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Sample records for immobilize chloride contaminated

  1. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian L.; Donald, Ian W.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2009-03-31

    AWE has developed a process for the immobilization of ILW waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate based phases, chlorapatite, Ca5(PO4)3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca2(PO4)Cl. Non-active trials performed at AWE using samarium as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process using actinide-doped material were performed at PNNL which confirmed the immobilized wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu /241Am loaded ceramic at 40°C/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10-5 g.m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g.m-2 for Pu and Cl respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced by 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected using XRD after the samples had experienced a radiation dose of 4 x 1018 α.g-1. Leach trials showed that there had been an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  2. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, B. L.; Donald, I. W.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2009-03-01

    A process for the immobilization of intermediate level waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material has been developed. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Non-active trials performed using Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, were performed at PNNL which confirmed the wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu/241Am loaded ceramic at 313 K/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 × 10-5 g m-2 and 2.7 × 10-3 g m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced with 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD spectra after the samples had experienced an α radiation fluence of 4 × 1018 g-1. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  3. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride-contaminated actinide waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian; Donald, Ian W.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2009-03-31

    At AWE, we have developed a process for the immobilization of ILW waste containing a significant quantity of chloride with Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Non-active trials performed at AWE with Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, wer performed at PNNL where the waste form was found to be resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu /241Am loaded ceramic at 40°C/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10-5 g.m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g.m-2 for Pu and Cl respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced with 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD patterns after the samples had experienced an α radiation dose of 4 x 1018 g-1. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  4. Immobilization of microalgae for biosorption and degradation of butyltin chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Huang, G; Yu, Y

    1998-07-01

    Since the discovery of their biocidal properties in the 1950s, organotin compounds have found a large spectrum of industrial applications such as wood and textile preservatives, fungicides and pesticides, and antifouling paint on ships and fishing equipment. The fate and environmental impact of butyltins have been the subjects of a large body of research in the last decades. Biosorption and degradation of butyltin compounds by immobilized microalgae chlorella were studied in this paper, aiming to find an alternative way to solve organotin pollution problem. Chlorella emersonii cells were entrapped in a calcium aginate matrix. The cell growth rates, respiratory rate and chlorophyll a content were studied and compared. Results showed that immobilized chlorella had increased respiratory and growth rates, and almost equal chlorophyll a content when compared with free cells. Cell leakage was slight during the 20-day experimental period Cell leakage from the matrix was unrelated to cell growth within the matrix. Immobilized chlorella was applied to deal with butytin contaminated aquatic solutions. Immobilized chlorella had increased degradation rates of tri-, di-, and mono-butyltin chlorides in aquatic solutions, and lower biological accumulation factors on cells, than free cells, which indicates a potential use for tackleing organotin polluted water body. PMID:9663338

  5. Understanding microwave vessel contamination by chloride species.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Sandro; Spanu, Davide; Bianchi, Davide; Dossi, Carlo; Pozzi, Andrea; Monticelli, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    Microwaves are widely used to assist digestion, general sample treatment and synthesis. The use of aqua regia is extensively adopted for the closed vessel mineralization of samples prior to trace element detection, leading to the contamination of microwave vessels by chlorine containing species. The latter are entrapped in the polymeric matrix of the vessels, leading to memory effects that are difficult to remove, among which the risk of silver incomplete recoveries by removal of the sparingly soluble chloride is the predominant one. In the present paper, we determined by mass spectrometry that hydrogen chloride is the species entrapped in the polymeric matrix and responsible for vessel contamination. Moreover, several decontamination treatments were considered to assess their efficiency, demonstrating that several cleaning cycles with water, nitric acid or silver nitrate in nitric acid were inefficient in removing chloride contamination (contamination reduction around 90%). Better results (≈95% decrease) were achieved by a single decontamination step in alkaline environment (sodium hydroxide or ammonia). Finally, a thermal treatment in a common laboratory oven (i.e. without vacuum and ventilation) was tested: a one hour heating at 150°C leads to a 98.5% decontamination, a figure higher than the ones obtained by wet treatments which requires comparable time. The latter treatment is a major advancement with respect to existing treatments as it avoids the need of a vacuum oven for at least 17h as presently proposed in the literature. PMID:27474275

  6. Immobilization of fission products arising from pyrometallurgical reprocessing in chloride media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leturcq, G.; Grandjean, A.; Rigaud, D.; Perouty, P.; Charlot, M.

    2005-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing to recover energy-producing elements such as uranium or plutonium can be performed by a pyrochemical process. In such method, the actinides and fission products are extracted by electrodeposition in a molten chloride medium. These processes generate chlorinated alkali salt flows contaminated by fission products, mainly Cs, Ba, Sr and rare earth elements constituting high-level waste. Two possible alternatives are investigated for managing this wasteform; a protocol is described for dechlorinating the fission products to allow vitrification, and mineral phases capable of immobilizing chlorides are listed to allow specification of a dedicated ceramic matrix suitable for containment of these chlorinated waste streams. The results of tests to synthesize chlorosilicate phases are also discussed.

  7. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  8. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on amidoximated acrylic polymer activated by cyanuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed S; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on amidoximated acrylic fabric after being activated with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize fabrics. The maximum immobilization efficiency of HRP (70%) was detected at 4% cyanuric chloride and pH 7.0. The immobilized enzyme retained 45% of its initial activity after ten reuses. The immobilization of enzyme on the carrier is saturated after 6h of incubation time. The pH was shifted from 7.0 for soluble HRP to 7.5-8.0 for the immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP had the same optimum activity at 40°C. The immobilized HRP is more thermal stable than soluble HRP. Substrate analogues were oxidized by immobilized HRP with higher efficiencies than those of soluble HRP. Km values of the soluble HRP and the immobilized HRP were 31 and 37mM for guiacol and 5.0 and 7.8mM for H2O2, respectively. The immobilized HRP had higher efficiency for removal of phenol than that of soluble HRP. The immobilized HRP had higher resistance toward heavy metal ions compared to the soluble enzyme. The immobilized HRP was more stable against high concentration of urea, Triton X-100 and isopropanol. The immobilized HRP exhibited high resistance to proteolysis by trypsin than soluble enzyme. In conclusion, the immobilized HRP could be used as a potential efficient catalyst for the removal of aromatic pollutants from wastewater. PMID:27264646

  9. Immobilization of radioactive strontium in contaminated soils by phosphate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Ammons, J.T. . Dept. of Plant and Soil Science); Lee, S.Y. )

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of in situ phosphate- and metal- (calcium, aluminum, and iron) solution treatment for {sup 90}Sr immobilization was investigated. Batch and column experiments were performed to find optimum conditions for coprecipitation of {sup 90}Sr with Ca-, Al-, and Fe-phosphate compounds in contaminated soils. Separate columns were packed with artificially {sup 85}Sr-contaminated acid soil as well as {sup 90}Sr-contaminated soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation. After metal-phosphate treatment, the columns were then leached successively with either tapwater or 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution. Most of the {sup 85}Sr coprecipitated with the metal phosphate compounds. Immobilization of {sup 85}Sr and {sup 90}Sr was affected by such factors as solution pH, metal and phosphate concentration, metal-to-phosphate ratio, and soil characteristics. Equilibration time after treatments also affected {sup 85}Sr immobilization. Many technology aspects still need to be investigated before field applications are feasible, but these experiments indicate that phosphate-based in situ immobilization should prevent groundwater contamination and will be useful as a treatment technology for {sup 90}Sr-contaminated sites. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Chloride contamination of concrete by interaction with PVC combustion gases

    SciTech Connect

    Climent-Llorca, M.A.; Viqueira-Perez, E.; Vera-Almenar, G. de; Lopez-Atalaya, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    Chloride contamination of concrete by interaction with PVC combustion gases has been studied in a small-scale testing chamber, which allows simulating the conditions probably prevailing in PVC fires of different magnitude through variation of the quotient between mass of burnt PVC and exposed concrete surface (PVC/S). In all cases, a steep gradient of chloride concentration with depth is found after the fire: most chloride is detected in the outermost layer at depths below 5 mm. Surface chloride contents (within 5 mm) for prestressed and reinforced concretes, tested with a high (PVC/S) ratio, are as high as 2.5 and 5% by weight of cement, respectively. Chloride concentrations in concrete near the steels are below the corrosion thresholds after the fire, but they can rise by diffusion to values able to induce rebar corrosion, especially if concrete is exposed to a humid atmosphere.

  11. Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition

    SciTech Connect

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

  12. Studies on acetone powder and purified rhus laccase immobilized on zirconium chloride for oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rong; Miyakoshi, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Rhus laccase was isolated and purified from acetone powder obtained from the exudates of Chinese lacquer trees (Rhus vernicifera) from the Jianshi region, Hubei province of China. There are two blue bands appearing on CM-sephadex C-50 chromatography column, and each band corresponding to Rhus laccase 1 and 2, the former being the major constituent, and each had an average molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa. The purified and crude Rhus laccases were immobilized on zirconium chloride in ammonium chloride solution, and the kinetic properties of free and immobilized Rhus laccase, such as activity, molecular weight, optimum pH, and thermostability, were examined. In addition, the behaviors on catalytic oxidation of phenols also were conducted. PMID:22545205

  13. [Immobilization impact of different fixatives on heavy metals contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lie-shan; Zeng, Dong-mei; Mo, Xiao-rong; Lu, Hong-hong; Su, Cui-cui; Kong, De-chao

    2015-01-01

    Four kinds of amendments including humus, ammonium sulfate, lime, superphosphate and their complex combination were added to rapid immobilize the heavy metals in contaminated soils. The best material was chosen according to the heavy metals' immobilization efficiency and the Capacity Values of the fixative in stabilizing soil heavy metals. The redistributions of heavy metals were determined by the European Communities Bureau of Referent(BCR) fraction distribution experiment before and after treatment. The results were as follows: (1) In the single material treatment, lime worked best with the dosage of 2% compared to the control group. In the compound amendment treatments, 2% humus combined with 2% lime worked best, and the immobilization efficiency of Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn reached 98.49%, 99.40%, 95.86%, 99.21%, respectively. (2) The order of Capacity Values was lime > humus + lime > ammonium sulfate + lime > superphosphate > ammonium sulfate + superphosphate > humus + superphosphate > humus > superphosphate. (3) BCR sequential extraction procedure results indicated that 2% humus combined with 2% lime treatment were very effective in immobilizing heavy metals, better than 2% lime treatment alone. Besides, Cd was activated firstly by 2% humus treatment then it could be easily changed into the organic fraction and residual fraction after the subsequent addition of 2% lime. PMID:25898680

  14. Immobilization of chloride-rich radioactive wastes produced by pyrochemical operations

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.; Terry, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    A a result of its former role as a producer of nuclear weapons components, the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Golden, Colorado accumulated a variety of plutonium-contaminated materials. When the level of contamination exceeded a predetermined level (the economic discard limit), the materials were classified as residues rather than waste and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. Although large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, remain in storage at the site. It is planned for the residues with lower concentrations of plutonium to be disposed of as wastes at an appropriate disposal facility, probably the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Because the plutonium concentration is too high or because the physical or chemical form would be difficult to get into a form acceptable to WIPP, it may not be possible to dispose of a portion of the residues at WIPP. The pyrochemical salts are among the residues that are difficult to dispose of. For a large percentage of the pyrochemical salts, safeguards controls are required, but WIPP was not designed to accommodate safeguards controls. A potential solution would be to immobilize the salts. These immobilized salts would contain substantially higher plutonium concentrations than is currently permissible but would be suitable for disposal at WIPP. This document presents the results of a review of three immobilization technologies to determine if mature technologies exist that would be suitable to immobilize pyrochemical salts: cement-based stabilization, low-temperature vitrification, and polymer encapsulation. The authors recommend that flow sheets and life-cycle costs be developed for cement-based and low-temperature glass immobilization.

  15. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass--Field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Bennett, P.G.; Corwin, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials such as sphagnum peat moss for extracting metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, have removed toxic metals from over 100 waters in laboratory tests. These waters include acid mine drainage (AMD) water from mining sites, metallurgical and chemical industry waste water, and contaminated ground water. Following the laboratory studies, cooperative field tests were conducted to evaluate the metal adsorption properties of the beads in column and low-maintenance circuits, determine bead stability in varied climatic situations, and demonstrate the beads' potential as a viable waste water treatment technique. Field results indicated that BIO-FIX beads readily adsorbed cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from dilute waters; effluents frequently met drinking water standards and other discharge criteria. The beads exhibited excellent handling characteristics in both column and low-maintenance circuits, and continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles. Based on laboratory and field data, cost evaluations for using BIO-FIX technology to treat two AMD waters were prepared. Operating costs for BIO-FIX treatment, which ranged from $1.40 to $2.30 per 1,000 gal of water treated, were comparable with chemical precipitation costs.

  16. [In situ immobilization remediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Qun; Luo, Lei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Wei, Dong-Pu; Hua, Luo

    2009-05-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils by adding extraneous active amendments has been considered as a cost-effective measure for contaminated soil remediation. Application of immobilization amendments can decrease the available fractions of heavy metals or change their redox states, and thus, effectively decrease the mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of the heavy metals in soils. This paper summarized the present researches about the in situ immobilization of heavy metals in soils, including kinds of immobilization amendments, research methods, immobilization indexes, immobilization mechanisms, and relevant environmental risk assessment. The mostly applied amendments include clay minerals, phosphates, organic composts, and microbes. Due to the complexity of soil matrix and the limitations of current analytical techniques, the exact immobilization mechanisms have not been clarified, which could include precipitation, chemical adsorption and ion exchange, surface precipitation, formation of stable complexes with organic ligands, and redox reaction. The prospects and limitations of in situ immobilization of heavy metals in soils were discussed. Future work should focus on the elucidation of immobilization mechanisms at molecular scale, with specific attention be paid to the potential risks of applying immobilization amendments and its long-term effects on field soils. PMID:19803184

  17. Two-year stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuefeng; Xu, Yi; Xu, Yingming; Wang, Pengchao; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yuebing; Huang, Qingqing; Huang, Rong

    2016-07-01

    The long-term stability of immobilization effect of immobilization agents was critical to the remediation practices. Two years consecutive in situ field-scale demonstration was conducted in Hunan province, with the purpose to certify the long-term stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil in the aspect of soil extraction and plant uptake. Natural sepiolite was selected as immobilization, and rice was the model plant. The immobilization effect of sepiolite on Cd contaminants in paddy soil was significant in the first year and remained at the second year. The Cd content of brown rice, 0.025 M HCl extractable Cd content and exchangeable Cd content of paddy soil decreased remarkably. The application of sepiolite led to an obvious increase in pH value of paddy soil and carbonate bounded fraction of Cd in soil. The immobilization effect was maintained even at the second year without any additional amendments. The results indicated the interaction of sepiolite and cadmium was a long-term process. The additional sepiolite at the second year had no significant lift effect on immobilization so that it was unnecessary to add sepiolite every year based on the immobilization effect and operation cost. The dynamics of available Cu, Zn, and Mn contents in paddy soil in two consecutive years indicated sepiolite had negligible effects on the bioavailability of trace metals. The result of the current research confirmed the stability of immobilization effect of sepiolite. PMID:26993515

  18. Microbially Mediated Immobilization of Contaminants Through In Situ Biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Fendorf

    2003-07-31

    In most natural environments, a multitude of metabolic substrates are resent simultaneously. Organisms that can utilize uranium as a metabolic substrate for respiration also may have the ability to use a variety of other oxidized substrates as electron acceptors. Thus, these substrates are, in effect, competing for electrons that are being passed through the electron transport chain during respiration. To assess the feasibility of in situ immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments and to understand the cycling of uranium, it is necessary to discern the chemical and/or biological conditions dictating which terminal electron acceptor(s) will be utilized.

  19. Immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn in mine-contaminated soils using reactive materials.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Andrés; Cardellach, Esteve; Corbella, Mercé

    2011-02-28

    Immobilization processes were used to chemically stabilize soil contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn from mine tailings and industrial impoundments. We examined the effectiveness of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), phosphoric acid and MgO at immobilizing Cu, Pb and Zn in soil contaminated by either mine tailings or industrial and mine wastes. The effectiveness was evaluated using column leaching experiments and geochemical modelling, in which we assessed possible mechanisms for metal immobilization using PHREEQC and Medusa numerical codes. Experimental results showed that Cu was mobilized in all the experiments, whereas Pb immobilization with H(3)PO(4) may have been related to the precipitation of chloropyromorphite. Thus, the Pb concentrations of leachates of pure mining and industrial contaminated soils (32-410 μg/l and 430-1000 μg/l, respectively) were reduced to 1-60 and 3-360 μg/l, respectively, in the phosphoric acid experiment. The mobilization of Pb at high alkaline conditions, when Pb(OH)(4)(-) is the most stable species, may be the main obstacle to the use of OPC and MgO in the immobilization of this metal. In the mining- and industry-contaminated soil, Zn was retained by OPC but removed by MgO. The experiments with OPC showed the Zn decrease in the leachates of mining soil from 226-1960 μg/l to 92-121 μg/l. In the industrial contaminated soil, the Zn decrease in the leachates was most elevated, showing >2500 μg/l in the leachates of contaminated soil and 76-173 μg/l in the OPC experiment. Finally, when H(3)PO(4) was added, Zn was mobilized. PMID:21190796

  20. Modified natural diatomite and its enhanced immobilization of lead, copper and cadmium in simulated contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinxin; Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Huimin; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Yunxia; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-05-30

    Natural diatomite was modified through facile acid treatment and ultrasonication, which increased its electronegativity, and the pore volume and surface area achieved to 0.211 cm(3) g(-1) and 76.9 m(2) g(-1), respectively. Modified diatomite was investigated to immobilize the potential toxic elements (PTEs) of Pb, Cu and Cd in simulated contaminated soil comparing to natural diatomite. When incubated with contaminated soils at rates of 2.5% and 5.0% by weight for 90 days, modified diatomite was more effective in immobilizing Pb, Cu and Cd than natural diatomite. After treated with 5.0% modified diatomite for 90 days, the contaminated soils showed 69.7%, 49.7% and 23.7% reductions in Pb, Cu and Cd concentrations after 0.01 M CaCl2 extraction, respectively. The concentrations of Pb, Cu and Cd were reduced by 66.7%, 47.2% and 33.1% in the leaching procedure, respectively. The surface complexation played an important role in the immobilization of PTEs in soils. The decreased extractable metal content of soil was accompanied by improved microbial activity which significantly increased (P<0.05) in 5.0% modified diatomite-amended soils. These results suggested that modified diatomite with micro/nanostructured characteristics increased the immobilization of PTEs in contaminated soil and had great potential as green and low-cost amendments. PMID:25725344

  1. Preparation and Characterization of a Calcium Phosphate Ceramic for the Immobilization of Chloride-containing Intermediate Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian; Donald, Ian W.; Scheele, Randall D.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2003-12-01

    Attention has recently been given to the immobilization of special categories of radioactive wastes, some of which contain high concentrations of actinide chlorides. Although vitrification in phosphate glass has been proposed, this was rejected because of the high losses of chloride. On the basis of non-radioactive and, more recently, radioactive studies, we have shown that calcium phosphate is an effective host for immobilizing the chloride constituents [1]. In this instance, the chlorine is retained as chloride, rather than evolved as a chlorine-bearing gas. The immobilized product is in the form of a free-flowing, non-hygroscopic powder, in which the chlorides are chemically combined within the mineral phases chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Data from studies on non-radioactive simulated waste consisting of a mixture of CaCl2 and SmCl3, and radioactive simulated waste composed of CaCl2 with PuCl3 or PuCl3 and AmCl3, are presented and compared. The XRD data confirm the presence of chlorapatite and spodiosite in the non-radioactive and radioactive materials. The durability of all specimens was measured with a modified MCC-1 test. Releases of Cl after 28 days were 1.6 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive specimens and 7 x 10-3 g m-2 for the Pu-bearing specimens. Releases of Ca after 28 days were 0.3 x 10-3 and 2.0 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive composition and the Pu composition, respectively, whilst release of Pu from the radioactive specimens was lower for the mixed Pu/Am specimen at 1.2 x 10-5g m-2. The release of Am from the mixed Pu/Am composition was exceptionally low at 2.4 x 10-7 g m-2. Overall, the release rate data suggest that the ceramics dissolve congruently, followed by precipitation of Sm, Pu and Am as less soluble phases, possibly oxides or phosphates. The differences in behaviour noted between non-radioactive and radioactive specimens are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemistry of the individual systems.

  2. Flow injection spectrophotometric method for chloride determination in natural waters using Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudineia R; Vieira, Heberth J; Canaes, Larissa S; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2005-02-28

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method was proposed for the determination of chloride ion in natural waters. The determination of chloride was carried out by reaction with Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in an epoxy resin bead in a solid-phase reactor (SPR) and the thiocyanate ions released were determined spectrophotometrically at 480nm after complexing reaction with Fe(III). The analytical curve for chloride was linear in the concentration range from 5.6 x 10(-5) to 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) with a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-5)moll(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.2% for a solution containing 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) (n = 10). The simple manifold allows a routine analytical frequency of 100 determinations per hour. The main advantage of the developed method is the 400% reduction of the Hg waste solution generated when compared to conventional methods for chloride determination based on the same spectrophotometric reaction. PMID:18969896

  3. Radioactively contaminated electric arc furnace dust as an addition to the immobilization mortar in low- and medium-activity repositories.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Menéndez, Esperanza; Andrade, Carmen; Zuloaga, Pablo; Navarro, Mariano; Ordóñez, Manuel

    2004-05-15

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), generated by the steel-making industry, is in itself an intrinsic hazardous waste; however, the case may also be that scrap used in the process is accidentally contaminated by radioactive elements such as cesium. In this case the resulting EAFD is to be handled as radioactive waste, being duly confined in low- and medium-activity repositories (LMAR). What this paper studies is the reliability of using this radioactive EAFD as an addition in the immobilization mortar of the containers of the LMAR, that is, from the point of view of the durability. Different mixes of mortar containing different percentages of EAFD have been subjected to flexural and compressive strength, initial and final setting time, XRD study, total porosity and pore size distribution, determination of the chloride diffusion coefficient, dimensional stability tests, hydration heat, workability of the fresh mix, and leaching behavior. What is deduced from the results is that for the conditions used in this research, (cement + sand) can be replaced by EAFD upto a ratio [EAFD/(cement + EAFD)] of 46% in the immobilization mortar of LMAR, apparently without any loss in the long-term durability properties of the mortar. PMID:15212272

  4. Solar detoxification of nitroglycerine-contaminated water using immobilized Titania

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z. )

    1994-03-01

    A solar-driven photocatalytic process based on TiO[sub 2] has been developed to destroy nitroglycerine (NG) in aqueous solutions. The study involved the design and construction of a plate type photoreactor with immobilized TiO[sub 2] (Degussa P25). The bench scale experiments with the solar (one sun) photocatalytic system demonstrated destruction of NG from an initial concentration of 500 to less than 1 ppm, with CO[sub 2], nitrate ion and water being the major products of the decomposition. the platinization of TiO[sub 2] surface did not significantly affect the rate of NG decomposition. Rhodamine dye, as a model compound, was also photocatalytically decomposed in the solar photoreactor from concentrations of 10 to less than 0.01 ppm in 20 min.

  5. Immobilization of defined laccase combinations for enhanced oxidation of phenolic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Erik M; Gasser, Christoph A; Hommes, Gregor; Corvini, Philippe F-X

    2014-02-01

    Immobilization is an important method to increase enzyme stability and allow enzyme reuse. One interesting application in the field of environmental biotechnology is the immobilization of laccase to eliminate phenolic contaminants via oxidation. Fumed silica nanoparticles have interesting potential as support material for laccase immobilization via sorption-assisted immobilization in the perspective of applications such as the elimination of micropollutants in aqueous phases. Based on these facts, the present work aimed to formulate laccase-nanoparticle conjugates with defined laccase combinations in order to obtain nanobiocatalysts, which are active over a broad range of pH values and possess a large substrate spectrum to suitably address pollution by multiple contaminants. A multi-enzymatic approach was investigated by immobilizing five different types of laccases originating from a Thielavia genus, Coriolopsis polyzona, Cerrena unicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Trametes versicolor onto fumed silica nanoparticles, separately and in combinations. The laccases differed concerning their pH optima and substrate affinity. Exploiting their differences allowed the formulation of tailor-made nanobiocatalysts. In particular, the production of a nanobiocatalyst could be achieved that retained a higher percentage of its relative activity over the tested pH range (3-7) compared to the dissolved or separately immobilized enzymes. Furthermore, a nanobiocatalyst could be formulated able to oxidize a broader substrate range than the dissolved or separately immobilized enzymes. Thereby, the potential of the nanobiocatalyst for application in biochemical oxidation applications such as the elimination of multiple target pollutants in biologically treated wastewater has been illustrated. PMID:23812279

  6. Immobilization of chromium-contaminated soil by means of microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Tai, H S; Jou, C J

    1999-03-19

    To reduce the amount of hazardous wastes contaminated by heavy metals, a new technology to immobilize heavy metal ions is desired. Microwave (MW) technology which can be used to vitrify the contaminated soil wastes and immobilize the heavy metal ions for this purpose to satisfy the leachate test standard. We found that 90%+ of the chromium-contaminated soil went through the glass/ceramic transformation and was thus vitrified after being radiated with MW for 60 min. The chromium ion (Cr6+) concentration in the leaching test of all the vitrified soil samples is less than 1 mg/l, below the USEPA regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/l. This technology may become a major treatment method for hazardous wastes if the large-scale field test proves to be successful. In this paper, we will present the experimental conditions, the results and the future projects. PMID:10337402

  7. Application, chemistry, and environmental implications of contaminant-immobilization amendments on agricultural soil and water quality.

    PubMed

    Udeigwe, Theophilus K; Eze, Peter N; Teboh, Jasper M; Stietiya, Mohammed H

    2011-01-01

    Contaminants such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), arsenic (As), heavy metals, and infectious pathogens are often associated with agricultural systems. Various soil and water remediation techniques including the use of chemical amendments have been employed to reduce the risks associated with these contaminants. This paper reviews the use of chemical amendments for immobilizing principal agricultural contaminants, the chemistry of contaminant immobilization, and the environmental consequences associated with the use of these chemical products. The commonly used chemical amendments were grouped into aluminum-, calcium-, and iron-containing products. Other products of interest include phosphorus-containing compounds and silicate clays. Mechanisms of contaminant immobilization could include one or a combination of the following: surface precipitation, adsorption to mineral surfaces (ion exchange and formation of stable complexes), precipitation as salts, and co-precipitation. The reaction pH, redox potential, clay minerals, and organic matter are potential factors that could control contaminant-immobilization processes. Reviews of potential environmental implications revealed that undesirable substances such as trace elements, fluoride, sulfate, total dissolved solids, as well as radioactive materials associated with some industrial wastes used as amendment could be leached to ground water or lost through runoff to receiving water bodies. The acidity or alkalinity associated with some of the industrial-waste amendments could also constitute a substantial environmental hazard. Chemical amendments could introduce elements capable of inducing or affecting the activities of certain lithotrophic microbes that could influence vital geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution and formation, weathering, and organic matter mineralization. PMID:20832118

  8. Chloride contamination effects on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Qian, Weimin; Zhang, Shengsheng; Wessel, Silvia; Cheng, Tommy T. H.; Shen, Jun; Wu, Shaohong

    2011-08-01

    Chlorine is a major fuel contaminant when by-product hydrogen from the chlor-alkali industry is used as the fuel for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Understanding the effects of chlorine contamination on fuel cell performance and durability is essential to address fuel cell applications for the automotive and stationary markets. This paper reports our findings of chloride contamination effects on PEM fuel cell performance and durability, as our first step in understanding the effects of chlorine contamination. Fuel cell contamination tests were conducted by injecting ppm levels of contaminant into the fuel cell from either the fuel stream or the air stream. In situ and ex situ diagnosis were performed to investigate the contamination mechanisms. The results show that cell voltage during chloride contamination is characterized by an initial sudden drop followed by a plateau, regardless of which side the contaminant is introduced into the fuel cell. The drop in cell performance is predominantly due to increased cathode charge transfer resistance as a result of electrochemical catalyst surface area (ECSA) loss attributable to the blocking of active sites by Cl- and enhanced Pt dissolution.

  9. Chemical immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd by phosphate materials and calcium carbonate in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyong; Su, Xiaojuan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Zhu, Yifei; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination with toxic metals has increasingly become a global concern over the past few decades. Phosphate and carbonate compounds are good passivation materials for Pb immobilization, while the effect of phosphate and carbonate on the immobilization of multiple heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Cd) in contaminated soils was seldom investigated. In this study, bone meal (BM), phosphate rock (PR), oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock (APR), super phosphate (SP), and calcium carbonate (CC) were added to the contaminated soils to evaluate the effect of phosphate materials and calcium carbonate on the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd. The results showed that the pH of the treated soils increased 1.3-2.7, except SP which decreased 0.5 at most. Compared to the control treatment, all phosphates and calcium carbonate added to the polluted soils increased the fraction of residual metals, and the application of APR, PR, BM, and CC significantly reduced exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction metals. PR and APR were the most effective for the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd in the soils among these materials. Moreover, the concentrations of all metals in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate decreased with increasing amounts of amendments, and the concentrations of Pb in the TCLP leachate for soils treated with PR and APR were below the nonhazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) (US Environmental Protection Agency). Based on our results, phosphate rock and oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock are effective in the immobilization of multiple metals by reducing their mobility in the co-contaminated soils. PMID:27197655

  10. Stabilize lead and cadmium in contaminated soils using hydroxyapatite and potassium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Liao, Xiaoyong; Wei, Binggan; Ye, Bixiong; Zhang, Fengying; Yang, Linsheng; Wang, Wuyi; Krafft, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Combination of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and potassium chloride (KCl) was used to stabilize lead and cadmium in contaminated mining soils. Pot experiments of chilli (Capsicum annuum) and rape (Brassica rapachinensis) were used to evaluate the stabilization efficiency. The results were the following: (1) the optimal combination decreased the leachable lead by 83.3 and 97.27 %, and decreased leachable cadmium by 57.82 and 35.96% for soil HF1 and soil HF2, respectively; (2) the total lead and cadmium concentrations in both plants decreased 69 and 44 %, respectively; (3) The total lead and cadmium concentrations in the edible parts of both vegetables also decreased significantly. This study reflected that potassium chloride can improve the stabilization efficiency of hydroxyapatite, and the combination of hydroxyapatite and potassium chloride can be effectively used to remediate lead and cadmium contaminated mining soil. PMID:25249043

  11. Method for immobilizing mixed waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and other hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a method for the encapsulation of soluble radioactive waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as strontium, cesium and hazardous wastes such as barium so that they may be permanently stored without future threat to the environment. The process consists of contacting the salts containing the radionuclides and hazardous wastes with certain zeolites which have been found to ion exchange with the radionuclides and to occlude the chloride salts so that the resulting product is leach resistant.

  12. Method for immobilizing mixed waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and other hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1993-09-07

    The invention is a method for the encapsulation of soluble radioactive waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as strontium, cesium and hazardous wastes such as barium so that they may be permanently stored without future threat to the environment. The process consists of contacting the salts containing the radionuclides and hazardous wastes with certain zeolites which have been found to ion exchange with the radionuclides and to occlude the chloride salts so that the resulting product is leach resistant.

  13. Phytoextraction of chloride from a cement kiln dust (CKD) contaminated landfill with Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Kaitlin; Rutter, Allison; Cumming, Robert; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2016-05-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a globally produced by-product from cement manufacturing that is stockpiled or landfilled. Elevated concentrations of chloride pose toxic threats to plants and aquatic communities, as the anion is highly mobile in water and can leach into surrounding water sources. Re-vegetation and in situ phytoextraction of chloride from a CKD landfill in Bath, ON, Canada, was investigated with the resident invasive species Phragmites australis (haplotype M). Existing stands of P. australis were transplanted from the perimeter of the site into the highest areas of contamination (5.9×10(3)μg/g). Accumulation in the shoots of P. australis was quantified over one growing season by collecting samples from the site on a bi-weekly basis and analyzing for chloride. Concentrations decreased significantly from early May (24±2.2×10(3)μg/g) until mid-June (15±2.5×10(3)μg/g), and then remained stable from June to August. Shoot chloride accumulation was not significantly affected by water level fluctuations at the site, however elevated potassium concentrations in the soil may have contributed to uptake. Based on shoot chloride accumulation and total biomass, it was determined that phytoextraction from the CKD landfill can remove 65±4kg/km(2) of chloride per season. Based on this extraction rate, removal of chloride present in the highly contaminated top 10cm of soil can be achieved in 3-9years. This is the first study to apply phytotechnologies at a CKD landfill, and to successfully demonstrate in situ phytoextraction of chloride. PMID:26597371

  14. Hydrogels for immobilization of bacteria used in the treatment of metal-contaminated wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiorgi, C. Fernández; Pizarro, R. A.; Smolko, E. E.; Lora, S.; Carenza, M.

    2002-01-01

    Polymeric matrices prepared by gamma irradiation of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate at -78°C in the presence of water and glycerol and poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes were examined as carriers for immobilization of bacterial cells in experiments of metal decontamination. Bacterial strains capable of growing in the presence of heavy metals were selected from soil and water from the Rı´o de la Plata coasts in Argentina and cultured in the hydrophilic membranes with the aim of bioremediation of the standard contaminated solutions. The results obtained indicate that removal from free bacteria was more efficient for Pb(II) and Cd(II) than for Cr(III) and Cu(II). It was ascertained that all metals could be immobilized in the polymer matrices to some extent. The Cr(III) ion concentration in bacteria immobilized on the acrylic hydrogel was approximately double of that found in the poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane.

  15. Preparation and optimization of a drug delivery system based on berberine chloride-immobilized MgAl hydrotalcite.

    PubMed

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Bouaziz, Zaineb; Elabed, Alae; Sadiki, Moulay; Elabed, Soumya; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Amara, Abdesslem Ben Haj

    2016-06-15

    Hydrotalcite (HT), also known as a layered double hydroxide (LDH) compound, has been widely used in past years in the formulation of drugs due to its specific properties including good biocompatibility, null toxicity, high chemical stability and pH-dependent solubility which aid in drug controlled release. In this work, berberine chloride (BBC) class antibacterial agent was immobilized into magnesium-aluminum LDH in order to improve the drug efficiency as well as to achieve the controlled release property. BBC molecules were immobilized into MgAl LDH through a conventional ion exchange reaction and co-precipitation method. The ion-exchange experiments of BBC on MgAl LDH were investigated with particular attention paid to the influence of the layer charge, the nature of the intercalated anion and the morphology. The immobilization efficiency was dependent upon the LDH properties and the immobilization process. Characterization by powder x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurements revealed that the interaction of BBC with MgAl LDH occurs by adsorption rather than intercalation of BBC within LDH layers. In vitro anti-bacterial tests were carried out using disc diffusion assay to prove the effectiveness of these novel biohybrid beads as a controlled drug delivery method. Consequently, the BBC-LDH co-precipitated formulation revealed an enhanced anti-bacterial activity compared to the ion-exchanged formulation not only due to an improvement of chemical stability and retained amount of BBC molecules but also due to the release property. PMID:27109050

  16. Simultaneous immobilization of lead and atrazine in contaminated soils using dairy-manure biochar.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Ma, Lena; Liang, Yuan; Gao, Bin; Harris, Willie

    2011-06-01

    Biochar produced from waste biomass is increasingly being recognized as a green, cost-effective amendment for environmental remediation. This work was to determine the ability of biochar to immobilize heavy metal Pb and organic pesticide atrazine in contaminated soils. Biochar prepared from dairy manure was incubated with contaminated soils at rates of 0, 2.5, and 5.0% by weight for 210 d. A commercial activated carbon (AC) was included as a comparison. The AC was effective in immobilizing atrazine, but was ineffective for Pb. However, biochar was effective in immobilizing both atrazine and Pb and the effectiveness was enhanced with increasing incubation time and biochar rates. After 210 d, soils treated with the highest rate of 5.0% biochar showed more than 57% and 66% reduction in Pb and atrazine concentrations in 0.01 M CaCl(2) extraction, respectively. Lead and atrazine concentrations in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure solutions were reduced by 70-89% and 53-77%, respectively. Uptake of Pb and atrazine by earthworms (Eisenia fetida) was reduced by up to 79% and 73%. Phosphorus originally contained in biochar reacted with soil Pb to form insoluble hydroxypyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)(OH), as determined by X-ray diffraction, which was presumably responsible for soil Pb immobilization, whereas atrazine stabilization may result from its adsorption by biochar demonstrated by the significant exponential decrease of extractable atrazine with increasing organic C in biochar (r(2) > 0.97, p < 0.05). The results highlighted the potential of dairy-manure biochar as a unique amendment for immobilization of both heavy metal and organic contaminants in cocontaminated soils. PMID:21542567

  17. Lead immobilization and phosphorus availability in phosphate-amended, mine-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Lydia R; Baker, Leslie L; Strawn, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Over a century of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene mining district in Idaho have contaminated soils of the downstream basin with lead, arsenic, zinc, and cadmium. Elevated soil-Pb levels are a significant hazard to the health of humans and wildlife in the region. One in situ treatment approach for remediating Pb-contaminated soils is application of phosphorus to promote the formation of lead phosphate minerals that have low solubility. However, this remediation strategy may result in excess P runoff to surface waters, which can lead to eutrophication, particularly when used in riparian areas. Research presented in this paper describes experiments in which monopotassium phosphate (KHPO) solution was applied to two Pb-contaminated soils from the Coeur d'Alene River valley to determine how P loading rates affect both Pb immobilization and P mobility and to determine if an optimal P amendment rate can be predicted. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extractions were used to assess changes in Pb availability for uptake by an organism or mobilization through the soil, and Bray extractions were used to assess P availability for leaching out of the soil system. For the two soils tested, increasing phosphate amendment caused decreasing Pb extractability. Phosphorus amendment rates above approximately 70 mg kg, however, did not provide any additional Pb immobilization. Phosphorus availability increased with increasing phosphate application rate. An empirical relationship is presented that predicts extractable Pb as a function of extractable P. This relationship allows for prediction of the amount of Pb that can be immobilized at specified P leaching amounts, such as regulatory levels that have been established to minimize risks for surface water degradation. Results suggest that phosphate can be used to immobilize Pb in contaminated wetland or riparian areas without posing risks of P loading to surface waters. PMID:25602333

  18. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to

  19. Evaluation of phosphate fertilizers for the immobilization of Cd in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yin; Zhou, Yi Qun; Liang, Cheng Hua

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of four phosphate fertilizers, including diammonium phosphate (DAP), potassium phosphate monobasic (MPP), calcium superphosphateon (SSP), and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP), in terms of the toxicity and bioavailability of Cd in contaminated soils. The efficiency of immobilization was evaluated on the basis of two criteria: (a) the reduction of extractable Cd concentration below the TCLP regulatory level and (b) the Cd changes associated with specific operational soil fractions on the basis of sequential extraction data. Results showed that after 50 d immobilization, the extractable concentrations of Cd in DAP, MPP, SSP, and TCP treated soils decreased from 42.64 mg/kg (in the control) to 23.86, 21.86, 33.89, and 35.59 mg/kg, respectively, with immobilization efficiency in the order of MPP > DAP > SSP > TCP. Results from the assessment of Cd speciation via the sequential extraction procedure revealed that the soluble exchangeable fraction of Cd in soils treated with phosphate fertilizers, especially TCP, was considerably reduced. In addition, the reduction was correspondingly related to the increase in the more stable forms of Cd, that is, the metal bound to manganese oxides and the metal bound to crystalline iron oxides. Treatment efficiency increased as the phosphate dose (according to the molar ratio of PO4/Cd) increased. Immobilization was the most effective under the molar ratio of PO4/Cd at 4:1. PMID:25915051

  20. Evaluation of Phosphate Fertilizers for the Immobilization of Cd in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yin; Zhou, Yi Qun; Liang, Cheng Hua

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of four phosphate fertilizers, including diammonium phosphate (DAP), potassium phosphate monobasic (MPP), calcium superphosphateon (SSP), and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP), in terms of the toxicity and bioavailability of Cd in contaminated soils. The efficiency of immobilization was evaluated on the basis of two criteria: (a) the reduction of extractable Cd concentration below the TCLP regulatory level and (b) the Cd changes associated with specific operational soil fractions on the basis of sequential extraction data. Results showed that after 50 d immobilization, the extractable concentrations of Cd in DAP, MPP, SSP, and TCP treated soils decreased from 42.64 mg/kg (in the control) to 23.86, 21.86, 33.89, and 35.59 mg/kg, respectively, with immobilization efficiency in the order of MPP > DAP > SSP > TCP. Results from the assessment of Cd speciation via the sequential extraction procedure revealed that the soluble exchangeable fraction of Cd in soils treated with phosphate fertilizers, especially TCP, was considerably reduced. In addition, the reduction was correspondingly related to the increase in the more stable forms of Cd, that is, the metal bound to manganese oxides and the metal bound to crystalline iron oxides. Treatment efficiency increased as the phosphate dose (according to the molar ratio of PO4/Cd) increased. Immobilization was the most effective under the molar ratio of PO4/Cd at 4:1. PMID:25915051

  1. Immobilized humic substances on an anion exchange resin and their role on the redox biotransformation of contaminants.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Márquez, Arturo; Alvarez, Luis H; Arriaga, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique to immobilize humic substances (HS) on an anion exchange resin is presented. Immobilized HS were demonstrated as an effective solid-phase redox mediator (RM) during the reductive biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the azo model compound, Reactive Red 2 (RR2). Immobilized HS increased ∼4-fold the extent of CT reduction to chloroform by a humus-reducing consortium in comparison to incubations lacking HS. Immobilized HS also increased 2-fold the second-order rate constant of decolorization of RR2 as compared with sludge incubations lacking HS. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first demonstration of immobilized HS serving as an effective solid-phase RM during the reductive biotransformation of priority contaminants. The immobilizing technique developed could be appropriate for enhancing the redox biotransformation of recalcitrant pollutants in anaerobic wastewater treatment systems. PMID:20801024

  2. FIELD AND LABORATORY EVIDENCE FOR INTRINSIC BIODEGRADATION OF VINYL CHLORIDE CONTAMINATION IN A FE(III)-REDUCING AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biod...

  3. [Differential Effect and Mechanism of in situ Immobilization of Cadmium Contamination in Soil Using Diatomite Produced from Different Areas].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Wang, Ping; Lin, Yan; Lei, Ming-jing; Chen, Yang

    2016-02-15

    In order to understand the difference of in situ immobilization effect and mechanism of Cd contamination in soil using diatomite produced from different areas, the test was conducted using diatomite produced from Yunnan Tengchong, Jilin Linjiang, Zhejiang Shengzhou and Henan Xinyang of China as modifiers to immobilize cadmium contamination in simulated soil. The results indicated that the diatomite from all the four producing areas could effectively immobilize available Cd in soil, decreasing the available Cd content in soil by 27.7%, 28.5%, 30.1% and 57.2%, respectively when the adding concentration was 30 g x kg(-1). Their ability for immobilizing available Cd in soil followed the sequence of Henan Xinyang > Zhejiang Shengzhou > Jilin Linjiang > Yunnan Tengchong. It was also found that the physical and chemical properties of diatomite played a main role in soil cadmium immobilization, lower bulk density, larger specific surface area, more micro pores and wider distribution range of aperture were more favorable for available Cd immobilization. The results also showed that, the diatomite could control Cd contamination by changing soil physical and chemical properties, among these properties, pH and organic matter content were the key factors, increasing soil pH value and organic matter content was favorable for available cadmium immobilization, while the soil water content had little effect on available cadmium immobilization. The control of soil cadmium contamination by using diatomite to change cation exchange capacity was limited by time in some degree. The diatomite produced from Henan Xinyang, Zhejiang Shengzhou and Yunnan Tengchong increased the soil pH value and organic matter content, and was favorable for available Cd immobilization, while the diatomite from Jilin Linjiang showed converse effect. PMID:27363165

  4. [Effect and mechanism of immobilization of cadmium and lead compound contaminated soil using new hybrid material].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xu, Ying-Ming; Liang, Xue-Feng; Sun, Yang; Qin, Xu

    2011-02-01

    The effect of new hybrid material and its compound treatments with phosphate on immobilization of cadmium and lead in contaminated soil was investigated using a pot-culture experiment, and the immobilization mechanism of hybrid material was clarified through analysis of heavy metal fractions, sorption equilibration experiment and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The single treatments of hybrid material could not significantly promote growth of Brassica chinensis, while the compound treatments of hybrid material and phosphate markedly increased dry biomass of shoots and roots, with maximal increases of 75.53% and 151.22%, respectively. Different hybrid material treatments could significantly reduce Cd and Pb concentrations in shoots, with maximal reductions of 66.79% and 48.62%, respectively, and the compound amendment treatments appeared more efficient than the single amendment treatments in reducing Cd and Pb uptake of B. chinensis. Different hybrid material treatments could significantly decrease concentrations of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) extractable Cd and Pb, and the compound hybrid material treatments appeared more efficient than the single treatments in reducing TCLP extractable Cd and Pb. Through the formation of bidentate ligand between metal ions and surface sulfhydryl by complexing reaction, the hybrid material could absorb and fix mobile fractions of Cd and Pb in soil, and promote transformation of acid extractable Cd and Pb into residual fraction, resulting in significant reduction of heavy metals bioavailability and mobility and then fixing remediation of contaminated soil. In summary, the compound treatment of hybrid material and phosphate is the most effective treatment for immobilization of Cd and Pb in contaminated soils, and the hybrid material inactivates Cd and Pb in soil mainly through special chemical adsorption. PMID:21528587

  5. Environmental monitoring of the role of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of lead in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi S; Chung, Jae Woo; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2011-08-01

    Lead is a highly toxic element and forms stable compounds with phosphate, which is commonly used to immobilize Pb in soils. However, few studies have monitored the long-term stability of immobilized Pb, which is a critical factor in determining the effectiveness of the in situ stabilization technique. Both soluble and insoluble phosphate compounds were tested for Pb immobilization, and its subsequent mobility and bioavailability in a contaminated soil from a shooting range. Adding tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, rock phosphate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate reduced the concentration of ammonium-nitrate-extractable Pb in the contaminated soil by 78.6%, 48.3%, 40.5% and 80.1%, respectively. Insoluble phosphate amendments significantly reduced leached Pb concentration from the column while soluble potassium dihydrogen phosphate compound increased P and Pb concentrations in the leachate. Rock phosphate reduced Pb accumulation in earthworms by 21.9% compared to earthworms in the control treatment. The long-term stability of immobilized Pb was evaluated after 2 years' incubation of the contaminated soil with rock phosphate or soluble phosphate compounds. Bioavailable Pb concentration as measured by simple bioavailability extraction test (SBET) showed the long-term stability of immobilized Pb by P amendments. Therefore, Pb immobilization using phosphate compounds is an effective remediation technique for Pb-contaminated soils. PMID:21748178

  6. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  7. Contaminant immobilization and nutrient release by biochar soil amendment: roles of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Lima, Isabel M; Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-08-01

    Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and releasing essential nutrients like sulfur. Information is currently lacking in how aging impacts the integrity of biochars as soil amendment for both agricultural and environmental remediation purposes. Major contributors to biochar aging in soils are: sorption of environmental constituents, especially natural organic matter (NOM), and oxidation. To investigate the impact of NOM and organic fractions of chars, we employed broiler litter-derived chars and steam-activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of carbonization, in the presence and absence of NOM having known carboxyl contents. For aging by oxidation, we employed phosphoric acid activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of oxidation during activation. The results suggest that the organic fractions of biochars, and NOM having high carboxyl contents can mobilize Cu(II) retained by alkaline soil. Base treatment of broiler litter-derived char formed at low pyrolysis temperature (350 degrees C) improved the immobilization of all heavy metals investigated, and the extent of immobilization was similar to, or slightly greater than pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons. Portions of total sulfur were released in soluble form in soil amended with broiler litter-derived carbons, but not pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons. PMID:20542314

  8. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Teresa J.; Looney, Brian B.; Smith, John G.; Miller, Carrie L.; Peterson, Mark J.; Bryan, A. Lawrence; Southworth, George R.

    2015-06-09

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations in the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.

  9. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Mandal, Asit; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-11-15

    Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad(®) 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC>unmodified bentonite>Arquad-bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10-43%) as well as activities (respiration 3-44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils. PMID:26022853

  10. Ameliorants to immobilize Cd in rice paddy soils contaminated by abandoned metal mines in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Kuk; Skousen, Jeffrey G; Lee, Jin-Soo; Cheong, Young-Wook; Kim, Su-Jung; Yang, Jae E

    2011-01-01

    The cadmium (Cd) content of rice grain grown in metal-contaminated paddy soils near abandoned metal mines in South Korea was found to exceed safety guidelines (0.2 mg Cd kg⁻¹) set by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA). However, current remediation technologies for heavy metal-contaminated soils have limited application with respect to rice paddy soils. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were conducted to assess the effects of amending contaminated rice paddy soils with zerovalent iron (ZVI), lime, humus, compost, and combinations of these compounds to immobilize Cd and inhibit Cd translocation to rice grain. Sequential extraction analysis revealed that treatment with the ameliorants induced a 50-90% decrease in the bioavailable Cd fractions when compared to the untreated control soil. When compared to the control, Cd uptake by rice was decreased in response to treatment with ZVI + humus (69%), lime (65%), ZVI + compost (61%), compost (46%), ZVI (42%), and humus (14%). In addition, ameliorants did not influence rice yield when compared to that of the control. Overall, the results of this study indicated that remediation technologies using ameliorants effectively reduce Cd bioavailability and uptake in contaminated rice paddy soils. PMID:21052787

  11. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, I. W.; Metcalfe, B. L.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not feasible due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been sought including phosphate-based glasses, crystalline ceramics and hybrid glass/ceramic systems. These studies have shown that high losses of chloride or evolution of chlorine gas from the melt make vitrification an unacceptable solution unless suitable off-gas treatment facilities capable of dealing with these corrosive by-products are available. On the other hand, both sodium aluminosilicate and calcium phosphate ceramics are capable of retaining chloride in stable mineral phases, which include sodalite, Na 8(AlSiO 4) 6Cl 2, chlorapatite, Ca 5(PO 4) 3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and precursor powders are mixed and reacted in air at temperatures in the range 700-800 °C. The ceramic products are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that only require encapsulation in a relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal.

  12. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Teresa J; Looney, Brian B; Bryan, A Lawrence; Smith, John G; Miller, Carrie L; Southworth, George R; Peterson, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the impacts of an innovative Hg water treatment system on a small, industrially-contaminated stream in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from wastewater using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations in the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from >100 to ∼10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70% at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to methylmercury (MeHg) production or bioaccumulation in this system. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream, but future studies are needed to assess longer term impacts of Sn on the environment. PMID:26070084

  13. Solubility and changes of mercury binding forms in contaminated soils after immobilization treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Biester, H.; Zimmer, H.

    1998-09-15

    Mobility at different pH and binding forms of mercury (Hg) have been investigated in three Hg-contaminated soils after immobilization treatment with alkali-polysulfide (APS) and trimercapto-s-triazine trisodium salt solution (TMT). Changes of solid-phase Hg binding forms after immobilization were determined by Hg pyrolysis. Hg concentrations in the water extracts of all samples increased after treatments due to the formation of soluble mercury sulfides (APS treatment), and the mobilization of humic acid bound Hg at the high pH of the reagents. In contrast, Hg concentrations decreased sharply at low pH due to decomposition of soluble mercury sulfides and precipitation of humic acid-bound Hg. Inorganic Hg compounds such as Hg{sup 0} or HgCl{sub 2} are effectively transformed to mercury sulfides by APS treatment, whereas TMT could transform HgCl{sub 2} but not Hg{sup 0}. Both reagents were found to affect humic acid bound Hg by way of increasing Hg desorption temperatures, although APS was found not to desorb Hg completely from humic acids and TMT-Hg complexes are actually incorporated into humic acids.

  14. Microscopic analysis of Pu-contaminated incinerator ash: Implications for immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper, a nanometer-scale mineralogical study with analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) of plutonium-bearing incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Colorado is described. The findings from this work may have implications for the present effort to immobilize plutonium waste. Around 70% of the plutonium ash in the DOE weapons complex is stored at RFETS. The ash was formed from the combustion of contaminated wastes generated from plutonium processing. The RFETS incinerator ash composition has been determined by Blum et al. The ash was formed at temperatures estimated to be between 200 C and 900 C and contains up to 14 wt% Pu. Ash is a generic term used to describe the by-product of combustion and owing to the variability in the inorganic components.

  15. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass: A laboratory study. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Ferguson, C.R.; Bennett, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials for removing metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, are prepared by blending biomass, such as sphagnum peat moss or algae, into a polymer solution and spraying the mixture into water. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine bead sorption and elution characteristics. Batch and continuous tests demonstrated that BIO-FIX beads sorbed arsenic, cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from acid mine drainage waters collected from several sites. Selectivity for heavy and toxic metal ions over calcium and magnesium was demonstrated. The beads exhibited excellent metal sorption and handling characteristics in stirred tanks, column contactors, and a low-maintenance passive system. The sorption process was reversible, and metal ions were eluted from the beads using dilute mineral acids. Cyclic tests indicated that the beads continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles.

  16. Immobilization of lead in anthropogenic contaminated soils using phosphates with/without oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Jun; Fu, Qingling; Zuo, Jichao; Liu, Yonghong; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on the immobilization of Pb(II) in contaminated soils by phosphate materials, has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for the soil. A series of phosphate amendments with/without oxalic acid were applied to two anthropogenic contaminated soils. We investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) by KH2PO4, phosphate rock (PR), activated phosphate rock (APR) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) at different phosphate:Pb (P:Pb) molar ratios (0, 0.6, 2.0 and 4.0) in the presence/absence of 50 mmol oxalic acid/kg soil, respectively. The effects of treatments were evaluated using single extraction with deionized water or CaCl2, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) methods. Our results showed that the concentration of water extractable, exchangeable and TCLP-Pb all decreased with incubation time. The concentration of water-extractable Pb after 120 days was reduced by 100% when soils were amended with APR, HAP and HAP+OA, and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L for the red soil at P:Pb molar ratio 4.0. Water-soluble Pb could not be detected and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L at all treatments applied to the yellow-brown soil. BCR results indicated that APR was most effective, although a slight enhancement of water-soluble phosphate was detected at the P:Pb molar ratio 4.0 at the beginning of incubation. Oxalic acid activated phosphates, and so mixing insoluble phosphates with oxalic acid may be a useful strategy to improve their effectiveness in reducing Pb bioavailability. PMID:25662240

  17. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mathews, Teresa J.; Looney, Brian B.; Smith, John G.; Miller, Carrie L.; Peterson, Mark J.; Bryan, A. Lawrence; Southworth, George R.

    2015-06-09

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations inmore » the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.« less

  18. The effects of a stannous chloride-based remediation system in a mercury contaminated stream

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mathews, Teresa J; Looney, Brian; BryanJr., Larry; Smith, John G; Miller, Carrie L; Peterson, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations inmore » the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.« less

  19. Meta-analysis of biochar potential for pollutant immobilization and stabilization in contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Gerhard; Marsz, Aleksandra; Fristak, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is the pyrolysis product of biomass, preferably from agricultural and forestry residues and waste materials. Characterized by a polyaromatic structure rich in carbon, it offers a microporous structure with a high specific surface area and active functional groups as binding sites. Because of the high sorption capacity for organic and inorganic soil pollutants biochar is an interesting tool for in-situ soil remediation. Especially if the reduction of contaminant bioavailability and the protection of groundwater from pollutants in the vadose zone are the most relevant issues for remediating a polluted site without excavation and removal of the soil, an in-situ application of biochar may offer a promising remediation strategy. The resulting interest of deploying biochar as sorbent for soil contaminants has stimulated a wealth of studies to develop successful applications for environmental technology. However, the existing studies do not always agree on the efficacy for different pollutants and on the most relevant char and soil characteristics that determine the rate of success when using biochar as sorbent. This makes it necessary to apply advanced literature assessment techniques to allow for the recognition of the extent and the significance of the efficacy of a given pollutant treatment technique. A meta-analysis is a study assessment technique that allows extracting a harmonized answer to a specific research question that has been studied more often than one time, even if the results are partially conflicting. Such a technique also allows getting an overview about the degree of consensus or contradiction in the answers to the question if biochar can be applied successfully for immobilizing certain soil contaminants. The meta-analysis results can also be used to quantify the average extent of effects of a certain treatment, depending on the characteristics of the sorbent and on the application rate. By checking 104 published papers in the peer

  20. Biochar- and phosphate-induced immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soil and water: implication on simultaneous remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling; Arellano, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Long-term wastewater irrigation or solid waste disposal has resulted in the heavy metal contamination in both soil and groundwater. It is often separately implemented for remediation of contaminated soil or groundwater at a specific site. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the hypothesis of simultaneous remediation of both heavy metal contaminated soil and groundwater by integrating the chemical immobilization and pump-and-treat methods. To accomplish the objective, three experiments were conducted, i.e., an incubation experiment was first conducted to determine how dairy-manure-derived biochar and phosphate rock tailing induced immobilization of Cd in the Cd-contaminated soils; second, a batch sorption experiment was carried out to determine whether the pre-amended contaminated soil still had the ability to retain Pb, Zn and Cd from aqueous solution. BCR sequential extraction as well as XRD and SEM analysis were conducted to explore the possible retention mechanism; and last, a laboratory-scale model test was undertaken by leaching the Pb, Zn, and Cd contaminated groundwater through the pre-amended contaminated soils to demonstrate how the heavy metals in both contaminated soil and groundwater were simultaneously retained and immobilized. The incubation experiment showed that the phosphate biochar were effective in immobilizing soil Cd with Cd concentration in TCLP (toxicity characteristics leaching procedure) extract reduced by 19.6 % and 13.7 %, respectively. The batch sorption experiment revealed that the pre-amended soil still had ability to retain Pb, Zn, and Cd from aqueous solution. The phosphate-induced metal retention was mainly due to the metal-phosphate precipitation, while both sorption and precipitation were responsible for the metal stabilization in the biochar amendment. The laboratory-scale test demonstrated that the soil amended with phosphate removed groundwater Pb, Zn, and Cd by 96.4 %, 44.6 %, and 49.2 %, respectively, and the

  1. Evaluation of monobasic calcium phosphate for the immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils from Lavrion.

    PubMed

    Theodoratos, Panagiotis; Papassiopi, Nymphodora; Xenidis, Anthimos

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of monobasic calcium phosphate for the stabilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils. The treatment was applied on a soil sample from the Lavrion mining area, Greece, heavily contaminated with Pb, Zn, Cd and As and characterized as toxic in respect to Pb according to the US EPA toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP). The efficiency of stabilization was evaluated based on two criteria: (a) the reduction of metals mobility below the TCLP regulatory limits; (b) the reduction of phytoaccumulation. Phytoaccumulation was evaluated both indirectly by applying leaching tests using EDTA, DTPA and NaHCO(3) solutions and directly by carrying out pot experiments with Phaseolus vulgaris as plant indicator. This treatment was found to immobilize Pb and Cd, whereas As and Zn were slightly mobilized. No effect on phytoaccumulation was observed. Moreover, the treatment had a negative effect on plants growth, which was combined with a strong deficiency of Ca in the tissue of leaves. PMID:12169417

  2. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass: Field studies. Report of Investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Bennett, P.G.; Corwin, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials such as sphagnum peat moss for extracting metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, have removed toxic metals from over 100 waters in laboratory tests. These waters include acid mine drainage (AMD) water from mining sites, metallurgical and chemical industry waste water, and contaminated ground water. Following the laboratory studies, cooperative field tests were conducted to evaluate the metal adsorption properties of the beads in column and low-maintenance circuits, determine bead stability in varied climatic situations, and demonstrate the beads' potential as a viable waste water treatment technique. Field results indicated that BIO-FIX beads readily adsorbed cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from dilute waters; effluents frequently met drinking water standards and other discharge criteria. The beads exhibited excellent handling characteristics in both column and low-maintenance circuits, and continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles.

  3. [Immobilization remediation of Cd and Pb contaminated soil: remediation potential and soil environmental quality].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue-Bing; Wang, Peng-Chao; Xu, Ying-Ming; Sun, Yang; Qin, Xu; Zhao, Li-Jie; Wang, Lin; Liang, Xue-Feng

    2014-12-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the immobilization remediation effects of sepiolite on soils artificially combined contamination by Cd and Pb using a set of various pH and speciation of Cd and Pb in soil, heavy metal concentration in Oryza sativa L., and soil enzyme activity and microbial quantity. Results showed that the addition of sepiolite increased the soil pH, and the exchangeable fraction of heavy metals was converted into Fe-Mn oxide, organic and residual forms, the concentration of exchangeable form of Cd and Pb reduced by 1.4% - 72.9% and 11.8% - 51.4%, respectively, when compared with the control. The contents of heavy metals decreased with increasing sepiolite, with the maximal Cd reduction of 39.8%, 36.4%, 55.2% and 32.4%, respectively, and 22.1%, 54.6%, 43.5% and 17.8% for Pb, respectively, in the stems, leaves, brown rice and husk in contrast to CK. The addition of sepiolite could improve the soil environmental quality, the catalase and urease activities and the amount of bacteria and actinomycete were increased to some extents. Although the fungi number and invertase activity were inhibited compared with the control group, it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The significant correlation between pH, available heavy metal content, urease and invertase activities and heavy metal concentration in the plants indicated that these parameters could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of stabilization remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. PMID:25826946

  4. Chloride/bromide and chloride/fluoride ratios of domestic sewage effluents and associated contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A.; Pankratov, I.

    1998-09-01

    To establish geochemical tools for tracing the origin of ground water contamination, the authors examined the variations of Cl/Br and Cl/F (weight) ratios in (1) domestic waste water from the Dan Region Sewage Reclamation Project and from reservoirs in the central coast of Israel; (2) associated contaminated ground water; and (3) pristine ground water from the Mediterranean coastal aquifer of Israel. The data show that supply water, anthropogenic NaCl and fluoridation control the Cl/Br and Cl/F ratios of domestic waste water, and conventional sewage treatment does not affect the anthropogenic inorganic signals. The Cl/Br ratios of ground water contaminated with sewage effluent reflect conservative mixing proportions of sewage and regional ground water components. Sensitivity tests demonstrate that it is possible to detect and distinguish sewage contamination from marine ratios after a sewage contribution of 5 to 15% is mixed with regional ground water. Mixing with Br-enriched fresh water however, would reduce this sensitivity. Since the high Cl/Br signal of sewage effluents is distinguishable from other anthropogenic sources with low Cl/Br ratios and from natural contamination sources, Cl/Br ratios can therefore be a useful inorganic tracer for identification of the origin of contaminated ground water. The Cl/F ratios of sewage-contaminated ground water were higher than those in the original sewage effluent, which suggests retention of fluoride into the aquifer solid phase.

  5. A comparative study of the most effective amendment for Pb, Zn and Cd immobilization in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Szrek, Dominik; Bajda, Tomasz; Manecki, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    The problem of an extensive contamination of soils with metals can be resolved using an in situ chemical immobilization technology. Five substances (natural zeolite, bog iron ore, "Polifoska 15" fertilizer, triple superphosphate, diammonium phosphate) were tested to determine their efficiency to immobilize Zn, Pb and Cd in smelter-contaminated soil in the Upper Silesia region. Soil samples were collected at three sites located in the vincity of a Pb-Zn smelter and a sludge landfill near the town of Bukowno. Effective reduction of leachable and fitoavailable Zn, Pb and Cd concentrations in soil was observed after addition of diammonium phosphate, "Polifoska 15" fertilizer and bog iron ore amendments. Additional test proved that immobilization effect gained by these amendments sustains at low-temperature conditions. It was noticed that phosphate addition resulted in lowering pH and mobilization of As(V) in soils. Good immobilization effectiveness and lack of major adverse effects of bog iron application suggest that this is the method of choice. PMID:21961559

  6. Immobilization of Pb from contaminated water, soils, and wastes by phosphate rock. Annual report, 15 March 1993-14 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q.Y.; Logan, T.J.; Traina, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    This research studies the feasibility of using phosphate rock and hydroxyapatite to immobilize Pb from aqueous solutions and contaminated soils, investigated the effects of CaCO3, aqueous Ca, Na, and K, and EDTA on aqueous Pb immobilization by hydroxyapatite, examined the stability of hydroxypyromorphite in the presence of high concentrations of anion exhange resin, aqueous Ca(+2), and EDTA, and determined the feasibility of using hydroxyapatite in immobilizing AsO4-3.

  7. Selection of support materials for immobilization of Burkholderia cepacia PCL3 in treatment of carbofuran-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Laocharoen, S; Plangklang, P; Reungsang, A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the utilization of agricultural matrices as the support materials for cell immobilization to improve the technique of bioremediation. Coir, bulrush, banana stem and water hyacinth stem in both delignified and undelignified forms were used to immobilize Burkholderia cepacia PCL3 in bioremediation of carbofuran at 5 mg l(-1) in synthetic wastewater. Undelignified coir was found to be the most suitable support material for cell immobilization, giving the short half-life of carbofuran of 3.40 d (2.8 times shorter than the treatments with free cells). In addition, it could be reused three times without a loss in ability to degrade carbofuran. The growth and degradation ability of free cells were completely inhibited at the initial carbofuran concentrations of 250 mg l(-1), while there was no inhibitory effect of carbofuran on the immobilized cells. The results indicated a great potential for using the agricultural matrices as support material for cell immobilization to improve the overall efficiency of carbofuran bioremediation in contaminated water by B. cepacia PCL3. PMID:24527620

  8. Immobilization and phytotoxicity of chromium in contaminated soil remediated by CMC-stabilized nZVI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fang, Zhanqiang; Kang, Yuan; Tsang, Eric Pokeung

    2014-06-30

    The toxic effect of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil remediated by sodium carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (CMC-stabilized nZVI) was assessed through in vitro toxicity and phytotoxicity tests. In vitro tests showed that 0.09 g L(-1) of Fe(0) nanoparticles (soil-to-solution ratio was 1 g:5 mL) significantly reduced the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachability and physiological based extraction test (PBET) bioaccessibility of Cr by 82% and 58%, respectively. Sequential extraction procedures (SEP) revealed that exchangeable (EX) Cr was completely converted to Fe-Mn oxides (OX) and organic matter (OM). Accordingly, phytotoxicity tests indicated that after 72-h remediation, Cr uptakes by edible rape and Chinese cabbage were suppressed by 61% and 36%, respectively. Moreover, no significant increase in Cr uptake was observed for either species after a 1-month static period for the amended soil. Regarding Fe absorption, germination and seedling growth, both plant species were significantly affected by CMC-nZVI-exposed soils. However, similar phytotoxicity tests conducted after 1 month showed an improvement in cultivation for both plants. Overall, this study demonstrated that CMC-nZVI could significantly enhance Cr immobilization, which reduced its leachability, bioavailability and bioaccumulation by plants. From a detoxification perspective, such remediation is technologically feasible and shows great potential in field applications. PMID:24880637

  9. Biogenic nanopalladium production by self-immobilized granular biomass: application for contaminant remediation.

    PubMed

    Suja, E; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-11-15

    Microbial granules cultivated in an aerobic bubble column sequencing batch reactor were used for reduction of Pd(II) and formation of biomass associated Pd(0) nanoparticles (Bio-Pd) for reductive transformation of organic and inorganic contaminants. Addition of Pd(II) to microbial granules incubated under fermentative conditions resulted in rapid formation of Bio-Pd. The reduction of soluble Pd(II) to biomass associated Pd(0) was predominantly mediated by H2 produced through fermentation. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that the produced Pd nanoparticles were associated with the microbial granules. The catalytic activity of Bio-Pd was determined using p-nitrophenol and Cr(VI) as model compounds. Reductive transformation of p-nitrophenol by Bio-Pd was ∼20 times higher in comparison to microbial granules without Pd. Complete reduction of up to 0.25 mM of Cr(VI) by Bio-Pd was achieved in 24 h. Bio-Pd synthesis using self-immobilized microbial granules is advantageous and obviates the need for nanoparticle encapsulation or use of barrier membranes for retaining Bio-Pd in practical applications. In short, microbial granules offer a dual purpose system for Bio-Pd production and retention, wherein in situ generated H2 serves as electron donor powering biotransformations. PMID:25223898

  10. A three-year experiment confirms continuous immobilization of cadmium and lead in contaminated paddy field with biochar amendment.

    PubMed

    Bian, Rongjun; Joseph, Stephen; Cui, Liqiang; Pan, Genxing; Li, Lianqing; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Afeng; Rutlidge, Helen; Wong, Singwei; Chia, Chee; Marjo, Chris; Gong, Bin; Munroe, Paul; Donne, Scott

    2014-05-15

    Heavy metal contamination in croplands has been a serious concern because of its high health risk through soil-food chain transfer. A field experiment was conducted in 2010-2012 in a contaminated rice paddy in southern China to determine if bioavailability of soil Cd and Pb could be reduced while grain yield was sustained over 3 years after a single soil amendment of wheat straw biochar. Contaminated biochar particles were separated from the biochar amended soil and microscopically analyzed to help determine where, and how, metals were immobilized with biochar. Biochar soil amendment (BSA) consistently and significantly increased soil pH, total organic carbon and decreased soil extractable Cd and Pb over the 3 year period. While rice plant tissues' Cd content was significantly reduced, depending on biochar application rate, reduction in plant Pb concentration was found only in root tissue. Analysis of the fresh and contaminated biochar particles indicated that Cd and Pb had probably been bonded with the mineral phases of Al, Fe and P on and around and inside the contaminated biochar particle. Immobilization of the Pb and Cd also occurred to cation exchange on the porous carbon structure. PMID:24685528

  11. Phylogenetic and Kinetic Diversity of Aerobic Vinyl Chloride-Assimilating Bacteria from Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nicholas V.; Mattes, Timothy E.; Gossett, James M.; Spain, Jim C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobic bacteria that grow on vinyl chloride (VC) have been isolated previously, but their diversity and distribution are largely unknown. It is also unclear whether such bacteria contribute to the natural attenuation of VC at chlorinated-ethene-contaminated sites. We detected aerobic VC biodegradation in 23 of 37 microcosms and enrichments inoculated with samples from various sites. Twelve different bacteria (11 Mycobacterium strains and 1 Nocardioides strain) capable of growth on VC as the sole carbon source were isolated, and 5 representative strains were examined further. All the isolates grew on ethene in addition to VC and contained VC-inducible ethene monooxygenase activity. The Mycobacterium strains (JS60, JS61, JS616, and JS617) all had similar growth yields (5.4 to 6.6 g of protein/mol), maximum specific growth rates (0.17 to 0.23 day−1), and maximum specific substrate utilization rates (9 to 16 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC. The Nocardioides strain (JS614) had a higher growth yield (10.3 g of protein/mol), growth rate (0.71 day−1), and substrate utilization rate (43 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC but was much more sensitive to VC starvation. Half-velocity constant (Ks) values for VC were between 0.5 and 3.2 μM, while Ks values for oxygen ranged from 0.03 to 0.3 mg/liter. Our results indicate that aerobic VC-degrading microorganisms (predominantly Mycobacterium strains) are widely distributed at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and are likely to be responsible for the natural attenuation of VC. PMID:12450841

  12. Contamination of vinyl chloride in shallow urban rivers in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Fukushima, M; Kakutani, N; Tsuruho, K

    2001-02-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) contamination had taken place in heavily polluted shallow rivers (Taishogawa and lower Hiranogawa Rivers) in Osaka, Japan. VC concentrations ranged from below detection limit to 55.6 micrograms l-1 (mean: 3.35 micrograms l-1, standard deviation: 5.96 micrograms l-1). Of 55 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyzed, concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (c-DCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) were significantly correlated to VC concentrations in the rivers, indicating that they share common sources. The four VOCs were invariably present at approximate relative ratios of about 1:2.7:1.5:0.31 (VC: c-DCE: PCE: TCE). The similarity between sampling dates in the distribution pattern of the four VOCs concentrations were observed, but their concentrations were different between the dates. The concentrations of the four VOCs decreased with distance down the river. A sample from the upper Taishogawa River in July 1997 had 55.6 micrograms l-1 of VC, 152 micrograms l-1 of c-DCE, 86.2 micrograms l-1 of PCE and 18.4 micrograms l-1 of TCE, respectively. These values are about an order of magnitude higher than the other sites over the study period and are likely indicative of point source inputs. PMID:11229012

  13. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values. PMID:27449537

  14. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  15. Techniques for Assessing the Performance of In Situ Bioreduction and Immobilization of Metals and Radionuclides in Contaminated Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this presentation is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  16. Evaluation of Soluble Phosphate Sources for Nickel and Uranium Immobilization in Contaminated Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majs, F.; Seaman, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    A batch equilibration study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of various forms of P on immobilizing two contaminants of interest (U and Ni; COIs) in exposed sediment. Four P amendments were evaluated at levels ranging from 0 to 10 g kg-1 of sediment: trisodium trimetaphosphate (TP3), reagent-grade dodecasodium phytate (Na-IP6), precipitated calcium phytate (Ca-IP6), and reagent-grade hydroxyapatite (HA). Samples were equilibrated in 0.001 M CaCl2 for seven days. Dissolved concentrations of the COIs, together with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the supernatant, were measured. A preliminary kinetic study indicated that seven days was sufficient to achieve equilibrium even with the least soluble amendment, e.g. HA. Redistribution of the COIs after equilibration was determined using selective extraction procedures: the USEPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and sequential extraction (SE) method with eight operationally defined phases. The solubility of Ni decreased at the lowest addition level (2 g kg-1 sediment) for all amendments. However, a negative relationship between dissolved Ni concentrations and increasing amendment level was observed only for HA. Only HA and Ca-IP6 were effective in lowering dissolved U concentrations at all amendment levels, and again only HA exhibited a desired negative relationship in decreasing dissolved U concentration. The Na-IP6 amendment increased soil pH from 4.5 to nearly 7.5, whereas other amendments increased pH only moderately. The DOC for the sediment treated with Na-IP6 increased beyond what could be attributed to IP6 addition (i.e., 50×). In contrast, TP3, Ca-IP6, and HA treatments increased DOC by 8×, 6×, and 3×, respectively. The increase in DOC for Na-IP6 was attributed to the dispersion of soil organic matter. All amendments with the exception of Na-IP6 proved to be efficient in lowering TCLP leachability of COIs, even after correcting for COIs removed during the initial batch

  17. An integrated approach to safer plant production on metal contaminated soils using species selection and chemical immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Sik; Kim, Won-Il; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2016-09-01

    In order to examine the species specific accumulation of heavy metals in medicinal crops, seven different common medicinal plants were cultivated on a Cd (55mgkg(-1)) and Pb (1283mgkg(-1)) contaminated soil. Subsequently, the effect of various immobilizing agents, applied in isolation and in combination, on Cd and Pb uptake by two medicinal plant species was examined. Cadmium and Pb root concentrations in medicinal plants grown in the control soil varied between 0.5 and 2.6mgkg(-1) for Cd and 3.2 and 36.4mgkg(-1) for Pb. The highest accumulation occurred in Osterici Radix (Ostericum koreanum) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and the lowest in Yam (Dioscorea batatas). Application of immobilizing agents significantly reduced both Cd and Pb concentrations in all medicinal plants examined, where the most effective single immobilizing agent was lime fertilizer (LF). Application of combination treatments involving sorption agents such as compost together with lime further decreased Cd and Pb concentrations from 1.3 and 25.3mgkg(-1) to 0.2 and 4.3mgkg(-1), respectively, which was well below the corresponding WHO guidelines. Thus appropriate immobilizing agents in combination with species selection can be practically used for safer medicinal plant production. PMID:27213564

  18. Laccase immobilization and insolubilization: from fundamentals to applications for the elimination of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ba, Sidy; Arsenault, Alexandre; Hassani, Thanina; Jones, J Peter; Cabana, Hubert

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades many attempts have been made to use biocatalysts for the biotransformation of emerging contaminants in environmental matrices. Laccase, a multicopper oxidoreductase enzyme, has shown great potential in oxidizing a large number of phenolic and non-phenolic emerging contaminants. However, laccases and more broadly enzymes in their free form are biocatalysts whose applications in solution have many drawbacks rendering them currently unsuitable for large scale use. To circumvent these limitations, the enzyme can be immobilized onto carriers or entrapped within capsules; these two immobilization techniques have the disadvantage of generating a large mass of non-catalytic product. Insolubilization of the free enzymes as cross-linked enzymes (CLEAs) is found to yield a greater volume ratio of biocatalyst while improving the characteristics of the biocatalyst. Ultimately, novel techniques of enzymes insolubilization and stabilization are feasible with the combination of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (combi-CLEAs) and enzyme polymer engineered structures (EPESs) for the elimination of emerging micropollutants in wastewater. In this review, fundamental features of laccases are provided in order to elucidate their catalytic mechanism, followed by different chemical aspects of the immobilization and insolubilization techniques applicable to laccases. Finally, kinetic and reactor design effects for enzymes in relation with the potential applications of laccases as combi-CLEAs and EPESs for the biotransformation of micropollutants in wastewater treatment are discussed. PMID:23051065

  19. Comparative value of phosphate sources on the immobilization of lead, and leaching of lead and phosphorus in lead contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-01-15

    The mobility and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in soils can be mitigated by its immobilization using both soluble and insoluble phosphate (P) compounds. The effectiveness of insoluble P sources on Pb immobilization depends on their rate of dissolution which can be enhanced by phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB). In this study, the effect of soluble (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) and insoluble (rock phosphate in the presence and absence of PSB) P compounds on the immobilization of Pb, and leaching of Pb and P was examined using both naturally contaminated (SR soil: NH₄NO₃ extractable Pb: 28.7 mg/kg, pH: 5.88, organic matter: 0.7%) and Pb spiked (AH soil: NH(4)NO(3) extractable Pb: 42.7 mg/kg, pH: 5.23, organic matter: 10.9%) soils. Phosphate compounds were added at the rate of 200 mg P/kg and 800 mg P/kg for SR and AH soils, respectively. Soluble P treatment immobilized 80% and 57% of Pb in SR and AH soils, respectively. Insoluble rock phosphate immobilized 40% and 9% of Pb without PSB, and 60% and 17% with PSB in SR and AH soils, respectively. Lead leaching was the lowest when soils were amended with rock phosphate in the presence of PSB, which reduced Pb leaching by 36% for SR soil and 18% for AH soil compared to the control. The leaching of Pb increased when the soils were amended with soluble P because soluble P treatment increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of soil, thereby increasing Pb mobility. Soluble P treatment significantly increased P leaching and 9% of total added P was leached from low P retaining AH soil. The optimum level of P amendment is a critical issue when soluble P is used as a Pb immobilizing agent because of eutrophication resulting from excessive P leaching to surface and ground water. While the soluble P compound was effective in the immobilization of Pb, it resulted in P leaching which increased with increasing levels of P addition. However, rock phosphate amendment with PSB achieved the immobilization of Pb with

  20. Arsenic immobilization in the contaminated soil using poorly crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxy sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihui; Liu, Lin; Chai, Liyuan; Liao, Yingping; Yao, Wenbin; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    A low crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxy sulfate (FeOS) was used to immobilize arsenic (As) in soils in this study. The effects of FeOS amount, treatment time and soil moisture on As immobilization were investigated. The results showed that water-soluble and NaHCO3-extractable As were immobilized by 53.4-99.8 and 13.8-73.3% respectively, with 1-10% of FeOS addition. The highest immobilization of water-soluble (98.5%) and NaHCO3-extractable arsenic (47.2%) was achieved under condition of 4% of FeOS and 80% of soil moisture. Further, more amounts of FeOS addition resulted in less time requirement for As immobilization. Sequential chemical extraction experiment revealed that easily mobile arsenic phase was transferred to less mobile phase. The FeOS-bonded As may play a significant role in arsenic immobilization. Under leaching with simulated acid rain at 60 times pore volumes, accumulation amount of As release from untreated soil and soil amended with FeOS were 98.4 and 1.2 mg, respectively, which correspond to 7.69 and 0.09% of total As amounts in soil. The result showed that the low crystalline FeOS can be used as a suitable additive for arsenic immobilization in soils. PMID:25911284

  1. Selective removal of iron contaminations from zinc-chloride melts by cementation with zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Devilee, R.A.; Sandwijk, A. van; Reuter, M.A.

    1999-08-01

    An investigation into the cementation of iron chloride from a zinc-chloride melt at 400 C has been carried out with zinc powder. The variables studies include preparation of the chloride melt and the amount of zinc added. The effect of lead, copper, and cadmium on cementation of iron has also been investigated. According to the results, it is possible to reduce the iron concentration in zinc-chloride melts to 20 ppm with a small excess of zinc. The preparation of the melt proved to be very important. Insufficient purification of the melt with respect to oxides, hydroxides, and water resulted in a low reaction rate and high residual iron concentration.

  2. Selective removal of iron contaminations from zinc-chloride melts by cementation with zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devilee, R. A.; van Sandwijk, A.; Reuter, M. A.

    1999-08-01

    An investigation into the cementation of iron chloride from a zinc-chloride melt at 400 °C has been carried out with zinc powder. The variables studied include preparation of the chloride melt and the amount of zinc added. The effect of lead, copper, and cadmium on cementation of iron has also been investigated. According to the results, it is possible to reduce the iron concentration in zinc-chloride melts to 20 ppm with a small excess of zinc. The preparation of the melt proved to be very important. Insufficient purification of the melt with respect to oxides, hydroxides, and water resulted in a low reaction rate and high residual iron concentration.

  3. Ammonia gas transport and reactions in unsaturated sediments: implications for use as an amendment to immobilize inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Szecsody, J E; Truex, M J; Williams, M D; Liu, Y

    2015-05-30

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants (such as uranium) because it induces a high pore-water pH, causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application of this treatment, further knowledge of ammonia transport in porous media and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia treatment is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate inter-phase (gas/sediment/pore water) reactions, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions, such as flow rate, gas concentration, and water content. Uranium-contaminated sediment was treated with ammonia gas to demonstrate U immobilization. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases the pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas advection front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase upon exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate when the pH declines due to buffering. Up to 85% of the water-leachable U was immobilized by ammonia treatment. PMID:25723886

  4. Microfoams as Reactant Transport Media for In-Situ Immobilization of Radionuclide and Metallic Contaminants in Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, D. M.; Zhong, L.; Mattigod, S.; Jansik, D.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently addressing issues related to remediation of Cr, U and Tc contamination in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site in Washington State. One of the transformational technology alternatives being considered by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, is the use of Reactant Carrier Microfoams (RCM) for in-situ immobilization of contaminants. Foam injection technology for Enhance Oil Recovery (EOR) has well-established pedigree. Use of surfactant foams have also been explored for mobilizing DNAPL from sediments. However, the novel concept of using RCM for in situ immobilization contaminants in the deep vadose zone has not been explored, therefore, presents many daunting challenges for successful implementation. Scienists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), leveraged previous EMSP-funded studies on microfoams conducted at LBNL with the goal to formulate robust stable microfoams for delivering reductive and/or precipitating reactants to the deep subsurface. Following an extensive literature review, a protocol was deisnged to select appropriate surfactant blends, and tested three different methods of foam generation namely, Venturi foam generato , high-speed gas entrainment and porous plate method. The resulting RCMs were characterized as to their quality, stability, bubble size distribution, surface tension and viscosity. The foam stabilities as a function of reactant (polyphosphate and polysulfides) concentrations and entrained polyatomic gases were also examined. Based on these experiments, optimal carrier foam compositions were identified for each Hanford deep vadose zone Contaminant of Concern (COC) namely U(VI) and Cr(VI). Finally, MSE Technology Applications, Inc (MSE) in collaboration with PNNL, conducted a series of scale-up reactant carrier foam injection tests to evaluate the efficacy of this technology for potential deep vadose zone remediation.

  5. Engineered/designer biochar for contaminant removal/immobilization from soil and water: Potential and implication of biochar modification.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhang, Ming; Vithanage, Meththika; Mandal, Sanchita; Gao, Bin; Bolan, Nanthi S; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar has been suggested as a means of remediating contaminated soil and water. The practical applications of conventional biochar for contaminant immobilization and removal however need further improvements. Hence, recent attention has focused on modification of biochar with novel structures and surface properties in order to improve its remediation efficacy and environmental benefits. Engineered/designer biochars are commonly used terms to indicate application-oriented, outcome-based biochar modification or synthesis. In recent years, biochar modifications involving various methods such as, acid treatment, base treatment, amination, surfactant modification, impregnation of mineral sorbents, steam activation and magnetic modification have been widely studied. This review summarizes and evaluates biochar modification methods, corresponding mechanisms, and their benefits for contaminant management in soil and water. Applicability and performance of modification methods depend on the type of contaminants (i.e., inorganic/organic, anionic/cationic, hydrophilic/hydrophobic, polar/non-polar), environmental conditions, remediation goals, and land use purpose. In general, modification to produce engineered/designer biochar is likely to enhance the sorption capacity of biochar and its potential applications for environmental remediation. PMID:26820777

  6. Covalent immobilization of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase & horseradish peroxidase onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip & its application in serum triglyceride determination

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Narang, Jagriti; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Reusable biostrip consisting enzymes immobilized onto alkylamine glass beads affixed on plasticized PVC strip for determination of triglyceride (TG) suffers from high cost of beads and their detachments during washings for reuse, leading to loss of activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a cheaper and stable biostrip for investigation of TG levels in serum. Methods: A reusable enzyme-strip was prepared for TG determination by co-immobilizing lipase, glycerol kinase (GK), glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO) and peroxidase (HRP) directly onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip through glutaraldehyde coupling. The method was evaluated by studying its recovery, precision and reusability. Results: The enzyme-strip showed optimum activity at pH 7.0, 35°C and a linear relationship between its activity and triolein concentration in the range 0.1 to 15 mM. The strip was used for determination of serum TG. The detection limit of the method was 0.1 mM. Analytical recovery of added triolein was 96 per cent. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.2 and 3.7 per cent, respectively. A good correlation (r=0.99) was found between TG values by standard enzymic colrimetric method employing free enzymes and the present method. The strip lost 50 per cent of its initial activity after its 200 uses during the span of 100 days, when stored at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The nitrating acidic treatment of plasticized PVC strip led to glutaraldehyde coupling of four enzymes used for enzymic colourimetric determination of serum TG. The strip provided 200 reuses of enzymes with only 50 per cent loss of its initial activity. The method could be used for preparation of other enzyme strips also. PMID:24927348

  7. SOIL DESICCATION TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE MW; CHRONISTER GB; TRUEX MJ

    2012-01-30

    Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

  8. [Effects of Phosphate Rock and Decomposed Rice Straw Application on Lead Immobilization in a Contaminated Soil].

    PubMed

    Tang, Fan; Hu, Hong-qing; Su, Xiao-juan; Fu, Qing-ling; Zhu, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The soils treated with phosphate rock (PR) and oxalic acid activated phosphate rock (APR) mixed with decomposed rice straw were incubated in different moisture conditions for 60 days to study the effect on the basic property of the soil and on the speciation variation of Pb. The results showed that all these three types of immobilizing materials increased the pH, the Olsen-P, the exchangeable Ca and the soil cation exchange capacity, and APR showed more obvious effect; the pH and the exchangeable Ca of soil in the flooding treatment were higher than those in normal water treatment (70%), but the Olsen-P of soil in normal water treatment was a little bit more. These materials reduced exchangeable Ph fraction, and converted it into unavailable fraction. But the APR was better than raw PR in immobilizing lead, and the exchangeable Pb fraction was reduced by 40.3% and 24.2%, compared with the control, respectively, and the immobilization effect was positively correlated with the dosage. Decomposed rice straw could transform the exchangeable Ph fraction in soil into organic-bound fraction, while the flooding treatment changed it into the Fe-Mn oxide-bound and residue fractions. PMID:26592041

  9. STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    CHRONISTER GB

    2011-01-14

    Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper describes processes and technologies being developed to use in the ongoing effort to remediate the contamination in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site.

  10. Contaminant Immobilization and Nutrient Release by Biochar Soil Amendment: Roles of Natural Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as CuII, CdII, and NiII is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and r...

  11. Remediation of Heavy Metal(loid)s Contaminated Soils – To Mobilize or To Immobilize?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike organic contaminants, metal(loid)s do not undergo microbial or chemical degradation and persist for a long time after their introduction. Bioavailability of metal(loid)s plays a vital role in the remediation of contaminated soils. In this review, the remediation of heavy ...

  12. Biological treatment of TNT-contaminated soil. 2: Biologically induced immobilization of the contaminants and full-scale application

    SciTech Connect

    Lenke, H.; Daun, G.; Sieglen, U.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Warrelmann, J.; Walter, U.; Hund, K.

    1998-07-01

    Anaerobic treatment of originally contaminated soil from a former ammunition plant was carried out in a laboratory slurry reactor. While fermenting glucose to ethanol, acetate, and propionate, the anaerobic bacteria completely reduced the nitro groups of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and aminodinitrotoluenes, which led to a complete and irreversible binding of the reduced products to the soil. 2,4-dinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine were also reduced in the soil slurry and were no longer detectable after the anaerobic treatment. To mineralize the fermentation products, a subsequent aerobic treatment was necessary to complete the bioremediation process. This bioremediation process was tested in a technical scale at Hessisch Lichtenau-Hirschhagen, Germany. A sludge reactor (Terranox system) was filled with 18 m{sup 3} of contaminated soil (main contaminants were TNT, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and 10 m{sup 3} of water. The anaerobic stage was carried out by periodical feeding of sucrose. The sludge was subsequently dewatered and treated aerobically. Chemical analysis revealed an overall reduction of more than 99% of the contaminants. Ecotoxicological tests performed with various aquatic systems (luminescent bacteria, daphnids, algae) and terrestrial systems (respiring bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, cress plants, earth worms) showed that residual toxicity could not be detected after the anaerobic/aerobic treatment.

  13. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel).

    PubMed

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users' homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m³ of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m³. Mercury contamination of cream users' homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641

  14. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel)

    PubMed Central

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users’ homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m3 of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m3. Mercury contamination of cream users’ homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641

  15. Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-21

    Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency. PMID:25506817

  16. Semi-analytical Solution for the Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media with Mobile-Immobile Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Zhan, H.

    2015-12-01

    With the consideration of advection, dispersion, adsorption and first order decay in the fracture and rock matrix in a single fracture model, a new semi-analytical solution is derived using the Mobile-Immobile Method. It can be used to estimate the concentration at any location at any time precisely within the fracture and rock matrix. Most fractures found underground are filled with the conglomerate, sand, clay and other kinds of possible porous media. The existence of those filling ingredients leads to the isolated pore space within the fracture, which is also called immobile zone. Certain assumptions have be made: the diffusion is the only way that the contamination travels from the fracture to the matrix as the large permeability difference between them; the diffusive transport is dominant in the rock matrix while the advective-dispersive transport plays the major role in the fracture. Experimental data have been collected from literatures to compare the performance of this semi-analytical solution from the classical analytical solution. The comparison shows that the semi-analytical solution simulates it better when the mobile zone percentage is limited. Also, the effects of matrix diffusion, dispersivity and Darcy velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, first order mass transfer rate and mobile zone percentage on solute transport are demonstrated through the sensitivity analysis, concentration profiles and breakthrough curves. By modifying the boundary conditions and adding an advection term in the rock matrix governing equation, this model can be extended to a two-layer solute transport model.

  17. Comparison of heavy metal immobilization in contaminated soils amended with peat moss and peat moss-derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Seul-Ji; Lee, Myoung-Eun; Chung, Jae Woo

    2016-04-20

    There have been contradictory viewpoints whether soil amendments immobilize or mobilize heavy metals. Therefore, this study evaluated the mobility and bioavailability of Pb, Cu, and Cd in contaminated soil (1218 mg Pb per kg, 63.2 mg Cu per kg, 2.8 mg Cd per kg) amended with peat moss (0.22, 0.43, and 1.29% carbon ratio) and peat moss-derived biochar (0.38, 0.75, and 2.26% carbon ratio) at 0.5, 1, 3% levels. The more peat moss added, the stronger both mobility and bioavailability of Pb, Cu, and Cd would be. In contrast, the addition of peat moss-derived biochar significantly reduced both mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals through the coordination of metal electrons to C[double bond, length as m-dash]C (π-electron) bonds and increased pH. Maximum immobilization was observed in 3% peat moss-derived biochar treatment after 10 days of incubation, which was measured at 97.8%, 100%, and 77.2% for Pb, Cu, and Cd, respectively. Since peat moss and peat moss-derived biochar showed conflicting effectiveness in mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals, soil amendments should be carefully applied to soils for remediation purposes. PMID:27055368

  18. Effect of chloride contamination in MON-1 propellant on crack growth properties of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, C. M.; Toth, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of a high level of chloride content (800 ppm) in MON-1 propellant on the crack growth properties of seven materials was investigated. Sustained load tests were conducted at 49 C (120 F) temperature with thin gauge tensile specimens having a semi-elliptical surface flaw. Alloys included aluminum 1100, 3003, 5086 and 6061; corrosion resistant steel types A286 and 347; and titanium 6Al-4V. The configurations tested with precracked flaws exposed to MON-1 were: parent or base metal, center weld, and heat affected zone. It was concluded that this chloride level in MON-1 does not affect the stress corrosion, crack growth properties of these alloys after 1000 hour exposure duration under high stresses.

  19. Effect of faults on fluid flow and chloride contamination in a carbonate aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maslia, M.L.; Prowell, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A unified, multidiscipline hypothesis is proposed to explain the anomalous pattern by which chloride has been found in water of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia. Analyses of geophysical, hydraulic, water chemistry, and aquifer test data using the equivalent porous medium (EPM) approach are used to support the hypothesis and to improve further the understanding of the fracture-flow system in this area. Using the data presented herein we show that: (1) four major northeast-southwest trending faults, capable of affecting the flow system of the Upper Floridan aquifer, can be inferred from structural analysis of geophysical data and from regional fault patterns; (2) the proposed faults account for the anomalous northeastward elongation of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer; (3) the faults breach the nearly impermeable units that confine the Upper Floridan aquifer from below, allowing substantial quantities of water to leak vertically upward; as a result, aquifer transmissivity need not be excessively large (as previously reported) to sustain the heavy, long-term pumpage at Brunswick without developing a steep cone of depression in the potentiometric surface; (4) increased fracturing at the intersection of the faults enhances the development of conduits that allow the upward migration of high-chloride water in response to pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer; and (5) the anomalous movement of the chloride plume is almost entirely controlled by the faults. ?? 1990.

  20. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  1. In-situ immobilization of an anthropogenic arsenic contamination at a military site in Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holländer, Hartmut; Krüger, Timo; Stummeyer, Jens; Harazim, Bodo; Boochs, Peter-Wilhelm; Billib, Max

    2015-04-01

    The groundwater at the investigated military site in Northern Germany is contaminated with arsenic (As)-containing chemical warfare agents. The maximum total As-concentration (Astot) at the site was 9 mg/l. Astot is predominantly organically bound As (Asorg) and thus mainly occurs in the form of phenylized As compounds. Inorganic compounds (Asinorg: As3+ and As5+, each

  2. Corrosion of simulated bearing components of three bearing steels in the presence of chloride-contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion tests were run with AISI 52100, AISI M-50 and AMS 5794 under conditions that simulate the crevice corrosion found in aircraft ball and roller bearings rejected at overhaul for corrosion. Test specimens were fabricated that simulated the contacts of balls or rollers and the raceways. Corrosion cells were assembled in the presence of a lubricant contaminated with water and chloride ions. The cell was then thermally cycled between 339 K (150 F) and 276 K (37 F). The corrosion observed after 14 cycles was that of crevice and pitting corrosion typically found in aircraft bearings. AMS 5749 showed a very slight amount of corrosion. No appreciable differences were noted between AISI 52100 and AISI M-50, but both showed much greater corrosion than AMS 5749. The corrosion pits observed in AISI M-50 appeared to be fewer in number but generally deeper and larger than in AISI 52100.

  3. Sugarcane bagasse as support for immobilization of Bacillus pumilus HZ-2 and its use in bioremediation of mesotrione-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Chen, Shaohua; Ding, Jie; Xiao, Ying; Han, Haitao; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    The degrading microorganisms isolated from environment usually fail to degrade pollutants when used for bioremediation of contaminated soils; thus, additional treatments are needed to enhance biodegradation. In the present study, the potential of sugarcane bagasse as bacteria-immobilizing support was investigated in mesotrione biodegradation. A novel isolate Bacillus pumilus HZ-2 was applied in bacterial immobilization, which was capable of degrading over 95 % of mesotrione at initial concentrations ranging from 25 to 200 mg L(-1) within 4 days in flask-shaking tests. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that the bacterial cells were strongly absorbed and fully dispersed on bagasse surface after immobilization. Specially, 86.5 and 82.9 % of mesotrione was eliminated by bacteria immobilized on bagasse of 100 and 60 mesh, respectively, which indicated that this immobilization was able to maintain a high degrading activity of the bacteria. Analysis of the degradation products determined 2-amino-4-methylsulfonylbenzoic acid (AMBA) and 4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA) as the main metabolites in the biodegradation pathway of mesotrione. In the sterile soil, approximately 90 % of mesotrione was degraded after supplementing 5.0 % of molasses in bacteria-bagasse composite, which greatly enhanced microbial adaptability and growth in the soil environment. In the field tests, over 75 % of mesotrione in soil was degraded within 14 days. The immobilized preparation demonstrated that mesotrione could be degraded at a wide range of pH values (5.0-8.0) and temperatures (25-35 °C), especially at low concentrations of mesotrione (5 to 20 mg kg(-1)). These results showed that sugarcane bagasse might be a good candidate as bacteria-immobilizing support to enhance mesotrione degradation by Bacillus p. HZ-2 in contaminated soils. PMID:26337896

  4. Ammonia Gas Transport and Reactions in Unsaturated Sediments: Implications for Use as an Amendment to Immobilize Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has been studied and has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants such as uranium because it induces a high pore-water pH causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application, knowledge of ammonia transport and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate reactions among gas, sediment, and water, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Measured diffusion front movement was 0.05, 0.03, and 0.02 cm/hr. in sediments with 2.0%, 8.7%, and 13.0% water content, respectively. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase on exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate with declining pH. When uranium is present in the sediment and pore water, up to 85% of the water-leachable uranium was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  5. Olive mill waste biochar: a promising soil amendment for metal immobilization in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Hmid, Amine; Al Chami, Ziad; Sillen, Wouter; De Vocht, Alain; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of biochar from olive mill waste for in situ remediation of metal contaminated soils was evaluated. Biochar was mixed with metal contaminated soil originating from the vicinity of an old zinc smelter. Soil-biochar mixtures were equilibrated for 30 and 90 days. At these time points, Ca(NO3)2 exchangeable metals were determined, and effects of the biochar amendment on soil toxicity were investigated using plants, bacteria, and earthworms. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) growth, metal content, antioxidative enzymes activities, and soluble protein contents were determined. Furthermore, effects on soil microbial communities (activity, diversity, richness) were examined using Biolog ECOplates. After 120 days of soil-biochar equilibration, effects on weight and reproduction of Eisenia foetida were evaluated. With increasing biochar application rate and equilibration period, Ca(NO3)2 exchangeable metals decreased, and growth of bean plants improved; leaf metal contents reduced, the activities of antioxidative stress enzymes decreased, and soluble protein contents increased. Soil microbial activity, richness, and diversity were augmented. Earthworm mortality lowered, and their growth and reproduction showed increasing trends. PMID:25146122

  6. Estimated risks of water and saliva contamination by phthalate diffusion from plasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Corea-Téllez, Kira S; Bustamante-Montes, Patricia; García-Fábila, Magdalena; Hernández-Valero, María A; Vázquez-Moreno, Flavio

    2008-10-01

    Phthalates are additives commonly used to convert hard polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resins into flexible and workable plastics employed in the production of chewable rubber toys and other soft-plastic products. In theory, phthalates can diffuse in small quantities to the surface of a product, and from there they can enter the environment and the human body. The purpose of this study was to determine the diffusion of phthalates from plasticized PVC in water and artificial saliva; to determine the migration of di(2-ethylhexyl) (DEHP) phthalate in human saliva using gas chromatography; to compare the experimental values with theoretical values calculated using a model based on the principles of molecular diffusion in fluids; and to use the experimental values to estimate daily doses of DEHP received by Mexican children and infants using plastic and soft-plastic products (e.g., pacifiers, chewable toys, and bottles). Our findings indicated phthalate diffusion of 0.36 microg/cm2 per hour and 4.10 microg/cm2 per hour, respectively, in water and artificial saliva. The average value of phthalate diffusion in vivo was 6.04 microg/cm2 per hour. The daily oral phthalate exposure in Mexican infants and toddlers from oral use of rubber toys and soft-plastic products is 18.12 microg/kg. These daily doses are considerably lower than the maximum daily phthalate intake recommended by an international public health committee. PMID:18990931

  7. Mapping of road-salt-contaminated groundwater discharge and estimation of chloride load to a small stream in southern New Hampshire, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Trowbridge, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of chloride in excess of State of New Hampshire water-quality standards (230 mg/l) have been measured in watersheds adjacent to an interstate highway (I-93) in southern New Hampshire. A proposed widening plan for I-93 has raised concerns over further increases in chloride. As part of this effort, road-salt-contaminated groundwater discharge was mapped with terrain electrical conductivity (EC) electromagnetic (EM) methods in the fall of 2006 to identify potential sources of chloride during base-flow conditions to a small stream, Policy Brook. Three different EM meters were used to measure different depths below the streambed (ranging from 0 to 3 m). Results from the three meters showed similar patterns and identified several reaches where high EC groundwater may have been discharging. Based on the delineation of high (up to 350 mmhos/m) apparent terrain EC, seven-streambed piezometers were installed to sample shallow groundwater. Locations with high specific conductance in shallow groundwater (up to 2630 mmhos/m) generally matched locations with high streambed (shallow subsurface) terrain EC. A regression equation was used to convert the terrain EC of the streambed to an equivalent chloride concentration in shallow groundwater unique for this site. Utilizing the regression equation and estimates of onedimensional Darcian flow through the streambed, a maximum potential groundwater chloride load was estimated at 188 Mg of chloride per year. Changes in chloride concentration in stream water during streamflow recessions showed a linear response that indicates the dominant process affecting chloride is advective flow of chloride-enriched groundwater discharge. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Influence of pyrolytic and non-pyrolytic rice and castor straws on the immobilization of Pb and Cu in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Chhajro, Muhammad Afzal; Huang, Guoyong; Fu, Qingling; Zhu, Jun; Aziz, Omar; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-11-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has become a global environmental health concern. In the present study, European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) techniques were used to evaluate the Pb and Cu subsequent transformations, immobilizing impact of pyrolytic and non-pyrolytic rice and castor straws and their efficiency to reduce the metals mobility and leachability in the polluted soil. Obtained results highlight the potential of biochar over non-pyrolytic residues to enhance the immobilization of Pb and Cu in the soil. Castor leaves-derived biochar (CLB), castor stem-derived biochar (CSB), and rice straw-derived biochar (RSB) prominently decreased the mobility (acid-soluble fraction) of Pb 49.8%, 31.1%, and 31.9%, respectively, while Cu decreased 15.8%, 11.5%, and 12%, respectively, as compare to control. Sequential extraction showed that biochar treatments prominently modified the proportioning of Pb and Cu from acid soluble to a less bioavailable fraction and increased the geochemical stability in the polluted soil as compared to relative feedstocks as well as the controlled soil. Additionally, the soil pH increased markedly after the addition of biochar. Compared with control, the TCLP-extractable Pb and Cu were reduced to 29.2-41.4% and 5.7-22.8% from the soil respectively by the application of CLB. The immobilization and reduction in leachability of Pb and Cu were correlated with the soil pH. The biochar effect on the Pb immobilization was much better as compared to Cu in co-contaminated soil. Overall addition of CLB offered the best results and could be effective in both Pb and Cu immobilization thereby reducing their mobility and bioavailability in the co-contaminated soil. PMID:26934087

  9. Effects of chloride, sulfate and natural organic matter (NOM) on the accumulation and release of trace-level inorganic contaminants from corroding iron.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-09-15

    This study examined effects of varying levels of anions (chloride and sulfate) and natural organic matter (NOM) on iron release from and accumulation of inorganic contaminants in corrosion scales formed on iron coupons exposed to drinking water. Changes of concentrations of sulfate and chloride were observed to affect iron release and, in lesser extent, the retention of representative inorganic contaminants (vanadium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium); but, effects of NOM were more pronounced. DOC concentration of 1 mg/L caused iron release to increase, with average soluble and total iron concentrations being four and two times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of NOM. In the presence of NOM, the retention of inorganic contaminants by corrosion scales was reduced. This was especially prominent for lead, vanadium, chromium and copper whose retention by the scales decreased from >80% in the absence of NOM to <30% in its presence. Some of the contaminants, notably copper, chromium, zinc and nickel retained on the surface of iron coupons in the presence of DOC largely retained their mobility and were released readily when ambient water chemistry changed. Vanadium, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium retained by the scales were largely unsusceptible to changes of NOM and chloride levels. Modeling indicated that the observed effects were associated with the formation of metal-NOM complexes and effects of NOM on the sorption of the inorganic contaminants on solid phases that are typical for iron corrosion in drinking water. PMID:23863395

  10. Metal immobilization in hazardous contaminated minesoils after marble slurry waste application. A field assessment at the Tharsis mining district (Spain).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caliani, J C; Barba-Brioso, C

    2010-09-15

    A one-year field trial was conducted at the abandoned mine site of Tharsis (Spain) in order to assess the potential value of waste sludge generated during the processing of marble stone, as an additive for assisting natural remediation of heavily contaminated acid mine soils. An amendment of 22 cmol(c) of lime per kilogram of soil was applied to raise the pH level from 3.2 to above 6. The amendment application was effective in reducing concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, sulfate and potentially hazardous trace elements (mainly Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd) in the most labile metal pools (water-soluble and EDTA-extractable fractions). Geochemical equilibrium calculations indicate that sulfate complexes and free metal ions were the dominant aqueous species in the soil solution. Metal coprecipitation with nanocrystalline ferric oxyhydroxides may be the major chemical mechanism of amendment-induced immobilization. The alleviating effect of the soil amendment on the metal bioavailability and phytotoxicity showed promise for assisting natural revegetation of the mine land. PMID:20541314

  11. Summary report on geochemical barrier special study. [Geochemically modify tailings to immobilize contaminants with modifiers such as peat, limestone, and hydrated lime

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Long-term management of uranium mill tailings must provide assurance that soluble contaminants will not migrate beyond the Point of Compliance. Conventional management alternatives provide containment through the use of physical barriers which are designed to prevent migration of water through the tailings pile. An alternative is to geochemically modify the tailings to immobilize the contaminants. This investigation examined three potential geochemical modifiers to determine their ability to immobilize inorganic groundwater contaminants found in uranium mill tailings. These modifiers were hydrated lime (Ca(OH)[sub 2]), limestone (CaCO[sub 3]), and a sphaegnum peat moss. This investigation focused on both the geochemical interactions between the tailings and the modifiers, and the effects the modifiers had on the physical strength of the tailings. The geochemical investigations began with characterization of the tailings by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This was followed by batch leaching experiments in which various concentrations of each modifier were added to tailings in shaker flasks and allowed to come to equilibrium. Finally, column experiments were conducted to simulate flow through a tailings pile. The results show that all of the modifiers were at least moderately effective at immobilizing most of the groundwater contaminants of concern at uranium mill tailings sites. Hydrated lime was able to achieve 90 percent concentration reduction of arsenic, cadmium, selenium, uranium, and sulfate when added at a two percent concentration. Limestone was somewhat less effective and peat removed greater than 90 percent of arsenic, lead, uranium, and sulfate at a one percent concentration. The column tests showed that kinetic and/or mass transfer limitations are important and that sufficient time must be allowed for the immobilization reactions to occur.

  12. Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of contaminant immobilization by activated carbon amended to sediments in the field.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, Magdalena I; Kupryianchyk, Darya; Koelmans, Albert A; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-12-15

    Addition of activated carbons (AC) to polluted sediments and soils is an attractive remediation technique aiming at reducing pore water concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). In this study, we present (pseudo-)equilibrium as well as kinetic parameters for sorption of a series of PAHs and PCBs to powdered and granular activated carbons (AC) after three different sediment treatments: sediment mixed with powdered AC (PAC), sediment mixed with granular AC (GAC), and addition of GAC followed by 2 d mixing and subsequent removal ('sediment stripping'). Remediation efficiency was assessed by quantifying fluxes of PAHs towards SPME passive samplers inserted in the sediment top layer, which showed that the efficiency decreased in the order of PAC > GAC stripping > GAC addition. Sorption was very strong to PAC, with Log KAC (L/kg) values up to 10.5. Log KAC values for GAC ranged from 6.3-7.1 and 4.8-6.2 for PAHs and PCBs, respectively. Log KAC values for GAC in the stripped sediment were 7.4-8.6 and 5.8-7.7 for PAH and PCB. Apparent first order adsorption rate constants for GAC (kGAC) in the stripping scenario were calculated with a first-order kinetic model and ranged from 1.6 × 10(-2) (PHE) to 1.7 × 10(-5) d(-1) (InP). Sorption affinity parameters did not change within 9 months post treatment, confirming the longer term effectiveness of AC in field applications for PAC and GAC. PMID:25262554

  14. In situ vitrification: Immobilizing radioactive contaminants in place by melting soils into man-made rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.K.; Spalding, B.P. ); Tixier, J.S. )

    1992-01-01

    From 1951 to 1966 over 1 [times] 10[sup 6] Ci of Cs-137, Sr-90, and other radioisotopes in liquid wastes were disposed of in shallow seepage pits at ORNL. In situ methods to stabilize these sites are being investigated because of radiation exposure risks to personnel during excavation and removal activities. A field test at ORNL of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) was performed to evaluate its ability to resistance heating through graphite electrodes to melt contaminated soils in place. The resulting small lava lake cools and solidifies to a rock consisting of glassy and crystalline material. Volatile products released from the surface of the melt are collected and treated. The Sr-90 was incorporated into mineral phases and residual glass that form upon solidification. The Cs-137, however, is incompatible with the mineral structures and is concentrated into the small amount of residual glass that is trapped in the interstices between mineral grains. Leach tests were performed on samples of sludge, sludge + soil, crushed ISV rock, crushed ISV rock + soil, and low surface area fragments of ISV rock. First, sequential extractions with 0.1 N CaCl[sub 2] were used. Then, sequential treatments with 0.1 N HCl were used. Approximately 10% of the Sr-90 was released from the sludge, with or without soil, after CaCl[sub 2] was applied. Subsequent treatment with HCl released essentially all the Sr-90. The Sr-90 in the crushed ISV rock was resistant to cation exchange, with only 0.4% leached after treatment with CaCl[sub 2]. Treatment with HCl released only 4% of the total Sr-90 present in the crushed ISV rock. The low surface area fragments, more representative of expected field conditions, released 10 [times] less of the Sr-90 than the crushed ISV rock samples. The Cs-137 was not significantly leached from any of the samples of sludge or ISV rock.

  15. A description of chloride cell and kidney tubule alterations in the flatfish Solea senegalensis exposed to moderately contaminated sediments from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Caeiro, Sandra; Diniz, Mário S.; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; DelValls, T. Ángel; Costa, M. Helena

    2010-11-01

    The effects of sediment-bound contaminants on kidney and gill chloride cells were surveyed in juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to fresh sediments collected from three distinct sites of the Sado Estuary (Portugal) in a 28-day laboratorial assay. Sediments were analyzed for metallic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorines as well as for total organic matter, redox potential and fine fraction. The potential for causing adverse biological effects of each surveyed sediment was assessed by comparison of contaminant levels to available guidelines for coastal sediments, namely the Threshold Effects Level ( TEL) and the Probable Effects Level ( PEL). The Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient indices ( SQGQ) were calculated to compare the overall contamination levels of the three stations. A qualitative approach was employed to analyze the histo/cytopathological traits in gill chloride cells and body kidney of fish exposed to each tested sediment for 0, 14 and 28 days. The results showed that sediment contamination can be considered low to moderate and that the least contaminated sediment (from a reference site, with the lowest SQGQ) caused lesser changes in the surveyed organs. However, the most contaminated sediment (by both metallic and organic xenobiotics, with highest SQGQ) was neither responsible for the highest mortality nor for the most pronounced lesions. Exposure to the sediment presenting an intermediate SQGQ, essentially contaminated by organic compounds, caused the highest mortality (48%) and the most severe damage to kidneys, up to full renal necrosis. Chloride cell alterations were similar in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments and consisted of a pronounced cellular hypertrophy, likely involving fluid retention and loss of mitochondria. It can be concluded that sediment contamination considered to be low or moderate may be responsible for severe injury to cells and parenchyma involved in the maintenance of osmotic

  16. Subcritical water treatment of explosive and heavy metals co-contaminated soil: Removal of the explosive, and immobilization and risk assessment of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jung, Ho-Young; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Co-contamination of explosives and heavy metals (HMs) in soil, particularly army shooting range soil, has received increasing environmental concern due to toxicity and risks to ecological systems. In this study, a subcritical water (SCW) extraction process was used to remediate the explosives-plus-HMs-co-contaminated soil. A quantitative evaluation of explosives in the treated soil, compared with untreated soil, was applied to assess explosive removal. The immobilization of HMs was assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, and by investigating the migration of HMs fractions. The environmental risk of HMs in the soil residue was assessed according to the risk assessment code (RAC) and ecological risk indices (Er and RI). The results indicated that SCW treatment could eliminate the explosives, >99%, during the remediation, while the HM was effectively immobilized. The effect of water temperature on reducing the explosives and the risk of HMs in soil was observed. A marked increase in the non-bioavailable concentration of each HM was observed, and the leaching rate of HMs was decreased by 70-97% after SCW treatment at 250 °C, showing the effective immobilization of HMs. According to the RAC or RI, each tested HM showed no or low risk to the environment after treatment. PMID:26340419

  17. Removal of water contaminants by nanoscale zero-valent iron immobilized in PAN-based oxidized membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Xiang; Ma, Bomou; Qin, Aiwen; He, Chunju

    2014-12-01

    The functionalizing nanoporous polyacrylonitrile-based oxidized membrane (PAN-OM) firmly immobilized with highly reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) are successfully prepared via an innovative in situ synthesis method. Due to the formation of ladder structure, the PAN-OM present excellent thermal and chemical stabilities as a new carrier for the in-situ growth of NZVI via firm chelation and reduction action, respectively, which prevent the aggregation and release of NZVI. The developed NZVI-immobilized membrane present effective decolorizing efficiency to both anionic methyl blue and cationic methylene blue with a pseudo-first-order decay and degrading efficiency to trichloroethylene (TCE). The regeneration and stability results show that NZVI-immobilized membrane system can be regenerated without obvious performance reduction, which remain the reactivity after half a year storage period. These results suggest that PAN-based oxidized membrane immobilized with NZVI exhibit significant potential for environmental applications.

  18. Preferential removal and immobilization of stable and radioactive cesium in contaminated fly ash with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Simion, Cristian

    2014-08-30

    In this work, the capability of nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension in removing and/or immobilizing stable ((133)Cs) and radioactive cesium species ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in contaminated fly ash was investigated. After a first methanol and second water washing yielded only 45% of (133)Cs removal. While, after a first methanol washing, the second solvent with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension yielded simultaneous enhanced removal and immobilization about 99% of (133)Cs. SEM-EDS analysis revealed that the mass percent of detectable (133)Cs on the fly ash surface recorded a 100% decrease. When real radioactive cesium contaminated fly ash (containing an initial 14,040Bqkg(-1)(134)Cs and (137)Cs cumulated concentration) obtained from burning wastes from Fukushima were reduced to 3583Bqkg(-1) after treatment with nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension. Elution test conducted on the treated fly ash gave 100BqL(-1) total (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentrations in eluted solution. Furthermore, both ash content and eluted solution concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were much lower than the Japanese Ministry of the Environment regulatory limit of 8000Bqkg(-1) and 150BqL(-1) respectively. The results of this study suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO methanol suspension is a highly potential amendment for the remediation of radioactive cesium-contaminated fly ash. PMID:25038573

  19. Role of Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 as Bioindicators and Immobilizers of Chromium in a Contaminated Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Millach, Laia; Solé, Antoni; Esteve, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of the two phototrophic microorganisms, both isolated from Ebro Delta microbial mats, to be used as bioindicators and immobilizers of chromium. The results obtained indicated that (i) the Minimum Metal Concentration (MMC) significantly affecting Chlorophyll a intensity in Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 was 0.25 µM and 0.75 µM, respectively, these values being lower than those established by current legislation, and (ii) Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 was able to immobilize chromium externally in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and intracellularly in polyphosphate (PP) inclusions. Additionally, this microorganism maintained high viability, including at 500 µM. Based on these results, we postulate that Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 are good chromium-indicators of cytotoxicity and, further, that Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 plays an important role in immobilizing this metal in a contaminated natural environment. PMID:26167488

  20. Metal immobilization and soil amendment efficiency at a contaminated sediment landfill site: a field study focusing on plants, springtails, and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bert, Valérie; Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Caron, Lucie; Biaz, Asmaa; Dazy, Marc; Masfaraud, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Metal immobilization may contribute to the environmental management strategy of dredged sediment landfill sites contaminated by metals. In a field experiment, amendment effects and efficiency were investigated, focusing on plants, springtails and bacteria colonisation, metal extractability and sediment ecotoxicity. Conversely to hydroxylapatite (HA, 3% DW), the addition of Thomas Basic Slag (TBS, 5% DW) to a 5-yr deposited sediment contaminated with Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb and As resulted in a decrease in the 0.01 M Ca(NO(3))(2)-extractable concentrations of Cd and Zn. Shoot Cd and Zn concentration in Calamagrostis epigejos, the dominant plant species, also decreased in the presence of TBS. The addition of TBS and HA reduced sediment ecotoxicity and improved the growth of the total bacterial population. Hydroxylapatite improved plant species richness and diversity and decreased antioxidant enzymes in C. Epigejos and Urtica dïoica. Collembolan communities did not differ in abundance and diversity between the different treatments. PMID:22647548

  1. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a key component of remediation at many chloroethene-contaminated sites. In some instances, limited accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products may suggest that natural attenuation is not adequate for site remediation. This conclusion is justified when evidence for parent compound (tetrachloroethene, PCE, or trichloroethene, TCE) degradation is lacking. For many chloroethene-contaminated shallow aquifer systems, however, non-conservative losses of the parent compounds are clear but the mass balance between parent compound attenuation and accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products is incomplete. Incomplete mass balance indicates a failure to account for important contaminant attenuation mechanisms, and is consistent with contaminant degradation to non-diagnostic mineralization products. An ongoing technical debate over the potential for mineralization of dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to CO2 in the complete absence of diatomic oxygen has largely obscured the importance of microbial DCE/VC mineralization at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below the current field standard (DO < 0.1-0.5 milligrams per liter) for nominally anoxic conditions. This study demonstrates that oxygen-based microbial mineralization of DCE and VC can be substantial under field conditions that are frequently characterized as "anoxic." Because mischaracterization of operant contaminant biodegradation processes can lead to expensive and ineffective remedial actions, a modified framework for assessing the potential importance of oxygen during chloroethene biodegradation was developed.

  2. Immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. DG17 onto sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Qi; Hua, Fei; Zhao, Yi Cun; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. DG17, capable of degrading crude oil, was immobilized in sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate for biodegradation of crude oil contaminated soil. In this work, proportion of independent variables, the laboratory immobilization parameters, the micromorphology and internal structure of the immobilized granule, as well as the crude oil biodegradation by sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate immobilized cells and sodium alginate–attapulgite immobilized cells were studied to build the optimal immobilization carrier and granule-forming method. The results showed that the optimal concentrations of sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate and calcium chloride were 2.5%–3.5%, 0.5%–1%, 3%–7% and 2%–4%, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal bath temperature, embedding cell amount, reaction time and multiplication time were 50–60 °C, 2%, 18 h and 48 h, respectively. Moreover, biodegradation was enhanced by immobilized cells with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 33.56% ± 3.84% to 56.82% ± 3.26% after 20 days. The SEM results indicated that adding calcium carbonate was helpful to form internal honeycomb-like pores in the immobilized granules. PMID:26019567

  3. THE EFFICACY OF OXIDATIVE COUPLING FOR PROMOTING IN-SITU IMMOBILIZATION OF HYDROXYLATED AROMATICS IN CONTAMINATED SOIL AND SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydroxylated aromatic compounds constitute an important class of commonly found subsurface organic contaminants. They have been classified as priority pollutants because of their multiple toxic health effects at very low concentrations. These compounds can be produced naturally o...

  4. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yusuke; Harada, Masayuki; Asanuma, Noriko; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2015-09-01

    In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around -0.8 to -1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at -1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  5. Immobilization of Pb, Cd, and Zn in a contaminated soil using eggshell and banana stem amendments: metal leachability and a sequential extraction study.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mehrnaz; Mohamad, Sharifah; Yusoff, Ismail; Shahul Hamid, Fauziah

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-metal-contaminated soil is one of the major environmental pollution issues all over the world. In this study, two low-cost amendments, inorganic eggshell and organic banana stem, were applied to slightly alkaline soil for the purpose of in situ immobilization of Pb, Cd, and Zn. The artificially metal-contaminated soil was treated with 5% eggshell or 10% banana stem. To simulate the rainfall conditions, a metal leaching experiment for a period of 12 weeks was designed, and the total concentrations of the metals in the leachates were determined every 2 weeks. The results from the metal leaching analysis revealed that eggshell amendment generally reduced the concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Zn in the leachates, whereas banana stem amendment was effective only on the reduction of Cd concentration in the leachates. A sequential extraction analysis was carried out at the end of the experiment to find out the speciation of the heavy metals in the amended soils. Eggshell amendment notably decreased mobility of Pb, Cd, and Zn in the soil by transforming their readily available forms to less accessible fractions. Banana stem amendment also reduced exchangeable form of Cd and increased its residual form in the soil. PMID:25060308

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Derivative Strains To Minimize E. coli Protein Contamination after Purification by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B.; Benner, Jack S.; Samuelson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The “NiCo” strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein. PMID:21602383

  7. A capillary liquid chromatography method for benzalkonium chloride determination as a component or contaminant in mixtures of biocides.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Blanco, M C; Argente-García, A; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-01-29

    A method for quantifying benzalkonium chloride (BAK), an alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium compound, in several biocides formulations is proposed. A tertiary amine like N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (TA) and a straight-chain alkyl ammonium compound like trimethyl-tetradecyl ammonium chloride (TMTDAC), have been employed as trade surfactants besides BAK. Two capillary analytical columns with different polarities are tested: inertsil CN-3 capillary column (150mm×0.5mm i.d., 3μm particle diameter) and a non endcapped Zorbax C18 capillary column (35mm×0.5mm i.d., 5μm particle diameter). This latter column provided the best separation of the BAK homologues in less than 12min using acetonitrile:acetate buffer (50mM, pH 5) 85:15 at 20μLmin(-1). The proposed method combines on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME) coupled to capillary liquid chromatography (CapLC) and UV diode array detection. Matrix effect was present when TA were in excess to BAK. If TMTDAC is the co-biocide, matrix effect is always present. A decreasing of analytical response mainly for C12-BAK homologue was found using both chromatographic columns. The charged amount of mixture in the system was the most important parameter for obtaining reliable results. 1mL was the on line processed sample volume optimum for concentrations lower than 35μgmL(-1) of total surfactants. LODs were 0.03μgmL(-1) and 0.006μgmL(-1) for C12-BAK and C14-BAK, respectively. This method is also of use to evaluate the unwanted presence of BAK in biocide formulations due to industrial processes. PMID:26755418

  8. Remediation and phytotoxicity of decabromodiphenyl ether contaminated soil by zero valent iron nanoparticles immobilized in mesoporous silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingying; Cheng, Wen; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Zhanqiang

    2016-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a new class of environmental pollutants which easily accumulated in the soil, especially at e-waste sites. However, knowledge about their phytotoxicity after degradation is not well understood. Nano zero valent iron (nZVI) immobilized in mesoporous silica microspheres covered with FeOOH (SiO2@FeOOH@Fe) synthesized in this study was utilized to remove decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) from soil. Results revealed that the removal efficiency of BDE209 can be achieved 78% within 120 h using a dosage of 0.165 g g(-1) and a pH of 5.42. Furthermore, the removal efficiency enhanced with increasing soil moisture content and the decreasing of initial BDE209 concentration. Phytotoxicity assays (biomass and germination rate, shoots and roots elongation of Chinese cabbage) were carried out to provide a preliminary risk assessment of treated soil for the application of SiO2@FeOOH@Fe. PMID:26560640

  9. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  10. Use of dissolved chloride concentrations in tributary streams to support geospatial estimates of Cl contamination potential near Skiatook Lake, northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.A.; Abbott, M.M.; Zielinski, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Releases of NaCl-rich (>100 000 mg/L) water that is co-produced from petroleum wells can adversely affect the quality of ground and surface waters. To evaluate produced water impacts on lakes, rivers and streams, an assessment of the contamination potential must be attainable using reliable and cost-effective methods. This study examines the feasibility of using geographic information system (GIS) analysis to assess the contamination potential of Cl to Skiatook Lake in the Hominy Creek drainage basin in northeastern Oklahoma. GIS-based predictions of affects of Cl within individual subdrainages are supported by measurements of Cl concentration and discharge in 19 tributaries to Skiatook Lake. Dissolved Cl concentrations measured in October, 2004 provide a snapshot of conditions assumed to be reasonably representative of typical inputs to the lake. Chloride concentrations ranged from 5.8 to 2300 mg/L and compare to a value of 34 mg/L in the lake. At the time of sampling, Hominy Creek provided 63% of the surface water entering the lake and 80% of the Cl load. The Cl load from the other tributaries is relatively small (150 mg/L) were generally in subdrainages with greater well density (>15 wells/km2), relatively large numbers of petroleum wells in close proximity (>2 proximity wells/stream km), and relatively small discharge (<0.005 m3/s). GIS calculations of subdrainage areas can be used to estimate the expected discharge of the tributary for each subdrainage. GIS-based assessment of Cl contamination potential at Skiatook Lake and at other lakes surrounded by oil fields can proceed even when direct measurements of Cl or discharge in tributary streams may be limited or absent.

  11. Subsurface injection of dissolved ferric chloride to form a chemical barrier: Laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.; Morris, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A chemical barrier is a permeable zone of reactive materials emplaced in the subsurface to remove ground-water contaminants while allowing clean ground water to pass through. Because dissolved ferric chloride hydrolyzes to amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide when it contacts calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), it may be viable to emplace a zone of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (an absorbent for U, Mo, and other inorganic contaminants) into calcite-bearing geologic units by injecting ferric chloride through wells. For a chemical barrier to be successful, it must remain permeable and must be immobile. This investigation monitored chemical compositions, hydraulic conductivity, and iron mobility in laboratory columns and in a two-dimensional tank to determine the viability of injecting ferric chloride to form an amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide chemical barrier. The authors introduced a ferric chloride solution (1,345 mg/1[0.024 m] Fe) to calcite-bearing alluvial gravel to form a chemical barrier of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide, followed by solutions contaminated with U and Mo. The simulated chemical barriers decreased U and Mo concentrations to less than 0.05 mg/l (2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m) and 0.01 (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m), respectively; however, the breakthrough front is spread out with concentrations increasing to more than regulatory guideline values sooner than predicted. The hydraulic conductivity of calcite-bearing alluvial gravel decreased substantially during ferric chloride introduction because of the formation of carbon dioxide but increased to within factors of 1 to 5 of the original value as synthetic ground water flowed through the system. Amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide that formed in these experiments remained immobile at flow rates exceeding those typical of ground water. These laboratory results, in conjunction with site-specific characterization data, can be used to design chemical barriers emplaced by injection of ferric chloride.

  12. The effect of compost treatments and a plant cover with Agrostis tenuis on the immobilization/mobilization of trace elements in a mine-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, P; de Varennes, A; Cunha-Queda, A C

    2014-01-01

    A semi-field experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC) and green waste-derived compost (GWC) as immobilizing agents in aided-phytostabilization of a highly acidic soil contaminated with trace elements, with and without a plant cover of Agrostis tenuis. The compost application ratio was 50 Mg ha(-1), and GWC amended soil was additionally limed and supplemented with mineral fertilizers. Both treatments had an equivalent capacity to raise soil organic matter and pH, without a significant increase in soil salinity and in pseudo-total As, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, allowing the establishment of a plant cover. Effective bioavailable Cu and Zn decreased as a consequence of both compost treatments, while effective bioavailable As increased by more than twice but remained as a small fraction of its pseudo-total content. Amended soil had higher soil enzymatic activities, especially in the presence of plants. Accumulation factors for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn by A. tenuis were low, and their concentrations in the plant were lower than the maximum tolerable levels for cattle. As a consequence, the use of A. tenuis can be recommended for assisted phytostabilization of this type of mine soil, in combination with one of the compost treatments evaluated. PMID:24912206

  13. Cd immobilization in a contaminated rice paddy by inorganic stabilizers of calcium hydroxide and silicon slag and by organic stabilizer of biochar.

    PubMed

    Bian, Rongjun; Li, Lianqing; Bao, Dandan; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Kun; Pan, Genxing

    2016-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted in a Cd-contaminated rice paddy field to evaluate the effect of inorganic and organic metal stabilizers on Cd mobility and rice uptake. A dose of inorganic stabilizer of calcium hydroxide (CH), silicon slag (SS), and wheat straw biochar (BC) was amended respectively to topsoil before rice transplanting. Rice production was managed with the same water regime and fertilization practices consistently between treatments including a control without amendment. Samples of topsoil and rice plant were collected at rice harvest to analyze the Cd mobility and uptake by rice. Without affecting rice grain yield, the stabilizers significantly decreased CaCl2-extractable Cd in a range of 44 to 75 % compared to the control, corresponding to soil pH changes under the different treatments. Accordingly, Cd concentrations both in rice tissue and in rice grain were very significantly decreased under these treatments. The decrease in rice Cd uptake was correlated to the decrease in extractable Cd, which was again correlated to soil pH change under the different treatments, indicating a prevalent role of liming effect by the amendments. While applied at a large amount in a single year, organic stabilizer of BC decreased Cd extractability by up to 43 % and Cd rice uptake by up to 61 %, being the most effective on Cd immobilization. However, the long-term effect on soil health and potential tradeoff effects with different stabilizers deserve further field monitoring studies. PMID:26865487

  14. Immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in contaminated soil amended with γ-polyglutamic acid, phosphate rock, and γ-polyglutamic acid-activated phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Zhijian; Su, Xiaojuan; Fu, Qingling; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Qiaoyun; Violante, Antonio; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), phosphate rock (PR), and γ-PGA-activated PR (γ-PGA-PR) on the immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in a contaminated soil. The proportion of residual Pb (Re-Pb) in soil was reduced by the addition of γ-PGA but was increased by the application of PR and γ-PGA-PR. The addition of γ-PGA in soil improved the accumulation of Pb in pak choi and decreased the growth of pak choi, suggesting the intensification of Pb phytotoxicity to pak choi. However, opposite effects of PR and γ-PGA-PR on the phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi in soil were observed. Moreover, in the examined range, γ-PGA-PR activated by a higher amount of γ-PGA resulted in a greater proportion of Re-Pb in soil and weaker phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi. The predominance of γ-PGA-PR in relieving the phytotoxicity of Pb was ascribed mainly to the increase of soil pH and available phosphate after the amendment, which could facilitate the precipitation of Pb in soil and provide pak choi with more phosphorus nutrient. PMID:25196962

  15. Solvent-free synthesis and application of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] composite for dual separation and immobilization of stable and radioactive cesium in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Simion, Cristian; Lee, Byeong Kyu

    2015-10-30

    This study assessed the synthesis and application of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO-based composite material for use as a separation and immobilizing treatment of dry soil contaminated by stable ((133)Cs) and radioactive cesium species ((134)Cs and (137)Cs). After grinding with nano-Fe/CaO, nano-Fe/Ca/CaO, and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4], approximately 31, 25, and 22 wt% of magnetic fraction soil was separated. Their resultant (133)Cs immobilization values were about 78, 81, and 100%, respectively. When real radioactive cesium contaminated soil obtained from Fukushima was treated with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4], approximately 27.3 wt% of magnetic and 72.75% of non-magnetic soil fractions were separated. The highest amount of entrapped (134)Cs and (137)Cs was found in the lowest weight of the magnetically separated soil fraction (i.e., 80% in 27.3% of treated soil). Results show that (134)Cs and (137)Cs either in the magnetic or non-magnetic soil fractions was 100% immobilized. The morphology and mineral phases of the nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] treated soil were characterized using SEM-EDS, EPMA, and XRD analysis. The EPMA and XRD patterns indicate that the main fraction of enclosed/bound materials on treated soil included Ca/PO4 associated crystalline complexes. These results suggest that simple grinding treatment with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO/[PO4] under dry conditions might be an extremely efficient separation and immobilization method for radioactive cesium contaminated soil. PMID:25942697

  16. Microorganism immobilization

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  17. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  18. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  20. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  1. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  2. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  3. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  4. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Implications of Fe/Pd Bimetallic Nanoparticles Immobilized on Adsorptive Activated Carbon for the Remediation of Groundwater and Sediment Contaminated with PCBs

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to respond to the current limitations and challenges in remediating groundwater and sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), we have recently developed a new strategy, integration of the physical adsorption of PCBs with their electrochemical dechlori...

  7. 40 CFR 141.50 - Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... contaminants. (a) MCLGs are zero for the following contaminants: (1) Benzene (2) Vinyl chloride (3) Carbon...) Toxaphene (19) Benzo pyrene (20) Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) (21) Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate...

  8. 40 CFR 141.50 - Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contaminants. (a) MCLGs are zero for the following contaminants: (1) Benzene (2) Vinyl chloride (3) Carbon...) Toxaphene (19) Benzo pyrene (20) Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) (21) Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate...

  9. 40 CFR 141.50 - Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contaminants. (a) MCLGs are zero for the following contaminants: (1) Benzene (2) Vinyl chloride (3) Carbon...) Toxaphene (19) Benzo pyrene (20) Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) (21) Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate...

  10. 40 CFR 141.50 - Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contaminants. (a) MCLGs are zero for the following contaminants: (1) Benzene (2) Vinyl chloride (3) Carbon...) Toxaphene (19) Benzo pyrene (20) Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) (21) Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate...

  11. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. he purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. ydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]was reacted with aqueous Pb, resinexchang...

  12. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  13. Cerium chloride heptahydrate (CeCl3 · 7H2O) induces muscle paralysis in the generalist herbivore, Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), fed contaminated plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Allison, Jane E; Boutin, Céline; Carpenter, David; Ellis, Deanna M; Parsons, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Of increasing economic importance are the rare earth elements (REEs). Pollution from mining and processing activity is expected to rise with industrial demand. Plants are known to accumulate REEs, although levels vary with species and soil content. However, the effect on wildlife of ingesting REE contaminated vegetation is not well understood. Here we examined the effect of consuming vegetation with elevated levels of cerium on the generalist grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius). Adults excreted a substantial portion of ingested contamination. However, after only four-days of feeding, accumulation in the body occurred at all doses and paralysis of appendages resulted at the highest doses. Short-term toxicity studies may underestimate the impact of ingesting REE contamination. Metals tend to be low in toxicity; however, their persistence in the environment may be better represented by exposure over longer portions of the life cycle. PMID:25462312

  14. A method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Candido

    1997-08-11

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

  15. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, Candido

    1999-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700.degree. C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

  16. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, C.

    1999-02-23

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite. 3 figs.

  17. Denitrification using a membrane-immobilized biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    McCleaf, P.R. ); Schroeder, E.D. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    Immobilized bacterial cell technology was applied, on a bench scale, to the selective removal of nitrate from contaminated water, together with the segregation of denitrifying bacteria and the carbon energy source from the treated water. The two-chambered reactor, with a microporous membrane for bacterial cell immobilization, performed at an average denitrification rate of 5,800 mg nitrate-nitrogen (NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  18. Immobilization of amyloglucosidase using two forms of polyurethane polymer.

    PubMed

    Storey, K B; Duncan, J A; Chakrabarti, A C

    1990-03-01

    Amyloglucosidase was covalently immobilized using two hydrophilic prepolymers: Hypol FHP 2002 (creates foams) and Hypol FHP 8190H (creates gels). The foamable prepolymer was superior as a support for enzyme immobilization. The percent activity immobilized in the polyurethane foams was 25 +/- 1.5%. Large substrates (greater than 200,000 daltons in mol wt) were hydrolyzed as effectively as smaller ones by the immobilized enzyme. The Km value of the foam-immobilized enzyme increased from 0.76 mg/mL (free) to 0.86 mg/mL (immobilized), whereas the Vmax dropped from 90.9 (free) to 12.4 nmol glucose/min/mL (immobilized). The long-term (2 mo) storage stability of amyloglucosidase was enhanced by immobilization in foams (70% activity retained; free enzyme only retained 50%). Immobilization also improved the enzyme stability to various denaturing agents (sodium chloride, urea, and ethanol). The immobilized enzyme exhibited increased stability compared to the free enzyme at high temperatures (95 degrees C). Both glycogen and starch could be utilized by the immobilized enzyme, indicating that this technique could prove useful for starch hydrolysis. PMID:2112366

  19. Aerobic vinyl chloride metabolism in Mycobacterium aurum L1

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmans, S.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1992-04-01

    Mycobacterium aurum L1, capable of growth on vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source, was previously isolated from soil contaminated with vinyl chloride. The initial step in vinyl chloride metabolism in strain L1 is catalyzed by alkene monooxygenase, transforming vinyl chloride into the reactive epoxide chlorooxirane. The enzyme responsible for chlorooxirane degradation appeared to be very unstable and thus hampered the characterization of the second step in vinyl chloride metabolism. Dichloroethenes are also oxidized by vinyl chloride-grown cells of strain L1, but they are not utilized as growth substrates. Three additional bacterial strains which utilize vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source were isolated from environments with no known vinyl chloride contamination. The three new isolates were similar to strain L1 and were also identified as Mycobacterium aurum.

  20. Performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters for removal of hydrogen sulfide from a contaminated air steam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqing; Fan, Zhidong; Ma, Lixia; Yin, Juan; Luo, Man; Cai, Wangfeng

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major malodorous compound emitted from wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters (BTFs) spacked with combinations of bamboo charcoal and ceramsite in different ratios was investigated in terms of H2S removal. Extensive tests were performed to determine the removal characteristics, pressure drops, metabolic products, and removal kinetics of the BTFs. The BTFs were operated in continuous mode at low loading rates varying from 0.59 to 5.00 g H2S m−3 h−1 with an empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 25 s. The removal efficiency (RE) for each BTF was >99% in the steady-state period, and high standards were met for the exhaust gas. It was found that a multilayer BTF had a slight advantage over a perfectly mixed BTF for the removal of H2S. Furthermore, an impressive amount >97% of the H2S was eliminated by 10% of packing materials near the inlet of the BTF. The modified Michaelis–Menten equation was adopted to describe the characteristics of the BTF, and Ks and Vm values for the BTF with pure bamboo charcoal packing material were 3.68 ppmv and 4.26 g H2S m−3 h−1, respectively. Both bamboo charcoal and ceramsite demonstrated good performance as packing materials in BTFs for the removal of H2S, and the results of this study could serve as a guide for further design and operation of industrial-scale systems. PMID:25313280

  1. Performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters for removal of hydrogen sulfide from a contaminated air steam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqing; Fan, Zhidong; Ma, Lixia; Yin, Juan; Luo, Man; Cai, Wangfeng

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major malodorous compound emitted from wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the performance of three pilot-scale immobilized-cell biotrickling filters (BTFs) spacked with combinations of bamboo charcoal and ceramsite in different ratios was investigated in terms of H2S removal. Extensive tests were performed to determine the removal characteristics, pressure drops, metabolic products, and removal kinetics of the BTFs. The BTFs were operated in continuous mode at low loading rates varying from 0.59 to 5.00 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) with an empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 25 s. The removal efficiency (RE) for each BTF was >99% in the steady-state period, and high standards were met for the exhaust gas. It was found that a multilayer BTF had a slight advantage over a perfectly mixed BTF for the removal of H2S. Furthermore, an impressive amount >97% of the H2S was eliminated by 10% of packing materials near the inlet of the BTF. The modified Michaelis-Menten equation was adopted to describe the characteristics of the BTF, and K s and V m values for the BTF with pure bamboo charcoal packing material were 3.68 ppmv and 4.26 g H2S m(-3) h(-1), respectively. Both bamboo charcoal and ceramsite demonstrated good performance as packing materials in BTFs for the removal of H2S, and the results of this study could serve as a guide for further design and operation of industrial-scale systems. PMID:25313280

  2. Antimony (Sb) and lead (Pb) in contaminated shooting range soils: Sb and Pb mobility and immobilization by iron based sorbents, a field study.

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Grasshorn Gebhardt, Karl-Alexander; Amstaetter, Katja; Bue, Helga Lassen; Herzel, Hannes; Mariussen, Espen; Rossebø Almås, Åsgeir; Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D; Rasmussen, Grete; Mulder, Jan

    2016-04-15

    Small-arm shooting ranges often receive a significant input of lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and antimony (Sb) from ammunition. The goal of the present study was to investigate the mobility, distribution and speciation of Pb and Sb pollution under field conditions in both untreated and sorbent-amended shooting range soil. Elevated Sb (19-349μgL(-1)) and Pb (7-1495μgPbL(-1)) concentrations in the porewater of untreated soil over the four-year test period indicated a long-term Sb and Pb source to the adjacent environment in the absence of remedial measures. Mixing ferric oxyhydroxide powder (CFH-12) (2%) together with limestone (1%) into the soil resulted in an average decrease of Sb and Pb porewater concentrations of 66% and 97%, respectively. A similar reduction was achieved by adding 2% zerovalent iron (Fe°) to the soil. The remediation effect was stable over the four-year experimental period indicating no remobilization. Water- and 1M NH4NO3-extractable levels of Sb and Pb in field soil samples indicated significant immobilization by both treatments (89-90% for Sb and 89-99% for Pb). Results from sequential extraction analysis indicate fixation of Sb and Pb in less accessible fractions like amorphous iron oxides or even more crystalline and residual mineral phases, respectively. This work shows that amendment with Fe-based sorbents can be an effective method to reduce the mobility of metals both in cationic and anionic form in polluted shooting range soil. PMID:26799225

  3. Bio-immobilization of U(VI) and Tc(VII) from nitric acid-contaminated groundwater in intermediate-scale physical models of an in situ bio-barrier.

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsen, M. M.; Peacock, A. D.; Smithgal, A. N.; White, D. C.; Spain, A. M.; Sanchez-Rosario, Y.; Krumholz, L. R.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; McKinley, J.; Heald, S. M.; Bogle, M. A.; Watson, D. B.; Istok, J. D.; U. S. Army Corps of Engineers; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. of Oklahoma; PNNL; ORNL; Oregon State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    Metal and hydrogen ion acidity and extreme nitrate concentrations at Department of Energy legacy waste sites pose challenges for successful in situ U and Tc bioimmobilization. In this study, we investigated a potential in situ biobarrier configuration designed to neutralize pH and remove nitrate and radionuclides from nitric acid-, U-, and Tc-contaminated groundwater for over 21 months. Ethanol additions to groundwater flowing through native sediment and crushed limestone effectively increased pH (from 4.7 to 6.9), promoted removal of 116 mM nitrate, increased sediment biomass, and immobilized 94% of total U. Increased groundwater pH and significant U removal was also observed in a control column that received no added ethanol. Sequential extraction and XANES analyses showed U in this sediment to be solid-associated U(VI), and EXAFS analysis results were consistent with uranyl orthophosphate (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O{sub (s)}, which may control U solubility in this system. Ratios of respiratory ubiquinones to menaquinones and copies of dissimilatory nitrite reductase genes, nirS and nirK, were at least 1 order of magnitude greater in the ethanol-stimulated system compared to the control, indicating that ethanol addition promoted growth of a largely denitrifying microbial community. Sediment 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that Betaproteobacteria were dominant (89%) near the source of influent acidic groundwater, whereas members of Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased along the flow path as pH increased and nitrate concentrations decreased, indicating spatial shifts in community composition as a function of pH and nitrate concentrations. Results of this study support the utility of biobarriers for treating acidic radionuclide- and nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

  4. Understanding potential futures of riverine chloride impairment in New England USA due to climate change, groundwater storage, and human activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, S.; Thorn, A.; Wollheim, W. M.; Wake, C. P.; Mineau, M.

    2015-12-01

    Road salt impairment may threaten future potability of urban water resources and stress aquatic life throughout snowy temperate watersheds. We contrast scenarios to project chloride flux, storage, and impairment throughout the Merrimack R. watershed, NH/MA, USA using the river-network scale Non-point Anthropogenic Chloride Loading (NACL) model, built within the Framework for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System (FrAMES). NACL simulates five chloride sources and represents long-term subsurface storage as mobile-immobile exchange at the catchment (grid-cell) scale. Tested scenarios that contrast major drivers include: road salt application rates (current recommendations versus recent inventories); groundwater storage uncertainty (low versus high storage effect); development (dispersed versus urban infilling) and future climate (low [B1] versus high [A1FI] carbon emission scenarios). Simulations that reduce road salt application rates to recommended levels significantly reduce threshold-dependent impaired river length from 20 to 5% within a few years, driven by flushing from headwater catchments. Concentrations downstream, however, decrease modestly and lag the change in loading because of chloride released slowly from groundwater storage. The scenarios suggest best practices and urban infill can mitigate legacy chloride contamination over a few decades. Conversely, dispersed development increases the near-term extent of threshold impaired river length, but downstream concentrations rise slowly as chloride concentrations increase in previously pristine groundwater pools. A warming climate plays a small role until late in the century when reduced snowfall from high emissions scenarios requires less road salting. Reducing road salt use is necessary to mitigate chloride impairment, but expectations and monitoring programs should acknowledge that achieving reasonable water quality goals will take years.

  5. A high-efficient batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles onto glass beads for photocatalytic degradation of phenazopyridine as a pharmaceutical contaminant: artificial neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shargh, Mahdie; Behnajady, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, removal efficiency of phenazopyridine (PhP) as a model pharmaceutical contaminant was investigated in a batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles on glass beads. Influence of various operational parameters such as irradiation time, initial concentration of PhP, volume of solution, volumetric flow rate, pH and power of light source was investigated. Results indicated that removal percentage increases with the rise of irradiation time, volumetric flow rate and power of light source but decreases with the rise of initial concentration of PhP and volume of solution. Highest removal percentage was obtained in the natural pH of PhP solution (pH = 5.9). Results of mineralization studies also showed a decreasing trend of total organic carbon (TOC) and producing mineralization products such as NO3(-), NO2(-) and NH4(+). Modeling of the process using artificial neural network showed that the most effective parameters in the degradation of PhP were volume of solution and power of light source. The packed bed photoreactor with TiO2-P25 nanoparticles coated onto glass beads in consecutive repeats have the proper ability for PhP degradation. Therefore, this system can be a promising alternative for the removal of recalcitrant organic pollutants such as PhP from aqueous solutions. PMID:27232418

  6. Laccase immobilized on magnetic carriers for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotková, Jana; Šuláková, Romana; Korecká, Lucie; Zdražilová, Pavla; Jandová, Miroslava; Lenfeld, Jiří; Horák, Daniel; Bílková, Zuzana

    2009-05-01

    Laccase catalyzing the oxidation of p-diphenols has been applied in many industrial and biotechnology areas. Immobilized form of laccase has overcome the problem with contamination of the final product. Nevertheless sensitive enzymes immobilized to the matrix can be inactivated by the environmental conditions. The aim of this research was to prepare carrier with improved activity and responsible stability even under extreme reaction conditions. Laccase immobilized through carbohydrate moieties on magnetic hydrazide bead cellulose with a final activity of 0.63 I.U./1 ml of settled carrier confirmed that carriers with oriented immobilized enzyme might be useful in routine biocatalytic applications.

  7. Fiber-optic chloride sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cosentino, P.; Grossman, B.; Shieh, C.; Doi, S.; Xi, H.; Erbland, P.

    1995-08-01

    Chloride in the form of salt water is a major contaminant of ground water, percolating through landfill liners and causing corrosion of steel. Four fiber-optic sensors capable of detecting chloride concentrations were developed. The most promising sensor detects chloride concentrations from 100 {micro}g/mL to greater than 3,000 {micro}g/mL. This sensor works when the chloride changes a reddish-brown silver chromate strip to white silver chloride. The color change causes the intensity of light propagating through the fiber to increase. The increase is monitored, and a calibration curve depicting light intensity versus chloride concentration results. The most promising sensor was multiplexed to determine the diffusion coefficients of chloride in a saturated sand column. The development, operation, and sensitivity of the sensors are described. Upon further development the sensor could be placed in the soil or in reinforced concrete for insitu monitoring of chloride. The sensor`s advantages over electronic sensors include immunity to corrosion and electromagnetic interference, and the ability for multiplexing sensors onto a single fiber.

  8. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  9. Horseradish peroxidase and chitosan: activation, immobilization and comparative results.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2013-09-01

    Recently, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on activated wool and we envisioned that the use of chitosan would be interesting instead of wool owing to its simple chemical structure, abundant nature and biodegradability. In this work, HRP was immobilized on chitosan crosslinked with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize immobilized HRP. The number of ten reuses of immobilized HRP has been detected. The pH was shifted from 5.5 for soluble HRP to 5.0 for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP had an optimum temperature of 30 °C, which was shifted to 35 °C for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP were thermal stable up to 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The apparent kinetic constant values (K(m)) of soluble HRP and chitosan-HRP were 35 mM and 40 mM for guaiacol and 2.73 mM and 5.7 mM for H2O2, respectively. Immobilization of HRP partially protected them from metal ions compared to soluble enzyme. The chitosan-HRP was remarkably more stable against urea, Triton X-100 and organic solvents. Chitosan-HRP exhibited large number of reuses and more resistance to harmful compounds compared with wool-HRP. On the basis of results obtained in the present study, chitosan-HRP could be employed in bioremediation application. PMID:23769933

  10. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  11. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  12. Metal Immobilization Influence On Bioavailability And Remediation For Urban Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immobilization of soil contaminants, such as lead, via phosphate amendments to alter the chemical environment of metals into highly insoluble forms is a well established process. The literature has documented numerous examples of highly contaminated Pb sites at shooting ranges, b...

  13. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER CHLORIDE, METHYLENE CHLORIDE,AND 6-AMINONICOTINAMIDE TO EMBRYOS OF THE GRASS SHRIMPPALAEMONETES PUGIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, cop...

  14. Application of ferric sludge to immobilize leachable mercury in soils and concrete.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J Ming; Walsh, T; Lam, T; Boulter, D

    2003-11-01

    A Hg-contaminated site in B.C. Province, Canada was caused by the previous operation of Hg-cell in chlor-alkali process for over 25 years. The soils and groundwater at the site are highly contaminated with mercury. An analysis of groundwater at the site has shown that most of the mercury is bonded with humic and fulvic acids (HFA) in colloidal form. The Hg-HFA colloids can be completely removed from the groundwater with ferric chloride treatment under optimized process conditions to form ferric sludge (FS), which is rendered non-leachable by standard TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) test. The effluent discharged from a clarifier has achieved mercury levels of < 0.5 microkg l(-1). The studies of mercury adsorption characteristics of FS show it has low mercury leachability by TCLP, and great mercury adsorption capability. This feature is the basis for the application of FS to immobilization of leachable Hg-contaminants in solid wastes. Full-scale stabilization tests of Hg-contaminated soil have been carried out, and the time-based stability of the treated soil has been monitored by TCLP over a period of 60 days. All the results have shown a small variation in TCLP mercury levels within a range of 10-40 microg l(-1). Based on these results and with the approval of the B.C. Ministry of the Environment, 1850 tons of Hg-contaminated soils and 260 tons of Hg-contaminated concrete fines have been treated, stabilized with FS, and disposed in a non-hazardous waste disposal site. PMID:14733397

  15. Application of accelerated carbonation on MSW combustion APC residues for metal immobilization and CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Cappai, G; Cara, S; Muntoni, A; Piredda, M

    2012-03-15

    The present study focuses on the application of an aqueous phase accelerated carbonation treatment on air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste combustion, aimed at assessing its influence on the environmental behaviour of the residue under concern, as well as the potential of the process in terms of sequestration of the CO2. APC residues are considered hazardous waste and must be treated before final disposal in order to achieve the immobilization/mobilization of critical contaminants such as heavy metals as well as mobilization of soluble salts. The treatment applied proved to be effective in reducing the mobility of Pb, Zn, Cr, Cu and Mo, the optimum final pH for the carbonated APC residues being in a range of 10-10.5, whilst a mobilization effect was noticed for Sb and no effect was assessed for chlorides. The effect of carbonation treatment on the contaminant release was further evaluated by means of a sequential extraction procedure, indicating that the distribution of contaminants on water soluble, exchangeable and carbonate fraction was modified after treatment. The CO2 sequestration potential assessed for the APC residues showed that the carbonation technology could be a technically viable option in order to reduce emissions from WtE plants. PMID:21601357

  16. Protecting group-free immobilization of glycans for affinity chromatography using glycosylsulfonohydrazide donors.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Armada, Daniel; Santos, Jobette T; Richards, Michele R; Cairo, Christopher W

    2015-11-19

    A variety of applications in glycobiology exploit affinity chromatography through the immobilization of glycans to a solid support. Although several strategies are known, they may provide certain advantages or disadvantages in how the sugar is attached to the affinity matrix. Additionally, the products of some methods may be hard to characterize chemically due to non-specific reactions. The lack of specificity in standard immobilization reactions makes affinity chromatography with expensive oligosaccharides challenging. As a result, methods for specific and efficient immobilization of oligosaccharides remain of interest. Herein, we present a method for the immobilization of saccharides using N'-glycosylsulfonohydrazide (GSH) carbohydrate donors. We have compared GSH immobilization to known strategies, including the use of divinyl sulfone (DVS) and cyanuric chloride (CC), for the generation of affinity matrices. We compared immobilization methods by determining their immobilization efficiency, based on a comparison of the mass of immobilized carbohydrate and the concentration of active binding sites (determined using lectins). Our results indicate that immobilization using GSH donors can provide comparable amounts of carbohydrate epitopes on solid support while consuming almost half of the material required for DVS immobilization. The lectin binding capacity observed for these two methods suggests that GSH immobilization is more efficient. We propose that this method of oligosaccharide immobilization will be an important tool for glycobiologists working with precious glycan samples purified from biological sources. PMID:26454791

  17. Evaluating the potential of immobilized bacterial consortium for black liquor biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Rashmi; Uniyal, Shivani; Rai, J P N

    2015-05-01

    Two indigenous bacterial strains, Bacillus megaterium ETLB-1 (accession no. KC767548) and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida ETLB-3 (accession no. KC767547), isolated from soil contaminated with paper mill effluent, were co-immobilized on corncob cubes to investigate their biodegradation potential against black liquor (BL). Results exhibit conspicuous reduction in color and lignin of BL upto 913.46 Co-Pt and 531.45 mg l(-1), respectively. Reduction in chlorophenols up to 12 mg l(-1) was recorded with highest release of chloride ions, i.e., 1290 mg l(-1). Maximum enzyme activity for lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (LAC) was recorded as 5.06, 8.13, and 8.23 U ml(-1), respectively, during the treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed successful immobilization of bacterial strains in porous structures of biomaterial. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) showed formation of certain low molecular weight metabolites such as 4-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde, ferulic acid, and t-cinnamic acid and removal of majority of the compounds (such as teratogenic phthalate derivatives) during the period of treatment. Results demonstrated that the indigenous bacterial consortium possesses excellent decolorization and lignin degradation capability which enables its commercial utilization in effluents treatment system. PMID:25433900

  18. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-02-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

  19. Melaminium chloride hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Janczak, J; Perpétuo, G J

    2001-09-01

    The crystals of a new melaminium salt, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium chloride hemihydrate, C(3)H(7)N(6)(+).Cl(-).0.5H(2)O, are built up from single-protonated melaminium residues, chloride anions and water molecules. The protonated melaminium cations lie on a twofold axis, while the chloride anions and water molecule lie on the m plane. The melaminium residues are interconnected by N-H...N hydrogen bonds, forming chains parallel to the (001) plane. The chains of melaminium residues form a three-dimensional network through hydrogen-bond interactions with chloride anions and water molecules. PMID:11588391

  20. Vinyl chloride loss during laboratory holding time

    SciTech Connect

    Soule, R.G.; Jones, D.B.A.; Symonik, D.M.; Gerbec, B.A.; Turgeon, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Because vinyl chloride is a potent human carcinogen, it`s important that analytical results from groundwater samples accurately reflect levels of exposure. This study investigated the current allowable sample holding time of 14 days to determine if vinyl chloride is lost from samples during this time. In addition to lab spiked samples, groundwater was collected from a well known to contain vinyl chloride. A statistically significant (a = 0.05) decrease in vinyl chloride concentrations was observed over the 14-day holding time. The most significant loss was seen for those samples held the maximum length of time (14 days). No differences in degradation pattern were noted between analytical detectors used (PID versus Hall) or sample type (lab versus field). There also was a loss of vinyl chloride observed during the sampling and handling process. Analytical variability at low concentrations and the establishment of health-based guidelines near the analytical detection limit require that multiple samples be collected from a single location when highly accurate results are required. These findings have implications for the accurate generation of public health exposure assessments and the implementation of health-based recommendations at sites with vinyl chloride groundwater contamination.

  1. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  2. Preparation and activity of bubbling-immobilized cellobiase within chitosan-alginate composite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Su, Rong-Xin; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Ming-Jia; He, Zhi-Min

    2010-01-01

    Cellobiase can hydrolyze cellobiose into glucose; it plays a key role in the process of cellulose hydrolysis by reducing the product inhibition. To reuse the enzyme and improve the economic value of cellulosic ethanol, cellobiase was immobilized using sodium alginate and chitosan as carriers by the bubbling method. The immobilization conditions were optimized as follows: enzyme loading of 100 U cellobiase/g carrier, 30 min immobilization, 3.5 wt% sodium alginate, 0.25 wt% chitosan, and 2 wt% calcium chloride. Compared to free enzyme, the immobilized cellobiase had a decreased apparent K(m) and the maximum activity at a lower pH, indicating its higher acidic and thermal stability. The immobilized cellobiase was further tested in the hydrolysis of cellobiose and various cellulosic substrates (microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, and ammonia-pretreated corn cobs). Together with cellulases, the immobilized cellobiase converted the cellulosic substrates into glucose with the rate and extent similar to the free enzyme. PMID:20024795

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Puck Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-26

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize excess plutonium and store the plutonium in a high level waste radiation field. To accomplish these goals, the PIP will process various forms of plutonium into plutonium oxide, mix the oxide powder with ceramic precursors, press the mixture into pucks, sinter the pucks into a ceramic puck, load the pucks into metal cans, seal the cans, load the cans into magazines, and load the magazines into a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) canister. These canisters will be sent to the DWPF, an existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facility, where molten high level waste glass will be poured into the canisters encapsulating the ceramic pucks. Due to the plutonium radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the early design stages and the facility will begin operation in 2005. This paper will discuss the Plutonium Immobilization puck handling conceptual design and the puck handling equipment testing.

  4. Immobilization induced hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Torres, Edgar Alonso; González-Cantú, Arnulfo; Hinojosa-Garza, Gabriela; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immobilization hypercalcemia is an uncommon diagnosis associated with increased bone remodeling disorders and conditions associated with limited movement such as medullar lesions or vascular events. Diagnosis requires an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes of hypercalcemia. This is a report of a woman with prolonged immobilization who presented with severe hypercalcemia. This case contributes to identification of severe hypercalcemia as a result of immobility and the description of bone metabolism during this state. PMID:27252745

  5. Immobilized Cell and Enzyme Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnill, P.

    1980-08-01

    The development of immobilized enzyme and cell technology is summarized. Industrial processes for sucrose inversion, penicillin deacylation and glucose isomerization using immobilized enzymes are described. An alternative process for glucose isomerization using immobilized cells, and some other industrial applications of immobilized cells are indicated. Recent developments in immobilized enzyme and cell technology are assessed and the relative merits of the different biochemical catalyst forms are considered.

  6. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  7. Influence of acetylcholinesterase immobilization on the photoluminescence properties of mesoporous silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2014-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase immobilized p-type porous silicon surface was prepared by covalent attachment. The immobilization procedure was based on support surface chemical oxidation, silanization, surface activation with cyanuric chloride and finally covalent attachment of free enzyme on the cyanuric chloride activated porous silicon surface. Different pore diameter of porous silicon samples were prepared by electrochemical etching in HF based electrolyte solution and appropriate sample was selected suitable for enzyme immobilization with maximum trapping ability. The surface modification was studied through field emission scanning electron microscope, EDS, FT-IR analysis, and photoluminescence measurement by utilizing the fluctuation in the photoluminescence of virgin and enzyme immobilized porous silicon surface. Porous silicon showed strong photoluminescence with maximum emission at 643 nm and immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on porous silicon surface cause considerable increment on the photoluminescence of porous silicon material while acetylcholinesterase free counterpart did not exhibit any fluorescence in the range of 635-670 nm. The activities of the free and immobilized enzymes were evaluated by spectrophotometric method by using neostigmine methylsulfate as standard enzyme inhibitor. The immobilized enzyme exhibited considerable response toward neostigmine methylsulfate in a dose dependent manner comparable with that of its free counterpart alongside enhanced stability, easy separation from the reaction media and significant saving of enzyme. It was believed that immobilized enzyme can be exploited in organic and biomolecule synthesis possessing technical and economical prestige over free enzyme and prominence of easy separation from the reaction mixture.

  8. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  9. Catalytic properties of maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus immobilized onto poly(urethane urea) microparticles.

    PubMed

    Straksys, Antanas; Kochane, Tatjana; Budriene, Saulute

    2016-11-15

    The immobilization of maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BsMa) onto novel porous poly(urethane urea) (PUU) microparticles synthesized from poly(vinyl alcohol) and isophorone diisocyanate was performed by covalent attachment to free isocyanate groups from PUU microparticles, or by physical adsorption of enzyme onto the surface of the carrier. The influence of structure, surface area and porosity of microparticles on the catalytic properties of immobilized BsMa was evaluated. The highest efficiency of immobilization of BsMa was found to be 72%. Optimal activity of immobilized BsMa was found to have increased by 10°C compared with the native enzyme. Influence of concentration of sodium chloride on activity of immobilized BsMa was evaluated. High storage and thermal stability and reusability for starch hydrolysis of immobilized enzyme were obtained. Immobilized BsMa has a great potential for biotechnology. PMID:27283635

  10. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  11. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  12. Immobilized tubular fermentor

    SciTech Connect

    Gencer, M.A.; Mutharasan, R.

    1983-09-01

    In this article, a mathematical model describing the kinetics of ethanol fermentation in a whole cell immobilized tubular fermentor is proposed. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with the proposed model. A procedure for treating the fermentation data for determining the ethanol inhibition constants k1 and k2 is described. The ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell fermentor is compared with those of traditional fermentors. Experimental studies indicate that with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL Y132) culture, ethanol productivity in the range 21.2-83.7 g ethanol/L/h at ethanol concentration of 76-60 g/L can be achieved. This is comparable to or higher than those reported in the literature for yeast. The product yield factor of 0.5 g ethanol/g glucose was obtained. The immobilized cell fermentor does not show washout at dilution rates of 7/h and shows good stability over a 650-h operating period.

  13. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  14. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  15. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  16. Adsorption of Sr by immobilized microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Wastewaters from numerous industrial and laboratory operations can contain toxic or undesirable components such as metal ions, which must be removed before discharge to surface waters. Adsorption processes that have high removal efficiencies are attractive methods for removing such contaminants. For economic operations, it is desirable to have an adsorbent that is selective for the metal contaminant of interest, has high capacity for the contaminant, has rapid adsorption kinetics, can be economically produced, and can be regenerated to a concentrated waste product or decomposed to a low-volume waste. Selected microorganisms are potentially useful adsorbents for these applications because they can be inexpensive, have high selectivities, and have high capacities for adsorption of many heavy metals, which are often problems in a variety of industries. A laboratory-scale packed column containing microbial cells immobilized within a gelatin matrix has been prepared, and its application to removal of Sr from a simulated wastewater is described. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  18. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    stronger for the mesocosms with the higher Fe(II) load. Analysis via XANES showed that a fraction (up to ~1/3) of uranium was reduced to U(IV), for mesocosms operated under low iron loading, indicating that iron cycling in the rhizosphere also results in uranium reduction and immobilization. For mesocosms operating under the higher iron loading, the fraction of uranium immobilized as U(IV) was much lower, indicating that uranium co-precipitation with iron might have been the dominant immobilization process. In parallel to these mesocosm experiments, dialysis samplers have been deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory near a creek with uranium contamination, to determine dissolved species, including Fe(II) and U(VI) in these wetland soils and their seasonal variability. The results show that there is a strong seasonal variability in dissolved iron and uranium, indicating a strong immobilization during the growing season, which is consistent with the mesocosm experimental results that the rhizosphere iron and uranium cycling are closely linked.

  19. Removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol by immobilized Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q T; Wong, Y S; Tam, N F Y

    2011-11-01

    The removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol (NP) by alginate-immobilized cells of Chlorella vulgaris were compared with their respective free cultures. The effects of four cell densities of 10(4) per algal bead were investigated, as were the four algal bead concentrations, with regard to the removal and biodegradation of NP. Although immobilization significantly decreased the growth rate and NP's biodegradation efficiency of C. vulgaris, NP removal over a short period was enhanced. The NP removal mechanism by immobilized cells was similar to that by free cells, including adsorption onto alginate matrix and algal cells, absorption within cells and cellular biodegradation. The optimal cell density and bead concentration for the removal and biodegradation of NP was 50-100×10(4) cells algal bead(-1) and 2-4 beads ml(-1) of wastewater, respectively. These results demonstrated that immobilized C. vulgaris cells under optimal biomass and photoautotrophic conditions are effective in removing NP from contaminated water. PMID:21944284

  20. Developmental toxicity of copper chloride, methylene chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide to embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1999-05-01

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.

  1. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO[sub 2]-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  2. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization. PMID:23436023

  3. Experiences with combined corrosion effects on stainless steel due to chlorides and H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.T.; Wortham, G.M.; Lawson, D.M.

    1999-07-01

    Chloride contamination of amines in contact with stainless steel creates a well known potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A far less recognized hazard of chloride contamination, when sulfides are present, is drastically accelerated generalized corrosion. Chloride induced corrosion can be avoided with an inlet gas reverse flow coalescer and an inlet slug catcher to knock out brine bearing produced water. If the amine is already contaminated with chlorides, steps can be taken to minimize this type of corrosion such as better amine filtration, amine reclamation and using stainless steel with higher nickel contents.

  4. A new technology for the treatment of mercury contaminated water and soils.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J M; Walsh, T; Lam, T

    2003-07-01

    A new technology has been developed for the treatment of contaminated water and soils with lignin derivatives. It has been demonstrated that this technology can be used in the process of removal of high levels of mercury from water, and in the immobilization of leachable mercury in contaminated soils. Lignin derivatives contain an abundance of oxygen-containing functional groups such as phenolic, carboxyl, sulfonyl, alcoholic and enolic structures, which will form lignin-metal macromolecular complexes with high stability through ionic and coordinate covalent bonding. This feature is the basis for the application of lignin derivatives in the removal of metal contaminants from water and in the immobilization of leachable metal in soils or sediments. Tests have confirmed that lignin derivatives are capable of combining with a variety of metal ions including chromium, copper, lead, zinc, mercury, nickel and aluminum. In the new water treatment process, lignin derivatives are dissolved in mercury contaminated water to complex mercury in an exceptionally stable form of a lignin-mercury colloid. The lignin-mercury colloid is then coagulated through the addition of a flocculating agent such as ferric chloride. Under optimized conditions, a dean effluent is produced with a residual mercury level of less than 1 microg l(-1), together with a ferric sludge that is not leachable by TCLP, EPA Method 1311. In the new soil stabilization process, a new solid adsorbent of ferric-lignin is blended with mercury contaminated soil. This solid adsorbent can stabilize the soil by complexing with mercury and, thereby, greatly reduce the TCLP mercury of soil. PMID:12916841

  5. Traditionally used medicinal plants against uncomplicated urinary tract infections: Are unusual, flavan-4-ol- and derhamnosylmaysin derivatives responsible for the antiadhesive activity of extracts obtained from stigmata of Zea mays L. against uropathogenic E. coli and Benzethonium chloride as frequent contaminant faking potential antibacterial activities?

    PubMed

    Rafsanjany, Nasli; Sendker, Jandirk; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Petereit, Frank; Scharf, Birte; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The dried stigmata from Zea mays L. are used traditionally for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. A recent screening has indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of the herbal material inhibits the adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to T24 bladder cells. For verification of these data EtOH-water (1:1) extracts from 4 different batches of Maydis stigmata were investigated. Within an in vitro adhesion assay (UPEC strain 2980 and human T24 bladder cells) a dose-dependent antiadhesive activity against UPEC was verified (IC50 1040μg/mL). Bioassay guided fractionation of M. stigmata, batch S1, by EtOH-water extraction, followed by chromatography on Sephadex LH20 revealed two active fractions (I and XI). Further purification of fraction I and structure elucidation of the isolated compound revealed the presence of significant amounts of the biocide benzethonium chloride as contaminant. Benzethonium chloride was also identified in subsequent investigations in 2 different batches of M. stigmata. The presence of such nondeclared and illegal contaminants in the herbal raw material market has to be discussed intensively. From benzethonium-free raw material (batch S2) as well as from batch S1 fraction XI was further fractionated by MPLC and preparative HPLC, leading to a still complex subfraction XIG, which was analyzed by UHPLC/+ESI-QTOF-MS analysis. Advanced data processing and species-metabolite relationship database revealed the tentatively existence of the unusual C-glycosidic flavones derhamnosylmaysin (6), 3'-deoxyrhamnosylmaysin (4), 3'-O-methylderhamnosylmaysin (3), apiferol (2) and alternanthin (8) which might be related to the antiadhesive activity of this subfraction against UPEC. PMID:26210697

  6. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  7. Immobilized microbe bioreactors for waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Portier, R J; Miller, G P

    1991-10-01

    The application of adapted microbial populations immobilized on a porous diatomaceous earth carrier to pre-treat and reduce toxic concentration of volatile organics, pesticides, petroleum aliphatics and aromatics has been demonstrated for several industrial sites. In the pre-treatment of industrial effluents and contaminated groundwaters, these bioreactors have been used to optimize and reduce the cost of conventional treatment systems, i.e. steam stripping, carbon adsorption and traditional biotreatment. Additionally, these systems have been employed as seeding devices for larger biotreatment systems. The cost effective utilization of an immobilized microbe reactor system for water supply regeneration in a microgravity environment is presented. The feasibility of using immobilized biomass reactors as an effluent treatment technology for the biotransformation and biodegradation of phenols, chlorinated halocarbons, residual oils and lubricants was evaluated. Primary biotransformation tests of two benchmark toxicants, phenol and ethylene dichloride at concentrations expected in life support effluents were conducted. Biocatalyst supports were evaluated for colonization potential, surface and structural integrity, and performance in continuous flow bioreactors. The implementation of such approaches in space will be outlined and specific areas for interfacing with other non-biological treatment approaches will be considered for advanced life support, tertiary waste water biotreatment. PMID:11537697

  8. Electrode-immobilized compounds through. gamma. radiation

    SciTech Connect

    De Castro, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Chemically Modified Electrodes (CMEs) are used as substrates in heterogeneous catalysis and as sensors. This work demonstrates a new strategy for immobilizing polyelectrolytes and electroactive agents on electrode surfaces. The success of this method lies in cross-linking water soluble polymer chains through the ionizing radiation of ..gamma.. emissions from a /sup 60/Co source. Cross-linking can create a continuous network out of the polymer macromolecules which then makes the network insoluble on the electrode surface. Bonds between the network and the substrate are also possible. Redox species mixed with the polymer network and irradiated become part of the insoluble network, and are permanently attached. The use of ..gamma.. radiation to make electrochemical sensors is demonstrated. The immobilized network poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (DDAC) is placed in a solution of potassium ferricyanide and ionicly exchanges the anion into the network. An electroactive network is created from irradiating a mixture of DDAC and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP). Using the amount of electroactive DCIP remaining in the film as the optimization parameter, variables such as polymer:DCIP ratio, film thickness, and dosage employed are shown to be relevant.

  9. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had bone marrow disease, blood disorders, or kidney disease.you should know that strontium-89 chloride may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, ...

  10. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    SciTech Connect

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  11. PHOTOOXIDATION OF ALLYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photooxidation of allyl chloride was studied by irradiation either in 100-L Teflon bags or in a 22.7-cu m Teflon smog chamber in the presence of added NOx. In the absence of added hydrocarbons, the reaction involves a Cl atom chain, which leads to a highly reactive system. A ...

  12. [Stabilization Treatment of Pb and Zn in Contaminated Soils and Mechanism Studies].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-qiang; Li, Xiao-mingi; Chen, Can; Chen, Xun-feng; Zhong, Yu; Zhong, Zhen-yu; Wan, Yong; Wang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the combined application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, quick lime and potassium chloride was used to immobilize the Pb and Zn in contaminated soils. The efficiency of the process was evaluated through leaching tests and Tessier sequential extraction procedure. The mechanism of stabilization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to reveal the mechanism of stabilization. The results showed that the stabilizing efficiency of Pb contaminated soils was above 80% and the leaching concentrations of Pb, Zn were far below the threshold when the ratio of exogenous P and soil (mol · mol⁻¹) was 2:1-4: 1, the dosing ratio of CaO was 0.1%-0.5% ( mass fraction) and the dosage of potassium chloride was 0.02-0. 04 mol. Meanwhile, Pb and Zn in soil were transformed from the exchangeable fraction into residual fraction, which implied that the migration of Pb, Zn in soil could be confined by the stabilization treatment. XRD and SEM analysis revealed that Ca-P-Pb precipitation, lead orthophosphate [PbHP0₄, Pb₃ (PO₄)₂], pyromorphite (Pb-PO₄-Cl/OH) and mixed heavy metal deposits (Fe-PO₄- Ca-Pb-Zn-OH) could be formed after solidification/stabilization in which Pb and Zn could be wrapped up to form a solidified composition and to prevent leaching. PMID:27012000

  13. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  14. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  15. Evaluation of localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium is prone to localized corrosion in acidic chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solutions contaminated by oxidizing ions, such as ferric or cupric ions. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. The effect of surface condition on localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions was predicted using potentiodynamic polarization scans. Predictions were confirmed by mass-loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real-time indication of localized corrosion was derived by monitoring electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solution. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlated well with predictions from the potentiodynamic polarization and mass-loss experiments. Electrochemical noise results showed a more anodic potential caused by ferric ion (Fe{sup 3+}) contamination might be necessary for localized corrosion but that it was not a sufficient condition. A clean zirconium surface reduced localized corrosion of zirconium.

  16. [Degradation of succinylcholine chloride].

    PubMed

    Németh, G; Török, I; Paál, T

    1993-05-01

    Quantitative thin-layer chormatographic method has been developed for the investigation of the degradation of injection formulations containing succinylcholinium chloride. The method is based on the denistometric determination of the main degradation product, choline at 430 nm after visualization with iodine vapour. The stability of the injection was investigated under various storage conditions and it has been stated that considerable decomposition takes place during as short a period as one week. PMID:8362654

  17. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  18. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Development of a new antibacterial biomaterial by tetracycline immobilization on calcium-alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ozseker, Emine Erdogan; Akkaya, Alper

    2016-10-20

    In recent years, increasing risk of infection, caused by resistant microorganism to antibiotics, has become the limelight discovery of new and natural antibacterial materials. Heavy metals, such as silver, copper, mercury and titanium, have antibacterial activity. Products, which improved these metals, do not have stable antibacterial property. Therefore, use of these products is restricted. The aim of this study was to immobilize tetracycline to alginate and improve an antibacterial biomaterial. For this purpose, calcium-alginate beads were formed by dropping to calcium-chloride solution and tetracycline was immobilized to beads using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide at optimum conditions. After immobilization, actualization of immobilization was investigated by analyzing ATR-FTIR spectrum and SEM images. Also, antibacterial property of obtained product was tested. Improved product demonstrated antibacterial property. It has potential for open wound, surgical drapes, bed and pillow sheath in hospitals and it may also be used for increasing human comfort in daily life. PMID:27474587

  20. Immobilization of mercuric reductase from a pseudomonas putida strain on different activated carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Anspach, F.B.; Hueckel, M.; Brunke, M.

    1994-02-01

    Mercuric reductase was isolated from Pseudomonas putida KT2442::mer-73 and immobilized on chromatographic carriers activated by various methods. The immobilization methods for covalent coupling were compared with regard to preservation of enzymatic activity and coupling yields. Highest yields were obtained with carriers bearing the most reactive functional groups. Best results were achieved with tresyl chloride-activated carriers. The optimum binding conditions were found at pH 8. Application of the immobilized mercuric reductase for continuous treatment of Hg(II)-containing water was examined in a fixed bed reactor. Space-time yields up to 510 nmol/min{center_dot}mL were attained. The kinetics of immobilized enzyme systems were not diffusion-controlled. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Study of phenol biodegradation using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain WJDB-1 immobilized in alginate-chitosan-alginate (ACA) microcapsules by electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Daban; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Shiquan; Wang, Letao; Lin, Shaoxiong; Wang, Chunming; Ye, Weichun; Yan, Chunlei

    2012-04-01

    An aerobic microorganism with an ability to utilize phenol as sole carbon and energy source was isolated from phenol-contaminated wastewater samples. The isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain WJDB-1 based on morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Strain WJDB-1 immobilized in alginate-chitosan-alginate (ACA) microcapsules could degrade 200 mg/l phenol completely within 36 h. The concentration of phenol was determined using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a linear relationship between peak current and phenol concentration ranging from 2.0 to 20.0 mg/l. Cells immobilized in ACA microcapsules were found to be superior to the free suspended ones in terms of improving the tolerance to the environmental loadings. The optimal conditions to prepare microcapsules for achieving higher phenol degradation rate were investigated by changing the concentrations of sodium alginate, calcium chloride, and chitosan. Furthermore, the efficiency of phenol degradation was optimized by adjusting various processing parameters, such as the number of microcapsules, pH value, temperature, and the initial concentration of phenol. This microorganism has the potential for the efficient treatment of organic pollutants in wastewater. PMID:21809019

  2. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in an immobilized cell airlift bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kermanshahi pour, A; Karamanev, D; Margaritis, A

    2005-09-01

    An "immobilized cell airlift bioreactor", was used for the aerobic bioremediation of simulated diesel fuel contaminated groundwater and tested with p-xylene and naphthalene in batch and continuous regimes. The innovative design of the experiments consists of two stages. At the first stage "immobilized soil bioreactor" (ISBR) was used to develop an efficient microbial consortium from the indigenous microorganisms, which exist in diesel fuel contaminated soil. The concept of ISBR relies on the entrapment of the soil particles into the pores of a semi-permeable membrane, which divides the bioreactor into two aerated and non-aerated portions. The second stage involves inoculating the "immobilized cell air lift bioreactor" with the cultivated microbial consortia of the first stage. Immobilized cell airlift bioreactor has the same configuration as ISBR except that in this bioreactor instead of soil, microorganisms were immobilized on the fibers of the membrane. The performance of a 0.83 L immobilized cell airlift bioreactor was investigated at various retention time (0.5-6 h) and concentrations of p-xylene (15, 40 and 77 mg/L) and naphthalene (8, 15 and 22 mg/L) in the continuous operation. In the batch regime, 0.9L bioreactor was operated at various biodegradation times (15-135 min) and concentrations of p-xylene (13.6, 44.9 and 67.5 mg/L) and naphthalene (1.5 and 3.8 mg/L). Under the conditions of the complete biodegradation of p-xylene and naphthalene, the obtained volumetric biodegradation rates at biomass density of 720 mg/L were 15 and 16 mg/L h, respectively. PMID:16095655

  3. INNOVATIVE IN-SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FOR SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF CONTAMINATION AND EROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-11-28

    New technologies are needed that neutralize contaminant toxicity and control physical transport mechanisms that mobilize sediment contaminants. The last 12 months of this comprehensive project investigated the use of combinations of sequestering agents to develop in situ active sediment caps that stabilize mixtures of contaminants and act as a barrier to mechanical disturbance under a broad range of environmental conditions. Efforts focused on the selection of effective sequestering agents for use in active caps, the composition of active caps, and the effects of active cap components on contaminant bioavailability and retention. Results from this project showed that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective at removing metals from both fresh and salt water. These amendments also exhibited high retention (80% or more) of most metals indicating reduced potential for remobilization to the water column. Experiments on metal speciation and retention in contaminated sediment showed that apatite and organoclay can immobilize a broad range of metals under both reduced and oxidized conditions. These studies were followed by sequential extractions to evaluate the bioavailability and retention of metals in treated sediments. Metal fractions recovered in early extraction steps are more likely to be bioavailable and were termed the Potentially Mobile Fraction (PMF). Less bioavailable fractions collected in later extraction steps were termed the Recalcitrant Factor (RF). Apatite and organoclay reduced the PMF and increased the RF for several elements, especially Pb, Zn, Ni, Cr, and Cd. Empirically determined partitioning coefficients and modeling studies were used to assess the retention of organic contaminants on selected sequestering agents. Organoclays exhibited exceptionally high sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as indicated by a comparison of K{sub d} values among 12 amendments. These results suggested that

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  5. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C.

    1995-12-31

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistance sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1,000 K to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  6. Oxomemazine hydro-chloride.

    PubMed

    Siddegowda, M S; Butcher, Ray J; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H S; Ramesh, A R

    2011-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 3-(5,5-dioxo-phen-othia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl-propanaminium chloride], C(18)H(23)N(2)O(2)S(+)·Cl(-), the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia-zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π inter-actions. PMID:22090928

  7. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-12-21

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the conceptual design stage and the facility will begin operation in 2008. This paper discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Project phase 2 automation equipment conceptual design, equipment design, and work completed.

  8. Chronic effects of mercuric chloride ingestion on rat adrenocortical function

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Chansouria, J.P.N. )

    1989-09-01

    Mercurial contamination of environment has increased. Mercury accumulates in various organs and adversely affects their functions. Some of the most prominent toxic effects of inorganic mercury compounds include neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Besides this, mercury has also been reported to affect various endocrine glands like pituitary, thyroid, gonadal and adrenal glands. There have been no reports on the toxic effects of chronic oral administration of varying doses of mercuric chloride on adrenocortical function in albino rats. The present work was undertaken to study the adrenocortical response to chronic oral administration of mercuric chloride of varying dose and duration in albino rats.

  9. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  10. Oil immobilization program at Sellafield: an innovative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, Helen

    2007-07-01

    Non-standard wastes - those defined as being both hazardous waste under the United Kingdom Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005 and radioactive under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 - pose particular, unique challenges for radioactive waste management organizations. Treatment and disposal routes for such wastes are limited, in some cases non existent, and generally not cost effective. A non-standard waste of particular concern in the United Kingdom, and indeed on the Sellafield site, is that of radiologically contaminated waste oil. The optioning process for treatment of bulk contaminated waste oil on the Sellafield site has assessed a range of options including incineration, chemical decontamination, physical decontamination and immobilization. Immobilization has proved to be a potentially useful option for oil waste streams that fail to meet waste acceptance criteria for incineration facilities. Experimental development work has been undertaken at Sellafield during 2006 to test the suitability of an innovative technology for the solidification of waste oil with a cross section of waste streams from the site. These trials have demonstrated that this polymer system is able to successfully immobilize a range of aged, chemically and physically diverse contaminated oil waste streams and thus provide a potential solution to the disposal problem posed by this waste stream. (author)

  11. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  12. REACTIVE BARRIER TREATMENT WALL TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    T. TAYLOR; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    The potential for subsurface reactive barrier wall technology to aid in remediation of contaminated groundwater in situ has prompted testing of novel porous media. Treatability testing of contaminants contacted with various media has been conducted using equilibrium batch techniques, one-dimensional (1-D) columns and 2-D boxes. Continuous mode column and box experiments are useful for assessing critical design parameters under dynamic flow conditions. Experiments have been conducted using a multi-layer barrier treatment approach to immobilize a suite of contaminants. For example, basalt coated with a cationic polymer (poly diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride [Catfloc{reg_sign}]) was used to agglomerate colloids, Apatite II{reg_sign} sorbed aqueous phase metals and radionuclides including {sup 85,87}Sr and {sup 235}U and facilitated reduction of nitrate and perchlorate, crushed pecan shells sorbed aqueous phase metals and served as a secondary medium for reduction of nitrate and perchlorate concentrations, and finally limestone raised the pH of exiting pore waters close to natural levels.

  13. Immobilized enzymes affect biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana L; Hippius, Catharina; Werner, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    The effect of the activity of immobilized enzymes on the initial attachment of pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with nosocomial infections (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis) was investigated. The proteolytic enzymes, subtilisin A and the glycoside hydrolase cellulose, were covalently attached onto poly(ethylene-alt-maleic) anhydride copolymer films. A comparison between active and heat-inactivated surfaces showed that while the activity of immobilized cellulase reduced the attachment of S. epidermidis by 67%, it had no effect on the attachment of P. aeruginosa. Immobilized subtilisin A had opposite effects: the active enzyme had no effect on the attachment of S. epidermidis but reduced the attachment of P. aeruginosa by 44%. The results suggest that different biomolecules are involved in the initial steps of attachment of different bacteria, and that the development of broad-spectrum antifouling enzymatic coatings will need to involve the co-immobilization of enzymes. PMID:21618024

  14. High-level-waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  18. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  19. Immobilized cells in meat fermentation.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, A J; Champagne, C P

    1994-01-01

    The immobilization of microbial cells can contribute to fermented meat technology at two basic levels. First, the solid/semisolid nature (low available water) of the substrate restricts the mobility of cells and results in spatial organizations based on "natural immobilization" within the fermentation matrix. The microniches formed influence the fermentation biochemistry through mass transfer limitations and the subsequent development and activity of the microflora. This form of immobilization controls the nature of competition between subpopulations within the microflora and ultimately exerts an effect on the ecological competence (ability to survive and compete) of the various cultures present. Second, immobilized cell technology (ICT) can be used to enhance the ecological competence of starter cultures added to initiate the fermentation. Immobilization matrices such as alginate can provide microniches or microenvironments that protect the culture during freezing or lyophilization, during subsequent rehydration, and when in competition with indigenous microflora. The regulated release of cells from the microenvironments can also contribute to competitive ability. The regulation of both immobilization processes can result in enhanced fermentation activity. PMID:8069934

  20. Reducing Sodium Contamination in MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehaye, R. F.; Feltner, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Method of removing positive ions from oxides in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors and intergrated circuits ensure freedom from contamination by sodium and other mobile positive ions. Electric field applied during oxide growth to push mobile Na + ions to surface. After cooling from growth temperature, field turned off and Na + contaminated surface layer etched away. New method intended to suplement established methods of minimizing ion contamination, such as scrupulous cleanliness in processing, purging with hydrogen chloride to react with and remove contaminants, and growing extra-thick gate oxide, then etching it to remove large portion of contaminants concentrated near surface.

  1. Use of Bromide: Chloride Ratios to Differentiate Potential Sources of Chloride in a Shallow, Unconfined Aquifer Affected by Brackish-Water Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, David C.; Fleck, William B.

    1997-02-01

    Brackish water from Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries has entered the Aquia aquifer in east-central Anne Arundel County, Maryland, USA. This determination was made based on chloride analyses of water samples collected in wells screened in the Aquia aquifer between October 1988 and May 1989. The Aquia aquifer, which is composed of fine- to medium-grained sand, is a shallow, unconfined aquifer in this area. Land use is primarily urban, consisting of a mixture of residential and light commercial areas. Associated with the urban setting is the potential for chloride contamination to enter the Aquia aquifer from anthropogenic sources, such as residential septic-tank effluent, leaky public sewer lines, road-deicing salt, stormwater infiltration basins, and domestic water-conditioning recharge effluent. In order to map the distribution of bay-water intrusion in the Aquia aquifer, chloride derived from Chesapeake Bay was differentiated from chloride derived from anthropogenic sources by comparing the ratio of dissolved bromide to dissolved chloride (bromide:chloride) in groundwater to the distinctive ratio in Chesapeake Bay water. Two additional factors considered in determining the source of the chloride were nitrogen concentrations and well-screen positions of sampled wells in relation to the estimated depth of the fresh-water/brackish-water interface. Of 36 Aquia-aquifer water samples with chloride condentrations greater than 30 mg/L, 22 had bromide:chloride ratios similar to the ratio in Chesapeake Bay water, an indication that bay water is the primary source of the chloride. Of the other 14 samples with bromide:chloride ratios dissimilar to the ratio in Chesapeake Bay water, seven were from wells where screen positions were substantially above the estimated fresh-water/brackish-water interface. Three of these samples had nitrogen concentrations (as nitrite plus nitrate) greater than 3.0 mg/L, an indication that chloride in these groundwater samples comes from

  2. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  3. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  4. Layer-by-layer self-assembly immobilization of catalases on wool fabrics.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Q; Fan, X R; Sun, X J; Huang, P H

    2013-04-01

    A new immobilization strategy of catalases on natural fibers was reported in this paper. Catalase (CAT) from Bacillus subtilis was assembled into multiple layers together with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) on wool fabrics via layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic self-assembly deposition. The mechanism and structural evaluation of LBL electrostatic self-assembly were studied in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface zeta potential, and apparent color depth (K/S). The SEM pictures showed obvious deposits absorbed on the wool surfaces after LBL self-assembly. The surface zeta potential and dyeing depth of CAT/PDDA-assembled wool fabrics presented a regular layer-by-layer alternating trend along with the change of deposited materials, revealing the multilayer structure of the wool fiber immobilized catalases. The V(max) values were found to be 2,500±238 U/mg protein for the free catalase and 1,000±102 U/mg protein for the immobilized catalase. The K(m) value of free catalase (11.25±2.3 mM) was found to be lower than that of the immobilized catalase (222.2±36.5 mM). The immobilized catalase remained high enzymatic activity and showed a measureable amount of reusability, which proved that LBL electrostatic self-assembly deposition is a promising approach to immobilize catalases. PMID:23420488

  5. CPP-603 Chloride Removal System Decontamination and Decommissioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, C.L.

    1993-02-01

    The CPP-603 (annex) Chloride Removal System (CRS) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The CRS was used for removing Chloride ions and other contaminants that were suspended in the waters of the underwater fuel storage basins in the CPP-603 Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility (FRSF) from 1975 to 1981. The Environmental Checklist and related documents, facility characterization, decision analysis`, and D&D plans` were prepared in 1991. Physical D&D activities were begun in mid summer of 1992 and were completed by the end of November 1992. All process equipment and electrical equipment were removed from the annex following accepted asbestos and radiological contamination removal practices. The D&D activities were performed in a manner such that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) occurred.

  6. Catalysis of Rice Straw Hydrolysis by the Combination of Immobilized Cellulase from Aspergillus niger on β-Cyclodextrin-Fe3O4 Nanoparticles and Ionic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Chang, Ken-Lin; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2015-01-01

    Cellulase from Aspergillus niger was immobilized onto β-cyclodextrin-conjugated magnetic particles by silanization and reductive amidation. The immobilized cellulase gained supermagnetism due to the magnetic nanoparticles. Ninety percent of cellulase was immobilized, but the activity of immobilized cellulase decreased by 10%. In this study, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) was introduced into the hydrolytic process because the original reaction was a solid-solid reaction. The activity of immobilized cellulase was improved from 54.87 to 59.11 U g immobilized cellulase−1 at an ionic liquid concentration of 200 mM. Using immobilized cellulase and ionic liquid in the hydrolysis of rice straw, the initial reaction rate was increased from 1.629 to 2.739 g h−1 L−1. One of the advantages of immobilized cellulase is high reusability—it was usable for a total of 16 times in this study. Compared with free cellulase, magnetized cellulase can be recycled by magnetic field and the activity of immobilized cellulase was shown to remain at 85% of free cellulase without denaturation under a high concentration of glucose (15 g L−1). Therefore, immobilized cellulase can hydrolyze rice straw continuously compared with free cellulase. The amount of harvested glucose can be up to twentyfold higher than that from the hydrolysis by free cellulase. PMID:25874210

  7. Preparation and properties of immobilized amyloglucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandam, V.S.; Srinivasan, K.S.V.; Thomas Joseph, K.; Santappa, M.

    1981-10-01

    Amyloglucosidase was immobilized on a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and 2-di-methylaminoethyl methacrylate. The resulting immobilized amyloglucosidase has 19% of the soluble enzyme specific activity. The pH optimum of immobilized amyloglucosidase is shifted towards acidity by 1.9 units. The temperature optimum of immobilized enzyme is shifted upward by 5 degrees C. The immobilized amyloglucosidase has the maximum stability at pH 4.6, whereas the soluble enzyme has maximum stability at pH 5.5. While soluble amyloglucosidase has a maximum thermal stability at 50 degrees C, the stability of the immobilized amyloglucosidase steadily decreases with the increase in temperature. (Refs. 7).

  8. Skeletal fluorosis in immobilized extremities.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, J B

    1975-11-01

    The effect of immobilization on skeletal fluorosis was studied in growing rabbits. One hind leg was immobilized by an external fixation device extending below the wrist joint and above the knee joint, the extremity being in a straight position after severance of the sciatic nerve. The animals, aged 7 weeks at the beginning of the experiment, were given 10 mg of fluoride per kg body weight and day during 12 weeks. In the tibiae, development of the skeletal fluorosis was more irregular than that observed in previous studies of normally active animals, being most excessive in the mobile bone. The immobilization effect was most profound in the femora as the cortical thickness and the femur score were significantly higher than those in the mobile femora. It was suggested that an altered muscular activity was the reason for the observed changes. PMID:1189918

  9. Nanoporous gold for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Stine, Keith J; Jefferson, Kenise; Shulga, Olga V

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) is a material of emerging interest for immobilization of biomolecules and -especially enzymes. NPG materials provide a high gold surface area onto which biomolecules can either be directly physisorbed or covalently linked after first modifying the NPG with a self-assembled monolayer. The material can be used as a high surface area electrode and with immobilized enzymes can be used for amperometric detection schemes. NPG can be prepared in a variety of formats from alloys containing less than 50 atomic% gold by dealloying procedures. Related high surface area gold structures have been prepared using templating approaches. Covalent enzyme immobilization can be achieved by first forming a self-assembled monolayer on NPG bearing a terminal reactive functional group followed by conjugation to the enzyme through amide linkages to lysine residues. PMID:20865389

  10. Immobilization of Microbes for Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Environments: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Cappello, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are the most common environmental pollutants in the world and oil spills pose a great hazard to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Oil pollution may arise either accidentally or operationally whenever oil is produced, transported, stored and processed or used at sea or on land. Oil spills are a major menace to the environment as they severely damage the surrounding ecosystems. To improve the survival and retention of the bioremediation agents in the contaminated sites, bacterial cells must be immobilized. Immobilized cells are widely tested for a variety of applications. There are many types of support and immobilization techniques that can be selected based on the sort of application. In this review article, we have discussed the potential of immobilized microbial cells to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. In some studies, enhanced degradation with immobilized cells as compared to free living bacterial cells for the treatment of oil contaminated areas have been shown. It was demonstrated that immobilized cell to be effective and is better, faster, and can be occurred for a longer period PMID:26668662

  11. Immobilization of Microbes for Bioremediation of Crude Oil Polluted Environments: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Cappello, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are the most common environmental pollutants in the world and oil spills pose a great hazard to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Oil pollution may arise either accidentally or operationally whenever oil is produced, transported, stored and processed or used at sea or on land. Oil spills are a major menace to the environment as they severely damage the surrounding ecosystems. To improve the survival and retention of the bioremediation agents in the contaminated sites, bacterial cells must be immobilized. Immobilized cells are widely tested for a variety of applications. There are many types of support and immobilization techniques that can be selected based on the sort of application. In this review article, we have discussed the potential of immobilized microbial cells to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. In some studies, enhanced degradation with immobilized cells as compared to free living bacterial cells for the treatment of oil contaminated areas have been shown. It was demonstrated that immobilized cell to be effective and is better, faster, and can be occurred for a longer period. PMID:26668662

  12. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  13. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  14. Immobilization of Burkholderia sp. lipase on a ferric silica nanocomposite for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dang-Thuan; Chen, Ching-Lung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-04-15

    In this work, lipase produced from an isolated strain Burkholderia sp. C20 was immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles to catalyze biodiesel synthesis. Core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by coating Fe(3)O(4) core with silica shell. The nanoparticles treated with dimethyl octadecyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] ammonium chloride were used as immobilization supporters. The Burkholderia lipase was then bound to the synthesized nanoparticles for immobilization. The protein binding efficiency on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 97%, while the efficiency was only 76% on non-modified Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2). Maximum adsorption capacity of lipase on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 29.45 mg g(-1) based on Langmuir isotherm. The hydrolytic kinetics (using olive oil as substrate) of the lipase immobilized on alkyl-grafted Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) followed Michaelis-Menten model with a maximum reaction rate and a Michaelis constant of 6251 Ug(-1) and 3.65 mM, respectively. Physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles and the immobilized lipase were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the immobilized lipase was used to catalyze the transesterification of olive oil with methanol to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), attaining a FAMEs conversion of over 90% within 30 h in batch operation when 11 wt% immobilized lipase was employed. The immobilized lipase could be used for ten cycles without significant loss in its transesterification activity. PMID:22306108

  15. Back contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. B.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the concept and implications of back contamination and of the ways and means for its prevention. Back contamination is defined as contamination of the terrestrial biosphere with organisms or materials returned from outer space that are capable of potentially harmful terrestrial activity. Since the question of whether or not life exists on other planets may, in reality, not be answered until many samples are returned to earth for detailed study, requirements for the prevention of back contamination are necessary. A review of methods of microbiologic contamination control is followed by a discussion of the nature of back contamination and its risk levels, contamination sources and locations, and possible defenses against back contamination. The U.S. lunar back contamination program is described and shown to provide a valuable basis for further refining the technology for the control of planetary back contamination.

  16. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  17. Immobilization of heavy metal ions (CuII, CdII, NiII, and PbII) by broiler litter-derived biochars in water and soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chars, a form of environmental black carbon resulting from incomplete burning of biomass, can immobilize organic contaminants by both surface adsorption and partitioning mechanisms. The predominance of each sorption mechanism depends upon the proportion of organic to carbonized fractions comprising...

  18. REDUCTIVE IMMOBILIZATION OF U(VI) IN FE(III) OXIDE-REDUCING SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS: ANALYSIS OF COUPLED MICROBIAL-GEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN EXPERIMENTAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the fundamental microbiological and geochemical processes underlying the potential use of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) to create subsurface redox barriers for immobilization of uranium and other redox-sensitive metal/radionuclide contaminants are well-und...

  19. Microbial contamination of antiseptic-soaked cotton balls.

    PubMed

    Oie, S; Kamiya, A

    1997-06-01

    We investigated microbial contamination of in-use antiseptics at a hospital. No microbial contamination was observed in 70 samples of 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution (500-ml volume), 70 samples of 1% titratable I2 povidone-iodine solution (250-ml volume), or 15 samples of 0.1% ethacridine lactate solution (500-ml volume) during use in reduced amounts. Nor was any microbial contamination observed in 70 samples of cotton balls soaked in 1% titratable I2 povidone-iodine solution in canisters or cotton gauze soaked in 70% (w/v) ethanol solution in canisters. However, among 70 samples of cotton balls soaked in 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution in canisters, 6 (8.6%) were contaminated with 10(4) to 10(6) viable cells/ml. The microbial species detected were glucose non-fermentative bacilli such as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans and Pseudomonas putida. The contaminants obtained from cotton balls soaked in 0.02% benzalkonium chloride solution did not proliferate in that solution or in distilled water but showed rapid growth in the cotton balls soaked in either of these liquids. These findings suggested that benzalkonium chloride solution tends to become contaminated when cotton balls are immersed. Therefore, cotton balls soaked in benzalkonium chloride solution are not recommended as an antiseptic. When no other choice is available, the cotton balls should be soaked in benzalkonium chloride solution at the time of usage. PMID:9212987

  20. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  7. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    PubMed Central

    Tallur, Preeti N.; Mulla, Sikandar I.; Megadi, Veena B.; Talwar, Manjunatha P.; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  8. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  9. Antimicrobial potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 against selected bacteria.

    PubMed

    Millette, M; Smoragiewicz, W; Lacroix, M

    2004-06-01

    Immobilization of living cells of lactic acid bacteria could be an alternative or complementary method of immobilizing organic acids and bacteriocins and inhibit undesirable bacteria in foods. This study evaluated the inhibition potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 on selected bacteria by a modified method of the agar spot test. L. lactis was immobilized in calcium alginate (1 to 2%)-whey protein concentrate (0 and 1%) beads. The antimicrobial potential of immobilized L. lactis was evaluated in microbiological media against pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus) or Pseudomonas putida, a natural meat contaminant, and against seven gram-positive bacteria used as indicator strains. Results obtained in this study indicated that immobilized L. lactis inhibited the growth of S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei, Kocuria varians, and Pediococcus acidilactici. Only 4 h of incubation at 35 degrees C resulted in a clear inhibition zone around the beads that increased with time. With the addition of 10 mM of a chelating agent (EDTA) to the media, results showed growth inhibition of E. coli; however, P. putida and Salmonella Typhi were unaffected by this treatment. These results indicate that immobilized lactic acid bacteria strains can be successfully used to produce nisin and inhibit bacterial growth in semisolid synthetic media. PMID:15222547

  10. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  11. Subsurface Immobilization of Plutonium: Experimental and Model Validation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, Bruce E; Deo, Randhir P; Reed, Donald T

    2008-08-13

    We conducted a coordinated experimental and modeling study centered on the interaction of Shewanella alga BrY (S. alga) with plutonium species and phases. Plutonium is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites that are being addressed by the overall ERSP program. The over-arching goal of this research was to understand the long-term stability of bio-precipitated immobilized plutonium phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. To initiate the process of plutonium immobilization, a side-by-side comparison of the bioreduction of uranyl and plutonyl species was conducted with S. alga. Uranyl was reduced in our system, consistent with literature reports, but we noted coupling between abiotic and biotic processes and observed that non-reductive pathways to precipitation typically exist. Additionally, a key role of biogenic Fe2+, which is known to reduce uranyl at low pH, is suggested. In contrast, residual organics, present in biologically active systems, reduce Pu(VI) species to Pu(V) species at near-neutral pH. The predominance of relatively weak complexes of PuO2+ is an important difference in how the uranyl and plutonyl species interacted with S. alga. Pu(V) also led to increased toxicity towards S. alga and is also more easily reduced by microbial activity. Biogenic Fe2+, produced by S. alga when Fe3+ is present as an electron acceptor, also played a key role in understanding redox controls and pathways in this system. Overall, the bioreduction of plutonyl was observed under anaerobic conditions, which favor its immobilization in the subsurface. Understanding the mechanism by which redox control is established in biologically active systems is a key aspect of remediation and immobilization strategies for actinides when they are present as subsurface contaminants.

  12. Calcitonin treatment of immobilization osteoporosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tuukkanen, J; Jalovaara, P; Väänänen, K

    1991-01-01

    We studied changes in bone mass induced by immobilization and the ability of salmon calcitonin to inhibit immobilization osteoporosis in rat. The bone mass of the immobilized hind leg of rat was compared with the contralateral non-treated leg. Neurectomy and cast immobilization reduced the bone mineral mass to an equal extent. However, the dose-response of calcitonin was different with these immobilization techniques. Calcitonin 15 IU kg-1 administered once daily reduced bone ash weight difference significantly after 2 weeks' neurectomy (P less than 0.001). This had no significant effect on the bone loss induced by cast immobilization, but the dose had to be delivered as two injections given every 12 h. Two weeks' immobilization decreased the incorporation of 45Ca into bones. Calcitonin could not prevent this. However, calcitonin tended to inhibit the overall incorporation of 45Ca into bones in immobilized rats but yet had no effect on 45Ca incorporation in non-immobilized rats. Immobilization decreased serum alkaline phosphatase activity in cast-immobilized animals. Neurectomy did not change serum alkaline phosphatase activity from a sham operation level. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase to total acid phosphatase ratio in the serum increased significantly in neurectomized rats and in cast-immobilized calcitonin-treated rats. PMID:2053438

  13. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  14. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Annual progress report, June 1992--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO{sub 2}-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  15. Immobilization of Heparin: Approaches and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Murugesan, Saravanababu; Xie, Jin; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been used in many forms to treat various diseases. These forms include soluble heparin and heparin immobilized to supporting matrices by physical adsorption, by covalent chemical methods and by photochemical attachment. These immobilization methods often require the use of spacers or linkers. This review examines and compares various techniques that have been used for the immobilization of heparin as well as applications of these immobilized heparins. In the applications reviewed, immobilized heparin is compared with soluble heparin for efficient and versatile use in each of the various applications. PMID:18289079

  16. Recent developments and applications of immobilized laccase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, María; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Moldes, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Laccase is a promising biocatalyst with many possible applications, including bioremediation, chemical synthesis, biobleaching of paper pulp, biosensing, textile finishing and wine stabilization. The immobilization of enzymes offers several improvements for enzyme applications because the storage and operational stabilities are frequently enhanced. Moreover, the reusability of immobilized enzymes represents a great advantage compared with free enzymes. In this work, we discuss the different methodologies of enzyme immobilization that have been reported for laccases, such as adsorption, entrapment, encapsulation, covalent binding and self-immobilization. The applications of laccase immobilized by the aforementioned methodologies are presented, paying special attention to recent approaches regarding environmental applications and electrobiochemistry. PMID:22398306

  17. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C. PMID:24057921

  18. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs. PMID:27396293

  19. Chloride in vesicular trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Luminal acidification is of pivotal importance for the physiology of the secretory and endocytic pathways and its diverse trafficking events. Acidification by the proton-pumping V-ATPase requires charge compensation by counterion currents that are commonly attributed to chloride. The molecular identification of intracellular chloride transporters and the improvement of methodologies for measuring intraorganellar pH and chloride have facilitated the investigation of the physiology of vesicular chloride transport. New data question the requirement of chloride for pH regulation of various organelles and furthermore ascribe functions to chloride that are beyond merely electrically shunting the proton pump. This review surveys the currently established and proposed intracellular chloride transporters and gives an overview of membrane-trafficking steps that are affected by the perturbation of chloride transport. Finally, potential mechanisms of membrane-trafficking modulation by chloride are discussed and put into the context of organellar ion homeostasis in general. PMID:23092411

  20. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. PMID:20580809

  1. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, C W; Mühlebach, S F

    1991-03-01

    The stability of succinylcholine chloride injection prepared by a hospital pharmacy was studied under a wide variety of conditions. Batches of succinylcholine chloride injection 10 mg/mL containing sodium chloride, methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate, hydrochloric acid, and water were prepared. Samples were tested for the effect of initial pH (3.0 and 4.2) and sterilization (steam treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes and 121 degrees C for 20 minutes) on stability after three weeks; long-term stability under refrigeration (12, 17, and 23 months of storage at 4 degrees C); and the effect of storage temperature (4-6 degrees C, 20-26 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 70 degrees C) and light exposure at various intervals up to 12 months. Samples were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Unlike heating at 121 degrees C, heating at 100 degrees C produced no significant loss of succinylcholine chloride, independent of the initial pH. Succinylcholine chloride was hydrolyzed only minimally over 23 months if the solution was stored at 4-6 degrees C. A 10% loss of drug content occurred if solutions were kept at 20-26 degrees C for five months, at 35 degrees C for one month, or at 70 degrees C for one day. Initial degradation was slowed if the solution was protected from light. The assessments by TLC proved to be more sensitive than the HPLC measurements. Succinylcholine chloride injection sterilized at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes can be stored for up to five months at room temperature if protected from light. The preparation is stable for at least two years under refrigeration. PMID:2028996

  2. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  3. Remediation of mercury contaminated sites - A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxu; Feng, Xinbin; Anderson, Christopher W N; Xing, Ying; Shang, Lihai

    2012-06-30

    Environmental contamination caused by mercury is a serious problem worldwide. Coal combustion, mercury and gold mining activities and industrial activities have led to an increase in the mercury concentration in soil. The objective of this paper is to present an up-to-date understanding of the available techniques for the remediation of soil contaminated with mercury through considering: mercury contamination in soil, mercury speciation in soil; mercury toxicity to humans, plants and microorganisms, and remediation options. This paper describes the commonly employed and emerging techniques for mercury remediation, namely: stabilization/solidification (S/S), immobilization, vitrification, thermal desorption, nanotechnology, soil washing, electro-remediation, phytostabilization, phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. PMID:22579459

  4. Ion exchange in a zeolite-molten chloride system

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, R.H.; Pereira, C.

    1997-07-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel results in a secondary waste stream of radioactive fission products dissolved in chloride salt. Disposal plans include a waste form that can incorporate chloride forms featuring one or more zeolites consolidated with sintered glass. A candidate method for incorporating fission products in the zeolites is passing the contaminated salt over a zeolite column for ion exchange. To date, the molten chloride ion-exchange properties of four zeolites have been investigated for this process: zeolite A, IE95{reg_sign}, clinoptilolite, and mordenite. Of these, zeolite A has been the most promising. Treating zeolite 4A, the sodium form of zeolite A , with the solvent salt for the waste stream-lithium-potassium chloride of eutectic melting composition, is expected to provide a material with favorable ion-exchange properties for the treatment of the waste salt. The authors constructed a pilot-plant system for the ion-exchange column. Initial results indicate that there is a direct relationship between the two operating variable of interest, temperature, and initial sodium concentration. Also, the mass ratio has been about 3--5 to bring the sodium concentration of the effluent below 1 mol%.

  5. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Can Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-12-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) as part of Department of Energy's two-track approach for the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium. The PIP will utilize the ceramic can-in-canister technology in a process that mixes plutonium with ceramic formers and neutron absorbers, presses the mixture into a ceramic puck-like form, sinters the pucks in a furnace, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into large canisters. The canisters will subsequently be filled with high level waste glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. This paper will discuss the PIP can inspection components, control system, and test results.

  8. Spine Immobilizer for Accident Victims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Lampson, K.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed conformal bladder filled with tiny spheres called "microballoons," enables spine of accident victim to be rapidly immobilized and restrained and permit victim to be safely removed from accident scene in extremely short time after help arrives. Microballoons expand to form rigid mass when pressure within bladder is less than ambient. Bladder strapped to victim is also strapped to rescue chair. Void between bladder and chair is filled with cloth wedges.

  9. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate. PMID:17686028

  10. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew; Smith, April; Balkwill, Dr. David; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  11. Industrial applications of immobilized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Linko, P.; Linko, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Although the application of the natural attraction of many microorganisms to surfaces has been applied in vinegar production since the early 1980s, and has long been utilized in waste water purification, the development of microbial cell immobilization techniques for special applications dates back only to the early 1960s. The immobilization may involve whole cells, cell fragments, or lysed cells. Whole cells may retain their metabolic activity with their complex multienzyme systems and cofactor regeneration mechanisms intact, or they may be killed in the process with only a few desired enzymes remaining active in the final biocatalyst. Cells may also be coimmobilized with an enzyme to carry out special reactions. Although relatively few industrial scale applications exist today, some are of very large scale. Current applications vary from relatively small scale steroid conversions to amino acid production and high fructose syrup manufacture. A vast number of potential applications are already known, and one of the most interesting applications may be in continuous fermentation such as ethanol production by immobilized living microorganisms. 373 references.

  12. Water Contaminated Throughout U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Presents results of an Environmental Protection Agency survey aimed at detecting and quantifying the presence of organic chemicals in U.S. drinking water supplies. The studies have turned up some surprising contaminants such as nicotine and vinyl chloride. (Author/GS)

  13. CHEMILUMINESCENT MONITOR FOR VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitor for vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air was constructed using commercially available components of a gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a chemiluminescence ozone analyzer slightly modified to make it suitable for use as a GC detector. The specificity for VCM is...

  14. Laser using lead chloride vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    By applying electric discharge, lead chloride vapor in tube is dissociated into lead and chlorine atoms. Population inversion of lead atoms is attained subsequently by second discharge, before chemical recombination of lead and chlorine has occurred. Optimum time interval between two discharges is required for maximum laser output.

  15. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  16. Use of microbial encapsulation/immobilization for biodegradation of PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.E.; Lantz, S.; Mueller, J.G.; Schultz, W.W.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    Bioaugmentation as a strategy in bioremediation has great potential but has had little success to support its use. Problems have arisen because of a general inability to support the growth and/or activity of the introduced organism in the environment because of competition factors, poor survival of the inoculum, and grazing by protozoa. A specialized technique that has been used to overcome these problems is cell immobilization or encapsulation, in which the inoculant can be placed in environmental media in a way that reduces competition from the indigenous microflora and allows expression of the specific introduced metabolic function. Packaging of specific bacterial or fungal cells in a porous polymeric material potentially improves storage of inocula, and enhances the capability of directly introducing viable and active cells into environmental material at some future time without the need to regrow the cells. The authors have been experimenting with encapsulation;immobilization procedures for use in the bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the potential usefulness of polyurethane foam and vermiculite for this purpose and show that optimal PAH degradation can be maintained with immobilized cells.

  17. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  18. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  19. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  20. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  1. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  3. Isolation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria and their potential for lead immobilization in soil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-01-30

    Lead (Pb), a highly toxic heavy metal forms stable compounds with phosphate (P). The potential of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) to immobilize Pb by enhancing solubilization of insoluble P compounds was tested in this research. Eighteen different PSB strains isolated from P amended and Pb contaminated soils were screened for their efficiency in P solubilization. The PSB isolated from P amended soils solubilized 217-479 mg/L of P while the PSB from Pb contaminated soil solubilized 31-293 mg/L of P. Stepwise multiple regression analysis and P solubility kinetics indicated that the major mechanism of P solubilization by PSB is the pH reduction through the release of organic acids. From the isolated bacteria, two PSB were chosen for Pb immobilization and these bacteria were identified as Pantoea sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. The PSB significantly increased P solubilization by 25.0% and 49.9% in the case of Pantoea sp., and 63.3% and 88.6% in the case of Enterobacter sp. for 200 and 800 mg/kg of rock phosphate (RP) addition, respectively, thereby enhancing the immobilization of Pb by 8.25-13.7% in the case of Pantoea sp. and 14.7-26.4% in the case of Enterobacter sp. The ability of PSB to solubilize P, promote plant growth, and immobilize Pb can be used for phytostabilization of Pb contaminated soils. PMID:20971555

  4. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  5. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-08-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-{sup 14}C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-{sup 14}C]dichloroethene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  6. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  7. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M.; Muller, Jochen A.; Rosner, Bettina M.; Von Abendroth, Gregory; Meshulam-Simon, Galit; McCarty, Perry L

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  8. A study on the immobilization of selenium oxyanions by H 2/Pd(s) in aqueous solution . Confirmation of the one-electron reduction barrier of selenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Anders; Jansson, Mats; Jonsson, Mats

    2010-07-01

    Selenium is a trace element of concern in several geochemical contexts, due to the potentially high mobility of the selenium oxyanions and the narrow range between deficiency and toxicity of the element. For high level nuclear waste repositories the long-lived fission product 79Se has been identified as a potential key dose contributor for the long-term safety. This paper deals with the catalytic effect of Pd(s) on the H 2 reduction of selenium oxyanions which was studied experimentally in aqueous solutions containing bicarbonate and chloride. Pd-catalysts and hydrogen have been proposed for the remediation of various groundwater contaminants and can also serve as a model substance for catalytic noble metal inclusions present in spent nuclear fuel. In this study selenite (SeO 32-) was found to adsorb on Pd. In the presence of hydrogen the rate of selenite removal increased yielding elemental Se. However, no adsorption or reduction of selenate (SeO 42-) was observed. A simple radiation chemical experiment revealed a notable barrier towards stepwise one-electron reduction of selenate to selenite. This provides an explanation for the lower reactivity of selenate in systems where reductive immobilization of selenite as well as selenate is thermodynamically favorable.

  9. Photometabolic production of hydrogen from organic substrates by free and immobilized mixed cultures of rhodospirillum rubrum and klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Weetall, H.H.; Sharma, B.P.; Detar, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    A culture of R. rubrum cells apparently contaminated with K. pneumoniae were immobilized by entrapment in agar. This system was used as a model for hydrogen production by photometabolic means. Observed results indicated that the contaminant exerted a major influence on the observed results. This preparation, when immobilized and used in a specifically designed reactor with glucose substrate, showed operational half-lives of approximately 1000 hr. The feasibility of using this ''mixed'' culture for producing hydrogen from acid hydrolyzed cellulose and wood sawdust was also examined. 5 refs.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  11. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  1. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  6. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34 Section 151.50-34 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-34 Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a)...

  16. Optimization and Immobilization of Purified Labeo rohita Visceral Protease by Entrapment Method

    PubMed Central

    Geethanjali, S.; Subash, Anitha

    2013-01-01

    The purified fish visceral protease enzyme was immobilized by using various concentrations of sodium alginate and calcium chloride to optimize the best concentration for the formation of the beads. Then it was characterized by assaying the optimal pH, temperature, storage stability and reusability. The results on immobilization with sodium alginate and calcium chloride showed that a combination of 2% sodium alginate and 0.3 M calcium chloride weas found to be the optimum concentration for the formation of spherical and stable beads, this gave a maximal entrapped activity of 48.31%, and there was no change in the optimum pH 8.0 and temperature 40°C of protease before and after entrapment. The results on stability and reusability indicated that it was stable at 4°C retaining 100% residual activity after 5 days of storage and 67% loss of activity after ten days of storage and it retained 100% residual activity on the first reuse, 75% residual activity on the second reuse, 25% residual activity on the third use and complete loss in the activity on the fourth reuse. PMID:23533718

  17. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. C.; Gu, B.; Wu, W.; Spalding, B. P.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P.

    2009-12-01

    Defense related activities have resulted in broad areas of uranium contaminated groundwater across the U. S. Department of Energy complex. For example, past waste disposal practices at the DOE’s Y-12 site generated a plume of uranium and nitrate contamination in the underlying vadose and saturated zones which extends more than 120 meters deep and thousands of meters along geologic strike. Several DOE sponsored research programs have enabled the study of multiple biotic and abiotic methods of immobilizing uranium in situ at the site. These include biostimulation of metal reducing bacteria to promote reduction of the more soluble U(VI) to the sparingly soluble U(IV) and pH manipulation to immobilize U(VI) through its interactions (e.g., sorption, coprecipitation) with incipient aluminum oxyhydroxide minerals. The application of laboratory based results to the field site must also account for (i) the structured media which can impose incomplete mixing conditions and (ii) steep geochemical gradients or transition zones which differ significantly from the typically well mixed laboratory conditions. In this presentation results of several of these studies will be reviewed and lessons learned summarized.

  18. Control and monitoring of the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1995-09-01

    Zirconium in acidic chloride solutions which are contaminated with ferric or cupric cations is prone to localized corrosion. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. In this paper, the effect of surface condition on the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions is predicted with potentiodynamic scans. These predictions are confirmed by weight loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real time indication of localized corrosion is seen by monitoring the electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solutions. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlates well with the predictions from potentiodynamic and weight loss experiments. The electrochemical noise results show that while an elevated (more anodic) potential caused by ferric ion contamination may be a necessary condition for localized corrosion, it is not a sufficient condition: A smooth, clean zirconium surface reduces the localized corrosion of zirconium.

  19. Detoxification of vinyl chloride to ethene coupled to growth of an anaerobic bacterium.

    PubMed

    He, Jianzhong; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Yang, Kun-Lin; Koenigsberg, Stephen S; Löffler, Frank E

    2003-07-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are ideal solvents for numerous applications, and their widespread use makes them prominent groundwater pollutants. Even more troubling, natural biotic and abiotic processes acting on these solvents lead to the accumulation of toxic intermediates (such as dichloroethenes) and carcinogenic intermediates (such as vinyl chloride). Vinyl chloride was found in at least 496 of the 1,430 National Priorities List sites identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and its precursors PCE and TCE are present in at least 771 and 852 of these sites, respectively. Here we describe an unusual, strictly anaerobic bacterium that destroys dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride as part of its energy metabolism, generating environmentally benign products (biomass, ethene and inorganic chloride). This organism might be useful for cleaning contaminated subsurface environments and restoring drinking-water reservoirs. PMID:12840758

  20. Immobilization of enzymes: a literature survey.

    PubMed

    Brena, Beatriz; González-Pombo, Paula; Batista-Viera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The term immobilized enzymes refers to "enzymes physically confined or localized in a certain defined region of space with retention of their catalytic activities, and which can be used repeatedly and continuously." Immobilized enzymes are currently the subject of considerable interest because of their advantages over soluble enzymes. In addition to their use in industrial processes, the immobilization techniques are the basis for making a number of biotechnology products with application in diagnostics, bioaffinity chromatography, and biosensors. At the beginning, only immobilized single enzymes were used, after 1970s more complex systems including two-enzyme reactions with cofactor regeneration and living cells were developed. The enzymes can be attached to the support by interactions ranging from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages to stable covalent bonds. Although the choice of the most appropriate immobilization technique depends on the nature of the enzyme and the carrier, in the last years the immobilization technology has increasingly become a matter of rational design. As a consequence of enzyme immobilization, some properties such as catalytic activity or thermal stability become altered. These effects have been demonstrated and exploited. The concept of stabilization has been an important driving force for immobilizing enzymes. Moreover, true stabilization at the molecular level has been demonstrated, e.g., proteins immobilized through multipoint covalent binding. PMID:23934795

  1. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  2. Modeling chloride movement in the alluvial aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    1977-01-01

    A solute-transport model that can be used to predict the movement of dissolved chemicals in flowing ground water was applied to a problem of ground-water contamination at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, near Denver, Colo. The model couples a finite-difference solution to the ground-water flow equation with the method-of-characteristics solution to the solute-transport equation. From 1943 to 1956 liquid industrial wastes containing high chloride concentrations were disposed into unlined ponds at the Arsenal. Wastes seeped out of the unlined disposal ponds and spread for many square miles in the underlying shallow alluvial aquifer. Since 1956 disposal has been into an asphalt-lined reservoir, which contributed to a decline in ground-water contamination by 1972. The simulation model quantitatively integrated the effects of the major factors that controlled changes in chloride concentrations and accurately reproduced the 30-year history of chloride ground-water contamination. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that the geologic framework of the area markedly restricted the transport and dispersion of dissolved chemicals in the alluvium. Dilution, from irrigation recharge and seepage from unlined canals, was an important factor in reducing the level of chloride concentrations downgradient from the Arsenal. Similarly, recharge of uncontaminated water from the unlined ponds since 1956 has helped to dilute and flush the contaminated ground water.

  3. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  4. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  5. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Daniel R.; Friedman, Irving

    1985-12-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 × 10 10 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park.

  6. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  7. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  8. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  9. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:23876136

  10. Enhanced heavy metal immobilization in soil by grinding with addition of nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Kakeda, Mitsunori

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a nanometallic Ca and CaO dispersion mixture for the immobilization of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr and Pb) in contaminated soil. Simple grinding achieved 85-90% heavy metal immobilization, but it can be enhanced further to 98-100% by addition of a nanometallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture produced by grinding. Observations using SEM-EDS elemental maps and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the amounts of As, Cd, Cr, and Pb measurable on the soil particle surface decrease after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment. The leachable heavy metal concentrations were reduced after nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment to concentrations lower than the Japan soil elution standard regulatory threshold: <0.01 mg L(-1) for As, Cd, and Pb; and 0.05 mg L(-1) for Cr. Effects of soil moisture and pH on heavy metal immobilization were not strongly influenced. The most probable mechanisms for the enhancement of heavy metal immobilization capacity with nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment might be due to adsorption and entrapment of heavy metals into newly formed aggregates, thereby prompting aggregation of soil particles and enclosure/binding with Ca/CaO-associated immobile salts. Results suggest that the nanometallic Ca/CaO mixture is suitable for use in immobilization of heavy-metal-contaminated soil under normal moisture conditions. PMID:22818089

  11. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of agricultural N-heterocyclic organic pollutants using immobilized nanoparticles of titania.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Arami, Mokhtar; Limaee, Nargess Yousefi; Gharanjig, Kamaladin

    2007-06-25

    Degradation and mineralization of two agricultural organic pollutants (Diazinon and Imidacloprid as N-heterocyclic aromatics) in aqueous solution by nanophotocatalysis using immobilized titania nanoparticles were investigated. Insecticides, Diazinon and Imidacloprid, are persistent pollutants in agricultural soil and watercourses. A simple and effective method was developed to immobilization of titania nanoparticles. UV-vis, ion chromatography (IC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyses were employed. The effects of operational parameters such as H(2)O(2) and inorganic anions (NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-)) were investigated. The mineralization of Diazinon and Imidacloprid was evaluated by monitoring of the formed inorganic anions. The selected pollutants are effectively degraded following first order kinetics model. Results show that the nanophotocatalysis using immobilized titania nanoparticle is an effective method for treatment Diazinon and Imidacloprid from contaminated water. PMID:17145132

  13. Effect of grain size and heavy metals on As immobilization by marble particles.

    PubMed

    Simón, M; García, I; González, V; Romero, A; Martín, F

    2015-05-01

    The effect of grain size and the interaction of heavy metals on As sorption by marble waste with different particle sizes was investigated. Acidic solutions containing only arsenic and a mixture of arsenic, lead, zinc, and cadmium were put in contact with the marble waste. The amount of metal(loid)s that were immobilized was calculated using the difference between the concentration in the acidic solution and in the liquid phase of the suspensions. Approximately 420 μg As m(-2) was sorbed onto the marble grains, both nonspecifically and specifically, where ≥ 80 % of the total arsenic in the acidic solution remained soluble, which suggests that this amendment is not effective to immobilize arsenic. However, in mixed contamination, relatively stable Pb-Ca arsenates were formed on the surface of the marble particles, and the soluble arsenic was reduced by 95 %, which indicates that marble particles can effectively immobilize arsenic and lead when both appear together. PMID:25432428

  14. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Method for selectively removing fluorine and fluorine-containing contaminants from gaseous UF.sub.6

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert L.; Otey, Milton G.; Perkins, Roy W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a method for effecting preferential removal and immobilization of certain gaseous contaminants from gaseous UF.sub.6. The contaminants include fluorine and fluorides which are more reactive with CaCO.sub.3 than is UF.sub.6. The method comprises contacting the contaminant-carrying UF.sub.6 with particulate CaCO.sub.3 at a temperature effecting reaction of the contaminant and the CaCO.sub.3.

  17. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-03-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

  18. Bone char: a clean and renewable phosphorus fertilizer with cadmium immobilization capability.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Nina; Leinweber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Soil contamination with Cd from P fertilizer and other anthropogenic and geogenic sources is a serious problem. In situ immobilization by P application to soil is known as an applicable remediation technique leading to reduced Cd uptake by plants, and use of a Cd-free P fertilizer from renewable sources would be most favorable. Bone char (BC) (15% P, 28% Ca, 0.7% Mg) may be used as such a quality P fertilizer, but it is unknown if its dissolution in soil provides sufficient P and immobilizes Cd in moderately contaminated soils. We incubated BC and triple superphosphate (TSP) in 11 soils that contained between 0.3 to 19.6 mg Cd kg and determined the kinetics of P dissolution during a time period of 145 d. The concomitant Cd immobilization was determined by extracting the mobile Cd with 1 mol L NHNO solution. For most soils, BC increased the concentration of labile P immediately after application, reaching a maximum after 34 d, although the solubility was below that of TSP (2.9-19.3 vs. 4.1-24.0%). Among five kinetic models, the Langmuir-type equation provided the best description of P dissolution from BC and TSP. The Cd immobilization resulting from BC dissolution exceeded that of TSP by a factor of 1.4 to 2.7. The P dissolution from BC was negatively correlated with pH and positively with P sorption capacity, whereas Cd immobilization was positively correlated with soil pH. These causal relationships were expressed in multiple equations that enable predictions of P dissolution and Cd immobilization and thus may help to introduce BC as sustainable P fertilizer and useful soil amendment. PMID:23673832

  19. Biodegradation of pesticide profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-09-01

    Profenofos is an organophosphate pesticide used extensively in agriculture to control pests. A bacterium capable of degrading profenofos was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil samples and identified as Pseudoxanthomonas suwonensis strain HNM based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. 4-Bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified as a metabolite of profenofos degradation by HPLC and GC-MS analysis. The organism degraded profenofos by hydrolysis to yield 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol which was further utilized as carbon source for growth. The organism utilized various organophosphate pesticides such as temephos, quinalphos, and chloropyrifos as carbon sources. The optimum conditions for degradation of profenofos by P. suwonensis strain HMN were found to be at pH 7 and 30 °C. We have investigated the rate of degradation of profenofos by the free and immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM in various matrices such as sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), and SA-bentonite clay. The rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos by the freely suspended cells were compared with that by immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells showed higher rate of degradation of 3 and 6 mM profenofos then freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in SA and SA-PVA. The SA-bentonite clay-immobilized cells of P. suwonensis strain HNM could be reused for more than 32 cycles without losing their degradation capacity. Thus, the immobilized cells are more efficient than freely suspended cells for the degradation of organophosphate pesticide contaminated water. PMID:25832924

  20. Isopropanol and acetone induces vinyl chloride degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Robin L; Brown, Lewis R; Zappi, Mark E; French, W Todd

    2003-11-01

    In situ bioremediation of vinyl chloride (VC)-contaminated waste sites requires a microorganism capable of degrading VC. While propane will induce an oxygenase to accomplish this goal, its use as a primary substrate in bioremediation is complicated by its flammability and low water solubility. This study demonstrates that two degradation products of propane, isoproponal and acetone, can induce the enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous that degrade VC. Additionally, a reasonable number of cells for bioremediation can be grown on conventional solid bacteriological media (nutrient agar, tryptic soy agar, plate count agar) in an average microbiological laboratory and then induced to produce the necessary enzymes by incubation of a resting cell suspension with isopropanol or acetone. Since acetone is more volatile than isopropanol and has other undesirable characteristics, isopropanol is the inducer of choice. It offers a non-toxic, water-soluble, relatively inexpensive alternative to propane for in situ bioremediation of waste sites contaminated with VC. PMID:14605909

  1. Tyrosinase immobilized enzyme reactor: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Karina Bora; Mischiatti, Keylla Lençone; Fontana, José Domingos; de Oliveira, Brás Heleno

    2014-01-15

    Immobilized enzyme reactors of tyrosinase (tyr-IMERs) for use on-line in HPLC system were prepared by different procedures and then compared. The enzyme, obtained from Agaricus bisporus, was immobilized on epoxy-silica which was prepared using different conditions. Enzyme immobilization was conducted by both in situ and in batch techniques. The different procedures were compared in terms of protein and activity retention, IMERs activity, kinetics and stability. The influence of immobilization procedure on enzyme activity and the behavior of the IMERs against a standard inhibitor were also investigated. In situ immobilization on epoxy-silica, synthesized using microwave assistance, provided the best conditions to prepare tyrosinase IMERs. The tyr-IMERs were successfully tested with known and potential inhibitors of tyrosinase, and the results showed that they can be used for the screening of inhibitors of that enzyme. PMID:24317418

  2. Immobilization of whole cells using polymeric coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.W.; Klei, H.E.; Sunstrom, D.V.; Voronka, P.J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A cell immobilization procedure was developed using latex coatings on solid particles. The method's widespread applicability has been demonstrated by successfully immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ethanol production), Bacillus subtilis (tryptophan production). Penicillium chrysogenum (penicillin G production), and Escherichia coli (aspartic acid production). In contrast to other immobilization methods, this procedure produces a pellicular particle that is porous, allowing rapid substrate and gas transfer, has a hard core to avoid compression in large beds, and is dense to allow use in fluidized beds. The immobilization procedure was optimized with S. cerevisiae. Kinetic constants obtained were used to calculate effectiveness factors to show that there was minimal intraparticle diffusion resistance. Reactors utilizing the optimized particles were run for 300 hours to evaluate immobilized particle half-life which was 250 hours.

  3. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  4. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  5. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma. PMID:21477526

  6. Zinc Speciation in Proximity to Phosphate Application Points in a Lead/Zinc Smelter-Contaminated Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of P to immobilize Pb in contaminated soils has been well documented. However, the influence of P on Zn speciation in soils has not been extensively examined, and these two metals often occur as co-contaminants. We hypothesized that additions of P to a Pb/Zn-contaminate...

  7. Metal immobilization in soils using synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oste, Leonard A; Lexmond, Theo M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2002-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils is a technique to improve soil quality. Synthetic zeolites are potentially useful additives to bind heavy metals. This study selected the most effective zeolite in cadmium and zinc binding out of six synthetic zeolites (mordenite-type, faujasite-type, zeolite X, zeolite P, and two zeolites A) and one natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). Zeolite A appeared to have the highest binding capacity between pH 5 and 6.5 and was stable above pH 5.5. The second objective of this study was to investigate the effects of zeolite addition on the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration. Since zeolites increase soil pH and bind Ca, their application might lead to dispersion of organic matter. In a batch experiment, the DOM concentration increased by a factor of 5 when the pH increased from 6 to 8 as a result of zeolite A addition. A strong increase in DOM was also found in the leachate of soil columns, particularly in the beginning of the experiment. This resulted in higher metal leaching caused by metal-DOM complexes. In contrast, the free ionic concentration of Cd and Zn strongly decreased after the addition of zeolites, which might explain the reduction in metal uptake observed in plant growth experiments. Pretreatment of zeolites with acid (to prevent a pH increase) or Ca (to coagulate organic matter) suppressed the dispersion of organic matter, but also decreased the metal binding capacity of the zeolites due to competition of protons or Ca. PMID:12026084

  8. Solution-Derived Sodalite Made with Si- and Ge-Ethoxide Precursors for Immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite to immobilize a mixed chloride salt using solution-based techniques. Sodalites were made using different Group IV contributions from either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4, NaAlO2, and a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. Additionally, 6 glass binders at low loadings of 5 mass% were evaluated as sintering aids for the consolidation process. The approach of using the organic Group IV additives can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at room temperature and shows promise over a method where colloidal silica is used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during pressure-less sintering.

  9. Immobilization of selenite via two parallel pathways during in situ bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youneng; Werth, Charles J; Sanford, Robert A; Singh, Rajveer; Michelson, Kyle; Nobu, Masaru; Liu, Wen-Tso; Valocchi, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    It is widely understood that selenite can be biologically reduced to elemental selenium. Limited studies have shown that selenite can also be immobilized through abiotic precipitation with sulfide, a product of biological sulfate reduction. We demonstrate that both pathways significantly contribute to selenite immobilization in a microfluidic flow cell having a transverse mixing zone between propionate and selenite that mimics the reaction zone along the margins of a selenite plume undergoing bioremediation in the presence of background sulfate. The experiment showed that red particles of amorphous elemental selenium precipitate on the selenite-rich side of the mixing zone, while long crystals of selenium sulfides precipitate on the propionate-rich side of the mixing zone. We developed a continuum-scale reactive transport model that includes both pathways. The simulated results are consistent with the experimental results, and indicate that spatial segregation of the two selenium precipitates is due to the segregation of the more thermodynamic favorable selenite reduction and the less thermodynamically favorable sulfate reduction. The improved understanding of selenite immobilization and the improved model can help to better design in situ bioremediation processes for groundwater contaminated by selenite or other contaminants (e.g., uranium(IV)) that can be immobilized via similar pathways. PMID:25734534

  10. Immobilized synthetic pathway for biodegradation of toxic recalcitrant pollutant 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Pavel; Bidmanova, Sarka; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek

    2014-06-17

    The anthropogenic compound 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) has recently drawn attention as an emerging groundwater contaminant. No living organism, natural or engineered, is capable of the efficient aerobic utilization of this toxic industrial waste product. We describe a novel biotechnology for transforming TCP based on an immobilized synthetic pathway. The pathway is composed of three enzymes from two different microorganisms: engineered haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064, and haloalcohol dehalogenase and epoxide hydrolase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1. Together, they catalyze consecutive reactions converting toxic TCP to harmless glycerol. The pathway was immobilized in the form of purified enzymes or cell-free extracts, and its performance was tested in batch and continuous systems. Using a packed bed reactor filled with the immobilized biocatalysts, 52.6 mmol of TCP was continuously converted into glycerol within 2.5 months of operation. The efficiency of the TCP conversion to the intermediates was 97%, and the efficiency of conversion to the final product glycerol was 78% during the operational period. Immobilized biocatalysts are suitable for removing TCP from contaminated water up to a 10 mM solubility limit, which is an order of magnitude higher than the concentration tolerated by living microorganisms. PMID:24787668

  11. Immobilized bacterial spores for use as bioindicators in the validation of thermal sterilization processes.

    PubMed

    Serp, D; von Stockar, U; Marison, I W

    2002-07-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051 and Bacillus stearothermophilus NCTC 10003 were immobilized in monodisperse alginate beads (diameter, 550 microm +/- 5%), and the capacity of the immobilized bioindicators to provide accurate and reliable F-values for sterilization processes was studied. The resistance of the beads to abrasion and heat was strong enough to ensure total retention of the bioindicators in the beads in a sterilization cycle. D- and z-values for free spores were identical to those for immobilized spores, which shows that immobilization does not modify the thermal resistance of the bioindicators. A D(100 degrees C) value of 1.5 min was found for free and immobilized B. subtilis spores heated in demineralized water, skimmed milk, and milk containing 4% fat, suggesting that a lipid concentration as low as 4% does not alter the thermal resistance of B. subtilis spores. Providing that the pH range is kept between 3.4 to 10 and that sufficiently low concentrations of Ca2+ competitors or complexants are present in the medium, immobilized bioindicators may serve as an efficient, accurate, and reliable tool with which to validate the efficiency of any sterilization process. The environmental factors (pH, media composition) affecting the thermoresistance of native contaminants are intrinsically reflected in the F-value, allowing for a sharper adjustment of the sterilization process. Immobilized spores of B. stearothermophilus were successfully used to validate a resonance and interference microwave system that is believed to offer a convenient alternative for the sterilization of temperature-sensitive products and medical wastes. PMID:12117247

  12. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  13. Oxomemazine hydro­chloride

    PubMed Central

    Siddegowda, M. S.; Butcher, Ray J.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H. S.; Ramesh, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound [systematic name: 3-(5,5-dioxo­phen­othia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl­propanaminium chloride], C18H23N2O2S+·Cl−, the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia­zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯π inter­actions. PMID:22090928

  14. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

  16. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-08-07

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents.

  17. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  18. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-02-26

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a

  19. ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic pollutants may constitute the most widespread waste loadings into the waters of Lake Superior. There are essentially three categories of organic contaminants. The first grouping consists of those organic compounds that readily degrade biologically or chemically. The secon...

  20. Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Upjohn Company sought a solution to their problem of potential particulate contamination of sterile injectable drugs. Contamination was caused by dust particles attracted by static electrical charge, which clung to plastic curtains in clean rooms. Upjohn found guidance in NASA Tech Briefs which provided detailed information for reducing static electricity. Guidelines for setting up static free work stations, materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection.

  1. EFFECTS OF NO3-, CL-, F-, SO42-, AND CO32- ON PB2+ IMMOBILIZATION BY HYDROXYAPATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of Pb-contaminated wastes has received considerable attention recently. e have previously shown that hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4OH] can reduce Pb 2+ concentrations below the EPA action level (72.4 nmol L-1) and, thus, has the potential for in situ Pb 2+ immobilization aga...

  2. TOXIC METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR POSSIBLE IMMOBILIZATION STRATEGIES FOR PB, CD, AS, AND HG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contamination of soils by toxic metals is a widespread, serious problem that demands immediate action either by removal or immobilization, which is defined as a process which puts the metal into a chemical form, probably as a mineral, which will be inert and highly insoluble ...

  3. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  4. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  5. Chloride transport in human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmark, M

    1975-01-01

    1. The chloride equilibrium flux (chloride self-exchange) was determined by measuring the rate of 36Cl efflux from radioactively labelled human red cells. The cellular chloride concentration was varied between 5 and 700 mM by the nystatin technique (Cass & Dalmark, 1973). The chloride transport capacity was not affected by the nystatin technique. 2. The chloride equilibrium flux showed saturation kinetics in the pH range between 6-2 and 9-2 (0 degrees C). The chloride transport decreased at chloride concentrations higher than those which gave the maximum transport. 3. The apparent half-saturation constant, (K1/2), depended on the pH and whether the chloride transport was perceived as a function of the chloride concentration in the medium or in the cell water. The (K1/2)m increased and the (K1/2)c decreased with increasing pH. The dependence of the chloride transport on the chloride concentration was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 7-2, but at values of pH outside pH 7-8 S-shaped or steeper graphs were observed. 4. The chloride equilibrium flux varied with the pH at constant chloride concentration in the medium (pH 5-7-9-5). The transport had a bell-shaped pH dependence at chloride concentrations below 200 mM. At chloride concentrations between 300 and 600 mM the chloride transport increased with increasing pH to reach a plateau around pH 8. The position of the acidic branches of the pH graphs was independent of the chloride concentration (25-600 mM), but the position of the alkaline branches moved towards higher values of pH with increasing chloride concentration (5-150 mM). Thus, the position of the pH optimum increased with increasing chloride concentration. The chloride transport at low pH values was a function of the inverse second power of the hydrogen ion concentration. The pK of the groups which caused the inhibition was approximately 6 and independent of the temperature (0-18 degrees C). 5. The chloride equilibrium flux as a function of

  6. Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites.

  7. Monitoring and modeling wetland chloride concentrations in relationship to oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Post van der Burg, Max; Tangen, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Extraction of oil and gas via unconventional methods is becoming an important aspect of energy production worldwide. Studying the effects of this development in countries where these technologies are being widely used may provide other countries, where development may be proposed, with some insight in terms of concerns associated with development. A fairly recent expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America provides such an opportunity. Rapid increases in energy development in North America have caught the attention of managers and scientists as a potential stressor for wildlife and their habitats. Of particular concern in the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. is the potential for chloride-rich produced water associated with unconventional oil and gas development to alter the water chemistry of wetlands. We describe a landscape scale modeling approach designed to examine the relationship between potential chloride contamination in wetlands and patterns of oil and gas development. We used a spatial Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to assess multiple models explaining chloride concentrations in wetlands. These models included effects related to oil and gas wells (e.g. age of wells, number of wells) and surficial geology (e.g. glacial till, outwash). We found that the model containing the number of wells and the surficial geology surrounding a wetland best explained variation in chloride concentrations. Our spatial predictions showed regions of localized high chloride concentrations. Given the spatiotemporal variability of regional wetland water chemistry, we do not regard our results as predictions of contamination, but rather as a way to identify locations that may require more intensive sampling or further investigation. We suggest that an approach like the one outlined here could easily be extended to more of an adaptive monitoring approach to answer questions about chloride contamination risk that are of interest to managers. PMID

  8. Method of treating fluoride contaminated wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.K.; Kakaria, V.K.

    1988-04-05

    A method for treating spent aluminum smelting potliner material containing fluoride contaminants is described which comprises: adding silica to the material to form a mixture thereof; elevating the temperature of the mixture within the range of 1,000/sup 0/ to 1,700/sup 0/C. to form a slag; providing sufficient silica in the mixture and forming the slag in the presence of sufficient water for pyrohydrolysis conditions resulting in the volatilization of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants mostly in the form of hydrogen fluoride; and cooling the slag remaining after volatilizatiion of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants to produce an insoluble silicate glass-residue containing any remaining portion of the fluoride contaminants in an immobile state.

  9. Indium-111 chloride imaging with ununited fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sayle, B.A.; Fawcett, H.D.; Yudt, W.M.; Wang, S.C.; Mader, J.T.; Cierny, G. 3d.

    1987-03-01

    Twenty patients with ununited fractures and a suspicion of infection had In-111 chloride imaging. Surgically obtained cultures were positive for infection in 12 and negative in eight patients. In-111 chloride images were positive in all 12 patients with infection but also were positive in six of the patients with negative cultures. It is not possible to differentiate infected from noninfected ununited fractures by In-111 chloride imaging.

  10. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  11. Concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire from 1960 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Several studies from the 1970s and more recently (for example, Hall (1975), Daley and others (2009) and Mullaney (2009)) have found that concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire have increased during the past 50 years. Increases likely are related to road salt and other anthropogenic sources, such as septic systems, wastewater, and contamination from landfills and salt-storage areas. According to water-quality data reported to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES), about 100 public water systems (5 percent) in 2010 had at least one groundwater sample with chloride concentrations that were equal to or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) of 250 mg/L before the water was treated for public consumption. The SMCL for chloride is a measurement of potential cosmetic or aesthetic effects of chloride in water. High concentrations of chloride and sodium in drinking-water sources can be costly to remove. A new cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the NHDES (Medalie, 2012) assessed chloride and sodium levels in groundwater in New Hampshire from the 1960s through 2011. The purpose of the study was to integrate all data on concentrations of chloride and sodium from groundwater in New Hampshire available from various Federal and State sources, including from the NHDES, the New Hamsphire Department of Health and Human Services, the USGS, and the U.S. Environmental Protection SurveyAgency (USEPA), for public and private (domestic) wells and to organize the data into a database. Medalie (2012) explained the many assumptions and limitations of disparate data that were collected to meet wide-ranging objectives. This fact sheet summarizes the most important findings of the data.

  12. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF PCP AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - SELMA, CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technolgy Evaluation Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of contaminated soil The STC immobilization technology uses a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stabilize and ...

  13. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  14. Immobilization depresses insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hirose, M; Kaneki, M; Sugita, H; Yasuhara, S; Martyn, J A

    2000-12-01

    Prolonged immobilization depresses insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle and leads to a catabolic state in the affected areas, with resultant muscle wasting. To elucidate the altered intracellular mechanisms involved in the insulin resistance, we examined insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-subunit (IR-beta) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and activation of its further downstream molecule, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), after unilateral hindlimb immobilization in the rat. The contralateral hindlimb served as control. After 7 days of immobilization of the rat, insulin was injected into the portal vein, and tibialis anterior muscles on both sides were extracted. Immobilization reduced insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-beta and IRS-1. Insulin-stimulated binding of IRS-1 to p85, the regulatory subunit of PI 3-K, and IRS-1-associated PI 3-K activity were also decreased in the immobilized hindlimb. Although IR-beta and p85 protein levels were unchanged, IRS-1 protein expression was downregulated by immobilization. Thus prolonged immobilization may cause depression of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle by altering insulin action at multiple points, including the tyrosine phosphorylation, protein expression, and activation of essential components of insulin signaling pathways. PMID:11093909

  15. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  16. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  17. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  18. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  19. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, O.M.; Hansen, P.F.; Coats, A.M.; Glasser, F.P.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature). The measurements are modelled on Fick's law modified by a term for chloride binding. Inclusion of chloride binding significantly improves the profile shape of the modelled ingress profiles. The presence of fine aggregate and formation of interfacial transition zones at paste-aggregate boundaries does not significantly affect diffusion rates.

  20. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  1. Immobilization and characterization of a thermostable lipase.

    PubMed

    Song, Chongfu; Sheng, Liangquan; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2013-12-01

    Lipases have found a number of commercial applications. However, thermostable lipase immobilized on nanoparticle is not extensively characterized. In this study, a recombinant thermostable lipase (designated as TtL) from Thermus thermophilus WL was expressed in Escherichia coli and immobilized onto 3-APTES-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 supermagnetic nanoparticles. Based on analyses with tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer observation, the diameter of immobilized lipase nanoparticle was 18.4 (± 2.4) nm, and its saturation magnetization value was 52.3 emu/g. The immobilized lipase could be separated from the reaction medium rapidly and easily in a magnetic field. The biochemical characterizations revealed that, comparing with the free one, the immobilized lipase exhibited better resistance to temperature, pH, metal ions, enzyme inhibitors, and detergents. The K m value for the immobilized TtL (2.56 mg/mL) was found to be lower than that of the free one (3.74 mg/mL), showing that the immobilization improved the affinity of lipase for its substrate. In addition, the immobilized TtL exhibited good reusability. It retained more than 79.5 % of its initial activity after reusing for 10 cycles. Therefore, our study presented that the possibility of the efficient reuse of the thermostable lipase immobilized on supermagnetic nanoparticles made it attractive from the viewpoint of practical application. PMID:23748908

  2. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C.; Harvey, G.

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  3. Sources of High-Chloride Water to Wells, Eastern San Joaquin Ground-Water Subbasin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Metzger, Loren F.; McPherson, Kelly R.; Everett, Rhett; Bennett, George L.

    2006-01-01

    As a result of pumping and subsequent declines in water levels, chloride concentrations have increased in water from wells in the Eastern San Joaquin Ground-Water Subbasin, about 80 miles east of San Francisco (Montgomery Watson, Inc., 2000). Water from a number of public-supply, agricultural, and domestic wells in the western part of the subbasin adjacent to the San Joaquin Delta exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (fig. 1) (link to animation showing chloride concentrations in water from wells, 1984 to 2004). Some of these wells have been removed from service. High-chloride water from delta surface water, delta sediments, saline aquifers that underlie freshwater aquifers, and irrigation return are possible sources of high-chloride water to wells (fig. 2). It is possible that different sources contribute high-chloride water to wells in different parts of the subbasin or even to different depths within the same well.

  4. Enhancing isomaltulose production by recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase: culture medium optimization containing agricultural wastes and cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Yu, Jianguang; Wang, Yanyuan; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2013-10-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose commercially used in food industries. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase (SIase) was used to convert sucrose into isomaltulose. To develop an economical industrial medium, untreated cane molasses (10.63 g l⁻¹), yeast extract (25.93 g l⁻¹), and corn steep liquor (10.45 g l⁻¹) were used as main culture compositions for SIase production. The relatively high SIase activity (14.50 ± 0.11 U mg DCW⁻¹) was obtained by the recombinant cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on SIase production by engineered E. coli using untreated cane molasses. The recombinant E. coli cells expressing the SIase gene were immobilized in calcium alginate gel in order to improve the efficiency of recycling. The immobilization was most effective with 2 % (w/v) sodium alginate and 3 % (w/v) calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was 20 % (w/v, wet wt.), with a hardening time of 8 h for cell immobilization. The immobilized E. coli cells exhibited good stability for 30 batches with the productivity of 0.45 g isomaltulose g pellet⁻¹ h⁻¹. A continuous isomaltulose formation process using a column reactor remained stable for 40 days with 83 ± 2 % isomaltulose yield, which would be beneficial for economical production of isomaltulose. PMID:23300051

  5. An immobilized and reusable Cu(I) catalyst for metal ion-free conjugation of ligands to fully deprotected oligonucleotides through click reaction.

    PubMed

    Eltepu, Laxman; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2013-01-01

    Chelation of Cu(I) ions to an immobilized hydrophilic tris(triazolylmethyl)amine chelator on a solid support allowed synthesis of RNA oligonucleotide conjugates from completely deprotected alkyne-oligonucleotides. No oligonucleotide strand degradation or metal ion contamination was observed. Furthermore, use of the immobilized copper(I) ion overcame regioselectivity issues associated with strain-promoted copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition. PMID:23172132

  6. Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.

    2000-07-19

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

  7. Immobilized Enzymes and Cells as Practical Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1983-02-01

    Performance of enzymes and whole cells in commercial applications can often be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalysts, for instance, by their covalent attachment to or adsorption on solid supports, entrapment in polymeric gels, encapsulation, and cross-linking. The effect of immobilization on enzymatic properties and stability of biocatalysts is considered. Applications of immobilized enzymes and cells in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, in clinical and chemical analyses, and in medicine, as well as probable future trends in enzyme technology are discussed.

  8. Immobilized enzymes and cells as practical catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klibanov, A.M.

    1983-02-11

    Performance of enzymes and whole cells in commercial applications can often be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalysts, for instance, by their covalent attachment to or adsorption on solid supports, entrapment in polymeric gels, encapsulation, and cross-linking. The effect of immobilization on enzymatic properties and stability of biocatalysts is considered. Applications of immobilized enzymes and cells in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, in clinical and chemical analyses, and in medicine, as well as probable future trends in enzyme technology are discussed.

  9. Enhanced dechlorination of trichloroethylene using electrospun polymer nanofibrous mats immobilized with iron/palladium bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Huang, Yunpeng; Shen, Mingwu; Guo, Rui; Cao, Xueyan; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-04-15

    Fe/Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have held great promise for treating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater, without the accumulation of chlorinated intermediates. However, the conventionally used colloidal Fe/Pd NPs usually aggregate rapidly, resulting in a reduced reactivity. To reduce the particle aggregation, we employed electrospun polyacrylic acid (PAA)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer nanofibers as a nanoreactor to immobilize Fe/Pd bimetallic NPs. In the study, the water-stable PAA/PVA nanofibrous mats were complexed with Fe (III) ions via the binding with the free carboxyl groups of PAA for subsequent formation and immobilization of zero-valent iron (ZVI) NPs. Fe/Pd bimetallic NPs were then formed by the partial reduction of Pd(II) ions with ZVI NPs. The formed electrospun nanofibrous mats containing Fe/Pd bimetallic NPs with a diameter of 2.8 nm were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The Fe/Pd NP-containing electrospun PAA/PVA nanofibrous mats exhibited higher reactivity than that of the ZVI NP-containing mats or colloidal Fe/Pd NPs in the dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE), which was used as a model contaminant. With the high surface area to volume ratio, high porosity, and great reusability of the fibrous mats immobilized with the bimetallic NPs, the composite nanofibrous mats should be amenable for applications in remediation of various environmental contaminants. PMID:22138171

  10. XAFS Studies of Ni Ta and Nb Chlorides in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl Imidazolium Chloride / Aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    W OGrady; D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek

    2011-12-31

    The structures of anhydrous nickel, niobium, and tantalum chlorides have been investigated in situ in acidic and basic ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/AlCl{sub 3} with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The coordination of NiCl{sub 2} changes from tetrahedral in basic solution to octahedral in acidic solution. The NiCl{sub 2} is a strong Lewis acid in that it can induce the AlCl{sub 3} to share its chlorides in the highly acidic IL, forming a structure with six near Cl{sup -} ions and eight further distant Al ions which share the chloride ions surrounding the Ni{sup 2+}. When Nb{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}, a dimer, is added to the acidic or basic solution, the dimer breaks apart and forms two species. In the acid solution, two trigonal bipyramids are formed with five equal chloride distances, while in the basic solution, a square pyramid with four chlorides forming a square base and one shorter axial chloride bond. Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 10} is also a dimer and divides into half in the acidic solution and forms two trigonal bipyramids. In the basic solution, the dimer breaks apart but the species formed is sufficiently acidic that it attracts two additional chloride ions and forms a seven coordinated tantalum species.

  11. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  12. Fourier transform infrared assay of membrane lipids immobilized to silica: leaching and stability of immobilized artificial membrane-bonded phases.

    PubMed

    Markovich, R J; Stevens, J M; Pidgeon, C

    1989-11-01

    A nondestructive, sensitive assay to monitor the hydrocarbon content of silica-based chromatography particles has been developed. The assay requires a microscope accessory interfaced with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. For determining hydrocarbon content, undiluted alkyl-silica-bonded phases were pressed into a thin wafer. Hydrocarbon content was quantitated using the integrated hydrocarbon band intensity between 2995 and 2825 cm-1 [i.e., band area C-H] and the integrated silica oxide band intensity between 1945 and 1780 cm-1 [i.e., band area Si-O]. Plotting the [band area C-H]/[band area Si-O] ratio vs the carbon content determined by elemental analysis gave a correlation coefficient of r = 0.997. The FTIR assay was validated on 5-, 7-, and 12-microns silica particles using three different immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) silica-bonded phases. The utility of the FTIR assay in determining hydrocarbon content was demonstrated by evaluating hydrocarbon leaching from IAM phases exposed to mobile-phase solvents. The ability of organic solvents to leach hydrocarbon from IAM phases containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) as the immobilized ligand was chloroform greater than ethanol approximately methanol greater than ethyl acetate greater than methylene chloride greater than acetonitrile greater than acetone. Acetone and acetonitrile cause very little hydrocarbon leaching from HPLC-IAM.PC columns. When challenged with different mobile phases, IAM.PC columns perfused with mobile phase are more stable than IAM.PC-bonded phases stirred in mobile phases. IAM.PC contains lecithin linked to silica by amide bonds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2558589

  13. Mercury Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Marcella R.

    2013-01-01

    IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

  14. Restaurant emissions removal by a biofilter with immobilized bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jian-Yu; Zheng, Lian-Ying; Guo, Xiao-Fen

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas sp. ZD8 isolated from contaminated soil was immobilized with platane wood chips to produce packing materials for a novel biofilter system utilized to control restaurant emissions. The effects of operational parameters including retention time, temperature, and inlet gas concentration on the removal efficiency and elimination capacity were evaluated. Criteria necessary for a scale-up design of the biofilter was established. High and satisfactory level of rapeseed oil smoke removal efficiency was maintained during operation and the optimal retention time was found to be 18 s corresponding to smoke removal efficiency greater than 97%. The optimal inlet rapeseed oil smoke loading was 120 mg/(m(3) x h) at the upper end of the linear correlation between inlet loading and elimination capacity. PMID:15822160

  15. Restaurant emissions removal by a biofilter with immobilized bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jian-yu; Zheng, Lian-ying; Guo, Xiao-fen

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. ZD8 isolated from contaminated soil was immobilized with platane wood chips to produce packing materials for a novel biofilter system utilized to control restaurant emissions. The effects of operational parameters including retention time, temperature, and inlet gas concentration on the removal efficiency and elimination capacity were evaluated. Criteria necessary for a scale-up design of the biofilter was established. High and satisfactory level of rapeseed oil smoke removal efficiency was maintained during operation and the optimal retention time was found to be 18 s corresponding to smoke removal efficiency greater than 97%. The optimal inlet rapeseed oil smoke loading was 120 mg/(m3·h) at the upper end of the linear correlation between inlet loading and elimination capacity. PMID:15822160

  16. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  17. Glutamate-gated Chloride Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are found only in protostome invertebrate phyla but are closely related to mammalian glycine receptors. They have a number of roles in these animals, controlling locomotion and feeding and mediating sensory inputs into behavior. In nematodes and arthropods, they are targeted by the macrocyclic lactone family of anthelmintics and pesticides, making the GluCls of considerable medical and economic importance. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of a GluCl was solved, the first for any eukaryotic ligand-gated anion channel, revealing a macrocyclic lactone-binding site between the channel domains of adjacent subunits. This minireview will highlight some unique features of the GluCls and illustrate their contribution to our knowledge of the entire Cys loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. PMID:23038250

  18. Chloride ion pairs in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.X.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1987-09-02

    The study of ions in water by statistical mechanical methods has made a significant contribution to the authors understanding of solution chemistry and biological processes in saline solutions. Integral equation methods have been used recently by Pettitt and Rossky to study solvent-averaged forces and the effective interactions or the potentials of mean force (PMF) for the alkali halides in water at infinite dilution. In this communication, they report a quantitative study of the Cl/sup -/-Cl/sup -/ PMF in water with use of an umbrella sampling method and the same Hamiltonian as that used in the integral equation study. The system studied here consists of two chloride ions and 295 water molecules in a rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions and lengths of 25.4, 18.6, and 18.6 A in the x,y,z directions, respectively.

  19. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  20. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  1. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Nedovic, Viktor; Goyal, Arun; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed. PMID:24288597

  2. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene Chloride. 1910.1052 Section 1910.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1052 Methylene Chloride. This...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1910.1017 Section 1910.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1017 Vinyl chloride. (a) Scope and...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride....

  17. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  18. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Rask, W.C.; Phillips, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  19. Peat porewater chloride concentration profiles in the Everglades during wet/dry cycles from January 1996 to June 1998: Field measurements and theoretical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Reddy, M.B.; Kipp, K.L.; Burman, A.; Schuster, P.; Rawlik, P.S., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality is a key aspect of the Everglades Restoration Project, the largest water reclamation and ecosystem management project proposed in the United States. Movement of nutrients and contaminants to and from Everglades peat porewater could have important consequences for Everglades water quality and ecosystem restoration activities. In a study of Everglades porewater, we observed complex, seasonally variable peat porewater chloride concentration profiles at several locations. Analyses and interpretation of these changing peat porewater chloride concentration profiles identifies processes controlling conservative solute movement at the peat-surface water interface, that is, solutes whose transport is minimally affected by chemical and biological reactions. We examine, with an advection-diffusion model, how alternating wet and dry climatic conditions in the Florida Everglades mediate movement of chloride between peat porewater and marsh surface water. Changing surface water-chloride concentrations alter gradients at the interface between peat and overlying water and hence alter chloride flux across that interface. Surface water chloride concentrations at two frequently monitored sites vary with marsh water depth, and a transfer function was developed to describe daily marsh surface water chloride concentration as a function of marsh water depth. Model results demonstrate that porewater chloride concentrations are driven by changing surface water chloride concentrations, and a sensitivity analysis suggests that inclusion of advective transport in the model improves the agreement between the calculated and the observed chloride concentration profiles. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Hydrocracking with molten zinc chloride catalyst containing 2-12% ferrous chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Bagshaw, Gary H.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. by contacting the feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten zinc chloride catalyst and thereafter separating at least a major portion of the hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten zinc chloride catalyst, an improvement comprising: adjusting the FeCl.sub.2 content of the molten zinc chloride to from about 2 to about 12 mol percent based on the mixture of ferrous chloride and molten zinc chloride.

  1. Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

  2. Mechanism of Sperm Immobilization by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vijay; Sandhu, Ravneet; Kaur, Siftjit; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Sarwal, Abha; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.; Singh, Shravan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To explore the influence of Escherichia coli on the motility of human spermatozoa and its possible mechanism. Methods. Highly motile preparations of spermatozoa from normozoospermic patients were coincubated with Escherichia coli for 4 hours. At 1, 2 and 4 hours of incubation, sperm motility was determined. The factor responsible for sperm immobilization without agglutination was isolated and purified from filtrates. Results. This report confirms the immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrates sperm immobilization factor (SIF) excreted by E. coli. Further this factor was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel permeation chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. Purified SIF (56 kDa) caused instant immobilization without agglutination of human spermatozoa at 800 μg/mL and death at 2.1 mg/mL. Spermatozoa incubated with SIF revealed multiple and profound alterations involving all superficial structures of spermatozoa as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion. In conclusion, these results have shown immobilization of spermatozoa by E. coli and demonstrate a factor (SIF) produced and secreted by E. coli which causes variable structural damage as probable morphological correlates of immobilization. PMID:20379358

  3. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  4. Chloride in Groundwater and Surface Water in Areas Underlain by the Glacial Aquifer System, Northern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullaney, John R.; Lorenz, David L.; Arntson, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    A study of chloride in groundwater and surface water was conducted for the glacial aquifer system of the northern United States in forested, agricultural, and urban areas by analyzing data collected for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program from 1991 to 2004. Groundwater-quality data from a sampling of 1,329 wells in 19 states were analyzed. Chloride concentrations were greater than the secondary maximum contaminant level established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of 250 milligrams per liter in 2.5 percent of samples from 797 shallow monitoring wells and in 1.7 percent of samples from 532 drinking-water supply wells. Water samples from shallow monitoring wells in urban areas had the largest concentration of chloride, followed by water samples from agricultural and forested areas (medians of 46, 12, and 2.9 milligrams per liter, respectively). An analysis of chloride:bromide ratios, by mass, and chloride concentrations compared to binary mixing curves for dilute groundwater, halite, sewage and animal waste, potassium chloride fertilizer, basin brines, seawater, and landfill leachate in samples from monitoring wells indicated multiple sources of chloride in samples from wells in urban areas and agricultural areas. Water from shallow monitoring wells in urban areas had the largest chloride:bromide ratio, and samples with chloride:bromide ratios greater than 1,000 and chloride concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per liter were dominated by halite; however, the samples commonly contained mixtures that indicated input from sewage or animal waste. Chloride:bromide ratios were significantly larger in samples from public-supply drinking-water wells than from private drinking-water wells, and ratios were significantly larger in all drinking-water wells in eastern and central regions of the glacial aquifer system than in west-central and western regions of the glacial aquifer system. Surface-water-quality data collected regularly during varying

  5. Determination of residual vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride, vinyl chloride copolymers, and articles from polyvinyl chloride by the method of equilibrium vapor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykova, T.A.; Konstantinova, E.I.; Lazaris, A. Ya.

    1985-11-01

    In connection with the fact that vinyl chloride (VC) has carcinogenic properties, norms for its content both in the work place and also in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and articles made from it have been sharply reduced. The method of equilibrium vapor analysis (EVA) has been used to determine vinyl chloride; this is carried out with the aid of devices for automatic metering. In the present work, the authors have investigated the possibility of applying the EVA method to PVC resins, VC copolymers, and articles made of PVC with the objective of developing universal methods of analyzing such objects. A two-stage separation is used in which the sample is preliminarily separated in a fore-column. The separation was worked out on the model mixture of methyl chloride-VC-ethyl chloride. The limit of VC detection is shown to be 5 x 10/sup -6/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/% by wt.

  6. Contamination control

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.C.

    1983-11-01

    An evaluation showed that fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles can replace polyethylene bottles when used for in-process cleaning. Fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles do not contaminate solvents stored in the bottles as polyethylene bottles do. In addition, a limited survey of industrial practices regarding aerosol spray container control showed containers are being controlled without inconveniencing production.

  7. Hyperalgesia in an immobilized rat hindlimb: effect of treadmill exercise using non-immobilized limbs.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Sayaka; Nakano, Jiro; Sekino, Yuki; Hamaue, Yohei; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Cast immobilization of limbs causes hyperalgesia, which is a decline of the threshold of mechanical and thermal mechanical stimuli. The immobilization-induced hyperalgesia (IIH) can disturb rehabilitation and activities of daily living in patients with orthopedic disorders. However, it is unclear what therapeutic and preventive approaches can be used to alleviate IIH. Exercise that activates the descending pain modulatory system may be effective for IIH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise during the immobilization period, using the non-immobilized limbs, on IIH. Thirty-six 8-week-old Wistar rats were randomly divided into (1) control, (2) immobilization (Im), and (3) immobilization and treadmill exercise (Im+Ex) groups. In the Im and Im+Ex groups, the right ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for an 8-week period. In the Im+Ex group, treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week) was administered during the immobilization period while the right hindlimb was kept immobilized. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using von Frey filaments every week. To investigate possible activation of the descending pain modulatory system, beta-endorphin expression levels in hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray were analyzed. Although IIH clearly occurred in the Im group, the hyperalgesia was partially but significantly reduced in the Im+Ex group. Beta-endorphin, which is one of the endogenous opioids, was selectively increased in the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray of the Im+Ex group. Our data suggest that treadmill running using the non-immobilized limbs reduces the amount of hyperalgesia induced in the immobilized limb even if it is not freed. This ameliorating effect might be due to the descending pain modulatory system being activated by upregulation of beta-endorphin in the brain. PMID:25304541

  8. The use of synthetic hydrocalcite as a chloride-ion getter for a barrier aluminum anodization process

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Sharp, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Chloride ion contamination at parts per billion concentrations plaques electrochemists studying barrier anodic aluminum oxide film growth and anodic aluminum oxide capacitor manufacturers. Chloride ion contamination slows film growth and reduces film quality. We have demonstrated that synthetic hydrocalcite substantially reduces the detrimental effects of chloride ion contamination in an aqueous electrolyte commonly used to grow barrier anodic aluminum oxide. We have determined that problems arise if precautions are not taken when using synthetic hydrocalcite as a chloride-ion getter in an aqueous electrolyte. Synthetic hydrocalcite is somewhat hydrophobic. If this powder is added directly to an aqueous electrolyte, some powder disperses; some floats to the top of the bath and forms scum that locally impedes anodic film formation. Commercially available powder contains a wide range of particle sizes including submicrometer-sized particles that can escape through filters into the electrolyte and cause processing problems. These problems can be over come if (1) the getter is placed in filter bags, (2) a piece of filter paper is used to skim trace amounts of getter floating on the top of the bath, (3) dummy runs are performed to scavenge chloride-ion loaded getter micelles dispersed in the bath, and (4) substrates are rinsed with a strong stream of deionized water to remove trace amounts of powder after anodization.

  9. Immobilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes in a developed sulfur polymer cement (SPC) matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Wagdy, M.; Azim, Abdel; El-Gammal, Belal; Husain, Ahmed

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A process has been developed for the immobilization Cs, Sr, Ce, Pb, and Cr in forms that is non-dispersible and could be safely immobilized. The simulated radioactive wastes of Cs, Sr, and Ce, and the hazardous wastes of Cr, and Pb were immobilized in the stable form of sulfur polymer cement (SPC). In this process, the contaminants (in a single form) were added to the sulfur mixture of sulfur and aromatic /or aliphatic hydrocarbons that used as polymerizing agents for sulfur (95% S, and 5% organic polymer by weight). Durability of the fabricated SPC matrices was assessed in terms of their water of immersion, porosity, and compressive strength. The water immersion, and open porosity were found to be less than 2.5% for all the prepared matrices, whereas the compressive strength was in the range between 62.4 and 142.3 Kg.cm{sup -2}, depending on the composition of the prepared matrix. The prepared SPC matrices that characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the different added contaminants were stabilized during the solidification process during their reaction with sulfur and the organic polymer to form the corresponding metal sulfides. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the IAEA standard method have assessed the leachability of the prepared waste matrices. The TCLP results showed that most the concentration of the contaminants released were under their detection limit. The leach index for the investigated metals from the prepared SPC matrices was in the range of 9-11. The order of release of the investigated metals was Sr>Cs>Pb>Cr>Ce for the aliphatic polymer, and Sr>Cr>Pb>Cs>Ce for the aromatic one. The results obtained revealed a high performance for the prepared SPC matrices, as they are of low cost effect, highly available materials, and possessed good mechanical and leaching properties. Key Words: SPC/ Matrices/ Immobilization/ Wastes/ Leachability. (authors)

  10. Adherence of oral streptococci to an immobilized antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takatsuka, T; Kato, T; Ishihara, K; Okuda, K

    1997-08-01

    An antimicrobial agent, 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride, was immobilized on silica. Interaction between the material (termed) OAIS) and various oral bacterial species were then studied. Seven species of Streptococcus and two Actinomyces were investigated for their ability to adhere to this biomaterial. Cell-surface hydrophobicity and zeta-potential were examined as well. Analysis of extracted hydrophobic proteins which adhered to OAIS revealed that the adherence of these micro-organisms was closely related to the hydrophobicity of their cell surfaces. The results of zeta-potential assays indicated that negative charge on the cell surface inhibited adherence to OAIS. Gel electrophoresis revealed that OAIS could absorb cell-surface hydrophobic proteins from all bacterial species tested. Preadsorption of hydrophobic components on the cell surface inhibited adherence of the Strep. mutans strain to OAIS in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that OAIS adsorption of these oral bacteria was dependent on the degree of hydrophobicity of their surfaces. A major component of this adherence was hydrophobic cell-surface proteins. PMID:9347116

  11. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum immobilization in alginate coated with chitosan and gelatin on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Imen; Ayadi, Dorra; Bejar, Wacim; Bejar, Samir; Chouayekh, Hichem; Ben Salah, Riadh

    2014-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate and evaluate the efficiency of immobilizing the Lactobacillus plantarum TN9 strain in alginate using chitosan and gelatin as coating materials, in terms of viability and antibacterial activity. The results indicate that maximum concentrations of L. plantarum TN9 strain were produced with 2% sodium alginate, 10(8)UFC/ml, and 1M calcium chloride. The viability and antibacterial activity of the L. plantarum TN9 cultures before and after immobilization in alginate, chitosan-coated alginate, and gelatin-coated alginate, were studied. The findings revealed that the viability of encapsulated L. plantarum could be preserved more than 5.8 log CFU/ml after 35 day of incubation at 4 °C, and no effects were observed when gelatin was used. The antibacterial activity of encapsulated L. plantarum TN9 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria was enhanced in the presence of chitosan coating materials, and no activity was observed in the presence of gelatin. The effects of catalase and proteolytic enzymes on the culture supernatant of L. plantarum TN9 were also investigated, and the results suggested that the antibacterial activity observed was due to the production of organic acids. Taken together, the findings indicated that immobilization in chitosan enhanced the antibacterial activity of L. plantarum TN9 against several pathogenic bacteria. This encapsulated strain could be considered as a potential strong candidate for future application as an additive in the food and animal feed industries. PMID:24315948

  12. Comparison of Zirconium Phosphonate-Modified Surfaces for Immobilizing Phosphopeptides and Phosphate-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Forato, Florian; Liu, Hao; Benoit, Roland; Fayon, Franck; Charlier, Cathy; Fateh, Amina; Defontaine, Alain; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Queffélec, Clémence; Bujoli, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Different routes for preparing zirconium phosphonate-modified surfaces for immobilizing biomolecular probes are compared. Two chemical-modification approaches were explored to form self-assembled monolayers on commercially available primary amine-functionalized slides, and the resulting surfaces were compared to well-characterized zirconium phosphonate monolayer-modified supports prepared using Langmuir-Blodgett methods. When using POCl3 as the amine phosphorylating agent followed by treatment with zirconyl chloride, the result was not a zirconium-phosphonate monolayer, as commonly assumed in the literature, but rather the process gives adsorbed zirconium oxide/hydroxide species and to a lower extent adsorbed zirconium phosphate and/or phosphonate. Reactions giving rise to these products were modeled in homogeneous-phase studies. Nevertheless, each of the three modified surfaces effectively immobilized phosphopeptides and phosphopeptide tags fused to an affinity protein. Unexpectedly, the zirconium oxide/hydroxide modified surface, formed by treating the amine-coated slides with POCl3/Zr(4+), afforded better immobilization of the peptides and proteins and efficient capture of their targets. PMID:27166821

  13. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  14. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure. PMID:25768298

  15. REMOVAL OF IODIDE FROM GROUNDWATER USING SILVER CHLORIDE WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, M

    2008-11-26

    Releases from the F and H Area Seepage Basins on the Savannah River Site (SRS) have caused groundwater plumes that contain a variety of contaminants. These plumes are releasing contaminants into Fourmile Branch, which is a small tributary of the Savannah River. The metallic contaminant releases to the branch are being controlled by base injection. The base injection targets cationic contaminants and was not intended to reduce the concentration of I-129 in groundwater. SRS and the regulatory agencies believe it is appropriate to investigate remedial alternatives that could reduce the I-129. The Savannah River Site Area Closures Projects (ACP) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are developing an innovative in situ treatment for I-129 using silver chloride (AgCl). The proposed AgCl amendment has a very small particle size and is designed to be injected into the contaminated aquifer to capture I-129. The solubility of AgI is several orders of magnitude lower than the solubility of AgCl. Thus, when I-129 comes in contact with AgCl it forms silver iodide (AgI), which is very stable and essentially insoluble in water. SRNL has been performing bench-scale column tests on the effectiveness of silver chloride to capture iodine in an aqueous solution. These initial tests evaluate silver chloride in four different particle sizes; 4-5 millimeters (standard reagent silver chloride), approximately 1 millimeters (sieved reagent silver chloride), approximately 2 micrometers (ultra fine grind without a grinding agent), and <1 micrometer (ultra fine grind with a grinding agent). The first two experiments with macro-sized particles were proof of principle tests. In these the AgCl was mechanically mixed into a portion of the soil filling the columns. The last two were to test the effectiveness of injecting particles suspended in an aqueous solution--the ability to inject the particles, their retention in the column and their effectiveness at removing dissolved iodide

  16. Evaluation of DUSTRAN Software System for Modeling Chloride Deposition on Steel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Tracy T.; Jensen, Philip J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-07-29

    The degradation of steel by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) when exposed to atmospheric conditions for decades is a significant challenge in the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. SCC can occur when corrosive contaminants such as chlorides are deposited on a susceptible material in a tensile stress state. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has identified chloride-induced SCC as a potential cause for concern in stainless steel used nuclear fuel (UNF) canisters in dry storage. The modeling of contaminant deposition is the first step in predictive multiscale modeling of SCC that is essential to develop mitigation strategies, prioritize inspection, and ensure the integrity and performance of canisters, pipelines, and structural materials. A multiscale simulation approach can be developed to determine the likelihood that a canister would undergo SCC in a certain period of time. This study investigates the potential of DUSTRAN, a dust dispersion modeling system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, to model the deposition of chloride contaminants from sea salt aerosols on a steel canister. Results from DUSTRAN simulations run with historical meteorological data were compared against measured chloride data at a coastal site in Maine. DUSTRAN’s CALPUFF model tended to simulate concentrations higher than those measured; however, the closest estimations were within the same order of magnitude as the measured values. The decrease in discrepancies between measured and simulated values as the level of abstraction in wind speed decreased suggest that the model is very sensitive to wind speed. However, the influence of other parameters such as the distinction between open-ocean and surf-zone sources needs to be explored further. Deposition values predicted by the DUSTRAN system were not in agreement with concentration values and suggest that the deposition calculations may not fully represent physical processes. Overall, results indicate that with parameter

  17. Ground water contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers: Ground water contamination and basic concepts of water law; Federal law governing water contamination and remediation; Ground water flow and contaminant migration; Ground water cleanup under CERCLA; Technical methods of remediation and prevention of contamination; Liability for ground water contamination; State constraints on contamination of ground water; Water quantity versus water quality; Prevention of use of contaminated ground water as an alternative to remediation; Economic considerations in liability for ground water contamination; and Contamination, extraction, and injection issues.

  18. Embedded chloride detectors for roadways and bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.; McPadden, Adam P.; Cauley, Robert F.

    1996-04-01

    The problems associated with the application of chloride-based deicing agents to roadways and specifically bridges include chemical pollution and accelerated corrosion of strength members (especially rebar) within the structure. In many instances, local ordinances are attempting to force state agencies to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of these chlorides (typically at the cost of increased driving hazards). With respect to the corrosion aspects of chloride application, cracks that occur in the roadway/bridge pavement allow water to seep into the pavement carrying the chloride to the rebar with the resultant increase in corrosion. In response to this problem, particularly in high roadsalt usage areas, a chloride/water impermeable membrane is placed above the rebar matrix so if/when roadway cracking occurs, the roadsalts won't be able to damage the rebar. Such a membrane is costly -- and the question of its in-service performance is questionable. In a joint effort between the University of Vermont and the Vermont Agency of Transportation, we are developing fiber optic chloride detectors which are capable of being embedded into the rebar-concrete roadway under this membrane. The sensing mechanism relies on spectroscopic analysis of a chemical reaction of chloride and reagents (which have been coated onto the ends of fibers). Laboratory results of these detectors and a usable system configuration are presented.

  19. Materials for Conoco zinc chloride hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of zinc chloride to augment hydrogenation of coal and yield a high-octane gasoline product is the most significant feature of a coal liquefaction process being developed by Conoco Coal Development Company. The zinc chloride catalyst is regenerated in a fluidized sand bed, where the spent melt is mixed with air and hydrogen chloride at about 1000/sup 0/C. Recovery is completed at 370/sup 0/C in a condenser, where the zinc chloride is collected and the oxygen and sulfur are separated as H/sub 2/O and SO/sub 2/. The economic viability of the entire process is highly dependent on almost complete recovery of the zinc chloride. The severe environmental conditions of this recovery process cause unique materials problems. Although high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation are being studied in related programs, suitable materials to resist their combined effects along with those of chlorides have not yet been specifically addressed. Common engineering materials, such as the austenitic stainless steels and many nickel-base alloys, are unsuitable because of their inability to tolerate the elevated temperatures and sulfidation, respectively. The objectives of this task are to screen various metallic and ceramic materials for resistance to the zinc chloride recovery system environment and to determine the nature of the attack by exposing coupons to the simulated environment in the laboratory.

  20. Methylene chloride poisoning in a cabinet worker.

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, M; Kales, S N

    1999-01-01

    More than a million workers are at risk for methylene chloride exposure. Aerosol sprays and paint stripping may also cause significant nonoccupational exposures. After methylene chloride inhalation, significant amounts of carbon monoxide are formed in vivo as a metabolic by-product. Poisoning predominantly affects the central nervous system and results from both carboxyhemoglobin formation and direct solvent-related narcosis. In this report, we describe a case of methylene chloride intoxication probably complicated by exogenous carbon monoxide exposure. The worker's presentation of intermittent headaches was consistent with both methylene chloride intoxication and carbon monoxide poisoning. The exposures and symptoms were corroborated by elevated carboxyhemoglobin saturations and a workplace inspection that documented significant exposures to both methylene chloride and carbon monoxide. When both carbon monoxide and methylene chloride are inhaled, additional carboxyhemoglobin formation is expected. Preventive efforts should include education, air monitoring, and periodic carboxyhemoglobin determinations. Methylene chloride should never be used in enclosed or poorly ventilated areas because of the well-documented dangers of loss of consciousness and death. Images Figure 1 PMID:10464079

  1. Shelf life of unrefrigerated succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Boehm, J J; Dutton, D M; Poust, R I

    1984-02-01

    The shelf life of succinylcholine chloride injection at several pH values when stored at room temperature was evaluated. Solutions containing 20 mg/ml of succinylcholine chloride were stored at 25 and 40 degrees C. The reaction was studied at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 4.5. At two-week intervals, the solutions were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The initial amount of succinylcholine chloride in all samples was 100.1 +/- 2.37% of label claim. Hydrolysis of succinylcholine chloride in unbuffered solutions followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The pH range of maximum stability was found to be from 3.75 to 4.50. Succinylcholine chloride decomposed at a considerably higher rate at 40 degrees C. Allowing for the effects of pH adjustment during manufacture and degradation during shipping, losses of 7.0% and 9.0% potency can be expected after storage at 25 degrees C for four and six weeks, respectively. Succinylcholine Chloride Injection, USP, should be stored in the refrigerator; if unbuffered succinylcholine chloride injection complying with USP pH limits must be stored at room temperature, it should not be kept for longer than four weeks. PMID:6702837

  2. Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl)-enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production in an estuarine Alcaligenes faecalis strain.

    PubMed

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada; Dubey, S K; Naik, Milind Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) has been used extensively as an antifouling agent in ship paints, which results in the contamination of aquatic sites. These contaminated sites serve as enrichment areas for TBTCl-resistant bacterial strains. One TBTCl-resistant bacterial strain was isolated from the sediments of Zuari estuary, Goa, India, which is a major hub of various ship-building activities. Based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this bacterial strain was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis and designated as strain SD5. It could degrade ≥3 mM TBTCl by using it as a sole carbon source and transform it into the less toxic dibutyltin chloride, which was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Interestingly, this bacterial strain also showed enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production when cells were exposed to toxic levels of TBTCl, suggesting their involvement in conferring resistance to this antifouling biocide as well as degradative capability respectively. PMID:25612551

  3. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Adcock, James L.; Pace, Marshall O.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1984-01-01

    A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

  4. L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride is a new salt with (A⋯A+) type dimeric cation. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P21, Z = 2). The asymmetric unit contains one zwitterionic L-tryptophan molecule, one L-tryptophanium cation and one chloride anion. The dimeric cation is formed by a Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond with the O⋯O distance equal to 2.5556(18) Å. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystal are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophanium chloride.

  5. Binary Nucleation of Water and Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, Thomas; Marsik, Frantisek; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation processes in the binary water-sodium chloride system are investigated in the sense of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The CNT is modified to be able to handle the electrolytic nature of the system and is employed to investigate the acceleration of the nucleation process due to the presence of sodium chloride in the steam. This phenomenon, frequently observed in the Wilson zone of steam turbines, is called early condensation. Therefore, the nucleation rates of the water-sodium chloride mixture are of key importance in the power cycle industry.

  6. Water structure in concentrated lithium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, R. H.; Neilson, G. W.; Soper, A. K.

    1992-06-01

    The radial pair distribution functions gHH(r) and gOH(r) (to a good approximation) of 1 and 10 m solutions of lithium chloride in water have been obtained from neutron diffraction. It turns out that the intermolecular water structure in a solution of 10 m is affected considerably by the presence of ions—the number of hydrogen bonds is about 70% lower than in pure water. The intermolecular water structure in 1 m lithium chloride as well as the intramolecular water structure in both 1 and 10 m lithium chloride is not distinguishable from that of pure water in any measurable extent.

  7. Photocatalyzed destruction of water contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ollis, D.F. ); Pelizzetti, E. ); Serpone, N. )

    1991-09-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis is a process in which the illumination of an oxide semiconductor, usually the anatase form of titanium dioxide, produces photoexcited electrons (e{sup {minus}}) and holes (h{sup +}). These can migrate to the oxide surface and participate in half-cell reactions that are part of a closed, catalytic cycle. In the aqueous phase, the illuminated surface is widely regarded as a producer of hydroxyl radicals (e.g., h{sup +} + OH{sup {minus}} {yields} {center dot}OH), and these and other highly oxidizing initial products of this indirect photochemistry go on to attack oxidizable contaminants. This article highlights recent developments in photocatalysis that are applicable to water treatment. Topics discussed include the generality of photocatalysis for complete contaminant destruction (mineralization); some specific contaminant classes of interest (chlorinated aromatics, surfactants, herbicides, and pesticides); the use of solar versus artificial illumination; the influence of additional oxidants such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}; catalyst forms (suspended vs. immobilized); and related potential applications of photocatalysis (metal recovery and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses).

  8. Immobilization of thermolysin to polyamide nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Moeschel, Klaus; Nouaimi, Meryem; Steinbrenner, Christa; Bisswanger, Hans

    2003-04-20

    In the last few years, an increasing number of biotechnological techniques have been applied to the restoration and conservation of works of art, paintings, old maps, and papers or books. Enzymes can solve problems that give restorers difficulties, although for many applications it is not possible to use soluble enzymes; therefore, it is necessary to look for suitable carriers for immobilization. Different methods for covalent immobilization of enzymes to polyamide nonwovens were tested, using thermolysin as an example. Two distinct strategies were pursued: (1). controlled, partial hydrolysis of the polymer and subsequent binding of the enzyme to the released amino and carboxy groups; and (2). attachment of reactive groups directly to the polyamide without disintegrating the polymeric structure (O-alkylation). Different spacers were used for covalent fixation of the enzyme in both cases. The enzyme was fixed to the released amino groups by glutaraldehyde, either with or without a spacer. Either way, active enzyme could be immobilized to the matrix. However, intense treatment caused severe damage to the stability of the nonwoven fabric, and reduced the mechanical strength. Conditions were investigated to conserve the nonwoven fabric structure while obtaining near-maximum immobilized enzyme activity. Immobilization of the enzyme to the released carboxy group after acid hydrolysis was performed using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. In comparison to the enzyme bound via the amino group, the yield of immobilized enzyme activity was slightly lower when benzidine was taken as spacer and still lower with a 1,6-hexanediamine spacer. O-alkylation performed with dimethylsulfate caused severe damage to the nonwoven fabric structure. Considerably better results were obtained with triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate. As the spacers 1,6-hexanediamine and adipic acid dihydrazide were used, activation for immobilizing thermolysin was performed with glutaraldehyde, adipimidate, and azide

  9. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-04-15

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R&D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R&D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the excellent

  10. Heavy metal removal by novel CBD-EC20 sorbents immobilized on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaohui; Bae, Weon; Mulchandani, Ashok; Mehra, Rajesh K; Chen, Wilfred

    2002-01-01

    Heavy metals are major contributors to pollution of the biosphere, and their efficient removal from contaminated water is required. Biosorption is an emerging technology that has been shown to be effective in removing very low levels of heavy metal from wastewater. Although peptides such as metallothioneins or phytotchelatins are known to immobilize heavy metals, peptide-based biosorbents have not been extensively investigated. In this paper, we describe the construction and expression of bifunctional fusion proteins consisting of synthetic phytochelatin (EC20) linked to a Clostridium-derived cellulose-binding domain (CBD(clos)), enabling purification and immobilization of the fusions onto different cellulose materials in essentially a single step. The immobilized sorbents were shown to be highly effective in removing cadmium at parts per million levels. Repeated removal of cadmium was demonstrated in an immobilized column. The ability to genetically engineer biosorbents with precisely defined properties could provide an attractive strategy for developing high-affinity bioadsorbents suitable for heavy metal removal. PMID:12005515

  11. Design of a papain immobilized antimicrobial food package with curcumin as a crosslinker.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Cynthya Maria; Prabhawathi, Veluchamy; Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of food products by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms during post process handling is one of the major causes for food spoilage and food borne illnesses. The present green sustainable approach describes the covalent immobilization of papain to LDPE (low density polyethylene), HDPE (high density polyethylene), LLDPE (linear low density polyethylene) and PCL (polycaprolactam) with curcumin as the photocrosslinker. About 50% of curcumin and 82-92% of papain were successfully immobilized on these polymers. After 30 days, the free enzyme retained 87% of its original activity, while the immobilized enzyme retained more than 90% of its activity on these polymers. Papain crosslinked to LLDPE exhibited the best antibiofilm properties against Acinetobacter sp. KC119137.1 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 5021 when compared to the other three polymers, because of the highest amount of enzyme immobilized on this surface. Papain acts by damaging the cell membrane. The enzyme is able to reduce the amount of carbohydrate and protein contents in the biofilms formed by these organisms. Meat wrapped with the modified LDPE and stored at 4°C showed 9 log reduction of these organisms at the end of the seventh day when compared to samples wrapped with the bare polymer. This method of crosslinking can be used on polymers with or without functional groups and can be adopted to bind any type of antimicrobial agent. PMID:25906061

  12. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine.

    PubMed

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  13. Design of a Papain Immobilized Antimicrobial Food Package with Curcumin as a Crosslinker

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of food products by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms during post process handling is one of the major causes for food spoilage and food borne illnesses. The present green sustainable approach describes the covalent immobilization of papain to LDPE (low density polyethylene), HDPE (high density polyethylene), LLDPE (linear low density polyethylene) and PCL (polycaprolactam) with curcumin as the photocrosslinker. About 50% of curcumin and 82-92% of papain were successfully immobilized on these polymers. After 30 days, the free enzyme retained 87% of its original activity, while the immobilized enzyme retained more than 90% of its activity on these polymers. Papain crosslinked to LLDPE exhibited the best antibiofilm properties against Acinetobacter sp. KC119137.1 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 5021 when compared to the other three polymers, because of the highest amount of enzyme immobilized on this surface. Papain acts by damaging the cell membrane. The enzyme is able to reduce the amount of carbohydrate and protein contents in the biofilms formed by these organisms. Meat wrapped with the modified LDPE and stored at 4°C showed 9 log reduction of these organisms at the end of the seventh day when compared to samples wrapped with the bare polymer. This method of crosslinking can be used on polymers with or without functional groups and can be adopted to bind any type of antimicrobial agent. PMID:25906061

  14. Sequential Fermentation with Selected Immobilized Non-Saccharomyces Yeast for Reduction of Ethanol Content in Wine

    PubMed Central

    Canonico, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Oro, Lucia; Ciani, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The average ethanol content of wine has increased over the last two decades. This increase was due to consumer preference, and also to climate change that resulted in increased grape maturity at harvest. In the present study, to reduce ethanol content in wine, a microbiological approach was investigated, using immobilized selected strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts namely Starmerella bombicola, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora osmophila, and Hanseniaspora uvarum to start fermentation, followed by inoculation of free Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The immobilization procedures, determining high reaction rates, led a feasible sequential inoculation management avoiding possible contamination under actual winemaking. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells metabolized almost 50% of the sugar in 3 days, while S. cerevisiae inoculation completed all of fermentation. The S. bombicola and M. pulcherrima initial fermentations showed the best reductions in the final ethanol content (1.6 and 1.4% v/v, respectively). Resulting wines did not have any negative fermentation products with the exception of H. uvarum sequential fermentation that showed significant amount of ethyl acetate. On the other hand, there were increases in desirable compounds such as glycerol and succinic acid for S. bombicola, geraniol for M. pulcherrima and isoamyl acetate and isoamyl alcohol for H. osmophila sequential fermentations. The overall results indicated that a promising ethanol reduction could be obtained using sequential fermentation of immobilized selected non-Saccharomyces strains. In this way, a suitable timing of second inoculation and an enhancement of analytical profile of wine were obtained. PMID:27014203

  15. Effects of joint immobilization on standing balance.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Paulo B; Freitas, Sandra M S F; Duarte, Marcos; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the effect of joint immobilization on the postural sway during quiet standing. We hypothesized that the center of pressure (COP), rambling, and trembling trajectories would be affected by joint immobilization. Ten young adults stood on a force plate during 60 s without and with immobilized joints (only knees constrained, CK; knees and hips, CH; and knees, hips, and trunk, CT), with their eyes open (OE) or closed (CE). The root mean square deviation (RMS, the standard deviation from the mean) and mean speed of COP, rambling, and trembling trajectories in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions were analyzed. Similar effects of vision were observed for both directions: larger amplitudes for all variables were observed in the CE condition. In the anterior-posterior direction, postural sway increased only when the knees, hips, and trunk were immobilized. For the medial-lateral direction, the RMS and the mean speed of the COP, rambling, and trembling displacements decreased after immobilization of knees and hips and knees, hips, and trunk. These findings indicate that the single inverted pendulum model is unable to completely explain the processes involved in the control of the quiet upright stance in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. PMID:19342114

  16. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Danker, W.

    1995-07-23

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996.

  17. EFFECTS OF JOINT IMMOBILIZATION ON STANDING BALANCE

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Paulo B.; Freitas, Sandra M. S. F.; Duarte, Marcos; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint immobilization on the postural sway during quiet standing. We hypothesized that center of pressure (COP), rambling, and trembling trajectories could be affected by joint immobilization. Ten young adults stood on a force plate during 60 s without and with immobilized joints (only knees constrained, CK; knees and hips, CH; and knees, hips and trunk, CT), with their eyes opened (EO) or closed (EC). The root mean square deviation (RMS, the standard deviation from the mean) and mean speed of COP, rambling, and trembling trajectories in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions were analyzed. Similar effects of vision were observed for both directions: larger amplitude for all variables was observed in the EC condition. In the anterior-posterior direction, postural sway increased only when the knees, hips and trunk were immobilized. For the medial-lateral direction, the RMS and the mean speed of the COP, rambling, and trembling displacements decreased after immobilization of knees and hips and knees, hips and trunk. These findings indicate that the inverted pendulum model is unable to completely explain the processes involved in the control of the quiet upright stance in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. PMID:19342114

  18. Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira )

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle makers exposed to stannic chloride solution and other potentially hazardous substances

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, B.S.; Davis, F.; Johnson, B.

    1985-04-01

    Concern about upper respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms among workers at a glass bottle manufacturing plant led to an epidemiologic and an industrial hygiene survey. Questionnaire responses from 35 hot end and 53 cold end workers indicated that the incidence of wheezing, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, and cough was significantly elevated among hot end workers. Among both smokers and nonsmokers, hot end workers reported higher, but not significantly higher, rates of wheezing and chest pain. Among smokers, hot end workers reported significantly higher rates of dyspnea on exertion and cough than did cold end workers. Data suggest that reported exposure to stannic chloride solution likely caused these symptoms. The industrial hygiene survey, conducted when stannic chloride use had been reduced, cleaning had been done, and ventilation improved, focused on measuring air contaminants that might possibly cause symptoms. Levels of hydrogen chloride, which apparently was formed by the combination of stannic chloride and water in the presence of heat, were elevated. The finding of increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms among hot end workers was consistent with this exposure. Recommendations were made to reduce hazardous exposures at this plant. Individuals responsible for occupational health should be aware that relatively benign substances, such as stannic chloride and water, can combine spontaneously to form hazardous substances.

  20. Contaminant transport in dual-porosity media with dissolved organic matter and bacteria present as mobile colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-12-01

    In riverbank filtration, contaminant transport is affected by colloidal particles such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterial particles. In addition, the subsurface heterogeneity influences the behavior of contaminant transport in riverbank filtration. A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport in dual-porosity media in the presence of DOM and bacteria as mobile colloids. In the model development, a porous medium is divided into the mobile and immobile regions to consider the presence of ineffective micropores in physically heterogeneous riverbanks. We assume that the contaminant transport in the mobile region is controlled by the advection and dispersion while the contaminant transport in the immobile region occurs due to the molecular diffusion. The contaminant transfer between the mobile and immobile regions takes place by diffusive mass transfer. The mobile region is conceptualized as a four-phase system: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. The complete set of governing equations is solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. The model results show that in riverbank filtration, the contaminant can migrate further than expected due to the presence of DOM and bacteria. In addition, the contaminant mobility increases further in the presence of the immobile region in aquifers. A sensitivity analysis shows that in dual-porosity media, earlier breakthrough of the contaminant takes place as the volumetric fraction of the mobile region decreases. It is also demonstrated that as the contaminant mass transfer rate coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions increases, the contaminant concentration gradient between the two regions reverses at earlier pore volumes. The contaminant mass transfer coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions mainly controls the tailing effect of the contaminant breakthrough. The contaminant breakthrough curves are sensitive to changes in

  1. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani Binti; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-06-30

    Pyroprocessing is a reprocessing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  2. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani; Hrma, Pavel; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-10-01

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  3. Biotransformation of Tributyltin chloride by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada S.; Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial isolate capable of utilizing tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) as sole carbon source was isolated from estuarine sediments of west coast of India and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on biochemical tests and Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. This isolate was designated as strain DN2. Although this bacterial isolate could resist up to 3 mM TBTCl level, it showed maximum growth at 2 mM TBTCl in mineral salt medium (MSM). Pseudomonas stutzeri DN2 exposed to 2 mM TBTCl revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as elongation and shrinkage in cell size along with roughness of cell surface. FTIR and NMR analysis of TBTCl degradation product extracted using chloroform and purified using column chromatography clearly revealed biotransformation of TBTCl into Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl2) through debutylation process. Therefore, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2 may be used as a potential bacterial strain for bioremediation of TBTCl contaminated aquatic environmental sites. PMID:25763027

  4. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  5. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  6. Biosynthesis and Immobilization of Biofunctional Allophycocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Shaofang; Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Chen, Huaxin; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2011-01-01

    The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit, which has various reported pharmacological uses, was biosynthesized with both Strep-II-tag and His-tag at the N-terminal in Escherichia coli. The streptavidin-binding ability resulting from the Strep II-tag was confirmed by Western blot. Additionally, the metal-chelating ability deriving from the His-tag not only facilitated its purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography but also promoted its immobilization on Zn (II)-decorated silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit with streptavidin-binding ability was thereby immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are promising as drug delivery vehicles for targeting and locating at tumors. Thus, based on genetic engineering and nanotechnology, we provide a potential strategy to facilitate the biomodification and targeted delivery of pharmacological proteins. PMID:23008737

  7. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  8. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions. PMID:21420710

  9. Cadmium accumulation by a Citrobacter sp. immobilized on gel and solid supports: applicability to the treatment of liquid wastes containing heavy metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Macaskie, L.E.; Wates, J.M.; Dean, A.C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel-immobilized cells of a Citrobacter sp. removed cadmium from flows supplemented with glycerol 2-phosphate, the metal uptake mechanism being mediated by the activity of a cell-bound phosphatase that precipitates liberated inorganic phosphate with heavy metals at the cell surface. The constraints of elevated flow rate and temperature were investigated and the results discussed in terms of the kinetics of immobilized enzymes. Loss in activity with respect to cadmium accumulation but not inorganic phosphate liberation was observed at acid pH and was attributed to the pH-dependent solubility of cadmium phosphate. Similarly high concentrations of chloride ions, and traces of cyanide inhibited cadmium uptake and this was attributed to the ability of these anions to complex heavy metals, especially the ability of CN/sup -/ to form complex anions with Cd/sup 2 +/. The data are discussed in terms of the known chemistry of chloride and cyanide-cadmium complexes and the relevance of these factors in the treatment of metal-containing liquid wastes is discussed. The cells immobilized in polyacrylamide provided a convenient small-scale laboratory model system. It was found that the Citrobacter sp. could be immobilized on glass supports with no chemical treatment or modification necessary. Such cells were also effective in metal accumulation and a prototype system more applicable to the treatment of metal-containing streams on a larger scale is described.

  10. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  11. Methyl chloride via oxhydrochlorination of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, R.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Dow Corning is developing a route from methane to methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination (OHC) chemistry with joint support from the Gas Research Institute and the Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center. Dow Corning is the world`s largest producer of methyl chloride and uses it as an intermediate in the production of silicone materials. Other uses include production of higher hydrocarbons, methyl cellulose, quaternary ammonium salts and herbicides. The objective of this project is to demonstrate and develop a route to methyl chloride with reduced variable cost by using methane instead of methanol raw materials. Methyl chloride is currently produced from methanol, but U.S. demand is typically higher than available domestic supply, resulting in fluctuating prices. OHC technology utilizes domestic natural gas as a feedstock, which allows a lower-cost source of methyl chloride which is independent of methanol. In addition to other uses of methyl chloride, OHC could be a key step in a gas-to-liquid fuels process. These uses could divert significant methanol demand to methane. A stable and selective catalyst has been developed in the laboratory and evaluated in a purpose-built demonstration unit. Materials of construction issues have been resolved and the unit has been run under a range of conditions to evaluate catalyst performance and stability. Many technological advances have been made, especially in the areas of catalyst development, online FTIR analysis of the product stream, and recovery of methyl chloride product via an absorber/stripper system. Significant technological hurdles still remain including heat transfer, catalysts scaleup, orthogonality in modeling, and scaleable absorption data. Economics of the oxyhydrochlorination process have been evaluated an found to be unfavorable due to high capital and utility costs. Future efforts will focus on improved methane conversion at high methyl chloride selectivity.

  12. The 5-(4-Ethynylophenoxy) isophthalic chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Sulfone-ester polymers containing pendent ethynyl groups and a direct and multistep process for preparing them are disclosed. The multistep process involves the conversion of a pendent bromo group to the ethynyl group while the direct route involves reating hydroxy-terminated sulfone oligomer or polymers with a stoichiometric amount of 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride. The 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride and the process for preparing it are also disclosed.

  13. Evaluating Carriers for Immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Ethanol Production in a Continuous Column Reactor.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye-Geun; Kim, Yi-Ok; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated a more practical and cost-effective immobilization carriers for ethanol production using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three candidate materials-rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust-were tested for their cell-adsorption capacity and operational durability. Derivatizations of rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust with the optimal concentration of 0.5 M of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl chloride hydrochloride (DEAE · HCl) resulted in > 95% adsorption of the initial yeast cells at 2 hr for DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-sawdust and in only approximately 80% adsorption for DEAE-rice straw. In addition, DEAE-sawdust was found to be a more practical carrier for immobilizing yeast cells in terms of operational durability in shaking flask cultures with two different speeds of 60 and 150 rpm. Furthermore, the biosorption isotherms of DEAE-rice hull, -rice straw, and -sawdust for yeast cells revealed that the Qmax of DEAE-sawdust (82.6 mg/g) was greater than that of DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-rice straw. During the 404-hr of continuous column reactor operation using yeast cells immobilized on DEAE-sawdust, no serious detachment of the yeast cells from the DEAE-sawdust was recorded. Ethanol yield of approximately 3.04 g/L was produced steadily, and glucose was completely converted to ethanol at a yield of 0.375 g-ethanol/g-glucose (73.4% of the theoretical value). Thus, sawdust is a promising practical immobilization carrier for ethanol production, with significance in the production of bioethanol as a biofuel. PMID:25346601

  14. Evaluating Carriers for Immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Ethanol Production in a Continuous Column Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hye-Geun; Kim, Yi-Ok; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a more practical and cost-effective immobilization carriers for ethanol production using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three candidate materials-rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust-were tested for their cell-adsorption capacity and operational durability. Derivatizations of rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust with the optimal concentration of 0.5 M of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl chloride hydrochloride (DEAE · HCl) resulted in > 95% adsorption of the initial yeast cells at 2 hr for DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-sawdust and in only approximately 80% adsorption for DEAE-rice straw. In addition, DEAE-sawdust was found to be a more practical carrier for immobilizing yeast cells in terms of operational durability in shaking flask cultures with two different speeds of 60 and 150 rpm. Furthermore, the biosorption isotherms of DEAE-rice hull, -rice straw, and -sawdust for yeast cells revealed that the Qmax of DEAE-sawdust (82.6 mg/g) was greater than that of DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-rice straw. During the 404-hr of continuous column reactor operation using yeast cells immobilized on DEAE-sawdust, no serious detachment of the yeast cells from the DEAE-sawdust was recorded. Ethanol yield of approximately 3.04 g/L was produced steadily, and glucose was completely converted to ethanol at a yield of 0.375 g-ethanol/g-glucose (73.4% of the theoretical value). Thus, sawdust is a promising practical immobilization carrier for ethanol production, with significance in the production of bioethanol as a biofuel. PMID:25346601

  15. Combined removal of a BTEX, TCE, and cis-DCE mixture using Pseudomonas sp. immobilized on scrap tyres.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qihong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Xie, Fei; Li, Junhui; Shim, Hojae

    2015-09-01

    The simultaneous aerobic removal of a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o,m,p-xylene (BTEX); cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE); and trichloroethylene (TCE) from the artificially contaminated water using an indigenous bacterial isolate identified as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida immobilized on waste scrap tyres was investigated. Suspended and immobilized conditions were compared for the removal of these volatile organic compounds. For the immobilized system, toluene, benzene, and ethylbenzene were completely removed, while the highest removal efficiencies of 99.0 ± 0.1, 96.8 ± 0.3, 73.6 ± 2.5, and 61.6 ± 0.9% were obtained for o-xylene, m,p-xylene, TCE, and cis-DCE, respectively. The sorption kinetics of contaminants towards tyre surface was also evaluated, and the sorption capacity generally followed the order of toluene > benzene > m,p-xylene > o-xylene > ethylbenzene > TCE > cis-DCE. Scrap tyres showed a good capability for the simultaneous sorption and bioremoval of BTEX/cis-DCE/TCE mixture, implying a promising waste material for the removal of contaminant mixture from industrial wastewater or contaminated groundwater. PMID:25956516

  16. Water and chloride transport in a fine-textured soil in a feedlot pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizaga, E. A.; Rodríguez, L.; Ocampo, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    Cattle feeding in feedlot pens produces large amounts of manure and animal urine. Manure solutions resulting from surface runoff are composed of numerous chemical constituents whose leaching causes salinization of the soil profile. There is a relatively large number of studies on preferential flow characterization and modeling in clayed soils. However, research on water flow and solute transport derived from cattle feeding operations in fine-textured soils under naturally occurring precipitation events is less frequent. A field monitoring and modeling investigation was conducted at two plots on a fine-textured soil near a feedlot pen in Argentina to assess the potential of solute leaching into the soil profile. Soil pressure head and chloride concentration of the soil solution were used in combination with HYDRUS-1D numerical model to simulate water flow and chloride transport resorting to the concept of mobile/immobile-MIM water for solute transport. Pressure head sensors located at different depths registered a rapid response to precipitation suggesting the occurrence of preferential flow-paths for infiltrating water. Cracks and small fissures were documented at the field site where the % silt and % clay combined is around 94%. Chloride content increased with depth for various soil pressure head conditions, although a dilution process was observed as precipitation increased. The MIM approach improved numerical results at one of the tested sites where the development of cracks and macropores is likely, obtaining a more dynamic response in comparison with the advection-dispersion equation.

  17. Water and chloride transport in a fine-textured soil in a feedlot pen.

    PubMed

    Veizaga, E A; Rodríguez, L; Ocampo, C J

    2015-11-01

    Cattle feeding in feedlot pens produces large amounts of manure and animal urine. Manure solutions resulting from surface runoff are composed of numerous chemical constituents whose leaching causes salinization of the soil profile. There is a relatively large number of studies on preferential flow characterization and modeling in clayed soils. However, research on water flow and solute transport derived from cattle feeding operations in fine-textured soils under naturally occurring precipitation events is less frequent. A field monitoring and modeling investigation was conducted at two plots on a fine-textured soil near a feedlot pen in Argentina to assess the potential of solute leaching into the soil profile. Soil pressure head and chloride concentration of the soil solution were used in combination with HYDRUS-1D numerical model to simulate water flow and chloride transport resorting to the concept of mobile/immobile-MIM water for solute transport. Pressure head sensors located at different depths registered a rapid response to precipitation suggesting the occurrence of preferential flow-paths for infiltrating water. Cracks and small fissures were documented at the field site where the % silt and % clay combined is around 94%. Chloride content increased with depth for various soil pressure head conditions, although a dilution process was observed as precipitation increased. The MIM approach improved numerical results at one of the tested sites where the development of cracks and macropores is likely, obtaining a more dynamic response in comparison with the advection-dispersion equation. PMID:26348833

  18. Immobilization of Firefly Luciferase on PVA-co-PE Nanofibers Membrane as Biosensor for Bioluminescent Detection of ATP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhao, Qinghua; Luo, Mengying; Li, Mufang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuedan; Liu, Qiongzhen

    2015-09-16

    The bioluminescent reaction catalyzed by firefly luciferase has become widely established as an outstanding analytical system for assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When in solution, the luciferase is unstable and cannot be reused. The problem can be partially solved by immobilizing the luciferase on solid substrates. The poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene) (PVA-co-PE) nanofibers membrane has abundant active hydroxyl groups on the surface. The PVA-co-PE nanofibers membrane was first activated by cyanuric chloride with triazinyl group. Then the activated PVA-co-PE nanofibers membrane was subsequently reacted with 1,3-propanediamine and biotin. The firefly luciferase was immobilized onto the surface of 1,3-propanediamine- and biotin-functionalized membranes. The surface chemical structure and morphologies of nanofibers membranes were characterized by FTIR-ATR spectra and SEM. The hydrophilicity of membranes was tested by water contact angle measurements. The detection of fluorescence intensity displayed that the firefly-luciferase-immobilized PVA-co-PE nanofibers membranes indicated high catalytic activity and efficiency. Especially, the firefly-luciferase-immobilized nanofiber membrane which was functionalized by biotin can be a promising candidate as biosensor for bioluminescent detection of ATP because of its high detection sensitivity. PMID:26275118

  19. [Use of immobilization in the study of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Immobilized monomers].

    PubMed

    Muronets, V I; Ashmarina, L I; Asriiants, R A; Nagradova, N K

    1982-06-01

    Active immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase were prepared by means of dissociation of the tetrameric enzyme molecule covalently bound to Sepharose via a single subunit. The conditions were elaborated to achieve the inactivation and solubilization of the non-covalently bound subunits leaving the monomer coupled to the matrix intact. This procedure differs from the previously developed method of matrix-bound oligomeric enzymes dissociation in a detail which was found to be essentially important. The widely used method includes complete denaturation of all subunits during treatment with urea followed by reactivation of the immobilized one, whereas only the non-covalently bound subunits suffer denaturation under the conditions developed in the present work. The immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase exhibit Vmax and Km (for NAD and substrate) values similar to those found for the immobilized tetramer. Reassociation of the immobilized monomers with soluble enzyme subunits obtained in the presence of urea produces matrix-bound tetrameric species. Immobilized trimers ae formed upon incubation of matrix-bound monomers in a diluted apoenzyme solution. The immobilized monomeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzyme species were used to study the role of subunit interactions in cooperative phenomena exhibited by the dehydrogenase. PMID:7115810

  20. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635