume reduction impacts several figures of merit in addition to cost such as system logistics, storage, transportation, and risk. The study concludes that the ceramic product/process has many potential advantages, and rapid deployment of the technology could be realized due to full-scale demonstrations of FBC and HIP technology in radioactive environments. Based on our finding and those of others, the ceramic innovation not only offers a viable backup to the glass reference process but promises to be a viable future option for new high-level nuclear waste management opportunities.

  3. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  4. Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Richard L.; Niemi, Belinda J.; Paik, Ingle K.; Buczek, Jeffrey A.; Lietzow, J.; McCoy, F.; Beranek, F.; Gupta, M.

    2013-11-07

    A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Farms) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

  5. Nitrogen immobilization in plant growth substrates: clean chip residual, pine bark and peat moss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent of nitrogen (N) immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate (clean chip residual (CCR)). Control treatments of pine bark (PB) and peat moss (PM) were compared to two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm) of CCR for micro...

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah Ri...

  7. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic

  8. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T.

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  9. [Detection of anaerobic processes and microorganisms in immobilized activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant with intense aeration].

    PubMed

    Litti, Iu V; Nekrasova, V K; Kulikov, N I; Siman'kova, M V; Nozhevnikova, A N

    2013-01-01

    Attached activated sludge from the Krasnaya Polyana (Sochi) wastewater treatment plant was studied after the reconstruction by increased aeration and water recycle, as well as by the installation of a bristle carrier for activated sludge immobilization. The activated sludge biofilms developing under conditions of intense aeration were shown to contain both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Activity of a strictly anaerobic methanogenic community was revealed, which degraded organic compounds to methane, further oxidized by aerobic methanotrophs. Volatile fatty acids, the intermediates of anaerobic degradation of complex organic compounds, were used by both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Anaerobic oxidation of ammonium with nitrite (anammox) and the presence of obligate anammox bacteria were revealed in attached activated sludge biofilms. Simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic degradation of organic contaminants by attached activated sludge provides for high rates of water treatment, stability of the activated sludge under variable environmental conditions, and decreased excess sludge formation. PMID:25509405

  10. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  11. Technetium Incorporation in Glass for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is to dispose of nuclear wastes accumulated in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. These nuclear wastes date from the Manhattan Project of World War II and from plutonium production during the Cold War. The DOE plans to separate high-level radioactive wastes from low activity wastes and to treat each of the waste streams by vitrification (immobilization of the nuclides in glass) for disposal. The immobilized low-activity waste will be disposed of here at Hanford and the immobilized high-level waste at the national geologic repository. Included in the inventory of highly radioactive wastes is large volumes of 99Tc (~9 × 10E2 TBq or ~2.5 × 104 Ci or ~1500 kg). A problem facing safe disposal of Tc-bearing wastes is the processing of waste feed into in a chemically durable waste form. Technetium incorporates poorly into silicate glass in traditional glass melting. It readily evaporates during melting of glass feeds and out of the molten glass, leading to a spectrum of high-to-low retention (ca. 20 to 80%) in the cooled glass product. DOE-ORP currently has a program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers University and in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University that seeks to understand aspects of Tc retention by means of studying Tc partitioning, molten salt formation, volatilization pathways, and cold cap chemistry. Another problem involves the stability of Tc in glass in both the national geologic repository and on-site disposal after it has been immobilized. The major environmental concern with 99Tc is its high mobility in addition to a long half-life (2.1×105 yrs). The pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) is highly soluble in water and does not adsorb well onto the surface of minerals and so migrates nearly at the same velocity as groundwater

  12. Technical Basis for Certification of Seismic Design Criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, T.M.; Rohay, A.C.; Youngs, R.R.; Costantino, C.J.; Miller, L.F.

    2008-07-01

    In August 2007, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman approved the final seismic and ground motion criteria for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Construction of the WTP began in 2002 based on seismic design criteria established in 1999 and a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The design criteria were reevaluated in 2005 to address questions from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. DOE announced in 2006 the suspension of construction on the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities within the WTP to validate the design with more stringent seismic criteria. In 2007, the U.S. Congress mandated that the Secretary of Energy certify the final seismic and ground motion criteria prior to expenditure of funds on construction of these two facilities. With the Secretary's approval of the final seismic criteria in the summer of 2007, DOE authorized restart of construction of the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities. The technical basis for the certification of seismic design criteria resulted from a two-year Seismic Boreholes Project that planned, collected, and analyzed geological data from four new boreholes drilled to depths of approximately 1400 feet below ground surface on the WTP site. A key uncertainty identified in the 2005 analyses was the velocity contrasts between the basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds below the WTP. The absence of directly-measured seismic shear wave velocities in the sedimentary interbeds resulted in the use of a wider and more conservative range of velocities in the 2005 analyses. The Seismic Boreholes Project was designed to directly measure the velocities and velocity contrasts in the basalts and sediments below the WTP, reanalyze the ground motion response, and assess the level of conservatism in the 2005 seismic design criteria

  13. Effects Influencing Plutonium-Absorber Interactions and Distributions in Routine and Upset Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Fiskum, Sandra K.

    2015-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of analyses written in support of a plan to revise the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) that is being implemented at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Criticality Safety Group. A report on the chemical disposition of plutonium in Hanford tank wastes was prepared as Phase 1 of this plan (Delegard and Jones 2015). Phase 2 is the provision of a chemistry report to describe the potential impacts on criticality safety of waste processing operations within the WTP (Freer 2014). In accordance with the request from the Environmental and Nuclear Safety Department of the WTP (Miles and Losey 2012), the Phase 2 report assessed the potential for WTP process conditions within and outside the range of normal control parameters to change the ratio of fissile material to neutron-absorbing material in the waste as it is processed with an eye towards potential implications for criticality safety. The Phase 2 study also considered the implications should WTP processes take place within the credible range of chemistry upset conditions. In the present Phase 3 report, the 28 phenomena described in the Phase 2 report were considered with respect to the disposition of plutonium and various absorber elements. The phenomena identified in the Phase 2 report are evaluated in light of the Phase 1 report and other resources to determine the impacts these phenomena might have to alter the plutonium/absorber dispositions and ratios. The outcomes of the Phase 3 evaluations then can be used to inform subsequent engineering decisions and provide reasonable paths forward to mitigate or overcome real or potential criticality concern in plant operations.

  14. Conventional Wet Chemistry ICP-AES Development for RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 Melter Feed Slurry Simulants - A Statistical Review of the Results from the Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thomas B.

    2005-04-30

    The River Protection Project (RPP)--Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to prepare and process High Level Waste (HLW) streams into glass waste forms that will meet HLW disposal requirements. Samples of HLW sludge and samples of this sludge mixed with glass-forming chemicals are to be taken and analyzed for process control. Glass characterization from the melter is not included in the scope. The development of viable analytical protocols to provide the required elemental analyses of these samples with rapid turnaround times (before and after addition of the glass-forming chemicals) has been defined as an RPP statement of work for the Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Wet chemistry is serving as the baseline comparison to laser ablation for method development. One of the simulants used in this study by ADS was AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant, a simulant used to represent HLW samples after the addition of glass-forming chemicals. Several different dissolution methods were used by ADS in preparing samples of this simulant for elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The measurements generated by this process were provided to SRNL's Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) for analysis. The measurement data generated for samples of the RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant are presented in this report and the different approaches used to prepare the samples are statistically compared. Comparisons among three of the dissolution methods are highlighted in this analysis. The methods are: sodium peroxide fusion in nickel crucibles, acidification with HNO{sub 3}/HCL at room temperature, and cesium carbonate fusion in zirconium crucibles. A summary table of the measurement averages generated by the three methods is presented. The cesium carbonate fusion method yielded measurements with significantly different mean values from the other two

  15. Propionic acid production in a plant fibrous-bed bioreactor with immobilized Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2012-12-15

    A plant fibrous-bed bioreactor (PFB) was constructed for propionic acid production. Sugar cane bagasse was applied to the PFB as immobilizing material. Starting at a concentration of 80g/L of glucose, Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015 produced 41.20±2.03g/L of propionic acid at 108h in the PFB. The value was 21.07% higher than that produced by free cell fermentation. Intermittent and constant fed-batch fermentations were performed in the PFB to optimize the fermentation results. The highest propionic acid concentration obtained from constant fed-batch fermentation was 136.23±6.77g/L, which is 1.40 times higher than the highest concentration (97.00g/L) previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that cells exhibited striking changes in morphology after PFB domestication. Compared with free cell fermentation, the fluxes of propionic acid synthesis and the pentose phosphate pathway in PFB fermentation increased by 84.65% and 227.62%, respectively. On the other hand, a decrease in succinic and acetic acid fluxes was also observed. The metabolic flux distributions of the two PFB fed-batch fermentation strategies also demonstrated that constant fed-batch fermentation is a more beneficial method for the immobilized production of propionic acid. The relevant key enzyme activities and metabolic flux variations of the batch cultures showed good consistency. These results suggest that the PFB was effective in high-concentration propionic acid production. PMID:22982366

  16. Managing sewer solids for the reduction of foul flush effects--Forfar WTP.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A G; Sakrabani, R; Ashley, R M; Johnstone, F M

    2002-01-01

    In times of high sewer flow, conditions can exist which enable previously deposited material to be re-entrained back into the body of the flow column. Pulses of this highly polluted flow have been recorded in many instances at the recently constructed wastewater treatment plant (WTP) in Forfar, Scotland. Investigations have been undertaken to characterise the incoming flows and to suggest remedial measures to manage the quality fluctuations. Initial visits to the works and incoming pipes indicated a high degree of sediment deposition in the two inlet pipes. Analyses were carried out and consequently, changes to the hydraulic regime were made. Measurements of sediment level, sediment quality, wall slime and bulk water quality were monitored in the period following the remedial works to observe any improvements. Dramatic alterations in each of the determinands measured were recorded. Analyses were then undertaken to determine long term sediment behaviour and to assess the future usefulness of existing upstream sediment traps. It was concluded that with proper maintenance of the traps, the new hydraulic regime is sufficient to prevent further significant build up of sediment deposits and reduce impacts on the WTP. Further investigations made by North of Scotland Water Authority highlighted trade inputs to the system which may also have contributed to the now managed foul flush problem. PMID:11902479

  17. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  18. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  19. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium

  20. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  1. Synergistic effects of plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 and immobilizers on the growth and heavy metal accumulation of edible tissues of hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-07-15

    A plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 was evaluated for its immobilization of Cd and Pb in solution. Meanwhile, the impacts of T1-17, immobilizers (vermiculite and peat) and their combination on the fruit biomass and heavy metal accumulation of hot pepper were characterized. T1-17 could significantly reduced water-soluble Cd and Pb in solution. T1-17, vermiculite+T1-17, peat, and peat+T1-17 significantly increased the fruit biomass (ranging from 45% to 269%) and decreased the fruit Cd (ranging from 66% to 87%) and Pb (ranging from 30% to 56%) contents and water-soluble Cd and Pb (ranging from 23% to 59%) contents of the rhizosphere soils compared to the controls. T1-17+vermiculite or peat had higher ability to increase the fruit biomass than T1-17 or vermiculite or peat. Furthermore, T1-17+peat had higher ability to reduce the water-soluble Cd and Pb contents of the rhizosphere soil and the fruit Pb uptake of hot pepper. The results showed that T1-17 and the immobilizers alleviated the heavy metal toxicity and decreased the fruit heavy metal uptake of hot pepper. The results also showed the synergistic effects of T1-17 and the immobilizers on the growth and Cd and Pb accumulation of hot pepper. PMID:27017398

  2. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D'Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Callow, Richard A.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  3. Silica-based waste form for immobilization of iodine from reprocessing plant off-gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyáš, Josef; Canfield, Nathan; Sulaiman, Sannoh; Zumhoff, Mac

    2016-08-01

    A high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine and a feasible consolidation to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel) an attractive choice for the removal and sequestration of iodine compounds from the off-gas of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Hot uniaxial pressing of iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel (20.2 mass% iodine) at 1200 °C for 30 min under 29 MPa pressure provided a partially sintered product with residual open porosity of 16.9% that retained ∼93% of sorbed iodine. Highly iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel was successfully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1200 °C with a 30-min hold and under 207 MPa. The fully densified waste form had a bulk density of 3.3 × 103 kg/m3 and contained ∼39 mass% iodine. The iodine was retained in the form of nano- and micro-particles of AgI that were uniformly distributed inside and along boundaries of fused silica grains.

  4. Full Focus Needed on Finishing Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant - 12196

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Suzanne; Biyani, Rabindra; Holmes, Erika

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) Hanford Nuclear Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks located 19 to 24 km (12 to 15 miles) from the Columbia River in south-central Washington State. Hanford's tanks now hold about 212,000 cu m (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. Sixty-seven tanks have leaked an estimated 3,785 cu m (1 million gallons) of this waste into the surrounding soil. Further releases to soil, groundwater, and the Columbia River are the inevitable result of the tanks continuing to age. The risk from this waste is recognized as a threat to the Northwest by both State and Federal governments. US DOE and Bechtel National, Inc., are building the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat and vitrify (immobilize in glass) the waste from Hanford's tanks. As is usual for any groundbreaking project, problems have arisen that must be resolved as they occur if treatment is to take place as specified in the court-enforceable Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) and the Consent Decree, entered into by US DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). At times, US DOE's approach to solving these critical issues seems to have caused undue wastes of time, energy, and, ultimately, public funds. Upon reviewing the history of Hanford's tank waste treatment project, Ecology hopes that constructive criticism of past failures and praise of successes will inspire US DOE to consider changing practices, be more transparent with regulatory agencies and the public, and take a 'lean production' approach to successfully completing this project. All three Tri-Party Agreement agencies share the goal of completing WTP on time, ensuring it is operational and in compliance with safety standards. To do this, Ecology believes US DOE should: - Maintain focus on the primary goal of completing the five major facilities of

  5. Metal immobilization and soil amendment efficiency at a contaminated sediment landfill site: a field study focusing on plants, springtails, and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bert, Valérie; Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Caron, Lucie; Biaz, Asmaa; Dazy, Marc; Masfaraud, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Metal immobilization may contribute to the environmental management strategy of dredged sediment landfill sites contaminated by metals. In a field experiment, amendment effects and efficiency were investigated, focusing on plants, springtails and bacteria colonisation, metal extractability and sediment ecotoxicity. Conversely to hydroxylapatite (HA, 3% DW), the addition of Thomas Basic Slag (TBS, 5% DW) to a 5-yr deposited sediment contaminated with Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb and As resulted in a decrease in the 0.01 M Ca(NO(3))(2)-extractable concentrations of Cd and Zn. Shoot Cd and Zn concentration in Calamagrostis epigejos, the dominant plant species, also decreased in the presence of TBS. The addition of TBS and HA reduced sediment ecotoxicity and improved the growth of the total bacterial population. Hydroxylapatite improved plant species richness and diversity and decreased antioxidant enzymes in C. Epigejos and Urtica dïoica. Collembolan communities did not differ in abundance and diversity between the different treatments. PMID:22647548

  6. Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T.; Galkin, A.; Bachilova, N.; Blynskiy, A.; Maev, V.; Wells, D.; Herrick, A.; Michelbacher, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

  7. Microorganism immobilization

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  8. Technical Basis for Certification of Seismic Design Criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.; Rohay, Alan C.; Youngs, Robert R.; Costantino, Carl J.; Miller, Lewis F.

    2008-02-28

    In August 2007, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman approved the final seismic and ground motion criteria for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site. Construction of the WTP began in 2002 based on seismic design criteria established in 1999 and a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The design criteria were re-evaluated in 2005 to address questions from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. DOE announced in 2006 the suspension of construction on the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities within the WTP to validate the design with more stringent seismic criteria. In 2007, the U.S. Congress mandated that the Secretary of Energy certify the final seismic and ground motion criteria prior to expenditure of funds on construction of these two facilities. With the Secretary’s approval of the final seismic criteria this past summer, DOE authorized restart of construction of the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities.

  9. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  10. Glass Formulations for Immobilizing Hanford Low-Activity Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Elliott, Michael L.; Smith, Harry D.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2006-02-28

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are developing and testing glasses for immobilizing low-activity wastes (LAW) for the full Hanford mission. PNNL is performing testing for low-activity waste glasses for both the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and the Bulk Vitrification Plant. The objective of this work is to increase the waste content of the glasses and ultimately increase the waste throughput of the LAW vitrification plants. This paper focuses on PNNL’s development and testing of glasses for the Bulk Vitrification process. Bulk Vitrification was selected as a potential supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of LAW at Hanford. Also known as In-Container Vitrification™ (ICV™), the Bulk Vitrification process combines soil, LAW, and chemical amendments; dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a batch process in a refractory lined box. The process was developed by AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. (AMEC). Working with AMEC, PNNL developed a glass formulation that could incorporate a broad range of Hanford LAW. The initial glass development involved a “nominal” waste composition, and a baseline glass was formulated and tested at crucible, engineering, and full scales. The performance of the baseline glass was then verified using a battery of laboratory tests as well as engineering-scale and full-scale ICV™ tests. Future testing is planned for optimizing the glass waste loading and qualifying a broader range of waste streams for treatment in the Bulk Vitrification process. This paper reviews the glass development and qualification process completed to date. This includes several series of crucible studies as well as confirmation testing at engineering-scale and full-scale. This formulation paper complements information presented by AMEC in an ICV™ processing paper.

  11. Overview of Corrosion, Erosion, and Synergistic Effects of Erosion and Corrosion in the WTP Pre-treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K. J.

    2015-03-27

    Corrosion is an extremely complex process that is affected by numerous factors. Addition of a flowing multi-phase solution further complicates the analysis. The synergistic effects of the multiple corrosive species as well as the flow-induced synergistic effects from erosion and corrosion must be thoroughly evaluated in order to predict material degradation responses. Public domain data can help guide the analysis, but cannot reliably provide the design basis especially when the process is one-of-a-kind, designed for 40 plus years of service, and has no viable means for repair or replacement. Testing in representative simulants and environmental conditions with prototypic components will provide a stronger technical basis for design. This philosophy was exemplified by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site and only after 15 plus years of successful operation has it been validated. There have been “hiccups”, some identified during the cold commissioning phase and some during radioactive operations, but they were minor and overcome. In addition, the system is robust enough to tolerate most flowsheet changes and the DWPF design allows minor modifications and replacements – approaches not available with the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) “Black Cell” design methodology. Based on the available data, the synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion is a credible – virtually certain – degradation mechanism and must be considered for the design of the WTP process systems. Testing is recommended due to the number of variables (e.g., material properties, process parameters, and component design) that can affect synergy between erosion and corrosion and because the available literature is of limited applicability for the complex process chemistries anticipated in the WTP. Applicable testing will provide a reasonable and defensible path forward for design of the WTP Black Cell and Hard-to-Reach process equipment. These

  12. Gas Generation and Hold-Up in Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Process Streams Containing Anti-Foam Agent (AFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2007-06-29

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify defense wastes stored at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries that exhibit non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Such streams can accumulate hazardous quantities of thermally and radiolytically generated flammable gases. Experiments were performed in a bubble column to measure gas hold-up under various conditions to better understand flammable gas behavior in WTP processes. The two non-Newtonian slurries tested were kaolin-bentonite clay and a chemical surrogate of pretreated high-level waste (HLW) from Hanford Tank AZ-101. The addition of solutes, whether a salt or anti-foaming agent (AFA) decrease the bubble coalescence rate leading to smaller bubbles, lower bubble rise velocity and higher gas holdup. Gas holdup decreased with increasing yield stress and consistency. The impact of AFA on gas holdup in kaolin-bentonite clay was less than in simulated HLW, presumably because the AFA adsorbed onto the clay particles, rendering it unavailable to retard coalescence.

  13. Setting and stiffening of cementitious components in Cast Stone waste form for disposal of secondary wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S.K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast Stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. However, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior, which is essential to ensure proper workability and is important to safety in a nuclear waste field-scale application. X-ray diffraction, rheology, and ultrasonic wave reflection methods were used to understand the specific phase formation and stiffening of Cast Stone. Our results showed a good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh mixture and phase formation in Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation was observed with low concentration simulants, and the formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. Highlights: • A combination of XRD, UWR, and rheology gives a better understanding of Cast Stone. • Stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. • A drastic change in stiffening of Cast Stone was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  14. The effect of compost treatments and a plant cover with Agrostis tenuis on the immobilization/mobilization of trace elements in a mine-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, P; de Varennes, A; Cunha-Queda, A C

    2014-01-01

    A semi-field experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC) and green waste-derived compost (GWC) as immobilizing agents in aided-phytostabilization of a highly acidic soil contaminated with trace elements, with and without a plant cover of Agrostis tenuis. The compost application ratio was 50 Mg ha(-1), and GWC amended soil was additionally limed and supplemented with mineral fertilizers. Both treatments had an equivalent capacity to raise soil organic matter and pH, without a significant increase in soil salinity and in pseudo-total As, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, allowing the establishment of a plant cover. Effective bioavailable Cu and Zn decreased as a consequence of both compost treatments, while effective bioavailable As increased by more than twice but remained as a small fraction of its pseudo-total content. Amended soil had higher soil enzymatic activities, especially in the presence of plants. Accumulation factors for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn by A. tenuis were low, and their concentrations in the plant were lower than the maximum tolerable levels for cattle. As a consequence, the use of A. tenuis can be recommended for assisted phytostabilization of this type of mine soil, in combination with one of the compost treatments evaluated. PMID:24912206

  15. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating a

  16. Uranium immobilization in an iron-rich rhizosphere of a native wetland plant from the Savannah River Site under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Buettner, Shea W; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; van Groos, Paul G Koster; Li, Dien; Peacock, Aaron D; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2014-08-19

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaques formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted using native plants (Sparganium americanum) from a wetland located on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. After iron plaques were established during a 73-day period by using an anoxic Fe(II)-rich nutrient solution, a U(VI) amended nutrient solution was added to the system for an additional two months. Compared to plant-free control microcosms, microcosms containing iron plaques successfully stimulated the growth of targeted iron reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp. Their population continuously increased after the introduction of the U(VI) nutrient solution. The reduction of some of the U(VI) to U(IV) by iron reducing bacteria was deduced based on the observations that the aqueous Fe(II) concentrations increased while the U(VI) concentrations decreased. The Fe(II) produced by the iron reducing bacteria was assumed to be reoxidized by the oxygen released from the roots. Advanced spectroscopic analyses revealed that a significant fraction of the U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV) and they were commonly deposited in association with phosphorus on the iron plaque. PMID:25051143

  17. Genotoxicity biomonitoring of sewage in two municipal wastewater treatment plants using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Thewes, Márcia Regina; Junior, Delio Endres; Droste, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity of untreated and treated sewage from two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WTP BN and WTP SJN) in the municipality of Porto Alegre, in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, was evaluated over a one-year period using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea (Trad-MCN) bioassay. Inflorescences of T. pallida var. purpurea were exposed to sewage samples in February (summer), April (autumn), July (winter) and October (spring) 2009, and the micronuclei (MCN) frequencies were estimated in each period. The high genotoxicity of untreated sewage from WTP BN in February and April was not observed in treated sewage, indicating the efficiency of treatment at this WTP. However, untreated and treated sewage samples from WTP SJN had high MCN frequencies, except in October, when rainfall may have been responsible for reducing these frequencies at both WTPs. Physicochemical analyses of sewage from both WTPs indicated elevated concentrations of organic matter that were higher at WTP SJN than at WTP BN. Chromium was detected in untreated and treated sewage from WTP SJN, but not in treated sewage from WTP BN. Lead was found in all untreated sewage samples from WTP SJN, but only in the summer and autumn at WTP BN. These results indicate that the short-term Trad-MCN genotoxicity assay may be useful for regular monitoring of municipal WTPs. PMID:22215975

  18. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  19. WTP for a QALY and health states: More money for severer health states?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In economic evaluation, cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) is generally used as an indicator for cost-effectiveness. Although JPY 5 million to 6 million (USD 60, 000 to 75,000) per QALY is frequently referred to as a threshold in Japan, do all QALYs have the same monetary value? Methods To examine the relationship between severity of health status and monetary value of a QALY, we obtained willingness to pay (WTP) values for one additional QALY in eight patterns of health states. We randomly sampled approximately 2,400 respondents from an online panel. To avoid misunderstanding, we randomly allocated respondents to one of 16 questionnaires, with 250 responses expected for each pattern. After respondents were asked whether they wanted to purchase the treatment, double-bounded dichotomous choice method was used to obtain WTP values. Results The results clearly show that the WTP per QALY is higher for worse health states than for better health states. The slope was about JPY −1 million per 0.1 utility score increase. The mean and median WTP values per QALY for 16 health states were JPY 5 million, consistent with our previous survey. For respondents who wanted to purchase the treatment, WTP values were significantly correlated with household income. Conclusion This survey shows that QALY based on the EQ-5D does not necessarily have the same monetary value. The WTP per QALY should range from JPY 2 million (USD 20,000) to JPY 8 million (USD 80,000), corresponding to the severity of health states. PMID:24128004

  20. Evaluation of metal mobility, plant availability and immobilization by chemical agents in a limed-silty soil.

    PubMed

    Mench, M; Vangronsveld, J; Didier, V; Clijsters, H

    1994-01-01

    Metal-contaminated soils in the vicinity of industrial sites become of ever-increasing concern. Diagnostic criteria and ecological technologies for soil remediation should be calibrated for various soil conditions; actually, our knowledge of calcareous soil is poor. Silty soils near smelters at Evin (Pas de Calais, France) have been contaminated by non-ferrous metal fallout and regularly limed using foams. Therefore, the mobility, bioavailability, and potential phytotoxicity of Cd, Pb and Zn, were investigated using single soil extractions (i.e. water, 0.1 n Ca(NO(3))(2), and EDTA pH 7), and vegetation experiments, in parallel with a biological test based on (iso)-enzymes in leaves and roots, before and following soil treatment with chemical agents, i.e. Thomas basic slags (TBS), hydrous manganese oxide (HMO), steel shots (ST) and beringite. No visible toxicity symptoms developed on the above-ground parts of ryegrass, tobacco and bean plants grown in potted soil under controlled environmental conditions. Cd, Zn and Pb uptake resulted in high concentrations in the above-ground plant parts, but the enzyme capacities in leaves and roots, and the peroxidase pattern indicated that these metal concentrations were not phytotoxic for beans as test plants. The addition of chemical agents to the soil did not increase biomass production, but treatment with either HMO, ST or beringite markedly decreased the mobility of Cd, Zn and Pb. These agents were proven to be effective in mitigating the Cd uptake by plants. HMO and ST decreased either Pb or Zn uptake by ryegrass. TBS was effective in lowering Pb uptake by the same species. Beringite decreased Cd uptake by beans. If fallout could be restricted, the metal content of food crops in this area should be lowered by soil treatment. However, the differences in Cd uptake between plant species were not suppressed, regardless of the type of agents applied to the soil. PMID:15091619

  1. Setting and Stiffening of Cementitious Components in Cast Stone Waste Form for Disposal of Secondary Wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S. K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from Hanford vitrification plant. While the strength and radioactive technetium leaching of different waste form candidates have been reported, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior of Cast Stone, which is essential to ensure the proper workability, especially considering necessary safety as a nuclear waste form in a field scale application. The rheological and ultrasonic wave reflection (UWR) measurements were used to understand the setting and stiffening Cast Stone batches. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to find the correlation between specific phase formation and the stiffening of the paste. Our results showed good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh Cast Stone mixture and phase formation during hydration of Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation originating from blast furnace slag was observed in Cast Stone made with low concentration simulants. The formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  2. Candidate glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the calcines stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1995-11-01

    Candidate glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilizaion of the major types of calcines stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) were synthesized and characterized. The waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture 70 wt% of precompacted simulated non-radioactive calcine and 30 wt% additives (Silica and Al or Ti metal powders). The types of calcines stored in stainless steel Bin Sets at the ICPP are fluorinel/sodium (Fl/Na), alumina, zirconia, zirconia/sodium (Zr/Na), and zirconia-alumina (Zr-AD. In addition to the silica additive, glass-ceramics for Fl/NA and alumina calcines were prepared and characterized using ICPP soil and clay additives. The characteristics of the waste forms including density, elastic properties, chemical durability, glass and crystalline phases, phases separation, and the microstructure were investigated. The 28-day MCC-1 test for chemical durability was used for all the waste forms. In addition, the Product Consistency Test (PCI) was conducted for the glass-ceramics, and the normalized elemental releases in g/m{sup 2} were compared with the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The characteristics of the soil and clay glass-ceramics appear to be as good as the waste forms prepared with silica. The glass-ceramic waste forms recommended are: 5Ti-Clay, or 5Ti-SoiL or 5Ti-Silica for the fluorinel/sodium calcine-, Clay or silica for the alumina calcine; and 5Ti-Silica for the zirconia, Zr/Na, and Zr-Al calcines. Soil- and clay-based glass- ceramics offer an opportunity to incorporate contaminated waste into durable low volume waste forms.

  3. Estimating cost of road traffic injuries in Iran using willingness to pay (WTP) method.

    PubMed

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit. PMID:25438150

  4. Estimating Cost of Road Traffic Injuries in Iran Using Willingness to Pay (WTP) Method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit. PMID:25438150

  5. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass

  6. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Can Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-12-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) as part of Department of Energy's two-track approach for the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium. The PIP will utilize the ceramic can-in-canister technology in a process that mixes plutonium with ceramic formers and neutron absorbers, presses the mixture into a ceramic puck-like form, sinters the pucks in a furnace, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into large canisters. The canisters will subsequently be filled with high level waste glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. This paper will discuss the PIP can inspection components, control system, and test results.

  8. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  9. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-02-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

  10. 77 FR 479 - Sunshine Act Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This will include actions discussed in DOE's implementation plan... in order to deliver waste safely and efficiently to WTP. During Session II, the Board will receive... the ability of the WTP project to identify and resolve technical issues, such as those discussed...

  11. Evaluating environmental impact caused by industrial activities - Implementation of the WTP-WTA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopsidas, Odysseas; Batzias, Fragiskos

    2012-12-01

    In this work, a methodological framework under the form of an algorithmic procedure, including 28 activity stages and 6 decision nodes, has been developed for evaluating environmental impact caused by industrial activities. The main part of this procedure is a modification of the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM), which is heavily relied on survey-based estimation of WTP-WTA (willingness to pay/accept, respectively). The survey may take place either under a strictly controlled environment or in situ and as-is ('laboratory conditions' or 'field conditions', respectively, in the terminology of experimental economics). Implementation of this methodology is presented, referring to three cases of industrial pollution (in three different sites) caused by (i) a cement producing units, (ii) an oil refinery complex, and (iii) an industrialized small city with an intensively polluted port, where several industrial units co-exist, all of them located in the vicinity of Athens, Greece. The results are interpreted/discussed and conclusions are drawn.

  12. Plutonium Immobilization Puck Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-26

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize excess plutonium and store the plutonium in a high level waste radiation field. To accomplish these goals, the PIP will process various forms of plutonium into plutonium oxide, mix the oxide powder with ceramic precursors, press the mixture into pucks, sinter the pucks into a ceramic puck, load the pucks into metal cans, seal the cans, load the cans into magazines, and load the magazines into a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) canister. These canisters will be sent to the DWPF, an existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facility, where molten high level waste glass will be poured into the canisters encapsulating the ceramic pucks. Due to the plutonium radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the early design stages and the facility will begin operation in 2005. This paper will discuss the Plutonium Immobilization puck handling conceptual design and the puck handling equipment testing.

  13. Economic Valuation of Health Care Services in Public Health Systems: A Study about Willingness to Pay (WTP) for Nursing Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Jesús; del Cura-González, Mª Isabel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Gemma; Ariza-Cardiel, Gloria; Zamora, Javier; Gómez-Gascón, Tomás; Polentinos-Castro, Elena; Pérez-Rivas, Francisco Javier; Domínguez-Bidagor, Julia; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Tello-Bernabé, Mª Eugenia; Conde-López, Juan Francisco; Aguado-Arroyo, Óscar; Bayona, Mª Teresa Sanz-; Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying the economic value assigned by users to a particular health service is of principal interest in planning the service. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of economic value of nursing consultation in primary care (PC) by its users. Methods and Results Economic study using contingent valuation methodology. A total of 662 users of nursing consultation from 23 health centers were included. Data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health needs, pattern of usage, and satisfaction with provided service were compiled. The validity of the response was evaluated by an explanatory mixed-effects multilevel model in order to assess the factors associated with the response according to the welfare theory. Response reliability was also evaluated. Subjects included in the study indicated an average Willingness to Pay (WTP) of €14.4 (CI 95%: €13.2–15.5; median €10) and an average Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA) of €20.9 (CI 95%: €19.6–22.2; median €20). Average area income, personal income, consultation duration, home visit, and education level correlated with greater WTP. Women and older subjects showed lower WTP. Fixed parameters explained 8.41% of the residual variability, and response clustering in different health centers explained 4–6% of the total variability. The influence of income on WTP was different in each center. The responses for WTP and WTA in a subgroup of subjects were consistent when reassessed after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.952 and 0.893, respectively). Conclusions The economic value of nursing services provided within PC in a public health system is clearly perceived by its user. The perception of this value is influenced by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the subjects and their environment, and by the unique characteristics of the evaluated service. The method of contingent valuation is useful for making explicit this perception of value of

  14. Immobilization induced hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Torres, Edgar Alonso; González-Cantú, Arnulfo; Hinojosa-Garza, Gabriela; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immobilization hypercalcemia is an uncommon diagnosis associated with increased bone remodeling disorders and conditions associated with limited movement such as medullar lesions or vascular events. Diagnosis requires an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes of hypercalcemia. This is a report of a woman with prolonged immobilization who presented with severe hypercalcemia. This case contributes to identification of severe hypercalcemia as a result of immobility and the description of bone metabolism during this state. PMID:27252745

  15. Immobilized Cell and Enzyme Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnill, P.

    1980-08-01

    The development of immobilized enzyme and cell technology is summarized. Industrial processes for sucrose inversion, penicillin deacylation and glucose isomerization using immobilized enzymes are described. An alternative process for glucose isomerization using immobilized cells, and some other industrial applications of immobilized cells are indicated. Recent developments in immobilized enzyme and cell technology are assessed and the relative merits of the different biochemical catalyst forms are considered.

  16. Analysis of a municipal wastewater treatment plant using a neural network-based pattern analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hong, Y.-S.T.; Rosen, Michael R.; Bhamidimarri, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of how to capture the complex relationships that exist between process variables and to diagnose the dynamic behaviour of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WTP). Due to the complex biological reaction mechanisms, the highly time-varying, and multivariable aspects of the real WTP, the diagnosis of the WTP are still difficult in practice. The application of intelligent techniques, which can analyse the multi-dimensional process data using a sophisticated visualisation technique, can be useful for analysing and diagnosing the activated-sludge WTP. In this paper, the Kohonen Self-Organising Feature Maps (KSOFM) neural network is applied to analyse the multi-dimensional process data, and to diagnose the inter-relationship of the process variables in a real activated-sludge WTP. By using component planes, some detailed local relationships between the process variables, e.g., responses of the process variables under different operating conditions, as well as the global information is discovered. The operating condition and the inter-relationship among the process variables in the WTP have been diagnosed and extracted by the information obtained from the clustering analysis of the maps. It is concluded that the KSOFM technique provides an effective analysing and diagnosing tool to understand the system behaviour and to extract knowledge contained in multi-dimensional data of a large-scale WTP. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of a municipal wastewater treatment plant using a neural network-based pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Rosen, Michael R; Bhamidimarri, Rao

    2003-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of how to capture the complex relationships that exist between process variables and to diagnose the dynamic behaviour of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WTP). Due to the complex biological reaction mechanisms, the highly time-varying, and multivariable aspects of the real WTP, the diagnosis of the WTP are still difficult in practice. The application of intelligent techniques, which can analyse the multi-dimensional process data using a sophisticated visualisation technique, can be useful for analysing and diagnosing the activated-sludge WTP. In this paper, the Kohonen Self-Organising Feature Maps (KSOFM) neural network is applied to analyse the multi-dimensional process data, and to diagnose the inter-relationship of the process variables in a real activated-sludge WTP. By using component planes, some detailed local relationships between the process variables, e.g., responses of the process variables under different operating conditions, as well as the global information is discovered. The operating condition and the inter-relationship among the process variables in the WTP have been diagnosed and extracted by the information obtained from the clustering analysis of the maps. It is concluded that the KSOFM technique provides an effective analysing and diagnosing tool to understand the system behaviour and to extract knowledge contained in multi-dimensional data of a large-scale WTP. PMID:12600389

  18. Immobilized tubular fermentor

    SciTech Connect

    Gencer, M.A.; Mutharasan, R.

    1983-09-01

    In this article, a mathematical model describing the kinetics of ethanol fermentation in a whole cell immobilized tubular fermentor is proposed. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with the proposed model. A procedure for treating the fermentation data for determining the ethanol inhibition constants k1 and k2 is described. The ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell fermentor is compared with those of traditional fermentors. Experimental studies indicate that with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL Y132) culture, ethanol productivity in the range 21.2-83.7 g ethanol/L/h at ethanol concentration of 76-60 g/L can be achieved. This is comparable to or higher than those reported in the literature for yeast. The product yield factor of 0.5 g ethanol/g glucose was obtained. The immobilized cell fermentor does not show washout at dilution rates of 7/h and shows good stability over a 650-h operating period.

  19. Restoring wtp53 activity in HIPK2 depleted MCF7 cells by modulating metallothionein and zinc.

    PubMed

    Puca, Rosa; Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Bossi, Gianluca; Sacchi, Ada; Rechavi, Gideon; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of p53 transactivation activity is important for p53 apoptotic function. We have shown that stable knockdown of HIPK2 induces p53 misfolding with inhibition of p53 target gene transcription. In this study we established a lentiviral-based system for doxycyclin (Dox)-induced conditional interference of HIPK2 expression to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in p53 deregulation. We found that HIPK2 knockdown induced metallothionein 2A (MT2A) upregulation as assessed by RT-PCR analysis, increased promoter acetylation, and increased promoter luciferase activity. The MT2A upregulation correlated with resistance to Adriamycin (ADR)-driven apoptosis and with p53 inhibition. Thus, acute knockdown of HIPK2 (HIPK2i) induced misfolded p53 protein in MCF7 breast cancer cells and inhibited p53 DNA-binding and transcription activities in response to ADR treatment. Previous works show that MT may modulate p53 activity through zinc exchange. Here, we found that inhibition of MT2A expression by siRNA in the HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity. Similarly zinc supplementation to HIPK2i cells restored p53 transcription activity and drug-induced apoptosis. These data support the notion that MT2A is involved in p53 deregulation and strengthen the possibility that combination of chemotherapy and zinc might be useful to treat tumors with inactive wtp53. PMID:18996371

  20. Surgical treatment of GERD. Comperative study of WTP vs. Toupet fundoplication – results of 151 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Nowosad, Małgorzata; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is recognized as one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The best choice of management for advanced GERD is laparoscopic surgery. Aim To compare and evaluate the results of surgical treatment of GERD patients operated on using two different techniques. Material and methods Between 2001 and 2012, 353 patients (211 female and 142 male), aged 17–76 years (mean 44), underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery. The study included patients who underwent a Toupet fundoplication or Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure (WTP). Results The mean age of the group was 47.77 years (17–80 years). Forty-nine (32.45%) patients had severe symptoms, 93 (61.58%) had mild symptoms and 9 (5.96%) had a single mild but intolerable sign of GERD. Eighty-six (56.95%) patients had a Toupet fundoplication and 65 (43.04%) had a WTP. The follow-up period was 18–144 months. The average operating time for Toupet fundoplication and the WTP procedure was 164 min (90–300 min) and 147 min (90–210 min), respectively. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.66%. The average post-operative hospitalization period was 5.4 days (2–16 post-operative days (POD) = Toupet) vs. 4.7 days (2–9 POD = WTP). No reoperations were performed. No major surgical complications were identified. Conclusions Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure due to a low percentage of post-operative complications, good quality of life of patients and a zero recurrence rate of hiatal hernia should be a method of choice. PMID:27458484

  1. Comparison of Five Isotope-Corrected Water-Triple-Point Cells with the NMIA-2002 WTP Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Mong-Kim; Ballico, Mark

    2008-10-01

    A comparison of NMIA’s new water-triple-point (WTP) ensemble with a previously established ensemble is reported. Until 2007, the kelvin in Australia was defined as the average of an ensemble of WTP cells that were selected for stability and purity and collected over a period of several years from a variety of sources. As a result of the recent CCT-K7 comparison, a clarification of the SI definition for the kelvin was adopted, explicitly specifying the isotopic composition of the water in WTP cells. Although NMIA’s results were within the estimated uncertainties, NMIA initiated a project to acquire cells with isotope information from several manufacturers and batches to establish a new ensemble. We find that the standard deviation of the isotope-shift-corrected temperatures of five cells from three manufacturers to be 6 μK, which is significantly lower than that of the cells in the previous ensemble, which was 24 μK. The average temperature of the new ensemble is found to be approximately 107 μK higher than that of the previous ensemble. This difference is consistent with the findings of CCT-K7, which identified a group of laboratories controlling isotope effects, and is displaced 73 μK from the mean of the other laboratories.

  2. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.

    1998-07-01

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium

  3. Performance of small water treatment plants: The case study of Mutshedzi Water Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makungo, R.; Odiyo, J. O.; Tshidzumba, N.

    The performance of small water treatment plants (SWTPs) was evaluated using Mutshedzi WTP as a case study. The majority of SWTPs in South Africa (SA) that supply water to rural villages face problems of cost recovery, water wastages, limited size and semi-skilled labour. The raw and final water quality analyses and their compliance were used to assess the performance of the Mutshedzi WTP. Electrical conductivity (EC), pН and turbidity were measured in the field using a portable multimeter and a turbidity meter respectively. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography were used to analyse metals and non-metals respectively. The results were compared with the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) guidelines for domestic use. The turbidity levels partially exceeded the recommended guidelines for domestic water use of 1 NTU. The concentrations of chemical parameters in final water were within the DWA guidelines for domestic water use except for fluoride, which exceeded the maximum allowable guideline of 1.5 mg/L in August 2009. Mutshedzi WTP had computed compliance for raw and final water analyses ranging from 79% to 93% and 86% to 93% throughout the sampling period, respectively. The results from earlier studies showed that the microbiological quality of final water in Mutshedzi WTP complied with the recommended guidelines, eliminating the slight chance of adverse aesthetic effects and infectious disease transmission associated with the turbidity values between 1 and 5 NTU. The study concluded that Mutshedzi WTP, though moving towards compliance, is still not producing adequate quality of water. Other studies also indicated that the quantity of water produced from Mutshedzi WTP was inadequate. The findings of the study indicate that lack of monitoring of quantity of water supplied to each village, dosage of treatment chemicals, the treatment capacity of the WTP and monitoring the quality of water treated are some of the factors that limit the performance of

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  5. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading FY98 Year End Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will immobilize plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report summarizes FY98 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes summaries of reports on Can Size, Equipment Review, Preliminary Concepts, Conceptual Design, and Preliminary Specification. Plant trip reports for the Greenville Automation and Manufacturing Exposition, Rocky Flats BNFL Pu repackaging glovebox line, and vendor trips are also included.

  6. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  7. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs RR

    2007-06-01

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  8. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  9. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization. PMID:23436023

  10. Manufacturing ceramic bricks with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) sludge from a water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E M; Morita, D M; Lima, A C M; Teixeira, L Girard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research work is to assess the viability of manufacturing ceramic bricks with sludge from a water treatment plant (WTP) for use in real-world applications. Sludge was collected from settling tanks at the Bolonha WTP, which is located in Belém, capital of the state of Pará, Brazil. After dewatering in drainage beds, sludge was added to the clay at a local brickworks at different mass percentages (7.6, 9.0, 11.7, 13.9 and 23.5%). Laboratory tests were performed on the bricks to assess their resistance to compression, water absorption, dimensions and visual aspects. Percentages of 7.6, 9.0, 11.7 and 13.9% (w/w) of WTP sludge presented good results in terms of resistance, which indicates that technically, ceramic bricks can be produced by incorporating up to 13.9% of WTP sludge. PMID:26038928

  11. Waste Treatment Plant Support Program: Summaries of Reports Produced During Fiscal Years 1999-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, Gordon H.

    2010-08-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) being built on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will be the largest chemical processing plant in the United States. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) is the designer and constructor for the WTP. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has provided significant research and testing support to the WTP. This report provides a summary of reports developed initially under PNNL’s “1831” use agreement and later PNNL’s “1830” prime contract with DOE in support of the WTP. In March 2001, PNNL under its “1831” use agreement entered into a contract with BNI to support their research and testing activities. However, PNNL support to the WTP predates BNI involvement. Prior to March 2001, PNNL supported British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. in its role as overall designer and constructor. In February 2007, execution of PNNL’s support to the WTP was moved under its “1830” prime contract with DOE.

  12. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  13. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-12-18

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  14. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  15. Immobilization of Rubia tinctorum L. Suspension Cultures and Biomass Production.

    PubMed

    Nartop, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Plants are natural sources of valuable secondary metabolites used as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, fragrances, colors, biopesticides, and food additives. There is an increasing demand to obtain these metabolites through more productive plant tissue applications and cell culture methods due to the importance of secondary metabolites.Immobilization of plant cells is a method used in plant cell cultures to induce secondary metabolite production. In this method, plant cells are fixed in or on a supporting material or matrix such as agar, agarose, calcium alginate, glass, or polyurethane foam. In the present study, three natural lignocellulosic materials, loofah sponge, and the long fibers of sisal and jute, were used to immobilize suspended R. tinctorum cells. PMID:27108315

  16. Microbial degradation of quinoline by immobilized cells of Burkholderia pickettii.

    PubMed

    Jianlong, Wang; Xiangchun, Quan; Liping, Han; Yi, Qian; Hegemann, Werner

    2002-05-01

    A quinoline-biodegrading microorganism was isolated from activated sludge of coke-oven wastewater treatment plant using quinoline as sole carbon and nitrogen source. It is a gram negative, rod-shaped and aerobic strain, which was identified as Burkholderia pickettii. The biodegradation of quinoline was carried out with this isolated strain. Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrum (GC/MS) revealed that 2-hydroxyquinoline (2-OH-Q) was the first intermediate in the course of quinoline biodegradation. A novel immobilization carrier, that is, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gauze hybrid carrier, was developed. The isolated strain was immobilized by two different immobilizing techniques and used for the quinolinerdegradation. It was found that biodegradation rate of quinoline by the microorganisms immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was faster than that by the microorganisms immobilized in PVA gel beads. Kinetics of quinoline biodegradation by cells of Burkholderia pickettii immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was investigated. The results demonstrate that quinoline degradation could be described by zero-order reaction rate equation when the initial quinoline concentration was in the range of 50-500 mg l(-1). PMID:12108721

  17. Two-year stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuefeng; Xu, Yi; Xu, Yingming; Wang, Pengchao; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yuebing; Huang, Qingqing; Huang, Rong

    2016-07-01

    The long-term stability of immobilization effect of immobilization agents was critical to the remediation practices. Two years consecutive in situ field-scale demonstration was conducted in Hunan province, with the purpose to certify the long-term stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil in the aspect of soil extraction and plant uptake. Natural sepiolite was selected as immobilization, and rice was the model plant. The immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil was significant in the first year and remained at the second year. The Cd content of brown rice, 0.025 M HCl extractable Cd content and exchangeable Cd content of paddy soil decreased remarkably. The application of sepiolite led to an obvious increase in pH value of paddy soil and carbonate bounded fraction of Cd in soil. The immobilization effect was maintained even at the second year without any additional amendments. The results indicated the interaction of sepiolite and cadmium was a long-term process. The additional sepiolite at the second year had no significant lift effect on immobilization so that it was unnecessary to add sepiolite every year based on the immobilization effect and operation cost. The dynamics of available Cu, Zn, and Mn contents in paddy soil in two consecutive years indicated sepiolite had negligible effects on the bioavailability of trace metals. The result of the current research confirmed the stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite. PMID:26993515

  18. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  19. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-12-21

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the conceptual design stage and the facility will begin operation in 2008. This paper discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Project phase 2 automation equipment conceptual design, equipment design, and work completed.

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Project Concept for Dustless Transfer of Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2001-08-15

    Plutonium powder will be brought into the Plutonium Immobilization Plant in Food Pack Cans in 3013 packages. The Food Pack Cans will be removed from the 3013 outer and inner can. This document describes their concept and completes PIP milestone 2.2.3.4/FY01/c, Complete Concept for Material Transfer.

  1. Immobilization and Limited Reoxidation of Technetium-99 by Fe(II)-Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-shik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Buck, Edgar C.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Lukens, Wayne W.

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the methodology used to test the sequestration of technetium-99 present in both deionized water and simulated Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant waste solutions.

  2. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.

    2001-01-31

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

  4. Material transfer system in support of the plutonium immobilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, D

    2000-12-20

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program requires development of the process and plant prototypic equipment to immobilize surplus plutonium in ceramic for long-term storage. Because of the hazardous nature of plutonium, it was necessary to develop a remotely operable materials transfer system which can function within the confines of a glovebox. In support of this work at LLNL, such a material transfer system (MTS) was developed. This paper presents both the mechanical and controls parts making up this system, and includes photographs of the key components and diagrams of their assemblies, as well as a description of the control sequence used to validate the MTS capabilities.

  5. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullulans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D. .

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain Y-2311-1 of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  6. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullanans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  7. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  8. Immobilized enzymes affect biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana L; Hippius, Catharina; Werner, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    The effect of the activity of immobilized enzymes on the initial attachment of pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with nosocomial infections (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis) was investigated. The proteolytic enzymes, subtilisin A and the glycoside hydrolase cellulose, were covalently attached onto poly(ethylene-alt-maleic) anhydride copolymer films. A comparison between active and heat-inactivated surfaces showed that while the activity of immobilized cellulase reduced the attachment of S. epidermidis by 67%, it had no effect on the attachment of P. aeruginosa. Immobilized subtilisin A had opposite effects: the active enzyme had no effect on the attachment of S. epidermidis but reduced the attachment of P. aeruginosa by 44%. The results suggest that different biomolecules are involved in the initial steps of attachment of different bacteria, and that the development of broad-spectrum antifouling enzymatic coatings will need to involve the co-immobilization of enzymes. PMID:21618024

  9. High-level-waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form.

  10. Immobilized cells in meat fermentation.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, A J; Champagne, C P

    1994-01-01

    The immobilization of microbial cells can contribute to fermented meat technology at two basic levels. First, the solid/semisolid nature (low available water) of the substrate restricts the mobility of cells and results in spatial organizations based on "natural immobilization" within the fermentation matrix. The microniches formed influence the fermentation biochemistry through mass transfer limitations and the subsequent development and activity of the microflora. This form of immobilization controls the nature of competition between subpopulations within the microflora and ultimately exerts an effect on the ecological competence (ability to survive and compete) of the various cultures present. Second, immobilized cell technology (ICT) can be used to enhance the ecological competence of starter cultures added to initiate the fermentation. Immobilization matrices such as alginate can provide microniches or microenvironments that protect the culture during freezing or lyophilization, during subsequent rehydration, and when in competition with indigenous microflora. The regulated release of cells from the microenvironments can also contribute to competitive ability. The regulation of both immobilization processes can result in enhanced fermentation activity. PMID:8069934

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-02-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River site (SRS) as part of a two-track approach for dispositioning weapons-usable plutonium. The Department of Energy is funding the development and testing effort for the PIP being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. PIP is developing the ''Can-in Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding the forms with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 that verified the adequacy of the baseline and demonstrated compliance with repository requirements.

  12. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  13. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  14. Preparation and properties of immobilized amyloglucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandam, V.S.; Srinivasan, K.S.V.; Thomas Joseph, K.; Santappa, M.

    1981-10-01

    Amyloglucosidase was immobilized on a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and 2-di-methylaminoethyl methacrylate. The resulting immobilized amyloglucosidase has 19% of the soluble enzyme specific activity. The pH optimum of immobilized amyloglucosidase is shifted towards acidity by 1.9 units. The temperature optimum of immobilized enzyme is shifted upward by 5 degrees C. The immobilized amyloglucosidase has the maximum stability at pH 4.6, whereas the soluble enzyme has maximum stability at pH 5.5. While soluble amyloglucosidase has a maximum thermal stability at 50 degrees C, the stability of the immobilized amyloglucosidase steadily decreases with the increase in temperature. (Refs. 7).

  15. Skeletal fluorosis in immobilized extremities.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, J B

    1975-11-01

    The effect of immobilization on skeletal fluorosis was studied in growing rabbits. One hind leg was immobilized by an external fixation device extending below the wrist joint and above the knee joint, the extremity being in a straight position after severance of the sciatic nerve. The animals, aged 7 weeks at the beginning of the experiment, were given 10 mg of fluoride per kg body weight and day during 12 weeks. In the tibiae, development of the skeletal fluorosis was more irregular than that observed in previous studies of normally active animals, being most excessive in the mobile bone. The immobilization effect was most profound in the femora as the cortical thickness and the femur score were significantly higher than those in the mobile femora. It was suggested that an altered muscular activity was the reason for the observed changes. PMID:1189918

  16. Nanoporous gold for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Stine, Keith J; Jefferson, Kenise; Shulga, Olga V

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) is a material of emerging interest for immobilization of biomolecules and -especially enzymes. NPG materials provide a high gold surface area onto which biomolecules can either be directly physisorbed or covalently linked after first modifying the NPG with a self-assembled monolayer. The material can be used as a high surface area electrode and with immobilized enzymes can be used for amperometric detection schemes. NPG can be prepared in a variety of formats from alloys containing less than 50 atomic% gold by dealloying procedures. Related high surface area gold structures have been prepared using templating approaches. Covalent enzyme immobilization can be achieved by first forming a self-assembled monolayer on NPG bearing a terminal reactive functional group followed by conjugation to the enzyme through amide linkages to lysine residues. PMID:20865389

  17. Cagelike mesoporous silica encapsulated with microcapsules for immobilized laccase and 2, 4-DCP degradation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junya; Huang, Yan; Yang, Yuxiang; Yuan, Hongming; Liu, Xiangnong

    2015-12-01

    In this study, cage-like mesoporous silica was used as the carrier to immobilize laccase by a physical approach, followed by encapsulating with chitosan/alginate microcapsule membranes to form microcapsules of immobilized laccase based on layer-by-layer technology. The relationship between laccase activity recovery/leakage rate and the coating thickness was simultaneously investigated. Because the microcapsule layers have a substantial network of pores, they act as semipermeable membranes, while the laccase immobilized inside the microcapsules acts as a processing plant for degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The microcapsules of immobilized laccase were able to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenol within a wide range of 2,4-dichlorophenol concentration, temperature and pH, with mean degradation rate around 62%. Under the optimal conditions, the thermal stability and reusability of immobilized laccase were shown to be improved significantly, as the removal rate and degradation rate remained over 40.2% and 33.8% respectively after 6cycles of operation. Using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), diisobutyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate were identified as the products of 2,4-dichlorophenol degradation by the microcapsules of immobilized laccase and laccase immobilized by a physical approach, respectively, further demonstrating the degradation mechanism of 2,4-dichlorophenol by microcapsule-immobilized laccase. PMID:26702968

  18. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996

    SciTech Connect

    Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-01-28

    This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

  19. Calcitonin treatment of immobilization osteoporosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tuukkanen, J; Jalovaara, P; Väänänen, K

    1991-01-01

    We studied changes in bone mass induced by immobilization and the ability of salmon calcitonin to inhibit immobilization osteoporosis in rat. The bone mass of the immobilized hind leg of rat was compared with the contralateral non-treated leg. Neurectomy and cast immobilization reduced the bone mineral mass to an equal extent. However, the dose-response of calcitonin was different with these immobilization techniques. Calcitonin 15 IU kg-1 administered once daily reduced bone ash weight difference significantly after 2 weeks' neurectomy (P less than 0.001). This had no significant effect on the bone loss induced by cast immobilization, but the dose had to be delivered as two injections given every 12 h. Two weeks' immobilization decreased the incorporation of 45Ca into bones. Calcitonin could not prevent this. However, calcitonin tended to inhibit the overall incorporation of 45Ca into bones in immobilized rats but yet had no effect on 45Ca incorporation in non-immobilized rats. Immobilization decreased serum alkaline phosphatase activity in cast-immobilized animals. Neurectomy did not change serum alkaline phosphatase activity from a sham operation level. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase to total acid phosphatase ratio in the serum increased significantly in neurectomized rats and in cast-immobilized calcitonin-treated rats. PMID:2053438

  20. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4-9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness. PMID:26839417

  1. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4–9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness. PMID:26839417

  2. Immobilization of Heparin: Approaches and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Murugesan, Saravanababu; Xie, Jin; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been used in many forms to treat various diseases. These forms include soluble heparin and heparin immobilized to supporting matrices by physical adsorption, by covalent chemical methods and by photochemical attachment. These immobilization methods often require the use of spacers or linkers. This review examines and compares various techniques that have been used for the immobilization of heparin as well as applications of these immobilized heparins. In the applications reviewed, immobilized heparin is compared with soluble heparin for efficient and versatile use in each of the various applications. PMID:18289079

  3. Recent developments and applications of immobilized laccase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, María; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Moldes, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Laccase is a promising biocatalyst with many possible applications, including bioremediation, chemical synthesis, biobleaching of paper pulp, biosensing, textile finishing and wine stabilization. The immobilization of enzymes offers several improvements for enzyme applications because the storage and operational stabilities are frequently enhanced. Moreover, the reusability of immobilized enzymes represents a great advantage compared with free enzymes. In this work, we discuss the different methodologies of enzyme immobilization that have been reported for laccases, such as adsorption, entrapment, encapsulation, covalent binding and self-immobilization. The applications of laccase immobilized by the aforementioned methodologies are presented, paying special attention to recent approaches regarding environmental applications and electrobiochemistry. PMID:22398306

  4. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  5. Adsorption of heavy metal ions by immobilized phytic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.; Zheng, Yizhou; Lu, J.; Gong, Cheng S.

    1997-12-31

    Phytic acid (myoinositol hexaphosphate) or its calcium salt, phytate, is an important plant constituents. It accounts for up to 85% of total phosphorus in cereals and legumes. Phytic acid has 12 replaceable protons in the phytic molecule rendering it the ability to complex with multivalent cations and positively charged proteins. Poly 4-vinyl pyridine (PVP) and other strong-based resins have the ability to adsorb phytic acid. PVP has the highest adsorption capacity of 0.51 phytic acid/resins. The PVP resin was used as the support material for the immobilization of phytic acid. The immobilized phytic acid can adsorb heavy metal ions, such as cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc ions, from aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherms of the selected ions by immobilized phytic acid were conducted in packed-bed column at room temperature. Results from the adsorption tests showed 6.6 mg of Cd{sup 2+}, 7 mg of Cu{sup 2+}, 7.2 mg of Ni{sup 2+}, 7.4 mg of Pb{sup 2+}, and 7.7 mg of Zn{sup 2+} can be adsorbed by each gram of PVP-phytic acid complex. The use of immobilized phytic acid has the potential for removing metal ions from industrial or mining waste water. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. PMID:20580809

  7. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  8. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  10. Spine Immobilizer for Accident Victims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Lampson, K.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed conformal bladder filled with tiny spheres called "microballoons," enables spine of accident victim to be rapidly immobilized and restrained and permit victim to be safely removed from accident scene in extremely short time after help arrives. Microballoons expand to form rigid mass when pressure within bladder is less than ambient. Bladder strapped to victim is also strapped to rescue chair. Void between bladder and chair is filled with cloth wedges.

  11. Industrial applications of immobilized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Linko, P.; Linko, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Although the application of the natural attraction of many microorganisms to surfaces has been applied in vinegar production since the early 1980s, and has long been utilized in waste water purification, the development of microbial cell immobilization techniques for special applications dates back only to the early 1960s. The immobilization may involve whole cells, cell fragments, or lysed cells. Whole cells may retain their metabolic activity with their complex multienzyme systems and cofactor regeneration mechanisms intact, or they may be killed in the process with only a few desired enzymes remaining active in the final biocatalyst. Cells may also be coimmobilized with an enzyme to carry out special reactions. Although relatively few industrial scale applications exist today, some are of very large scale. Current applications vary from relatively small scale steroid conversions to amino acid production and high fructose syrup manufacture. A vast number of potential applications are already known, and one of the most interesting applications may be in continuous fermentation such as ethanol production by immobilized living microorganisms. 373 references.

  12. Combining physico-chemical analysis with a Daphnia magna bioassay to evaluate a recycling technology for drinking water treatment plant waste residuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Xu, Yongpeng; Zhu, Shijun; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Recycling water treatment plant (WTP) waste residuals is considered to be a feasible method to enhance the efficiency of pollutant removal. This study also evaluated the safety and water quality of a pilot-DWTP waste residuals recycling technology by combining physical-chemistry analysis with a Daphnia magna assay. The water samples taken from each treatment step were extracted and concentrated by XAD-2 resin and were then analyzed for immobilization and enzyme activity with D. magna. The measured parameters, such as the dissolve organic carbon (DOC), UV254 and THM formation potential (THMFPs) of the recycling process, did not obviously increase over 15 days of continuous operation and were even lower than typical values from a conventional process. The extract concentration ranged from 0 to 2 Leq/ml as measured on the 7th and 15th days and the immobilization of D. magna exposed to water treated by the recycling process was nearly equivalent to that of the conventional process. Both the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the catalase (CAT) activity assay indicated that a lower dose of water extract (0.5, 1, 1.5 Leq/ml) could stimulate the enzyme activity of D. magna, whereas a higher dose (2 Leq/ml at the sampling point C3, R3, R4 ) inhibits the activity. Moreover, the SOD and CAT activity of D. magna with DOC and UV254 showed a strong concentration-effect relationship, where the concentration range of DOC and UV254 were 4.1-16.2 mg/L and 0.071-4.382 cm(-1), respectively. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the conventional and recycling treatment processes and the toxicity of water samples in the recycling process did not increase during the 15-day continuous recycling trial. PMID:26318972

  13. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  14. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  15. Modification of tumor cell exosome content by transfection with wt-p53 and microRNA-125b expressing plasmid DNA and its effect on macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, M; Talekar, M; Shah, P; Ouyang, Q; Amiji, M

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are responsible for intercellular communication between tumor cells and others in the tumor microenvironment. These microvesicles promote oncogensis and can support towards metastasis by promoting a pro-tumorogenic environment. Modifying the exosomal content and exosome delivery are emerging novel cancer therapies. However, the clinical translation is limited due to feasibility of isolating and delivery of treated exosomes as well as an associated immune response in patients. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept for a novel treatment approach for manipulating exosomal content by genetic transfection of tumor cells using dual-targeted hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. Following transfection with plasmid DNA encoding for wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and microRNA-125b (miR-125b), we evaluate the transgene expression in the SK-LU-1 cells and in the secreted exosomes. Furthermore, along with modulation of wt-p53 and miR-125b expression, we also show that the exosomes (i.e., wt-p53/exo, miR-125b/exo and combination/exo) have a reprogramed global miRNA profile. The miRNAs in the exosomes were mainly related to the activation of genes associated with apoptosis as well as p53 signaling. More importantly, these altered miRNA levels in the exosomes could mediate macrophage repolarization towards a more pro-inflammatory/antitumor M1 phenotype. However, further studies, especially in vivo studies, are warranted to assess the direct influence of such macrophage reprogramming on cancer cells and oncogenesis post-treatment. The current study provides a novel platform enabling the development of therapeutic strategies affecting not only the cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by utilizing the 'bystander effect' through genetic transfer with secreted exosomes. Such modification could also support antitumor environment leading to decreased oncogenesis. PMID:27500388

  16. Modification of tumor cell exosome content by transfection with wt-p53 and microRNA-125b expressing plasmid DNA and its effect on macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, M; Talekar, M; Shah, P; Ouyang, Q; Amiji, M

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are responsible for intercellular communication between tumor cells and others in the tumor microenvironment. These microvesicles promote oncogensis and can support towards metastasis by promoting a pro-tumorogenic environment. Modifying the exosomal content and exosome delivery are emerging novel cancer therapies. However, the clinical translation is limited due to feasibility of isolating and delivery of treated exosomes as well as an associated immune response in patients. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept for a novel treatment approach for manipulating exosomal content by genetic transfection of tumor cells using dual-targeted hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. Following transfection with plasmid DNA encoding for wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and microRNA-125b (miR-125b), we evaluate the transgene expression in the SK-LU-1 cells and in the secreted exosomes. Furthermore, along with modulation of wt-p53 and miR-125b expression, we also show that the exosomes (i.e., wt-p53/exo, miR-125b/exo and combination/exo) have a reprogramed global miRNA profile. The miRNAs in the exosomes were mainly related to the activation of genes associated with apoptosis as well as p53 signaling. More importantly, these altered miRNA levels in the exosomes could mediate macrophage repolarization towards a more pro-inflammatory/antitumor M1 phenotype. However, further studies, especially in vivo studies, are warranted to assess the direct influence of such macrophage reprogramming on cancer cells and oncogenesis post-treatment. The current study provides a novel platform enabling the development of therapeutic strategies affecting not only the cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by utilizing the ‘bystander effect' through genetic transfer with secreted exosomes. Such modification could also support antitumor environment leading to decreased oncogenesis. PMID:27500388

  17. Combination wt-p53 and MicroRNA-125b Transfection in a Genetically Engineered Lung Cancer Model Using Dual CD44/EGFR-targeting Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Meghna; Trivedi, Malav; Shah, Parin; Ouyang, Qijun; Oka, Adwait; Gandham, Srujan; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in KRAS and p53 signaling pathways contribute to loss of responsiveness to current therapies and a decreased survival in lung cancer. In this study, we have investigated the delivery and transfection of wild-type (wt-) p53 and microRNA-125b (miR-125b) expressing plasmid DNA, in SK-LU-1 human lung adenocarcinoma cells as well as in Kras(G12D)/p53(fl/fl) (KP) genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Systemic plasmid DNA delivery with dual CD44/EGFR-targeted hyaluronic acid (HA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) resulted in a 2- to 20-fold increase in wt-p53 and miR-125b gene expression in SK-LU-1 cells. This resulted in enhanced apoptotic activity as seen with increased APAF-1 and caspase-3 gene expression. Similarly, in vivo evaluations in KP mouse model indicated successful CD44/EGFR-targeted delivery. Tumor growth inhibition and apoptotic induction were also observed with (wt-p53+miR125b) combination therapy in KP tumor model. Lastly, J774.A1 murine macrophages co-cultured with transfected SK-LU-1 cells showed a 14- to 35-fold increase in the iNOS-Arg-1 ratio, supportive of previous results demonstrating a role of miR-125b in macrophage repolarization. Overall, these results show tremendous promise of wt-p53 and miR-125b gene therapy using dual CD44/EGFR-targeting HA NP vector for effective treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26686386

  18. Occurrence and removal of selected micropollutants in a water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Jo, Byung-Il; Yoon, Yeomin; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-01-01

    The levels of 14 micropollutants including nine pharmaceuticals, two pesticides, and three endocrine disruptors were measured in a water treatment plant (WTP) in Seoul, Korea. Among the measured micropollutants, 12 (excluding atrazine and triclocarban) were found in the influent and effluent from the WTP, at levels ranging from 2 to 482 ng L(-1). The removal efficiencies of the detected micropollutants in the WTP ranged from 6% to 100%. Among them diclofenac, acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, and 2,4-D were effectively removed (>80%). Metoprolol was unlikely to be removed (6%) in the WTP process. Concentrations of acetaminophen, metoprolol, ibuprofen, and naproxen were higher in winter, while levels of herbicides of 2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were higher in summer. Metoprolol was hardly removed in the water treatment process. Laboratory experiments showed that compounds with logKow>2.5 (especially bisphenol-A, 2,4-D, carbamazepine, triclocarban and 4-nonylphenol) were effectively removed by coagulation process, and adsorption effect increased in proportion with hydrophobicity of micropollutants and the turbidity of water. Sunlight photodegradation also effectively removed sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine, caffeine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen, which are photosensitizes. Chlorination was relatively not effective for the removal of micropollutants due to the lower chlorine dosage (2 mg L(-1)), lower contact time (1h), and already lower levels of micropollutants at the chlorination stage at WTP. Our results imply that micropollutants during coagulation stage at WTP can be removed not only by coagulation itself, but also by adsorption to clay particle especially for high turbidity water, and by sunlight photodegradation in the areas open to the atmosphere. PMID:24074880

  19. Potential Applications of Immobilized β-Galactosidase in Food Processing Industries

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Parmjit S.; Kumari, Shweta; Panesar, Reeba

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme β-galactosidase can be obtained from a wide variety of sources such as microorganisms, plants, and animals. The use of β-galactosidase for the hydrolysis of lactose in milk and whey is one of the promising enzymatic applications in food and dairy processing industries. The enzyme can be used in either soluble or immobilized forms but the soluble enzyme can be used only for batch processes and the immobilized form has the advantage of being used in batch wise as well as in continuous operation. Immobilization has been found to be convenient method to make enzyme thermostable and to prevent the loss of enzyme activity. This review has been focused on the different types of techniques used for the immobilization of β-galactosidase and its potential applications in food industry. PMID:21234407

  20. Immobilization of enzymes: a literature survey.

    PubMed

    Brena, Beatriz; González-Pombo, Paula; Batista-Viera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The term immobilized enzymes refers to "enzymes physically confined or localized in a certain defined region of space with retention of their catalytic activities, and which can be used repeatedly and continuously." Immobilized enzymes are currently the subject of considerable interest because of their advantages over soluble enzymes. In addition to their use in industrial processes, the immobilization techniques are the basis for making a number of biotechnology products with application in diagnostics, bioaffinity chromatography, and biosensors. At the beginning, only immobilized single enzymes were used, after 1970s more complex systems including two-enzyme reactions with cofactor regeneration and living cells were developed. The enzymes can be attached to the support by interactions ranging from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages to stable covalent bonds. Although the choice of the most appropriate immobilization technique depends on the nature of the enzyme and the carrier, in the last years the immobilization technology has increasingly become a matter of rational design. As a consequence of enzyme immobilization, some properties such as catalytic activity or thermal stability become altered. These effects have been demonstrated and exploited. The concept of stabilization has been an important driving force for immobilizing enzymes. Moreover, true stabilization at the molecular level has been demonstrated, e.g., proteins immobilized through multipoint covalent binding. PMID:23934795

  1. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  2. Rendering plant emissions in a residential setting: An economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.M.; MacDonald, H.F.

    1992-12-01

    The contingent value method is employed to estimate economic damages to households resulting from rendering plant emissions in a small town. Household WTA and WTP are estimated individually and in aggregate. The influence of Household characteristics is examined with regression models. The perception of health risk is an important determinant of household valuation while income appears insignificant. Results indicate that a potential Pareto-improvement is possible with the incorporation of current abatement technology.

  3. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:23876136

  4. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  5. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-03-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

  6. Tyrosinase immobilized enzyme reactor: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Karina Bora; Mischiatti, Keylla Lençone; Fontana, José Domingos; de Oliveira, Brás Heleno

    2014-01-15

    Immobilized enzyme reactors of tyrosinase (tyr-IMERs) for use on-line in HPLC system were prepared by different procedures and then compared. The enzyme, obtained from Agaricus bisporus, was immobilized on epoxy-silica which was prepared using different conditions. Enzyme immobilization was conducted by both in situ and in batch techniques. The different procedures were compared in terms of protein and activity retention, IMERs activity, kinetics and stability. The influence of immobilization procedure on enzyme activity and the behavior of the IMERs against a standard inhibitor were also investigated. In situ immobilization on epoxy-silica, synthesized using microwave assistance, provided the best conditions to prepare tyrosinase IMERs. The tyr-IMERs were successfully tested with known and potential inhibitors of tyrosinase, and the results showed that they can be used for the screening of inhibitors of that enzyme. PMID:24317418

  7. Immobilization of whole cells using polymeric coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.W.; Klei, H.E.; Sunstrom, D.V.; Voronka, P.J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A cell immobilization procedure was developed using latex coatings on solid particles. The method's widespread applicability has been demonstrated by successfully immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ethanol production), Bacillus subtilis (tryptophan production). Penicillium chrysogenum (penicillin G production), and Escherichia coli (aspartic acid production). In contrast to other immobilization methods, this procedure produces a pellicular particle that is porous, allowing rapid substrate and gas transfer, has a hard core to avoid compression in large beds, and is dense to allow use in fluidized beds. The immobilization procedure was optimized with S. cerevisiae. Kinetic constants obtained were used to calculate effectiveness factors to show that there was minimal intraparticle diffusion resistance. Reactors utilizing the optimized particles were run for 300 hours to evaluate immobilized particle half-life which was 250 hours.

  8. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  9. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  10. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma. PMID:21477526

  11. Immobile Robots: AI in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian C.; Nayak, P. Pandurang

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of sensor rich, massively distributed, autonomous systems are being developed that have the potential for profound social, environmental, and economic change. These include networked building energy systems, autonomous space probes, chemical plant control systems, satellite constellations for remote ecosystem monitoring, power grids, biosphere-like life support systems, and reconfigurable traffic systems, to highlight but a few. To achieve high performance, these immobile robots (or immobots) will need to develop sophisticated regulatory and immune systems that accurately and robustly control their complex internal functions. To accomplish this, immobots will exploit a vast nervous system of sensors to model themselves and their environment on a grand scale. They will use these models to dramatically reconfigure themselves in order to survive decades of autonomous operations. Achieving these large scale modeling and configuration tasks will require a tight coupling between the higher level coordination function provided by symbolic reasoning, and the lower level autonomic processes of adaptive estimation and control. To be economically viable they will need to be programmable purely through high level compositional models. Self modeling and self configuration, coordinating autonomic functions through symbolic reasoning, and compositional, model-based programming are the three key elements of a model-based autonomous systems architecture that is taking us into the New Millennium.

  12. Immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon for degradation of sulphonated phenolic compound in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, G; Karthikeyan, S; Gupta, V K; Boopathy, R; Maharaja, P

    2013-03-01

    Xenobiotic compounds are used in considerable quantities in leather industries besides natural organic and inorganic compounds. These compounds resist biological degradation and thus they remain in the treated wastewater in the unaltered molecular configurations. Immobilization of organisms in carrier matrices protects them from shock load application and from the toxicity of chemicals in bulk liquid phase. Mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) has been considered in the present study as the carrier matrix for the immobilization of Bacillus sp. isolated from Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) employed for the treatment of wastewater containing sulphonated phenolic (SP) compounds. Temperature, pH, concentration, particle size and mass of MAC were observed to influence the immobilization behavior of Bacillus sp. The percentage immobilization of Bacillus sp. was the maximum at pH 7.0, temperature 20 °C and at particle size 300 μm. Enthalpy, free energy and entropy of immobilization were -46.9 kJ mol(-1), -1.19 kJ mol(-1) and -161.36 JK(-1)mol(-1) respectively at pH 7.0, temperature 20 °C and particle size 300 μm. Higher values of ΔH(0) indicate the firm bonding of the Bacillus sp. in MAC. Degradation of aqueous sulphonated phenolic compound by Bacillus sp. immobilized in MAC followed pseudo first order rate kinetics with rate constant 1.12 × 10(-2) min(-1). PMID:25427481

  13. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

  14. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-08-07

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents.

  15. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a ¼-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the ¼-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  16. Immobilization depresses insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hirose, M; Kaneki, M; Sugita, H; Yasuhara, S; Martyn, J A

    2000-12-01

    Prolonged immobilization depresses insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle and leads to a catabolic state in the affected areas, with resultant muscle wasting. To elucidate the altered intracellular mechanisms involved in the insulin resistance, we examined insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-subunit (IR-beta) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and activation of its further downstream molecule, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), after unilateral hindlimb immobilization in the rat. The contralateral hindlimb served as control. After 7 days of immobilization of the rat, insulin was injected into the portal vein, and tibialis anterior muscles on both sides were extracted. Immobilization reduced insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-beta and IRS-1. Insulin-stimulated binding of IRS-1 to p85, the regulatory subunit of PI 3-K, and IRS-1-associated PI 3-K activity were also decreased in the immobilized hindlimb. Although IR-beta and p85 protein levels were unchanged, IRS-1 protein expression was downregulated by immobilization. Thus prolonged immobilization may cause depression of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle by altering insulin action at multiple points, including the tyrosine phosphorylation, protein expression, and activation of essential components of insulin signaling pathways. PMID:11093909

  17. Immobilization and characterization of a thermostable lipase.

    PubMed

    Song, Chongfu; Sheng, Liangquan; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2013-12-01

    Lipases have found a number of commercial applications. However, thermostable lipase immobilized on nanoparticle is not extensively characterized. In this study, a recombinant thermostable lipase (designated as TtL) from Thermus thermophilus WL was expressed in Escherichia coli and immobilized onto 3-APTES-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 supermagnetic nanoparticles. Based on analyses with tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer observation, the diameter of immobilized lipase nanoparticle was 18.4 (± 2.4) nm, and its saturation magnetization value was 52.3 emu/g. The immobilized lipase could be separated from the reaction medium rapidly and easily in a magnetic field. The biochemical characterizations revealed that, comparing with the free one, the immobilized lipase exhibited better resistance to temperature, pH, metal ions, enzyme inhibitors, and detergents. The K m value for the immobilized TtL (2.56 mg/mL) was found to be lower than that of the free one (3.74 mg/mL), showing that the immobilization improved the affinity of lipase for its substrate. In addition, the immobilized TtL exhibited good reusability. It retained more than 79.5 % of its initial activity after reusing for 10 cycles. Therefore, our study presented that the possibility of the efficient reuse of the thermostable lipase immobilized on supermagnetic nanoparticles made it attractive from the viewpoint of practical application. PMID:23748908

  18. Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.

    2000-07-19

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

  19. Immobilized Enzymes and Cells as Practical Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1983-02-01

    Performance of enzymes and whole cells in commercial applications can often be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalysts, for instance, by their covalent attachment to or adsorption on solid supports, entrapment in polymeric gels, encapsulation, and cross-linking. The effect of immobilization on enzymatic properties and stability of biocatalysts is considered. Applications of immobilized enzymes and cells in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, in clinical and chemical analyses, and in medicine, as well as probable future trends in enzyme technology are discussed.

  20. Immobilized enzymes and cells as practical catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klibanov, A.M.

    1983-02-11

    Performance of enzymes and whole cells in commercial applications can often be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalysts, for instance, by their covalent attachment to or adsorption on solid supports, entrapment in polymeric gels, encapsulation, and cross-linking. The effect of immobilization on enzymatic properties and stability of biocatalysts is considered. Applications of immobilized enzymes and cells in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, in clinical and chemical analyses, and in medicine, as well as probable future trends in enzyme technology are discussed.

  1. Water treatment plant sludge disposal into stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Filho, Sidney Seckler Ferreira; Piveli, Roque Passos; Cutolo, Silvana Audrá; de Oliveira, Alexandre Alves

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have paid particular attention to the disposal of sludge produced in water treatment plants (WTPs) into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for further processing, mainly because it is considered an attractive alternative for the treatment of waste generated in water production processes. This study evaluated the effects of flow equalization and disposal of sludge, from a conventional WTP, into a WWTP system that includes an anaerobic stabilization pond followed by a facultative pond. During the period of sludge discharge from the WTP into the wastewater system, the influent to the WWTP presented an increase of 17% (from 171 to 200 mg L(-1)) of total suspended solids (TSS) and a 7.0% flow rate increase, without showing adverse effects on the organic load, TSS and nutrients removal. The most significant impact observed in the WWTP was the increase of solids accumulation rate in the anaerobic pond, with a value of 141 mm/year during the sludge discharge period. The operating time, before the dredging and desludging cycles required for this specific anaerobic pond, decreased from 12.7 to 10.4 years, which is consistent with previous studies in literature. Thus, based on the observed parameters of this study, it is viable to release solids from a WTP effluent into a WWTP that includes anaerobic stabilization ponds followed by a facultative pond. Indeed, this process scheme becomes a viable technical, environmental, and economical alternative for small to medium WWTPs. PMID:23416593

  2. [WTP guidance technology: a comparison of payment card, single-bounded and double-bounded dichotomous formats for evaluating non-use values of Sanjiang Plain ecotourism water resources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Guang; Wang, Qiu-Dan; Li, Chen-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Contingent valuation method (CVM) is the most widespread method to assess resources and value of environmental goods and services. The guidance technology of willingness to pay (WTP) is an important means of CVM. Therefore, the study on the WTP guidance technology is an important approach to improve the reliability and validity of CVM. This article conducted comprehensive evaluation on non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain by using payment card, single-bound dichotomous choice and double-bound dichotomous choice. Results showed that the socio-economic attributes were consistent with the willingness to pay in the three formats, and the tender value, age, educational level, annual income and the concern level had significant effect on the willingness to pay, while gender and job did not have significant influence. The WTP value was 112.46 yuan per capita with the payment card, 136.15 with the single-bound dichotomous choice, and 168.74 with the double-bound dichotomous choice. Comprehensive consideration of the nature of the investigation, investigation costs and statistical techniques, the result of double-bound dichotomous choice (47.86 x 10(8) yuan · a(-1)) was best in accordance with the reality, and could be used as non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain. The format of questionnaire was very important to improve its validity, and made a great influence on the WTP. PMID:25757326

  3. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  4. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Nedovic, Viktor; Goyal, Arun; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed. PMID:24288597

  5. Denitrification using a membrane-immobilized biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    McCleaf, P.R. ); Schroeder, E.D. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    Immobilized bacterial cell technology was applied, on a bench scale, to the selective removal of nitrate from contaminated water, together with the segregation of denitrifying bacteria and the carbon energy source from the treated water. The two-chambered reactor, with a microporous membrane for bacterial cell immobilization, performed at an average denitrification rate of 5,800 mg nitrate-nitrogen (NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  6. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Rask, W.C.; Phillips, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  7. Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

  8. Mechanism of Sperm Immobilization by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vijay; Sandhu, Ravneet; Kaur, Siftjit; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Sarwal, Abha; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.; Singh, Shravan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To explore the influence of Escherichia coli on the motility of human spermatozoa and its possible mechanism. Methods. Highly motile preparations of spermatozoa from normozoospermic patients were coincubated with Escherichia coli for 4 hours. At 1, 2 and 4 hours of incubation, sperm motility was determined. The factor responsible for sperm immobilization without agglutination was isolated and purified from filtrates. Results. This report confirms the immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrates sperm immobilization factor (SIF) excreted by E. coli. Further this factor was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel permeation chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. Purified SIF (56 kDa) caused instant immobilization without agglutination of human spermatozoa at 800 μg/mL and death at 2.1 mg/mL. Spermatozoa incubated with SIF revealed multiple and profound alterations involving all superficial structures of spermatozoa as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion. In conclusion, these results have shown immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrate a factor (SIF) produced and secreted by E. coli which causes variable structural damage as probable morphological correlates of immobilization. PMID:20379358

  9. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  10. Metal immobilization in soils using synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oste, Leonard A; Lexmond, Theo M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2002-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils is a technique to improve soil quality. Synthetic zeolites are potentially useful additives to bind heavy metals. This study selected the most effective zeolite in cadmium and zinc binding out of six synthetic zeolites (mordenite-type, faujasite-type, zeolite X, zeolite P, and two zeolites A) and one natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). Zeolite A appeared to have the highest binding capacity between pH 5 and 6.5 and was stable above pH 5.5. The second objective of this study was to investigate the effects of zeolite addition on the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration. Since zeolites increase soil pH and bind Ca, their application might lead to dispersion of organic matter. In a batch experiment, the DOM concentration increased by a factor of 5 when the pH increased from 6 to 8 as a result of zeolite A addition. A strong increase in DOM was also found in the leachate of soil columns, particularly in the beginning of the experiment. This resulted in higher metal leaching caused by metal-DOM complexes. In contrast, the free ionic concentration of Cd and Zn strongly decreased after the addition of zeolites, which might explain the reduction in metal uptake observed in plant growth experiments. Pretreatment of zeolites with acid (to prevent a pH increase) or Ca (to coagulate organic matter) suppressed the dispersion of organic matter, but also decreased the metal binding capacity of the zeolites due to competition of protons or Ca. PMID:12026084

  11. COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF PLASMA MASS SEPARATION IN THE ARCHIMEDES FILTER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, C.E.; Gilleland, J.G.; Wagoner, J.D.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the commercial application of an innovative plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter to a pre-treatment plant that can be integrated into the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River Sites to significantly enhance the treatment of radioactive high-level waste. The output of the Archimedes Filter is completely compatible with existing waste immobilization processes such as vitrification and requires no new waste form to be developed. A full-geometric-scale Demonstration Filter Unit (DEMO) has been constructed and is undergoing initial testing at the Archimedes Technology Group Development Facilities in San Diego. Some of the technology and engineering development is being performed by other organizations in collaboration with Archimedes. The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is developing the plasma calcination technology and all of the associated systems for AFP feed preparation. Two Russian institutes are involved in the development of the ICP torch and injector system. The Remote System Group (UT-Battelle) at ORNL is developing the remote maintenance system for the filter units. Conceptual design of the Archimedes Filter Plant (AFP) is being developed concurrently with the DEMO testing program. The AFP mission is to significantly reduce the cost and accelerate the rate of vitrification of high-level waste by separating low activity waste from the sludge removed from underground storage tanks. Mass separation is accomplished by vaporizing the sludge feed and injecting it into a partially ionized, neutral plasma. In a single pass, heavy ions are deposited near the center of the filter and light mass ions are transported by the plasma to the ends of the cylindrically-shaped vacuum vessel. Responding to the DOE programs for cost reduction and cleanup acceleration, the AFP Project is planned on an expeditious schedule that executes all phases of the project with private sector funding. The initial AFP

  12. Hyperalgesia in an immobilized rat hindlimb: effect of treadmill exercise using non-immobilized limbs.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Sayaka; Nakano, Jiro; Sekino, Yuki; Hamaue, Yohei; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Cast immobilization of limbs causes hyperalgesia, which is a decline of the threshold of mechanical and thermal mechanical stimuli. The immobilization-induced hyperalgesia (IIH) can disturb rehabilitation and activities of daily living in patients with orthopedic disorders. However, it is unclear what therapeutic and preventive approaches can be used to alleviate IIH. Exercise that activates the descending pain modulatory system may be effective for IIH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise during the immobilization period, using the non-immobilized limbs, on IIH. Thirty-six 8-week-old Wistar rats were randomly divided into (1) control, (2) immobilization (Im), and (3) immobilization and treadmill exercise (Im+Ex) groups. In the Im and Im+Ex groups, the right ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for an 8-week period. In the Im+Ex group, treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week) was administered during the immobilization period while the right hindlimb was kept immobilized. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using von Frey filaments every week. To investigate possible activation of the descending pain modulatory system, beta-endorphin expression levels in hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray were analyzed. Although IIH clearly occurred in the Im group, the hyperalgesia was partially but significantly reduced in the Im+Ex group. Beta-endorphin, which is one of the endogenous opioids, was selectively increased in the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray of the Im+Ex group. Our data suggest that treadmill running using the non-immobilized limbs reduces the amount of hyperalgesia induced in the immobilized limb even if it is not freed. This ameliorating effect might be due to the descending pain modulatory system being activated by upregulation of beta-endorphin in the brain. PMID:25304541

  13. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242-A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to

  14. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  15. Fusing probability density function into Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence for the evaluation of water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2013-05-01

    The evaluation of the status of a municipal drinking water treatment plant (WTP) is important. The evaluation depends on several factors, including, human health risks from disinfection by-products (R), disinfection performance (D), and cost (C) of water production and distribution. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) of evidence can combine the individual status with respect to R, D, and C to generate a new indicator, from which the overall status of a WTP can be evaluated. In the DST, the ranges of different factors affecting the overall status are divided into several segments. The basic probability assignments (BPA) for each segment of these factors are provided by multiple experts, which are then combined to obtain the overall status. In assigning the BPA, the experts use their individual judgments, which can impart subjective biases in the overall evaluation. In this research, an approach has been introduced to avoid the assignment of subjective BPA. The factors contributing to the overall status were characterized using the probability density functions (PDF). The cumulative probabilities for different segments of these factors were determined from the cumulative density function, which were then assigned as the BPA for these factors. A case study is presented to demonstrate the application of PDF in DST to evaluate a WTP, leading to the selection of the required level of upgradation for the WTP. PMID:22941202

  16. Immobilization of thermolysin to polyamide nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Moeschel, Klaus; Nouaimi, Meryem; Steinbrenner, Christa; Bisswanger, Hans

    2003-04-20

    In the last few years, an increasing number of biotechnological techniques have been applied to the restoration and conservation of works of art, paintings, old maps, and papers or books. Enzymes can solve problems that give restorers difficulties, although for many applications it is not possible to use soluble enzymes; therefore, it is necessary to look for suitable carriers for immobilization. Different methods for covalent immobilization of enzymes to polyamide nonwovens were tested, using thermolysin as an example. Two distinct strategies were pursued: (1). controlled, partial hydrolysis of the polymer and subsequent binding of the enzyme to the released amino and carboxy groups; and (2). attachment of reactive groups directly to the polyamide without disintegrating the polymeric structure (O-alkylation). Different spacers were used for covalent fixation of the enzyme in both cases. The enzyme was fixed to the released amino groups by glutaraldehyde, either with or without a spacer. Either way, active enzyme could be immobilized to the matrix. However, intense treatment caused severe damage to the stability of the nonwoven fabric, and reduced the mechanical strength. Conditions were investigated to conserve the nonwoven fabric structure while obtaining near-maximum immobilized enzyme activity. Immobilization of the enzyme to the released carboxy group after acid hydrolysis was performed using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. In comparison to the enzyme bound via the amino group, the yield of immobilized enzyme activity was slightly lower when benzidine was taken as spacer and still lower with a 1,6-hexanediamine spacer. O-alkylation performed with dimethylsulfate caused severe damage to the nonwoven fabric structure. Considerably better results were obtained with triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate. As the spacers 1,6-hexanediamine and adipic acid dihydrazide were used, activation for immobilizing thermolysin was performed with glutaraldehyde, adipimidate, and azide

  17. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-04-15

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R&D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R&D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the excellent

  18. Effects of joint immobilization on standing balance.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Paulo B; Freitas, Sandra M S F; Duarte, Marcos; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the effect of joint immobilization on the postural sway during quiet standing. We hypothesized that the center of pressure (COP), rambling, and trembling trajectories would be affected by joint immobilization. Ten young adults stood on a force plate during 60 s without and with immobilized joints (only knees constrained, CK; knees and hips, CH; and knees, hips, and trunk, CT), with their eyes open (OE) or closed (CE). The root mean square deviation (RMS, the standard deviation from the mean) and mean speed of COP, rambling, and trembling trajectories in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions were analyzed. Similar effects of vision were observed for both directions: larger amplitudes for all variables were observed in the CE condition. In the anterior-posterior direction, postural sway increased only when the knees, hips, and trunk were immobilized. For the medial-lateral direction, the RMS and the mean speed of the COP, rambling, and trembling displacements decreased after immobilization of knees and hips and knees, hips, and trunk. These findings indicate that the single inverted pendulum model is unable to completely explain the processes involved in the control of the quiet upright stance in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. PMID:19342114

  19. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Danker, W.

    1995-07-23

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996.

  20. EFFECTS OF JOINT IMMOBILIZATION ON STANDING BALANCE

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Paulo B.; Freitas, Sandra M. S. F.; Duarte, Marcos; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint immobilization on the postural sway during quiet standing. We hypothesized that center of pressure (COP), rambling, and trembling trajectories could be affected by joint immobilization. Ten young adults stood on a force plate during 60 s without and with immobilized joints (only knees constrained, CK; knees and hips, CH; and knees, hips and trunk, CT), with their eyes opened (EO) or closed (EC). The root mean square deviation (RMS, the standard deviation from the mean) and mean speed of COP, rambling, and trembling trajectories in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions were analyzed. Similar effects of vision were observed for both directions: larger amplitude for all variables was observed in the EC condition. In the anterior-posterior direction, postural sway increased only when the knees, hips and trunk were immobilized. For the medial-lateral direction, the RMS and the mean speed of the COP, rambling, and trembling displacements decreased after immobilization of knees and hips and knees, hips and trunk. These findings indicate that the inverted pendulum model is unable to completely explain the processes involved in the control of the quiet upright stance in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. PMID:19342114

  1. Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira )

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  3. Link Climate Effects to Surface Water Quality and Drinking Water Plant Adaptation - A Update on Hydroclimatic Province and WTP-ccam Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key points in this presentation are: (1) How and why hydroclimatic province can help precipitation projection for water program engineering and management, (2) Implications of initial research results and planned further monitoring / research activities, (3) Five adaptation t...

  4. Biosynthesis and Immobilization of Biofunctional Allophycocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Shaofang; Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Chen, Huaxin; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2011-01-01

    The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit, which has various reported pharmacological uses, was biosynthesized with both Strep-II-tag and His-tag at the N-terminal in Escherichia coli. The streptavidin-binding ability resulting from the Strep II-tag was confirmed by Western blot. Additionally, the metal-chelating ability deriving from the His-tag not only facilitated its purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography but also promoted its immobilization on Zn (II)-decorated silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit with streptavidin-binding ability was thereby immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are promising as drug delivery vehicles for targeting and locating at tumors. Thus, based on genetic engineering and nanotechnology, we provide a potential strategy to facilitate the biomodification and targeted delivery of pharmacological proteins. PMID:23008737

  5. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Project Can Loading and Puck Handling Vision Software

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2001-09-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of a two track approach for the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium. The Department of Energy is funding the development and testing effort for the PIP being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The PIP will utilize the ceramic can-in-canister technology in a process that mixes plutonium and uranium with ceramic formers and neutron absorbers, presses the mixture into a ceramic puck-like form, and sinters the pucks in a furnace. Once sintered, the pucks are loaded into cans, then cans are placed into magazines, and magazines are inserted into large canisters. The canisters will subsequently be filled with high-level waste glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP project is currently being suspended due to budget constraints. The suspension requires documenting the current status of all systems under development including the Can Loading Vision System and the Puck Handling Vision System. This report provides this documentation.

  7. [Use of immobilization in the study of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Immobilized monomers].

    PubMed

    Muronets, V I; Ashmarina, L I; Asriiants, R A; Nagradova, N K

    1982-06-01

    Active immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase were prepared by means of dissociation of the tetrameric enzyme molecule covalently bound to Sepharose via a single subunit. The conditions were elaborated to achieve the inactivation and solubilization of the non-covalently bound subunits leaving the monomer coupled to the matrix intact. This procedure differs from the previously developed method of matrix-bound oligomeric enzymes dissociation in a detail which was found to be essentially important. The widely used method includes complete denaturation of all subunits during treatment with urea followed by reactivation of the immobilized one, whereas only the non-covalently bound subunits suffer denaturation under the conditions developed in the present work. The immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase exhibit Vmax and Km (for NAD and substrate) values similar to those found for the immobilized tetramer. Reassociation of the immobilized monomers with soluble enzyme subunits obtained in the presence of urea produces matrix-bound tetrameric species. Immobilized trimers ae formed upon incubation of matrix-bound monomers in a diluted apoenzyme solution. The immobilized monomeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzyme species were used to study the role of subunit interactions in cooperative phenomena exhibited by the dehydrogenase. PMID:7115810

  8. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  9. Synergistic improvement of crop physiological status by combination of cadmium immobilization and micronutrient fertilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingtao; Dumat, Camille; Lu, Huanping; Li, Yingwen; Li, Hanqing; Xiao, Yanhui; Zhuang, Ping; Li, Zhian

    2016-04-01

    Wollastonite application in cadmium-contaminated soils can reduce cadmium concentrations in plant, while the side effect is the synchronous immobilization of micronutrients, which reduces micronutrient uptake in plant, inducing micronutrient deficient symptoms. Accordingly, we investigated whether the supplement of Zn and Mn fertilizers after the wollastonite addition could promote the growth and photosynthesis in amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.). In this study, plants were cultivated in cadmium-contaminated soil under micronutrient fertilization alone, wollastonite addition, and combination of wollastonite and micronutrient fertilization treatments. Then, plant biomass; photosynthesis parameters; and total Cd, Zn, and Mn concentrations were investigated. Moreover, chemical extractions were performed on soil samples. The results show that application of wollastonite decreased Cd, Zn, and Mn concentrations in plant and availability in soil and it increased the gas exchange ability of plants. But, it reduced the chlorophyll content in leaves and had no positive influence on plant biomass. In comparison, Zn and Mn fertilization after wollastonite application greatly increased plant biomass and photosynthetic ability. It also reduced Cd phytoavailability more efficiently. Therefore, synergistic improvement of physiological status of farmland crop by sequential treatment with first wollastonite for cadmium immobilization, and then micronutrient fertilization to avoid micronutrient deficiency, was demonstrated. PMID:26645231

  10. Literature Review: Assessment of DWPF Melter and Melter Off-gas System Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2015-07-30

    Testing to date for the MOC for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melters is being reviewed with the lessons learned from DWPF in mind and with consideration to the changes in the flowsheet/feed compositions that have occurred since the original testing was performed. This information will be presented in a separate technical report that identifies any potential gaps for WTP processing.

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-05-13

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  12. Applications of immobilized biocatalysts in chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, L.D.

    1986-04-01

    In 1974, Weetall published a report in Analytical Chemistry documenting the increasing interest in a relatively new concept in catalysis involving enzymes physically or covalently bound to a solid support. Very few reports of a new immobilization chemistry can stir enthusiasm, and the descriptions of new analysis systems have become less and less frequent. With these advances in mind, it seems appropriate to evaluate the use of immobilized enzymes as routine laboratory tools, a prediction made in 1976 (2), and the reasons for the success or failure of the technique. 20 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  13. REPORT ON QUALITATIVE VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS USING LITHIUM-ALUMINUM LAYERED DOUBLE-HYDROXIDES FOR THE REDUCTION OF ALUMINUM FROM THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT FEEDSTOCK

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ; DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA

    2010-05-11

    A process for removing aluminum from tank waste simulants by adding lithium and precipitating Li-Al-dihydroxide (Lithiumhydrotalcite, [LiAl{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sup +}X{sup -}) has been verified. The tests involved a double-shell tank (DST) simulant and a single-shell tank (SST) simulant. In the case of the DST simulant, the product was the anticipated Li-hydrotalcite. For the SST simulant, the product formed was primarily Li-phosphate. However, adding excess Li to the solution did result in the formation of traces of Li-hydrotalcite. The Li-hydrotalcite from the DST supernate was an easily filterable solid. After four water washes the filter cake was a fluffy white material made of < 100 {micro}m particles made of smaller spheres. These spheres are agglomerates of {approx} 5 {micro}m diameter platelets with < 1 {micro}m thickness. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of the filtrate, filter cake, and wash waters indicate a removal of 90+ wt% of the dissolved Al for the DST simulant. For the SST simulant, the main competing reaction to the formation of lithium hydrotalcite appears to be the formation of lithium phosphate. In case of the DST simulant, phosphorus co-precipitated with the hydrotalcite. This would imply the added benefit of the removal of phosphorus along with aluminum in the pre-treatment part of the waste treatment and immobilization plant (WTP). For this endeavor to be successful, a serious effort toward process parameter optimization is necessary. Among the major issues to be addressed are the dependency of the reaction yield on the solution chemistry, as well as residence times, temperatures, and an understanding of particle growth.

  14. High accumulation of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol-4-beta-D: -glucoside in free and immobilized Linum usitatissimum cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Attoumbré, Jacques; Charlet, Stéphane; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Hano, Christophe; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Gillet, Françoise; Bensaddek, Lamine; Mesnard, François; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2006-08-01

    As flaxseed mainly accumulates lignans (secoisolariciresinol diglucoside and matairesinol), these compounds were barely or not detected in plant cell suspensions initiated from Linum usitatissimum. In contrast, these cell suspensions were shown to accumulate substantial amounts of a neolignan identified as dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol-4-beta-D: -glucoside (DCG) (up to 47.7 mg g(-1) DW). The formation of this pharmacologically active compound was evaluated as a function of cell growth and in relation to phytohormone balance of the culture media. After establishment of efficient culture conditions, production of DCG was investigated in immobilized plant cell suspensions initiated from plantlet roots of L. usitatissimum. The results indicate that immobilization enhances the DCG production up to 60.0 mg g(-1) DW but depresses the cell growth resulting in no improvement of the total DCG yield. Nevertheless, with immobilized cell suspensions, a release of DCG into the medium is observed allowing an easier recovery. PMID:16523286

  15. Bone char: a clean and renewable phosphorus fertilizer with cadmium immobilization capability.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Nina; Leinweber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Soil contamination with Cd from P fertilizer and other anthropogenic and geogenic sources is a serious problem. In situ immobilization by P application to soil is known as an applicable remediation technique leading to reduced Cd uptake by plants, and use of a Cd-free P fertilizer from renewable sources would be most favorable. Bone char (BC) (15% P, 28% Ca, 0.7% Mg) may be used as such a quality P fertilizer, but it is unknown if its dissolution in soil provides sufficient P and immobilizes Cd in moderately contaminated soils. We incubated BC and triple superphosphate (TSP) in 11 soils that contained between 0.3 to 19.6 mg Cd kg and determined the kinetics of P dissolution during a time period of 145 d. The concomitant Cd immobilization was determined by extracting the mobile Cd with 1 mol L NHNO solution. For most soils, BC increased the concentration of labile P immediately after application, reaching a maximum after 34 d, although the solubility was below that of TSP (2.9-19.3 vs. 4.1-24.0%). Among five kinetic models, the Langmuir-type equation provided the best description of P dissolution from BC and TSP. The Cd immobilization resulting from BC dissolution exceeded that of TSP by a factor of 1.4 to 2.7. The P dissolution from BC was negatively correlated with pH and positively with P sorption capacity, whereas Cd immobilization was positively correlated with soil pH. These causal relationships were expressed in multiple equations that enable predictions of P dissolution and Cd immobilization and thus may help to introduce BC as sustainable P fertilizer and useful soil amendment. PMID:23673832

  16. The income elasticity of Willingness-To-Pay (WTP) revisited: A meta-analysis of studies for restoring Good Ecological Status (GES) of water bodies under the Water Framework Directive (WFD).

    PubMed

    Tyllianakis, Emmanouil; Skuras, Dimitris

    2016-11-01

    The income elasticity of Willingness-To-Pay (WTP) is ambiguous and results from meta-analyses are disparate. This may be because the environmental good or service to be valued is very broadly defined or because the income measured in individual studies suffers from extensive non-reporting or miss reporting. The present study carries out a meta-analysis of WTP to restore Good Ecological Status (GES) under the Water Framework Directive (WFD). This environmental service is narrowly defined and its aims and objectives are commonly understood among the members of the scientific community. Besides income reported by the individual studies, wealth and income indicators collected by Eurostat for the geographic entities covered by the individual studies are used. Meta-regression analyses show that income is statistically significant, explains a substantial proportion of WTP variability and its elasticity is considerable in magnitude ranging from 0.6 to almost 1.7. Results are robust to variations in the sample of the individual studies participating in the meta-analysis, the econometric approach and the function form of the meta-regression. The choice of wealth or income measure is not that important as it is whether this measure is Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) adjusted among the individual studies. PMID:27538249

  17. Development of polyphase ceramics for the immobilization of high-level Defense nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Harker, A.B.; Clarke, D.R.; Flintoff, J.J.; Shaw, T.M.

    1983-02-25

    The report contains two major sections: Section I - An Improved Polyphase Ceramic for High-Level Defense Nucleation Waste reports the work conducted on titanium-silica based ceramics for immobilizing Savannah River Plant waste. Section II - Formulation and Processing of Alumina Based Ceramic Nuclear Waste Forms describes the work conducted on developing a generic alumina and alumina-silica based ceramic waste form capable of immobilizing any nuclear waste with a high aluminum content. Such wastes include the Savannah River Plant wastes, Hanford neutralized purex wastes, and Hanford N-Reactor acid wastes. The design approach and process technology in the two reports demonstrate how the generic high waste loaded ceramic form can be applied to a broad range of nuclear waste compositions. The individual sections are abstracted and indexed separately.

  18. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. he purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. ydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]was reacted with aqueous Pb, resinexchang...

  19. COMPLEXANTS FOR ACTINIDE ELEMENT COORDINATION AND IMMOBILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose that inorganic clusters known as polyoxoanions (POAs) can be exploited as complexants for actinide (An) ion coordination and immobilization. Our objective is to develop rugged, stoichiometrically well-defined POAs that act as molecular containers of An elements. Poly...

  20. Immobilization of plasmid DNA in bacterial ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Peter; Tabrizi, Chakameh Azimpour; Walcher, Petra; Haidinger, Wolfgang; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Werner

    2005-02-16

    The development of novel delivery vehicles is crucial for the improvement of DNA vaccine efficiency. In this report, we describe a new platform technology, which is based on the immobilization of plasmid DNA in the cytoplasmic membrane of a bacterial carrier. This technology retains plasmid DNA (Self-Immobilizing Plasmid, pSIP) in the host envelope complex due to a specific protein/DNA interaction during and after protein E-mediated lysis. The resulting bacterial ghosts (empty bacterial envelopes) loaded with pDNA were analyzed in detail by real time PCR assays. We could verify that pSIP plasmids were retained in the pellets of lysed Escherichia coli cultures indicating that they are efficiently anchored in the inner membrane of bacterial ghosts. In contrast, a high percentage of control plasmids that lack essential features of the self-immobilization system were expelled in the culture broth during the lysis process. We believe that the combination of this plasmid immobilization procedure and the protein E-mediated lysis technology represents an efficient in vivo technique for the production of non-living DNA carrier vehicles. In conclusion, we present a "self-loading", non-living bacterial DNA delivery vector for vaccination endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15681093

  1. Enzyme immobilization by means of ultrafiltration techniques.

    PubMed

    Scardi, V; Cantarella, M; Gianfreda, L; Palescandolo, R; Alfani, F; Greco, G

    1980-01-01

    Unstirred, plane membrane, ultrafiltration cells have been used as enzymatic reactor units. Because of the concentration polarization phenomena which take place in the system, at steady-state the enzyme is confined (dynamically immobilized) within an extremely narrow region upstream the ultrafiltration membrane. Correspondingly its concentration attains fairly high values. Kinetic studies have been therefore performed under quite unusual experimental conditions in order to better approximate local enzyme concentration levels in immobilized enzyme systems. Studies have been also carried out on the kinetics of enzyme deactivation in the continuous presence of substrate and reaction products. Once the enzyme concentration profile is completely developed, further injection into the system of suitable amounts of an inert proteic macromolecule (albumin polymers) gives rise to the formation of a gel layer onto the ultrafiltration membrane within which the enzyme is entrapped (statically immobilized). The effect of this immobilization technique has been studied as far as the kinetics of the main reaction, the substrate mass transfer resistances and the enzyme stability are concerned. The rejective properties of such gel layers towards enzymatic molecules have been exploited in producing multilayer, multi-enzymatic reactors. PMID:7417597

  2. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes. PMID:26747440

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

  4. Immobilization: A Revolution in Traditional Brewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkajärvi, Ilkka; Linko, Matti

    In nature many micro-organisms tend to bind to solid surfaces. This tendency has long been utilized in a number of processes, for example in producing vinegar and acetic acid in bioreactors filled with wood shavings. Acetobacteria are attached to the surface of these shavings. In modern technical language: they are immobilized. Also yeast cells can be immobilized. In the brewing industry this has been the basis for maintaining efficient, continuous fermentation in bioreactors with very high yeast concentrations. The most dramatic change in brewing over recent years has been the replacement of traditional lagering of several weeks by a continuous process in which the residence time is only about 2h. Continuous primary fermentation is used on a commercial scale in New Zealand. In this process, instead of a carrier, yeast is retained in reactors by returning it partly after separation. In many pilot scale experiments the primary fermentation is shortened from about 1week to 1-2days using immobilized yeast reactors. When using certain genetically modified yeast strains no secondary fermentation is needed, and the total fermentation time in immobilized yeast reactors can therefore be shortened to only 2days.

  5. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Robotic canister loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-04-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form.

  7. Immobilization of immunoglobulins on silica surfaces. Stability.

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, U; Malmqvist, M; Rönnberg, I

    1985-01-01

    The development of new immunosensors based on surface-concentration-measuring devices requires a stable and reproducible immobilization of antibodies on well-characterized solid surfaces. We here report on the immobilization of immunoglobulin G (IgG) on chemically modified silica surfaces. Such surfaces may be used in various surface-oriented analytical methods. Reactive groups were introduced to the silica surfaces by chemical-vapour deposition of silane. The surfaces were characterized by ellipsometry, contact-angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy. IgG covalently bound by the use of thiol-disulphide exchange reactions, thereby controlling the maximum number of covalent bonds to the surface, was compared with IgG adsorbed on various silica surfaces. This comparison showed that the covalently bound IgG has a superior stability when the pH was lowered or incubation with detergents, urea or ethylene glycol was carried out. The result was evaluated by ellipsometry, an optical technique that renders possible the quantification of amounts of immobilized IgG. The results outline the possibilities of obtaining a controlled covalent binding of biomolecules to solid surfaces with an optimal stability and biological activity of the immobilized molecules. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2988497

  8. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  9. Affinity chromatography of immobilized actin and myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, R C; Trayer, I P

    1975-01-01

    Actin and myosin were immobilized by coupling them to agarose matrices. Both immobilized G-actin and immobilized myosin retain most of the properties of the proteins in free solution and are reliable over long periods of time. Sepharose-F-actin, under the conditions used in this study, has proved unstable and variable in its properties. Sepharose-G-actin columns were used to bind heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1 specifically and reversibly. The interaction involved is sensitive to variation in ionic strength, such that myosin itself is not retained by the columns at the high salt concentration required for its complete solubilization. Myosin, rendered soluble at low ionic strength by polyalanylation, will interact successfully with the immobilized actin. The latter can distinguish between active and inactive fractions of the proteolytic and polyalanyl myosin derivatives, and was used in the preparation of these molecules. The complexes formed between the myosin derivatives and Sepharose-G-actin can be dissociated by low concentrations of ATP, ADP and pyrophosphate in both the presence and the absence of Mg2+. The G-actin columns were used to evaluate the results of chemical modifications of myosin subfragments on their interactions with actin. F-Actin in free solution is bound specifically and reversibly to columns of insolubilized myosin. Thus, with elution by either ATP or pyrophosphate, actin has been purified in one step from extracts of acetone-dried muscle powder. PMID:241335

  10. Short-Term Limb Immobilization Affects Cognitive Motor Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toussaint, Lucette; Meugnot, Aurore

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a brief period of limb immobilization on the cognitive level of action control. A splint placed on the participants' left hand was used as a means of immobilization. We used a hand mental rotation task to investigate the immobilization-induced effects on motor imagery performance (Experiments 1 and 2) and a number mental…

  11. Continuous Production of Alkyl Esters Using an Immobilized Lipase Bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An immobilized lipase packed-bed bioreactor was developed for esterifying the free fatty acids in greases as a pretreatment step in the production of their simple alkyl esters for use as biodiesel. The immobilized lipases used in the study were immobilized preparations of Candida antarctica (C. a.)...

  12. Comparison of phosphate materials for immobilizing cadmium in soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Chung, Doug Young; Lee, Do Kyoung; Kim, Pil Joo

    2010-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effects of phosphate (P) materials in reducing cadmium extractability. Seven P materials (commercial P fertilizers--fused phosphate (FP), 'fused and superphosphate' [FSP], and rock phosphate [RP]; P chemicals--Ca[H(2)PO(4)](2).H(2)O, [NH(4)](2)HPO(4), KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4)) were selected for the test. The selected P source was mixed with Cd-contaminated soil at the rate of 0, 200, 400, 800, and 1,600 mg P kg(-1) under controlled moisture conditions at 70% of water holding capacity, then incubated for 8 weeks. FP, Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2) H(2)O, KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4) significantly decreased NH(4)OAc-extractable Cd (plant-available form) concentrations with increasing application rates. Compared to other phosphate materials used, K(2)HPO(4) was found to be the most effective in reducing the plant-available Cd concentration in soil, mainly due to the negative charge increase caused by soil pH and phosphate adsorption. Contrary to the general information, FSP and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) increased Cd extractability at low levels of P application (<400 mg kg(-1)), and thereafter Cd extractability decreased significantly with increasing application rate. RP scarcely had an effect on reducing Cd extractability. Ion activity products of CdHPO(4), Cd(OH)(2), and CdCO(3) analyzed by the MINTEQ program were significantly increased by K(2)HPO(4) addition, but the effect of Cd-P compound formation on reducing Cd extractability was negligible. Conclusively, the P-induced alleviation of Cd extractability can be attributed primarily to Cd immobilization due to the increase in soil pH and negative charge rather than Cd-P precipitation, and therefore, alkaline P materials such as K(2)HPO(4) are effective for immobilizing soil Cd. PMID:19633979

  13. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. Methods A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Results Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. Conclusions We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer. PMID:24355316

  14. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  15. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors Using Immobilized Bioreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, David R.; Luo, Shufang; Munkholm, Christiane

    1988-06-01

    Optrodes employing immobilized enzymes were developed using covalent attachment of sensor reagents. This development is an extension of the original application of this sensor technology in which a pH sensor was constructed with the pH sensitive dye fluorescein incorporated into a polymer covalently attached to the fiber tip. This sensor displayed significantly improved response times over previous fiber optic sensors because of reduced diffusion limitations. In addition, the signal intensities were greatly enhanced by the high concentration of fluorescent dye localized at the fiber tip. With the anticipation that these qualities would be preserved, a class of sensors based on the immobilization of biomolecules in the polymer matrix became the next goal. This paper will first describe a fiber optic probe prepared by immobilizing esterase in a crosslinked polyacrylamide matrix. The immobilized esterase converts the nonfluorescent fluoresceindiacetate into fluorescein. Both the steady state level and kinetic generation of fluorescence can be related to the concentration of fluoresceindiacetate. A fiber optic sensor for penicillin has been made by coimmobili zing penicillinase with a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Penicillinase converts penicillin to penicilloic acid which produces a microenvironmental pH change in the dye-containing polymer matrix resulting in a concommitant change in fluorescence. The change in fluorescence is proportional to the concentration of penicillin and a 95% response is reached in 40-60 seconds. The sensor has a detection limit of 2.5 x 10-4 M. Another class of sensors using immobilized bioreceptors will be based on the principles of fluoroimmunoassay. This paper will discuss some basic principles and problems of 1) fluorescence quenching immunoassays, 2) fluorescence excitation transfer immunoassays, and 3) energy transfer immunoassays for digoxin. Both advantages and inherent problems for these sensor preparations will be addressed.

  16. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  17. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

  18. Entry Boreholes Summary Report for the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    This report describes the 2006 fiscal year field activities associated with the installation of four cable-tool-drilled boreholes located within the boundary of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), DOE Hanford site, Washington. The cable-tool-drilled boreholes extend from surface to ~20 ft below the top of basalt and were utilized as cased entry holes for three deep boreholes (approximately 1400 ft) that were drilled to support the acquisition of sub-surface geophysical data, and one deep corehole (1400 ft) that was drilled to acquire continuous core samples from underlying basalt and sedimentary interbeds. The geophysical data acquired from these boreholes will be integrated into a seismic response model that will provide the basis for defining the seismic design criteria for the WTP facilities.

  19. Impact of immobilized polysaccharide chiral stationary phases on enantiomeric separations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2006-04-01

    Immobilized polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs) are gaining importance in the resolution of racemic compounds due to their stable nature on working with normal solvents and those prohibited for use with coated phases (tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, dichloromethane, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, ethyl acetate, and certain other ethers). This review discusses the use of immobilized polysaccharide CSPs in the chiral resolution of various racemates by liquid chromatography. The discussion includes immobilization methodologies, enantioselectivities, efficiencies, and a comparison of chiral recognition capabilities of coated vs. immobilized CSPs. Some applications of immobilized CSPs to the chiral resolution of racemic compounds are also presented. PMID:16830488

  20. Biosorption of uranium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU immobilized in a novel matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.C.Z.; Reeves, M.

    1997-01-01

    A number of polymeric materials, including calcium alginate, polyacrylamide, polysulfone, and polyurethane, were evaluated as possible immobilization matrices for lyophilized biomass of P. aeruginoso CSU. Polyurethane-based materials such as hydrogel were identified as superior candidates for biomass immobilization. A novel polyurethane gel-bead fabrication technique was developed and successfully demonstrated at pilot-plant scale for producing mass qualities of spherical, uniform-size beads. The immobilized bacterial biomass was evaluated via the measurement of sorption isotherms and dynamics within a batch, stirred-tank reactor; and loading and elution behavior within a continuous, upflow, packed-bed columnar reactor. Sorption equilibrium and dynamics in a batch stirred tank were modeled with a pore-diffusion mass transfer model, by which a pore-diffusion coefficient was determined to be approximately 2.0 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/s for uranyl ion transport through the polyurethane gel matrix. The biosorbent beads were regenerable with dilute (0.01-0.1 M) sodium carbonate solutions. Preliminary column breakthrough-elution studies indicated that P. aeruginosa CSU biomass immobilized within polyurethane gel beads was effective for removal of uranium from low-concentration, acidic wastewater. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Isolation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria and their potential for lead immobilization in soil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-01-30

    Lead (Pb), a highly toxic heavy metal forms stable compounds with phosphate (P). The potential of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) to immobilize Pb by enhancing solubilization of insoluble P compounds was tested in this research. Eighteen different PSB strains isolated from P amended and Pb contaminated soils were screened for their efficiency in P solubilization. The PSB isolated from P amended soils solubilized 217-479 mg/L of P while the PSB from Pb contaminated soil solubilized 31-293 mg/L of P. Stepwise multiple regression analysis and P solubility kinetics indicated that the major mechanism of P solubilization by PSB is the pH reduction through the release of organic acids. From the isolated bacteria, two PSB were chosen for Pb immobilization and these bacteria were identified as Pantoea sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. The PSB significantly increased P solubilization by 25.0% and 49.9% in the case of Pantoea sp., and 63.3% and 88.6% in the case of Enterobacter sp. for 200 and 800 mg/kg of rock phosphate (RP) addition, respectively, thereby enhancing the immobilization of Pb by 8.25-13.7% in the case of Pantoea sp. and 14.7-26.4% in the case of Enterobacter sp. The ability of PSB to solubilize P, promote plant growth, and immobilize Pb can be used for phytostabilization of Pb contaminated soils. PMID:20971555

  2. Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhen, Xiangjun; Chen, Baodong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can enhance plant Cr tolerance through immobilizing Cr in mycorrhizal roots. However, the detailed processes and mechanisms are unclear. The present study focused on cellular distribution and speciation of Cr in both extraradical mycelium (ERM) and mycorrhizal roots exposed to Cr(VI) by using field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FE-SEM-EDS), scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy techniques. We found that amounts of particles (possibly extracellular polymeric substances, EPS) were produced on the AM fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress, which contributed greatly to Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. With EDS of the surface of AM fungi exposed to various Cr(VI) levels, a positive correlation between Cr and P was revealed, suggesting that phosphate groups might act as counter ions of Cr(III), which was also confirmed by the XAFS analysis. Besides, STXM and XAFS analyses showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in AM fungal structures (arbuscules, intraradical mycelium, etc.) and cell walls in mycorrhizal roots, and complexed possibly with carboxyl groups or histidine analogues. The present work provided evidence of Cr immobilization on fungal surface and in fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots at a cellular level, and thus unraveled the underlying mechanisms by which AM symbiosis immobilize Cr. PMID:27209517

  3. Immobilization of amyloglucosidase using two forms of polyurethane polymer.

    PubMed

    Storey, K B; Duncan, J A; Chakrabarti, A C

    1990-03-01

    Amyloglucosidase was covalently immobilized using two hydrophilic prepolymers: Hypol FHP 2002 (creates foams) and Hypol FHP 8190H (creates gels). The foamable prepolymer was superior as a support for enzyme immobilization. The percent activity immobilized in the polyurethane foams was 25 +/- 1.5%. Large substrates (greater than 200,000 daltons in mol wt) were hydrolyzed as effectively as smaller ones by the immobilized enzyme. The Km value of the foam-immobilized enzyme increased from 0.76 mg/mL (free) to 0.86 mg/mL (immobilized), whereas the Vmax dropped from 90.9 (free) to 12.4 nmol glucose/min/mL (immobilized). The long-term (2 mo) storage stability of amyloglucosidase was enhanced by immobilization in foams (70% activity retained; free enzyme only retained 50%). Immobilization also improved the enzyme stability to various denaturing agents (sodium chloride, urea, and ethanol). The immobilized enzyme exhibited increased stability compared to the free enzyme at high temperatures (95 degrees C). Both glycogen and starch could be utilized by the immobilized enzyme, indicating that this technique could prove useful for starch hydrolysis. PMID:2112366

  4. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Ayad, D M; Wei, Y; Sarhan, A A

    2010-04-01

    A method has been developed to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on modified chitosan beads by means of graft copolymerization of polyethylacrylate in presence of potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator. The activity of free and immobilized HRP was studied. FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize HRP immobilization. The efficiency of the immobilization was investigated by examining the relative enzymatic activity of free enzyme before and after the HRP immobilization. The obtained values were found to reach 98.4%. The results show that the optimum temperature of immobilized HRP was 45 degrees C, which was identical to that of free enzyme, and the immobilized HRP exhibited a higher relative activity than that of free HRP over 45 degrees C. The optimal pH for immobilized HRP was 10, which was higher than that of the free HRP (pH 9.0), and the immobilization resulted in stabilization of enzyme over a broader pH range. The apparent kinetic constant value (K(m)) of immobilized HRP was 3.784 mmol ml(-1), which was higher than that of free HRP. On the other hand, the activity of immobilized HRP decreased slowly against time when compared to that of the free HRP, and could retain 65.8% residual activity after 6 consecutive cycles. PMID:20060854

  5. Removing Phosphate from Hanford High-Phosphate Tank Wastes: FY 2010 Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Carter, Jennifer C.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2010-09-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for environmental remediation at the Hanford Site in Washington State, a former nuclear weapons production site. Retrieving, processing, immobilizing, and disposing of the 2.2 × 105 m3 of radioactive wastes stored in the Hanford underground storage tanks dominates the overall environmental remediation effort at Hanford. The cornerstone of the tank waste remediation effort is the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As currently designed, the capability of the WTP to treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes in the expected lifetime of the plant is questionable. For this reason, DOE has been pursuing supplemental treatment options for selected wastes. If implemented, these supplemental treatments will route certain waste components to processing and disposition pathways outside of WTP and thus will accelerate the overall Hanford tank waste remediation mission.

  6. Immobilization of Polymeric Luminophor on Nanoparticles Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolbukh, Yuliia; Podkoscielna, Beata; Lipke, Agnieszka; Bartnicki, Andrzej; Gawdzik, Barbara; Tertykh, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    Polymeric luminophors with reduced toxicity are of the priorities in the production of lighting devices, sensors, detectors, bioassays or diagnostic systems. The aim of this study was to develop a method of immobilization of the new luminophor on a surface of nanoparticles and investigation of the structure of the grafted layer. Monomer 2,7-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)naphthalene (2,7-NAF.DM) with luminophoric properties was immobilized on silica and carbon nanotubes in two ways: mechanical mixing with previously obtained polymer and by in situ oligomerization with chemisorption after carrier's modification with vinyl groups. The attached polymeric (or oligomeric) surface layer was studied using thermal and spectral techniques. Obtained results confirm the chemisorption of luminophor on the nanotubes and silica nanoparticles at the elaborated synthesis techniques. The microstructure of 2,7-NAF.DM molecules after chemisorption was found to be not changed. The elaborated modification approach allows one to obtain nanoparticles uniformly covered with polymeric luminophor.

  7. Improving immobilized biocatalysts by gel phase polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuu, W.Y.; Polack, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    A new method is presented for the treatment of gel-type supports, used for immobilizing microbial cells and enzymes, to obtain high mechanical strength. It is particularly useful for ethanol fermentation over gel beads containing immobilized viable cells, where the beads can be ruptured by gas production and the growth of cells within the gels. This method consists of treating agar or carrageenan gel with polyacrylamide to form a rigid support which retains the high catalytic activity characteristic of the untreated biocatalysts. The size and shape of the biocatalyst is unaffected by this treatment. The method involves the diffusion of acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and BETA-dimethylaminopropionitrile (or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) into the preformed biocatalyst beads followed by the addition of an initiator to cause polymerization within the beads. Treated gels have been used for the continuous fermentation of glucose to ethanol in a packed column for over two months.

  8. Reducing Uncertainty in the Seismic Design Basis for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, T.M.; Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Gardner, M.G.

    2007-07-01

    The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland was re-evaluated in 2005, resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. The original seismic design basis for the WTP was established in 1999 based on a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The 2005 analysis was performed to address questions raised by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) about the assumptions used in developing the original seismic criteria and adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. The updated seismic response analysis used existing and newly acquired seismic velocity data, statistical analysis, expert elicitation, and ground motion simulation to develop interim design ground motion response spectra which enveloped the remaining uncertainties. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile to produce conservative design spectra, which contributed significantly to the increase in the seismic design basis. A key uncertainty identified in the 2005 analysis was the velocity contrasts between the basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds below the WTP. The velocity structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) and the inter-layered sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation) produces strong reductions in modeled earthquake ground motions propagating through them. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds primarily resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave velocity (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was used and produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. Because of the

  9. A novel bioreactor for immobilized phototrophs.

    PubMed

    Fermont, Saskia; Shama, Gilbert

    2010-02-01

    A novel configuration of photobioreactor is described in which filaments of alginate containing immobilized cells of a leaky mutant of Dunaliella parva are wound round a central light well which is located within a glass outer chamber so that a liquid medium is caused to flow in the annular space between the outside chamber and the alginate filaments. Glycerol production by D. parva was maintained for 700 h and the highest concentration of glycerol attained was approx. 12 mg l(-1). PMID:19838629

  10. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  11. Immobilization of Thermomyces lanuginosus Xylanase on Aluminum Hydroxide Particles Through Adsorption: Characterization of Immobilized Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Wu, Yue; Li, Huixin

    2015-12-28

    Xylanase plays important roles in a broad range of industrial production as a biocatalyst, and its applications commonly require immobilization on supports to enhance its stability. Aluminum hydroxide, a carrier material with high surface area, has the advantages of simple and low-cost preparation and resistance to biodegradation, and can be potentially used as a proper support for xylanase immobilization. In this work, xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus was immobilized on two types of aluminum hydroxide particles (gibbsite and amorphous Al(OH)3) through adsorption, and the properties of the adsorbed enzymes were studied. Both particles had considerable adsorptive capacity and affinity for xylanase. Xylanase retained 75% and 64% of the original catalytic activities after adsorption to gibbsite and amorphous Al(OH)3. Both the adsorptions improved pH and thermal stability, lowered activation energy, and extended lifespan of the immobilized enzyme, as compared with the free enzyme. Xylanase adsorbed on gibbsite and amorphous Al(OH)3 retained 71% and 64% of its initial activity, respectively, after being recycled five times. These results indicated that aluminum hydroxides served as good supports for xylanase immobilization. Therefore, the adsorption of xylanase on aluminum hydroxide particles has promising potential for practical production. PMID:26282687

  12. Effect of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge and questions remaining concerning the effects of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle is reviewed. The most dramatic of these effects is muscle atrophy, which has been noted in cases of muscles fixed at or below their resting length. Immobilization is also accompanied by a substantial decrease in motoneuronal discharges, which results in the conversion of slow-twitch muscle to muscle with fast-twitch characteristics. Sarcolemma effects include no change or a decrease in resting membrane potential, the appearance of extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors, and no change in acetylcholinesterase activity. Evidence of changes in motoneuron after hyperpolarization characteristics suggests that the muscle inactivity is responsible for neuronal changes, rather than vice versa. The rate of protein loss from atrophying muscles is determined solely by the first-order rate constant for degradation. Various other biochemical and functional changes have been noted, including decreased insulin responsiveness and protein synthesis. The model of limb immobilization may also be useful for related studies of muscle adaptation.

  13. Immobilized microbe bioreactors for waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Portier, R J; Miller, G P

    1991-10-01

    The application of adapted microbial populations immobilized on a porous diatomaceous earth carrier to pre-treat and reduce toxic concentration of volatile organics, pesticides, petroleum aliphatics and aromatics has been demonstrated for several industrial sites. In the pre-treatment of industrial effluents and contaminated groundwaters, these bioreactors have been used to optimize and reduce the cost of conventional treatment systems, i.e. steam stripping, carbon adsorption and traditional biotreatment. Additionally, these systems have been employed as seeding devices for larger biotreatment systems. The cost effective utilization of an immobilized microbe reactor system for water supply regeneration in a microgravity environment is presented. The feasibility of using immobilized biomass reactors as an effluent treatment technology for the biotransformation and biodegradation of phenols, chlorinated halocarbons, residual oils and lubricants was evaluated. Primary biotransformation tests of two benchmark toxicants, phenol and ethylene dichloride at concentrations expected in life support effluents were conducted. Biocatalyst supports were evaluated for colonization potential, surface and structural integrity, and performance in continuous flow bioreactors. The implementation of such approaches in space will be outlined and specific areas for interfacing with other non-biological treatment approaches will be considered for advanced life support, tertiary waste water biotreatment. PMID:11537697

  14. Immobilization of enzyme on a polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Cheng, Kenneth Chun Kuen; Schroeder, McKenna; Yang, Pei; Marsh, E. Neil G.; Lahann, Joerg; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-01

    We successfully immobilized enzymes onto polymer surfaces via covalent bonds between cysteine groups of the enzyme and dibromomaleimide functionalities present at the polymer surface. In this work, we used nitroreductase (NfsB) as a model enzyme molecule. The polymers were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization, resulting in surfaces with dibromomaleimide groups. NfsB variants were engineered so that each NfsB molecule only has one cysteine group on the enzyme surface. Two different NfsB constructs were studied, with cysteines at the positions of H360 and V424, respectively. A combination of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies were used to deduce the orientation of the immobilized enzymes on the surface. It was found that the orientation of the immobilized enzymes is controlled by the position of the cysteine residue in the protein. The NfsB H360C construct exhibited a similar orientational behavior on the polymer surface as compared to that on the self-assembled monolayer surface, but the NsfB V424C construct showed markedly different orientations on the two surfaces.

  15. Photo-Sensitivities of Immobilized Retinoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Yosuke; Ikeda, Yasukazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Arakawa, Takamasa; Yamano, Shinichiro; Mitachi, Seiko

    2009-03-01

    Optical absorption of retinoids, retinal and retinoic acid, in immobilized thin films were measured and evaluated using films fabricated by spin coating, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB), and layer-by-layer self-assembly methods. We succeeded in forming thin films of immobilized retinoids fabricated by self-assembly methods for the first time. Based on measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM), it is estimated that film thickness was about 30 nm, with a total of sixteen layers. The photoisomerization reaction rate of the self-assembled film was found to be much more suppressed than that of LB films. Photoreceptive devices were built around films produced using a chitosan sol and immobilized retinoids in a self-assembled film, and the photocurrent responses of these devices were measured. Photoreceptive biophotonic devices using a self-assembled film showed photocurrent response by irradiation of ultraviolet light of 254 nm. Photocurrent response of the self-assembled films was faster than that of sol-based films. These nanoscale photoreceptive devices may be applied to bio-functional optical sensing or to future visual information processing devices.

  16. Sufentanil citrate immobilization of Alaskan moose calves.

    PubMed

    Kreeger, Terry J; Kellie, Kalin A

    2012-10-01

    Free-ranging Alaskan moose calves (Alces alces gigas) were immobilized with 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil (S; n=16), 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil plus 0.27 mg/kg xylazine (SX; n=11), or 0.007 mg/kg carfentanil plus 0.36 mg/kg xylazine (CX; n=13). Immobilants were antagonized with 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone (S) or 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone plus 2.4 mg/kg tolazoline (SX, CX). There were no differences in induction (P ≥ 0.29) or processing (P ≥ 0.44) times between groups. Moose given either S or SX had significantly shorter recovery times than moose given CX (P=0.001) and recovery times from S were shorter than from SX (P=0.02). Oxygen saturation values for all groups averaged 85 ± 8%, but were significantly higher (P=0.048) for CX (89 ± 7%) than for S (82 ± 8%). Based on these data, sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg or sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg plus xylazine at 0.25 mg/kg could provide effective remote immobilization for Alaskan moose calves and could be substituted for carfentanil or thiafentanil should the need arise. PMID:23060515

  17. Methanogenesis from Sucrose by Defined Immobilized Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. Jack; Guyot, Jean-Pierre; Wolfe, Ralph S.

    1984-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of sucrose degradation primarily to CH4 and CO2 was constructed, with acetate as the key methanogenic precursor. In addition, the effect of agar immobilization on the activity of the consortium was determined. The primary fermentative organism, Escherichia coli, produced acetate, formate, H2, and CO2 (known substrates for methanogens), as well as ethanol and lactate, compounds that are not substrates for methanogens. Oxidation of the nonmethanogenic substrates, lactate and ethanol, to acetate was mediated by the addition of Acetobacterium woodii and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The methanogenic stage was accomplished by the addition of the acetophilic methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri and the hydrogenophilic methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Results of studies with low substrate concentrations (0.05 to 0.2% [wt/vol]), a growth-limiting medium, and the five-component consortium indicated efficient conversion (40%) of sucrose carbon to CH4. Significant decreases in yields of CH4 and rates of CH4 production were observed if any component of the consortium was omitted. Approximately 70% of the CH4 generated occurred via acetate. Agar-immobilized cells of the consortium exhibited yields of CH4 and rates of CH4 production from sucrose similar to those of nonimmobilized cells. The rate of CH4 production decreased by 25% when cysteine was omitted from reaction conditions and by 40% when the immobilized consortium was stored for 1 week at 4°C. PMID:16346452

  18. Methanogenesis from sucrose by defined immobilized consortia.

    PubMed

    Jones, W J; Guyot, J P; Wolfe, R S

    1984-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of sucrose degradation primarily to CH(4) and CO(2) was constructed, with acetate as the key methanogenic precursor. In addition, the effect of agar immobilization on the activity of the consortium was determined. The primary fermentative organism, Escherichia coli, produced acetate, formate, H(2), and CO(2) (known substrates for methanogens), as well as ethanol and lactate, compounds that are not substrates for methanogens. Oxidation of the nonmethanogenic substrates, lactate and ethanol, to acetate was mediated by the addition of Acetobacterium woodii and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The methanogenic stage was accomplished by the addition of the acetophilic methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri and the hydrogenophilic methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Results of studies with low substrate concentrations (0.05 to 0.2% [wt/vol]), a growth-limiting medium, and the five-component consortium indicated efficient conversion (40%) of sucrose carbon to CH(4). Significant decreases in yields of CH(4) and rates of CH(4) production were observed if any component of the consortium was omitted. Approximately 70% of the CH(4) generated occurred via acetate. Agar-immobilized cells of the consortium exhibited yields of CH(4) and rates of CH(4) production from sucrose similar to those of nonimmobilized cells. The rate of CH(4) production decreased by 25% when cysteine was omitted from reaction conditions and by 40% when the immobilized consortium was stored for 1 week at 4 degrees C. PMID:16346452

  19. Immobilization of chloride-rich radioactive wastes produced by pyrochemical operations

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.; Terry, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    A a result of its former role as a producer of nuclear weapons components, the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Golden, Colorado accumulated a variety of plutonium-contaminated materials. When the level of contamination exceeded a predetermined level (the economic discard limit), the materials were classified as residues rather than waste and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. Although large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, remain in storage at the site. It is planned for the residues with lower concentrations of plutonium to be disposed of as wastes at an appropriate disposal facility, probably the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Because the plutonium concentration is too high or because the physical or chemical form would be difficult to get into a form acceptable to WIPP, it may not be possible to dispose of a portion of the residues at WIPP. The pyrochemical salts are among the residues that are difficult to dispose of. For a large percentage of the pyrochemical salts, safeguards controls are required, but WIPP was not designed to accommodate safeguards controls. A potential solution would be to immobilize the salts. These immobilized salts would contain substantially higher plutonium concentrations than is currently permissible but would be suitable for disposal at WIPP. This document presents the results of a review of three immobilization technologies to determine if mature technologies exist that would be suitable to immobilize pyrochemical salts: cement-based stabilization, low-temperature vitrification, and polymer encapsulation. The authors recommend that flow sheets and life-cycle costs be developed for cement-based and low-temperature glass immobilization.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a green nano-support for the covalent immobilization of glucoamylase from Neurospora sitophila.

    PubMed

    Syed, Fatima; Ali, Khurshid; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Fraz, Muhammad Gul; Khan, Zahid; Imran, Muhammad; Taj, Raheela; Ahmad, Aftab

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of green nano supports for the covalent immobilization of enzymes is of special interest both from the economic and environmental point of view. In this contribution, we report on the synthesis of phytochemicals coated silver nanoparticles, which were used as a novel green support for the covalent immobilization of glucoamylase isolated from Neurospora sitophila. The aqueous extract of Fagonia indica was used as a source of reducing and capping agents for the reduction of silver ions into silver nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by various analytical techniques. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to detect the characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands (426, 438nm) of the silver nanoparticles. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were mostly spherical in shapes with an average particle size of 30-40nm (TEM and DLS measurements). X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray studies confirmed the face centered cubic crystalline form and elemental composition of the biogenic silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR study revealed that plant polyphenolics and protein were mainly involved in the reduction and capping of silver ions. Glucoamylase from Neurospora sitophila was covalently immobilized to these nanoparticles via EDC (1-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl) 3-ethylcarbodiimidehydrochloride) coupling reaction. The immobilized enzyme exhibited higher pH and thermal stabilities as compared to the free enzyme. The kinetic constant (KM) value for the immobilized glucoamylase was higher (0.73mg/mL) than its free counterpart (0.44mg/mL), whereas the Vmax value was slightly higher for the immobilized glucoamylase. The findings of this study conclude that the newly developed green method for the synthesis of green nano-support is simple, cost effective and could be successfully used for the immobilization of various enzymes and other macromolecules. PMID:27395794

  1. Enzyme immobilization and biocatalysis of polysiloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojari, Yadagiri

    Lipases have been proven to be versatile and efficient biocatalysts which can be used in a broad variety of esterification, transesterification, and ester hydrolysis reactions. Due to the high chemo-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity and the mild conditions of lipase-catalyzed reactions, the vast potential of these biocatalysts for use in industrial applications has been increasingly recognized. Polysiloxanes (silicones) are well known for their unique physico-chemical properties and can be prepared in the form of fluids, elastomers, gels and resins for a wide variety of applications. However, the enzymatic synthesis of silicone polyesters and copolymers is largely unexplored. In the present investigations, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) on macroporous acrylic resin beads (Novozym-435 RTM) has been successfully employed as a catalyst to synthesize silicone polyesters and copolymers under mild reaction conditions. The silicone aliphatic polyesters and the poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(ethylene glycol) (PDMS-PEG) copolymers were synthesized in the bulk (without using a solvent), while the silicone aromatic polyesters, the silicone aromatic polyamides and the poly(epsilon-caprolactone)--poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-PDMS-PCL) triblock copolymers were synthesized in toluene. The synthesized silicone polyesters and copolymers were characterized by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD). This dissertation also describes a methodology for physical immobilization of the enzyme pepsin from Porcine stomach mucosa in silicone elastomers utilizing condensation-cure room temperature vulcanization (RTV) of silanol-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The activity and the stability of free pepsin and pepsin immobilized in silicone elastomers were studied with respect to p

  2. Detergent formulations for wool domestic washings containing immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Silva, Carla J S M; Schroeder, Marc; Guebitz, Georg M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2006-05-01

    The stability of immobilized and native Esperase, a commercial serine protease, was studied by incubating the enzymes in four formulations containing the same amount of anionic and non-ionic surfactants. The results show that the activity of the immobilized enzyme is not affected by the presence of detergents while the native enzyme lost 50% of activity after 20 min of incubation in these four formulations. The washing performance of the detergents prepared with the immobilized Esperase was studied on cotton and wool fabric samples stained with human blood and egg yolk, using as control the detergent containing native Esperase. The best stain removal for cotton samples stained with human blood was achieved using the detergent with immobilized Esperase. Several physical tests confirmed that wool keratin was not degraded by the immobilized Esperase, validating the ability to use formulated detergents containing this immobilized enzyme for safe wool domestic washing. PMID:16791727

  3. Nonporous magnetic materials as enzyme supports: studies with immobilized chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Munro, P A; Dunnill, P; Lilly, M D

    1977-01-01

    Chymotrypsin has been immobilized to several nonporous magnetic materials. Nickel particles were considered to be most suitable as immobilized enzyme supports. Chymotrypsin immobilized to nonporous magnetic supports was not fouled significantly by either whole milk or clarified yeast homogenate. AE-cellulose-chymotrypsin was rapidly fouled by both these materials and chymotrypsin immobilized to acrylic-based ion exchangers was slowly fouled. Immobilized enzyme activity was found to be inversely proportional to particle diameter for nonporous rock magnetic particles. Immobilization by adsorption and then glutaraldehyde crosslinking was used to produce controlled amounts of chymotrypsin on the particles. Esterolytic activity increased with enzyme loading but caseinolytic activity did not increase. Chymotrypsin is inhibited by metal ions from the magnetic supports. It is partially protected by use of a preliminary protein coating and may be reactivated by incubation with EDTA or BSA. PMID:14743

  4. The immobilization of lipase on PVDF-co-HFP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Naciye; Eyüpoǧlu, Volkan; Adem, Şevki

    2016-04-01

    Lipase is an enzyme having a lot of different industrial applications such as biodiesel production, biopolymer synthesis, enantiopure pharmaceutical productions, agrochemicals, etc. Its immobilized form on different substances is more conventional and useful than its free form. Supporting material was prepared using PVDF-co-HFP in laboratory conditions and attached 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and epichlorohydrin (EPI) ligands to the membrane to immobilize lipase enzyme. The immobilization conditions such as enzyme amount, pH, the concentration of salt, thermal stability and activity were stabilized for our experimental setup. Then, biochemical characterizations were performed on immobilized lipase PVDF-co-HFP regarding optimal pH activity, temperature and thermal stability. Also, the desorption ratios of immobilized enzyme in two different pathway were investigated to confirm immobilization stability for 24 hours.

  5. Immobilization of enzyme onto poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-02-01

    Invertase was ionically bound to the poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane surface modified with two aminoacetals with different molecular length, 2-dimethyl-aminoacetoaldehyde dimethylacetal (AAA) and 3-(N,N-dimethylamino-n-propanediamine) propionaldehyde dimethylacetal (APA). Immobilization conditions were determined with respect to enzyme concentration in solution, pH value, ionic strength in immobilization solution, and immobilization time. Various properties of immobilized invertase were evaluated, and thermal stability was found especially to be improved by immobilization. The apparent Michaelis constant, Km, was smaller for invertase bound by APA with longer molecular lengths than for invertase bound by AAA. We attempted to bind glucoamylase of Rhizopus delemarorigin in the same way. The amount and activity of immobilized glucoamylase were much less than those of invertase. 16 references.

  6. Screening of Supports for the Immobilization of β-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Joelise de Alencar; Dias, Fernanda Furlan Gonçalves; Sato, Hélia Harumi; Fernandes, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    A set of supports were screened for the immobilization of a partially purified extract of β-glucosidase from Aspergillus sp. These supports, namely, Eupergit, Amberlite, alginate, gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol- (PVA-) based matrices (Lentikats), and sol-gel, have proved effective for the implementation of some other enzyme-based processes. The initial criterion for selection of promising supports prior to further characterization relied on the retention of the catalytic activity following immobilization. Based on such criterion, where immobilization in sol-gel and in Lentikats outmatched the remaining approaches, those two systems were further characterized. Immobilization did not alter the pH/activity profile, whereas the temperature/activity profile was improved when sol-gel support was assayed. Both thermal and pH stability were improved as a result of immobilization. An increase in the apparent KM (Michaelis constant) was observed following immobilization, suggesting diffusion limitations. PMID:21915374

  7. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. PMID:25267117

  8. Covalent immobilization of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase on semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Renny Edwin; Bhattacharya, Enakshi; Chadha, Anju

    2008-05-01

    Lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was covalently immobilized on crystalline silicon, porous silicon and silicon nitride surfaces. The various stages of immobilization were characterized using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy. The surface topography of the enzyme immobilized surfaces was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The quantity of the immobilized active enzyme was estimated by the para-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) assay. The immobilized lipase was used for triglyceride hydrolysis and the acid produced was detected by a pH sensitive silicon nitride surface as a shift in the C- V (capacitance-voltage) characteristics of an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor capacitor (EISCAP) thus validating the immobilization method for use as a biosensor.

  9. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Platform for immobilization and observation of subcellular processes

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Melechko, Anatoli V.

    2014-08-26

    A method of immobilizing matter for imaging that includes providing an array of nanofibers and directing matter to the array of the nanofibers. The matter is immobilized when contacting at least three nanofibers of the array of nanofibers simultaneously. Adjacent nanofibers in the array of nanofibers may be separated by a pitch as great as 100 microns. The immobilized matter on the array of nanofibers may then be imaged. In some examples, the matter may be cell matter, such as protoplasts.

  11. Antibacterial functionalization of wool fabric via immobilizing lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong; Hu, Yingjun; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Wang, Ping

    2009-08-01

    Greater attention has been given to enzymatic processes of textiles as effective alternatives to conventional chemical treatments because of the non-toxic and eco-friendly characteristics of enzymes as well as the increasingly important requirement for reducing pollution in textile production. A new functionalization method for wool fabrics based on immobilization of lysozymes was investigated in this paper. Wool fabric was first activated with glutaraldehyde, and then employed to covalently immobilize lysozymes. Main immobilization parameters were optimized in terms of the activity of immobilized enzyme. A high activity of the immobilized enzyme was obtained when the fabric was activated at 25 degrees C for 6 h in a bath containing with 0.2% of glutaraldehyde followed by the immobilization at 4 degrees C and pH 7.0 for 6 h with 5 g l(-1) lysozyme. The scanning electron microscopy and staining tests based on modified Coomassie protein assay (Bradford method) revealed that the lysozyme was fixed covalently on the wool fabric. Wool fabrics immobilizing lysozymes presented a higher ratio of bacteriostasis to Staphylococcus aureus. The durability of antibacterial wool was assessed and the lysozyme immobilized on wool fabric retained ca. 43% of its activity after five cycles of use when taking the activity of the immobilized lysozyme before using as reference. PMID:19082843

  12. Adhesion Peptide Immobilization on Electrospun Polymers: a Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Iucci, G.; Polzonetti, G.; Ghezzo, F.; Modesti, M.; Roso, M.; Dettin, M.

    2010-06-02

    The immobilization of an oligopeptide, mimicking the adhesion sequence of fibronectin, on the surface of polymer films prepared by electrospinning was investigated by XPS spectroscopy. Films of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(l-lactide-caprolactone)[P(LLA-CL)] were prepared by electrospinning onto aluminium substrates. A modified adhesion peptide containing a photoreactive group was immobilized on the surface of the polymer nanofibers by incubation in peptide solution and subsequent UV irradiation. XPS analysis yield evidence of successful peptide immobilization on the polymer surface; the amount of immobilized peptide increases with the concentration of the mother solution.

  13. Laccase immobilized on magnetic carriers for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotková, Jana; Šuláková, Romana; Korecká, Lucie; Zdražilová, Pavla; Jandová, Miroslava; Lenfeld, Jiří; Horák, Daniel; Bílková, Zuzana

    2009-05-01

    Laccase catalyzing the oxidation of p-diphenols has been applied in many industrial and biotechnology areas. Immobilized form of laccase has overcome the problem with contamination of the final product. Nevertheless sensitive enzymes immobilized to the matrix can be inactivated by the environmental conditions. The aim of this research was to prepare carrier with improved activity and responsible stability even under extreme reaction conditions. Laccase immobilized through carbohydrate moieties on magnetic hydrazide bead cellulose with a final activity of 0.63 I.U./1 ml of settled carrier confirmed that carriers with oriented immobilized enzyme might be useful in routine biocatalytic applications.

  14. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research. PMID:26472272

  15. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two

  17. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  18. Immobilization-associated osteoporosis in primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Niklowitz, W. J.; Brown, R. J.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Osteopenic changes in the tibial compact bone of fifteen adult male monkeys immobilized for up to 7 months are examined histologically. Osteonal formation in the proximal tibia is analyzed. The analysis reveals the loss of haversian bone in the proximal tibia, increased activation with excessive depth of penetration of osteoclastic activity, rapid bone loss, and resorption cavities of irregular size and orientation. Osteonal formation following reambulation is examined; the recovery of cortical is a repair and rejuvenation process characterized by refilling of resorption cavities and remodeling activities.

  19. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Immobilized humic substances and immobilized aggregates of humic substances as sorbent for solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Erny, Guillaume L; Gonçalves, Bruna M; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2013-09-01

    In this work, humic substances (HS) immobilized, as a thin layer or as aggregates, on silica gel were tested as material for solid phase extraction. Some triazines (simazine, atrazine, therbutylazine, atrazine-desethyl-desisopropyl-2-hydroxy, ametryn and terbutryn), have been selected as test analytes due to their environmental importance and to span a large range of solubility and octanol/water partition coefficient (logP). The sorbent was obtained immobilizing a thin layer of HS via physisorption on a pre-coated silica gel with a cationic polymer (polybrene). While the sorbent could be used as it is, it was demonstrated that additional HS could be immobilized, via weak interactions, to form stable humic aggregates. However, while a higher quantity of HS could be immobilized, no significant differences were observed in the sorption parameters. This sorbent have been tested for solid phase extraction to concentrate triazines from aqueous matrixes. The sorbent demonstrated performances equivalent to commercial alternatives as a concentration factor between 50 and 200, depending on the type of triazines, was obtained. Moreover the low cost and the high flow rate of sample through the column allowed using high quantity of sorbent. The analytical procedure was tested with different matrixes including tap water, river water and estuarine water. PMID:23916952

  1. Plants on the move

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Livia Camilla Trevisan; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier

    2011-01-01

    One may think that plants seem relatively immobile. Nevertheless, plants not only produce movement but these movements can be quite rapid such as the closing traps of carnivorous plants, the folding up of leaflets in some Leguminosae species and the movement of floral organs in order to increase cross pollination. We focus this review on thigmotropic and thigmonastic movements, both in vegetative and reproductive parts of higher plants. Ultrastructural studies revealed that most thigmotropic and thigmonastic movements are caused by differentially changing cell turgor within a given tissue. Auxin has emerged as a key molecule that modulates proton extrusion and thus causing changes in cell turgor by enhancing the activity of H+ATPase in cell membranes. Finding conserved molecules and/or operational molecular modules among diverse types of movements would help us to find universal mechanisms controlling movements in plants and thus improve our understanding about the evolution of such phenomena. PMID:22231201

  2. A simple and robust approach to immobilization of antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Ikonomova, Svetlana P; He, Ziming; Karlsson, Amy J

    2016-08-01

    Antibody fragments, such as the single-chain variable fragment (scFv), have much potential in research and diagnostics because of their antigen-binding ability similar to a full-sized antibody and their ease of production in microorganisms. Some applications of antibody fragments require immobilization on a surface, and we have established a simple immobilization method that is based on the biotin-streptavidin interaction and does not require a separate purification step. We genetically fused two biotinylation tags-the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) or the AviTag minimal sequence-to six different scFvs (scFv13R4, scFvD10, scFv26-10, scFv3, scFv5, and scFv12) for site-specific biotinylation in vivo by endogenous biotin ligases produced by Escherichia coli. The biotinylated scFvs were immobilized onto streptavidin-coated plates directly from cell lysates, and immobilization was detected through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. All scFvs fusions were successfully immobilized, and scFvs biotinylated via the BCCP tag tended to immobilize better than those biotinylated via the AviTag, even when biotinylation efficiency was improved with the biotin ligase BirA. The ability of immobilized scFvs to bind antigens was confirmed using scFv13R4 and scFvD10 with their respective targets β-galactosidase and bacteriophage lambda head protein D (gpD). The immobilized scFv13R4 bound to β-galactosidase at the same level for both biotinylation tags when the surface was saturated with the scFv, and immobilized scFvs retained their functionality for at least 100days after immobilization. The simplicity and robustness of our method make it a promising approach for future applications that require antibody fragment immobilization. PMID:27142477

  3. Aqueous Waste Treatment Plant at Aldermaston

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, D.; Fowler, J.; Frier, S.

    2006-07-01

    For over half a century the Pangbourne Pipeline formed part of AWE's liquid waste management system. Since 1952 the 11.5 mile pipeline carried pre-treated wastewater from the Aldermaston site for safe dispersal in the River Thames. Such discharges were in strict compliance with the exacting conditions demanded by all regulatory authorities, latterly, those of the Environment Agency. In March 2005 AWE plc closed the Pangbourne Pipeline and ceased discharges of treated active aqueous waste to the River Thames via this route. The ability to effectively eliminate active liquid discharges to the environment is thanks to an extensive programme of waste minimization on the Aldermaston site, together with the construction of a new Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Waste minimization measures have reduced the effluent arisings by over 70% in less than four years. The new WTP has been built using best available technology (evaporation followed by reverse osmosis) to remove trace levels of radioactivity from wastewater to exceptionally stringent standards. Active operation has confirmed early pilot scale trials, with the plant meeting throughput and decontamination performance targets, and final discharges being at or below limits of detection. The performance of the plant allows the treated waste to be discharged safely as normal industrial effluent from the AWE site. Although the project has had a challenging schedule, the project was completed on programme, to budget and with an exemplary safety record (over 280,000 hours in construction with no lost time events) largely due to a pro-active partnering approach between AWE plc and RWE NUKEM and its sub-contractors. (authors)

  4. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  5. Improving immobilized biocatalysts by gel phase polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuu, W.Y.; Polack, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    A new method is presented for the treatment of gel-type supports, used for immobilizing microbial cells and enzymes, to obtain high mechanical strength. It is particularly useful for ethanol fermentation over gel beads containing immobilized viable cells, where the beads can be ruptured by gas production and the growth of cells within the gels. This method consists of treating agar or carrageenan gel with polyacrylamide to form a rigid support which retains the high catalytic activity characteristic of the untreated biocatalysts. The size and shape of the biocatalyst is unaffected by this treatment. The method involves the diffusion of acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and ..beta..-dimethylaminopropionitrile (or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) into the preformed biocatalyst beads followed by the addition of an initiator to cause polymerization within the beads. Treated gels have been used for the continuous fermentation of glucose to ethanol in a packed column for over two months. During this operation, the gel beads maintained their rigidity, and the maximum productivity was as high as 50 gh/sup -1/ L/sup -1/ gel. There was no appreciable decay of cell activity.

  6. Electrode-immobilized compounds through. gamma. radiation

    SciTech Connect

    De Castro, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Chemically Modified Electrodes (CMEs) are used as substrates in heterogeneous catalysis and as sensors. This work demonstrates a new strategy for immobilizing polyelectrolytes and electroactive agents on electrode surfaces. The success of this method lies in cross-linking water soluble polymer chains through the ionizing radiation of ..gamma.. emissions from a /sup 60/Co source. Cross-linking can create a continuous network out of the polymer macromolecules which then makes the network insoluble on the electrode surface. Bonds between the network and the substrate are also possible. Redox species mixed with the polymer network and irradiated become part of the insoluble network, and are permanently attached. The use of ..gamma.. radiation to make electrochemical sensors is demonstrated. The immobilized network poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (DDAC) is placed in a solution of potassium ferricyanide and ionicly exchanges the anion into the network. An electroactive network is created from irradiating a mixture of DDAC and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP). Using the amount of electroactive DCIP remaining in the film as the optimization parameter, variables such as polymer:DCIP ratio, film thickness, and dosage employed are shown to be relevant.

  7. Nanodevices for the immobilization of therapeutic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Valeria E; Islan, Germán A; Martínez, Yanina N; Durán, Nelson; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic enzymes are one of the most promising applications of this century in the field of pharmaceutics. Biocatalyst properties can be improved by enzyme immobilization on nano-objects, thereby increasing stability and reusability and also enhancing the targeting to specific tissues and cells. Therapeutic biocatalyst-nanodevice complexes will provide new tools for the diagnosis and treatment of old and newly emerging pathologies. Among the advantages of this approach are the wide span and diverse range of possible materials and biocatalysts that promise to make the matrix-enzyme combination a unique modality for therapeutic delivery. This review focuses on the most significant techniques and nanomaterials used for enzyme immobilization such as metallic superparamagnetic, silica, and polymeric and single-enzyme nanoparticles. Finally, a review of the application of these nanodevices to different pathologies and modes of administration is presented. In short, since therapeutic enzymes constitute a highly promising alternative for treating a variety of pathologies more effectively, this review is aimed at providing the comprehensive summary needed to understand and improve this burgeoning area. PMID:25641329

  8. Immobilization of dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Frank Alwin; Jördening, Hans-Joachim

    2007-09-30

    In order to facilitate the Co-Immobilization of dextransucrase and dextranase, various techniques for the immobilization of industrial endo-dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum (Novozymes A/S) were researched. Adsorption isotherms at various pH-values have been determined for bentonite (Montmorillonite), hydroxyapatite and Streamline DEAE. Using bentonite and hydroxyapatite, highest activity loads (12,000 Ug(-1); 2900 Ug(-1), respectively) can be achieved without a significant change of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant K(M). For successful adsorption, enzyme to bentonite ratios greater than 0.4 (w/w) have to be used as lower ratios lead to 90% enzyme inactivation due to bentonite contact. In addition, covalent linkage using the activated oxiran carriers Eupergit C and Eupergit C250L as well as linkage with aminopropyl silica via metaperiodate activation of glycosyl moiety of dextranase are discussed. This is also the first report probing the structure of a matrix containing dextranase by use of substrate species with different molecular weights. From this we can observe a relationship between the porosity of Eupergit and dextran dependent activity. For the reactor concept using Co-Immobilisates, hydroxyapatite will be preferred to Eupergit because of its higher specific activity and dispersity. PMID:17875335

  9. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  10. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Robotic canister loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.L.

    2000-01-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form and making it unattractive for reuse. Since there are significant radiation and security concerns, the program team is developing novel and unique technology to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. The remote task covered in this paper employs a jointed arm robot to load seven 3.5 inch diameter, 135-pound cylinders (magazines) through the 4 inch diameter neck of a stainless steel canister. Working through the narrow canister neck, the robot secures the magazines into a specially designed rack pre-installed in the canister. To provide the deterrent effect, the canisters are filled with a mixture of high-level waste and glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

  11. Immobilization of Polymeric Luminophor on Nanoparticles Surface.

    PubMed

    Bolbukh, Yuliia; Podkoscielna, Beata; Lipke, Agnieszka; Bartnicki, Andrzej; Gawdzik, Barbara; Tertykh, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric luminophors with reduced toxicity are of the priorities in the production of lighting devices, sensors, detectors, bioassays or diagnostic systems. The aim of this study was to develop a method of immobilization of the new luminophor on a surface of nanoparticles and investigation of the structure of the grafted layer. Monomer 2,7-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)naphthalene (2,7-NAF.DM) with luminophoric properties was immobilized on silica and carbon nanotubes in two ways: mechanical mixing with previously obtained polymer and by in situ oligomerization with chemisorption after carrier's modification with vinyl groups. The attached polymeric (or oligomeric) surface layer was studied using thermal and spectral techniques. Obtained results confirm the chemisorption of luminophor on the nanotubes and silica nanoparticles at the elaborated synthesis techniques. The microstructure of 2,7-NAF.DM molecules after chemisorption was found to be not changed. The elaborated modification approach allows one to obtain nanoparticles uniformly covered with polymeric luminophor. PMID:27090657

  12. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Alves, J S M; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Santos-Júnior, F F U; Carlos, P S; Silva, R C; Lucci, C M; Báo, S N; Ceccatto, V M; Barbosa, R

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13 ± 0.05 V and 52.31 ± 1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84 ± 0.06 V and 59.71 ± 2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63 ± 7.49 to 79.14 ± 5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  13. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  14. Limb immobilization alters functional electrophysiological parameters of sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Alves, J.S.M.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.; Santos-Júnior, F.F.U.; Carlos, P.S.; Silva, R.C.; Lucci, C.M.; Báo, S.N.; Ceccatto, V.M.; Barbosa, R.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization, used in clinical practice to treat traumatologic problems, causes changes in muscle, but it is not known whether changes also occur in nerves. We investigated the effects of immobilization on excitability and compound action potential (CAP) and the ultrastructure of the rat sciatic nerve. Fourteen days after immobilization of the right leg of adult male Wistar rats (n=34), animals were killed and the right sciatic nerve was dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated at a baseline frequency of 0.2 Hz and tested for 2 min at 20, 50, and 100 Hz. Immobilization altered nerve excitability. Rheobase and chronaxy changed from 3.13±0.05 V and 52.31±1.95 µs (control group, n=13) to 2.84±0.06 V and 59.71±2.79 µs (immobilized group, n=15), respectively. Immobilization altered the amplitude of CAP waves and decreased the conduction velocity of the first CAP wave (from 93.63±7.49 to 79.14±5.59 m/s) but not of the second wave. Transmission electron microscopy showed fragmentation of the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve of immobilized limbs and degeneration of the axon. In conclusion, we demonstrated that long-lasting leg immobilization can induce alterations in nerve function. PMID:23969978

  15. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-temperature solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology for immobilizing waste streams containing fission products such as cesium, strontium, and technetium in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic. This technology can immobilize partitioned tank wastes and decontaminate waste streams containing volatile fission products.

  16. Horseradish peroxidase and chitosan: activation, immobilization and comparative results.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2013-09-01

    Recently, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on activated wool and we envisioned that the use of chitosan would be interesting instead of wool owing to its simple chemical structure, abundant nature and biodegradability. In this work, HRP was immobilized on chitosan crosslinked with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize immobilized HRP. The number of ten reuses of immobilized HRP has been detected. The pH was shifted from 5.5 for soluble HRP to 5.0 for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP had an optimum temperature of 30 °C, which was shifted to 35 °C for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP were thermal stable up to 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The apparent kinetic constant values (K(m)) of soluble HRP and chitosan-HRP were 35 mM and 40 mM for guaiacol and 2.73 mM and 5.7 mM for H2O2, respectively. Immobilization of HRP partially protected them from metal ions compared to soluble enzyme. The chitosan-HRP was remarkably more stable against urea, Triton X-100 and organic solvents. Chitosan-HRP exhibited large number of reuses and more resistance to harmful compounds compared with wool-HRP. On the basis of results obtained in the present study, chitosan-HRP could be employed in bioremediation application. PMID:23769933

  17. Evaluation of Fungal Laccase Immobilized on Natural Nanostructured Bacterial Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zou, Min; Hong, Feng F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of using native bacterial nanocellulose (BC) as a carrier for laccase immobilization. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which was statically cultivated in a mannitol-based medium and was freeze-dried to form BC sponge after purification. For the first time, fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was immobilized on the native nanofibril network-structured BC sponge through physical adsorption and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The properties including morphologic and structural features of the BC as well as the immobilized enzyme were thoroughly investigated. It was found that enzyme immobilized by cross-linking exhibited broader pH operation range of high catalytic activity as well as higher running stability compared to free and adsorbed enzyme. Using ABTS as substrate, the optimum pH value was 3.5 for the adsorption-immobilized laccase and 4.0 for the crosslinking-immobilized laccase. The immobilized enzyme retained 69% of the original activity after being recycled seven times. Novel applications of the BC-immobilized enzyme tentatively include active packaging, construction of biosensors, and establishment of bioreactors. PMID:26617585

  18. Evaluation of Fungal Laccase Immobilized on Natural Nanostructured Bacterial Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zou, Min; Hong, Feng F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of using native bacterial nanocellulose (BC) as a carrier for laccase immobilization. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which was statically cultivated in a mannitol-based medium and was freeze-dried to form BC sponge after purification. For the first time, fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was immobilized on the native nanofibril network-structured BC sponge through physical adsorption and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The properties including morphologic and structural features of the BC as well as the immobilized enzyme were thoroughly investigated. It was found that enzyme immobilized by cross-linking exhibited broader pH operation range of high catalytic activity as well as higher running stability compared to free and adsorbed enzyme. Using ABTS as substrate, the optimum pH value was 3.5 for the adsorption-immobilized laccase and 4.0 for the crosslinking-immobilized laccase. The immobilized enzyme retained 69% of the original activity after being recycled seven times. Novel applications of the BC-immobilized enzyme tentatively include active packaging, construction of biosensors, and establishment of bioreactors. PMID:26617585

  19. Metabolic alkalosis during immobilization in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Yeh, I.; Swenson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The systemic and renal acid-base response of monkeys during ten weeks of immobilization was studied. By three weeks of immobilization, arterial pH and bicarbonate concentrations were elevated (chronic metabolic alkalosis). Net urinary acid excretion increased in immobilized animals. Urinary bicarbonate excretion decreased during the first three weeks of immobilization, and then returned to control levels. Sustained increases in urinary ammonium excretion were seen throughout the time duration of immobilization. Neither potassium depletion nor hypokalemia was observed. Most parameters returned promptly to the normal range during the first week of recovery. Factors tentatively associated with changes in acid-base status of monkeys include contraction of extracellular fluid volume, retention of bicarbonate, increased acid excretion, and possible participation of extrarenal buffers.

  20. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  1. Change in blood glucose level in rats after immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platonov, R. D.; Baskakova, G. M.; Chepurnov, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on male white rats divided into four groups. In group one the blood glucose level was determined immediately after immobilization. In the other three groups, two hours following immobilization, the blood glucose level was determined every 20 minutes for 3 hours 40 minutes by the glucose oxidase method. Preliminary immobilization for 2 hours removed the increase in the blood glucose caused by the stress reaction. By the 2nd hour of immobilization in the presence of continuing stress, the blood glucose level stabilized and varied within 42 + or - 5.5 and 47 + or - 8.1 mg %. Within 2 hours after the immobilization, the differences in the blood glucose level of the rats from the control groups were statistically insignificant.

  2. Physiological and Morphological Modifications in Immobilized Gibberella fujikuroi Mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, José Edmundo Nava; Barbotin, Jean-Noël; Thomas, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Constraints created by immobilization conditions modified the physiological behavior and morphological characteristics of Gibberella fujikuroi mycelia in comparison with their development in free-cell conditions. G. fujikuroi mycelia were immobilized in different support matrices (polyurethane, carrageenan, and alginate) and showed a variety of reactions in response to the different microenvironmental factors encountered during and after immobilization. The best support with respect to gibberellic acid yield and biocatalyst stability was found to be an alginate with a high degree of polymerization. The most visible effects of immobilization included changes in growth development, morphological appearance, metabolite production, mycelial pigmentation, mycelial viability under starvation conditions, and induction of resting forms when previously immobilized mycelia were subcultured. Images PMID:16348017

  3. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  4. Phytotoxicity of biosolids and screening of selected plant species with potential for mercury phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Cristina; Doronila, Augustine I; Gregory, David; Baker, Alan J M; Kolev, Spas D

    2010-01-15

    Mercury contaminated stockpiles of biosolids (3.5-8.4 mg kg(-1) Hg) from Melbourne Water's Western Treatment Plant (MW-WTP) were investigated to evaluate the possibility for their phytoremediation. Nine plant species (Atriplex codonocarpa, Atriplex semibaccata, Austrodanthonia caespitosa, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Gypsophila paniculata, Sorghum bicolor, Themeda triandra and Trifolium subterraneum) were screened for phytoextraction potential in Hg-contaminated biosolids from MW-WTP. In addition, the same plant species were germinated and grown in two other substrates (i.e. potting mix and potting mix spiked with mercury(II)). Growth measurements and the mercury uptake for all three substrates were compared. Some plant species grown in potting mix spiked with mercury(II) grew more vigorously than in the other two substrates and showed higher levels of sulphur in their tissues. These results suggested that the mercury stress activated defence mechanisms and it was hypothesised that this was the likely reason for the enhanced production of sulphur compounds in the plant species studied which stimulated their growth. Some species did not grow in biosolids because of the combined effect of high mercury toxicity and high salt content. Atriplex conodocarpa and Australodanthonia caespitose proved to be the most suitable candidates for mercury phytoextraction because of their ability to translocate mercury from roots to the above-ground tissues. PMID:19775810

  5. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased.

  6. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J.; Kacich, Richard M.; Skwarek, Raymond J.

    2012-12-20

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  7. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval and Delivery of Hanford Tank Wastes for Vitrification in the Waste Treatment Plant - 13234

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J.; Kacich, Richard M.; Skwarek, Raymond J.

    2013-07-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety-conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  8. Rapid-Scan EPR of Immobilized Nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J.; Boratyński, Przemysław J.; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for 14N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for 15N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10" magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes. PMID:25240151

  9. Immobilization Techniques for Microarray: Challenges and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Song, Keumsoo; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2014-01-01

    The highly programmable positioning of molecules (biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanobeads, nanocomposites materials) on surfaces has potential applications in the fields of biosensors, biomolecular electronics, and nanodevices. However, the conventional techniques including self-assembled monolayers fail to position the molecules on the nanometer scale to produce highly organized monolayers on the surface. The present article elaborates different techniques for the immobilization of the biomolecules on the surface to produce microarrays and their diagnostic applications. The advantages and the drawbacks of various methods are compared. This article also sheds light on the applications of the different technologies for the detection and discrimination of viral/bacterial genotypes and the detection of the biomarkers. A brief survey with 115 references covering the last 10 years on the biological applications of microarrays in various fields is also provided. PMID:25429408

  10. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  11. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  12. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  13. Adsorption of Sr by immobilized microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Wastewaters from numerous industrial and laboratory operations can contain toxic or undesirable components such as metal ions, which must be removed before discharge to surface waters. Adsorption processes that have high removal efficiencies are attractive methods for removing such contaminants. For economic operations, it is desirable to have an adsorbent that is selective for the metal contaminant of interest, has high capacity for the contaminant, has rapid adsorption kinetics, can be economically produced, and can be regenerated to a concentrated waste product or decomposed to a low-volume waste. Selected microorganisms are potentially useful adsorbents for these applications because they can be inexpensive, have high selectivities, and have high capacities for adsorption of many heavy metals, which are often problems in a variety of industries. A laboratory-scale packed column containing microbial cells immobilized within a gelatin matrix has been prepared, and its application to removal of Sr from a simulated wastewater is described. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Rapid-scan EPR of immobilized nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J; Boratyński, Przemysław J; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for (14)N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for (15)N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10″ magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes. PMID:25240151

  15. Stability of alginate-immobilized algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, A.L.; Goulding, K.H.; Robinson, P.K.; Simpkins, I; Trevan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using immobilized Chlorella cells to determine the diameter, compressibility, tolerance to phosphate chelation, and ability to retain algal cells during incubation of various alginate beads. These physical bead-characteristics were affected by a variety of interactive factors, including multivalent cation type (hardening agent) and cell, cation, and alginate concentration, the latter exhibiting a predominant influence. The susceptibility of alginate beads to phosphate chelation involved a complex interaction of cation type, concentration, and pH of phosphate solution. A scale of response ranging from gel swelling to gel shrinking was observed for a range of conditions. However, stable Ca alginate beads were maintained in incubation media with a pH of 5.5 and a phosphate concentration of 5 micro M. A preliminary investigation into cell leakage from the beads illustrated the importance of maintaining a stable gel structure and limiting cell growth to reduce leakage.

  16. Abiotic immobilization/detoxification of recalcitrant organics

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G. ); Sims, R.C. )

    1990-11-01

    In contrast to many remedial techniques that simply transfer hazardous wastes from one part of the environment to another (e.g., off-site landfilling), in situ restoration may offer a safe and cost-effective solution through transformation (to less hazardous products) or destruction of recalcitrant organics. Currently, the US Environmental Protection Agency and US Department of Energy are encouraging research that addresses the development of innovative alternatives for hazardous-waste control. One such alternative is biotic and abiotic immobilization and detoxification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAs) as associated with the soil humification process. This paper discusses (1) the possibility of using abiotic catalysis (with manganese dioxide) to polymerize organic substances; (2) aspects associated with the thermodynamics and kinetics of the process, and (3) a simple model upon which analyses may be based. 36 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Immobilized catalysts for iridium-catalyzed allylic amination: rate enhancement by immobilization.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Chandi C; Helmchen, Günter

    2015-05-01

    The first immobilized catalyst for Ir-catalyzed asymmetric allylic aminations is described. The catalyst is a cationic (π-allyl)Ir complex bound by cation exchange to an anionic silica gel support. Preparation of the catalyst is facile, and the supported catalyst displayed considerably enhanced activity compared with the parent homogeneous catalyst. Up to 43 consecutive amination runs were possible in recycling experiments. PMID:25787122

  18. An evaluation of the effectiveness of novel industrial by-products and organic wastes on heavy metal immobilization in Pb-Zn mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengxiang; Cao, Jianbing; Hu, Wenyong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Duan, Chun

    2013-10-01

    The in situ immobilization of heavy metals using various easily obtainable amendments is a cost-effective and practical method in the remediation of contaminated sites. In this study, two novel industrial waste materials (sweet sorghum vinasse and medicinal herb residues), spent mushroom compost and municipal solid wastes were used as amendments to assess their potential value for the in situ immobilization of heavy metals in tailings from a Pb-Zn mine in South China. Our results demonstrate that all three freely-available organic wastes decrease the deionized water (DW)- and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable metal concentrations, enhance the enzyme activity, reduce the metal concentration in plant tissues, and could be used for the remediation of these Pb-Zn mine tailings metals by immobilization. The municipal solid waste failed to reduce the metal concentration in tailings and plant tissues and therefore would not be a suitable immobilizing agent. The potential value of these materials as immobilizers of heavy metals and their remediation efficacy deserve further studies in large-scale field trials. PMID:24056870

  19. Skeletal muscle HSP expression in response to immobilization and remobilization.

    PubMed

    Venojärvi, M; Kvist, M; Jozsa, L; Kalimo, H; Hänninen, O; Atalay, M

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock proteins play an important regulatory role in the cellular defence. Oxidative stress is one of the factors inducing heat shock protein expression. This study tested the effects of 4 weeks of immobilization and subsequent remobilization on heat shock protein expression and oxidative stress in the lateral gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of the rat. Active mobilization or free mobilization protocols were used for remobilization. In active mobilization, strenuous uphill treadmill running, twice a day, was started immediately after the immobilization and lasted for six days. Rats in the free mobilization group moved freely in their cages immediately after the immobilization. Expression of heat shock proteins was upregulated during the recovery from immobilization, especially in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle in the active mobilization group. However, markers of oxidative stress, such as protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, or activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, did not change after the immobilization and subsequent recovery. In summary, following immobilization, both intensive and spontaneous exercise upregulated the heat shock protein expressions in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle and partly in the plantaris muscle, which may contribute to the recovery from immobilization atrophy. PMID:17024631

  20. Advances in ethanol production using immobilized cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Merchant, F.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The application of immobilized cell systems for the production of ethanol has resulted in substantial improvements in the efficiency of the process when compared to the traditional free cell system. In this review, the various methods of cell immobilization employed in ethanol production systems have been described in detail. Their salient features, performance characteristics, advantages and limitations have been critically assessed. More recently, these immobilized cell systems have also been employed for the production of ethanol from non-conventional feedstocks such as Jerusalem artichoke extracts, cheese whey, cellulose, cellobiose and xylose. Ethanol production by immobilized yeast and bacterial cells has been attempted in various bioreactor types. Although most of these studies have been carried out using laboratory scale prototype bioreactors, it appears that only fluidized bed, horizontally packed bed bioreactors and tower fermenters may find application on scale-up. Several studies have indicated that upon immobilization, yeast cells performing ethanol fermentation exhibit more favourable physiological and metabolic properties. This, in addition to substantial improvements in ethanol productivities by immobilized cell systems, is indicative of the fact that future developments in the production of ethanol and alcoholic beverages will be directed towards the use of immobilized cell systems. 291 references.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase immobilized onto PEI-coated silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tumturk, Hayrettin; Yüksekdag, Hazer

    2016-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated-silica nanoparticles were prepared by the Stöber method. The formation and the structure of the nanoparticles were characterized by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM images of the silica and PEI-coated nanoparticles revealed that they were well dispersed and that there was no agglomeration. The acetylcholineesterase enzyme was immobilized onto these nanoparticles. The effects of pH and temperature on the storage stability of the free and immobilized enzyme were investigated. The optimum pHs for free and immobilized enzymes were determined as 7.0 and 8.0, respectively. The optimum temperatures for free and immobilized enzymes were found to be 30.0 and 35.0°C, respectively. The maximum reaction rate (Vmax) and the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were investigated for the free and immobilized enzyme. The storage stability of acetylcholinesterase was increased when immobilized onto the novel PEI-coated silica nanoparticles. The reuse numbers of immobilized enzyme were also studied. These hybrid nanoparticles are desirable as carriers for biomedical applications. PMID:25365355

  2. Remobilization does not fully restore immobilization induced articular cartilage atrophy.

    PubMed

    Haapala, J; Arokoski, J P; Hyttinen, M M; Lammi, M; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V; Helminen, H J; Kiviranta, I

    1999-05-01

    The recovery of articular cartilage from immobilization induced atrophy was studied. The right hind limbs of 29-week-old beagle dogs were immobilized for 11 weeks and then remobilized for 50 weeks. Cartilage from the immobilized knee was compared with tissue from age matched control animals. After the immobilization period, uncalcified articular cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration was reduced by 20% to 23%, the reduction being largest (44%) in the superficial zone. The collagen fibril network showed no significant changes, but the amount of collagen crosslinks was reduced (13.5%) during immobilization. After remobilization, glycosaminoglycan concentration was restored at most sites, except for in the upper parts of uncalcified cartilage in the medial femoral and tibial condyles (9% to 17% less glycosaminoglycans than in controls). The incorporation of 35SO4 was not changed, and remobilization also did not alter the birefringence of collagen fibrils. Remobilization restored the proportion of collagen crosslinks to the control level. The changes induced by joint unloading were reversible at most sites investigated, but full restoration of articular cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration was not obtained in all sites, even after remobilization for 50 weeks. This suggests that lengthy immobilization of a joint can cause long lasting articular cartilage proteoglycan alterations at the same time as collagen organization remains largely unchanged. Because proteoglycans exert strong influence on the biomechanical properties of cartilage, lengthy immobilization may jeopardize the well being of articular cartilage. PMID:10335301

  3. Enhanced growth of lactobacilli in soymilk upon immobilization on agrowastes.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Ahmad, Rosma; Wan-Abdullah, Wan-Nadiah; Liong, Min-Tze

    2010-04-01

    Cell immobilization is an alternative to microencapsulation for the maintenance of cells in a liquid medium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of agrowastes from durian (Durio zibethinus), cempedak (Artocarpus champeden), and mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) as immobilizers for lactobacilli grown in soymilk. Rinds from the agrowastes were separated from the skin, dried, and ground (150 microm) to form powders and used as immobilizers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that lactobacilli cells were attached and bound to the surface of the immobilizers. Immobilized cells of Lactobacillus acidophilus FTDC 1331, L. acidophilus FTDC 2631, L. acidophilus FTDC 2333, L. acidophilus FTDC 1733, and L. bulgaricus FTCC 0411 were inoculated into soymilk, stored at room temperature (25 degrees C) and growth properties were evaluated over 168 h. Soymilk inoculated with nonimmobilized cells was used as the control. Utilization of substrates, concentrations of lactic and acetic acids, and changes in pH were evaluated in soymilk over 186 h. Immobilized lactobacilli showed significantly better growth (P < 0.05) compared to the control, accompanied by higher production of lactic and acetic acids in soymilk. Soymilk containing immobilized cells showed greater reduction of soy sugars such as stachyose, raffinose, sucrose, fructose, and glucose compared to the control (P < 0.05). PMID:20492305

  4. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  5. Immobilized Complexes for Enantioselective Catalysis: the Industrial Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugin, Benoît; Blaser, Hans-Ulrich

    Work carried out during the development of a production process for (­S)-Metolachlor, an important herbicide now produced on a >10,000 t/year scale with a homogeneous catalyst, is used as an example to describe the design and preparation of immobilized catalysts in an industrial environment. In the course of this work, a modular approach for the covalent immobilization of catalysts was developed. It is shown that immobilized catalysts with industrially relevant properties can indeed be prepared but that these catalysts tend to be substantially more complex and expensive than their homogeneous counterparts. The second part addresses the question of which requirements an immobilized catalyst must meet to be of industrial interest. Different methods for the preparation of catalysts that can be separated by filtration or extraction are discussed and assessed from our personal point of view and experience. It is shown, that to be accepted, immobilized catalysts must have a clear advantage over their homogeneous counterparts and that the immobilization strategy has to be tailored to the type of product as well as to limitations in time and money to be spent. It is concluded that the most feasible method for the immobilization of chiral catalysts is adsorption on suitable solid supports.

  6. Stability of soybean oil degumming using immobilized phospholipase A(2).

    PubMed

    Yu, Dianyu; Ma, Ying; Jiang, Lianzhou; Walid, Elfalleh; He, Shenghua; He, Yanming; Xiaoyu, Zhou; Zhang, Jianing; Hu, Lizhi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluation of stability of immobilized phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for soybean oil degumming. Also, the effect of reaction time on residual phosphorus levels was investigated according to the optimum pH and temperature. The free PLA2 and three immobilized PLA2 demonstrated significant differences in optimum operation conditions. pH, temperature and reaction time increased upon immobilization for three different immobilized PLA2 (PLA2-CA, PLA2-CAC and PLA2-CAG). Immobilized PLA2 showed enhanced thermal stability and retained more than 74% of relative activity after 1 h of incubation at 60°C, while the free PLA2 retained only 33%. The three immobilized PLA2 retained 30% to 60% of initial activities after 7 recycles. In particular, PLA2-CAC has more significant profiles in pH, temperature, reaction time and showed the highest remaining activity, thermal stability, reusability. Therefore, PLA2-CAC is a suitable immobilized enzyme for soybean oil degumming process. PMID:24371193

  7. Polymer-assisted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle immobilized keratinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwarh, Rocktotpal; Karak, Niranjan; Rai, Sudhir Kumar; Mukherjee, Ashis Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Nanotechnology holds the prospect for avant-garde changes to improve the performance of materials in various sectors. The domain of enzyme biotechnology is no exception. Immobilization of industrially important enzymes onto nanomaterials, with improved performance, would pave the way to myriad application-based commercialization. Keratinase produced by Bacillus subtilis was immobilized onto poly(ethylene glycol)-supported Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The optimization process showed that the highest enzyme activity was noted when immobilized onto cyanamide-activated PEG-assisted MNP prepared under conditions of 25 °C and pH 7.2 of the reaction mixture before addition of H2O2 (3% w/w), 2% (w/v) PEG6000 and 0.062:1 molar ratio of PEG to FeCl2·4H2O. Further statistical optimization using response surface methodology yielded an R2 value that could explain more than 94% of the sample variations. Along with the magnetization studies, the immobilization of the enzyme onto the PEG-assisted MNP was characterized by UV, XRD, FTIR and TEM. The immobilization process had resulted in an almost fourfold increase in the enzyme activity over the free enzyme. Furthermore, the immobilized enzyme exhibited a significant thermostability, storage stability and recyclability. The leather-industry-oriented application of the immobilized enzyme was tested for the dehairing of goat-skin.

  8. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min). PMID:23827593

  9. Nitrogen fixation by immobilized NIF derepressed Klebsiella pneumoniae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, K.; Toda, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro production of ammonia through biological means poses a number of challenges. The organisms should be able to accumulate considerable concentrations of ammonia in the medium. Secondly, nonphotosynthetic organisms must be supplied with high-energy substrates to carry out the fixation reaction. Thirdly, the organisms must be kept in a viable state to produce ammonia over long periods of time. In this article, preliminary results on the production of ammonia by a mutant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in continuous reactor systems are discussed. Continuous production of ammonia becomes feasible through the immobilization of the whole microbial cells and then through the use of the resulting catalyst system in a flow-through reactor. The rationale for immobilizing microbial cells and the advantages of such an approach over traditional fermentation processes are briefly described as they relate to the microbial production of ammonia. The microbial cells can be immobilized in such a way that their viability is still maintained in the immobilized state. This, in turn, obviates addition of cofactors, which is often an expensive step associated with immobilized multi-enzyme systems. Reconstituted bovine-hide collagen as the carrier matrix for fixing the cells was the carrier of choice for our work on immobilized Klebsiella cells. Polyacrylamide gels were examined as an alternate carrier matrix but results from this were found to be inferior to those collagen immobilized cell system.

  10. Biosynthesis of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by New Klebsiella oxytoca Free and Immobilized Cells on Inorganic Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Celloto, Valéria R.; Oliveira, Arildo J. B.; Gonçalves, José E.; Watanabe, Cecília S. F.; Matioli, Graciette; Gonçalves, Regina A. C.

    2012-01-01

    While many natural and synthetic compounds exhibit auxin-like activity in bioassays, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is recognized as the key auxin in most plants. IAA has been implicated in almost all aspects of plant growth and development and a large array of bacteria have been reported to enhance plant growth. Cells of Klebsiella oxytoca isolated from the rhizosphere of Aspidosperma polyneuron and immobilized by adsorption on different inorganic matrices were used for IAA production. The matrices were prepared by the sol-gel method and the silica-titanium was the most suitable matrix for effective immobilization. In operational stability assays, IAA production was maintained after four cycles of production, obtaining 42.80 ± 2.03 μg mL−1 of IAA in the third cycle, which corresponds to a 54% increase in production in relation to the first cycle, whereas free cells began losing activity after the first cycle. After 90 days of storage at 4°C the immobilized cells showed the slight reduction of IAA production without significant loss of activity. PMID:22623901

  11. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III). PMID:22840534

  12. Methods for immobilizing nucleic acids on a gel substrate

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Proudnikov, Dimitri Y.; Timofeev, Edward N.; Kochetkova, Svetlana V.; Florentiev, Vladimir L.; Shick, Valentine V.

    1999-01-01

    A method for labeling oligonucleotide molecules, and for immobilizing oligonucleotide and DNA molecules is provided comprising modifying the molecules to create a chemically active group, and contacting activated fluorescent dyes to the region. A method for preparing an immobilization substrate is also provided comprising modifying a gel to contain desired functional groups which covalently interact with certain moieties of the oligonucleotide molecules. A method for immobilizing biomolecules and other molecules within a gel by copolymerization of allyl-substituted oligonucleotides, DNA and proteins with acrylamide is also provided.

  13. Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H.

    1997-10-03

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations.

  14. Process development testing in support of the plutonium immobilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, C; Ebbinghaus, B

    2000-02-11

    As an integral part of the plutonium disposition program, formulation and process development is being performed for the immobilization of surplus plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic. Small-scale process prototypic and lab-scale functionally prototypic equipment have been tested to help define the immobilization process. The testing has included non-radioactive surrogates and actual actinide oxides contained in the immobilized form. A summary of the process development studies, as well as the formulation studies relevant to the process, will be provided.

  15. Graft copolymers with immobilized peroxidase for organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vargas, Reinaldo Romero; Higa, Olga Zazuco; Barrak, Élcio Rogério; Bechara, Etelvino J. H.; Wlasdislaw, Blanka; Marzorati, Liliana

    1999-07-01

    The graft copolymer poly(propylene)-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (PP-G-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto polypropylene spheres and characterized by thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Maximum percentage of grafting (70%) was obtained at a total dose of 12 kGy using 30% (w/w) of acrylic acid. The Michaelis constant, KM, and the maximum reaction velocity, VMax, were determined for the free horseradish peroxidase and for the immobilized horseradish peroxidase. The enzyme affinity for the substrate ( KM/ Vmax) remains quite good after immobilization. The sulfoxidation reaction of a ketosulfide was investigated with the immobilized peroxidase.

  16. [A new method of immobilizing proteolytic enzymes in polymeric hydrogels].

    PubMed

    Markvicheva, E A; Bronin, A S; Kudriavtseva, N E; Kuz'kina, I F; Pashkin, I I; Kirsh, Iu E; Rumsh, L D; Zubov, V P

    1994-03-01

    A novel one-step method for enzyme immobilization in composite gels based on the thermally reversible polymer poly (N-vinyl-caprolactam) was developed. Conditions for entrapment of trypsin and carboxypeptidase B in the gels were optimized. After immobilization, 80 and 90% of the original carboxypeptidase B and trypsin activities, respectively, were found to retain. Both immobilizes enzymes were active in a wider pH and temperature range. The granules with entrapped enzymes were successfully applied to obtain human insulin from recombinant proinsulin. PMID:8166751

  17. Rapid protein immobilization for thin film continuous flow biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Britton, Joshua; Raston, Colin L; Weiss, Gregory A

    2016-08-01

    A versatile enzyme immobilization strategy for thin film continuous flow processing is reported. Here, non-covalent and glutaraldehyde bioconjugation are used to immobilize enzymes on the surfaces of borosilicate reactors. This approach requires only ng of protein per reactor tube, with the stock protein solution readily recycled to sequentially coat >10 reactors. Confining reagents to thin films during immobilization reduced the amount of protein, piranha-cleaning solution, and other reagents by ∼96%. Through this technique, there was no loss of catalytic activity over 10 h processing. The results reported here combines the benefits of thin film flow processing with the mild conditions of biocatalysis. PMID:27461146

  18. Glutaraldehyde activated eggshell membrane for immobilization of tyrosinase from Amorphophallus companulatus: application in construction of electrochemical biosensor for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Tembe, Sanket; Kubal, B S; Karve, Meena; D'Souza, S F

    2008-04-01

    Tyrosinase from a plant source Amorphophallus companulatus was immobilized on eggshell membrane using glutaraldehyde. Among the three different approaches used for immobilization, activation of eggshell membrane by glutaraldehyde followed by enzyme adsorption on activated support could stabilize the enzyme tyrosinase and was found to be effective. K(m) and V(max) values for dopamine hydrochloride calculated from Lineweaver-Burk plot were 0.67 mM and 0.08 mM min(-1), respectively. Studies on effect of pH showed retention of more than 90% activity over a pH range 5.0-6.5. Membrane bound enzyme exhibited consistent activity in the temperature range 20-45 degrees C. Shelf life of immobilized tyrosinase system was found to be more than 6 months when stored in phosphate buffer at 4 degrees C. An electrochemical biosensor for dopamine was developed by mounting the tyrosinase immobilized eggshell membrane on the surface of glassy carbon electrode. Dopamine concentrations were determined by the direct reduction of biocatalytically liberated quinone species at -0.19 V versus Ag/AgCl (3M KCl). Linearity was observed within the range of 50-250 microM with a detection limit of 25 microM. PMID:18358868

  19. Immobilization of flavan-3-ols onto sensor chips to study their interactions with proteins and pectins by SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watrelot, Aude A.; Tran, Dong Tien; Buffeteau, Thierry; Deffieux, Denis; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Quideau, Stéphane; Renard, Catherine M. G. C.

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between plant polyphenols and biomacromolecules such as proteins and pectins have been studied by several methods in solution (e.g. isothermal titration calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and spectrophotometry). Herein, these interactions were investigated in real time by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis after immobilization of flavan-3-ols onto a sensor chip surface. (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and flavan-3-ol oligomers with an average degree of polymerization of 2 and 8 were chemically modified using N-(2-(tritylthio)ethyl)propiolamide in order to introduce a spacer unit onto the catecholic B ring. Modified flavan-3-ols were then immobilized onto a carboxymethylated dextran surface (CM5). Immobilization was validated and further verified by evaluating flavan-3-ol interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), poly-L-proline or commercial pectins. BSA was found to have a stronger association with monomeric flavan-3-ols than oligomers. SPR analysis of selected flavan-3-ols immobilized onto CM5 sensor chips showed a stronger association for citrus pectins than apple pectins, regardless of flavan-3-ol degree of polymerization.

  20. Optimizing immobilization of avidin on surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application of protein-immobilized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Sun, Shuguo; Ma, Meihu; Lin, Qinlu; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yan; Luo, Feijun

    2015-10-01

    A simple optimization method of immobilization of avidin on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs)' surface was proposed in this study. The avidin-immobilized MNPs were then developed and used to immobilize a model enzyme [Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)]. The loading capacity (LC) and activity of avidin-immobilized MNPs were optimized through selecting the most appropriate nanoparticle's size and shape, glutaraldehyde concentration, cross-linking reaction time, ultrasonic processing time, and initial concentration of avidin. The LC under optimized conditions was 63.37 ± 1.29 mg avidin/g MNPs, and the immobilized protein was still able to maintain its high biological activity of 10.86 ± 0.13 U/mg (biotin-binding activity of nature avidin was 14.1 U/mg) and better thermal stability compared to free avidin. A highly reusable, stable, and easily recovered immobilized HRP was obtained using MNPs as carriers. The immobilized HRP was reused repeatedly more than 9 times and retained more than 65 % of its original activity. PMID:26224655

  1. Effect of immobilized rhizobacteria and organic amendment in bulk and rhizospheric soil of Cistus albidus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengual, Carmen Maria; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldan, Antonio; Schoebitz, Mauricio

    2013-04-01

    A field experiment was carried out to assess the effectiveness of the immobilized microbial inoculant and the addition of organic olive residue. The microbial inoculant contained two rhizobacterial species identified as Azospirillum brasilense and Pantoea dispersa immobilized in a natural inert support. Bacterial population densities were 3.5×109 and 4.1×109 CFU g-1 of A. brasilense M3 and P. dispersa C3, respectively. The amendment used was the organic fraction extracted with KOH from composted "alperujo". The raw material was collected from an olive-mill and mixed with fresh cow bedding as bulking agent for composting. The inoculation of rhizobacteria and the addition of organic residue were employed for plant growth promotion of Cistus albidus L. and enhancement of soil physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties in a degraded semiarid Mediterranean area. One year after planting, the available phosphorus and potassium content in the amended soils was about 100 and 70% respectively higher than in the non-amended soil. Microbial inoculant and their interaction with organic residue increased the aggregate stability of the rhizosphere soil of C. albidus (by 12% with respect to control soil) while the organic residue alone not increased the aggregate stability of the rhizosphere of C. albidus. Microbial biomass C content and enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, urease, protease-BAA and alkaline phosphatase) of the rhizosphere of C. albidus were increased by microbial inoculant and organic residue interaction but not by microbial inoculation alone. The microbial inoculant and organic residue interaction were the most effective treatment for stimulating the roots dry weight of C. albidus (by 133% with respect to control plants) and microbial inoculant was the most effective treatment for increase the shoot dry weigh of plants (by 106% with respect to control plants). The combined treatment, involving microbial inoculant and addition of the organic residue

  2. HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-30

    A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

  3. Alternatives generation and analysis report for immobilized low-level waste interim storage architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-01

    The Immobilized Low-Level Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-level waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This report describes alternative Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architectures, evaluation criteria, and evaluation results to support the Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architecture selection decision process.

  4. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  5. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses. PMID:26551890

  6. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  7. Cell immobilization for microbial production of 1,3-propanediol.

    PubMed

    Gungormusler-Yilmaz, Mine; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B; Azbar, Nuri

    2016-06-01

    Cell and enzyme immobilization are often used for industrial production of high-value products. In recent years, immobilization techniques have been applied to the production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO). Biotechnological fermentation is an attractive alternative to current 1,3-PDO production methods, which are primarily thermochemical processes, as it generates high volumetric yields of 1,3-PDO, is a much less energy intensive process, and generates lower amounts of environmental organic pollutants. Although several approaches including: batch, fed-batch, continuous-feed and two-step continuous-feed were tested in suspended systems, it has been well demonstrated that cell immobilization techniques can significantly enhance 1,3-PDO production and allow robust continuous production in smaller bioreactors. This review covers various immobilization methods and their application for 1,3-PDO production. PMID:25600463

  8. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY EXTRACTION OF MERCURY FROM GROUNDWATER IMMOBILIZED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contamina...

  9. Recovery of uranium from seawater by immobilized tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Nakajima, A.

    1987-06-01

    Tannin compounds having multiple adjacent hydroxy groups have an extremely high affinity for uranium. To prevent the leaching of tannins into water and to improve the adsorbing characteristics of these compounds, the authors tried to immobilize tannins. The immobilized tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability to uranium, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The immobilized tannin can recover uranium from natural seawater with high efficiency. About 2530 ..mu..g uranium is adsorbed per gram of this adsorbent within 22 h. Depending on the concentration in seawater, an enrichment of up to 766,000-fold within the adsorbent is possible. Almost all uranium adsorbed is easily desorbed with a very dilute acid. Thus, the immobilized tannin can be used repeatedly in the adsorption-desorption process.

  10. Removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol by immobilized Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q T; Wong, Y S; Tam, N F Y

    2011-11-01

    The removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol (NP) by alginate-immobilized cells of Chlorella vulgaris were compared with their respective free cultures. The effects of four cell densities of 10(4) per algal bead were investigated, as were the four algal bead concentrations, with regard to the removal and biodegradation of NP. Although immobilization significantly decreased the growth rate and NP's biodegradation efficiency of C. vulgaris, NP removal over a short period was enhanced. The NP removal mechanism by immobilized cells was similar to that by free cells, including adsorption onto alginate matrix and algal cells, absorption within cells and cellular biodegradation. The optimal cell density and bead concentration for the removal and biodegradation of NP was 50-100×10(4) cells algal bead(-1) and 2-4 beads ml(-1) of wastewater, respectively. These results demonstrated that immobilized C. vulgaris cells under optimal biomass and photoautotrophic conditions are effective in removing NP from contaminated water. PMID:21944284

  11. Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-07-10

    The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

  12. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. PMID:26010162

  13. Rational surface silane modification for immobilizing glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feibao; Guo, Yi; Lin, Feifei; Zhang, Yumei; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) has many significant applications in biosensor and biocatalysis. In this study, we firstly quantitatively analyzed the binding efficiency of (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTES) modified onto the surface of GOx. It was found that the contents of the grafted silane did not significantly influence the relative activities and tertiary structures of all surface modified GOxs. Immobilization ratio and relative activity of all instances of APTES modified GOx increased, compared with those of native enzyme. However, good stability of immobilized GOx at extreme pH and high temperature could only be obtained when modified protein with low binding silane content. At pH 2.0, the immobilized GOx with low binding content showed a more than 600% activity, compared to the free enzyme. Therefore, rational surface modification would be beneficial to improving the activity and stability of immobilized enzyme as well as increasing loading amount. PMID:26921503

  14. Glyphosate degradation by immobilized bacteria: field studies with industrial wastewater effluent.

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, L E; Adams, W J; Heitkamp, M A

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized bacteria have been shown in the laboratory to effectively remove glyphosate from wastewater effluent discharged from an activated sludge treatment system. Bacterial consortia in lab columns maintained a 99% glyphosate-degrading activity (GDA) at a hydraulic residence time of less than 20 min. In this study, a pilot plant (capacity, 45 liters/min) was used for a field demonstration. Initially, activated sludge was enriched for microbes with GDA during a 3-week biocarrier activation period. Wastewater effluent was then spiked with glyphosate and NH4Cl and recycled through the pilot plant column during start-up. Microbes with GDA were enhanced by maintaining the pH at less than 8 and adding yeast extract (less than 10 mg/liter). Once the consortia were stabilized, the column capacity for glyphosate removal was determined in a 60-day continuous-flow study. Waste containing 50 mg of glyphosate per liter was pumped at increasing flow rates until a steady state was reached. A microbial GDA of greater than 90% was achieved at a 10-min hydraulic residence time (144 hydraulic turnovers per day). Additional studies showed that microbes with GDA were recoverable within (i) 5 days of an acid shock and (ii) 3 days after a 21-day dormancy (low-flow, low-maintenance) mode. These results suggest that full-scale use of immobilized bacteria can be a cost-effective and dependable technique for the biotreatment of industrial wastewater. PMID:1599241

  15. Depression of osteoblastic activity in immobilized limbs of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, M; Rodan, G A; Thompson, D D

    1991-07-01

    Recently we characterized the immobilization-related osteopenia in adult rats and showed that it is caused by increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation (Weinreb et al. 1989 Bone 10:187). To assess the effect of age on disuse osteopenia, this study investigated the effects of immobilization on bone turnover in very young, suckling rats. The 15-day-old rats underwent unilateral hind limb immobilization by sciatic neurectomy; the contralateral limb was left intact and served as control. Experimental or sham-operated animals were killed after 0, 2, 4, or 12 days postsurgery. Dry, fat-free weight and ash weight were determined in both femora, and both tibiae were subjected to static and dynamic histomorphometry. Immobilization caused a progressive deficit in bone mass in the immobilized limb compared to the contralateral intact limb but did not affect femoral longitudinal growth. The total mineral content in the immobilized femora was 13.6% less than that in the intact limb by day 12. Concomitantly, tibial cancellous bone area and perimeter declined in the immobilized limb by 37.3 and 32.2%, respectively. This reduction in bone mass in the tibiae of immobilized limbs was associated with increased bone resorption, expressed as osteoclast perimeter, number of osteoclasts per mm surface, and number of osteoclasts per mm2 tissue area. Bone formation was reduced as a result of impaired osteoblast activity as evidenced by (1) decreased endocortical and trabecular mineral apposition rate; (2) reduced trabecular mineral formation rate; (3) decreased percentage of ash of the femoral dry weight; and (4) increased volume of unmineralized osteoid in the tibial metaphysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1950676

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Project System Design Description for Can Loading System

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2001-02-15

    The purpose of this System Design Description (SDD) is to specify the system and component functions and requirements for the Can Loading System and provide a complete description of the system (design features, boundaries, and interfaces), principles of operation (including upsets and recovery), and the system maintenance approach. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize up to 13 metric tons (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials.

  17. Short-duration electrical immobilization of lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Gingerich, William H.; Gutreuter, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Chemical anesthetics induce stress responses, and most leave residues in fish tissues that require a certain withdrawal time before the animal can be released into the environment. Therefore, alternatives are needed in cases when fish must be released immediately, for example, during egg-collecting operations or after implanting elastomer tags. To evaluate pulsed direct current as an alternative method of immobilization, individual lake trout Salvelinus namaycush were electrically immobilized using various pulsed-DC voltage gradients and shock durations. Duration of opercular recovery and narcosis were measured for individual fish. Fish were euthanized 24 h after electrical immobilization and processed for lateral radiograph analysis and assessment of perivertebral hemorrhaging by dissection. Survival of lake trout after electrical immobilization at 0.6 V/cm for 30 or 40 s or 0.8 V/cm for 5 or 15 s was monitored for 81 or 84 d after immobilization. Mean narcosis duration increased with voltage gradient and shock duration. Larger fish had longer periods of narcosis at the same combination of voltage gradient and shock duration. Radiological evaluation indicated that 9 of 28 fish in the oldest age-class tested had detectable injuries of the vertebral column, but all but one were in the lowest injury category. Although vertebral column injuries were observed in most small fish, the majority of vertebral column injuries were minor compressions involving two to seven vertebrae. Of the 82 lake trout electrically immobilized to assess long-term survival, only 5 died (6%). Our data suggest that lake trout could be electrically immobilized for a sufficient period to allow field workers to collect length and weight data and implant visible implant tags or colored elastomer tags. The technique we used, however, is probably not appropriate for procedures that require immobilization for more than 2a??3 min.

  18. Cellulase immobilized on modified nylon for saccharification of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, P.; Wilkins, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present study deals with the immobilization of cellulase on nylon and nylon incorporated with glass. The immobilized and free enzymes were compared in terms of their yields, using untreated sawdust (yellow pine wood) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) as substrates, at a standard pH and temperature. Also, the sawdust was pretreated with 1% alkaline hydrogen peroxide and the yield compared with the untreated sawdust hydrolysis to determine the importance of the substrate pretreatment.

  19. Immobilization of enzymes on alginic acid-polyacrylamide copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaraswamy, M.D.K.; Panduranga R.K.; Thomas J.K.; Santappa, M.

    1981-08-01

    In this report, the authors present initial results and limitations of a polymeric system for the immobilization of enzymes. Enzymes attached to insoluble polymers of natural and synthetic origin are gaining importance in many industrial and biomedical applications. Graft copolymers are used as enzyme supports and in this study a novel polymeric system of alginic acid-polyacrylamide graft copolymer is described which was used for immobilizing enzymes. (Refs. 4).

  20. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  1. Clodronate prevents immobilization osteopenia in rats.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, R; Arnala, I; Olkkonen, H; Lappalainen, R; Nevalainen, T; Alhava, E

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effect of clodronate on immobilization osteopenia (IO) induced by sciatic neurectomy in rats. 100 Wistar female rats were divided into 5 groups of 20 animals each: 1) sham-operated, control group, 2) IO+saline control group, 3) IO+clodronate 3 mg/kg/day, 4) IO+clodronate 10 mg/kg/day, and 5) IO+clodronate 30 mg/kg/day. Clodronate was administered subcutaneously beginning on the day after nerve sectioning. After 7 weeks, the animals were killed and both tibiae were removed. Bone mineral density, ash weight and calcium, phosphorus and magnesium contents of the ash of the tibiae were analyzed. The weight of the rats did not differ between the groups during the experiment. The ash weight of the tibiae decreased by 6.6 percent and the mineral density decreased by 5.1 percent after neurectomy. Clodronate reduced IO in a dose-dependent manner and the highest dose neutralized the effect of neurectomy. The calcium content of the ash decreased after neurectomy as compared to the sham-operated group, and clodronate increased it to the sham-operated level. The bone Ca/P ratio remained normal. PMID:7839852

  2. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  3. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  4. Estolides synthesis catalyzed by immobilized lipases.

    PubMed

    Aguieiras, Erika C G; Veloso, Cláudia O; Bevilaqua, Juliana V; Rosas, Danielle O; da Silva, Mônica A P; Langone, Marta A P

    2011-01-01

    Estolides are vegetable-oil-based lubricants obtained from oleic acid or any source of hydroxy fatty acids. In this work, the estolides synthesis from oleic acid and methyl ricinoleate (biodiesel from castor oil), using immobilized commercial lipases (Novozym 435, Lipozyme RM-IM, and Lipozyme TL-IM) in a solvent-free medium was investigated. Acid value was used to monitor the reaction progress by determining the consumption of acid present in the medium. Novozym 435 showed the best performance. Water removal improved the conversion. Novozym 435 was more active at atmospheric pressure. Novozym 435 was reused four times with conversion reaching 15% after the fourth reaction at 80°C. Estolides produced under the reaction conditions used in this work presented good properties, such as, low temperature properties as pour point (-24°C), viscosity (23.9 cSt at 40°C and 5.2 cSt at 100°C), and viscosity index (153). PMID:21755040

  5. Estolides Synthesis Catalyzed by Immobilized Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Aguieiras, Erika C. G.; Veloso, Cláudia O.; Bevilaqua, Juliana V.; Rosas, Danielle O.; da Silva, Mônica A. P.; Langone, Marta A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Estolides are vegetable-oil-based lubricants obtained from oleic acid or any source of hydroxy fatty acids. In this work, the estolides synthesis from oleic acid and methyl ricinoleate (biodiesel from castor oil), using immobilized commercial lipases (Novozym 435, Lipozyme RM-IM, and Lipozyme TL-IM) in a solvent-free medium was investigated. Acid value was used to monitor the reaction progress by determining the consumption of acid present in the medium. Novozym 435 showed the best performance. Water removal improved the conversion. Novozym 435 was more active at atmospheric pressure. Novozym 435 was reused four times with conversion reaching 15% after the fourth reaction at 80°C. Estolides produced under the reaction conditions used in this work presented good properties, such as, low temperature properties as pour point (−24°C), viscosity (23.9 cSt at 40°C and 5.2 cSt at 100°C), and viscosity index (153). PMID:21755040

  6. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  7. Immobilizing U from solution by immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria of desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hulfang; Barton, Larry L.

    2000-07-01

    As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl accetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. It is proposed that cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl through transferring electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to uranyl ions.

  8. New immobilized cell system with protection against toxic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Harada, S.; Kurosawa, H.; Yajima, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new immobilized cell system providing protection against toxic solvents was investigated so that normal fermentations could be carried out in a medium containing toxic solvents. The system consists of immobilized growing cells in Ca-alginate gel beads to which vegetable oils, which are inexpensive absorbents of solvents, had been added. The ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26603 was used as a model fermentation to study the protection afforded by the system against solvent toxicities. The fermentation was inhibited by solvents such as 2-octanol, benzene, toluene, and phenol. Ethanol production of one batch was not finished even after 35 h using immobilized growing yeast cells in conventional Ca-alginate gel beads in an ethanol production medium (5% glucose) containing 0.1% 2-octanol, which is used as a solvent for liquid-liquid extraction and is one of the most toxic solvents in our experiments. With the new immobilized growing cell system using vegetable oils, however, four repeated batch fermentations were completed in 35 h. Castor oil provided even more protection than soy bean, olive, and tung oils, and it was possible to complete six repeated batches in 35 h. The immobilized cell system with vegetable oils also provided protection against other toxic solvents such as benzene and toluene. A possible mechanism for the protective function of the new immobilized cell system is discussed.

  9. Aminohydroxybutane bisphosphonate inhibits bone loss due to immobilization in rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D D; Seedor, J G; Weinreb, M; Rosini, S; Rodan, G A

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effects of aminobutane bisphosphonate (AHBuP) on bone remodeling during immobilization in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral sciatic neurectomy after receiving two daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 0.01, 0.10, or 1.0 mg P per kg AHBuP. Rats were sacrificed at 24 h or 10 or 20 days postimmobilization. Femora were ashed and tibiae were prepared for histomorphometric analysis. AHBuP was effective in inhibiting bone loss due to immobilization in a dose-dependent manner. The percentage loss of femoral ash weight due to immobilization decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In vehicle-treated rats, there was a significant decrease in trabecular bone volume (TBV) in the immobilized tibiae compared to the normal tibiae; in AHBuP-treated rats there was a dose-dependent increase in TBV both in the immobilized and control tibiae. The osteoid surface extent was decreased in AHBuP-treated rats in a dose-dependent manner. The mineral apposition rate was altered only in the intact leg of rats treated with 0.1 and 1.0 mg P AHBuP per kg compared to vehicle treated. Osteoclast number per mm was reduced by AHBuP treatment. In conclusion, aminohydroxybutane bisphosphonate effectively prevented the bone loss due to immobilization in this system. PMID:2333787

  10. Continuous culture of immobilized streptomyces cells for kasugamycin production.

    PubMed

    Kim, C J; Chang, Y K; Chun, G T; Jeong, Y H; Lee, S J

    2001-01-01

    Continuous cultures of immobilized Streptomyces kasugaensis, a kasugamycin producer, were carried out on Celite beads. When using a prototype separator for immobilized-cell separation and recycling, the continuous operation could not be sustained for an extended period as a result of an excessive loss of immobilized cells caused by the poor performance of the separator. Accordingly, the immobilized-cell separator was revised to provide better immobilized-cell settling and thus recycling into the reactor. In a subsequent culture using the revised separator, a stable operation was maintained for over 820 h with a high kasugamycin productivity. The kasugamycin productivity ranged from 9.8 to 16.1 mg/L/h, which was about 14- to 23-fold higher than that in a batch suspended-cell culture. When the original feeding medium concentration was doubled at the end of the continuous culture, the productivity became severely impaired for several reasons, which will be discussed. An excessive formation of free cells and loss of immobilized cells through the separator were also observed. PMID:11386865

  11. Remote material handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brault, J.R.

    2000-03-13

    With the downsizing of the US and Russian nuclear stockpiles, large quantities of weapons-usable plutonium in the US are being declared excess and will be disposed of by the Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program. To implement this program, DOE has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the construction and operation of three new facilities: pit disassembly and conversion; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and plutonium immobilization. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize a portion of the excess plutonium in a hybrid ceramic and glass form containing high level waste for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP is divided into three distinct operating areas: Plutonium Conversion, First Stage Immobilization, and Second Stage Immobilization. Processing technology for the PIP is being developed jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper will discuss development of the automated unpacking and sorting operations in the conversion area, and the automated puck and tray handling operations in the first stage immobilization area. Due to the high radiation levels and toxicity of the materials to be disposed of, the PIP will utilize automated equipment in a contained (glovebox) facility. Most operations involving plutonium-bearing materials will be performed remotely, separating personnel from the radiation source. Source term materials will be removed from the operations during maintenance. Maintenance will then be performed hands on within the containment using glove ports.

  12. Immobilization of pectin depolymerising polygalacturonase using different polymers.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Haneef; Aman, Afsheen; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Karim, Asad; Ghani, Maria; Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Ul Qader, Shah Ali

    2016-01-01

    Polygalacturonase catalyses the hydrolysis of pectin substances and widely has been used in food and textile industries. In current study, different polymers such as calcium alginate beads, polyacrylamide gel and agar-agar matrix were screened for the immobilization of polygalacturonase through entrapment technique. Polyacrylamide gel was found to be most promising one and gave maximum (89%) immobilization yield as compared to agar-agar (80%) and calcium alginate beads (46%). The polymers increased the reaction time of polygalacturonase and polymers entrapped polygalacturonases showed maximum pectinolytic activity after 10 min of reaction as compared to free polygalacturonase which performed maximum activity after 5.0 min of reaction time. The temperature of polygalacturonase for maximum enzymatic activity was increased from 45°C to 50°C and 55°C when it was immobilized within agar-agar and calcium alginate beads, respectively. The optimum pH (pH 10) of polygalacturonase was remained same when it was immobilized within polyacrylamide gel and calcium alginate beads, but changed from pH 10 to pH 9.0 after entrapment within agar-agar. Thermal stability of polygalacturonase was improved after immobilization and immobilized polygalacturonases showed higher tolerance against different temperatures as compared to free enzyme. Polymers entrapped polygalacturonases showed good reusability and retained more than 80% of their initial activity during 2nd cycles. PMID:26454112

  13. Nucleosome immobilization strategies for single-pair FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Wiepke J A; Schmidt, Thomas; van Noort, John

    2008-10-01

    All genomic transactions in eukaryotes take place in the context of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, which is responsible for DNA compaction. Overcoming the steric hindrance that nucleosomes present for DNA-processing enzymes requires significant conformational changes. The dynamics of these have been hard to resolve. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (spFRET) microscopy is a powerful technique for observing conformational dynamics of the nucleosome. Nucleosome immobilization allows the extension of observation times to a limit set only by photobleaching, and thus opens the possibility of studying processes occurring on timescales ranging from milliseconds to minutes. It is crucial however, that immobilization itself does not introduce artifacts in the dynamics. Here we report on various nucleosome immobilization strategies, such as single-point attachment to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or surfaces coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and confinement in porous agarose or polyacrylamide gels. We compare the immobilization specificity and structural integrity of immobilized nucleosomes. A crosslinked star polyethylene glycol coating performs best with respect to tethering specificity and nucleosome integrity, and enables us to reproduce for the first time bulk nucleosome unwrapping kinetics in single nucleosomes without immobilization artifacts. PMID:18792054

  14. Photo selective protein immobilization using bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Kim, Ansoon; Huh, Chul; Park, Chan Woo; Ah, Chil Seong; Kim, Bong Kyu; Yang, Jong-Heon; Chung, Kwang Hyo; Choi, Yo Han; Hong, Jongcheol; Sung, Gun Yong

    2012-11-01

    A simple and selective technique which immobilizes protein onto a solid substrate by using UV illumination has been developed. In protein immobilization, a Bovine serum albumin (BSA) performed bifunctional role as a cross-linker between substrate and proteins and as a blocker inhibiting a nonspecific protein adsorption. A new photo-induced protein immobilization process has been investigated at each step by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A UV photomask has been used to induce selective protein immobilization on target regions of the surface of the SiO2 substrates under UV illumination with negligible nonspecific binding. The UV illumination also showed improved photostability than the conventional methods which employed bifunctional photo-crosslinker molecules of photo-reactive diazirine. This new UV illumination-based photo-addressable protein immobilization provides a new approach for developing novel protein microarrays for multiplexed sensing as well as other types of bio-immobilization in biomedical devices and biotechnologies.

  15. One-step enzyme extraction and immobilization for biocatalysis applications.

    PubMed

    Cassimjee, Karim Engelmark; Kourist, Robert; Lindberg, Diana; Wittrup Larsen, Marianne; Thanh, Nguyen Hong; Widersten, Mikael; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Berglund, Per

    2011-04-01

    An extraction/immobilization method for HIs(6) -tagged enzymes for use in synthesis applications is presented. By modifying silica oxide beads to be able to accommodate metal ions, the enzyme was tethered to the beads after adsorption of Co(II). The beads were successfully used for direct extraction of C. antarctica lipase B (CalB) from a periplasmic preparation with a minimum of 58% activity yield, creating a quick one-step extraction-immobilization protocol. This method, named HisSi Immobilization, was evaluated with five different enzymes [Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB), Bacillus subtilis lipase A (BslA), Bacillus subtilis esterase (BS2), Pseudomonas fluorescence esterase (PFE), and Solanum tuberosum epoxide hydrolase 1 (StEH1)]. Immobilized CalB was effectively employed in organic solvent (cyclohexane and acetonitrile) in a transacylation reaction and in aqueous buffer for ester hydrolysis. For the remaining enzymes some activity in organic solvent could be shown, whereas the non-immobilized enzymes were found inactive. The protocol presented in this work provides a facile immobilization method by utilization of the common His(6) -tag, offering specific and defined means of binding a protein in a specific location, which is applicable for a wide range of enzymes. PMID:21381205

  16. XPS characterization of the surface immobilization of antibacterial furanones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bataineh, Sameer A.; Britcher, Leanne G.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2006-02-01

    Brominated furanones have attracted recent interest as antibacterial compounds. To utilize them as protective coatings in biomedical device applications, they must be covalently immobilized onto solid surfaces; however, interfacial coupling protocols developed for other biomolecules are not applicable to furanones. An azide reaction scheme has enabled covalent immobilization onto fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer but its chemistry is less predictable, requiring detailed characterization by XPS and tapping mode AFM after each step of the immobilization sequence. XPS curve fitting resolved components in the C 1s, N 1s and Br 3d regions. Angle dependent XPS was used to assess the depth distributions and layer thicknesses. The results indicated successful covalent immobilization of furanones; however, side reactions occurred. In addition to the expected C sbnd Br, a contribution from bromine ion (Br -) was detected, indicating that photo-degradation of furanones took place during UV illumination, and this reaction was found to increase with illumination time. The Br - was removed by washing with water, whereas the C sbnd Br signal from immobilized furanone remained. Spectroscopic characterization will assist in elucidating the structure of furanone coatings, understanding their mode of action when covalently immobilized on surfaces, and rationally designing and optimizing an effective antibacterial coating for biomedical applications.

  17. Transport of fine sediment over a coarse, immobile riverbed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment transport in cobble-boulder rivers consists mostly of fine sediment moving over a coarse, immobile bed. Transport rate depends on several interrelated factors: boundary shear stress, the grain size and volume of fine sediment, and the configuration of fine sediment into interstitial deposits and bed forms. Existing models do not incorporate all of these factors. Approaches that partition stress face a daunting challenge because most of the boundary shear is exerted on immobile grains. We present an alternative approach that divides the bed into sand patches and interstitial deposits and is well constrained by two clear end-member cases: full sand cover and absence of sand. Entrainment from sand patches is a function of their aerial coverage. Entrainment from interstices among immobile grains is a function of sand elevation relative to the size of the immobile grains. The bed-sand coverage function is used to predict the ratio of the rate of entrainment from a partially covered bed to the rate of entrainment from a completely sand-covered bed, which is determined using a standard sand transport model. We implement the bed-sand coverage function in a morphodynamic routing model and test it against observations of sand bed elevation and suspended sand concentration for conditions of nonuniform fine sediment transport in a large flume with steady uniform flow over immobile hemispheres. The results suggest that this approach may provide a simple and robust method for predicting the transport and migration of fine sediment through rivers with coarse, immobile beds.

  18. [Growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Qing; Peng, Qian; Lai, Yong-Hong; Ji, Kai-Yan; Han, Xiu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    To confirm the growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on algae, co-cultivation method was used to investigate the effect of immobilized pectinase on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. After co-cultivation, the damage status of the algae was observed through electron microscope, and the effect of immobilized pectase on the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the algae was also measured. The results showed that the algae and immobilized pectase co-cultivated solution etiolated distinctly on the third day and there was a significantly positive correlation between the extent of etiolation and the dosage as well as the treating time of the immobilized pectinase. Under electron microscope, plasmolysis was found in the slightly damaged cells, and the cell surface of these cells was rough, uneven and irregular; the severely damaged cells were collapsed or disintegrated completely. The algal yield and the chlorophyll a content decreased significantly with the increase of the treating time. The measurement of the malondiadehyde (MDA) value showed that the antioxidation system of the treated algal cells was destroyed, and their membrane lipid was severely peroxidated. The study indicated that the immobilized pectinase could efficiently inhibit the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the inhibitory rate reached up to 96%. PMID:23379158

  19. Removal of chlorophenols from wastewater by immobilized horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu

    1996-07-05

    Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on magnetite and removal of chlorophenols using immobilized enzyme were investigated. Immobilization by physical adsorption on magnetite was much more effective than that by the crosslinking method, and the enzyme was found to be immobilized at 100% of retained activity. In addition, it was discovered that horseradish peroxidase was selectively adsorbed on magnetite, and the immobilization resulted in a 20-fold purification rate for crude enzyme. When immobilized peroxidase was used to treat a solution containing various chlorophenols, p-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, each chlorophenol was almost 100% removed, and also the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) reached more than 90%, respectively. However, in the case of soluble peroxidase, complete removal of each chlorophenol could not be attained, and in particular, the removal of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was the lowest, with a removal rate of only 36%.

  20. Optimization of polyphenol oxidase immobilization in copper alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kocaturk, Selin; Yagar, Hulya

    2010-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1) was isolated from artichoke head (Cynara scolymus L.) by using 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0), concentrated by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and immobilized in copper-alginate beads. Immobilization yield was determined to be 70%. The cresolase and catecholase activities of enzyme immobilized at optimum immobilization conditions were found to be 13.3 and 670 U g beads min(-1), respectively. Effects of immobilization conditions such as alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CuCl2 concentration were found to be 2 % and 3 % (w/v), respectively. Using bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.25 g maximum enzyme activities were observed for both polyphenol activities. The initial concentrations of loading free enzyme were 6.5 U mL(-1) and 5815 U mL(-1) for cresolase activity and catecholase activities, respectively. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 8 repeated uses. PMID:20429683

  1. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  2. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    PubMed

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae. PMID:25129521

  3. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  4. Novel immobilization process of a thermophilic catalase: efficient purification by heat treatment and subsequent immobilization at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Luo, Hui; López, Claudia; Xiao, Jing; Chang, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of the present work is to investigate a novel process of purification and immobilization of a thermophilic catalase at high temperatures. The catalase, originated from Bacillus sp., was overexpressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET28-CATHis and efficiently purified by heat treatment, achieving a threefold purification. The purified catalase was then immobilized onto an epoxy support at different temperatures (25, 40, and 55 °C). The immobilizate obtained at higher temperatures reached its maximum activity in a shorter time than that obtained at lower temperatures. Furthermore, immobilization at higher temperatures required a lower ionic strength than immobilization at lower temperatures. The characteristics of immobilized enzymes prepared at different temperatures were investigated. The high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) showed the highest thermal stability, followed by the 40 °C immobilizate. And the high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) had slightly higher operational stability than the 25 °C immobilizate. All of the immobilized catalase preparations showed higher stability than the free enzyme at alkaline pH 10.0, while the alkali resistance of the 25 °C immobilizate was slightly better than that of the 40 and 55 °C immobilizates. PMID:26205324

  5. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanová, Soňa; Zarevúcká, Marie; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-03-01

    The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels.The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed

  6. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  7. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate. PMID:17686028

  8. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew; Smith, April; Balkwill, Dr. David; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  9. Biotransformation of polydatin to resveratrol in Polygonum cuspidatum roots by highly immobilized edible Aspergillus niger and Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuang; Luo, Meng; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Chun-jian; Gu, Cheng-bo; Li, Chun-ying; Zu, Yuan-gang; Fu, Yu-jie; Guan, Yue

    2013-05-01

    A new biotransformation method of producing resveratrol with co-immobilized edible Aspergillus niger and Yeast (AY) was investigated. The biotransformation conditions were optimized for the resveratrol production under 30 °C, pH 6.5, 2 days, liquid-solid ratio 12:1 (mL/g), the yield of resveratrol reached 33.45 mg/g, which increased 11-fold to that of untreated one. The conversion rate of polydatin reached 96.7%. The residual activity of immobilized microorganism was 83.2% after used for 15 runs. The developed method could be an effectively alternative biotransformation method for producing resveratrol from the plants. PMID:23566471

  10. Preparation, characterization, and luminescence of (SBA-15) immobilized pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Sun, Si-Jia

    2014-12-01

    SBA-15 mesoporous silica was synthesized by hydrothermal method and its surface was methylated by treatment with methyltrimethoxysilane. Pepsin was immobilized on the obtained materials giving host-guest composite materials (SBA-15)-pepsin and (methylated SBA-15)-pepsin. The optimum conditions for preparation of these materials were established. Methylated SBA-15 (M-SBA-15) has improved immobilization efficiency of enzyme compared to initial SBA-15 silica. It was shown that with the gradual increase of NaCl solution ionic strength the immobilized amount of enzyme was reduced. Powder X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the host frameworks in the prepared host-guest composite materials are intact and the ordered structure was retained. Scanning electron microscopic studies revealed fibrous morphologic characteristics of the SBA-15 and the immobilized pepsin composite materials. The average particle diameter of (SBA-15)-pepsin composite was 338 ± 10 and 343 ± 10 nm for (M-SBA-15)-pepsin. The low temperature N2 adsorption-desorption study at 77 K showed that the pore sizes and specific surface areas of the host-guest composite materials were smaller than those before the introduction of the enzyme, suggesting that the immobilized enzyme occupied a definite position in the host material pore channels. The UV-vis solid diffuse reflectance and luminescence studies showed that the enzyme was successfully immobilized on to the host material and that after the immobilization of enzyme on SBA-15 the conformation of pepsin macromolecule has not been changed.

  11. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  12. Immobilization of swift foxes with ketamine hydrochloride-xylazine hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Telesco, R.L.; Sovada, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop field immobilization techniques that allow researchers to handle safely swift foxes (Vulpes velox) with minimal risk of stress or injury. We immobilized captive swift foxes to determine the safety and effectiveness of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride at different dosages. We attempted to determine appropriate dosages to immobilize swift foxes for an adequate field-handling period based on three anesthesia intervals (induction period, immobilization period, and recovery period) and physiologic responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate, and heart rate). Between October 1998-July 1999, we conducted four trials, evaluating three different dosage ratios of ketamine and xylazine (2.27:1.2, 5.68:1.2, and 11.4:1.2 mg/kg ketamine:mg/kg xylazine, respectively), followed by a fourth trial with a higher dosage at the median ratio (11.4 mg/kg ketamine:2.4 mg/kg xylazine). We found little difference in induction and recovery periods among trials 1-3, but immobilization time increased with increasing dosage (P<0.08). Both the immobilization period and recovery period increased in trial 4 compared with trials 1-3 (P???0.03). There was a high variation in responses of individual foxes across trials, making it difficult to identify an appropriate dosage for field handling. Heart rate and respiration rates were depressed but all physiologic measures remained within normal parameters established for domestic canids. We recommend a dosage ratio of 10 mg/kg ketamine to 1 mg/kg xylazine to immobilize swift foxes for field handling.

  13. Radiological assessment of water treatment processes in a water treatment plant in Saudi Arabia: Water and sludge radium content, radon air concentrations and dose rates.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaseem, Q Kh; Almasoud, Fahad I; Ababneh, Anas M; Al-Hobaib, A S

    2016-09-01

    There is an increase demand for clean water sources in Saudi Arabia and, yet, renewable water resources are very limited. This has forced the authorities to explore deep groundwater which is known to contain large concentrations of radionuclides, mainly radium isotopes. Lately, there has been an increase in the number of water treatment plants (WTPs) around the country. In this study, a radiological assessment of a WTP in Saudi Arabia was performed. Raw water was found to have total radium activity of 0.23Bq/L, which exceeds the international limit of 0.185Bq/L (5pCi/L). The WTP investigated uses three stages of treatment: flocculation/sedimentation, sand filtration and reverse osmosis. The radium removal efficiency was evaluated for each stage and the respective values were 33%, 22% and 98%. Moreover, the activity of radium in the solid waste generated from the WTP in the sedimentation and sand filtrations stages were measured and found to be 4490 and 6750Bq/kg, respectively, which exceed the national limit of 1000Bq/kg for radioactive waste. A radiological assessment of the air inside the WTP was also performed by measuring the radon concentrations and dose rates and were found in the ranges of 2-18Bq/m(3) and 70-1000nSv/h, respectively. The annual effective dose was calculated and the average values was found to be 0.3mSv which is below the 1mSv limit. PMID:27169731

  14. Immobilizing Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 via Improvement of Microspheres by Gelatin Modification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Cui, Caixia; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of immobilizing Yarrowia lipolytica lipase lip2 on epoxy microspheres with or without gelatin modifications. The activity of lipase immobilized on gelatin-modified supports was twofold higher than those immobilized on native supports. There was no significant difference in the Michaelis-Menten constant (K M ) between the two immobilized lipases. However, lipase immobilized on gelatin modified supports showed an approximately fourfold higher V max than lipase immobilized on native supports. Lipase immobilization on the gelatin-modified support exhibited a significantly improved operational stability in an esterification system. After it was reused for a total of 35 batches, the ester conversion of lipase immobilized on gelatin-modified and native microspheres was 83 and 60 %, respectively. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase could be stored at 4 °C for 12 months without any loss of activity. PMID:26245260

  15. C-Terminal-oriented Immobilization of Enzymes Using Sortase A-mediated Technique.

    PubMed

    Hata, Yuto; Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, sortase A-mediated immobilization of enzymes was used for the preparation of immobilized enzymes. Thermobifida fusca YX β-glucosidase (BGL) or Streptococcus bovis 148 α-amylase (AmyA) were produced with C-terminal sortase A recognition sequences. The resulting fusion proteins were successfully immobilized on nanoparticle surfaces using sortase A. Some properties (activity, stability, and reusability) of the immobilized fusion proteins were evaluated. Both immobilized BGL and immobilized AmyA prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique retained their catalytic activity, exhibiting activities 3.0- or 1.5-fold (respectively) of those seen with the same enzymes immobilized by chemical crosslinking. Immobilized enzymes prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique did not undergo dramatic changes in stability compared with the respective free enzymes. Thus, the sortase A-mediated technique provides a promising method for immobilization of active, stable enzymes. PMID:26098063

  16. Effects of immobilization by electricity and MS-222 on brown trout broodstock and their progeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, S.D.; Meinertz, J.R.; Gaikowski, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effects of electrically and chemically induced immobilization on postspawn broodstock and their progeny, age-2 and age-3 female broodstock and age-2 male broodstock of brown trout Salmo trutta were immobilized with electricity or tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222), stripped of their eggs or milt, and weighed. Eggs taken from electrically immobilized females were fertilized with milt taken from age-2 males that were immobilized with electricity, and eggs taken from females immobilized with MS-222 were fertilized with milt taken from age-2 males that were immobilized with MS-222. After spawning, the mortality and weight of broodstock were compared twice over a 6-month period. Egg viability and growth of offspring fry from each treatment group were also compared. Electricity induced complete and consistent immobilization in brown trout broodstock. Electrically immobilized fish were more easily handled than fish immobilized with MS-222; however, electrically immobilized fish survival (70%) was significantly less than fish immobilized with MS-222 (83%). Broodstock growth differences were only noted at 6 months postexposure, when the mean weight of electrically immobilized fish was slightly less than the weight of fish immobilized with MS-222. Broodstock immobilization by electricity did not reduce egg viability or fry growth.

  17. A general method for immobilization of glycoproteins on regenerable immobilized metal-ion carriers: application to glucose oxidase from Penicillium chrysogenum and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G

    1994-08-01

    A general method for immobilization of glycoproteins on immobilized metal-ion carriers is described. The method includes oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the glycoprotein with potassium periodate, covalent modification with histidine and immobilization on bivalent metal ion-iminodiacetic acid-agarose. The method is exemplified with horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The modified and immobilized enzymes are stable for at least 2 months at 4 degrees C. The immobilized enzymes were used as enzyme electrodes for the determination of the glucose concentration. PMID:7917065

  18. Immobilization osteoporosis and active vitamin D: effect of active vitamin D analogs on the development of immobilization osteoporosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Y; Makita, T; Hino, S; Hashimoto, Y; Kushida, K; Inoue, T; Orimo, H

    1981-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of vitamin D analogs, 1,24(R)-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,24(R)-(OH)2D3], 1,24(S)-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,24-(S)(OH)2D3], and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] on immobilization osteoporosis were studied in rats. The right hind limb was immobilized through application of a plaster cast following the section of the sciatic nerve. The left hind limb was intact. Vitamin D analogs were orally administered for 6 weeks at dose levels of 0.02 and 0.10 micrograms/kg/day, respectively. The mean lengths of the immobilized femurs were not significantly different from those of the intact femurs in all the experimental groups. In the immobilized femur of animals treated with 1,24(R)(OH)2D3, 0.10 micrograms/kg, dry and ash weights were heavier and calcium and phosphorus contents greater than those in the nontreated group. Furthermore, the amount of calcified bone mass and the cortical thickness of the femurs of the immobilized limb in 1,24(OH)2D3-treated animals were greater than those in the nontreated animals. Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 at 0.10 micrograms/kg caused an increase of the bone mass in both immobilized and intact femurs when compared with those of the control group. It was concluded that the administration of 1,24(R)(OH)2D3 diminished the effect of immobilization in the development of osteoporosis without any side effects. PMID:6799174

  19. Effects of the immobilization supports on the catalytic properties of immobilized mushroom tyrosinase: a comparative study using several substrates.

    PubMed

    Marín-Zamora, María Elisa; Rojas-Melgarejo, Francisco; García-Cánovas, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio

    2007-09-30

    Mushroom tyrosinase was immobilized from an extract onto glass beads covered with one of the following compounds: the crosslinked totally cinnamoylated derivatives of glycerine, D-sorbitol, D-manitol, 1,2-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose, D-glucuronic acid, D-gulonic acid, sucrose, D-glucosone, D-arabinose, D-fructose, D-glucose, ethyl-D-glucopyranoside, inuline, dextrine, dextrane or starch, or the partially cinnamoylated derivative 3,5,6-tricinnamoyl-D-glucofuranose which was obtained by the acid hydrolysis of 1,2-O-isopropylidene-alpha-d-glucofuranose. The enzyme was immobilized by direct adsorption onto the support and the quantity of tyrosinase immobilized was found to increase with the hydrophobicity of the supports. The kinetic constants of immobilized tyrosinase acting on the substrates, 4-tert-butylcatechol, dopamine and DL-dopa, were studied. When immobilized tyrosinase acted on 4-tert-butylcatechol, the values of K(m)(app) were lower than these obtained for tyrosinase in solution while, when dopamine and DL-dopa were used, the K(m)(app) were higher. The order of the substrates as regards their ionizable groups, DL-dopa (two ionizable groups)>dopamine (one ionizable group)>4-tert-butylcatechol (no ionizable group) coincided with the order of the K(m)(app) values shown by tyrosinase immobilized on the hydrophobic supports, and was the inverse of that observed for tyrosinase in solution. The K(m)(app) values of immobilized tyrosinase were in all cases higher than those of soluble tyrosinase and depended on the nature of the support and the hydrophobicity of the substrate, meaning that it is possible to design supports with different degrees of selectivity towards a mixture of enzyme substrates in the reaction medium. PMID:17868943

  20. Nonionic micellar liquid chromatography coupled to immobilized enzyme reactors.

    PubMed

    Tomer, S; Dorsey, J G; Berthod, A

    2001-07-20

    Immobilized enzyme reactors are used as post-column reactors to modify the detectability of analytes. An immobilized amino acid oxidase reactor was prepared and coupled to an immobilized peroxidase reactor to detect low level of amino acids by fluorescence of the homovanilic dimer produced. A cholesterol oxidase reactor was prepared to detect cholesterol and metabolites by 241 nm UV absorbance of the enone produced. The preparation of the porous glass beads with the immobilized enzymes is described. Micellar liquid chromatography is used with non-ionic micellar phases to separate the amino acids or cholesterol derivatives. It is demonstrated that the non ionic Brij 35 micellar phases are very gentle for the enzyme activity allowing the reactor activity to remain at a higher level and for a much longer time than with hydro-organic classical chromatographic mobile phases or aqueous buffers. The coupling of nonionic micellar phases with enzymatic detection gave limits of detection of 32 pmol (4.8 ng injected) of methionine and 50 pmol (19 ng injected) of 20alpha-hydroxy cholesterol. The immobilized enzyme reactors could be used continuously for a week without losing their activity. It is shown that the low efficiency obtained with micellar liquid chromatography is compensated by the possibility offered by the technique to easily adjust selectivity. PMID:11510562

  1. Preliminary studies on immobilization of lipase using chicken eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S.; Serri, N. A.; Hena, S.; Tajarudin, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    A few advantages of enzyme immobilization are reusability of expensive enzyme, improvement of stability and activity compared to crude enzyme. Various organic components can be used as carrier for enzyme immobilization such as chicken eggshell. It can be used as a carrier for immobilization as its mineral component mostly contains of calcium carbonate. In the present study, Tributyrin method was used to test enzyme activity of Rhizomucour Miehei, Candida Antarctica and Candida Rugosa. Rhizomucour Miehei shows the highest enzyme activity (360.8 mol/min/mL lipase) and was used in further experiment. Experiment was continued to study incubation time for lipase immobilization on eggshell (1-4 hours) and reaction time of esterification of sugar ester (0-72 hours). Two hours incubation time for lipase immobilization was observed and gives the highest yield of sugar ester (78.13%). Fructose and stearic acid as substrate was used for the production of sugar ester. The highest percentage of sugar ester production was shown at 36 hours of reaction time.

  2. Immobilization of Candida rugosa lipase on sporopollenin from Lycopodium clavatum.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Havva; Yilmaz, Elif; Pehlivan, Erol; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Sporopollenin is a natural polymer obtained from Lycopodium clavatum, which is highly stable with constant chemical structure and has high resistant capacity to chemical attack. In this study, immobilization of lipase from Candida rugosa (CRL) on sporopollenin by adsorption method is reported for the first time. Besides this, the enzyme adsorption capacity, activity and thermal stability of immobilized enzyme have also been investigated. It has been observed that under the optimum conditions (Spo-E((0.3))), the specific activity of the immobilized lipase on the sporopollenin by adsorption was 16.3U/mg protein, which is 0.46 times less than that of the free lipase (35.6U/mg protein). The pH and temperature of immobilized enzyme were optimized, which were 6.0 and 40 degrees C respectively. Kinetic parameters V(max) and K(m) were also determined for the immobilized lipase. It was observed that there is an increase of the K(m) value (7.54mM) and a decrease of the V(max) value (145.0U/mg-protein) comparing with that of the free lipase. PMID:19583977

  3. Knee joint immobilization decreases aggrecan gene expression in the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Djurasovic, M; Aldridge, J W; Grumbles, R; Rosenwasser, M P; Howell, D; Ratcliffe, A

    1998-01-01

    Aggrecan is the major proteoglycan of the meniscus, and its primary function is to give the meniscus its viscoelastic compressive properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of joint immobilization on aggrecan gene expression in the meniscus. The right hindlimbs of six mature beagles were knee cast-immobilized in 90 degrees of flexion and supported by a sling to prevent weightbearing, while the contralateral limb was left free to bear weight. The animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the anterior and posterior halves of the medial and lateral menisci were analyzed separately. Analysis of aggrecan gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed decreased aggrecan gene expression in menisci from immobilized knees (P < 0.01, two-way analysis of variance). Aggrecan gene expression decreased by a factor of 2 to 5.5 in the different regions examined. Analysis of the composition of the meniscus also showed decreased proteoglycan content and increased water content with immobilization (P < 0.05, two-way analysis of variance). These results show that joint immobilization can significantly affect meniscal cellular activity and composition and can therefore potentially affect meniscal function. PMID:9617414

  4. [Novel Immobilized Biocatalyst for Microbiological Synthesis of Pharmaceutical Steroids].

    PubMed

    Andryushina, V A; Karpova, N V; Druzhinina, A V; Stytsenko, T S; Podorozhko, E A; Ryabev, A N; Lozinskii, V I

    2015-01-01

    The steroid-transforming activity of free and immobilized cells of Pimelobacter simplex VKPM As-1632 entrapped in an operationally stable macroporous polyvinyl alcohol cryogel was studied. It was shown that the macroporous matrix of the carrier did not create any diffusional limitations for steroid access to the cells or the removal of the transformation products from them. The optimal conditions for the hydrocortisone 1,2-dehydration into prednisolone by free and immobilized cells were elucidated. The immobilized biocatalyst was obtained in a granulated form and used in 32 successive cycles of steroid transformation. The average cycle duration was 45 min, and the prednisolone yield of during the first 20 cycles was 98%. It was established that the immobilized cells of the actinobacteria P. simplex retained high steroid-transforming activity over all of the transformation cycles. The physicochemical and diffusion characteristics of the polyvinyl alcohol gels and its granules were determined, and their high stability during repeated cycles of steroid transformation was shown. The results indicated that P. simplex immobilized cells represent an effective catalyst suitable for multiple use. Biomass consumption decreased upon its use, and product isolation, as well as culture storage, was much easier. PMID:26596083

  5. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  6. In –Situ Spectroscopic Investigation of Immobilized Organometallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert, J.

    2007-11-14

    Immobilized organometallic catalysts, in principle, can give high rates and selectivities like homogeneous catalysts with the ease of separation enjoyed by heterogeneous catalysts. However, the science of immobilized organometallics has not been developed because the field lies at the interface between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis communities. By assembling an interdisciplinary research team that can probe all aspects of immobilized organometallic catalyst design, the entire reacting system can be considered, where the transition metal complex, the complex-support interface and the properties of the support can all be considered simultaneously from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Researchers at Georgia Tech and the University of Virginia are studying the fundamental principles that can be used to understand and design future classes of immobilized organometallic catalysts. In the framework of the overall collaborative project with Georgia Tech, our work focused on (a) the X-ray absorption spectroscopy of an immobilized Pd-SCS-O complex (b) the mode of metal leaching from supported Pd catalysts during Heck catalysis and (c) the mode of deactivation of Jacobsen’s Co-salen catalysts during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides. Catalysts containing supported Pd pincer complexes, functionalized supports containing mercapto and amine groups, and oligomeric Co-salen catalysts were synthesized at Georgia Tech and sent to the University of Virginia. Incorporation of Pd onto several different kinds of supports (silica, mercapto-functionalized silica, zeolite Y) was performed at the University of Virginia.

  7. Bacterial Immobilization for Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, David P; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    AFM is a high-resolution (nm scale) imaging tool that mechanically probes a surface. It has the ability to image cells and biomolecules, in a liquid environment, without the need to chemically treat the sample. In order to accomplish this goal, the sample must sufficiently adhere to the mounting surface to prevent removal by forces exerted by the scanning AFM cantilever tip. In many instances, successful imaging depends on immobilization of the sample to the mounting surface. Optimally, immobilization should be minimally invasive to the sample such that metabolic processes and functional attributes are not compromised. By coating freshly cleaved mica surfaces with porcine (pig) gelatin, negatively charged bacteria can be immobilized on the surface and imaged in liquid by AFM. Immobilization of bacterial cells on gelatin-coated mica is most likely due to electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged bacteria and the positively charged gelatin. Several factors can interfere with bacterial immobilization, including chemical constituents of the liquid in which the bacteria are suspended, the incubation time of the bacteria on the gelatin coated mica, surface characteristics of the bacterial strain and the medium in which the bacteria are imaged. Overall, the use of gelatin-coated mica is found to be generally applicable for imaging microbial cells.

  8. Polymer-Immobilized Photosensitizers for Continuous Eradication of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Valkov, Anton; Nakonechny, Faina; Nisnevitch, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The photosensitizers Rose Bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB), when immobilized in polystyrene, were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity in a continuous regime. The photosensitizers were immobilized by dissolution in chloroform, together with polystyrene, with further evaporation of the solvent, yielding thin polymeric films. Shallow reservoirs, bottom-covered with these films, were used for constructing continuous-flow photoreactors for the eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and wastewater bacteria under illumination with visible white light using a luminescent lamp at a 1.8 mW·cm−2 fluence rate. The bacterial concentration decreased by two to five orders of magnitude in separate reactors with either immobilized RB or MB, as well as in three reactors connected in series, which contained one of the photosensitizers. Bacterial eradication reached more than five orders of magnitude in two reactors connected in series, where the first reactor contained immobilized RB and the second contained immobilized MB. PMID:25158236

  9. Serial DNA immobilization in micro- and extended nanospace channels.

    PubMed

    Renberg, Björn; Sato, Kae; Mawatari, Kazuma; Idota, Naokazu; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-06-01

    That focused arrays, even with a small set of ligands, provide more data than single point experiments is well established in the DNA microarray research field, but microarray technology has yet to be transferred to fused silica microchips. Fused silica microchips have several attractive features such as stability to pressure, solvents, acids and bases, and can be fabricated with minute dimensions, making them good candidates for nanofluidic research. However, due to harsh bonding conditions, DNA ligands must be immobilized after fabrication, thus preventing standard microarray spotting techniques from being used. In this paper, we provide tools for serial DNA immobilization in fused silica microchips using UV. We report the synthesis of a new UV-linker which was used to covalently couple functional DNA oligos to the inside of channels in fused silica microchips. With some simple modifications to our mask aligner, we were able to transfer OHP mask patterns, which allows the creation of basically any pattern in the channels. The functionality of the oligos was measured through the binding of fluorophore-labeled complementary target oligos. We examined parameters influencing DNA immobilization, and carry-over between spots after consecutive immobilizations inside the same channel. We also report the first successful multiple immobilizations of functional DNA oligos inside single channels of extended nanospace depth (460 nm). PMID:19458857

  10. Lead immobilization and bioavailability in microbial and root interface.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi

    2013-10-15

    A range of both soluble and insoluble phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize Pb in solution and soil. However, these compounds have limitations because of low solubility or leaching of P. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can be used to enhance the solubility of insoluble P compounds. The effects of PSB on the immobilization of Pb in the presence of phosphate rock (PR) and subsequent reduction in Pb uptake by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) in nutrient agar medium and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in soil under sterile condition were tested. Root colonization of PSB was confirmed by halo formation around the root in the medium containing tricalcium phosphate. Addition of PR in the presence of PSB immobilized Pb in both agar medium and soil, and reduced Pb translocation from root to shoot. Furthermore, shoot Pb concentrations of Indian mustard in agar medium and ryegrass in soil were decreased by 58.1% and 22.8%, respectively, compared to the control. Even though soluble P compound was the most effective in the immobilization of Pb, excess P may cause eutrophication. Therefore, PSB are suggested as a co-amendment to facilitate immobilization of Pb without causing any detrimental effect on the environment. PMID:23489643

  11. Effects of acoustic wave resonance oscillation on immobilized enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomoya; Inoue, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    In aiming at developing a new method to artificially activate enzyme catalysts immobilized on surface, the effects of resonance oscillation of bulk acoustic waves were studied. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized by a covalent coupling method on a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) device that was able to generate thickness-extensional resonance oscillation (TERO). Glucose oxidation by the GOD enzyme was studied in a microreactor. The generation of TERO immediately increased the catalytic activity of immobilized GOD by a factor of 2-3. With turn-off of TERO, no significant activity decrease occurred, and 80-90% of the enhanced activity was maintained while the reaction proceeded. The almost complete reversion of the activity to the original low level before TERO generation was observed when the immobilized GOD was exposed to a glucose substrate-free solution. These results indicated that the presence of glucose substrate was essential for TERO-induced GOD activation and preservation of the increased activity level. The influences of reaction temperature, glucose concentration, pH, and rf electric power on the TERO activation showed that TERO strengthened the interactions of the immobilized enzyme with glucose substrate and hence promoted the formation of an activation complex.

  12. [Immobilization of heavy metal Pb2+ with geopolymer].

    PubMed

    Jin, Man-tong; Jin, Zan-fang; Huang, Cai-ju

    2011-05-01

    A series of geopolymers were synthesized by mixing metakaolinite, water glass, sodium hydroxide and water, and the lead ion solidification experiments were performed with the geopolymer. Then, the immobilization efficiency was characterized by monitoring the leaching concentration and compressive strength of solidified products. Additionally, the structure and properties of the solidified products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, based on the analysis of immobilization efficiency, microstructure and mineral structure, the difference between geopolymer and cement on the performance of immobilizing heavy metals was discussed. The results of lead ion immobilization experiments showed that over 99.7% of heavy metal was captured by the geopolymer as the doping concentration of lead ion was less than 3%. Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the solidified product ranged from 40 MPa to 50 MPa. Furthermore, by using the same Pb2+ concentration, the geopolymer showed higher compressive strength and lower leaching concentration compared to the cement. Because lead ion participated in constitution of structure of geopolymer, or Pb2+ was adsorbed by the aluminium ions on the geopolymeric skeleton and held in geopolymer. However, cement mainly solidified lead ion by physical encapsulation and adsorption mechanism. Therefore, both from the compressive strength and leaching concentration and from the microstructure characterization as well as the mechanism of the geopolymerization reaction, the geopolymer has more advantages in immobilizing Pb2+ than the cement. PMID:21780604

  13. Immobilization of diastase α-amylase on nano zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Antony, Navya; Balachandran, S; Mohanan, P V

    2016-11-15

    Diastase α-amylase extracted from malt, catalyses break down of starch into maltose. It is commonly used in food and fermentation industry. In the present study nano zinc oxide is used as support for this starch hydrolyzing enzyme. IR study revealed that the enzyme got adsorbed via electrostatic interaction with the functional groups on the support. The immobilized enzyme possessed a better heat-resistance than free enzyme. The kinetic parameters were determined using Lineweaver-Burk plot. The immobilized enzyme showed higher Km 2.08mg/ml than the free enzyme whose Km is 0.45±.05mg/ml. The Vmax of immobilized enzyme was about 2.92±.02mg/ml/min and that of free enzyme was 7.14±.02mg/ml/min, showing decrease in activity after immobilization. The immobilized enzyme showed 70% activity after 30days of storage while free enzyme lost its activity within 7days. About 80% of enzyme retained activity after 4 cycles of reuse. PMID:27283676

  14. Astaxanthin intake attenuates muscle atrophy caused by immobilization in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Miyaji, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Goto, Katsumasa; Ohmori, Daijiro; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Sugiura, Takao

    2016-08-01

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment and has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage. We tested the hypothesis that astaxanthin intake would attenuate immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Male Wistar rats (14-week old) were fed for 24 days with either astaxanthin or placebo diet. After 14 days of each experimental diet intake, the hindlimb muscles of one leg were immobilized in plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. Following 10 days of immobilization, both the atrophic and the contralateral plantaris muscles were removed and analyzed to determine the level of muscle atrophy along with measurement of the protein levels of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and selected proteases. Compared with placebo diet animals, the degree of muscle atrophy in response to immobilization was significantly reduced in astaxanthin diet animals. Further, astaxanthin supplementation significantly prevented the immobilization-induced increase in the expression of CuZn-SOD, cathepsin L, calpain, and ubiquitin in the atrophied muscle. These results support the postulate that dietary astaxanthin intake attenuates the rate of disuse muscle atrophy by inhibiting oxidative stress and proteolysis via three major proteolytic pathways. PMID:27482075

  15. Immobilized Polymer Layers on Spherical Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Harton, S.; Kumar, S; Yang, H; Koga, T; Hicks, K; Lee, H; Mijovic, J; Liu, M; Vallery, R; Gidley, D

    2010-01-01

    Polymer properties, such as their mechanical strength, barrier properties, and dielectric response, can be dramatically improved by the addition of nanoparticles. This improvement is thought to be because the surface area per unit mass of particles increases with decreasing particle size, R, as 1/R. This favorable effect has to be reconciled with the expectation that at small enough R the nanoparticles must behave akin to a solvent and cause a deterioration of properties. How does this transition in behavior from large solutes to the solvent limit occur? We conjecture that for small enough particles the layer of polymer affected by the particles ('bound' polymer layer) must be much smaller than that for large particles: the favorable effect of increasing particle surface area can thus be overcome and lead to the small solvent limit with unfavorable mechanical properties, for example. To substantiate this picture requires that we measure and compare the 'bound polymer layer' formed on nanoparticles with those near large particles with equivalent chemistry. We have implemented a novel strategy to obtain uniform nanoparticle dispersion in polymers, a problem for many previous works. Then, by combining theory and a suite of experimental techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, we show that the immobilized poly(2-vinylpyridine) layer near 15 nm diameter silica particles ({approx}1 nm) is considerably thinner than that at flat silica surfaces ({approx}4 to 5 nm), which is the limit of an infinitely large particle. We have also determined that the changes in the polymer's glass-transition temperature due to the presence of this strongly interacting surface are very small in both well-dispersed nanocomposites and thin films (<100 nm). Similarly, the polymer's fragility, as determined by dielectric spectroscopy, is also found to be little affected in the nanocomposites relative to the pure polymer. While a

  16. Planarian Immobilization, Partial Irradiation, and Tissue Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guedelhoefer IV, Otto C.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    cover the culture of large animals, immobilization, preparation for partial irradiation, tissue transplantation, and the optimization of animal recovery. Furthermore, the work described here demonstrates the first application of the partial irradiation method for use with the most widely studied planarian, Schmidtea mediterranea. Additionally, efficient tissue grafting in planaria opens the door for the functional testing of subpopulations of naïve or treated stem cells in repopulation assays, which has long been the gold-standard method of assaying adult stem cell potential in mammals8. Broad adoption of these techniques will no doubt lead to a better understanding of the cellular behaviors of adult stem cells during tissue homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:23007410

  17. Treatment of textile effluent in a developed phytoreactor with immobilized bacterial augmentation and subsequent toxicity studies on Etheostoma olmstedi fish.

    PubMed

    Watharkar, Anuprita D; Khandare, Rahul V; Waghmare, Pankajkumar R; Jagadale, Ashwini D; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2015-01-01

    A static hydroponic bioreactor using nursery grown plants of Pogonatherum crinitum along with immobilized Bacillus pumilus cells was developed for the treatment of textile wastewater. Independent reactors with plants and immobilized cells were also kept for performance and efficacy evaluation. The effluent samples characterized before and after their treatment showed that the plant-bacterial consortium reactor was more efficient than those of individual plant and bacterium reactors. COD, BOD, ADMI, conductivity, turbidity, TDS and TSS of the textile effluent was found to be reduced by 78, 70, 93, 4, 90, 13 and 70% respectively within 12 d by the consortial set. HPTLC analysis revealed the transformation of the textile effluent to new products. The phytotoxicity study on Phaeseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare seeds showed reduced toxicity of treated effluents. The animal toxicity study performed on Etheostoma olmstedi fishes showed the toxic nature of untreated effluent giving extreme stress to fishes leading to death. Histology of fish gills exposed to treated effluent was found to be less affected. The oxidative stress related enzymes like superoxide dismutase and catalase were found to show decreased activities and less lipid peroxidation in fishes exposed to treated effluent. PMID:25464312

  18. Determination of conformation and orientation of immobilized peptides and proteins at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Ulrich, Nathan W.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Surface immobilized peptides/proteins have important applications such as antimicrobial coating and biosensing. We report a study of such peptides/proteins using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ATR-FTIR. Immobilization on surfaces via physical adsorption and chemical coupling revealed that structures of chemically immobilized peptides are determined by immobilization sites, chemical environments, and substrate surfaces. In addition, controlling enzyme orientation by engineering the surface immobilization site demonstrated that structures can be well-correlated to measured chemical activity. This research facilitates the development of immobilized peptides/proteins with improved activities by optimizing their surface orientation and structure.

  19. Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip & Classroom Experiment to Demystify the Symbioses Formed between Plants & Fungi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy C.; Chaudhary, V. Bala; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Moore, John C.; Pringle, Anne; Umbanhowar, James A.; Wilson, Gail W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Biology curricula cover fungi in units on bacteria, protists, and primitive plants, but fungi are more closely related to animals than to bacteria or plants. Like animals, fungi are heterotrophs and cannot create their own food; but, like plants, fungi have cell walls, and are for the most part immobile. Most species of fungi have a filamentous…

  20. Purification, immobilization, and characterization of nattokinase on PHB nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Suresh babu Ram Kumar; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2009-12-01

    In this study, nattokinase was purified from Bacillus subtilis using ion exchange chromatography and immobilized upon polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) nanoparticles. A novel strain isolated from industrial dairy waste was found to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and the strain was identified as Brevibacterium casei SRKP2. PHA granules were extracted from 48 h culture and the FT-IR analysis characterized them as PHB, a natural biopolymer from B. casei. Nanoprecipitation by solvent displacement technique was used to synthesize PHB nanoparticles. PHB nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and particle size ranged from 100-125 nm. Immobilization of nattokinase upon PHB nanoparticles resulted in a 20% increase in the enzyme activity. Immobilization also contributed to the enhanced stability of the enzyme. Moreover, the activity was completely retained on storage at 4 degrees C for 25 days. The method has proven to be highly simple and can be implemented to other enzymes also. PMID:19608412

  1. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24755261

  2. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions

    PubMed Central

    Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport–driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  3. Immobilized catalase on CoFoam hydrophilic polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Palligarnai T; Como, Karin

    2006-02-01

    Catalase from bovine liver was covalently immobilized on hydrophilic polyurethane composite (CoFoam). The activity of the enzyme was assayed in the decomposition of H2O2 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The effects of water-to-prepolymer ratio, the addition of a crosslinking agent, and the utilization of a spacer on enzyme activity were examined. The results of immobilization of the enzyme in a large-scale unit are reported. The advantage of the CoFoam composite lies in the low drop in pressure in a packed-bed reactor at fairly large flow rates. For example, at flow rates of 10-12 L/min, the drop in pressure is typically 3 kPa. Enzymes immobilized on CoFoam represent a novel use as catalysts in packed-bed reactors owing to the low drop in pressure. PMID:16484719

  4. Magnetically immobilized nanoporous giant proteoliposomes as a platform for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Tse-Ming; Wu, Kan; Chellappan, Gowri

    2012-01-01

    We report a biosensing method that is based on magnetically immobilized functional liposomes. The vesicles encapsulate magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and enzymatic sensing reagents. Magnetic attraction between MNP and external magnets first immobilizes liposomes onto the surface of a coverglass. With the assistance from α-hemolysin (aHL), translocations of analytes through a lipid membrane trigger intravesicular enzymatic reactions. After 90 s incubation, the product from the sensing reactions, resorufin, was probed by laser-induced fluorescence. Detection of two analytes, glucose and ethanol, was demonstrated using two types of functional vesicles. The effects of MNP-containing vesicles and biotinylated vesicles on aHL's translocations of analytes were also compared. Unlike biotinylated lipids, MNP facilitate immobilization of liposomes without compromising the integrity of membrane and pore-forming activity of aHL. PMID:22073389

  5. Optimization of alpha-amylase immobilization in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Figen; Yagar, Hulya; Balkan, Bilal

    2007-01-01

    alpha-Amylase enzyme was produced by Aspergillus sclerotiorum under SSF conditions, and immobilized in calcium alginate beads. Effects of immobilization conditions, such as alginate concentration, CaCl(2) concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads, on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CaCl(2) concentration were found to be 3% (w/v). Using a loading enzyme concentration of 140 U mL(-1), and bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.5 g, maximum enzyme activity was observed. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 7 repeated uses, losing only 35% of their initial activity. Among the various starches tested, the highest enzyme activity (96.2%) was determined in soluble potato starch hydrolysis for 120 min at 40 degrees C. PMID:17516249

  6. Immobilization of bioactive plasmin reduces the thrombogenicity of metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wise, Steven G; Michael, Praveesuda L; Waterhouse, Anna; Santos, Miguel; Filipe, Elysse; Hung, Juichien; Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela M M; Ng, Martin K C

    2015-12-01

    Components of many vascular prostheses including endovascular stents, heart valves and ventricular assist devices are made using metal alloys. In these blood contacting applications, metallic devices promote blood clotting, which is managed clinically by profound platelet suppression and/or anticoagulation. Here it is proposed that the localized immobilization of bioactive plasmin, a critical mediator of blood clot stability, may attenuate metallic prosthesis-induced thrombus formation. Previously described approaches to covalently immobilize biomolecules on implantable materials have relied on complex chemical linker chemistry, increasing the possibility of toxic side effects and reducing bioactivity. We utilize a plasma deposited thin film platform to covalently immobilize biologically active plasmin on stainless steel substrates, including stents. A range of in vitro whole blood assays demonstrate striking reductions in thrombus formation. This approach has profound potential to improve the efficacy of a wide range of metallic vascular implants. PMID:26551872

  7. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  8. Plutonium immobilization ceramic feed batching component test report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Ceramic feed batching (CFB) is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. The CFB step will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization CFB process preliminary concept (including a process block diagram), batch splitting component test results, CFB development areas, and FY 1999 and 2000 CFB program milestones.

  9. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:27429157

  10. Selective dielectrophoretic manipulation of surface-immobilized DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Germishuizen, W.; Wälti, Christoph; Wirtz, René; Johnston, Michael B.; Pepper, Michael; Davies, A. Giles; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2003-08-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale molecular devices is becoming increasingly important and research into their fabrication has intensified over the last few years. In particular, the attachment of molecular objects onto various surfaces has attracted considerable attention. Here, we report a multistep surface immobilization procedure, which allows the specific and controlled attachment of very long DNA molecules onto gold electrodes. Further, we report the effect of dielectrophoresis on these surface-bound DNA molecules with respect to amplitude and frequency, and we show that selected surface-immobilized DNA molecules can be manipulated by dielectrophoresis. Finally, we investigated the use of dielectrophoresis in conjunction with the multistep surface immobilization of fluorescently labelled, surface-bound lambda-DNA in a basic data-storage device.

  11. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions.

    PubMed

    Tikekar, Mukul D; Archer, Lynden A; Koch, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Ion transport-driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  12. Preparing bioactive surface of polystyrene with hydrophobin for trypsin immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Baolong; Li, Bingzhang; Wang, Huifang; Guo, Ruijie; Liang, HaiXia; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2016-05-01

    A simple and reliable enzyme immobilization technique which can retain their catalytic activity for a long time is interest in many technologies. Here, the trypsin was immobilized by physisorption on polystyrene (PS) surface coated with a class I hydrophobin recombinant HGFI (rHGFI). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water-contact-angle measurements demonstrated that the hydrophobicity of the PS could be well improved by rHGFI modification, and the self-assembled rHGFI showed an admirable stability on the hydrophobic PS surface against hot SDS rinsing. The enzyme activity assay illustrated that the capacity of rHGFI could enable it to well intermediate trypsin on PS surface and allow its immobilization lasting in an active form. The results obtained in this work show a way that surface modification with rHGFI should be an easy and feasible strategy for applications of enzyme-based catalytic surfaces in biosensing.

  13. Novel immobilization techniques in the fabrication of efficient electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, Shridhara; Marx, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lynne A.; Kumar, Jayant; Tripathy, Sukant K.; Kaplan, David L.

    1996-02-01

    The development of enzyme electrodes plays a major role in the performance of an electrochemical biosensor. In this paper, we describe two generic methods for efficient immobilization of enzymes or biomolecules at the electrode surface. These methods are based on physical entrapment of the enzymes during biochemical polymerization of phenols and electrochemical copolymerization of aromatic diamines with enzymes that are covalently coupled to the monomer. Both of these techniques have proven to be chemically mild and provide efficient polymer matrices for the fabrication of enzyme electrodes. Enzymes including horseradish peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucose oxidase have been immobilized in these polymeric matrices and used for electrochemical as well as colorimetric detection of various substrates. Response times of the order of 5 - 10 seconds and sensitivities of the order of mM have been achieved with these electrodes. The use of these immobilization techniques towards the development of microelectrode arrays for multianalyte sensors is also discussed.

  14. Cultivation characteristics of immobilized Aspergillus oryzae for kojic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kwak, M Y; Rhee, J S

    1992-04-15

    Aspergillus oryzae in situ grown from spores entrapped in calcium alginate gel beads was used for the production of kojic acid. The immobilized cells in flask cultures produced kojic acid in a linear proportion while maintaining the stable metabolic activity for a prolonged production period. Kojic acid was accumulated up to a high concentration of 83 g/L, at which the kojic acid began to crystallize, and, thus, the culture had to be replaced with fresh media for the next batch culture. The overall productivities of two consecutive cultivations were higher than that of free mycelial fermentation. However, the production rate of kojic acid by the immobilized cells was suddenly decreased with the appearance of central cavernae inside the immobilized gel beads after 12 days of the third batch cultivation. PMID:18601027

  15. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto,; Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-29

    Enriched–immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  16. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto, Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched-immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  17. Radiation stability of resveratrol in immobilization on poly vinyl pyrrolidone hydrogel dressing for dermatological use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momesso, Roberta G. R. A. P.; Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, José R.; Spencer, Patrick J.; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2010-03-01

    The polyphenol trans-resveratrol is a natural phytoalexin, which is found in red wine and in a wide variety of plant species. Resveratrol displays a wide array of biological activities, such as modulation of lipid metabolism, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. This active compound immobilized in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hydrogel could be very interesting for topical administration, as a dressing form for dermatological use. However, PVP hydrogel obtained by radiation-induced crosslinking can cause undesirable hydrolysis reactions in the active compound. The aim of this work was to verify the resveratrol stability after irradiation at 0.5 and 1 kGy in the presence of ethanol, methanol or tert-butyl alcohol. The integrity of these samples was compared to unirradiated resveratrol by HPLC. The PVP hydrogel matrix was characterized by gel fraction, swelling and in vitro biocompatibility test. The results of gel fraction and swelling degree were approximately 90% and 1600%, respectively. The cytotoxicity assay showed absence of toxicity for this formulation after crosslinking and sterilization, indicating that the PVP hydrogel formulation was appropriate for resveratrol immobilization to produce a dressing for dermatological use.

  18. Radiation and photografting as complementary techniques for immobilizing bioactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, J. L.; Jankiewicz, S. V.; Long, M. A.; Sangster, D. F.

    The technique of radiation grafting to immobilize a typical enzyme, trypsin, to three representative backbone polymers namely polypropylene, PVC and polystyrene, is described. The process involves the simultaneous grafting of p-nitrostyrene to the polymer, the nitro group subsequently being converted to its isothiocyanato derivative to which trypsin is attached. For this immobilization work, the utilization of additives which enhance grafting is shown to be an advantage. Typical of the additives used are mineral acids (≈0.1M) and polyfunctional monomers (≈1% v/v), the two acting in a synergistic fashion when used together. A new class of additives, namely metal salts such as LiClO 4, which also increase grafting yields has now been discovered. The reactivity of these salts in grafting enhancement is compared with that of mineral acid. A new model for the modus operandi of metal salts as well as acids in grafting enhancement is proposed whereby increased grafting yields are attributed to increased partitioning of monomer into the graft region in the presence of ionic solutes. The significance of using these additives to prepare radiation copolymers for enzyme immobilization is discussed. In addition to ionizing radiation, UV is also shown to be of value as an initiator for the preparation of graft copolymers for enzyme immobilization, however the presence of sensitizer in the copolymer may limit the photografting method. The possibility of using radiation curing processes involving electron beam (EB) and high powered (300 W/inch) UV sources for immobilization work has been explored and found to be feasible. The curing system possesses great potential for the current immobilization work since complete polymerization is achieved in a fraction of a second.

  19. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope) tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that can be coupled to biotin. PMID

  20. Synthesis and heavy metal immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Zhang; Wei, Sun; Qianli, Chen; Lin, Chen

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, two aspects of studies are carried out: (1) synthesis of geopolymer by using slag and metakaolin; (2) immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions. As for the synthesis of slag based geopolymer, four different slag content (10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) and three types of curing regimes (standard curing, steam curing and autoclave curing) are investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength. The testing results showed that geopolymer mortar containing 50% slag that is synthesized at steam curing (80 degrees C for 8h), exhibits higher mechanical strengths. The compressive and flexural strengths of slag based geopolymer mortar are 75.2 MPa and 10.1 MPa, respectively. Additionally, Infrared (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques are used to characterize the microstructure of the slag based geopolymer paste. IR spectra show that the absorptive band at 1086 cm(-1) shifts to lower wave number around 1007 cm(-1), and some six-coordinated Als transforms into four-coordination during the synthesis of slag based geopolymer paste. The resulting slag based geopolymeric products are X-ray amorphous materials. SEM observation shows that it is possible to have geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel forming simultaneously within slag based geopolymer paste. As for immobilization of heavy metals, the leaching tests are employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the slag based geopolymer mortar synthesized under the above optimum condition. The leaching tests show that slag based geopolymer mortar can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions, and the immobilization efficiency reach 98.5% greater when heavy metals are incorporated in the slag geopolymeric matrix in the range of 0.1-0.3%. The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu in the case of large dosages of heavy metals. PMID:17034943

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in an immobilized cell airlift bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kermanshahi pour, A; Karamanev, D; Margaritis, A

    2005-09-01

    An "immobilized cell airlift bioreactor", was used for the aerobic bioremediation of simulated diesel fuel contaminated groundwater and tested with p-xylene and naphthalene in batch and continuous regimes. The innovative design of the experiments consists of two stages. At the first stage "immobilized soil bioreactor" (ISBR) was used to develop an efficient microbial consortium from the indigenous microorganisms, which exist in diesel fuel contaminated soil. The concept of ISBR relies on the entrapment of the soil particles into the pores of a semi-permeable membrane, which divides the bioreactor into two aerated and non-aerated portions. The second stage involves inoculating the "immobilized cell air lift bioreactor" with the cultivated microbial consortia of the first stage. Immobilized cell airlift bioreactor has the same configuration as ISBR except that in this bioreactor instead of soil, microorganisms were immobilized on the fibers of the membrane. The performance of a 0.83 L immobilized cell airlift bioreactor was investigated at various retention time (0.5-6 h) and concentrations of p-xylene (15, 40 and 77 mg/L) and naphthalene (8, 15 and 22 mg/L) in the continuous operation. In the batch regime, 0.9L bioreactor was operated at various biodegradation times (15-135 min) and concentrations of p-xylene (13.6, 44.9 and 67.5 mg/L) and naphthalene (1.5 and 3.8 mg/L). Under the conditions of the complete biodegradation of p-xylene and naphthalene, the obtained volumetric biodegradation rates at biomass density of 720 mg/L were 15 and 16 mg/L h, respectively. PMID:16095655

  2. Radioactive Waste Evaporation: Current Methodologies Employed for the Development, Design, and Operation of Waste Evaporators at the Savannah River Site and Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2003-09-11

    Evaporation of High level and Low Activity (HLW and LAW) radioactive wastes for the purposes of radionuclide separation and volume reduction has been conducted at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites for more than forty years. Additionally, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has used evaporators in preparing HLW for immobilization into a borosilicate glass matrix. This paper will discuss the methodologies, results, and achievements of the SRTC evaporator development program that was conducted in support of the SRS and Hanford WTP evaporator processes. The cross pollination and application of waste treatment technologies and methods between the Savannah River and Hanford Sites will be highlighted. The cross pollination of technologies and methods is expected to benefit the Department of Energy's Mission Acceleration efforts by reducing the overall cost and time for the development of the baseline waste treatment processes.

  3. Structural and catalytic properties of immobilized α-amylase from Laceyella sacchari TSI-2.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rushit J; Singh, Satya P

    2016-04-01

    One of the approaches to address the issues of the cost of production, recovery and reusability of the extremozymes can be immobilization. In this report, we describe immobilization of an α-amylase from Laceyella sacchari TSI-2 and characterization of the immobilized enzyme. The enzyme was immobilized on 6 different matrices using entrapment, ionic binding and surface adsorption. The DEAE cellulose with glutaraldehyde crosslinking appeared most effective for the immobilization with high operational stability. While the temperature optima and thermal stability of the immobilized α-amylase shifted from 60 to 70°C with increased half-life, the pH optima remain unaltered while pH stability was shifted from 6 to 7. The stability of the immobilized enzyme improved in solvents. The enzyme catalysis in surfactants enhanced, while the Km and Vmax were reduced after immobilization. The structural features of the immobilized enzyme as probed by FT-IR established the role of aliphatic amines, esters and alkenes in immobilization. The starch hydrolysis efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was 15.55%. The immobilized enzyme in various detergents was highly efficient in removing the starch stain from cotton cloth. Taken together, the α-amylase turned more stable after immobilization and can be a favored choice for applications. PMID:26740465

  4. Aligned Immobilization of Proteins Using AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Protein molecules are aligned and immobilized from solution by AC electric fields. In a single-step experiment, the enhanced green fluorescent proteins are immobilized on the surface as well as at the edges of planar nanoelectrodes. Alignment is found to follow the molecules' geometrical shape with their longitudinal axes parallel to the electric field. Simultaneous dielectrophoretic attraction and AC electroosmotic flow are identified as the dominant forces causing protein movement and alignment. Molecular orientation is determined by fluorescence microscopy based on polarized excitation of the proteins' chromophores. The chromophores' orientation with respect to the whole molecule supports X-ray crystal data. PMID:26779699

  5. Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.

    1997-10-28

    This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

  6. Optical properties of silver nanocube surfaces obtained by silane immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merk, Virginia; Nerz, Alexander; Fredrich, Sebastian; Gernert, Ulrich; Selve, Sören; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanocubes were synthesized by the polyol method and immobilized on a surface in a simple approach using an aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The optical and structural properties of the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) stabilized nanocubes were investigated in solution and on glass surfaces. The SERS enhancement factors at two excitation wavelengths for crystal violet were compared with electric fields arising in different nano¬particle configurations using finite-difference time-domain simulations. They are in agreement with the preferred face-to-face orientation in the nanoaggregates on the surfaces. The facile immobilization enables on-demand preparation and use of the nanocubes in real analytical applications.

  7. Final Report: Role of microbial synergies in immobilization of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Slava Epstein, Ph.D. and Kim Lewis, Ph.D.

    2012-11-14

    This Subsurface Microbial Ecology and Community Dynamics project tested the following hypothesis: synergistic groups of microorganisms immobilize heavy elements more efficiently than do individual species. We focused on groundwater at several DOE FRC and their microbial communities affecting the fate of U, Tc, and Cr. While we did not obtain evidence to support the original hypothesis, we developed a platform to accessing novel species from the target environments. We implemented this technology and discovered and isolated novel species capable of immobilization of uranium and species with exceptionally high resistances to the extant toxic factors. We have sequenced their genomes are are in the process of investigating the genomic contents behind these surprising resistances.

  8. Maltodextrin hydrolysis in a fluidized-bed immobilized enzyme reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vallat, I.; Monsan, P.; Riba, J.P.

    1986-02-01

    The present work deals with maltodextrin hydrolysis by glucoamylase immobilized onto corn stover in a fluidized bed reactor. An industrial enzyme preparation was convalently grafted onto corn stover, yielding an activity of up to 372 U/g and 1700 U/g for support particle sizes of 0.8 and 0.2 mm, respectively. A detailed kinetic study, using a differntial reactor, allowed the characterization of the influence of mass transfer resistance on the reaction catalyzed by immobilized glucoamylase. A simple and general mathematical model was then developed to describe the experimental conversion data and found to be vaild.

  9. Material transfer system in support of the plutonium immobilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, D

    2000-02-23

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project is currently undertaking formulation and process development to demonstrate the immobilization of surplus plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic. These ceramic forms will be encapsulated within canisters containing high level waste glass for geologic disposal. Process development work is being conducted with sub-scale, process prototypic equipment. Final validation of the process will be done using actual plutonium material and functionally prototypic equipment within a glovebox. Due to the radioactive nature of the material, remote material handling is necessary to reduce the radiation exposure to the operators. A remote operated Material Transfer System to interface with process equipment has been developed.

  10. New monolithic chromatographic supports for macromolecules immobilization: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Calleri, E; Ambrosini, S; Temporini, C; Massolini, G

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review reports on some recent advances in the field of immobilized protein employing both silica and polymer-based monoliths as supports, and their application in affinity chromatography and immobilized enzyme reactors (IMERs) developments. The major emphasis is put on some interesting challenges and opportunities related to the development of new monolithic affinity supports based on biofriendly sol-gel inorganic monoliths with entrapped proteins and on organic monolithic supports with improved hydrophilicity for IMERs development in proteomic studies. The ease of preparation of monoliths and the multitude of functionalization techniques, make monoliths interesting for an increasing number of biochemical and medical applications. PMID:22386208

  11. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  12. Stabilization of surface-immobilized enzymes using grafted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Srebnik, Simcha

    2004-09-01

    We introduce a two-dimensional lattice model of immobilization and stabilization of proteinlike polymers using grafted polymers. The protein is designed to have a specific bulk conformation reproducing a catalytic cleft of natural enzymes. Our model predicts a first order denaturing adsorption transition of free proteins. On the other hand, for an immobilized protein we observe a more gradual disappearance of the hydrophobic centers accompanied by adsorption. We show that, using hydrophilic grafted polymers of proper length and grafting density, the conformation as well as the hydrophobic centers of the protein can be restored.

  13. Nucleic acid hybridization with RNA immobilized on filter paper.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxinger, W. C.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Gillespie, D.

    1972-01-01

    RNA has been immobilized in a manner suitable for use in molecular hybridization experiments with dissolved RNA or DNA by a nonaqueous solid-phase reaction with carbonyldiimidazole and RNA 'dry coated' on cellulose or, preferably, on previously activated phosphocellulose filters. Immobilization of RNA does not appear to alter its chemical character or cause it to acquire affinity for unspecific RNA or DNA. The versatility and efficiency of this method make it potentially attractive for use in routine analytical or preparative hybridization experiments, among other applications.

  14. Utilization of immobilized urease for waste water treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husted, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using immobilized urease for urea removal from waste water for space system applications is considered, specifically the elimination of the urea toxicity problem in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. Because urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide, control of their concentrations within nontoxic limits was also determined. The results of this study led to the use of free urease in lieu of the immobilized urease for controlling urea concentrations. An ion exchange resin was used which reduced the NH3 level by 94% while reducing the sodium ion concentration only 10%.

  15. Immobilization of EAFD heavy metals using acidic materials.

    PubMed

    Mitrakas, Manassis G; Sikalidis, Constantinos A; Karamanli, Theoktisti P

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the chemical and leaching characteristics of the Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD) generated by a Greek plant and to investigate various acidic materials efficiency on the EAFD stabilization. In order to investigate how [OH(-)] neutralization influences EAFD heavy metals leachability, Na HCO3(-), HNO3 and H3PO4 were used as acidic materials. The concentration of Pb in leachate was found between 40 and 3.7 x 10(3) mg Pb/kg of EAFD, exceeding in all EAFD samples the maximum acceptable limit (MAL) 25 mg/kg for landfill disposal. Neutralization of [OH(-)] with HCO3(-) decreased Pb concentration in leachate at 350 mg Pb/kg of EAFD, while excess over a stoichiometry in HCO3(-) addition increased leachability of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu as well as F. Using HNO3 as an acidic material decreased leachability of almost all the parameters concerning the EC directive 33/19-01-2003 in a pH value up to 7.2, in exception of Zn. Zinc leachability showed a U shape curve as a function of pH value. The concentration of Zn was minimized in a concentration lower than 1 mg Zn/kg EAFD in a pH range 10.5 to 9 and exceeded the MAL 90 mg/kg at a pH value 7.2. However, the major disadvantage of HNO3 was proved to be its leachability, since NO3(-) concentration in leachate was equal to HNO3 dose. H3PO4 was found the most promising acidic material for the chemical immobilization of heavy metals, since it decreased their leachability in a concentration significantly lower than MAL at a pH value up to 7.1. Finally, the concentration of Cl(-) ranged between 18 and 33 x 10(3) mg Cl(-)/kg EAFD exceeding in all EAFD samples the MAL 17 x 10(3) mg/kg. This high concentration of Cl(-) is attributed to the scrap and it could be reduced only by modification of its composition. PMID:17365324

  16. Site-specific, reversible and fluorescent immobilization of proteins on CrAsH-modified surfaces for microarray analytics.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Zweckel, Janine; Rosi, Federica; Sreenu, Domalapally; Schröder, Hendrik; Niemeyer, Christof M; Triola, Gemma

    2014-10-28

    A novel technique for protein immobilization onto CrAsH-modified surfaces is presented. This approach enables an efficient, reversible and fluorogenic immobilization of proteins. Moreover, expressed proteins can also be directly immobilized from cellular lysates without prior purification. The immobilized proteins are suitable for protein-protein interaction studies and the fluorescence enhancement upon immobilization can be employed for the direct detection of the immobilized protein without the need for secondary detection methods. PMID:25207673

  17. Localization of heavy metals immobilized on specific organic and mineral parts of a wood-derived biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Frédéric; Watteau, Françoise; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2013-04-01

    plant tissues, and enlightened metal associations with newly-formed mineral phases such as calcite present on biochar surface. These observations provide new insights in the understanding of metal immobilization mechanisms on biochar such as precipitation and co-precipitation. Our findings also underline the need to consider the heterogeneity of biochar constitution for optimizing the remediation potential of biochar on contaminated sites.

  18. Amperometric Determination of Glucose at Parts per Million Levels with Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittampalam, G.; Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on the operation and utility of an amperometric immobilized enzyme electrode (or probe) is described, including advantages of the experiment, equipment, reagents, preparation of phosphate buffer, enzyme immobilization techniques, laboratory procedures, precautions, and discussion of experimental results. (SK)

  19. Simultaneous co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase in their substrates.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, G; Tukel, S S

    2007-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were simultaneously co-immobilized onto magnesium silicate (florisil) by covalent coupling. Glucose was added in immobilization mixture and hydrogen peroxide which is the substrate of CAT was produced in coupling mixture during immobilization time. Therefore, co-immobilization of GOD and CAT was carried out in presence of both their substrate: glucose and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The effect of glucose concentration in immobilization mixture on activities of GOD and CAT of co-immobilized samples were investigated. Maximum GOD and CAT activities were determined for samples co-immobilized in presence of 15 and 20 mM glucose, respectively. Co-immobilization of GOD and CAT in presence of their substrates highly improved the activity and reusability of both enzymes. PMID:17345856

  20. Immobilization induces nuclear accumulation of HDAC4 in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Machida, Shuichi; Kurosaka, Yuka; Kakigi, Ryo; Sugiura, Takao; Naito, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The study described herein aimed to examine changes in HDAC4 and its downstream targets in immobilization-induced rat skeletal muscle atrophy. Eleven male Wistar rats were used, and one hindlimb was immobilized in the plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. The contralateral, non-immobilized leg served as an internal control. After 10 days, the gastrocnemius muscles were removed from both hindlimbs. Ten days of immobilization resulted in a significant reduction (-27.3 %) in gastrocnemius muscle weight. A significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation was also observed in nuclear fractions from immobilized legs relative to the controls. HDAC4 expression was significantly increased in immobilized legs in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Moreover, Myogenin and MyoD mRNA levels were upregulated in immobilized legs, resulting in increased Atrogin-1 mRNA expression. Our data suggest that nuclear HDAC4 accumulation is partly related to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:26759025

  1. Oral administration of Cimicifuga racemosa extract affects immobilization stress-induced changes in murine cerebral monoamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nadaoka, Isao; Yasue, Masaaki; Sami, Manabu; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects of Cimicifuga racemosa (CR) plant extracts on the changes in levels of the cerebral monoamines norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT), the respective metabolites 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and plasma corticosterone in mice subjected to acute immobilization stress. Single oral administration of the CR extract (1,000 mg/kg) significantly attenuated plasma corticosterone levels that had been increased as a result of enforced immobilization. Acute immobilization stress caused significant changes in the corresponding amine-to-metabolite ratios in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cortex; however, CR-extract treatment significantly attenuated the MHPG/NE change in the hypothalamus, and the 5-HIAA/5- HT changes in each region of the brain. Our results suggest that the CR extract interacts not only with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis but also with the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM) system under stress conditions. Thus the CR extract can alleviate acute stress responses by suppressing the changes of amine-to-metabolite ratio in brain. PMID:22572387

  2. Commercializing plant tissue culture processes: economics, problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, O.; Knuth, M.

    1985-03-01

    Novel tissue culture techniques and a range of process schemes may be considered for commercial production of plant derived drugs, chemicals, flavors and cosmetics. Plant cell immobilization, in conjunction with strain selection and product leakage, represents a major technological advancement, with significant economic implications. Conventional batch processes produce high value products at low production capacities, whereas continuous biocatalytic processes can potentially enable production of plant derived chemicals in the $20-$25/kg price range.

  3. A capture coupling method for the covalent immobilization of hexahistidine tagged proteins for surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Muller, Robin E; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a robust method to detect and quantify macromolecular interactions; however, to measure binding interactions, one component must be immobilized on a sensor surface. This is typically achieved using covalent immobilization via free amines or thiols, or noncovalent immobilization using high-affinity interactions such as biotin/streptavidin or antibody/antigen. In this chapter we describe a robust method to covalently immobilize His(6) fusion proteins on the sensor surface for SPR analysis. PMID:20217615

  4. A capture coupling method for the covalent immobilization of hexahistidine tagged proteins for surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Adam J.; Muller, Robin E.; Siderovski, David P.; Willard, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    i. Summary Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a robust method to detect and quantify macromolecular interactions; however, to measure binding interactions, one component must be immobilized on a sensor surface. This is typically achieved using covalent immobilization via free amines or thiols, or noncovalent immobilization using high affinity interactions such as biotin/streptavidin or antibody/antigen. In this Chapter we describe a robust method to covalently immobilize His6 fusion proteins on the sensor surface for SPR analysis. PMID:20217615

  5. The immobilization of DNA molecules to electrodes in confined channels at physiological pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukkipati, V. R.; Pang, S. W.

    2008-11-01

    Large numbers of DNA molecules are immobilized to electrodes at the physiological pH of 8.0, and the length of the immobilized DNA molecules is controlled using an ac voltage. Efficient DNA immobilization at physiological pH has been demonstrated by integrating electrodes in confined channels 500 nm wide and 100 nm deep. The low volume of the channels allows large numbers of DNA molecules to access the electrode surfaces, leading to efficient immobilization.

  6. Secondary Waste Form Development and Optimization—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Parker, Kent E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pitman, Stan G.; Chun, Jaehun; Chung, Chul-Woo; Kimura, Marcia L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Um, Wooyong; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-07-14

    Washington River Protection Services is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-permitted, multi-waste, treatment and storage unit and can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid wastes generated during operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The STU to ETF will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary wastes expected to be produced by WTP.

  7. Vitrification and Product Testing of C-104 and AZ-102 Pretreated Sludge Mixed with Flowsheet Quantities of Secondary Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Bates, Derrick J.; Goles, Ronald W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lettau, Ralph C.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

    2001-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has acquired Hanford tank waste treatment services at a demonstration scale. The River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) team is responsible for producing an immobilized (vitrified) high-level waste (IHLW) waste form. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, hereafter referred to as PNNL, has been contracted to produce and test a vitrified IHLW waste form from two Envelope D high-level waste (HLW) samples previously supplied to the RPP-WTP project by DOE.

  8. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-03-01

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to save the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tens of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass.

  9. Conceptual design for remote handling methods using the HIP process in the Calcine Immobilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, S.M.; Cox, C.G.; Hoover, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report recommends the remote conceptual design philosophy for calcine immobilization using the hot isostatic press (HIP) process. Areas of remote handling operations discussed in this report include: (1) introducing the process can into the front end of the HIP process, (2) filling and compacting the calcine/frit mixture into the process can, (3) evacuating and sealing the process can, (4) non-destructive testing of the seal on the process can, (5) decontamination of the process can, (6) HIP furnace loading and unloading the process can for the HIPing operation, (7) loading an overpack canister with processed HIP cans, (8) sealing the canister, with associated non-destructive examination (NDE) and decontamination, and (9) handling canisters for interim storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site.

  10. Waste incineration and immobilization for nuclear facilities. Status report, April-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. J.; Williams, P. M.; Burkhardt, S. C.; Ledford, J. A.; Gallagher, K. Y.

    1980-12-10

    The fluidized bed incinerator and waste immobilization processes are being developed to process various liquid and solid wastes that are generated by a nuclear facility. The versatility of the incinerator liquid waste handling system has been enhanced by recent changes made in the pumping and related piping system. Tributyl phosphate-solvent incineration has been evaluated thoroughly using the pilot plant fluidized bed incinerator. Vitrified glass pellets were made to determine operating parameters of a resistance-heated reactor and to produce samples for testing. Procedures were developed for testing the product pellets. A simplified start-up procedure was devised as development continued on a second type of reactor, the Joule-heated melter.

  11. Use of immobilized enzymes in drug metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Dulik, D M; Fenselau, C

    1988-04-01

    The immobilization of drug-metabolizing enzymes onto polymeric supports offers several advantages over use of conventional microsomal or soluble enzyme preparations. These include increased storage stability, facilitated separation of products from the incubation mixture, the ability to recover and reuse the enzyme catalyst, and in many cases, stabilization of the tertiary structure of membrane-bound enzymes. Attachment of the protein to the solid support may be accomplished by adsorption, covalent bonding, or entrapment techniques. This methodology has been successfully utilized for studies with such enzymes as cytochrome P-450, UDP-glucuronyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases, S-methyltransferases, and N-acetyltransferases. Although often employed for the synthesis of xenobiotic metabolites, immobilized enzymes have been used for mechanistic and relative reactivity studies, limited kinetic studies, and extracorporeal detoxification. Co-immobilization of multiple drug-metabolizing enzyme systems has made possible the sequential formation of metabolites arising from oxidation followed by conjugation. Immobilized enzymes may also be used in the prediction of species-dependent metabolic pathways. The potential for large-scale synthesis of drug metabolites using this methodology has been explored. PMID:3127263

  12. Posing for a picture: vesicle immobilization in agarose gel

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Rafael B.; Steinkühler, Jan; Knorr, Roland L.; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Taking a photo typically requires the object of interest to stand still. In science, imaging is potentiated by optical and electron microscopy. However, living and soft matter are not still. Thus, biological preparations for microscopy usually include a fixation step. Similarly, immobilization strategies are required for or substantially facilitate imaging of cells or lipid vesicles, and even more so for acquiring high-quality data via fluorescence-based techniques. Here, we describe a simple yet efficient method to immobilize objects such as lipid vesicles with sizes between 0.1 and 100 μm using agarose gel. We show that while large and giant unilamellar vesicles (LUVs and GUVs) can be caged in the pockets of the gel meshwork, small molecules, proteins and micelles remain free to diffuse through the gel and interact with membranes as in agarose-free solutions, and complex biochemical reactions involving several proteins can proceed in the gel. At the same time, immobilization in agarose has no adverse effect on the GUV size and stability. By applying techniques such as FRAP and FCS, we show that the lateral diffusion of lipids is not affected by the gel. Finally, our immobilization strategy allows capturing high-resolution 3D images of GUVs. PMID:27140695

  13. Arthrobacter sp. lipase immobilization for improvement in stability and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Asha; Parshad, Rajinder; Koul, Surrinder; Taneja, Subhash C; Qazi, Ghulam N

    2006-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. lipase (ABL, MTCC no. 5125) is being recognized as an efficient enzyme for the resolution of drugs and their intermediates. The immobilization of ABL on various matrices for its enantioselectivity, stability, and reusability has been studied. Immobilization by covalent bonding on sepharose and silica afforded a maximum of 380 and 40 IU/g activity, respectively, whereas sol-gel entrapment provided a maximum of 150 IU/g activity in dry powder. The immobilized enzyme displayed excellent stability in the pH range of 4-10 and even at higher temperature, i.e., 50-60 degrees C, compared to free enzyme, which is unstable under extreme conditions. The resolution of racemic auxiliaries like 1-phenyl ethanol and an intermediate of antidepressant drug fluoxetine, i.e., ethyl 3-hydroxy-3-phenylpropanoate alkyl acylates, provided exclusively R-(+) products ( approximately 99% ee, E=646 and 473), compared to cell free extract/whole cells which gave a product with approximately 96% ee (E=106 and 150). The repeated use (ten times) of covalently immobilized and entrapped ABL resulted in no loss in activity, thus demonstrating its prospects for commercial applications. PMID:16896604

  14. Effect of immobilization on collagen synthesis in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, J; Väänänen, K; Vihko, V; Puranen, J; Takala, T E

    1987-05-01

    The activities of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PH) and galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase (GGT), both enzymes of collagen biosynthesis, and the concentration of hydroxyproline (Hyp) were measured in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles of rats after cast immobilization in the middle position for 1 or 3 wk. The specific activity of PH decreased by 54 and 70-75% (P less than 0.001) in the soleus muscle after 1 and 3 wk, respectively, the corresponding decreases in GGT activity were 43 and 47% (P less than 0.001). A less pronounced decrease in the activities of these enzymes was observed in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. The Hyp concentration in the soleus increased during the first week of immobilization but began to decrease thereafter, and the total muscular Hyp content was reduced after immobilization for 3 wk. The results suggest a marked inhibition of muscular collagen synthesis during immobilization. Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve partially prevented this disuse atrophy and the decreases in PH, GGT, and Hyp in the tibialis anterior muscle but not in the gastrocnemius or soleus muscles. PMID:3034082

  15. FOAMING IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical mechanisms of the formation of foam in radioactive waste treatment and waste immobilization processes are poorly understood. The objective of this research is to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms that produce foaming, to identify the key parameters whic...

  16. Process for immobilizing radioactive boric acid liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1986-01-01

    A method of immobilizing boric acid liquid wastes containing radionuclides by neutralizing the solution and evaporating the resulting precipitate to near dryness. The dry residue is then fused into a reduced volume, insoluble, inert, solid form containing substantially all the radionuclides.

  17. Plutonium immobilization can loading FY99 component test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-06-01

    This report summarizes FY99 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes details about the Helium hood, cold pour cans, Can Loading robot, vision system, magnetically coupled ray cart and lifts, system integration, Can Loading glovebox layout, and an FY99 cost table.

  18. Papain immobilized polyurethane as an ureteral stent material.

    PubMed

    Maria Manohar, Cynthya; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-05-01

    Long term use of polyurethane-based ureteral stent is hampered by the development of infection due to the formation of bacterial biofilm and salt deposition. Here papain, is covalently immobilized to polyurethane using glutarldehyde and is investigated as a possible anti-infective ureteral stent material. Fourier transform infrared spectrum confirmed its immobilization. Immobilized enzyme retained 85% of the activity of the free enzyme and about 12% loss of enzyme was observed from the polymer surface in one month. The modified polyurethane showed 8 log reduction in Staphylococcus aureus and 7 log reduction in Escherichia coli live colonies and 3-4 times decrease in the protein and carbohydrate in the biofilms than bare polymer. The amount of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on the polymer surface reduced by 40% after enzyme immobilization. 80% of L6 myoblast cells were viable on this material which indicated that it was noncytotoxic. A linear regression equation with hydrophilicity of the polymer surface and the cell surface hydrophobicity as the two independent variables was able to predict the number of live cells attached on the modified PU. This study indicated the possibility of using such an approach to overcome the problems of ureteral stent associated biofilm and salt encrustation. PMID:26853541

  19. Investigating the dynamics of surface-immobilized DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Katherine E; Trefzer, Martin A; Johnson, Steven; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2016-01-01

    Surface-immobilization of molecules can have a profound influence on their structure, function and dynamics. Toehold-mediated strand displacement is often used in solution to drive synthetic nanomachines made from DNA, but the effects of surface-immobilization on the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we show that the kinetics of strand displacement in surface-immobilized nanomachines are significantly different to those of the solution phase reaction, and we attribute this to the effects of intermolecular interactions within the DNA layer. We demonstrate that the dynamics of strand displacement can be manipulated by changing strand length, concentration and G/C content. By inserting mismatched bases it is also possible to tune the rates of the constituent displacement processes (toehold-binding and branch migration) independently, and information can be encoded in the time-dependence of the overall reaction. Our findings will facilitate the rational design of surface-immobilized dynamic DNA nanomachines, including computing devices and track-based motors. PMID:27387252

  20. Fine sediment erosion rate in immobile gravel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarekegn, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of fine sediment transport in immobile gravel bed is a complex process and is a common phenomenon downstream of dams during dam removal and flushing operations. Despite many developments in the field, the direct measurement of fine sediment erosion (entrainment) rates in immobile coarse beds remains challenging. We developed a new approach for measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in coarse immobile bed in laboratory experiment. The method uses single laser line, a video camera and a reflective mirror. It allows a non-intrusive, fast and accurate measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in running water and non-equilibrium transport conditions. The measurement method was conducted for flow depth that ranges from 3.0 cm to 8.0 cm. We present procedures developed to extract laser lines from series of images captured at high temporal resolution and to estimate rapid evolution of fine sediment erosion depth within the roughness layer of the immobile gravel bed. With the use of a reflective mirror the depth of erosion can be measured with sub-millimeter (350μm) resolution. The results of the measurements are used to describe vertical profile of fine sediment erosion rate in the gravel roughness layer and its spatial heterogeneity. The spatial pattern of erosion rates shows good agreement with gravel bed turbulent flow structures.