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Sample records for immune cells macrophages

  1. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-? release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  2. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  3. Polymicrobial Sepsis Enhances Clearance of Apoptotic Immune Cells by Splenic Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Ryan; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Albina, Jorge; Cioffi, William; Perl, Mario; Ayala, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Background Macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells induces an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. Immune cell apoptosis is widespread in sepsis; however, it is unknown whether sepsis alters the capacity of macrophages to clear this expanded population. We hypothesize that sepsis will enhance splenic macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic immune cells, potentially contributing to immunosuppression. Methods Sepsis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Apoptosis was induced in mouse thymocytes by dexamethasone incubation. At multiple time points following CLP/sham, splenic and peritoneal macrophages were isolated, plated on glass coverslips, co-incubated with apoptotic thymocytes, fixed, and the coverslips were then Giemsa stained. Splenic macrophages were also isolated 48 hours after CLP/sham, stained with the red fluorescent dye PKH26, co-incubated with green fluorescent dye CFSE-stained apoptotic thymocytes and then coverslips were fixed and counterstained with DAPI. The macrophage phagocytic index (PI) was calculated for both staining methods. Results The PI of CLP splenic macrophages was significantly higher than sham by 24 hours, and this difference was sustained through 48 hours. Conclusions Studies suggest that apoptotic cell clearance leads to an anti-inflammatory macrophage condition, which together with our findings in septic macrophages, may point at a process that contributes to septic immune suppression. PMID:17689693

  4. Intestinal macrophages: unique effector cells of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Phillip D; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Smythies, Lesley E

    2005-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa is the largest reservoir of macrophages in the body. These important effector cells are derived from blood monocytes that are recruited to the lamina propria by endogenous chemoattractants in the non-inflamed mucosa and by inflammatory chemokines and bacterial products during inflammation. In the non-inflamed mucosa, newly recruited pro-inflammatory monocytes are exposed to lamina propria stromal (extracellular matrix) factors that induce phenotypic and functional differentiation into non-inflammatory macrophages. As a consequence of this differentiation, resident lamina propria macrophages are strikingly downregulated for the expression of innate response receptors, such as the receptors for lipopolysaccharide, immunoglobulin G (IgG), and IgA, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Despite downregulated pro-inflammatory function, strong phagocytic and bactericidal activities remain intact. Thus, in the non-inflamed intestinal mucosa, lamina propria macrophages are non-inflammatory but retain avid scavenger and host defense functions, a unique but ideal phenotype and functional profile for effector cells in close proximity to immunostimulatory microorganisms and products. PMID:16048547

  5. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct subpopulations with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents a common mechanism for modulating innate or adaptive immunity. PMID:22012443

  6. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Thomas, Ginu; Zhou, Shouhao; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D.; Yaghi, Nasser K.; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R.; Curran, Michael A.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Antel, Jack P.; Cooper, Laurence J.; Sulman, Erik P.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b+ cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages. PMID:26973881

  7. Sequestration from Immune CD4^+ T Cells of Mycobacteria Growing in Human Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancholi, Preeti; Mirza, Asra; Bhardwaj, Nina; Steinman, Ralph M.

    1993-05-01

    CD4^+ helper T cells mediate resistance to tuberculosis, presumably by enhancing the antimicrobial activity of macrophages within which the Mycobacterium tuberculosis organism grows. A first step in resistance should be the presentation of mycobacterial antigens by macrophages to CD4^+ T cells. However, when the antigenic stimulus is limited to organisms growing in human monocytes, the organisms become sequestered from immune CD4^+ T cells. This block in presentation is selective for growing mycobacteria and not for other stimuli. Sequestration would allow replicating organisms to persist in infected individuals and may contribute to virulence.

  8. Interleukin-10 Receptor Signaling in Innate Immune Cells Regulates Mucosal Immune Tolerance and Anti-Inflammatory Macrophage Function

    PubMed Central

    Shouval, Dror S.; Biswas, Amlan; Goettel, Jeremy A.; McCann, Katelyn; Conaway, Evan; Redhu, Naresh S.; Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Adham, Ziad Al; Lavoie, Sydney; Ibourk, Mouna; Nguyen, Deanna D.; Samsom, Janneke N.; Escher, Johanna C.; Somech, Raz; Weiss, Batia; Beier, Rita; Conklin, Laurie; Ebens, Christen L.; Santos, Fernanda GMS; Ferreira, Alexandre R.; Sherlock, Mary; Bhan, Atul K.; Mller, Werner; Mora, J. Rodrigo; Quintana, Francisco J.; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M.; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Snapper, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intact interkeulin-10 receptor (IL-10R) signaling on effector and regulatory T (Treg) cells are each independently required to maintain immune tolerance. Here we show that IL-10 sensing by innate immune cells, independent of its effects on T cells, was critical for regulating mucosal homeostasis. Following wild-type CD4+ T cell transfer, Rag2?/?Il10rb?/? mice developed severe colitis in association with profound defects in generation and function of Treg cells. Moreover, loss of IL-10R signaling impaired the generation and function of anti-inflammatory intestinal and bone marrow-derived macrophages, and their ability to secrete IL-10. Importantly, transfer of wild-type but not Il10rb?/? anti-inflammatory macrophages ameliorated colitis induction by wild-type CD4+ T cells in Rag2?/?Il10rb?/? mice. Similar alterations in the generation and function of anti-inflammatory macrophages were observed in IL-10R-deficient patients with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. Collectively, our studies define innate immune IL-10R signaling as a key factor regulating mucosal immune homeostasis in mice and humans. PMID:24792912

  9. Macrophage- and Neutrophil-Derived TNF-? Instructs Skin Langerhans Cells to Prime Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Epaulard, Olivier; Adam, Lucille; Poux, Candice; Zurawski, Gerard; Salabert, Nina; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Oh, Sangkon; Romain, Gabrielle; Chapon, Catherine; Banchereau, Jacques; Lvy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frdric

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime immune responses. However, the roles of skin resident Langerhans cells (LCs) in eliciting immune responses have not been fully understood. We here demonstrate for the first time that LCs in cynomolgus macaque skin are capable of inducing antiviral-specific immune responses in vivo. Targeting HIV-Gag or influenza hemagglutinin antigens to skin LCs using recombinant fusion proteins of anti-Langerin antibody and antigens resulted in the induction of the viral antigen-specific responses. We further demonstrated that such antigen-specific immune responses elicited by skin LCs were greatly enhanced by TLR ligands (TLR-Ls), polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and R848. These enhancements were not due to the direct actions of TLR-Ls on LCs, but mainly dependent on TNF-? secreted from macrophages and neutrophils recruited to local tissues. Skin LC activation and migration out of the epidermis are associated with macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. More importantly, blocking TNF-? abrogated the activation and migration of skin LCs. This study highlights that the cross-talk between innate immune cells in local tissues is an important component for the establishment of adaptive immunity. Understanding the importance of local immune networks will help us to design new and effective vaccines against microbial pathogens. PMID:25057007

  10. MicroRNA-33-dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N; Gundra, U Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J; Steinberg, Gregory R; Zamore, Phillip D; Fisher, Edward A; Loke, P'ng; Moore, Kathryn J

    2015-12-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33-mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization-associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33-mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid-producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33-depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4(+) T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3(+) Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  11. CD4+ T-cell-dependent tumour rejection in an immune-privileged environment requires macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dace, Dru S; Chen, Peter W; Niederkorn, Jerry Y

    2008-01-01

    Although intraocular tumours reside in an immune-privileged site, they can circumvent immune privilege and undergo rejection. Ocular tumour rejection typically follows one of two pathways. One pathway involves CD4+ T cells, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and culmination in ischemic necrosis of the tumour and phthisis (atrophy) of the eye. The second pathway is DTH-independent and does not inflict collateral injury to ocular tissues, and the eye is preserved. In this study, we used a well-characterized tumour, Ad5E1, to investigate the role of CD4+ T cells in the non-phthisical form of intraocular tumour rejection. It has been previously documented that CD4+ T cells and interferon (IFN)-? are necessary for rejection of these tumours in the eye. In this study, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells can circumvent immune privilege and infiltrate intraocular Ad5E1 tumours. Following tumour rejection, CD4+ T cells from tumour rejector mice could be adoptively transferred to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and protect them from intraocular Ad5E1 tumour growth. Tumour-specific CD4+ T cells produced IFN-? in response to Ad5E1 tumour antigens. Macrophages also contributed to rejection, as they were present in intraocular Ad5E1 tumours, and local depletion of macrophages resulted in progressive tumour growth. Ocular macrophages contributed to Ad5E1 tumour rejection, as Ad5E1 tumour rejection did not occur in macrophage-depleted SCID mice reconstituted with rejector CD4+ T cells. This demonstrates that macrophage and CD4+ T-cell co-operation is needed for non-phthisical rejection of intraocular tumours. PMID:17944931

  12. Macrophage- and neutrophil-derived TNF-? instructs skin langerhans cells to prime antiviral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Epaulard, Olivier; Adam, Lucille; Poux, Candice; Zurawski, Gerard; Salabert, Nina; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Oh, Sangkon; Romain, Gabrielle; Chapon, Catherine; Banchereau, Jacques; Lvy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frdric

    2014-09-01

    Dendritic cells are major APCs that can efficiently prime immune responses. However, the roles of skin-resident Langerhans cells (LCs) in eliciting immune responses have not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that LCs in cynomolgus macaque skin are capable of inducing antiviral-specific immune responses in vivo. Targeting HIV-Gag or influenza hemagglutinin Ags to skin LCs using recombinant fusion proteins of anti-Langerin Ab and Ags resulted in the induction of the viral Ag-specific responses. We further demonstrated that such Ag-specific immune responses elicited by skin LCs were greatly enhanced by TLR ligands, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, and R848. These enhancements were not due to the direct actions of TLR ligands on LCs, but mainly dependent on TNF-? secreted from macrophages and neutrophils recruited to local tissues. Skin LC activation and migration out of the epidermis are associated with macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. More importantly, blocking TNF-? abrogated the activation and migration of skin LCs. This study highlights that the cross-talk between innate immune cells in local tissues is an important component for the establishment of adaptive immunity. Understanding the importance of local immune networks will help us to design new and effective vaccines against microbial pathogens. PMID:25057007

  13. Macrophages and immune cells in atherosclerosis: recent advances and novel concepts.

    PubMed

    Cochain, Clment; Zernecke, Alma

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesion-related thrombosis is the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, which together constitute the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response is considered as a predominant driving force in atherosclerotic plaque formation, growth and progression towards instability and rupture. Notably, accumulation of macrophages in the intima and emergence of a pro-inflammatory milieu are a characteristic feature of plaque progression, and these processes can be modulated by adaptive immune responses. Recently, novel evidences of onsite proliferation of macrophages in lesions and transdifferentiation of smooth muscle cells to macrophages have challenged the prevalent paradigm that macrophage accumulation mostly relies on recruitment of circulating monocytes to plaques. Furthermore, previously unrecognized roles of inflammatory cell subsets such as plasmacytoid dendritic cells, innate response activator B cells or CD8(+) T cells in atherosclerosis have emerged, as well as novel mechanisms by which regulatory T cells or natural killer T cells contribute to lesion formation. Here, we review and discuss these recent advances in our understanding of inflammatory processes in atherosclerosis. PMID:25947006

  14. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takashi; Ido, Atsushi; Kusano, Kie; Miura, Chiemi; Miura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named “dipterose”, with a molecular weight of 1.01×106 and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose was synthesized in the melon fly itself at the pupal stage. The NO-producing activity of dipterose was approximately equal to that of lipopolysaccharide, a potent immunostimulator. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) led to the suppression of NO production by dipterose. Furthermore, dipterose induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon β (IFNβ) and promoted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in macrophages, indicating that it stimulates the induction of various cytokines in RAW264 cells via the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our results thus suggest that dipterose activates the innate immune response against various pathogenic microorganisms and viral infections. This is the first identification of an innate immune-activating polysaccharide from an animal. PMID:25490773

  15. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  16. Macrophages enhance the radiosensitizing activity of lipid A: A novel role for immune cells in tumor cell radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Darville, Martine I.; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Eizirik, Decio L.; Storme, Guy A.

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: This study examines whether activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the release of proinflammatory mediators. Methods and materials: RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated by lipid A, and the conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for the secretion of cytokines and the production of nitric oxide (NO) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). EMT-6 tumor cells were exposed to CM and analyzed for hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B in the transcriptional activation of iNOS was examined by luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: Clinical immunomodulator lipid A, at a plasma-relevant concentration of 3 {mu}g/mL, stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages to release NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and other cytokines. This in turn activated iNOS-mediated NO production in EMT-6 tumor cells and drastically enhanced their radiosensitivity. Radiosensitization was abrogated by the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine but not by a neutralizing anti-TNF-{alpha} antibody. The mechanism of iNOS induction was linked to NF-{kappa}B but not to JAK/STAT signaling. Interferon-{gamma} further increased the NO production by macrophages to a level that caused radiosensitization of EMT-6 cells through the bystanding effect of diffused NO. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the induction of NO synthesis, which occurs in both tumor and immune cells.

  17. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES NATURAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL FUNCTION: EFFECTS ON MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of MnCl2 in mice caused an increase in macrophage functional activity. Spleen cell antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against both chicken erythrocytes and P815 tumor cell targets was enhanced 24 hours following a single injection...

  18. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells as Actors in the Immune Reaction of Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Christiane Silke; Bruns, Heiko; Daniel, Christoph; Distel, Luitpold Valentin; Hartmann, Arndt; Gerbitz, Armin; Buettner, Maike Julia

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory infiltrate plays a pivotal role in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Here, we focussed on the role of macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DC). Methods MΦ and DC infiltration was investigated in 106 cHL specimens using immunohistochemistry and cytokine expression was analyzed in a subset by real-time PCR. Human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, DC, MΦ stimulated with GM-CSF (MΦGM-CSF, pro-inflammatory MΦ-1-model) or M-CSF (MΦM-CSF, immunomodulatory MΦ-2-model) were incubated with cHL cell line (L1236, HDLM2) supernatants (SN). DC maturation or MΦ polarization were investigated by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the impact of DC or MΦ on cHL cell proliferation was analyzed by BrdU/CFSE assay. Results In cHL tissues mature myeloid (m)DC and MΦ predominated. High numbers of CD83+ mDC and low numbers of CD163+ MΦ were associated with improved disease specific survival. In numerous cHL specimens increased levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and of IL13 and GM-CSF were observed compared to reactive lymphadenopathies. Maturation of DC and induction and maintenance of an immunomodulatory MΦ phenotype were promoted by SN derived from cHL cell lines. TNFα neutralization in SN resulted in a significant inhibition of mDC maturation. DC and pro-inflammatory MΦ inhibited the proliferation of cHL cells. Conclusion Adopting an immunomodulatory phenotype is a potential mechanism for how MΦ promote immune evasion in cHL. Mature DC, in contrast, might participate in antitumoral immunity. PMID:25470820

  19. Porcine macrophage Cdelta2+ and Cdelta2- cell lines support influenza virus infection and replication and Cdelta2+ cells mount innate immune responses to influenza virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory epithelial cells are the first cells which are infected with influenza virus and these cells play a major role in influenza pathogenesis. However, many studies have shown that alveolar macrophages also play a very important role in the pathogenesis and immunity to influenza infection. Un...

  20. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage immune responses to Leishmania major infection in both susceptible and resistance mice.

    PubMed

    Dameshghi, Safura; Zavaran-Hosseini, Ahmad; Soudi, Sara; Shirazi, Fatemeh Jalali; Nojehdehi, Shahrzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attracted to inflammation site and switch immune system to modulate inflammatory responses. This ability makes MSCs the best candidate cells for stem cell therapy of infection diseases. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the modulatory effect of adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) on macrophages in Leishmania (L.) major infection. Macrophages and MSCs were isolated from both susceptible (BALB/c) and resistance (C57BL/6) strains. After co-culture of AD-MSCs with macrophages using a transwell system, we assessed MSCs-educated macrophage responses to L. major infection. Our results indicated suppression in levels of tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) of MSCs co-cultured macrophages in response to L. major infection. To clarify the effects of this suppression on inflammatory conditions, TNF-?/IL-10 ratio was calculated, indicating an increase in TNF-?/IL-10 ratio in MSCs co-cultured groups. The higher TNF-?/IL-10 ratio was observed in BALB/c macrophages co-cultured with BALB/c MSCs. Nitric oxide (NO) assay presented a significant reduction in the supernatant of all MSCs co-cultured groups compared to control. We observed a significant reduction in phagocytosis of MSCs co-cultured groups in response to L. major infection without any significant differences in the phagocytic index. In conclusion, our results represented a new spectrum of immunomodulation induced by MSCs co-cultured with macrophages in response to L. major infection. The magnitude of immunoregulation was different between BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains. Our findings also showed that MSCs exerted potential effect of M1 polarization due to unequal decrease in levels of TNF-? and IL-10 when we considered TNF-? and IL-10as representatives of M1 and M2 phenotypes, respectively. Induction of inflammatory cytokine milieu and reduction in level of IL-10 provides a new hope for stem cell therapy of leishmaniasis in susceptible models. PMID:26703818

  2. Streptococcus uberis strains isolated from the bovine mammary gland evade immune recognition by mammary epithelial cells, but not of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Günther, Juliane; Czabanska, Anna; Bauer, Isabel; Leigh, James A; Holst, Otto; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus uberis is frequently isolated from the mammary gland of dairy cattle. Infection with some strains can induce mild subclinical inflammation whilst others induce severe inflammation and clinical mastitis. We compared here the inflammatory response of primary cultures of bovine mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC) towards S. uberis strains collected from clinical or subclinical cases (seven strains each) of mastitis with the strong response elicited by Escherichia coli. Neither heat inactivated nor live S. uberis induced the expression of 10 key immune genes (including TNF, IL1B, IL6). The widely used virulent strain 0140J and the avirulent strain, EF20 elicited similar responses; as did mutants defective in capsule (hasA) or biofilm formation (sub0538 and sub0539). Streptococcus uberis failed to activate NF-κB in pbMEC or TLR2 in HEK293 cells, indicating that S. uberis particles did not induce any TLR-signaling in MEC. However, preparations of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from two strains strongly induced immune gene expression and activated NF-κB in pbMEC, without the involvement of TLR2. The immune-stimulatory LTA must be arranged in the intact S. uberis such that it is unrecognizable by the relevant pathogen receptors of the MEC. The absence of immune recognition is specific for MEC, since the same S. uberis preparations strongly induced immune gene expression and NF-κB activity in the murine macrophage model cell RAW264.7. Hence, the sluggish immune response of MEC and not of professional immune cells to this pathogen may aid establishment of the often encountered belated and subclinical phenotype of S. uberis mastitis. PMID:26738804

  3. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1158-1166, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26447454

  4. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Albert, Matthew L.; Ingersoll, Molly A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the nave bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder. PMID:26182347

  5. Forward genetics screens using macrophages to identify Toxoplasma gondii genes important for resistance to IFN-γ-dependent cell autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, Odaelys; Skariah, Sini; Lynch, Brian; Kim, Nathaniel; Ueda, Yukari; Vohora, Neal; Choe, Josh; Mordue, Dana G

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen. The parasite invades and replicates within virtually any warm blooded vertebrate cell type. During parasite invasion of a host cell, the parasite creates a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that originates from the host cell membrane independent of phagocytosis within which the parasite replicates. While IFN-dependent-innate and cell mediated immunity is important for eventual control of infection, innate immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells, can also serve as vehicles for systemic dissemination of the parasite early in infection. An approach is described that utilizes the host innate immune response, in this case macrophages, in a forward genetic screen to identify parasite mutants with a fitness defect in infected macrophages following activation but normal invasion and replication in naïve macrophages. Thus, the screen isolates parasite mutants that have a specific defect in their ability to resist the effects of macrophage activation. The paper describes two broad phenotypes of mutant parasites following activation of infected macrophages: parasite stasis versus parasite degradation, often in amorphous vacuoles. The parasite mutants are then analyzed to identify the responsible parasite genes specifically important for resistance to induced mediators of cell autonomous immunity. The paper presents a general approach for the forward genetics screen that, in theory, can be modified to target parasite genes important for resistance to specific antimicrobial mediators. It also describes an approach to evaluate the specific macrophage antimicrobial mediators to which the parasite mutant is susceptible. Activation of infected macrophages can also promote parasite differentiation from the tachyzoite to bradyzoite stage that maintains chronic infection. Therefore, methodology is presented to evaluate the importance of the identified parasite gene to establishment of chronic infection. PMID:25867017

  6. Cooperativity Between CD8+ T Cells, Non-Neutralizing Antibodies, and Alveolar Macrophages Is Important for Heterosubtypic Influenza Virus Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J.; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Abt, Michael C.; Wolf, Amaya I.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential “universal” vaccine. PMID:23516357

  7. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors. PMID:26240140

  8. Anti-G-CSF treatment induces protective tumor immunity in mouse colon cancer by promoting protective NK cell, macrophage and T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Morris, Katherine T; Castillo, Eliseo F; Ray, Anita L; Weston, Lea L; Nofchissey, Robert A; Hanson, Joshua A; Samedi, Von G; Pinchuk, Irina V; Hudson, Laurie G; Beswick, Ellen J

    2015-09-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that is highly expressed in human and mouse colorectal cancers (CRC). We previously reported that G-CSF stimulated human CRC cell growth and migration, therefore in this study we sought to examine the therapeutic potential of anti-G-CSF treatment for CRC. G-CSF is known to mobilize neutrophils, however its impact on other immune cells has not been well examined. Here, we investigated the effects of therapeutic anti-G-CSF treatment on CRC growth and anti-tumor immune responses. C57BL/6 mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS) to induce neoplasms were administered anti-G-CSF or isotype control antibodies three times a week for three weeks. Animals treated with anti-G-CSF antibodies had a marked decrease in neoplasm number and size compared to the isotype control group. Colon neutrophil and macrophage frequency were unchanged, but the number of macrophages producing IL-10 were decreased while IL-12 producing macrophages were increased. NK cells were substantially increased in colons of anti-G-CSF treated mice, along with IFN? producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These studies are the first to indicate a crucial role for G-CSF inhibition in promoting protective anti-tumor immunity, and suggest that anti-G-CSF treatment is a potential therapeutic approach for CRC. PMID:26061815

  9. Anti-G-CSF treatment induces protective tumor immunity in mouse colon cancer by promoting NK cell, macrophage and T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Katherine T.; Castillo, Eliseo F.; Ray, Anita L.; Weston, Lea L.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Hanson, Joshua A.; Samedi, Von G.; Pinchuk, Irina V.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Beswick, Ellen J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that is highly expressed in human and mouse colorectal cancers (CRC). We previously reported that G-CSF stimulated human CRC cell growth and migration, therefore in this study we sought to examine the therapeutic potential of anti-G-CSF treatment for CRC. G-CSF is known to mobilize neutrophils, however its impact on other immune cells has not been well examined. Here, we investigated the effects of therapeutic anti-G-CSF treatment on CRC growth and anti-tumor immune responses. C57BL/6 mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS) to induce neoplasms were administered anti-G-CSF or isotype control antibodies three times a week for three weeks. Animals treated with anti-G-CSF antibodies had a marked decrease in neoplasm number and size compared to the isotype control group. Colon neutrophil and macrophage frequency were unchanged, but the number of macrophages producing IL-10 were decreased while IL-12 producing macrophages were increased. NK cells were substantially increased in colons of anti-G-CSF treated mice, along with IFN? producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These studies are the first to indicate a crucial role for G-CSF inhibition in promoting protective anti-tumor immunity, and suggest that anti-G-CSF treatment is a potential therapeutic approach for CRC. PMID:26061815

  10. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8? cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (M?). The present studies investigated the role of M? in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of M? antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of M? by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of M?, demonstrating the substantial role of M? in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed M? and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated M?. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated M? mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated M? in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of M? in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation. PMID:25808106

  11. Macrophage Cytokines: Involvement in Immunity and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arango Duque, Guillermo; Descoteaux, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of macrophages has made them primordial for both development and immunity. Their functions range from the shaping of body plans to the ingestion and elimination of apoptotic cells and pathogens. Cytokines are small soluble proteins that confer instructions and mediate communication among immune and non-immune cells. A portfolio of cytokines is central to the role of macrophages as sentries of the innate immune system that mediate the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. In concert with other mediators, cytokines bias the fate of macrophages into a spectrum of inflammation-promoting classically activated, to anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated macrophages. Deregulated cytokine secretion is implicated in several disease states ranging from chronic inflammation to allergy. Macrophages release cytokines via a series of beautifully orchestrated pathways that are spatiotemporally regulated. At the molecular level, these exocytic cytokine secretion pathways are coordinated by multi-protein complexes that guide cytokines from their point of synthesis to their ports of exit into the extracellular milieu. These trafficking proteins, many of which were discovered in yeast and commemorated in the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, coordinate the organelle fusion steps that are responsible for cytokine release. This review discusses the functions of cytokines secreted by macrophages, and summarizes what is known about their release mechanisms. This information will be used to delve into how selected pathogens subvert cytokine release for their own survival. PMID:25339958

  12. Macrophage cytokines: involvement in immunity and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Arango Duque, Guillermo; Descoteaux, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of macrophages has made them primordial for both development and immunity. Their functions range from the shaping of body plans to the ingestion and elimination of apoptotic cells and pathogens. Cytokines are small soluble proteins that confer instructions and mediate communication among immune and non-immune cells. A portfolio of cytokines is central to the role of macrophages as sentries of the innate immune system that mediate the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. In concert with other mediators, cytokines bias the fate of macrophages into a spectrum of inflammation-promoting "classically activated," to anti-inflammatory or "alternatively activated" macrophages. Deregulated cytokine secretion is implicated in several disease states ranging from chronic inflammation to allergy. Macrophages release cytokines via a series of beautifully orchestrated pathways that are spatiotemporally regulated. At the molecular level, these exocytic cytokine secretion pathways are coordinated by multi-protein complexes that guide cytokines from their point of synthesis to their ports of exit into the extracellular milieu. These trafficking proteins, many of which were discovered in yeast and commemorated in the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, coordinate the organelle fusion steps that are responsible for cytokine release. This review discusses the functions of cytokines secreted by macrophages, and summarizes what is known about their release mechanisms. This information will be used to delve into how selected pathogens subvert cytokine release for their own survival. PMID:25339958

  13. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury. PMID:25650776

  14. Interleukin 8 and CK-6 chemokines specifically attract rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) RTS11 monocyte-macrophage cells and have variable effects on their immune functions.

    PubMed

    Montero, Jana; Coll, Julio; Sevilla, Noem; Cuesta, Alberto; Bols, Niels C; Tafalla, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    In the current work, we have demonstrated that both rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) interleukin 8 (IL-8), a CXC chemokine, and CK-6, a CC chemokine, are able of efficiently attracting RTS11, a rainbow trout established macrophage-monocyte-like cell line. Interestingly, two sub-populations of non-adherent cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry that could be identified as immature monocyte- and mature macrophage-like populations, respectively, and the two chemokines studied exert their effects on different populations. Although IL-8 specifically attracts the monocyte-like sub-population, CK-6 specifically attracts the macrophage-like cell sub-population. We have also determined the effects of both of these chemokines on RTS11 phagocytosis, respiratory burst and the expression of other immune-related genes. We found that IL-8 inhibited the phagocytosis capacity of RTS11 cells belonging to the macrophage-like profile. No effect was observed, however, on the respiratory burst, immune function that has been considerably affected throughout the establishment of the cell culture. Concerning the effect that IL-8 and CK-6 have on the expression of other immune genes, we found that IL-8 significantly induced the levels of expression of CK-6, IL-8, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) of RTS11 cells. On the other hand, CK-6 induced the levels of expression of IL-8, iNOS and the integrin CD-18, while it had very faint effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results constitute one of the very few studies in which the effect of IL-8, a CXC chemokine, on monocyte-like cells is described. Moreover, it demonstrates that different monocyte-macrophage sub-populations have different reactivity to different chemokines. PMID:18572244

  15. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes. PMID:23827020

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) mediate their immunosuppressive effects via a variety of mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the induction of macrophages with immunomodulatory capacities. This effect of MSC may be exploited when MSC are used as a cell therapeutic product. Furthermore, MSC are resident in tissues where they may locally target infiltrating macrophages to adapt more regulatory properties. The present review discusses the interaction between MSC and macrophages, the induction of MSC-educated macrophages, how these cells position between other immune regulatory cells, and how they may be used in the clinic. PMID:23369493

  17. GPC3 expression in mouse ovarian cancer induces GPC3-specific T cell-mediated immune response through M1 macrophages and suppresses tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    LUO, CHENHONG; SHIBATA, KIYOSUMI; SUZUKI, SHIRO; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; SENGA, TAKESHI; KOYA, YOSHIHIRO; DAIMON, MINA; YAMASHITA, MAMORU; KIKKAWA, FUMITAKA

    2014-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is specifically expressed in ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and melanoma and lung cancer. GPC3 is being explored as a potential candidate for OCCC and HCC immunotherapy. As a tumor-associated antigen, induction of immune response of GPC3 in ovarian cancer remains elusive. We established a GPC3 transgenic mouse ovarian cancer cell line, OV2944-HM-1 (HM-1), and used the intraperitoneal ovarian cancer mouse model to investigate immune response in GPC3-expressing tumor. We found that GPC3 expression in the tumor increased F4/80+CD86+ macrophage (M1) proportion and caused GPC3-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses, and prolonged mouse survival. Our results demonstrated that GPC3 expression induced T cell-mediated immune response in this mouse ovarian cancer model and also provided supportive evidence that GPC3 is an ideal target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24992906

  18. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population. PMID:25883791

  19. Immune memory-boosting dose of rapamycin impairs macrophage vesicle acidification and curtails glycolysis in effector CD8 cells, impairing defense against acute infections

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Emily L.; Smithey, Megan J.; Lutes, Lydia K.; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Direct mTORC1 inhibition by short-term low-dose rapamycin treatment has recently been shown to improve CD8 T cell immunological memory. While these studies focused on memory development, the impact of low-dose rapamycin on the primary immune response, particularly as it relates to functional effector immunity, is far less clear. We investigated the impact of acute rapamycin treatment on immune effector cell function during the primary immune response to several acute infections. We found that functional CD8 T cell and macrophage responses to both viral and intracellular bacterial pathogens were depressed in mice in vivo and in humans to phorbol ester and calcium ionophore stimulation in vitro in the face of low-dose rapamycin treatment. Mechanistically, the CD8 defect was linked to impaired glycolytic switch in stimulated nave cells and the reduced formation of short-lived effector cells (SLEC). Therefore, more than one cell type required for a protective effector immune response are impaired by rapamycin in both mice and humans, at the dose shown to improve immune memory and extend lifespan. This urges caution with regard to the relative therapeutic costs and benefits of rapamycin treatment as means to improve immune memory. PMID:24913978

  20. Impact of macrophage and dendritic cell subset elimination on antiviral immunity, viral clearance and production of type 1 interferon.

    PubMed

    Ciavarra, Richard P; Taylor, Lisa; Greene, Amy R; Yousefieh, Nazita; Horeth, Dale; van Rooijen, Nico; Steel, Christina; Gregory, Betsy; Birkenbach, Mark; Sekellick, Margaret

    2005-11-25

    We report herein that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) induced a concurrent primary Th1 (T helper 1) and Th2 cytokine response detectable ex vivo. Liposome-encapsulated clodronate-mediated elimination of CD8- marginal dendritic cells (DCs) and splenic macrophages (m Phi), but not CD8+ interdigitating DCs, prior to infection resulted in a markedly diminished chemokine and Th1 (IL-2, interferon-gamma) cytokine response, although the Th2 response (IL-4) remained relatively intact. Repopulation with marginal DCs and marginal metallophilic macrophages (MMM) restored Th1 cytokine profiles but did not restore chemokine responsiveness or reduce VSV-induced morbidity/mortality. Chemokine competency returned approximately 4 weeks post-depletion, which correlated temporally with repopulation of the spleen with marginal zone macrophages (MZM) and red pulp macrophages (RPM). Unexpectedly, virus-induced morbidity persisted for over 1 month post-depletion and was associated with virus dissemination and distinctive histological lesions in the liver. Depletion of interferon-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells did not account for virus-induced morbidity because serum levels of type I interferon were not diminished in Cl2MBP-liposome-treated mice. Thus, distinct m Phi subsets are critical for chemokine production and viral clearance, and, in their absence, VSV disseminates even in the presence of high titers of interferon. PMID:16143360

  1. Neuro-immune Interactions Drive Tissue Programming in Intestinal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gabanyi, Ilana; Muller, Paul A; Feighery, Linda; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Costa-Pinto, Frederico A; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Proper adaptation to environmental perturbations is essential for tissue homeostasis. In the intestine, diverse environmental cues can be sensed by immune cells, which must balance resistance to microorganisms with tolerance, avoiding excess tissue damage. By applying imaging and transcriptional profiling tools, we interrogated how distinct microenvironments in the gut regulate resident macrophages. We discovered that macrophages exhibit a high degree of gene-expression specialization dependent on their proximity to the gut lumen. Lamina propria macrophages (LpMs) preferentially expressed a pro-inflammatory phenotype when compared to muscularis macrophages (MMs), which displayed a tissue-protective phenotype. Upon luminal bacterial infection, MMs further enhanced tissue-protective programs, and this was attributed to swift activation of extrinsic sympathetic neurons innervating the gut muscularis and norepinephrine signaling to β2 adrenergic receptors on MMs. Our results reveal unique intra-tissue macrophage specialization and identify neuro-immune communication between enteric neurons and macrophages that induces rapid tissue-protective responses to distal perturbations. PMID:26777404

  2. Macrophages as IL-25/IL-33-responsive cells play an important role in the induction of type 2 immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Th2 immunity is essential for the host protection against nematode infection, while detrimental in allergic inflammation or asthma. Although many of the details regarding the cellular and molecular events in Th2 immunity have been described, the specific cell types and effector molecules involved i...

  3. TLR3 Signaling in Macrophages Is Indispensable for the Protective Immunity of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells against Enterovirus 71 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Yang, Juhao; Luo, Kaiming; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Ruifeng; Chen, Jianxia; Jin, Mingfei; Xu, Bin; Guo, Nining; Wang, Jianrong; Chen, Zuolong; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yan; Deng, Chaoyang; Bai, Li; Ge, Baoxue; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Hao; Yang, Chun-Fu; Leng, Qibin

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most virulent pathogen among enteroviruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease in children but rarely in adults. The mechanisms that determine the age-dependent susceptibility remain largely unclear. Here, we found that the paucity of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells together with immaturity of the immune system was related to the susceptibility of neonatal mice to EV71 infection. iNKT cells were crucial antiviral effector cells to protect young mice from EV71 infection before their adaptive immune systems were fully mature. EV71 infection led to activation of iNKT cells depending on signaling through TLR3 but not other TLRs. Surprisingly, iNKT cell activation during EV71 infection required TLR3 signaling in macrophages, but not in dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, interleukin (IL)-12 and endogenous CD1d-restricted antigens were both required for full activation of iNKT cells. Furthermore, CD1d-deficiency led to dramatically increased viral loads in central nervous system and more severe disease in EV71-infected mice. Altogether, our results suggest that iNKT cells may be involved in controlling EV71 infection in children when their adaptive immune systems are not fully developed, and also imply that iNKT cells might be an intervention target for treating EV71-infected patients. PMID:25615690

  4. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  5. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field. PMID:26892963

  6. M1 and M2 macrophages: the chicken and the egg of immunity.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: 'Inhibit' type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and 'Heal' type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be 'activated' or 'alternatively activated' by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display 'foreign' antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  7. M1 and M2 Macrophages: The Chicken and the Egg of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: ‘Inhibit’ type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and ‘Heal’ type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be ‘activated’ or ‘alternatively activated’ by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display ‘foreign’ antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  8. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  9. Regulation of mucosal and systemic antibody responses by T helper cell subsets, macrophages, and derived cytokines following oral immunization with live recombinant Salmonella.

    PubMed

    VanCott, J L; Staats, H F; Pascual, D W; Roberts, M; Chatfield, S N; Yamamoto, M; Coste, M; Carter, P B; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R

    1996-02-15

    We have assessed regulatory Th cell and cytokine responses in mice after oral immunization with recombinant Salmonella (BRD 847) expressing fragment C of tetanus toxoid, since little information is available to explain how these vectors induce mucosal IgA responses. A single dose of BRD 847 elicited serum IgG2a and mucosal IgA anti-tetanus toxoid Ab responses. To assess Th1-and Th2-type responses, CD4+ T cells from Peyer's patches and spleen were restimulated in vitro, and cytokine-specific ELISPOT, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase-PCR assays were used to assess cytokine patterns. CD4+ T cells produced IFN-gamma and IL-2 as well as IL-10, but not IL-4 or IL-5. Although IL-6 was elevated, further purification of cells from in vitro cultures into CD4+ Mac-1- T cells and Mac-1+ CD4- cells revealed that only the latter cell population had consistently elevated IL-6 gene expression, whereas both sorted populations exhibited increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 gene expression. Thus, orally administered recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxoid elicited dominant Ag-specific Th1-type responses together with Th2-type cells producing IL-10 in both mucosal and systemic tissues. Macrophages producing IL-6 were also evident. Our results are consistent with the suggestion that Ag-specific Th1 cells and their derived cytokines, IFN-gamma and IL-2, and Th2-derived IL-10 together with IL-6 produced by macrophages provide important signals for the development of mucosal IgA and serum IgG subclass responses in the absence of preferential expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5. PMID:8568254

  10. Maternal immune activation leads to activated inflammatory macrophages in offspring.

    PubMed

    Onore, Charity E; Schwartzer, Jared J; Careaga, Milo; Berman, Robert F; Ashwood, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown an association between infection or inflammation during pregnancy and increased risk of autism in the child. In addition, animal models have illustrated that maternal inflammation during gestation can cause autism-relevant behaviors in the offspring; so called maternal immune activation (MIA) models. More recently, permanent changes in T cell cytokine responses were reported in children with autism and in offspring of MIA mice; however, the cytokine responses of other immune cell populations have not been thoroughly investigated in these MIA models. Similar to changes in T cell function, we hypothesized that following MIA, offspring will have long-term changes in macrophage function. To test this theory, we utilized the poly (I:C) MIA mouse model in C57BL/6J mice and examined macrophage cytokine production in adult offspring. Pregnant dams were given either a single injection of 20mg/kg polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, poly (I:C), or saline delivered intraperitoneally on gestational day 12.5. When offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams reached 10weeks of age, femurs were collected and bone marrow-derived macrophages were generated. Cytokine production was measured in bone marrow-derived macrophages incubated for 24h in either growth media alone, LPS, IL-4/LPS, or IFN-?/LPS. Following stimulation with LPS alone, or the combination of IFN-?/LPS, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams produced higher levels of IL-12(p40) (p<0.04) suggesting an increased M1 polarization. In addition, even without the presence of a polarizing cytokine or LPS stimulus, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams exhibited a higher production of CCL3 (p=0.05). Moreover, CCL3 levels were further increased when stimulated with LPS, or polarized with either IL-4/LPS or IFN-?/LPS (p<0.05) suggesting a general increase in production of this chemokine. Collectively, these data suggest that MIA can produce lasting changes in macrophage function that are sustained into adulthood. PMID:24566386

  11. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection. PMID:24712747

  12. Osmotically Sensitive Brucella in Infected Normal and Immune Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Jerry R.; Freeman, Bob A.

    1970-01-01

    When Brucella suis is grown in tissue cultures of normal guinea pig macrophages, the Brucella multiplies significantly without the induction of osmotically sensitive forms. In immune macrophages in the presence of normal guinea pig serum, there is a reduction in the number of intracellular Brucella and no multiplication is seen over a 72-hr period. After 6 hr of exposure to immune macrophages, however, approximately 50% of the surviving intracellular Brucella are osmotically sensitive, i.e., they will survive and grow only on medium containing 0.2 m sucrose. Brucella grown in immune macrophages, in the presence of rabbit antiserum against whole guinea pig serum, show the presence of osmotically sensitive forms, although at a reduced level compared to the number seen with immune macrophages in normal guinea pig serum. PMID:16557705

  13. HIV-1-Infected and/or Immune-Activated Macrophage-Secreted TNF-? Affects Human Fetal Cortical Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    PENG, HUI; WHITNEY, NICHOLAS; WU, YUMEI; TIAN, CHANGHAI; DOU, HUANYU; ZHOU, YOU; ZHENG, JIALIN

    2009-01-01

    Neurogenesis, tied to the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPC) is affected during neurodegenerative diseases, but how neurogenesis is affected during HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) has not been fully addressed. Here we test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected and/or immune-activated brain macrophages affect NPC proliferation and differentiation through the regulation of cytokines. We showed that human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) conditioned medium (MCM) induces a dose dependant increase in NPC proliferation. Conditioned media from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated MDM (LPS-MCM) or HIV-infected MCM (HIV-MCM) induced a profound increase in NPC proliferation. HIV-infected and LPS-activated MCM (HIV+LPS-MCM) induced the most robust increase in NPC proliferation. Moreover, LPS-MCM and HIV+LPS-MCM decreased ?-III-tubulin and increased GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of gliogenesis and inhibition of neurogenesis. The increase of NPC proliferation and gliogenesis correlated with increases in production of TNF-? by infected/activated MDM. Although both IL-1? and TNF-? induced NPC proliferation and gliogenesis, these effects were only partially abrogated by soluble TNF-? receptors R1 and R2 (TNF-R1R2), but not by the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). This indicated that the HIV-1-infected/LPS-activated MCM-mediated effects were, in part, through TNF-?. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE). In these HIVE mice, NPC injected with HIV-infected MDM showed more astrocyte differentiation and less neuronal differentiation compared to NPC injection alone. These observations demonstrated that HIV-1-infected and immune-activated MDM could affect neurogenesis through induction of NPC proliferation, inhibition of neurogenesis, and activation of gliogenesis. PMID:18383342

  14. Microarray expression analysis of genes involved in innate immune memory in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Renard-Guillet, Claire; Inoue, Kentaro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2016-03-01

    Immunological memory has been believed to be a feature of the adaptive immune system for long period, but recent reports suggest that the innate immune system also exhibits memory-like reaction. Although evidence of innate immune memory is accumulating, no in vivo experimental data has clearly implicated a molecular mechanism, or even a cell-type, for this phenomenon. In this study of data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE71111, we analyzed the expression profile of peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice pre-administrated with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, mimicking pathogen infection. In these macrophages, increased expression of a group of innate immunity-related genes was sustained over a long period of time, and these genes overlapped with ATF7-regulated genes. We conclude that ATF7 plays an important role in innate immune memory in macrophages. PMID:26981372

  15. Microarray expression analysis of genes involved in innate immune memory in peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Renard-Guillet, Claire; Inoue, Kentaro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory has been believed to be a feature of the adaptive immune system for long period, but recent reports suggest that the innate immune system also exhibits memory-like reaction. Although evidence of innate immune memory is accumulating, no in vivo experimental data has clearly implicated a molecular mechanism, or even a cell-type, for this phenomenon. In this study of data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE71111, we analyzed the expression profile of peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice pre-administrated with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, mimicking pathogen infection. In these macrophages, increased expression of a group of innate immunity-related genes was sustained over a long period of time, and these genes overlapped with ATF7-regulated genes. We conclude that ATF7 plays an important role in innate immune memory in macrophages.

  16. Ubiquitination by SAG regulates macrophage survival/death and immune response during infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Ding, J L

    2014-09-01

    The checkpoint between the life and death of macrophages is crucial for the host's frontline immune defense during acute phase infection. However, the mechanism as to how the immune cell equilibrates between apoptosis and immune response is unclear. Using in vitro and ex vivo approaches, we showed that macrophage survival is synchronized by SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), which is a key member of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When challenged by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we observed a reciprocal expression profile of pro- and antiapoptotic factors in macrophages. However, SAG knockdown disrupted this balance. Further analysis revealed that ubiquitination of Bax and SARM (sterile ?- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein) by SAG-UPS confers survival advantage to infected macrophages. SAG knockdown caused the accumulation of proapoptotic Bax and SARM, imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, induction of cytosolic cytochrome c and activation of caspase-9 and -3, all of which led to disequilibrium between life and death of macrophages. In contrast, SAG-overexpressing macrophages challenged with PAMPs exhibited upregulation of protumorigenic cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-?), and downregulation of antitumorigenic cytokine (IL-12p40) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). This suggests that SAG-dependent UPS is a key switch between immune defense and apoptosis or immune overactivation and tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results indicate that SAG-UPS facilitates a timely and appropriate level of immune response, prompting future development of potential immunomodulators of SAG-UPS. PMID:24786833

  17. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment. PMID:26483876

  18. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  19. Flagellin-Deficient Legionella Mutants Evade Caspase-1- and Naip5-Mediated Macrophage Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tao; Zamboni, Dario S; Roy, Craig R; Dietrich, William F; Vance, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages from C57BL/6J (B6) mice restrict growth of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Restriction of bacterial growth requires caspase-1 and the leucine-rich repeat-containing protein Naip5 (Birc1e). We identified mutants of L. pneumophila that evade macrophage innate immunity. All mutants were deficient in expression of flagellin, the primary flagellar subunit, and failed to induce caspase-1-mediated macrophage death. Interestingly, a previously isolated flagellar mutant (fliI) that expresses, but does not assemble, flagellin did not replicate in macrophages, and induced macrophage death. Thus, flagellin itself, not flagella or motility, is required to initiate macrophage innate immunity. Immunity to Legionella did not require MyD88, an essential adaptor for toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) signaling. Moreover, flagellin of Legionella and Salmonella induced cytotoxicity when delivered to the macrophage cytosol using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. It thus appears that macrophages sense cytosolic flagellin via a TLR5-independent pathway that leads to rapid caspase-1-dependent cell death and provides defense against intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:16552444

  20. Innate immune cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Jessica H.; Li, Wenjun; Kreisel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines the recent literature on the role of innate cells in immunity to transplanted tissue. It specifically addresses the impact of monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, and platelets. Recent findings Current research indicates that innate immunity plays a dual role in response to transplanted tissue with the ability to either facilitate rejection or promote tolerance. Intriguingly, some of these cells are even capable of reacting to allogeneic cells, a feature usually only attributed to cells of the adaptive immune system. Summary This review highlights new therapeutic targets in the innate immune system that may be useful in the treatment of transplant recipients. It also emphasizes the need to use caution in exploring these new therapeutics. PMID:24316757

  1. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. II. Peritoneal macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Rama Rao, G.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acute exposure to hamsters to microwave energy (2.45 GHz; 25 mW/cm2 for 60 min) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages that were significantly more viricidal to vaccinia virus as compared to sham-exposed or normal (minimum-handling) controls. Macrophages from microwave-exposed hamsters became activated as early as 6 h after exposure and remained activated for up to 12 days. The activation of macrophages by microwave exposure paralleled the macrophage activation after vaccinia virus immunization. Activated macrophages from vaccinia-immunized hamsters did not differ in their viricidal activity when the hamsters were microwave- or sham-exposed. Exposure for 60 min at 15 mW/cm2 did not activate the macrophages while 40 mW/cm2 exposure was harmful to some hamsters. Average maximum core temperatures in the exposed (25 mW/cm2) and sham groups were 40.5 degrees C (+/- 0.35 SD) and 38.4 degrees C (+/- 0.5 SD), respectively. In vitro heating of macrophages to 40.5 degrees C was not as effective as in vivo microwave exposure in activating macrophages to the viricidal state. Macrophages from normal, sham-exposed, and microwave-exposed hamsters were not morphologically different, and they all phagocytosed India ink particles. Moreover, immune macrophage cytotoxicity for virus-infected or noninfected target cells was not suppressed in the microwave-irradiated group (25 mW/cm2, 1 h) as compared to sham-exposed controls, indicating that peritoneal macrophages were not functionally suppressed or injured by microwave hyperthermia.

  2. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C.glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C.glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C.glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C.glabrata during infection. PMID:26066553

  3. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J R; McLaren, D J

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell: target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-1 and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. In this study MAF is shown to be released by a population of lymph node cells that does not adhere to nylon-wool columns, that responds well in proliferation assays to schistosome antigens and to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A, but does not respond to the B-cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide. These cells have been identified as small lymphocytes. PMID:2832308

  4. Dendritic Cells and Macrophages: Sentinels in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Weisheit, Christina K.; Engel, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells and macrophages) are closely related immune cells with central roles in anti-infectious defense and maintenance of organ integrity. The canonical function of dendritic cells is the activation of T cells, whereas macrophages remove apoptotic cells and microbes by phagocytosis. In the kidney, these cell types form an intricate system of mononuclear phagocytes that surveys against injury and infection and contributes to organ homeostasis and tissue repair but may also promote progression of CKD. This review summarizes the general functions and classification of dendritic cells and macrophages in the immune system and recapitulates why overlapping definitions and historically separate research have created controversy about their tasks. Their roles in acute kidney disease, CKD, and renal transplantation are described, and therapeutic strategy to modify these cells for therapeutic purposes is discussed. PMID:25568218

  5. Interplay of macrophages and T cells in the lung vasculature.

    PubMed

    Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia; Kratzer, Adelheid; Sidiakova, Asya; Salys, Jonas; Zamora, Martin; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute

    2012-05-15

    In severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), vascular lesions are composed of phenotypically altered vascular and inflammatory cells that form clusters or tumorlets. Because macrophages are found in increased numbers in intravascular and perivascular space in human PAH, here we address the question whether macrophages play a role in pulmonary vascular remodeling and whether accumulation of macrophages in the lung vasculature could be compromised by the immune system. We used the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 because these cells are resistant to apoptosis, have high proliferative capacity, and resemble cells in the plexiform lesions that tend to pile up instead of maintaining a monolayer. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry with cell surface markers (Lycopersicon Esculentum Lectin, CD117, CD133, FVIII, CD31, VEGFR-2, and S100). Activated, but not quiescent, T cells were able to suppress RAW 264.7 cell proliferative and migration activity in vitro. The carboxyfluorescein diacetate-labeled RAW 264.7 cells were injected into the nave Sprague Dawley (SD) rat and athymic nude rat. Twelve days later, cells were found in the lung vasculature of athymic nude rats that lack functional T cells, contributing to vascular remodeling. No labeled RAW 264.7 cells were detected in the lungs of immune-competent SD rats. Our data demonstrate that T cells can inhibit in vitro migration and in vivo accumulation of macrophage-like cells. PMID:22387295

  6. Antigen detection in vivo after immunization with different presentation forms of rabies virus antigen, II. Cellular, but not humoral, systemic immune responses against rabies virus immune-stimulating complexes are macrophage dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, I J; Osterhaus, A D; Poelen, M; Van Rooijen, N; Claassen, E

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we describe the effect of depletion of splenic macrophages on the uptake, and immune response against, different formulations of rabies virus antigen. Splenic macrophages were removed by intravenous injection with clodronate liposomes. beta-propiolacton inactivated rabies virus (RV-BPL) and immune-stimulating complexes (iscom) containing these antigens were given to macrophage-depleted and control mice. In the absence of phagocytic cells in the spleen, antigen is still trapped in the red pulp and to a lesser extent in the peri-arteriolar lymphocyte sheaths (PALS) for both antigen formulations. The localization pattern in the main area of immune response induction, namely the follicles, was unaltered after macrophage depletion. Functionally, the depletion of splenic and liver macrophages had no influence on the induction of specific antibody responses in both RV-BPL or RV-iscom immunized mice, even though the latter presentation form was clearly associated with specific localization in the marginal metallophillic macrophages. In RV-BPL immunized mice, macrophage depletion had no influence on proliferative T-cell responses. However, macrophage-depleted mice that were immunized with RV-iscom showed a significant decrease in proliferative T-cell responses. These results confirm existing ideas on the spleen as a physical filter rather than an induction site for humoral responses and shed new light on the efficient role of iscoms as antigen-presenting moieties in relation to their specific in vivo localization patterns and partial macrophage dependency. Images Figure 1 PMID:9767431

  7. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  8. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  9. PPE26 induces TLR2-dependent activation of macrophages and drives Th1-type T-cell immunity by triggering the cross-talk of multiple pathways involved in the host response

    PubMed Central

    Su, Haibo; Kong, Cong; Zhu, Lin; Huang, Qi; Luo, Liulin; Wang, Honghai; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological functions and the underlying molecular basis of PE /PPE proteins of M. tuberculosis remain largely unknown. In this study, we focused on the link between PPE26 and host response. We demonstrated that PPE26 can induce extensive inflammatory responses in macrophages through triggering the cross-talk of multiple pathways involved in the host response, as revealed by iTRAQ-based subcellular quantitative proteomics. We observed that PPE26 is able to specifically bind to TLR2 leading to the subsequent activation of MAPKs and NF-κB signaling. PPE26 functionally stimulates macrophage activation by augmenting pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12 p40) and the expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86, MHC class I and II). We observed that PPE26-treated macrophages effectively polarizes naïve CD4+ T cells to up-regulate CXCR3 expression, and to secrete IFN-γ and IL-2, indicating PPE26 contributes to the Th1 polarization during the immune response. Importantly, rBCG::PPE26 induces stronger antigen-specific TNF-α and IFN-γ activity, and higher levels of the Th1 cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ comparable to BCG. Moreover, PPE26 effectively induces the reciprocal expansion of effector/memory CD4+/CD8+ CD44highCD62Llow T cells in the spleens of mice immunized with this strain. These results suggest that PPE26 may be a TLR2 agonist that stimulates innate immunity and adaptive immunity, indicating that PPE26 is a potential antigen for the rational design of an efficient vaccine against M. tuberculosis. PMID:26439698

  10. Loss of PPAR gamma in immune cells impairs the ability of abscisic acid to improve insulin sensitivity by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel; Ferrer, Gerardo; Casagran, Oriol; Wankhade, Umesh; Noble, Alexis M; Eizirik, Decio L; Ortis, Fernanda; Cnop, Miriam; Liu, Dongmin; Si, Hongwei; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2008-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a natural phytohormone and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist that significantly improves insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Although it has become clear that obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue (WAT), the phenotype of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and the mechanisms by which insulin-sensitizing compounds modulate their infiltration remain unknown. We used a loss-of-function approach to investigate whether ABA ameliorates insulin resistance through a mechanism dependent on immune cell PPARgamma. We characterized two phenotypically distinct ATM subsets in db/db mice based on their surface expression of F4/80. F4/80(hi) ATMs were more abundant and expressed greater concentrations of chemokine receptor (CCR) 2 and CCR5 when compared to F4/80(lo) ATMs. ABA significantly decreased CCR2(+) F4/80(hi) infiltration into WAT and suppressed monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in WAT and plasma. Furthermore, the deficiency of PPARgamma in immune cells, including macrophages, impaired the ability of ABA to suppress the infiltration of F4/80(hi) ATMs into WAT, to repress WAT MCP-1 expression and to improve glucose tolerance. We provide molecular evidence in vivo demonstrating that ABA improves insulin sensitivity and obesity-related inflammation by inhibiting MCP-1 expression and F4/80(hi) ATM infiltration through a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. PMID:17618105

  11. Minocycline differentially modulates macrophage mediated peripheral immune response following Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Kallol; Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Nazmi, Arshed; Kumawat, Kanhaiya Lal; Basu, Anirban

    2010-11-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a neurotropic flavivirus that is the causative agent of a major mosquito-borne encephalitis in the world. Evasion of peripheral immune system facilitates the entry of the virus into the central nervous system (CNS) where it causes extensive neuronal inflammatory damage that leads to death or severe neuropschychiatric sequel in survivors. It has been proposed that after entry into the body, the virus is carried into the CNS by peripheral immune cells that act as Trojan horses. In this study we investigate whether macrophages can be considered as such a Trojan horse. We also investigate the role of minocycline, a synthetic tetracycline, in such processes. Minocycline has been found to be broadly protective in neurological disease models featuring inflammation and cell death but there has been no report of it having any modulatory role in peripheral macrophage-mediated immune response against viral infection. Persistence of internalized virus within macrophages was visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that there was no significant cell death after 24 h and 72 h infection with JEV. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in cells that were infected with JEV but it was abrogated following minocycline treatment. Reactive oxygen species level was also increased after JEV infection. Nitric oxide level was found to increase after 72 h post infection but remained unchanged after 24h. The cellular levels of signaling molecules such as PI3 kinase, phophoAkt and phospho p38MAP kinase were found to be altered after JEV infection and minocycline treatment. JEV infection also affected the VEGF-MMP pathway. Increased activity of MMP-9 was detected from JEV-infected macrophage culture supernatants after 72 h; minocycline treatment resulted in reduced activity. Thus it seems that minocycline dampens peripheral immune reactions by decreasing proinflammatory cytokine release from infected macrophages and the virus survives within macrophages long enough to be carried into the CNS, even though minocycline inhibits cell survival. PMID:20153075

  12. The Yin-Yang of tumor-associated macrophages in neoplastic progression and immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Allavena, Paola; Sica, Antonio; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2008-04-01

    An intrinsic (oncogene-driven) pathway and an extrinsic (microenvironment-driven) pathway connect inflammatory reactions and cancer. M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages and the related myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key prototypic components of smoldering inflammation driving neoplastic progression. However, mononuclear phagocytes can exert anti-tumor activity by killing tumor cells and eliciting tissue disruptive reactions (M1), a likely scenario in the early phases of carcinogenesis of immunogenic tumors and following therapeutic intervention. Shifting the macrophage balance represents a viable therapeutic target. Herein, the 'macrophage balance' is discussed in the context of the apparent paradox of tumor promotion by innate immunity-driven inflammation and the seemingly opposed tumor surveillance by adaptive immune responses. PMID:18364000

  13. Macrophages: sentinels and regulators of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Franken, Lars; Schiwon, Marzena; Kurts, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The important role of macrophages in host defense against a variety of pathogens has long been recognized and has been documented and reviewed in numerous publications. Recently, it has become clear that tissue macrophages are not entirely derived from monocytes, as has been assumed for a long time, but rather show an ontogenetic dichotomy in most tissues: while part of the tissue macrophages are derived from monocytes, a major subset is prenatally seeded from the yolk sac. The latter subset shows a remarkable longevity and is maintained by self-renewal in the adult animal. This paradigm shift poses interesting questions: are these two macrophage subsets functionally equivalent cells that are recruited into the tissue at different development stages, or are both macrophage subsets discrete cell types with distinct functions, which have to exist side by side? Is the functional specialization that can be observed in most macrophages due to their lineage or due to their anatomical niche? This review will give an overview about what we know of macrophage ontogeny and will discuss the influence of the macrophage lineage and location on their functional specialization. PMID:26880038

  14. Immune Reaction and Survivability of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Infantis after Infection of Primary Avian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages. PMID:25811871

  15. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story

    PubMed Central

    de Back, Djuna Z.; Kostova, Elena B.; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 1010 RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages. PMID:24523696

  16. Role of macrophages in the immune response to hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, G.L.; Chen, S.; Almond, S.P.; Ascher, N.L.; Payne, W.D.; Matas, A.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of host macrophages in the development of allospecific cytolytic T cells (allo-CTLs) in response to purified allogeneic MHC Class I+, Class II- hepatocytes in vivo in hepatocyte sponge matrix allografts (HC-SMA). Depletion of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from responder splenocytes in mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte culture (MLHC) inhibits the development of allo-CTLs in response to purified hepatocytes. First the ability of sponge macrophages to function as accessory cells in indirect presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen was tested in MLHC. We found that addition of irradiated sponge cells (a source of sponge macrophages) restored the development of allo-CTLs in MLHC depleted of responder APCs. Therefore, radioresistant sponge macrophages can function as accessory cells in MLHC. We next employed silica as an immunotherapy targeted against host macrophages and assessed the effect on development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. We found that local (intrasponge) silica treatment completely inhibited the development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. Combined local and systemic silica treatment resulted in inhibition of allocytotoxicity comparable to local silica treatment alone in the doses tested. We conclude that host macrophages which infiltrate HC-SMA can function as accessory cells in vitro in MLHC and that both infiltrating host macrophages and lymphocytes participate in the development of an alloimmune response to purified hepatocytes in vivo. This interaction may involve indirect antigen presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen by macrophages to host lymphocytes which accumulate in HC-SMA.

  17. The role of human glioma-infiltrating microglia/macrophages in mediating antitumor immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S. Farzana; Yang, David; Suki, Dima; Aldape, Kenneth; Grimm, Elizabeth; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the immune performance and interactions of CNS microglia/macrophages in glioma patients. We found that microglia/macrophages were the predominant immune cell infiltrating gliomas (~1% of total cells); others identified were myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), plasmacytoid DCs, and T cells. We isolated and analyzed the immune functions of CD11b/c+CD45+ glioma-infiltrating microglia/macrophages (GIMs) from postoperative tissue specimens of glioma patients. Although GIMs expressed substantial levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), they did not appear stimulated to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 1, or interleukin 6), and in vitro, lipopolysaccharides could bind TLR-4 but could not induce GIM-mediated T-cell proliferation. Despite surface major histocompatibility complex class II expression, they lacked expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86, CD80, and CD40 critical for T-cell activation. Ex vivo, we demonstrate a corresponding lack of effector/activated T cells, as glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells were phenotypically CD8+CD25?. By contrast, there was a prominent population of regulatory CD4 T cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) infiltrating the tumor. We conclude that while GIMs may have a few intact innate immune functions, their capacity to be stimulated via TLRs, secrete cytokines, upregulate costimulatory molecules, and in turn activate antitumor effector T cells is not sufficient to initiate immune responses. Furthermore, the presence of regulatory T cells may also contribute to the lack of effective immune activation against malignant human gliomas. PMID:16775224

  18. Photodynamic therapy mediates innate immune responses via fibroblast-macrophage interactions.

    PubMed

    Zulaziz, N; Azhim, A; Himeno, N; Tanaka, M; Satoh, Y; Kinoshita, M; Miyazaki, H; Saitoh, D; Shinomiya, N; Morimoto, Y

    2015-10-01

    Antibacterial photodynamic therapy (PDT) has come to attract attention as an alternative therapy for drug-resistant bacteria. Recent reports revealed that antibacterial PDT induces innate immune response and stimulates abundant cytokine secretion as a part of inflammatory responses. However, the underlying mechanism how antibacterial PDT interacts with immune cells responsible for cytokine secretion has not been well outlined. In this study, we aimed to clarify the difference in gene expression and cytokine secretion between combined culture of fibroblasts and macrophages and their independent cultures. SCRC-1008, mouse fibroblast cell line and J774, mouse macrophage-like cell line were co-cultured and PDT treatments with different parameters were carried out. After various incubation periods (1-24h), cells and culture medium were collected, and mRNA and protein levels for cytokines were measured using real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Our results showed that fibroblasts and macrophages interact with each other to mediate the immune response. We propose that fibroblasts initially respond to PDT by expressing Hspa1b, which regulates the NF-?B pathway via Tlr2 and Tlr4. Activation of the NF-?B pathway then results in an enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-6 and IL-1?) and neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 and KC from macrophages. PMID:25997703

  19. Homolog of allograft inflammatory factor-1 induces macrophage migration during innate immune response in leech.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Tilo; Drago, Francesco; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Valvassori, Roberto; de Eguileor, Magda; Vizioli, Jacopo; Grimaldi, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a 17-kDa cytokine-inducible calcium-binding protein that, in vertebrates, plays an important role in the allograft immune response. Its expression is mostly limited to the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Until recently, AIF-1 was assumed to be a novel molecule involved in inflammatory responses. To clarify this aspect, we have investigated the expression of AIF-1 after bacterial challenge and its potential role in regulating the innate immune response in an invertebrate model, the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis). Analysis of an expressed sequence tag library from the central nervous system of Hirudo revealed the presence of the gene Hmaif-1/alias Hmiba1, showing high homology with vertebrate aif-1. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-HmAIF-1 polyclonal antibody revealed the constitutive presence of this protein in spread CD68(+) macrophage-like cells. A few hours after pathogen (bacterial) injection into the body wall, the amount of these immunopositive cells co-expressing HmAIF-1 and the common leucocyte marker CD45 increased at the injected site. Moreover, the recombinant protein HmAIF-1 induced massive angiogenesis and was a potent chemoattractant for macrophages. Following rHmAIF-1 stimulation, macrophage-like cells co-expressed the macrophage marker CD68 and the surface glycoprotein CD45, which, in vertebrates, seems to have a role in the integrin-mediated adhesion of macrophages and in the regulation of the functional responsiveness of cells to chemoattractants. CD45 is therefore probably involved in leech macrophage-like cell activation and migration towards an inflammation site. We have also examined its potential effect on HmAIF-1-induced signalling. PMID:25435328

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Macrophages to Modulate Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Enzo; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastian; Villegas-Valdes, Blgica; Neira, Tanya; Lopez, Mercedes; Maisey, Kevin; Tempio, Fabin; Ros, Miguel; Acua-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mnica

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological agent of gonorrhoea, which is a sexually transmitted disease widespread throughout the world. N. gonorrhoeae does not improve immune response in patients with reinfection, suggesting that gonococcus displays several mechanisms to evade immune response and survive in the host. N. gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. In this study, we determined whether N. gonorrhoeae directly conditions the phenotype of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line and its response. We established that gonococcus was effectively phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and upregulates production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-?1) but not the production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-?, indicating that gonococcus induces a shift towards anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, N. gonorrhoeae did not induce significant upregulation of costimulatory CD86 and MHC class II molecules. We also showed that N. gonorrhoeae infected macrophage cell line fails to elicit proliferative CD4+ response. This implies that macrophage that can phagocytose gonococcus do not display proper antigen-presenting functions. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae induces a tolerogenic phenotype in antigen-presenting cells, which seems to be one of the mechanisms to induce evasion of immune response. PMID:24204097

  1. The journey from stem cell to macrophage.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Mikael J; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2014-06-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells' maturational pathways over time and space and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages compose a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  2. Evidence for the opposing roles of different gamma delta T cell subsets in macrophage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Daniela; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Rhodes, Kate; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R

    2006-07-01

    To ensure invading pathogens are eliminated with minimal damage to host tissues it is essential that macrophage activation be tightly regulated. Previously we demonstrated that a subset of gammadelta T cells (Vgamma1(+)) contributes to resolving pathogen-induced immune responses by killing activated macrophages. However, the exaggerated macrophage response seen in infected Vgamma1(+) T cell-deficient mice suggests that gammadelta T cells play a broader role in macrophage homeostasis and other subsets might promote macrophage activation. Using a macrophage:gammadelta T cell co-culture system we have shown that gammadelta T cells increase the activity of macrophages activated in vivo by Listeria monocytogenes infection. In a dose-dependent manner, gammadelta T cells up-regulated production of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) and chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta) by Listeria-elicited macrophages. The ability to increase macrophage cytokine production was prominent among Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells. Reciprocally, Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells were activated by Listeria-elicited macrophages, resulting in production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. gammadelta T cell adoptive transfer experiments showed that Vgamma4(+) T cells protected TCRdelta(-/-) mice against Listeria-induced liver injury and necrosis. These findings identify distinct and non-overlapping roles for gammadelta T cell subsets in regulating macrophage function during pathogen-induced immune responses. PMID:16783854

  3. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS. PMID:26371121

  4. The journey from stem cell to macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2014-01-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells’ maturational pathways over time and space, and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages comprise a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  5. Macrophages are essential for CTGF-mediated adult ?-cell proliferation after injury

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Kimberly G.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Maulis, Matthew F.; Dunn, Jennifer C.; Bolus, W. Reid; Kendall, Peggy L.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Gannon, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Promotion of endogenous ?-cell mass expansion could facilitate regeneration in patients with diabetes. We discovered that the secreted protein CTGF (aka CCN2) promotes adult ?-cell replication and mass regeneration after injury via increasing ?-cell immaturity and shortening the replicative refractory period. However, the mechanism of CTGF-mediated ?-cell proliferation is unknown. Here we focused on whether CTGF alters cells of the immune system to enhance ?-cell replication. Methods Using mouse models for 50% ?-cell ablation and conditional, ?-cell-specific CTGF induction, we assessed changes in immune cell populations by performing immunolabeling and gene expression analyses. We tested the requirement for macrophages in CTGF-mediated ?-cell proliferation via clodronate-based macrophage depletion. Results CTGF induction after 50% ?-cell ablation increased both macrophages and T-cells in islets. An upregulation in the expression of several macrophage and T-cell chemoattractant genes was also observed in islets. Gene expression analyses suggest an increase in M1 and a decrease in M2 macrophage markers. Depletion of macrophages (without changes in T cell number) blocked CTGF-mediated ?-cell proliferation and prevented the increase in ?-cell immaturity. Conclusions Our data show that macrophages are critical for CTGF-mediated adult ?-cell proliferation in the setting of partial ?-cell ablation. This is the first study to link a specific ?-cell proliferative factor with immune-mediated ?-cell proliferation in a ?-cell injury model. PMID:26266091

  6. Epigenetic programming during monocyte to macrophage differentiation and trained innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sadia; Quintin, Jessica; Kerstens, Hindrik H.D.; Rao, Nagesha A; Aghajanirefah, Ali; Matarese, Filomena; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Ratter, Jacqueline; Berentsen, Kim; van der Ent, Martijn A.; Sharifi, Nilofar; Janssen-Megens, Eva M.; Huurne, Menno Ter; Mandoli, Amit; van Schaik, Tom; Ng, Aylwin; Burden, Frances; Downes, Kate; Frontini, Mattia; Kumar, Vinod; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Ouwehand, Willem H; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Martens, Joost H.A.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Logie, Colin; Netea, Mihai G.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Introduction Monocytes circulate in the bloodstream for up to 35 days. Concomitantly, immunological imprinting of either tolerance (immunosuppression) or trained immunity (innate immune memory) determines the functional fate of monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages, as observed after infection or vaccination. Methods Purified circulating monocytes from healthy volunteers were differentiated under the homeostatic M-CSF concentrations present in human serum. During the first 24 hours, trained immunity was induced by ?-glucan (BG) priming, while post-sepsis immunoparalysis was mimicked by exposure to LPS, generating endotoxin-induced tolerance. Epigenomic profiling of the histone marks H3K4me1, H3K4me3 and H3K27ac, DNase I accessibility and RNA sequencing were performed at both the start of the experiment (ex vivo monocytes) and at the end of the six days of in vitro culture (macrophages). Results Compared to monocytes (Mo), nave macrophages (Mf) display a remodeled metabolic enzyme repertoire and attenuated innate inflammatory pathways; most likely necessary to generate functional tissue macrophages. Epigenetic profiling uncovered ~8000 dynamic regions associated with ~11000 DNase I hypersensitive sites. Changes in histone acetylation identified most dynamic events. Furthermore, these regions of differential histone marks displayed some degree of DNase I accessibility that was already present in monocytes. H3K4me1 mark increased in parallel with de novo H3K27ac deposition at distal regulatory regions; H3K4me1 mark remained even after the loss of H3K27ac, marking decommissioned regulatory elements. ?-glucan priming specifically induced ~3000 distal regulatory elements, whereas LPS-tolerization uniquely induced H3K27ac at ~500 distal regulatory regions. At the transcriptional level, we identified co-regulated gene modules during monocyte to macrophage differentiation, as well as discordant modules between trained and tolerized cells. These indicate that training likely involves an increased expression of modules expressed in nave macrophages, including genes that code for metabolic enzymes. On the other hand, endotoxin tolerance involves gene modules that are more active in monocytes than in nave macrophages. About 12% of known human transcription factors display variation in expression during macrophage differentiation, training and tolerance. We also observed transcription factor motifs in DNase I hypersensitive sites at condition-specific dynamic epigenomic regions, implying that specific transcription factors are required for trained and tolerized macrophage epigenetic and transcriptional programs. Finally, our analyses and functional validation indicate that the inhibition of cAMP generation blocked trained immunity in vitro and during an in vivo model of lethal C. albicans infection, abolishing the protective effects of trained immunity. Discussion We documented the importance of epigenetic regulation of the immunological pathways underlying monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and trained immunity. These dynamic epigenetic elements may inform on potential pharmacological targets that modulate innate immunity. Altogether, we uncovered the epigenetic and transcriptional programs of monocyte differentiation to macrophages that distinguish tolerant and trained macrophage phenotypes, providing a resource to further understand and manipulate immune-mediated responses. PMID:25258085

  7. DNA-Protein Immunization Using Leishmania Peroxidoxin-1 Induces a Strong CD4+ T Cell Response and Partially Protects Mice from Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Role of Fusion Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor DNA Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Bayih, Abebe Genetu; Daifalla, Nada S.; Gedamu, Lashitew

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no universally effective and safe vaccine has been developed for general human use. Leishmania donovani Peroxidoxin-1 (LdPxn-1) is a member of the antioxidant family of proteins and is predominantly expressed in the amastigote stage of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of LdPxn-1 in BALB/c mice in heterologous DNA-Protein immunization regimen in the presence of fusion murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGMCSF) DNA adjuvant. Methodology and Principal Findings A fusion DNA of LdPxn1 and mGMCSF was cloned into a modified pcDNA vector. To confirm the expression in mammalian system, Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the plasmid vector containing LdPxn1 gene. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 or pcDNA-LdPxn1 DNA and boosted once with recombinant LdPxn-1 protein. Three weeks after the last immunization, mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes. The result showed that immunization with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 elicited a mixed Th-1/Th-2 immune response with significantly higher production of IFN-γ than controls. Intracellular cytokine staining of antigen-stimulated spleen cells showed that immunization with this antigen elicited significantly higher proportion of CD4+ T cells that express IFN-γ, TNF-α, or IL-2. The antigen also induced significantly higher proportion of multipotent CD4+ cells that simultaneously express the three Th-1 cytokines. Moreover, a significant reduction in the footpad swelling was seen in mice immunized with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 antigen. Expression study in CHO cells demonstrated that pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 was expressed in mammalian system. Conclusion The result demonstrates that immunization of BALB/c mice with a plasmid expressing LdPxn1 in the presence of mGMCSF adjuvant elicits a strong specific immune response with high level induction of multipotent CD4+ cells that mediate protection of the mice from Leishmania major infection. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the vaccine potential of Leishmania peroxidoxin -1. PMID:25500571

  8. Shaping macrophages function and innate immunity by bile acids: mechanisms and implication in cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Calmus, Yvon; Poupon, Raoul

    2014-10-01

    The liver is selectively enriched in innate immune cells, macrophages (Kupffer cells), natural killer, and natural killer T cells. These cells release an array of mediators with cytotoxic, pro- and anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, fibrogenic, and mitogenic activity that function to fight infections, limit tissue injury, and promote wound healing. The diverse activity of macrophages is mediated by distinct subpopulations that develop in response to signals within their microenvironment. Understanding the mechanisms and role of the microenvironment contributing to modulation of macrophage populations is crucial for comprehension of the pathophysiology of liver injury in diverse conditions. Several studies initiated in the 1990s have shown that bile acids modulate innate and adaptive immunity. In the last decade, bile acids turned into hormones and signalling molecules involved in many metabolic and inflammatory processes. Biological properties of bile acids are thought to be mediated mainly through activation of the nuclear receptor FXR, the membrane receptor TGR5, as well as PK, ERK, MAP kinases signalling pathways. FXR and TGR5 agonists are currently under development for clinical purpose. This review analyses the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effects of bile acids on the macrophage and discuss their implications in the pathophysiology of cholestasis, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. PMID:25176586

  9. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-?, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-? and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-?. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  10. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing. PMID:27016754

  11. Neonatal macrophages express elevated levels of interleukin-27 that oppose immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Jennifer D; Horzempa, Joseph; Davis, Celestia; Jung, Joo-Yong; Pea, Maria Marjorette O; Robinson, Cory M

    2013-08-01

    Microbial infections are a major cause of infant mortality worldwide because of impaired immune defences in this population. The nature of this work was to further understand the mechanistic limitations of the neonatal and infant immune response. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a heterodimeric cytokine of the IL-12 family that is produced primarily by antigen-presenting cells and is immunosuppressive toward a variety of immune cell types. We show that IL-27 gene expression is elevated in cord blood-derived macrophages relative to macrophages originating from healthy adults. We also evaluated the duration over which elevated IL-27 gene expression may impact immune responses in mice. Age-dependent analysis of IL-27 gene expression indicated that levels of IL-27 remained significantly elevated throughout infancy and then declined in adult mice. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokine-stained splenocytes further confirmed these results. Interleukin-27 may be induced during pregnancy to contribute to the immunosuppressive environment at the fetal-maternal interface because we demonstrate dose-responsive gene expression to progesterone in macrophages. Neutralization of IL-27 in neonatal macrophages improved the ability of these cells to limit bacterial replication. Moreover, neutralization of IL-27 during incubation with the Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Gurin vaccine augmented the level of interferon-? elicited from allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes. This suggests that blocking IL-27 during vaccination and infection may improve immune responses in newborn and infant populations. Furthermore, mice will be a suitable model system to further address these possibilities. PMID:23464355

  12. Immune cells in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  13. Immune Cells in the Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-hyun

    2015-01-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  14. Caspase-2 Mediated Apoptotic and Necrotic Murine Macrophage Cell Death Induced by Rough Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; He, Yongqun

    2009-01-01

    Brucella species are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause zoonotic brucellosis. Survival and replication inside macrophages is critical for establishment of chronic Brucella infection. Virulent smooth B. abortus strain 2308 inhibits programmed macrophage cell death and replicates inside macrophages. Cattle B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 is an attenuated rough, lipopolysaccharide O antigen-deficient mutant derived from smooth strain 2308. B. abortus rough mutant RA1 contains a single wboA gene mutation in strain 2308. Our studies demonstrated that live RB51 and RA1, but not strain 2308 or heat-killed Brucella, induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell death in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and bone marrow derived macrophages. The same phenomenon was also observed in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages from mice immunized intraperitoneally with vaccine strain RB51 using the same dose as regularly performed in protection studies. Programmed macrophage cell death induced by RB51 and RA1 was inhibited by a caspase-2 inhibitor (Z-VDVAD-FMK). Caspase-2 enzyme activation and cleavage were observed at the early infection stage in macrophages infected with RB51 and RA1 but not strain 2308. The inhibition of macrophage cell death promoted the survival of rough Brucella cells inside macrophages. The critical role of caspase-2 in mediating rough B. abortus induced macrophage cell death was confirmed using caspase-2 specific shRNA. The mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in macrophages infected with rough B. abortus as demonstrated by increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and the release of cytochrome c to cytoplasm in macrophages infected with rough Brucella. These results demonstrate that rough B. abortus strains RB51 and RA1 induce apoptotic and necrotic murine macrophage cell death that is mediated by caspase-2. The biological relevance of Brucella O antigen and caspase-2-mediated macrophage cell death in Brucella pathogenesis and protective Brucella immunity is discussed. PMID:19714247

  15. Macrophages.com: an on-line community resource for innate immunity research.

    PubMed

    Robert, Christelle; Lu, Xiang; Law, Andrew; Freeman, Tom C; Hume, David A

    2011-11-01

    Macrophages play a major role in tissue remodelling during development, wound healing and tissue homeostasis, and are central to innate immunity and to the pathology of tissue injury and inflammation. Given this fundamental role in many aspects of biological function, an enormous wealth of information has accumulated on these fascinating cells in the literature and other public repositories. With the escalation of genome-scale data derived from macrophages and related haematopoietic cell types, there is a growing need for an integrated resource that seeks to compile, organise and analyse our collective knowledge of macrophage biology. Here we describe a community-driven web-based resource, macrophages.com that aims to provide a portal onto various types of Omics data to facilitate comparative genomic studies, promoter and transcriptional network analyses, models of macrophage pathways together with other information on these cells. To this end, the website combines public and in-house analyses of expression data with pre-analysed views of co-expressed genes as supported by the network analysis tool BioLayout Express(3D), as well as providing access to maps of pathways active in macrophages. Macrophages.com also provides access to an extensive image library of macrophages in adult/embryonic tissue sections prepared from normal and transgenic mice. In addition, the site links to the Human Protein Atlas database so as to provide direct access to protein expression patterns in human macrophages. Finally, an integrated gene-centric portal provides the tools for rapid promoter analysis studies based on a comprehensive set of CAGE-derived transcription start site (TSS) sequences in human and mouse genomes as generated by the Functional Annotation of Mammalian genomes (FANTOM) projects initiated by the RIKEN Omics Science Center. Our aim is to continue to grow the macrophages.com resource using publicly available data, as well as in-house generated knowledge. In so doing we aim to provide a user-friendly community website and a community portal for access to comprehensive sets of macrophage-related data. PMID:21924793

  16. Immune cells in term and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm. PMID:24954221

  17. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Jo Anne; Shah, Prajay T.

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function – most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  18. Tim-3 induces Th2-biased immunity and alternative macrophage activation during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK1.1(+) cells, and CD11b(+) cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8(+) T cells or CD11b(+) cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b(+) cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection. PMID:25987707

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  20. The Debate about Dendritic Cells and Macrophages in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Catherine; Kurts, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system includes macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), which are usually classified by morphology, phenotypical characteristics, and function. In the last decades, large research communities have gathered substantial knowledge on the roles of these cells in immune homeostasis and anti-infectious defense. However, these communities developed to a degree independent from each other, so that the nomenclature and functions of the numerous DC and macrophage subsets overlap, resulting in the present intense debate about the correct nomenclature. This controversy has also reached the field of experimental nephrology. At present, no mutually accepted way to distinguish renal DC and macrophages is available, so that many important roles in acute and chronic kidney disease have been ascribed to both DCs and macrophages. In this perspective article, we discuss the causes and consequences of the overlapping DC–macrophage classification systems, functional roles of DCs and macrophages, and the transferability of recent findings from other disciplines to the renal mononuclear phagocyte system from the nephrologist’s point of view. PMID:26388867

  1. Diverse influences of androgen-disrupting chemicals on immune responses mounted by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong Hoon; Yeon, Seung-min; Kim, Hyun Gyung; Choi, Hyun Suk; Kang, Hyojeung; Park, Hee-Deung; Park, Tae Won; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Eun Hee; Byun, Youngjoo; Choi, Sang-Eun; Lee, Kenneth Sung; Ha, Un-Hwan; Jung, Yong Woo

    2014-06-01

    Androgen-disrupting chemicals (ADCs) can alter male sexual development. Although the effects of ADCs on hormone disruption have been studied, their influence on the immune response is not fully understood. To investigate the effects of ADCs on innate immunity, we tested eight candidate ADCs for their influence on macrophages by measuring nitric oxide (NO) production and cell viability. Our results showed that treatment with a mixture of lipopolysaccharide and hexachlorobenzene increased NO production in RAW 264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line. In contrast, compared to exposure to a negative control, exposure to di-2-ethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP), testosterone (TTT), or permethrin decreased NO production. DEHA, BBP, and TTT inhibited NO production in an inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent manner. Treatment with bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NNP), or tributyltin chloride (TBTC) reduced NO production and induced cell death. While BPA induced RAW 264.7 cell death through apoptosis, NNP and TBTC caused cell death through necrosis. These results offer insights into the influences of ADCs on the innate immune system. PMID:24287822

  2. T CellMacrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jrg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophageT cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cellmacrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  3. p-Cresyl sulfate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-bacterial immune responses in murine macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takahiro; Makino, Ikuyo; Kawakami, Koji; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2016-03-14

    p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) is a known uremic toxin that is metabolized from p-cresol produced by intestinal bacteria. Abnormal accumulation of pCS in the blood is a characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). pCS is suggested to cause immune dysfunction and increase the risk of infectious diseases in CKD patients. In this study, we focused on the effects of pCS on macrophage functions related to host defense. We evaluated the effects of pCS on cytokine production, nitric oxide (NO) production, arginase activity, expression of cell-surface molecules, and phagocytosis in the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. pCS significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-12 p40 production and increased IL-10 production. pCS also decreased NO production, but did not influence arginase activity. pCS suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced CD40 expression on the cell surface, but did not influence phagocytosis. We further assessed whether the effects of pCS observed in the macrophage-like cell line were consistent in primary macrophages. Similar to RAW264.7 cells, pCS decreased IL-12 p40 and p70 production and increased IL-10 production in primary peritoneal macrophages. These data indicate that pCS suppresses certain macrophage functions that contribute to host defense, and may play a role in CKD-related immune dysfunction. PMID:26784855

  4. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M.tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M.tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M.tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M.tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M.tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25319335

  5. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D.; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25319335

  6. To Study the Effect of Paclitaxel on the Cytoplasmic Viscosity of Murine Macrophage Immune Cell RAW 264.7 Using Self-Developed Optical Tweezers System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-chun; Wu, Chien-ming

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, optical tweezers have become one of the tools to measure the mechanical properties of living cells. In this study, we first constructed an optical tweezers to investigate the cytoplasmic viscosity of immune cells. In addition to measuring viscosity of cells in a normal condition, we also treated cells with anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, and in order to study its effect on the cytoplasmic viscosity. The results showed that the viscosity decreased dramatically during the first 3 h. After 3 h, the change started to slow down and it remained nearly flat by the end of the experiment. In addition, we used the confocal laser scanning microscope to observe the cytoskeleton of the cell after drug treatment for 3 and 5 h, respectively, and found that actin filaments were disrupted and that the nucleus had disintegrated in some drug-treated cells, similar to the process of apoptosis. This study presents a new way for measuring the changes in cytoplasmic viscosity, and to determine if a cell is going into apoptosis as a result of a drug treatment.

  7. Innate immune recognition triggers secretion of lysosomal enzymes by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lackman, Rebecca L; Jamieson, Amanda M; Griffith, Janice M; Geuze, Hans; Cresswell, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Gamma interferon-induced lysosomal thiolreductase (GILT) is expressed constitutively in antigen-presenting cells, where it reduces disulfide bonds to facilitate antigen presentation. GILT is synthesized as an enzymatically active precursor protein and is processed in early endosomes to yield the mature enzyme. The exposure of the promonocytic cell line THP-1 to Escherichia coli causes a differentiation-dependent induction of GILT expression in which the majority of precursor GILT is secreted as active enzyme. We confirm this result in cultured primary monocytes and macrophages, and demonstrate, as an in vivo correlate of the phenomenon, upregulation of precursor GILT levels in the serum of mice injected with lipopolysaccharide. We show that macrophage differentiation is accompanied by a transcriptional downregulation of mannose-6-phosphorylation, which likely prevents the recognition and proper sorting of soluble lysosomal enzymes by the mannose-6-phosphate receptors. We provide evidence for a mechanism of generalized soluble lysosomal enzyme secretion through the constitutive secretory pathway. PMID:17555533

  8. Hyphal growth of phagocytosed Fusarium oxysporum causes cell lysis and death of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schfer, Katja; Bain, Judith M; Di Pietro, Antonio; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is an important plant pathogen and an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Here we investigated phagocytosis of F. oxysporum by J774.1 murine cell line macrophages using live cell video microscopy. Macrophages avidly migrated towards F. oxysporum germlings and were rapidly engulfed after cell-cell contact was established. F. oxysporum germlings continued hyphal growth after engulfment by macrophages, leading to associated macrophage lysis and escape. Macrophage killing depended on the multiplicity of infection. After engulfment, F. oxysporum inhibited macrophages from completing mitosis, resulting in large daughter cells fused together by means of a F. oxysporum hypha. These results shed new light on the initial stages of Fusarium infection and the innate immune response of the mammalian host. PMID:25025395

  9. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-? stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  10. Differentiation of THP1 Cells into Macrophages for Transwell Co-culture Assay with Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael P; Young, Helen; Hurlstone, Adam; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how immune cells such as macrophages interact with cancer cells is of increasing interest, as cancer treatments move towards combining both targeted- and immuno- therapies in new treatment regimes. This protocol is using THP-1 cells, a human leukemia monocytic cell line that can be differentiated into macrophages. This allows studying the effects of the macrophage secretome on cancer cells (on e.g. growth, drug response or gene expression) in co-cultures without direct cell contact interactions. This is an important aspect as it removes the presence of any phagocytic aspect to changes in the cancer cell number and behaviour. The in vitro THP-1 monocyte differentiation into polarized macrophages was used to study the effects of both M1 and M2 type populations of macrophages on melanoma cells (Smith et al., 2014; Tsuchiya et al., 1980). M1 type macrophages are classically thought to be tumour suppressing as opposed to M2 type macrophages, which are thought to possess tissue repairing and tumour growth promoting activities.

  11. 20S-dihydroprotopanaxadiol, a ginsenoside derivative, boosts innate immune responses of monocytes and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    20S-dihydroprotopanaxadiol (2H-PPD) is a derivative of protopanaxadiol, a glycone of ginsenosides prepared from Panax ginseng. Although ginsenosides and acidic polysaccharides are known to be major active ingredients in ginseng, the immunopharmacological activities of their metabolites and derivatives have not been fully explored. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the regulatory action of 2H-PPD on the function of monocytes and macrophages in innate immune responses. 2H-PPD was able to boost the phagocytic uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran in macrophages and enhance the generation of radicals (reactive oxygen species) in sodium nitroprusside-treated RAW264.7 cells. The surface levels of the costimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86 were also increased during 2H-PPD treatment. In addition, this compound boosted U937 cellcell aggregation induced by CD29 and CD43 antibodies, but not by cell-extracellular matrix (fibronectin) adhesion. Similarly, the surface levels of CD29 and CD43 were increased by 2H-PPD exposure. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that 2H-PPD has the pharmacological capability to upregulate the functional role of macrophages/monocytes in innate immunity. PMID:24198654

  12. IL-34- and M-CSF-induced macrophages switch memory T cells into Th17 cells via membrane IL-1?.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Etienne D; Blanchard, Simon; Preisser, Laurence; Descamps, Philippe; Ifrah, Norbert; Delneste, Yves; Jeannin, Pascale

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages orchestrate the immune response via the polarization of CD4(+) T helper (Th) cells. Different subsets of macrophages with distinct phenotypes, and sometimes opposite functions, have been described. M-CSF and IL-34 induce the differentiation of monocytes into IL-10(high) IL-12(low) immunoregulatory macrophages, which are similar to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in ovarian cancer. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of human macrophages induced in the presence of M-CSF (M-CSF macrophages) or IL-34 (IL-34 macrophages) and ovarian cancer TAMs to modulate the phenotype of human CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, our results show that M-CSF-, IL-34 macrophages, and TAMs switch non-Th17 committed memory CD4(+) T cells into conventional CCR4(+) CCR6(+) CD161(+) Th17 cells, expressing or not IFN-gamma. Contrary, the pro-inflammatory GM-CSF macrophages promote Th1 cells. The polarization of memory T cells into Th17 cells is mediated via membrane IL-1? (mIL-1?), which is constitutively expressed by M-CSF-, IL-34 macrophages, and TAMs. This study elucidates a new mechanism that allows macrophages to maintain locally restrained and smoldering inflammation, which is required in angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25545357

  13. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice. PMID:9682967

  14. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  15. Innate Immune Response of Human Alveolar Macrophages during Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieru; Nikrad, Mrinalini P.; Travanty, Emily A.; Zhou, Bin; Phang, Tzulip; Gao, Bifeng; Alford, Taylor; Ito, Yoko; Nahreini, Piruz; Hartshorn, Kevan; Wentworth, David; Dinarello, Charles A.; Mason, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are one of the key cell types for initiating inflammatory and immune responses to influenza virus in the lung. However, the genome-wide changes in response to influenza infection in AM have not been defined. We performed gene profiling of human AM in response to H1N1 influenza A virus PR/8 using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 chips and verified the changes at both mRNA and protein levels by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. We confirmed the response with a contemporary H3N2 influenza virus A/New York/238/2005 (NY/238). To understand the local cellular response, we also evaluated the impact of paracrine factors on virus-induced chemokine and cytokine secretion. In addition, we investigated the changes in the expression of macrophage receptors and uptake of pathogens after PR/8 infection. Although macrophages fail to release a large amount of infectious virus, we observed a robust induction of type I and type III interferons and several cytokines and chemokines following influenza infection. CXCL9, 10, and 11 were the most highly induced chemokines by influenza infection. UV-inactivation abolished virus-induced cytokine and chemokine response, with the exception of CXCL10. The contemporary influenza virus NY/238 infection of AM induced a similar response as PR/8. Inhibition of TNF and/or IL-1? activity significantly decreased the secretion of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL5 and CXCL8 by over 50%. PR/8 infection also significantly decreased mRNA levels of macrophage receptors including C-type lectin domain family 7 member A (CLEC7A), macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1), and CD36, and reduced uptake of zymosan. In conclusion, influenza infection induced an extensive proinflammatory response in human AM. Targeting local components of innate immune response might provide a strategy for controlling influenza A infection-induced proinflammatory response in vivo. PMID:22396727

  16. Innate Immune Cells in Liver Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liaskou, Evaggelia; Wilson, Daisy V.; Oo, Ye H.

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune system is the first line of defence against invading pathogens that is critical for the overall survival of the host. Human liver is characterised by a dual blood supply, with 80% of blood entering through the portal vein carrying nutrients and bacterial endotoxin from the gastrointestinal tract. The liver is thus constantly exposed to antigenic loads. Therefore, pathogenic microorganism must be efficiently eliminated whilst harmless antigens derived from the gastrointestinal tract need to be tolerized in the liver. In order to achieve this, the liver innate immune system is equipped with multiple cellular components; monocytes, macrophages, granulocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells which coordinate to exert tolerogenic environment at the same time detect, respond, and eliminate invading pathogens, infected or transformed self to mount immunity. This paper will discuss the innate immune cells that take part in human liver inflammation, and their roles in both resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:22933833

  17. Sterols and oxysterols in immune cell function.

    PubMed

    Spann, Nathanael J; Glass, Christopher K

    2013-09-01

    Intermediates in the cholesterol-biosynthetic pathway and oxysterol derivatives of cholesterol regulate diverse cellular processes. Recent studies have expanded the appreciation of their roles in controlling the functions of cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review recent literature reporting on the biological functions of sterol intermediates and oxysterols, acting through transcription factors such as the liver X receptors (LXRs), sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and the G protein-coupled receptor EBI2, in regulating the differentiation and population expansion of cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, their responses to inflammatory mediators, their effects on the phagocytic functions of macrophages and their effects on antiviral activities and the migration of immune cells. Such findings have raised many new questions about the production of endogenous bioactive sterols and oxysterols and their mechanisms of action in the immune system. PMID:23959186

  18. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, ?? T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  19. Immune Evasion, Stress Resistance, and Efficient Nutrient Acquisition Are Crucial for Intracellular Survival of Candida glabrata within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Katja; Gerwien, Franziska; Kasper, Lydia; Allert, Stefanie; Brunke, Sascha; Jablonowski, Nadja; Schwarzmüller, Tobias; Barz, Dagmar; Rupp, Steffen; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata is both a human fungal commensal and an opportunistic pathogen which can withstand activities of the immune system. For example, C. glabrata can survive phagocytosis and replicates within macrophages. However, the mechanisms underlying intracellular survival remain unclear. In this work, we used a functional genomic approach to identify C. glabrata determinants necessary for survival within human monocyte-derived macrophages by screening a set of 433 deletion mutants. We identified 23 genes which are required to resist killing by macrophages. Based on homologies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs, these genes are putatively involved in cell wall biosynthesis, calcium homeostasis, nutritional and stress response, protein glycosylation, or iron homeostasis. Mutants were further characterized using a series of in vitro assays to elucidate the genes' functions in survival. We investigated different parameters of C. glabrata-phagocyte interactions: uptake by macrophages, replication within macrophages, phagosomal pH, and recognition of mutant cells by macrophages as indicated by production of reactive oxygen species and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We further studied the cell surface integrity of mutant cells, their ability to grow under nutrient-limited conditions, and their susceptibility to stress conditions mirroring the harsh environment inside a phagosome. Additionally, resistance to killing by neutrophils was analyzed. Our data support the view that immune evasion is a key aspect of C. glabrata virulence and that increased immune recognition causes increased antifungal activities by macrophages. Furthermore, stress resistance and efficient nutrient acquisition, in particular, iron uptake, are crucial for intraphagosomal survival of C. glabrata. PMID:24363366

  20. Nanogel-based immunologically stealth vaccine targets macrophages in the medulla of lymph node and induces potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Daisuke; Harada, Naozumi; Hayashi, Tae; Tahara, Yoshiro; Momose, Fumiyasu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2014-09-23

    Because existing therapeutic cancer vaccines provide only a limited clinical benefit, a different vaccination strategy is necessary to improve vaccine efficacy. We developed a nanoparticulate cancer vaccine by encapsulating a synthetic long peptide antigen within an immunologically inert nanoparticulate hydrogel (nanogel) of cholesteryl pullulan (CHP). After subcutaneous injection to mice, the nanogel-based vaccine was efficiently transported to the draining lymph node, and was preferentially engulfed by medullary macrophages but was not sensed by other macrophages and dendritic cells (so-called "immunologically stealth mode"). Although the function of medullary macrophages in T cell immunity has been unexplored so far, these macrophages effectively cross-primed the vaccine-specific CD8(+) T cells in the presence of a Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist as an adjuvant. The nanogel-based vaccine significantly inhibited in vivo tumor growth in the prophylactic and therapeutic settings, compared to another vaccine formulation using a conventional delivery system, incomplete Freund's adjuvant. We also revealed that lymph node macrophages were highly responsive to TLR stimulation, which may underlie the potency of the macrophage-oriented, nanogel-based vaccine. These results indicate that targeting medullary macrophages using the immunologically stealth nanoparticulate delivery system is an effective vaccine strategy. PMID:25180962

  1. Control of growth and inflammatory response of macrophages and foam cells with nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2012-07-01

    Macrophages play an important role in modulating the immune function of the human body, while foam cells differentiated from macrophages with subsequent fatty streak formation play a key role in atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that nanotopography modulates the behavior and function of macrophages and foam cells without bioactive agent. In the present study, nanodot arrays ranging from 10- to 200-nm were used to evaluate the growth and function of macrophages and foam cells. In the quantitative analysis, the cell adhesion area in macrophages increased with 10- to 50-nm nanodot arrays compared to the flat surface, while it decreased with 100- and 200-nm nanodot arrays. A similar trend of adhesion was observed in foam cells. Immunostaining, specific to vinculin and actin filaments, indicated that a 50-nm surface promoted cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. On the contrary, 200-nm surfaces hindered cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. Further, based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data, expression of inflammatory genes was upregulated for the 100- and 200-nm surfaces in macrophages and foam cells. This suggests that nanodots of 100- and 200-nm triggered immune inflammatory stress response. In summary, nanotopography controls cell morphology, adhesions, and proliferation. By adjusting the nanodot diameter, we could modulate the growth and expression of function-related genes in the macrophages and foam cell system. The nanotopography-mediated control of cell growth and morphology provides potential insight for designing cardiovascular implants.

  2. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  3. Cell motility is decreased in macrophages activated by cancer cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  4. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of lead and cadmium on cell-mediated immunity was studied in peritoneal macrophages, B-, and T-lymphocytes of mice. Lead and cadmium were administered in drinking water for 10 weeks in short-term experiments and up to 18 months to deal with immune responses in aged mic...

  5. Immunopathogenesis of Myocarditis: The Interplay Between Cardiac Fibroblast Cells, Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Amoah, B Prince; Yang, H; Zhang, P; Su, Z; Xu, H

    2015-07-01

    The myocardium responds to aetiologically different pathological injuries through a common multistep process involving highly co-ordinated interactions between cardiac and immune cells. Cardiac fibroblast cells which constitute the prevalent cell type in the heart to have their functional effects that express contractile proteins and exhibit increased migratory, proliferative and secretory properties. During the pathogenesis of myocarditis, cardiac fibroblast, dendritic cells, macrophages, CD4(+) T cells and other immune cells are known to play variable roles. It is becoming increasingly clear that cardiac fibroblasts are not passive players in immune responses, and several evidences show this through the release of soluble signals and/or direct interactions with these immune cells. Typically, fibroblasts are involved in synthesizing factors such as cytokines, chemokines, prostanoids, matrix components and matrix-degrading enzymes to influence dendritic cells, CD4(+) T cells and macrophage functions and vice versa in the pathogenesis of myocarditis. Again, evidence proves a crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and immune cells recruited into the myocardium during myocarditis in the microenvironments. This piece reviews the properties and roles of cardiac fibroblast cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, and how these cells interplay on each other in the microenvironment. PMID:25845946

  6. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-21

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor ? were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction. PMID:25597450

  7. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06175f

  8. The immune-microenvironment confers resistance to MAP kinase pathway inhibitors through macrophage-derived TNF?

    PubMed Central

    OBrien, Kate; Brunton, Holly; Ferguson, Jennifer; Young, Helen; Dhomen, Nathalie; Flaherty, Keith T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Marais, Richard; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Recently the rationale for combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy has come to light, but our understanding of the immune response during MAPK pathway inhibitor treatment is limited. We discovered that the immune-microenvironment can act as source of resistance to MAPK pathway-targeted therapy, and moreover during treatment this source becomes reinforced. In particular, we identified macrophage-derived TNF? as a crucial melanoma-growth factor that provides resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors through the lineage-transcription factor MITF. Most strikingly, in BRAF mutant melanomas of patients and BRafV600E-melanoma allografts MAPK pathway inhibitors increased the number of tumor-associated macrophages, and TNF? and MITF expression. Inhibiting TNF?-signaling with I?B-kinase inhibitors profoundly enhanced the efficacy of MAPK pathway inhibitors by targeting not only the melanoma cells, but also the microenvironment. In summary, we identify the immune-microenvironment as a novel source of resistance and reveal a new strategy to improve the efficacy of targeted therapy in melanoma. PMID:25256614

  9. Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase-2 Inhibition by CYLD Impairs Antibacterial Immune Responses in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Katharina; Schmid, Ursula; Just, Sissy; Wang, Xu; Wurm, Rebecca; Naumann, Michael; Schlüter, Dirk; Nishanth, Gopala

    2016-01-01

    Upon infection with intracellular bacteria, nucleotide oligomerization domain protein 2 recognizes bacterial muramyl dipeptide and binds, subsequently, to receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2), which activates immune responses via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Activation of RIPK2 depends on its K63 ubiquitination by E3 ligases, whereas the deubiquitinating enzyme A20 counter regulates RIPK2 activity by cleaving K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2. Here, we newly identify the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD as a new inhibitor of RIPK2. We show that CYLD binds to and removes K63-polyubiquitin chains from RIPK2 in Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. CYLD-mediated K63 deubiquitination of RIPK2 resulted in an impaired activation of both NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-12, anti-listerial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), and, finally, impaired pathogen control. In turn, RIPK2 inhibition by siRNA prevented activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and completely abolished the protective effect of CYLD deficiency with respect to the production of IL-6, NO, ROS, and pathogen control. Noteworthy, CYLD also inhibited autophagy of Listeria in a RIPK2-ERK1/2-dependent manner. The protective function of CYLD deficiency was dependent on interferon gamma (IFN-γ) prestimulation of infected macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced NF-κB activation in CYLD-expressing macrophages limited the protective effect of IFN-γ by reducing NF-κB-dependent signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 (STAT1) activation. Taken together, our study identifies CYLD as an important inhibitor of RIPK2-dependent antibacterial immune responses in macrophages. PMID:26834734

  10. Immunosurveillance and immunotherapy of tumors by innate immune cells.

    PubMed

    Iannello, Alexandre; Thompson, Thornton W; Ardolino, Michele; Marcus, Assaf; Raulet, David H

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for innate immune effector cells in tumor surveillance. Natural killer (NK) cells and myeloid cells represent the two main subsets of innate immune cells possessing efficient but quite different tumor suppressive abilities. Here, we describe the germline-encoded NK cell receptors that play a role in suppressing tumor development and describe briefly the cellular pathways leading to the upregulation of their ligands in tumor cells. We also describe mechanisms underlying the elimination of tumor cells by macrophages and a recently characterized mechanism dedicated to sensing cytosolic DNA that is implicated in antitumor immune responses. PMID:26686774

  11. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ceri A; Dickinson, Abigail K; Taams, Leonie S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?), interferon ? (IFN?), interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4(+) T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14(+) myeloid cells and CD4(+) T cells can significantly influence CD4(+) T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4(+) T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4(+) T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  12. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Dickinson, Abigail K.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  13. Trophoblast debris modulates the expression of immune proteins in macrophages: a key to maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft?

    PubMed

    Abumaree, M H; Chamley, L W; Badri, M; El-Muzaini, M F

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between maternal immune cells and the placenta are of substantial interest since diseases of pregnancy, such as recurrent miscarriage, villitis of unknown etiology and preeclampsia may arise due to inadequate adaptation of the maternal immune system. During normal pregnancy trophoblast debris is shed from the placenta into the maternal blood in large quantities. This trophoblast debris is then rapidly cleared from the maternal circulation. In this study, we exposed trophoblast debris generated from an in vitro placental explant model to peripheral blood-derived macrophages and quantified a variety of molecules that are important in immune responses by ELISA or flow cytometry. Phagocytosis of trophoblast debris resulted in reduced cell-surface expression of MHC-II molecules, the costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, CD40 and B7H3), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), inter-cellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and IL-8 receptors in macrophages while the expression of programmed death-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) was upregulated. In addition, phagocytosis of trophoblast debris induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL6 and IL1Ra and decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1?, IL12p70 and IL-8 by macrophages. Phagocytosis of trophoblast debris also increased macrophage expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We have shown that phagocytosis of trophoblast debris from normal placentae alters the phenotype of macrophages such that they are likely to deviate maternal immune responses towards tolerance and away from inflammation. This may be one of the mechanisms that allow the human fetal allograft to survive in direct contact with the maternal immune system. PMID:22542910

  14. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  15. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9−/−) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9–B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10–mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  16. HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells induce NO production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2013-02-01

    High fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) provides a new stimulator to trigger cell apoptosis, and it is well known that apoptotic cells provide antigens to effectively trigger recognition by the immune system. In order to investigate the effect of HF-LPLI on the professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) function, in our primary study, we focused our attention on the effect of HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells on macrophages phagocytosis and NO production. Both confocal microscopy and flowcytometry analysis showed that HF-LPLI (120 J/cm2) induced significantly EMT6 death. Further experiments showed that HF-LPLI-treated EMT6 cells could be phagocyted by the murine macrophage cells RAW264.7, and could induce NO production in macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells effectively regulated the immune system. The HF-LPLI effect on the APC function needs to be further studied.

  17. Macrophage PTEN Regulates Expression and Secretion of Arginase I Modulating Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Emine; Haubenwallner, Stefan; Kuttke, Mario; Kollmann, Isabella; Halfmann, Angela; Dohnal, Alexander B.; Chen, Li; Cheng, Paul; Hoesel, Bastian; Einwallner, Elisa; Brunner, Julia; Kral, Julia B.; Schrottmaier, Waltraud C.; Thell, Kathrin; Saferding, Victoria; Blüml, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The activation of innate immune cells triggers numerous intracellular signaling pathways, which require tight control to mount an adequate immune response. The PI3K signaling pathway is intricately involved in innate immunity, and its activation dampens the expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines in myeloid cells. These signaling processes are strictly regulated by the PI3K antagonist, the lipid phosphatase, PTEN, a known tumor suppressor. Importantly, PTEN is responsible for the elevated production of cytokines such as IL-6 in response to TLR agonists, and deletion of PTEN results in diminished inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms by which PI3K negatively regulates TLR signaling are only partially resolved. We observed that Arginase I expression and secretion were markedly induced by PTEN deletion, suggesting PTEN−/− macrophages were alternatively activated. This was mediated by increased expression and activation of the transcription factors C/EBPβ and STAT3. Genetic and pharmacologic experimental approaches in vitro, as well as in vivo autoimmunity models, provide convincing evidence that PI3K/PTEN-regulated extracellular Arginase I acts as a paracrine regulator of inflammation and immunity. PMID:25015834

  18. Brugia malayi Microfilariae Induce a Regulatory Monocyte/Macrophage Phenotype That Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Gopinath; Rao, Gopala B.; Lucius, Richard; Srikantam, Aparna; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages contribute to the dysfunction of immune responses in human filariasis. During patent infection monocytes encounter microfilariae in the blood, an event that occurs in asymptomatically infected filariasis patients that are immunologically hyporeactive. Aim To determine whether blood microfilariae directly act on blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages to induce a regulatory phenotype that interferes with innate and adaptive responses. Methodology and principal findings Monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages from filaria non-endemic normal donors were stimulated in vitro with Brugia malayi microfilarial (Mf) lysate. We could show that monocytes stimulated with Mf lysate develop a defined regulatory phenotype, characterised by expression of the immunoregulatory markers IL-10 and PD-L1. Significantly, this regulatory phenotype was recapitulated in monocytes from Wuchereria bancrofti asymptomatically infected patients but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. Monocytes from non-endemic donors stimulated with Mf lysate directly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10). IFN-γ responses were restored by neutralising IL-10 or PD-1. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with Mf lysate expressed high levels of IL-10 and had suppressed phagocytic abilities. Finally Mf lysate applied during the differentiation of macrophages in vitro interfered with macrophage abilities to respond to subsequent LPS stimulation in a selective manner. Conclusions and significance Conclusively, our study demonstrates that Mf lysate stimulation of monocytes from healthy donors in vitro induces a regulatory phenotype, characterized by expression of PD-L1 and IL-10. This phenotype is directly reflected in monocytes from filarial patients with asymptomatic infection but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. We suggest that suppression of T cell functions typically seen in lymphatic filariasis is caused by microfilaria-modulated monocytes in an IL-10-dependent manner. Together with suppression of macrophage innate responses, this may contribute to the overall down-regulation of immune responses observed in asymptomatically infected patients. PMID:25275395

  19. Changes in adipose tissue macrophage and T cell during aging

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sanjay K; Delaney, Colin; Shi, Hang; Yung, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue historically was believed to be an inert tissue, functioning primarily in the storage of energy and thermal homeostasis. However, recent discoveries point toward a critical role for adipocytes in endocrine function as well as immune regulation. Excess body fat, accumulated through aging and/or calorie-rich diet, is associated with many chronic metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Within the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue, macrophages and T cells accumulate with increasing tissue mass, secreting pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines. In this review we discuss the current understanding of immune cell function in both diet-induced and age-related obesity. In both models of obesity, the classically activated, pro-inflammatory (M1) subtype takes precedence over the alternatively activated, anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, causing tissue necrosis and releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-6. Recently, other distinct adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) subtypes have been identified by surface marker expression and their functions characterized. Adipose tissue T cell (ATT) recruitment to adipose tissue is also different between aging and diet-induced obesity. Under both conditions, T cells exhibit restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity and produce higher levels of pro-inflammatory signals like IFN-? and granzyme B relative to young or healthy mice. However, regulatory T cell numbers are dramatically different between the two models of obesity. Taken together, these findings suggest model of age- and diet-induced obesity may be more distinct than previously thought with many questions yet to be resolved in this multidimensional disease. PMID:24579699

  20. Activation of murine dendritic cells and macrophages induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kalupahana, Ruwani Sagarika; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan; Blacklaws, Barbara Ann

    2005-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the direct involvement of both cell types in the immune response to Salmonella has been identified. In this study we analysed the phenotypic and functional changes that take place in murine macrophages and DCs in response to live and heat-killed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both types of cell secreted proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in response to live and heat-killed salmonellae. Bacterial stimulation also resulted in up-regulation of costimulatory molecules on macrophages and DCs. The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by macrophages and DCs was differentially regulated by interferon (IFN)-? and salmonellae. Live and heat-killed salmonellae as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibited the up-regulation of MHC class II expression induced by IFN-? on macrophages but not on DCs. Macrophages as well as DCs presented Salmonella-derived antigen to CD4 T cells, although DCs were much more efficient than macrophages at stimulating CD4 T-cell cytokine release. Macrophages are effective in the uptake and killing of bacteria whilst DCs specialize in antigen presentation. This study showed that the viability of salmonellae was not essential for activation of APCs but, unlike live bacteria, prolonged contact with heat-killed bacteria was necessary to obtain maximal expression of the activation markers studied. PMID:16011515

  1. Activation of murine dendritic cells and macrophages induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kalupahana, Ruwani Sagarika; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan; Blacklaws, Barbara Ann

    2005-08-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the direct involvement of both cell types in the immune response to Salmonella has been identified. In this study we analysed the phenotypic and functional changes that take place in murine macrophages and DCs in response to live and heat-killed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both types of cell secreted proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in response to live and heat-killed salmonellae. Bacterial stimulation also resulted in up-regulation of costimulatory molecules on macrophages and DCs. The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by macrophages and DCs was differentially regulated by interferon (IFN)-gamma and salmonellae. Live and heat-killed salmonellae as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibited the up-regulation of MHC class II expression induced by IFN-gamma on macrophages but not on DCs. Macrophages as well as DCs presented Salmonella-derived antigen to CD4 T cells, although DCs were much more efficient than macrophages at stimulating CD4 T-cell cytokine release. Macrophages are effective in the uptake and killing of bacteria whilst DCs specialize in antigen presentation. This study showed that the viability of salmonellae was not essential for activation of APCs but, unlike live bacteria, prolonged contact with heat-killed bacteria was necessary to obtain maximal expression of the activation markers studied. PMID:16011515

  2. Helical Carbon Nanotubes Enhance the Early Immune Response and Inhibit Macrophage-Mediated Phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Brent E.; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Lian, Feifei; Miller, Lou Ann; Shah, Amish B.; Jeffries, Jayme L.; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph W.; Pop, Eric; Lau, Gee W.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosolized or aspirated manufactured carbon nanotubes have been shown to be cytotoxic, cause pulmonary lesions, and demonstrate immunomodulatory properties. CD-1 mice were used to assess pulmonary toxicity of helical carbon nanotubes (HCNTs) and alterations of the immune response to subsequent infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice. HCNTs provoked a mild inflammatory response following either a single exposure or 2X/week for three weeks (multiple exposures) but were not significantly toxic. Administering HCNTs 2X/week for three weeks resulted in pulmonary lesions including granulomas and goblet cell hyperplasia. Mice exposed to HCNTs and subsequently infected by P. aeruginosa demonstrated an enhanced inflammatory response to P. aeruginosa and phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages was inhibited. However, clearance of P. aeruginosa was not affected. HCNT exposed mice depleted of neutrophils were more effective in clearing P. aeruginosa compared to neutrophil-depleted control mice, accompanied by an influx of macrophages. Depletion of systemic macrophages resulted in slightly inhibited bacterial clearance by HCNT treated mice. Our data indicate that pulmonary exposure to HCNTs results in lesions similar to those caused by other nanotubes and pre-exposure to HCNTs inhibit alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa. However, clearance was not affected as exposure to HCNTs primed the immune system for an enhanced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection consisting of an influx of neutrophils and macrophages. PMID:24324555

  3. Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Macrophages and the Immune Evasion Strategies of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitually professional phagocytes, including macrophages, eradicate microbial invaders from the human body without overt signs of infection. Despite this, there exist select bacteria that are professional pathogens, causing significant morbidity and mortality across the globe and Staphylococcus aureus is no exception. S. aureus is a highly successful pathogen that can infect virtually every tissue that comprises the human body causing a broad spectrum of diseases. The profound pathogenic capacity of S. aureus can be attributed, in part, to its ability to elaborate a profusion of bacterial effectors that circumvent host immunity. Macrophages are important professional phagocytes that contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune response, however from in vitro and in vivo studies, it is evident that they fail to eradicate S. aureus. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms employed by macrophages to combat bacteria and describes the immune evasion strategies and some representative effectors that enable S. aureus to evade macrophage-mediated killing. PMID:26633519

  4. Apoptotic Cells Can Deliver Chemotherapeutics to Engulfing Macrophages and Suppress Inflammatory Cytokine Production*

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Beatriz; Paquette, Nicholas; Padassi, Helena; Zhai, Bo; White, Kristin; Skvirsky, Rachel; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M.

    2012-01-01

    Immunosuppression via cell-cell contact with apoptotic cells is a well studied immunological phenomenon. Although the original studies of immune repression used primary cells, which undergo spontaneous cell death or apoptosis in response to irradiation, more recent studies have relied on chemotherapeutic agents to induce apoptosis in cell lines. In this work, we demonstrate that Jurkat cells induced to die with actinomycin D suppressed inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages, whereas cells treated with etoposide did not. This immune repression mediated by actinomycin D-treated cells did not require phagocytosis or cell-cell contact and thus occurs through a different mechanism from that seen with primary apoptotic neutrophils. Moreover, cells induced to die with etoposide and then treated for a short time with actinomycin D also suppressed macrophage responses, indicating that suppression was mediated by actinomycin D independent of the mechanism of cell death. Finally, phagocytosis of actinomycin D-treated cells caused apoptosis in macrophages, and suppression could be blocked by inhibition of caspase activity in the target macrophage. Together, these data indicate that apoptotic cells act as Trojan horses, delivering actinomycin D to engulfing macrophages. Suppression of cytokine production by macrophages is therefore due to exposure to actinomycin D from apoptotic cells and is not the result of cell-receptor interactions. These data suggest that drug-induced death may not be an appropriate surrogate for the immunosuppressive activity of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, these effects of cytotoxic drugs on infiltrating immune phagocytes may have clinical ramifications for their use as antitumor therapies. PMID:22433861

  5. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hal X; Tidball, James G

    2003-02-15

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:12562965

  6. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  7. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Notari, Luigi; Riera, Diana C; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; McLean, Leon P; Madden, Kathleen B; van Rooijen, Nico; Vanuytsel, Tim; Urban, Joseph F; Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1?. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells. PMID:24465430

  8. The role of macrophages and dendritic cells in the initiation of inflammation in IBD

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Erin C.; Plevy, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy gastrointestinal tract, homeostasis is an active process that requires a careful balance of host responses to the enteric luminal contents. Intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells comprise a unique group of tissue immune cells that are ideally situated at the interface of the host and the enteric luminal environment to appropriately respond to microbes and ingested stimuli. However, intrinsic defects in macrophage and dendritic cell function contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), as highlighted by recent genome-wide association studies. Gastrointestinal macrophages and dendritic cells participate in IBD development through inappropriate responses to enteric microbial stimuli, inefficient clearance of microbes from host tissues, and impaired transition from appropriate pro-inflammatory responses to anti-inflammatory responses that promote resolution. By understanding how intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells initiate chronic inflammation, new pathogenesis-based therapeutic strategies to treat human IBD will be elucidated. PMID:23974993

  9. A Group A Streptococcus ADP-Ribosyltransferase Toxin Stimulates a Protective Interleukin 1β-Dependent Macrophage Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann E.; Beasley, Federico C.; Keller, Nadia; Hollands, Andrew; Urbano, Rodolfo; Troemel, Emily R.; Hoffman, Hal M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The M1T1 clone of group A Streptococcus (GAS) is associated with severe invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis and septicemia. During invasive M1T1 GAS disease, mutations in the covRS regulatory system led to upregulation of an ADP-ribosyltransferase, SpyA. Surprisingly, a GAS ΔspyA mutant was resistant to killing by macrophages and caused higher mortality with impaired bacterial clearance in a mouse intravenous challenge model. GAS expression of SpyA triggered macrophage cell death in association with caspase-1-dependent interleukin 1β (IL-1β) production, and differences between wild-type (WT) and ΔspyA GAS macrophage survival levels were lost in cells lacking caspase-1, NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), or pro-IL-1β. Similar in vitro findings were identified in macrophage studies performed with pseudomonal exotoxin A, another ADP-ribosylating toxin. Thus, SpyA triggers caspase-1-dependent inflammatory cell death in macrophages, revealing a toxin-triggered IL-1β-dependent innate immune response pathway critical in defense against invasive bacterial infection. PMID:25759502

  10. Recent progress in understandıng the function of intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses must be tightly controlled, particularly in the intestine, As members of the mononuclear phagocyte family, dendritic cells and macrophages, are well represented in intestinal tissues, and have developed unique functional niches. This review will focus on recent findings on antigen uptake and processing in the intestine, and the role of DCs in the imprinting homing receptors on T and B cells, the induction of IgA B cell responses, and the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It will also address the unique phenotype of intestinal macrophages and briefly what is known regarding the relationships between these cell types. PMID:19079213

  11. Macrophage and T Cell Produced IL-10 Promotes Viral Chronicity

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kirsten; Perriard, Guillaume; Behrendt, Rayk; Schwendener, Reto A.; Sexl, Veronika; Dunn, Robert; Kamanaka, Masahito; Flavell, Richard A.; Roers, Axel; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Chronic viral infections lead to CD8+ T cell exhaustion, characterized by impaired cytokine secretion. Presence of the immune-regulatory cytokine IL-10 promotes chronicity of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Clone 13 infection, while absence of IL-10/IL-10R signaling early during infection results in viral clearance and higher percentages and numbers of antiviral, cytokine producing T cells. IL-10 is produced by several cell types during LCMV infection but it is currently unclear which cellular sources are responsible for induction of viral chronicity. Here, we demonstrate that although dendritic cells produce IL-10 and overall IL-10 mRNA levels decrease significantly in absence of CD11c+ cells, absence of IL-10 produced by CD11c+ cells failed to improve the LCMV-specific T cell response and control of LCMV infection. Similarly, NK cell specific IL-10 deficiency had no positive impact on the LCMV-specific T cell response or viral control, even though high percentages of NK cells produced IL-10 at early time points after infection. Interestingly, we found markedly improved T cell responses and clearance of normally chronic LCMV Clone 13 infection when either myeloid cells or T cells lacked IL-10 production and mice depleted of monocytes/macrophages or CD4+ T cells exhibited reduced overall levels of IL-10 mRNA. These data suggest that the decision whether LCMV infection becomes chronic or can be cleared critically depends on early CD4+ T cell and monocyte/macrophage produced IL-10. PMID:24244162

  12. Macrophage and T cell produced IL-10 promotes viral chronicity.

    PubMed

    Richter, Kirsten; Perriard, Guillaume; Behrendt, Rayk; Schwendener, Reto A; Sexl, Veronika; Dunn, Robert; Kamanaka, Masahito; Flavell, Richard A; Roers, Axel; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Chronic viral infections lead to CD8(+) T cell exhaustion, characterized by impaired cytokine secretion. Presence of the immune-regulatory cytokine IL-10 promotes chronicity of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Clone 13 infection, while absence of IL-10/IL-10R signaling early during infection results in viral clearance and higher percentages and numbers of antiviral, cytokine producing T cells. IL-10 is produced by several cell types during LCMV infection but it is currently unclear which cellular sources are responsible for induction of viral chronicity. Here, we demonstrate that although dendritic cells produce IL-10 and overall IL-10 mRNA levels decrease significantly in absence of CD11c(+) cells, absence of IL-10 produced by CD11c(+) cells failed to improve the LCMV-specific T cell response and control of LCMV infection. Similarly, NK cell specific IL-10 deficiency had no positive impact on the LCMV-specific T cell response or viral control, even though high percentages of NK cells produced IL-10 at early time points after infection. Interestingly, we found markedly improved T cell responses and clearance of normally chronic LCMV Clone 13 infection when either myeloid cells or T cells lacked IL-10 production and mice depleted of monocytes/macrophages or CD4(+) T cells exhibited reduced overall levels of IL-10 mRNA. These data suggest that the decision whether LCMV infection becomes chronic or can be cleared critically depends on early CD4(+) T cell and monocyte/macrophage produced IL-10. PMID:24244162

  13. T-cell-induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, R D; McCutchan, J A; Venable, J C; Nelson, J A; Wiley, C A

    1990-01-01

    Macrophages are major reservoirs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the tissues of infected humans. As monocytes in the peripheral blood do not show high levels of infection, we have investigated the expression of HIV in T-cell-activated, differentiated macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from HIV-seropositive individuals and stimulated with antigens or mitogens, and the nonadherent fraction was removed. Macrophages were cultured alone for 2 weeks, and HIV expression was assessed. Results from p24 antigen capture assays demonstrated that the presence of autologous T cells and concanavalin A or autologous T cells and allogeneic cells for the initial 24 h of culture induced HIV expression in 35 of 47 (74%) HIV-seropositive patients tested. The macrophage monolayers could be immunostained with anti-HIV antibodies to reveal discrete infectious centers, indicating that complete virus replication was occurring in the macrophages and that infection of adjacent cells was mediated by cell-cell contact. Time course studies of the interval of coculture of the adherent and nonadherent cells indicated that 24 h (but not 2 h) was sufficient for induction of HIV in the macrophages. Direct contact between the adherent cells and activated T cells was required as well. Since the presence of autologous T cells also appeared to be necessary, induction of HIV expression in macrophages may be genetically restricted. HIV-seronegative nonadherent cells were able to induce HIV expression in macrophages from HIV-seropositive donors, demonstrating that the virus originated in the monocytes and was reactivated in the context of a classic T-cell-mediated immune reaction. The high percentage of monocytes from HIV-seropositive donors which can be induced to replicate HIV by activated T cells suggests that infection of monocytes may be critical to the pathogenesis of this lentivirus infection. Images PMID:2112615

  14. Application of a novel immunization protocol to the production of monoclonal antibodies specific for macrophages in human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, A D; Uren, S; Hawes, C S; Boyle, W

    1989-01-01

    A monolayer depletion/adoptive immunization protocol that biased the immune response towards recognition of placental macrophage (pMO) antigens was established. BALB/c spleen cells immune to human pMO were adsorbed onto monolayers of the B-cell line QIMR-WIL. Monolayer-depleted or unfractionated cells were transferred to irradiated recipients, which subsequently were restimulated with pMO then killed for hybridoma production. Screening of hybridomas revealed an increased proportion of pMO-specific hybridomas following transfer and fusion of monolayer-depleted cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), L9 and L21, which were generated through application of this protocol, are described. L9 recognized an antigen on cells within the villi in sections of term placenta and freshly isolated pMO. With time in culture, expression of this antigen decreased markedly. Macrophages, but no other cell type, in placental cell suspensions expressed this antigen. L9 failed to react with any peripheral blood cells. Immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE analyses indicated that two proteins of molecular weight (MW) 40,000 and 43,000 were recognized by L9. Sections of term placenta and freshly isolated pMO failed to react with L21. After 2-3 days in culture, however, most macrophages expressed this antigen. L21 reacted weakly with peripheral monocytes and granulocytes but not other normal peripheral blood cells. Myeloid cell lines reacted strongly with this mAb only after activation with PMA. SDS-PAGE analyses of the L21 immunoprecipitate under non-reducing conditions revealed a single band of 61,000 MW, while two bands of 46,000 and 49,000 MW were detected under reducing conditions. Cellular distribution and molecular weight analyses indicated that the antigens recognized by these two mAb were apparently distinct from previously defined myeloid antigens. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2531720

  15. T CellMediated Host Immune Defenses in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has increasingly shown that the lungs are a major site of immune regulation. A robust and highly regulated immune response in the lung protects the host from pathogen infection, whereas an inefficient or deleterious response can lead to various pulmonary diseases. Many cell types, such as epithelial cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, and B and T lymphocytes, contribute to lung immunity. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding how T lymphocytes mediate pulmonary host defenses against bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. PMID:23516986

  16. The macrophage at the intersection of immunity and metabolism in obesity.

    PubMed

    Samaan, M Constantine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic representing one of the major challenges that societies face around the globe. Identifying the mechanisms involved in its development and propagation will help the development of preventative and therapeutic strategies that may help control its rising rates.Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, and this is believed to be one of the major contributors to the development of insulin resistance, which is an early event in obesity and leads to type 2 diabetes when the pancreas fails to keep up with increased demand for insulin. In this review, we discuss the role of macrophages in mediation of inflammation in obesity in metabolic organs including adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver. The presence of immune cells at the interface with metabolic organs modulates both metabolic function and inflammatory responses in these organs, and may provide a potential therapeutic target to modulate metabolic function in obesity. PMID:22035457

  17. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the post-testicular environment.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Nicolas; Barton, Claire R

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages (M?) and dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous families of functionally and developmentally related immune cells that play crucial roles in tissue homeostasis and the regulation of immune responses. During the past 5 years, immunologists have generated a considerable amount of data that challenge dogmas about the ontogeny and functions of these highly versatile cells. The male excurrent duct system plays a critical role in the establishment of fertility by allowing sperm maturation, transport and storage. In addition, it is challenged by pathogens and must establish a protective and tolerogenic environment for a continuous flow of autoantigenic spermatozoa. The post-testicular environment and, in particular, the epididymis contain an intricate network of DCs and M?; however, the immunophysiology of this intriguing and highly specialized mucosal system is poorly understood. This review summarizes the current trends in mouse M? and DC biology and speculates about their roles in the steady-state epididymis. Unraveling immune cell functions in the male reproductive tract is an essential prerequisite for the design of innovative strategies aimed at controlling male fertility and treating infertility. PMID:26337514

  18. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as an immune-based therapy in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pierre Antoine; Angel, Jonathan B

    2005-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to spread despite more than 20 years of significant research and major advances in its treatment. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in recent years has significantly improved disease treatment with a dramatic impact in HIV/AIDS associated morbidity and mortality in countries which have access to this therapy. Despite these advances, such therapies are imperfect and other therapeutic modalities, including immune-based therapies, are being actively sought. Potential benefits of immune-based therapies include: 1) the improvement of HIV-specific immunity to enhance control of viral replication, 2) the improvement of other aspects of host immunity in order to prevent or delay the development of opportunistic infections and 3) the potential to purge virus from cellular reservoirs which are sustained despite the effects of potent antiretroviral therapy. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been studied as one of these immune-based therapies. Several randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of using GM-CSF as an adjunct to conventional anti-retroviral therapy, although such benefits have not been universally observed. Individual studies have shown that GM-CSF increases CD4+ T cells counts and may be associated with decreased plasma HIV RNA levels. There is limited evidence that GM-CSF may help prevent the emergence of antiretroviral drug resistant viruses and that it may decrease the risk of infection in advanced HIV disease. Despite its high costs and the need to be administered subcutaneously, encouraging results continue to emerge from further studies, suggesting that GM-CSF has the potential to become an effective agent in the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:15904525

  19. Prostaglandin E2 Regulation of Macrophage Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Danielle W; Rogers, Lisa M; Aronoff, David M; Cliffel, David E

    2016-01-19

    Globally, maternal and fetal health is greatly impacted by extraplacental inflammation. Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a leading cause of chorioamnionitis, is thought to take advantage of the uterine environment during pregnancy in order to cause inflammation and infection. In this study, we demonstrate the metabolic changes of murine macrophages caused by GBS exposure. GBS alone prompted a delayed increase in lactate production, highlighting its ability to redirect macrophage metabolism from aerobic to anaerobic respiration. This production of lactate is thought to aid in the development and propagation of GBS throughout the surrounding tissue. Additionally, this study shows that PGE2 priming was able to exacerbate lactate production, shown by the rapid and substantial lactate increases seen upon GBS exposure. These data provide a novel model to study the role of GBS exposure to macrophages with and without PGE2 priming. PMID:26656203

  20. Teleost T and NK cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Uwe; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2013-08-01

    The main function of the immune system is to maintain the organism's homeostasis when invaded by foreign material or organisms. Prior to successful elimination of the invader it is crucial to distinguish self from non-self. Most pathogens and altered cells can be recognized by immune cells through expressed pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS or DAMPS, respectively), through non-self (e.g. allogenic or xenogenic cells) or missing major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules (some virus-infected target cells), and by presenting foreign non-self peptides of intracellular (through MHC class I-e.g. virus-infected target cells) or extracellular (through MHC class II-e.g. from bacteria) origin. In order to eliminate invaders directly or by destroying their ability to replicate (e.g. virus-infected cells) specialized immune cells of the innate and adaptive responses appeared during evolution. The first line of defence is represented by the evolutionarily ancient macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. These innate mechanisms are well developed in bony fish. Two types of NK cell homologues have been described in fish: non-specific cytotoxic cells and NK-like cells. Adaptive cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) requires key molecules expressed on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and target cells. CTLs kill host cells harbouring intracellular pathogens by binding of their T cell receptor (TCR) and its co-receptor CD8 to a complex of MHC class I and bound peptide on the infected host cell. Alternatively, extracellular antigens are taken up by professional antigen presenting cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells and B cells to process those antigens and present the resulting peptides in association with MHC class II to CD4(+) T helper cells. During recent years, genes encoding MHC class I and II, TCR and its co-receptors CD8 and CD4 have been cloned in several fish species and antibodies have been developed to study protein expression in morphological and functional contexts. Functional assays for innate and adaptive lymphocyte responses have been developed in only a few fish species. This review summarizes and discusses recent results and developments in the field of T and NK cell responses with focus on economically important and experimental model fish species in the context of vaccination. PMID:23664867

  1. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  2. Nitric oxidemediated regulation of ferroportin-1 controls macrophage iron homeostasis and immune function in Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Schleicher, Ulrike; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Ludwiczek, Susanne; Talasz, Heribert; Brandacher, Gerald; Moser, Patrizia L.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Fang, Ferric C.; Bogdan, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase 2 (NOS2) affects cellular iron homeostasis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and implications for NOS2-dependent pathogen control are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that NO up-regulated the expression of ferroportin-1 (Fpn1), the major cellular iron exporter, in mouse and human cells. Nos2?/? macrophages displayed increased iron content due to reduced Fpn1 expression and allowed for an enhanced iron acquisition by the intracellular bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Nos2 gene disruption or inhibition of NOS2 activity led to an accumulation of iron in the spleen and splenic macrophages. Lack of NO formation resulted in impaired nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, resulting in reduced Fpn1 transcription and diminished cellular iron egress. After infection of Nos2?/? macrophages or mice with S. typhimurium, the increased iron accumulation was paralleled by a reduced cytokine (TNF, IL-12, and IFN-?) expression and impaired pathogen control, all of which were restored upon administration of the iron chelator deferasirox or hyperexpression of Fpn1 or Nrf2. Thus, the accumulation of iron in Nos2?/? macrophages counteracts a proinflammatory host immune response, and the protective effect of NO appears to partially result from its ability to prevent iron overload in macrophages PMID:23630227

  3. Interleukin-27 in T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Fujio, Keishi; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-27, a member of IL-12/IL-23 heterodimeric family of cytokines, has pleiotropic properties that can enhance or limit immune responses. IL-27 acts on various cell types, including T cells, B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells and non-hematopoietic cells. Intensive studies have been conducted especially on T cells, revealing that various subsets of T cells respond uniquely to IL-27. IL-27 induces expansion of Th1 cells by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1-mediated T-bet signaling pathway. On the other hand, IL-27 suppresses immune responses through inhibition of the development of T helper (Th) 17 cells and induction of IL-10 production in a STAT1- and STAT3-dependent manner. IL-27 is a potentially promising cytokine for therapeutic approaches on various human diseases. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of IL-27 related to T cell subsets, its structure, and production mechanism. PMID:25633106

  4. Glioma cancer stem cells induce immunosuppressive macrophages/microglia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Adam; Wei, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wang, Yongtao; Priebe, Waldemar; Qiao, Wei; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy B

    2010-11-01

    Macrophages (M?s)/microglia that constitute the dominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells in glioblastoma are recruited by tumor-secreted factors and are induced to become immunosuppressive and tumor supportive (M2). Glioma cancer stem cells (gCSCs) have been shown to suppress adaptive immunity, but their role in innate immunity with respect to the recruitment and polarization of M?s/microglia is unknown. The innate immunosuppressive properties of the gCSCs were characterized based on elaborated M? inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), transforming growth factor (TGF-?1), soluble colony-stimulating factor (sCSF), recruitment of monocytes, inhibition of M?/microglia phagocytosis, induction of M?/microglia cytokine secretion, and the inhibition of T-cell proliferation. The role of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in mediating innate immune suppression was evaluated in the context of the functional assays. The gCSCs produced sCSF-1, TGF-?1, and MIC-1, cytokines known to recruit and polarize the M?s/microglia to become immunosuppressive. The gCSC-conditioned medium polarized the M?/microglia to an M2 phenotype, inhibited M?/microglia phagocytosis, induced the secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and TGF-?1 by the M?s/microglia, and enhanced the capacity of M?s/microglia to inhibit T-cell proliferation. The inhibition of phagocytosis and the secretion of IL-10 were reversed when the STAT3 pathway was blocked in the gCSCs. The gCSCs modulate innate immunity in glioblastoma by inducing immunosuppressive M?s/microglia, and this capacity can be reversed by inhibiting phosphorylated STAT3. PMID:20667896

  5. Glioma cancer stem cells induce immunosuppressive macrophages/microglia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Adam; Wei, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wang, Yongtao; Priebe, Waldemar; Qiao, Wei; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages (M?s)/microglia that constitute the dominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells in glioblastoma are recruited by tumor-secreted factors and are induced to become immunosuppressive and tumor supportive (M2). Glioma cancer stem cells (gCSCs) have been shown to suppress adaptive immunity, but their role in innate immunity with respect to the recruitment and polarization of M?s/microglia is unknown. The innate immunosuppressive properties of the gCSCs were characterized based on elaborated M? inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), transforming growth factor (TGF-?1), soluble colony-stimulating factor (sCSF), recruitment of monocytes, inhibition of M?/microglia phagocytosis, induction of M?/microglia cytokine secretion, and the inhibition of T-cell proliferation. The role of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in mediating innate immune suppression was evaluated in the context of the functional assays. The gCSCs produced sCSF-1, TGF-?1, and MIC-1, cytokines known to recruit and polarize the M?s/microglia to become immunosuppressive. The gCSC-conditioned medium polarized the M?/microglia to an M2 phenotype, inhibited M?/microglia phagocytosis, induced the secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and TGF-?1 by the M?s/microglia, and enhanced the capacity of M?s/microglia to inhibit T-cell proliferation. The inhibition of phagocytosis and the secretion of IL-10 were reversed when the STAT3 pathway was blocked in the gCSCs. The gCSCs modulate innate immunity in glioblastoma by inducing immunosuppressive M?s/microglia, and this capacity can be reversed by inhibiting phosphorylated STAT3. PMID:20667896

  6. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-?-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages. PMID:26699483

  7. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  8. The macrophage-TCR?? is a cholesterol-responsive combinatorial immune receptor and implicated in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tina; Puellmann, Kerstin; Emmert, Alexander; Fleig, Julian; Oniga, Septimia; Laird, Rebecca; Heida, Nana Maria; Schfer, Katrin; Neumaier, Michael; Beham, Alexander W; Kaminski, Wolfgang E

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates constitutive expression of a recombinatorial TCR?? immune receptor in mammalian monocytes and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate in vitro that macrophage-TCR? repertoires are modulated by atherogenic low density cholesterol (LDL) and high-density cholesterol (HDL). In vivo, analysis of freshly obtained artery specimens from patients with severe carotid atherosclerosis reveals massive abundance of TCR??(+) macrophages within the atherosclerotic lesions. Experimental atherosclerosis in mouse carotids induces accumulation of TCR bearing macrophages in the vascular wall and TCR deficient rag(-/-) mice have an altered macrophage-dependent inflammatory response. We find that the majority of TCR?? bearing macrophages are localized in the hot spot regions of the atherosclerotic lesions. Advanced carotid artery lesions express highly restricted TCR?? repertoires that are characterized by a striking usage of the V?22 and V?16 chains. This together with a significant degree of interindividual lesion repertoire sharing suggests the existence of atherosclerosis-associated TCR?? signatures. Our results implicate the macrophage-TCR?? combinatorial immunoreceptor in atherosclerosis and thus identify an as yet unknown adaptive component in the innate response-to-injury process that underlies this macrophage-driven disease. PMID:25446098

  9. Regulation of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p during macrophage and dendritic cell differentiation potentiates innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Jezrom B; Naqvi, Afsar R; Nares, Salvador

    2015-08-01

    miRNAs are ubiquitous regulators of human biology. Parallel profiling of in vitro monocyte-to-M? and monocyte-to-DC differentiation revealed static, convergent, and divergent expression of miRNA. Bioinformatic and network analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs implicated miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p as negative regulators of intracellular signaling pathways, triggered not only by differentiation factors (M-CSF/GM-CSF/IL-4) but also from PRRs. Manipulation of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p expression during the differentiation of mD-M? and mD-DC differentiation had minimal impact on the acquisition of phenotype but significantly abrogated the ability of these cells to mount inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated stimuli. Forced expression of these miRNAs, which are down-regulated during differentiation, inhibited release of inflammatory cytokines [TNF-?, IL-12(p40), IL-6] upon stimulation with LPS. Functional analysis revealed overlapping mechanisms of inhibition, including surface expression of TLR4/CD14/MD-1 and intracellular PKC?/NF-?B activation. Potential intermediary targets of the TLR4-NF-?B axis included members of the PI3K and MAPK families and PKC isoforms. These results demonstrate the requirement of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p down-regulation for the generation of fully functional M?s and DCs. PMID:25990241

  10. Selenoprotein K knockout mice exhibit deficient calcium flux in immune cells and impaired immune responses.

    PubMed

    Verma, Saguna; Hoffmann, FuKun W; Kumar, Mukesh; Huang, Zhi; Roe, Kelsey; Nguyen-Wu, Elizabeth; Hashimoto, Ann S; Hoffmann, Peter R

    2011-02-15

    Selenoprotein K (Sel K) is a selenium-containing protein for which no function has been identified. We found that Sel K is an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein expressed at relatively high levels in immune cells and is regulated by dietary selenium. Sel K(-/-) mice were generated and found to be similar to wild-type controls regarding growth and fertility. Immune system development was not affected by Sel K deletion, but specific immune cell defects were found in Sel K(-/-) mice. Receptor-mediated Ca(2+) flux was decreased in T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages from Sel K(-/-) mice compared with controls. Ca(2+)-dependent functions including T cell proliferation, T cell and neutrophil migration, and Fc? receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages were decreased in cells from Sel K(-/-) mice compared with that in cells from controls. West Nile virus infections were performed, and Sel K(-/-) mice exhibited decreased viral clearance in the periphery and increased viral titers in brain. Furthermore, West Nile virus-infected Sel K(-/-) mice demonstrated significantly lower survival (2 of 23; 8.7%) compared with that of wild-type controls (10 of 26; 38.5%). These results establish Sel K as an endoplasmic reticulum-membrane protein important for promoting effective Ca(2+) flux during immune cell activation and provide insight into molecular mechanisms by which dietary selenium enhances immune responses. PMID:21220695

  11. Depletion of CLL-associated patrolling monocytes and macrophages controls disease development and repairs immune dysfunction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hanna, B S; McClanahan, F; Yazdanparast, H; Zaborsky, N; Kalter, V; Rößner, P M; Benner, A; Dürr, C; Egle, A; Gribben, J G; Lichter, P; Seiffert, M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by apoptosis resistance and a dysfunctional immune system. Previous reports suggested a potential role of myeloid cells in mediating these defects. However, the composition and function of CLL-associated myeloid cells have not been thoroughly investigated in vivo. Using the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model, we observed severe skewing of myeloid cell populations with CLL development. Monocytes and M2-like macrophages infiltrated the peritoneal cavity of leukemic mice. Monocytes also accumulated in the spleen in a CCR2-dependent manner, and were severely skewed toward Ly6C(low) patrolling or nonclassical phenotype. In addition, the percentage of MHC-II(hi) dendritic cells and macrophages significantly dropped in the spleen. Gene expression profiling of CLL-associated monocytes revealed aberrantly high PD-L1 expression and secretion of multiple inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokines like interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and CXCL9. In vivo myeloid cell depletion using liposomal Clodronate resulted in a significant control of CLL development accompanied by a pronounced repair of innate immune cell phenotypes and a partial resolution of systemic inflammation. In addition, CLL-associated skewing of T cells toward antigen-experienced phenotypes was repaired. The presented data suggest that targeting nonmalignant myeloid cells might serve as a novel immunotherapeutical strategy for CLL. PMID:26522085

  12. Phenotypic and functional switch of macrophages induced by regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Ma, Haixia; Qiu, Lin; Li, Long; Cao, Yuhong; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2011-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are important in maintenance of peripheral tolerance. The direct effect of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells on macrophages was studied using a mouse model in which syngeneic CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells were adoptively transferred into the peritoneal cavity of SCID mice. Peritoneal macrophages in mice transferred with CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD23, CD47 and CD206 and less CD80 and major histocompatibility complex class II molecules as compared with those mice that received either CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells or no cells. Macrophages of mice injected with CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells displayed a remarkably enhanced phagocytosis of chicken red blood cells, and arginase activity together with an increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, whereas they showed a decreased antigen-presenting ability and nitric oxide production. Furthermore, CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells showed strong antagonistic effects on macrophage polarizations in vivo. Blocking arginase, IL-10 and/or transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) partially but significantly reversed the effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells to induce M2 macrophages in vivo suggesting that CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells have the ability to induce M2 macrophages at least in part through arginase, IL-10 and TGF-? pathways. Thus, we have provided the in vivo evidence to support the unknown pathways for CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells to regulate innate immunity by promoting the differentiation of M2 macrophages as well as by inhibiting M1 macrophage induction by CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in mice. CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells efficiently induced M2 macrophage differentiation in mice, offering the in vivo evidence to support the role of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in regulating innate immunity. PMID:20514074

  13. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  14. [Adipose-derived stem cells promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuehong; Pang, Chunyan; Bai, Li; Zhang, Ying; Geng, Lixia

    2016-03-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on M1/M2 macrophages and whether ADSCs are able to promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. Methods M1 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by 24-hour stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon γ (IFN-γ), and M2 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by interleukin 4 (IL-4) for another 24 hours. Then M1/M2 macrophages were separately cultured in the presence of ADSCs for 24 hours. The M1/M2 macrophages and their corresponding supernatants were collected for further analysis. The expressions of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), CD86, arginase 1 (Arg1), mannose receptors/CD206 (MR/CD206), IL-10, found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA. Results ADSCs significantly decreased the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CCL2 and CD86, and increased the levels of Arg1, CD206 and IL-10 in M1 macrophages. In the supernatant of M1 macrophages, the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced, while those of CD206 were enhanced. In M2 macrophages, ADSCs resulted in down-regulation of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CD86 and up-regulation of Arg1, CD206, FIZZ-1, Ym-1 and IL-10. In the supernatant of M2 macrophages, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were down-regulated and those of CD206 were up-regulated. Conclusion ADSCs can inhibit the gene expression of M1 macrophages and promote the gene expression of M2 macrophages, as well as mediate the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. PMID:26927552

  15. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  16. Splenic macrophages and B cells mediate immunosuppression following abrupt withdrawal from morphine.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Rahil T; Meissler, Joseph J; Adler, Martin W; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that abrupt withdrawal (AW) from morphine induces greater than 80% immunosuppression in murine spleen cells, as assessed by the capacity to mount an in vitro plaque-forming cell response to sheep red blood cells. Present studies about the mechanisms of immunosuppression following AW showed that addition of highly enriched (CD11b+) splenic macrophages (obtained by cell sorting or magnetic separation) from AW mice to cultures of normal, unfractionated spleen cells suppressed immune responses. Further, addition of highly enriched (CD19+) B cells (but not T cells) from AW mice to normal cells was also immunosuppressive. B cells from AW mice were also able to inhibit the proliferative response of normal spleen cells to concanavalin A but not to lipopolysaccharide. Overall, the data suggest that immunosuppression by AW spleen cells is a result of active suppression by macrophages and B cells. PMID:16204646

  17. Elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host macrophages in different models of regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Fatkhudinov, Timur; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Usman, Natalia; Bolshakova, Galina; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic multipotent stromal cells were previously thought to be poorly recognized by host immune system; the prolonged survival in host environments was explained by their immune privileged status. As long as the concept is currently reconsidered, the routes of elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host immunity must be taken into account. This is necessary for correct comprehension of their therapeutic action. The study was focused upon survival of umbilical cord-derived allogeneic multipotent stromal cells in different rat models of tissue regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or by critical limb ischemia. The observations were carried out by means of vital labeling of the cells with PKH26 prior to injection, in combination with differential immunostaining of host macrophages with anti-CD68 antibody. According to the results, allogeneic multipotent stromal cells are specifically eliminated by host immune system; the efficacy can reach 100%. Massive clearance of transplanted cells by host macrophages is accompanied by appropriation of the label by the latter, and this is a pronounced case of misleading presentation of exogenous label by host cells. The study emphasizes the role of macrophages in host response and also the need of additional criteria for correct data interpretation. PMID:26191137

  18. The dynamic lives of macrophage and dendritic cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Paresa L.; Butcher, Matthew J.; Galkina, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major pathological process through which arterial plaques are formed, is a dynamic chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium sized arteries in which the vasculature, lipid metabolism, and the immune system all play integral roles. Both the innate and adaptive immune systems are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis but myeloid cells represent the major component of the burgeoning atherosclerotic plaque. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells can be found within the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial wall, where they can contribute to or regulate inflammation. However, the precise behaviors and functions of these cells in situ are still active areas of investigation that continue to yield exciting and surprising new data. Here, we review recent progress in understanding of the complex biology of macrophages and dendritic cells, focusing particularly on the dynamic regulation of these subsets in the arterial wall and novel, emerging functions of these cells during atherogenesis. PMID:24628328

  19. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  20. Differential regulation of the nature and functions of dendritic cells and macrophages by cathepsin E.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Hiroe; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Tsukuba, Takayuki; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Nakamura, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    The aspartic proteinase cathepsin E is localized mainly in the endosomal structures of APCs and has been implicated in a variety of immune responses, however, the precise roles of cathepsin E in these cells remain speculative. In this study, we report the effect of disrupting the gene encoding cathepsin E on the nature and functions of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages derived from mouse bone marrow precursors, as well as mouse peritoneal macrophages. Whereas cathepsin E deficiency induced the accumulation of the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1 and LAMP-2 and elevated the lysosomal pH in macrophages, it did not have these effects on DCs. Although cathepsin E deficiency also caused a marked decrease in degradation of phagocytosed OVA and chemotactic responses to MCP-1 and fMLP by macrophages, these abilities were little affected in DCs by the absence of cathepsin E. Interestingly, cathepsin E deficiency markedly decreased the ability of macrophages to present intact OVA, as well as an OVA-derived antigenic peptide (266-281), to cognate T cells, while that of DCs was inversely enhanced by the absence of this protein. This paradox was resolved, in part, by the enhanced phagocytic activity and the increased expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86, CD80, and CD40, which amplify the response of T cells, in cathepsin E-deficient DCs compared with the wild-type cells. These results indicate that cathepsin E differentially regulates the nature and function of DCs and macrophages. PMID:17947645

  1. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jake W.; Gilson, Danny J.; Song, Zhengyu; Chen, Jia; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Jianyu; Yang, Jun; Jing, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Background The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg) cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings. Conclusions/Significance Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26751388

  2. Dual Roles for Perivascular Macrophages in Immune-to-Brain Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Serrats, Jordi; Schiltz, Jennifer C.; García-Bueno, Borja; van Rooijen, Nico; Reyes, Teresa M.; Sawchenko, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines produced during infection/inflammation activate adaptive CNS responses, including acute stress responses mediated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The mechanisms by which cytokines engage HPA control circuitry remain unclear, though stimulated release of prostanoids from neighboring vascular cells has been implicated in this regard. How specific vascular cell types, endothelial cells (ECs) vs. perivascular cells (PVCs; a subset of brain-resident macrophages), participate in this response remains unsettled. We exploited the phagocytic activity of PVCs to deplete them in rats by central injection of a liposome-encapsulated pro-apoptotic drug. This manipulation abrogated CNS and hormonal indices of HPA activation under immune challenge conditions (interleukin-1; IL-1) that activated prostanoid synthesis only in PVCs, while enhancing these responses to stimuli (lipopolysaccaride; LPS) that engaged prostanoid production by ECs as well. Thus, PVCs provide both prostanoid-mediated drive to the HPA axis, and an anti-inflammatory action that constrains endothelial, and overall CNS, responses to inflammatory insults. PMID:20152116

  3. In vivo imaging of inflammasome activation reveals a subcapsular macrophage burst response that mobilizes innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Garcia, Zacarias; Breart, Beatrice; Lematre, Fabrice; Michonneau, David; Albert, Matthew L; Levy, Yves; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome is activated in response to a variety of pathogens and has an important role in shaping adaptive immunity, yet the spatiotemporal orchestration of inflammasome activation in vivo and the mechanisms by which it promotes an effective immune response are not fully understood. Using an in vivo reporter to visualize inflammasome assembly, we establish the distribution, kinetics and propagation of the inflammasome response to a local viral infection. We show that modified vaccinia Ankara virus induces inflammasome activation in subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophages, which is immediately followed by cell death and release of extracellular ASC specks. This transient inflammasome signaling in the lymph node generates a robust influx of inflammatory cells and mobilizes T cells from the circulation to increase the magnitude of T cell responses. We propose that after infection, SCS macrophages deliver a burst response of inflammasome activity and cell death that translates into the broadening of T cell responses, identifying an important aspect of inflammasome-driven vaccination strategies. PMID:26692332

  4. Immune cell promotion of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death from cancer, and immunotherapy and chemotherapy have had limited success in reversing its progression. Data from mouse models suggest that the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells to tumours protects metastatic cancer cells from surveillance by killer cells, which nullifies the effects of immunotherapy and thus establishes metastasis. Furthermore, in most cases, tumour-infiltrating immune cells differentiate into cells that promote each step of the metastatic cascade and thus are novel targets for therapy. In this Review, we describe how tumour-infiltrating immune cells contribute to the metastatic cascade and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies to target these cells. PMID:25614318

  5. Polarization of immune responses in fish: The 'macrophages first' point of view.

    PubMed

    Wiegertjes, Geert F; Wentzel, Annelieke S; Spaink, Herman P; Elks, Philip M; Fink, Inge R

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we support taking polarized immune responses in teleost fish from a 'macrophage first' point of view, a hypothesis that reverts the dichotomous T helper (TH)1 and TH2 driving forces by building on the idea of conservation of innate immune responses in lower vertebrates. It is plausible that the initial trigger for macrophage polarization into M1 (inflammation) or M2 (healing) could rely only on sensing microbial/parasite infection or other innate danger signals, without the influence of adaptive immunity. Given the long and ongoing debate on the presence/absence of a typical TH1 cytokine environment and, in particular, TH2 cytokine environment in fish immune responses, it stands out that the presence of macrophages with polarized phenotypes, alike M1 and M2, have been relatively easy to demonstrate for fish. We summarize in short present knowledge in teleost fish on those cytokines considered most critical to the dichotomous development of TH1/M1 and TH2/M2 polarization, in particular, but not exclusively, interferon-? and interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13. We review, in more detail, polarization of fish immune responses taken from the macrophage point of view for which we adopted the simple nomenclature of M1 and M2. We discuss inducible nitric oxide synthase, or NOS-2, as a reliable M1 marker and arginase-2 as a reliable M2 marker for teleost fish and discuss the value of these macrophage markers for the generation of zebrafish reporter lines to study M1/M2 polarization in vivo. PMID:26471699

  6. Interaction of mouse splenocytes and macrophages with bacterial strains in vitro: the effect of age in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Van Beek, A A; Hoogerland, J A; Belzer, C; De Vos, P; De Vos, W M; Savelkoul, H F J; Leenen, P J M

    2016-03-11

    Probiotics influence the immune system, both at the local and systemic level. Recent findings suggest the relation between microbiota and the immune system alters with age. Our objective was to address direct effects of six bacterial strains on immune cells from young and aged mice: Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, Lactobacillus casei BL23, Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Bifidobacterium breve ATCC15700, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC15697, and Akkermansia muciniphila ATCC BAA-835. We used splenocytes and naïve or interferon-γ-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as responder populations. All tested bacterial strains induced phenotypic and cytokine responses in splenocytes and BMDM. Based on magnitude of the cellular inflammatory response and cytokine profiles, two subgroups of bacteria were identified, i.e. L. plantarum and L. casei versus B. breve, B. infantis, and A. muciniphila. The latter group of bacteria induced high levels of cytokines produced under inflammatory conditions, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Responses to L. lactis showed features of both subgroups. In addition, we compared responses by splenocytes and BMDM derived from young mice to those of aged mice, and found that splenocytes and BMDM derived from aged mice had an increased IL-10 production and dysregulated IL-6 and TNF production compared to young immune cells. Overall, our study shows differential inflammatory responses to distinct bacterial strains, and profound age-dependent effects. These findings, moreover, support the view that immune environment importantly influences bacterial immune effects. PMID:26689225

  7. Curcumin inhibits Th1 cytokine profile in CD4+ T cells by suppressing interleukin-12 production in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kang, B Y; Song, Y J; Kim, K -M; Choe, Y K; Hwang, S Y; Kim, T S

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) plays a central role in the immune system by driving the immune response towards T helper 1 (Th1) type responses which are characterized by high IFN-? and low IL-4 production. In this study we investigated the effects of curcumin, a natural product of plants obtained from Curcuma longa (turmeric), on IL-12 production by mouse splenic macrophages and the subsequent ability of these cells to regulate cytokine production by CD4+ T cells.Pretreatment with curcumin significantly inhibited IL-12 production by macrophages stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or head-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKL).Curcumin-pretreated macrophages reduced their ability to induce IFN-? and increased the ability to induce IL-4 in Ag-primed CD4+ T cells. Addition of recombinant IL-12 to cultures of curcumin-pretreated macrophages and CD4+ T cells restored IFN-? production in CD4+ T cells.The in vivo administration of curcumin resulted in the inhibition of IL-12 production by macrophages stimulated in vitro with either LPS or HKL, leading to the inhibition of Th1 cytokine profile (decreased IFN-? and increased IL-4 production) in CD4+ T cells.These findings suggest that curcumin may inhibit Th1 cytokine profile in CD4+ T cells by suppressing IL-12 production in macrophages, and points to a possible therapeutic use of curcumin in the Th1-mediated immune diseases. PMID:10510448

  8. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages.

  9. TIM-4, expressed by medullary macrophages, regulates respiratory tolerance by mediating phagocytosis of antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Albacker, Lee A; Yu, Sanhong; Bedoret, Denis; Lee, Wan-Ling; Umetsu, Sarah E; Monahan, Sheena; Freeman, Gordon J; Umetsu, Dale T; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory exposure to antigen induces T cell tolerance via several overlapping mechanisms that limit the immune response. While the mechanisms involved in the development of Treg cells have received much attention, those that result in T cell deletion are largely unknown. Herein, we show that F4/80+ lymph node medullary macrophages expressing TIM-4, a phosphatidylserine receptor, remove antigen-specific T cells during respiratory tolerance, thereby reducing secondary T cell responses. Blockade of TIM-4 inhibited the phagocytosis of antigen-specific T cells by TIM-4 expressing lymph node medullary macrophages, resulting in an increase in the number of antigen-specific T cells and the abrogation of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, specific depletion of medullary macrophages inhibited the induction of respiratory tolerance, highlighting the key role of TIM-4 and medullary macrophages in tolerance. Therefore, TIM-4-mediated clearance of antigen specific T cells represents an important previously unrecognized mechanism regulating respiratory tolerance. PMID:23149665

  10. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M.; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.; Thiel, Cora S.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:25654110

  11. Regulation of ICAM-1 in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M; Glz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hrlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Unverdorben, Felix; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmnner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Buttron, Isabell; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:25654110

  12. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  13. Immune Responsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Promotes Endotoxin Tolerance by Increasing A20 Expression in Macrophages through Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingke; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chengcai; Han, Chaofeng; Meng, Jun; Liu, Xingguang; Xu, Sheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Xueyin; Cao, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis-associated immunosuppression (SAIS) is regarded as one of main causes for the death of septic patients at the late stage because of the decreased innate immunity with a more opportunistic infection. LPS-tolerized macrophages, which are re-challenged by LPS after prior exposure to LPS, are regarded as the common model of hypo-responsiveness for SAIS. However, the molecular mechanisms of endotoxin tolerance and SAIS remain to be fully elucidated. In addition, negative regulation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered innate inflammatory response needs further investigation. Here we show that expression of immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1) was highly up-regulated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of septic patients and in LPS-tolerized mouse macrophages. IRG1 significantly suppressed TLR-triggered production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-?, IL-6, and IFN-? in LPS-tolerized macrophages, with the elevated expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and A20. Moreover, ROS enhanced A20 expression by increasing the H3K4me3 modification of histone on the A20 promoter domain, and supplement of the ROS abrogated the IRG1 knockdown function in breaking endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression. Our results demonstrate that inducible IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression through ROS, indicating a new molecular mechanism regulating hypoinflammation of sepsis and endotoxin tolerance. PMID:23609450

  14. Dietary fats affect macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity towards tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wallace, F A; Neely, S J; Miles, E A; Calder, P C

    2000-02-01

    In the present study, the effects of feeding mice diets of different fatty acid compositions on the production of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peritoneal macrophages and on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity towards L929 and P815 cells were investigated. C57Bl6 mice were fed on a low-fat (LF) diet or on high-fat diets (21% fat by weight), which included coconut oil (CO), olive oil (OO), safflower oil (SO) or fish oil (FO) as the principal fat source. The fatty acid composition of the macrophages was markedly influenced by that of the diet fed. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages from FO-fed mice showed significantly lower production (up to 80%) of PGE2 than those from mice fed on each of the other diets. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the proportion of arachidonic acid in macrophage lipids and the ability of macrophages, to produce PGE2. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated TNF-alpha production by macrophages decreased with increasing unsaturated fatty acid content of the diet (i.e. FO < SO < OO < CO < LF). Macrophages from FO-fed mice showed significantly lower production of TNF-alpha than those from mice fed on each of the other diets. Nitrite production was highest for LPS-stimulated macrophages from mice fed on the LF diet. Macrophages from FO-fed mice showed significantly higher production of nitrite than those from mice fed on the OO and SO diets. Compared with feeding the LF diet, feeding the CO, OO or SO diets significantly decreased macrophage- mediated killing of P815 cells (killed by nitric oxide). Fish oil feeding did not alter killing of P815 cells by macrophages, compared with feeding the LF diet; killing of P815 cells was greater after FO feeding than after feeding the other high fat diets. Compared with feeding the LF diet, feeding the OO or SO diets significantly decreased macrophage-mediated killing of L929 cells (killed by TNF). Coconut oil or FO feeding did not alter killing of L929 cells by macrophages, compared with feeding the LF diet. It is concluded that the type of fat in the diet affects macrophage composition and alters the ability of macrophages to produce cytotoxic and immunoregulatory mediators and to kill target tumour cells. PMID:10651928

  15. High expression levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor sustain the innate immune responses of neonates.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thierry; Schneider, Anina; Weier, Manuela; Sweep, Fred C G J; Le Roy, Didier; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-02-23

    The vulnerability to infection of newborns is associated with a limited ability to mount efficient immune responses. High concentrations of adenosine and prostaglandins in the fetal and neonatal circulation hamper the antimicrobial responses of newborn immune cells. However, the existence of mechanisms counterbalancing neonatal immunosuppression has not been investigated. Remarkably, circulating levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory immunoregulatory cytokine expressed constitutively, were 10-fold higher in newborns than in children and adults. Newborn monocytes expressed high levels of MIF and released MIF upon stimulation with Escherichia coli and group B Streptococcus, the leading pathogens of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Inhibition of MIF activity or MIF expression reduced microbial product-induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases and secretion of cytokines. Recombinant MIF used at newborn, but not adult, concentrations counterregulated adenosine and prostaglandin E2-mediated inhibition of ERK1/2 activation and TNF production in newborn monocytes exposed to E. coli. In agreement with the concept that once infection is established high levels of MIF are detrimental to the host, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of MIF reduced systemic inflammatory response, bacterial proliferation, and mortality of septic newborn mice. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for how newborns may cope with an immunosuppressive environment to maintain a certain threshold of innate defenses. However, the same defense mechanisms may be at the expense of the host in conditions of severe infection, suggesting that MIF could represent a potential attractive target for immune-modulating adjunctive therapies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26858459

  16. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  17. Modulators affecting the immune dialogue between human immune and colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The link between chronic inflammation and colorectal cancer has been well established. The events proceeding along tumorigenesis are complicated and involve cells activated at the cancer microenvironment, tumor infiltrating polymorphonuclears, immune cells including lymphocyte subtypes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), as well as tumor-associated macrophages. The immune cells generate inflammatory cytokines, several of them playing a crucial role in tumorigenesis. Additional factors, such as gene expression regulated by cytokines, assembling of tumor growth- and transforming factors, accelerated angiogenesis, delayed apoptosis, contribute all to initiation, development and migration of tumor cells. Oxygen radical species originating from the inflammatory area promote cell mutation and cancer proliferation. Tumor cells may over-express pro-inflammatory mediators that in turn activate immune cells for inflammatory cytokines production. Consequently, an immune dialogue emerges between immune and cancer cells orchestrated through a number of activated molecular pathways. Cytokines, encompassing migration inhibitory factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23 have been reported to be involved in human cancer development. Some cytokines, namely IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-22 and growth factors promote tumor development and metastasis, and inhibit apoptosis via activation of signal transducer activator transcription-3 transcription factor. Colon cancer environment comprises mesenchymal, endothelial and immune cells. Assessment of the interaction between components in the tumor environment and malignant cells requires a reconsideration of a few topics elucidating the role of chronic inflammation in carcinogenesis, the function of the immune cells expressed by inflammatory cytokine production, the immunomodulation of cancer cells and the existence of a cross-talk between immune and malignant cells leading to a balance in cytokine production. It is conceivable that the prevalence of anti-inflammatory cytokine production by PBMC in the affected colonic mucosa will contribute to the delay, or even to halt down malignant expansion. Targeting the interplay between immune and cancer cells by mediators capable to alter cytokine secretion toward increased anti-inflammatory cytokine release by PBMC and tumor associated macrophages, may serve as an additional strategy for treatment of malignant diseases. This review will focus on the inflammatory events preceding tumorigenesis in general, and on a number of modulators capable to affect colon cancer cell-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by PBMC through alteration of the immune cross-talk between PBMC and cancer cells. PMID:24834143

  18. Modulators affecting the immune dialogue between human immune and colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-05-15

    The link between chronic inflammation and colorectal cancer has been well established. The events proceeding along tumorigenesis are complicated and involve cells activated at the cancer microenvironment, tumor infiltrating polymorphonuclears, immune cells including lymphocyte subtypes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), as well as tumor-associated macrophages. The immune cells generate inflammatory cytokines, several of them playing a crucial role in tumorigenesis. Additional factors, such as gene expression regulated by cytokines, assembling of tumor growth- and transforming factors, accelerated angiogenesis, delayed apoptosis, contribute all to initiation, development and migration of tumor cells. Oxygen radical species originating from the inflammatory area promote cell mutation and cancer proliferation. Tumor cells may over-express pro-inflammatory mediators that in turn activate immune cells for inflammatory cytokines production. Consequently, an immune dialogue emerges between immune and cancer cells orchestrated through a number of activated molecular pathways. Cytokines, encompassing migration inhibitory factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor-?, Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23 have been reported to be involved in human cancer development. Some cytokines, namely IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-22 and growth factors promote tumor development and metastasis, and inhibit apoptosis via activation of signal transducer activator transcription-3 transcription factor. Colon cancer environment comprises mesenchymal, endothelial and immune cells. Assessment of the interaction between components in the tumor environment and malignant cells requires a reconsideration of a few topics elucidating the role of chronic inflammation in carcinogenesis, the function of the immune cells expressed by inflammatory cytokine production, the immunomodulation of cancer cells and the existence of a cross-talk between immune and malignant cells leading to a balance in cytokine production. It is conceivable that the prevalence of anti-inflammatory cytokine production by PBMC in the affected colonic mucosa will contribute to the delay, or even to halt down malignant expansion. Targeting the interplay between immune and cancer cells by mediators capable to alter cytokine secretion toward increased anti-inflammatory cytokine release by PBMC and tumor associated macrophages, may serve as an additional strategy for treatment of malignant diseases. This review will focus on the inflammatory events preceding tumorigenesis in general, and on a number of modulators capable to affect colon cancer cell-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by PBMC through alteration of the immune cross-talk between PBMC and cancer cells. PMID:24834143

  19. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4+ T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMVnamely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunitybut also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host?s immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4+ T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can help NK cells to act against HCMV infection. PMID:25855747

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mara Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acua-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mnica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (M?) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals M? may undergo classical-M1 (M1-M?) or alternative-M2 (M2-M?) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human M? polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived M? (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on M? challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-M? phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-M?-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated M? are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with M? polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  1. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS: a new tool to assess the multifaceted activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Richard; Daumas, Aurlie; Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis; Textoris, Julien

    2012-10-22

    Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS is routinely used to identify bacterial species in clinical samples. This technique has also proven to allow identification of intact mammalian cells, including macrophages. Here, we wondered whether this approach enabled the assessment human macrophages plasticity. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF spectra of macrophages stimulated with IFN-? and IL-4, two inducers of M1 and M2 macrophage polarisation, consisted of peaks ranging from 2 to 12 kDa. The spectra of unstimulated and stimulated macrophages were clearly different. The fingerprints induced by the M1 agonists, IFN-?, TNF, LPS and LPS+IFN-?, and the M2 agonists, IL-4, TGF-?1 and IL-10, were specific and readily identifiable. Thus, whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS was able to characterise M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes. In addition, the fingerprints induced by extracellular (group B Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus) or intracellular (BCG, Orientia tsutsugamushi, Coxiella burnetii) bacteria were bacterium-specific. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS fingerprints therefore revealed the multifaceted activation of human macrophages. This approach opened a new avenue of studies to assess the immune response in the clinical setting, by monitoring the various activation patterns of immune cells in pathological conditions. PMID:22967923

  2. Guardians of the Gut – Murine Intestinal Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Mor; Salame, Tomer-Meir; Jung, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes find themselves in a unique environment, most prominently characterized by its constant exposure to commensal microbiota and food antigens. This anatomic setting has resulted in a number of specializations of the intestinal mononuclear phagocyte compartment that collectively contribute the unique steady state immune landscape of the healthy gut, including homeostatic innate lymphoid cells, B, and T cell compartments. As in other organs, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate in addition the immune defense against pathogens, both in lymph nodes and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Here, we will discuss origins and functions of intestinal DCs and macrophages and their respective subsets, focusing largely on the mouse and cells residing in the lamina propria. PMID:26082775

  3. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  4. Modulation of Intracellular Restriction Factors Contributes to Methamphetamine-Mediated Enhancement of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Virus Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Yizhong; Ye, Li; Li, Jieliang; Zhou, Yu; Sakarcan, Sinem; Ho, Wenzhe

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of methamphetamine (METH), a sympathomimetic stimulant, is particularly common among patients infected with HIV. In vitro studies have determined that METH enhances HIV infection of CD4+ T cells, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and macrophages. In addition, animal studies have also showed that METH treatment increases brain viral load of SIV-infected monkeys and promotes HIV replication and viremia in HIV/hu-CycT1 transgenic mice. However, the mechanisms (s) of METH actions on HIV remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the impact of METH on intracellular restriction factors against HIV and SIV. We demonstrated that METH treatment of human blood mononuclear phagocytes significantly affected the expression of anti-HIV microRNAs and several key elements (RIG-I, IRF-3/5, SOCS-2, 3 and PIAS-1, 3, X, Y) in the type I IFN pathway. The suppression of these innate restriction factors was associated with a reduced production of type I IFNs and the enhancement of HIV or SIV infection of macrophages. These findings indicate that METH use impairs intracellular innate antiviral mechanism(s) in macrophages, contributing to cell susceptibility to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus infection. PMID:22591364

  5. Development of a cell system for siRNA screening of pathogen responses in human and mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Sun, Jing; Benet, Zachary L; Wang, Ze; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; John, Sinu P; Lin, Bin; Sung, Myong-Hee; Fraser, Iain D C

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the innate immune response to pathogen infection, but few tools exist for systematic dissection of these responses using modern genome-wide perturbation methods. To develop an assay platform for high-throughput analysis of macrophage activation by pathogenic stimuli, we generated reporter systems in human and mouse macrophages with dynamic readouts for NF-?B and/or TNF-? responses. These reporter cells show responsiveness to a broad range of TLR ligands and to gram-negative bacterial infection. There are significant challenges to the use of RNAi in innate immune cells, including efficient small RNA delivery and non-specific immune responses to dsRNA. To permit the interrogation of the macrophage pathogen response pathways with RNAi, we employed the stably expressed reporter genes to develop efficient siRNA delivery protocols for maximal target gene silencing with minimal activation of the innate macrophage response to nucleic acids. We demonstrate the utility of these macrophage cell systems for siRNA screening of pathogen responses by targeting components of the human and mouse TLR pathways, and observe species-specific perturbation of signaling and cytokine responses. Our approach to reporter cell development and siRNA delivery optimization provides an experimental paradigm with significant potential for developing genetic screening platforms in mammalian cells. PMID:25831078

  6. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Lhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko; Speletas, Matthaios; Eibel, Hermann; Ware, Carl F.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Hussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the generation and maintenance of the CD169+ macrophage compartment. Consequently, Baffr?/? mice exhibited limited induction of innate type I interferon production after viral infection. Lack of BAFFR signaling reduced virus amplification and presentation following viral infection, resulting in highly reduced antiviral adaptive immune responses. As a consequence, BAFFR-deficient mice showed exacerbated and fatal disease after viral infection. Mechanistically, transient lack of B cells in Baffr?/? animals resulted in limited lymphotoxin expression, which is critical for maintenance of CD169+ cells. In conclusion, BAFFR signaling affects both innate and adaptive immune activation during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Viruses cause acute and chronic infections in humans resulting in millions of deaths every year. Innate immunity is critical for the outcome of a viral infection. Innate type I interferon production can limit viral replication, while adaptive immune priming by innate immune cells induces pathogen-specific immunity with long-term protection. Here, we show that BAFFR deficiency not only perturbed B cells, but also resulted in limited CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages are critical in amplifying viral particles to trigger type I interferon production and initiate adaptive immune priming. Consequently, BAFFR deficiency resulted in reduced enforced viral replication, limited type I interferon production, and reduced adaptive immunity compared to BAFFR-competent controls. As a result, BAFFR-deficient mice were predisposed to fatal viral infections. Thus, BAFFR expression is critical for innate immune activation and antiviral immunity. PMID:25673724

  7. M2 Polarized Macrophages and Giant Cells Contribute to Myofibrosis in Neuromuscular Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Stefan; Heppner, Frank L.; Goebel, Hans H.; Stenzel, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of sarcoidosis, a systemic granulomatous disease, still remains obscure. A multitude of organs have been described to be affected in systemic sarcoidosis. Skeletal muscles may also be affected, leading to myalgia and weakness. A workup of the specific immune response with emphasis on the macrophage response is provided herein. Affected muscle tissue from seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis was analyzed and compared with that from seven patients with other myopathies containing macrophagocytic infiltration. Monocytes/macrophages and giant cells in granulomas of muscle tissue from patients with sarcoidosis show a status of alternative activation (M2) based on their expression of CD206, CD301, arginase-1, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 as a consequence of a functionally type 2 helper T cell (Th2)-biased cytokine profile. Significant fibrosis and up-regulation of CCL18 were associated with the M2 phenotype of macrophages. Conversely, up-regulated Th1 cytokines did not result in significant classical activation of macrophages (M1), with poor inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 production. Giant cell formation was further associated with up-regulated expression of DNAX-activating protein of 12 kDa (DAP12; gene symbol TYROBP). Functionally, alternative activation of macrophages on the basis of a Th2-biased immune response may induce clinical symptoms and chronic evolution of neuromuscular sarcoidosis. This is the first characterization of Th2-mediated immune mechanisms in neuromuscular sarcoidosis suggesting that a specific macrophage activation status leading to myofibrosis may be a key event in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21356378

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Regulates the Lung Macrophage Phenotype and Host Immunity in Murine Pneumonia Caused by Legionella pneumophila?

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Urvashi; Trujillo, Glenda; Lyn-Kew, Kenneth; Newstead, Michael W.; Zeng, Xianying; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Krieg, Arthur M.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the contribution of TLR9 to the generation of protective immunity against the intracellular respiratory bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. In initial studies, we found that the intratracheal (i.t.) administration of L. pneumophila to mice deficient in TLR9 (TLR9?/?) resulted in significantly increased mortality, which was associated with an approximately 10-fold increase in the number of lung CFU compared to that of wild-type BALB/c mice. Intrapulmonary bacterial challenge in TLR9?/? mice resulted in the reduced accumulation of myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and activated CD4+ T cells. Lung macrophages isolated from Legionella-infected TLR9?/? mice displayed the impaired internalization of bacteria and evidence of alternative rather than classical activation, as manifested by the markedly reduced expression of nitric oxide and type 1 cytokines, whereas the expression of Fizz-1 and arginase-1 was enhanced. The adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived DC from syngeneic wild-type, but not TLR9?/?, mice administered i.t. reconstituted anti-legionella immunity and restored the macrophage phenotype in TLR9?/? mice. Finally, the i.t., but not intraperitoneal, administration of the TLR9 agonist molecule CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulated protective immunity in Legionella-infected mice. In total, our findings indicate that TLR9 is required for effective innate immune responses against the intracellular bacterial pathogen L. pneumophila, and approaches to maximize TLR9-mediated responses may serve as a means to augment antibacterial immunity in pneumonia. PMID:18426877

  9. CD40 and CD154 in cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Grewal, I S; Flavell, R A

    1998-01-01

    CD40-CD154-mediated contact-dependent signals between B and T cells are required for the generation of thymus dependent (TD) humoral immune responses. CD40-CD154 interactions are however also important in many other cell systems. CD40 is expressed by a large variety of cell types other than B cells, and these include dendritic cells, follicular dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, mast cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. CD40- and CD154-knockout mice and antibodies to CD40 and CD154 have helped to elucidate the role of the CD40-CD154 system in immune responses. Recently published studies indicate that CD40-CD154 interactions can influence T cell priming and T cell-mediated effector functions; they can also upregulate costimulatory molecules and activate macrophages, NK cells, and endothelia as well as participate in organ-specific autoimmune disease, graft rejection, and even atherosclerosis. This review focuses on the role of the CD40-CD154 system in the regulation of many newly discovered functions important in inflammation and cell-mediated immunity. PMID:9597126

  10. Salmonella Typhimurium Co-Opts the Host Type I IFN System To Restrict Macrophage Innate Immune Transcriptional Responses Selectively.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Darren J; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Tennant, Sharon M; Ramachandran, Girish; Higginson, Ellen E; Dyson, Tristan N; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2015-09-01

    Innate immune inflammatory responses are subject to complex layers of negative regulation at intestinal mucosal surfaces. Although the type I IFN system is critical for amplifying antiviral immunity, it has been shown to play a homeostatic role in some models of autoimmune inflammation. Type I IFN is triggered in the gut by select bacterial pathogens, but whether and how the type I IFN might regulate innate immunity in the intestinal environment have not been investigated in the context of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST). ST infection of human or murine macrophages reveals that IFN-? selectively restricts the transcriptional responses mediated by both the TLRs and the NOD-like receptors. Specifically, IFN-? potently represses ST-dependent innate induction of IL-1 family cytokines and neutrophil chemokines. This IFN-?-mediated transcriptional repression was independent of the effects of IFN-? on ST-induced macrophage cell death, but significantly dependent on IL-10 regulation. We further evaluated ST pathogenesis in vivo following oral inoculation of mice lacking IFN-?. We show that IFN-?(-/-) mice exhibit greater resistance to oral ST infection and a slower spread of ST to distal sterile sites. This work provides mechanistic insight into the relationship between ST and type I IFN, and demonstrates an additional mechanism by which IFN-? may promote spread of enteric pathogens. PMID:26202980

  11. Human dermal CD14? cells are a transient population of monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Schlitzer, Andreas; Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Shin, Amanda; Poyner, Elizabeth; Green, Kile; Dickinson, Rachel; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Low, Donovan; Best, Katie; Covins, Samuel; Milne, Paul; Pagan, Sarah; Aljefri, Khadija; Windebank, Martin; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Saavedra, Diego Miranda; Larbi, Anis; Wasan, Pavandip Singh; Duan, Kaibo; Poidinger, Michael; Bigley, Venetia; Ginhoux, Florent; Collin, Matthew; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2014-09-18

    Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are leukocytes with critical roles in immunity and tolerance. The DC network is evolutionarily conserved; the homologs of human tissue CD141(hi)XCR1? CLEC9A? DCs and CD1c? DCs are murine CD103? DCs and CD64? CD11b? DCs. In addition, human tissues also contain CD14? cells, currently designated as DCs, with an as-yet unknown murine counterpart. Here we have demonstrated that human dermal CD14? cells are a tissue-resident population of monocyte-derived macrophages with a short half-life of <6 days. The decline and reconstitution kinetics of human blood CD14? monocytes and dermal CD14? cells in vivo supported their precursor-progeny relationship. The murine homologs of human dermal CD14? cells are CD11b? CD64? monocyte-derived macrophages. Human and mouse monocytes and macrophages were defined by highly conserved gene transcripts, which were distinct from DCs. The demonstration of monocyte-derived macrophages in the steady state in human tissue supports a conserved organization of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:25200712

  12. Norcantharidin facilitates LPS-mediated immune responses by up-regulation of AKT/NF-?B signaling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qufei; Qian, Yu; Li, Ruimei; Tan, Binghe; Han, Honghui; Liu, Mingyao; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD), a demethylated analog of cantharidin, is a common used clinical drug to inhibit proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. But the role of NCTD in modulating immune responses remains unknown. Here, we investigated the function and mechanism of NCTD in regulation of TLR4 associated immune response in macrophages. We evaluated the influence of NCTD on host defense against invaded pathogens by acute peritonitis mouse model, ELISA, Q-PCR, nitrite quantification, phagocytosis assay and gelatin zymography assay. Our data showed that the survival and the serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-? were all enhanced by NCTD significantly in peritonitis mouse model. Accordingly, LPS-induced cytokine, nitric oxide and MMP-9 production as well as the phagocytosis of bacteria were all up-regulated by NCTD in a dose dependent manner in both RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Then we further analyzed TLR4 associated signaling pathway by Western blot, Immunofluorescence and EMSA in the presence or absence of LPS. The phosphorylation of AKT and p65 at serine 536 but not serine 468 was enhanced obviously by NCTD in a dose dependent manner, whereas the degradation of I?B? was little effected. Consequently, the nuclear translocation and DNA binding ability of NF-?B was also increased by NCTD obviously in RAW264.7 cells. Our results demonstrated that NCTD could facilitate LPS-mediated immune response through promoting the phosphorylation of AKT/p65 and transcriptional activity of NF-?B, thus reprofiling the traditional anti-tumor drug NCTD as a novel immune regulator in promoting host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:22984593

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 in macrophages is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Anas, Adam A; de Vos, Alex F; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Lieshout, Miriam Hp; van Heijst, Jeroen Wj; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia, mice homozygous for the conditional Hsp90b1 allele encoding gp96 were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the LysM promoter to generate LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice showed absence of gp96 protein in macrophages and partial depletion in monocytes and granulocytes. This was accompanied by almost complete absence of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages. Likewise, integrin subunits CD11b and CD18 were not detectable on macrophages, while being only slightly reduced on monocytes and granulocytes. Gp96-deficient macrophages did not release pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to Klebsiella and displayed reduced phagocytic capacity independent of CD18. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice were highly vulnerable to lower airway infection induced by K. pneumoniae, as reflected by enhanced bacterial growth and a higher mortality rate. The early inflammatory response in Hsp90b1-flox mice was characterized by strongly impaired recruitment of granulocytes into the lungs, accompanied by attenuated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the inflammatory response during late-stage pneumonia was not dependent on the presence of gp96. Blocking CD18 did not reproduce the impaired host defence of LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice during Klebsiella pneumonia. These data indicate that macrophage gp96 is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia by regulating TLR expression. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26365983

  14. Reciprocal communication between endometrial stromal cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eyster, Kathleen M; Hansen, Keith A; Winterton, Emily; Klinkova, Olga; Drappeau, Donis; Mark-Kappeler, Connie J

    2010-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that reciprocal communication occurs between macrophages and cultured human endometrial stromal cells and that this communication may contribute to the pathology of endometriosis. An endometrial stromal cell line (telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell [T-HESC]) was treated with macrophage-conditioned medium (CM) +/- estradiol + progesterone. Macrophages were treated without or with T-HESC CM. DNA microarray identified 716 differentially expressed genes in T-HESCs in response to factors secreted by macrophages. Upregulated genes in T-HESC included interleukin 8 (IL-8)/chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), phospholamban, cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), tenascin C, and nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT), whereas integrin alpha-6 was downregulated. In contrast, 15 named genes were differentially expressed in macrophages in response to factors secreted by endometrial stromal cells. The data document reciprocal communication between macrophages and endometrial stromal cells and suggest that interaction with macrophages stimulates the expression of genes in endometrial stromal cells that may support the establishment of endometriosis. PMID:20601541

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  16. STAT1 signaling regulates tumor-associated macrophage-mediated T cell deletion.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-04-15

    It is well established that tumor progression is associated with the accumulation of myeloid suppressive cells, which in mice include Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells and F4/80+ macrophages. The paradox is that with the exception of terminal stages of the disease or chemotherapy treatment, tumor-bearing mice or cancer patients do not display a profound systemic immune suppression. We therefore raised the question as to whether myeloid cell-mediated T cell suppression is controlled at a local level at the site of the tumor. We have demonstrated that after adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing recipients, Gr-1+ (immature myeloid cells) freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing mice become F4/80+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). These TAM, but not F4/80+ macrophages or Gr-1+ cells freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing or naive mice were able to inhibit T cell-mediated immune response in vitro via induction of T cell apoptosis. Arginase and NO were both responsible for the apoptotic mechanism, and were seen only in TAM, but not in freshly isolated Gr1+ cells. Using the analysis of STAT activity in combination with STAT knockout mice, we have determined that STAT1, but not STAT3 or STAT6, was responsible for TAM-suppressive activity. PMID:15814715

  17. Regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production and function in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojing; Yan, Wenjun; Zheng, Hua; Du, Qinglin; Zhang, Lixing; Ban, Yi; Li, Na; Wei, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 and Interleukin-12 are produced primarily by pathogen-activated antigen-presenting cells, particularly macrophages and dendritic cells. IL-10 and IL-12 play very important immunoregulatory roles in host defense and immune homeostasis. Being anti- and pro-inflammatory in nature, respectively, their functions are antagonistically opposing. A comprehensive and in-depth understanding of their immunological properties and signaling mechanisms will help develop better clinical intervention strategies in therapy for a wide range of human disorders. Here, we provide an update on some emerging concepts, controversies, unanswered questions, and opinions regarding the immune signaling of IL-10 and IL-12. PMID:26918147

  18. Regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production and function in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojing; Yan, Wenjun; Zheng, Hua; Du, Qinglin; Zhang, Lixing; Ban, Yi; Li, Na; Wei, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 and Interleukin-12 are produced primarily by pathogen-activated antigen-presenting cells, particularly macrophages and dendritic cells. IL-10 and IL-12 play very important immunoregulatory roles in host defense and immune homeostasis. Being anti- and pro-inflammatory in nature, respectively, their functions are antagonistically opposing. A comprehensive and in-depth understanding of their immunological properties and signaling mechanisms will help develop better clinical intervention strategies in therapy for a wide range of human disorders. Here, we provide an update on some emerging concepts, controversies, unanswered questions, and opinions regarding the immune signaling of IL-10 and IL-12. PMID:26918147

  19. Does khat chewing increases the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by macrophage immune modulation?

    PubMed

    Alvi, Ayesha; Rizwan, Mohammed; Sunosi, Rashad A L; Bin Ali Jerah, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Drug abuse is a serious problem associated with different pathological outcomes including modulating the immune system. Drug abuse is rising in Saudi Arabia and so as TB, a disease of worldwide significance, caused by immunological modulation in the host system. Khat chewing is a common practice in Arabian Peninsula which is now gaining momentum in other parts of the world. It is considered as an addiction. It has been associated with different adverse outcomes such as periodontitis, oral leukoplakia and oral cancer and also has shown to promote apoptotic cell death through cysteine proteases. The active ingredient of khat, cathinone is shown to have immunomodulatory effect. In principle, this leads to enhanced susceptibility to various infections. The present study is designed to delineate the mechanism of immunomodulation produced by khat/cathinone in human/mouse macrophage. Further, this activity will be evaluated both in vivo and in vitro in response to infection with Mycobacterium smegmatis to get an insight if there exists a co relation between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and khat chewing. PMID:24661941

  20. Brevetoxin-2 induces an inflammatory response in an alveolar macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Sas, Kelli M; Baatz, John E

    2010-09-01

    Brevetoxins, the algal toxins produced by Karenia brevis during red tide blooms, adversely impact health following ingestion or inhalation. Inhalation of brevetoxins results in a variety of acute symptoms including coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. Analysis of manatee lungs following death by purported brevetoxicosis has identified brevetoxin accumulation within macrophages, with pathological manifestions of lung congestion, inflammation, and edema. The goals of this work were to specifically examine effects of brevetoxin-2 on alveolar macrophages, a key cell in responding to toxins in the lung, as well as to determine if brevetoxin-2 results in an inflammatory response and/or direct cytotoxicity. Exposure of an alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) to an environmentally and physiologically relevant dose of brevetoxin-2 (0.5microg/ml) did not significantly alter cellular growth over a 24h time period. However, exposure of MH-S cells to brevetoxin-2 for 6h increased phagocytosis of latex beads, increased secretion of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and decreased secretion of IL-5. Very few changes were seen in gene expression following 3 or 6h exposure to brevetoxin-2. These results show that brevetoxin-2 induced an immune response indicative of inflammation in an alveolar macrophage cell line, indicating that inhalation of brevetoxin-2 may lead to lung inflammation through an alveolar macrophage-initiated pathway. PMID:20655277

  1. Localization and quantitation of macrophages, mast cells, and eosinophils in the developing bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Beaudry, K L; Parsons, C L M; Ellis, S E; Akers, R M

    2016-01-01

    Prepubertal mammary development involves elongation and branching of ducts and stromal tissue remodeling. This process is highly regulated and in mice is known to be affected by the presence of innate immune cells. Whether or not such immune cells are present or involved in bovine mammary development is unknown. For the first time, we determined the presence, location (relative to mammary ductal structures), and changes in numbers of eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages in prepubertal bovine mammary tissue, and evaluated the effects of age, ovariectomy, and exogenous estrogen on numbers of each cell type. Chemical stains and immunofluorescence were used to identify the 3 cell types in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mammary tissue from prepubertal female calves from 3 archived tissue sets. The ontogeny tissue set included samples of mammary tissue from female calves (n=4/wk) from birth to 6 wk of age. The ovary tissue set contained samples from ovary intact and ovariectomized heifers allowing us to investigate the influence of the ovaries on immune cells in the developing mammary gland in prepubertal heifers. Nineteen animals were intact or ovariectomized 30 d before sampling; they were 90, 120, or 150 d old at the time of sampling. A third tissue set, the estrogen set, allowed us to determine the effect of exogenous estrogen on innate immune cells in the gland. Eosinophils were identified via Luna staining, mast cells by May-Grunwald Giemsa staining, and macrophages with immunofluorescence. Key findings were that more eosinophils and mast cells were observed in near versus far stroma in the ontogeny and ovary tissue sets but not estrogen. More macrophages were observed in near versus far stroma in ontogeny animals. Eosinophils were more abundant in the younger animals, and fewer macrophages tended to be observed in ovariectomized heifers as compared with intact heifers and estrogen treatment resulted in a reduction in cell numbers. In summary, we show for the first time that innate immune cells are present in prepubertal bovine mammary tissue, localization varies by immune cell type, and abundance is related to proximity of epithelial structures and physiological state. We suggest a likely role for these cells in control of bovine mammary growth and ductal development. PMID:26547646

  2. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  3. The Dynamic Duo-Inflammatory M1 macrophages and Th17 cells in Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D

    2013-11-01

    The synovial tissue of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients is enriched with macrophages and T lymphocytes which are two central players in the pathogenesis of RA. Interaction between myeloid cells and T cells are essential for the initiation and progression of the inflammatory processes in the synovium. With the rapid evolution of our understanding of how these two cell types are involved in the regulation of immune responses, RA is emerging as an ideal disease model for investigating the cell-cell interactions and consequently introducing novel biologic agents that are designed to disrupt these processes. This review will discuss the bidirectional interaction between the IL-23(+) inflammatory macrophages and IL-17(+) GM-CSF(+) CD4 T cells in rheumatic diseases as well as potential antirheumatic strategies via apoptosis induction in this context. PMID:25309946

  4. The cell and molecular biology of apolipoprotein E synthesis by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Werb, Z; Chin, J R; Takemura, R; Oropeza, R L; Bainton, D F; Stenberg, P; Taylor, J M; Reardon, C

    1986-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes secrete over 50 different proteins that are regulated during differentiation and that are under the influence of various materials and factors in their extracellular milieu as part of the inflammatory response. The complex nature of the regulation of the expression of these molecules is displayed by apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE mRNA first appears as monocytes differentiate into macrophages, and this expression is paralleled by the secretion of ApoE by the cells. In mature macrophages ApoE synthesis and secretion are decreased by activation of macrophages with endotoxin and interferon-gamma. Although these macrophages contain abundant translatable ApoE mRNA, little ApoE is synthesized, suggesting that this decrease occurs largely at the translational level. ApoE is also controlled at the level of secretion. ApoE is concentrated in the Golgi complex of macrophages and is also found in endoplasmic reticulum, secretion vesicles and coated vesicles. When macrophages come in contact with immune complexes the intracellular ApoE compartment degranulates rapidly. Therefore, ApoE is regulated at the levels of secretion, translation and transcription. PMID:3525037

  5. TGF-?1-Induced EpithelialMesenchymal Transition Promotes Monocyte/Macrophage Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Joel; Tabor, Vedrana; Wikell, Anna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer progression toward metastatic disease is linked to re-activation of epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT), a latent developmental process. Breast cancer cells undergoing EMT lose epithelial characteristics and gain the capacity to invade the surrounding tissue and migrate away from the primary tumor. However, less is known about the possible role of EMT in providing cancer cells with properties that allow them to traffic to distant sites. Given the fact that pro-metastatic cancer cells share a unique capacity with immune cells to traffic in-and-out of blood and lymphatic vessels we hypothesized that tumor cells undergoing EMT may acquire properties of immune cells. To study this, we performed gene-profiling analysis of mouse mammary EpRas tumor cells that had been allowed to adopt an EMT program after long-term treatment with TGF-?1 for 2?weeks. As expected, EMT cells acquired traits of mesenchymal cell differentiation and migration. However, in addition, we found another cluster of induced genes, which was specifically enriched in monocyte-derived macrophages, mast cells, and myeloid dendritic cells, but less in other types of immune cells. Further studies revealed that this monocyte/macrophage gene cluster was enriched in human breast cancer cell lines displaying an EMT or a Basal B profile, and in human breast tumors with EMT and undifferentiated (ER?/PR?) characteristics. The results identify an EMT-induced monocyte/macrophage gene cluster, which may play a role in breast cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. PMID:25674539

  6. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro manipulation of the Tim-3 and PD-1 molecules restored the functionality of T cells and macrophages to restrict bacterial growth. Our results provide a novel immune strategy that may be implemented in the near future in order to improve the immune responses in HIV+ patients. PMID:26486200

  7. Regulation of innate immune cell function by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Weichhart, Thomas; Hengstschläger, Markus; Linke, Monika

    2015-10-01

    The innate immune system is central for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and quickly responds to local or systemic perturbations by pathogenic or sterile insults. This rapid response must be metabolically supported to allow cell migration and proliferation and to enable efficient production of cytokines and lipid mediators. This Review focuses on the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in controlling and shaping the effector responses of innate immune cells. mTOR reconfigures cellular metabolism and regulates translation, cytokine responses, antigen presentation, macrophage polarization and cell migration. The mTOR network emerges as an integrative rheostat that couples cellular activation to the environmental and intracellular nutritional status to dictate and optimize the inflammatory response. A detailed understanding of how mTOR metabolically coordinates effector responses by myeloid cells will provide important insights into immunity in health and disease. PMID:26403194

  8. Stimulatory Effects of Polysaccharide Fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Faizan Naeem; Ismail, Amirah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth. PMID:25299340

  9. Macrophages Key Cells in the Response to Wear Debris from Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Nich, Christophe; Takakubo, Yuya; Pajarinen, Jukka; Ainola, Mari; Salem, Abdelhakim; Sillat, Tarvo; Rao, Allison J.; Raska, Milan; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Takagi, Michiaki; Konttinen, Yrj T.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Gallo, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The generation of wear debris is an inevitable result of normal usage of joint replacements. Wear debris particles stimulate local and systemic biological reactions resulting in chronic inflammation, periprosthetic bone destruction, and eventually, implant loosening and revision surgery. The latter may be indicated in up to 15% patients in the decade following the arthroplasty using conventional polyethylene. Macrophages play multiple roles in both inflammation and in maintaining tissue homeostasis. As sentinels of the innate immune system, they are central to the initiation of this inflammatory cascade, characterized by the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-osteoclastic factors. Similar to the response to pathogens, wear particles elicit a macrophage response, based on the unique properties of the cells belonging to this lineage, including sensing, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and adaptive stimulation. The biological processes involved are complex, redundant, both local and systemic, and highly adaptive. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are implicated in this phenomenon, ultimately resulting in differentiation and activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Simultaneously, other distinct macrophage populations inhibit inflammation and protect the bone-implant interface from osteolysis. Here, the current knowledge about the physiology of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells is reviewed. In addition, the pattern and consequences of their interaction with wear debris and the recent developments in this field are presented. PMID:23568608

  10. The uptake of apoptotic cells drives Coxiella burnetii replication and macrophage polarization: a model for Q fever endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Marie; Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Raoult, Didier; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    Patients with valvulopathy have the highest risk to develop infective endocarditis (IE), although the relationship between valvulopathy and IE is not clearly understood. Q fever endocarditis, an IE due to Coxiella burnetii, is accompanied by immune impairment. Patients with valvulopathy exhibited increased levels of circulating apoptotic leukocytes, as determined by the measurement of active caspases and nucleosome determination. The binding of apoptotic cells to monocytes and macrophages, the hosts of C. burnetii, may be responsible for the immune impairment observed in Q fever endocarditis. Apoptotic lymphocytes (AL) increased C. burnetii replication in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in a cell-contact dependent manner, as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. AL binding induced a M2 program in monocytes and macrophages stimulated with C. burnetii as determined by a cDNA chip containing 440 arrayed sequences and functional tests, but this program was in part different in monocytes and macrophages. While monocytes that had bound AL released high levels of IL-10 and IL-6, low levels of TNF and increased CD14 expression, macrophages that had bound AL released high levels of TGF-beta1 and expressed mannose receptor. The neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 prevented the replication of C. burnetii due to the binding of AL, suggesting that they were critically involved in bacterial replication. In contrast, the binding of necrotic cells to monocytes and macrophages led to C. burnetii killing and typical M1 polarization. Finally, interferon-gamma corrected the immune deactivation induced by apoptotic cells: it prevented the replication of C. burnetii and re-directed monocytes and macrophages toward a M1 program, which was deleterious for C. burnetii. We suggest that leukocyte apoptosis associated with valvulopathy may be critical for the pathogenesis of Q fever endocarditis by deactivating immune cells and creating a favorable environment for bacterial persistence. PMID:18483547

  11. Therapeutic Peptide Vaccine-Induced CD8 T Cells Strongly Modulate Intratumoral Macrophages Required for Tumor Regression.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Tetje C; Sluijter, Marjolein; van Duikeren, Suzanne; West, Brian L; Melief, Cornelis J M; Arens, Ramon; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; van Hall, Thorbald

    2015-09-01

    Abundant macrophage infiltration of solid cancers commonly correlates with poor prognosis. Tumor-promoting functions of macrophages include angiogenesis, metastasis formation, and suppression of Th1-type immune responses. Here, we show that successful treatment of cervical carcinoma in mouse models with synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines induced influx of cytokine-producing CD8 T cells that strongly altered the numbers and phenotype of intratumoral macrophages. On the basis of the expression of CD11b, CD11c, F4/80, Ly6C, Ly6G, and MHC II, we identified four myeloid subpopulations that increased in numbers from 2.0-fold to 8.7-fold in regressing tumors. These changes of the intratumoral myeloid composition coincided with macrophage recruitment by chemokines, including CCL2 and CCL5, and were completely dependent on a vaccine-induced influx of tumor-specific CD8 T cells. CD4 T cells were dispensable. Incubation of tumor cells with T cell-derived IFN? and TNF? recapitulated the chemokine profile observed in vivo, confirming the capacity of antitumor CD8 T cells to mediate macrophage infiltration of tumors. Strikingly, complete regressions of large established tumors depended on the tumor-infiltrating macrophages that were induced by this immunotherapy, because a small-molecule drug inhibitor targeting CSF-1R diminished the number of intratumoral macrophages and abrogated the complete remissions. Survival rates after therapeutic SLP vaccination deteriorated in the presence of CSF-1R blockers. Together, these results show that therapeutic peptide vaccination could induce cytokine-producing T cells with strong macrophage-skewing capacity necessary for tumor shrinkage, and suggest that the development of macrophage-polarizing, rather than macrophage-depleting, agents is warranted. PMID:25888578

  12. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia. PMID:1563800

  13. Development and optimization of near-IR contrast agents for immune cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pratixa P.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods (NRs) are attractive for in vivo imaging due to their high optical cross-sections and tunable absorbance. However, the feasibility of using NRs for cell tracking has not been fully explored. Here, we synthesized dye doped silica-coated NRs as multimodal contrast agents for imaging of macrophages immune cells which play an important role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. We showed the importance of silica coating in imaging of NR-labeled cells. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of NRs labeled macrophages showed high sensitivity. Therefore, these results provide foundation for applications of silica-coated NRs and PA imaging in tracking of immune cells. PMID:24298419

  14. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  15. Emodin suppresses pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer cells accompanied with decreased macrophage recruitment and M2 polarization in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Fang; Wang, Junfeng; Iwanowycz, Stephen; Saaoud, Fatma; Wang, Yuzhen; Hu, Jun; Wang, Qian; Fan, Daping

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in female cancer patients due to the lack of effective treatment for metastasis. Macrophages are the most abundant immune cells in the primary and metastatic tumors, and contribute to tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Emodin has been found to exert anti-tumor effects through promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis, but its effects on tumor-associated macrophages during cancer metastasis have not been investigated. Methods Mice inoculated with 4T1 or EO771 breast cancer cells orthotopically were treated with Emodin after the primary tumors reached 200 mm3 in size. Primary tumor growth, lung metastasis, and macrophage infiltration in the lungs were analyzed. In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effects of Emodin on macrophage migration and M2 polarization, and the underlying mechanisms. Results Emodin significantly suppressed breast cancer lung metastasis in both orthotopic mouse models without apparent effects on primary tumors. Reduced infiltration of F4/80+ macrophages and Ym1+ M2 macrophages in lungs was observed in Emodin-treated mice. In vitro experiments demonstrated that Emodin decreased the migration of macrophages towards tumor cell conditioned medium (TCM) and inhibited macrophage M2 polarization induced by TCM. Mechanistically, Emodin suppressed STAT6 phosphorylation and C/EBP? expression, two crucial signaling events in macrophage M2 polarization, in macrophages treated with IL-4 or TCM. Conclusion Taken together, our study, for the first time, demonstrated that Emodin suppressed pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer probably through inhibiting macrophage recruitment and M2 polarization in the lungs by reducing STAT6 phosphorylation and C/EBP? expression. PMID:25311112

  16. Play the Immune System Defender Game

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Questionnaire The Immune System Play the Immune System Game About the game Granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells are immune cells ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  17. Phospholipase C-? in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Xiao, Wenbin

    2013-01-01

    Great progress has recently been made in structural and functional research of phospholipase C (PLC)-?. We now understand how PLC-? isoforms (?1-?4) are activated by GTP-bound G?q downstream of G protein-coupled receptors. Numerous studies indicate that PLC-?s participate in the differentiation and activation of immune cells that control both the innate and adaptive immune systems. The PLC-?3 isoform also interplays with tyrosine kinase-based signaling pathways, to inhibit Stat5 activation by recruiting the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, with which PLC-?3 and Stat5 form a multi-molecular signaling platform, named SPS complex. The SPS complex has important regulatory roles in tumorigenesis and immune cell activation. PMID:23981313

  18. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Villaseor-Cardoso, Mnica I.; Frausto-Del-Ro, Dulce A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (Fc?Rs). In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages. PMID:24063007

  19. Selective inhibitory effects of 50-nm gold nanoparticles on mouse macrophage and spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Micah; Pfau, Jean C; Gilmer, John; Brey, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are significant to multiple industrial processes, consumer products and medical applications today. The health effects of many different types of NP, however, are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of 50-nm gold NP coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on mouse macrophage and spleen cells with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS), testing the hypothesis that the NP would modulate immune responses without being overtly toxic. Gold NP had no effect on macrophage viability and, in the absence of LPS, they had no effect on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? production as measured by ELISA. The presence of LPS significantly increased the release of TNF? from the macrophages above no-treatment controls, but increasing gold NP concentration led to decreasing release of TNF?. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by exposed macrophages were also reduced compared to untreated controls, both with and without LPS, suggesting some kind of oxygen radical scavenging. In splenocyte cultures, gold NP had no effect alone, but significantly reduced the release of interleukin (IL)-17 and TNF? triggered by LPS. These results suggest that the gold NP used here are not cytotoxic to immune cells at these concentrations, but may affect cellular responses to infection or inflammation by altering the balance of cytokines. PMID:25875326

  20. Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Charriere, Guillaume M.; Cousin, Beatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Saillan-Barreau, Corinne; Andre, Mireille; Massoudi, Ali; Dani, Christian; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis . E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

    2006-10-15

    We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

  1. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  2. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  3. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy.

  4. Evolutionary implication of B-1 lineage cells from innate to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lv-Yun; Shao, Tong; Nie, Li; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm that B cells mainly play a central role in adaptive immunity may have to be reevaluated because B-1 lineage cells have been found to exhibit innate-like functions, such as phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Therefore, the evolutionary connection of B-1 lineage cells between innate and adaptive immunities have received much attention. In this review, we summarized various innate-like characteristics of B-1 lineage cells, such as natural antibody production, antigen-presenting function in primary adaptive immunity, and T cell-independent immune responses. These characteristics seem highly conserved between fish B cells and mammalian B-1 cells during vertebrate evolution. We proposed an evolutionary outline of B cells by comparing biological features, including morphology, phenotype, ontogeny, and functional activity between B-1 lineage cells and macrophages or B-2 cells. The B-1 lineage may be a transitional cell type between phagocytic cells (e.g., macrophages) and B-2 cells that functionally connects innate and adaptive immunities. Our discussion would contribute to the understanding on the origination of B cells specialized in adaptive immunity from innate immunity. The results might provide further insight into the evolution of the immune system as a whole. PMID:26573260

  5. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage differentiation and activation in U937 cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Young-Sook; Haas, Stefan; Hackstein, Holger; Bein, Gregor; Hernandez-Santana, Maria; Lehrach, Hans; Sauer, Sascha; Seitz, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages play essential role in innate immunity. Understanding the underlying mechanism of macrophage differentiation and the identification of regulatory mechanisms will help to find new strategies to prevent their harmful effects in chronic inflammatory diseases and sepsis. Results Maturation of blood monocytes into tissue macrophages and subsequent inflammatory response was mimicked in U937 cells of human histocytic lymphoma origin. Whole genome array analysis was employed to evaluate gene expression profile to identify underlying transcriptional networks implicated during the processes of differentiation and inflammation. In addition to already known transcription factors (i.e. MAFB, EGR, IRF, BCL6, NFkB, AP1, Nur77), gene expression analysis further revealed novel genes (i.e. MEF2, BRI, HLX, HDAC5, H2AV, TCF7L2, NFIL3) previously uncharacterized to be involved in the differentiation process. A total of 58 selected genes representing cytokines, chemokines, surface antigens, signaling molecules and transcription factors were validated by real time PCR and compared to primary monocyte-derived macrophages. Beside the verification of several new genes, the comparison reveals individual heterogeneity of blood donors. Conclusion Up regulation of MEF2 family, HDACs, and H2AV during cell differentiation and inflammation sheds new lights onto regulation events on transcriptional and epigenetic level controlling these processes. Data generated will serve as a source for further investigation of macrophages differentiation pathways and related biological responses. PMID:19341462

  6. Distinct spatial distribution of microglia and macrophages following mesenchymal stem cell implantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chlo; Daans, Jasmijn; Santermans, Eva; Hens, Niel; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Although implantation of cellular material in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key direction in CNS regenerative medicine, this approach is currently limited by the occurrence of strong endogenous immune cell responses. In a model of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) grafting in the CNS of immune-competent mice, we previously described that MSC grafts become highly surrounded and invaded by Iba1(+) myeloid cells (microglia and/or macrophages). Here, following grafting of blue fluorescent protein (BFP)-expressing MSC in the CNS of CX3CR1(+/-) and CX3CR1(-/-) mice, our results indicate: (1) that the observed inflammatory response is independent of the fractalkine signalling axis, and (2) that a significant spatial distribution of Iba1(+) inflammatory cells occurs, in which Iba1(+) CX3CR1(+) myeloid cells mainly surround the MSC graft and Iba1(+) CX3CR1(-) myeloid cells mainly invade the graft at 10 days post transplantation. Although Iba1(+) CX3CR1(+) myeloid cells are considered to be of resident microglial origin, Iba1(+) CX3CR1(-) myeloid cells are most likely of peripheral monocyte/macrophage origin. In order to confirm the latter, we performed MSC-BFP grafting experiments in the CNS of eGFP(+) bone marrow chimeric C57BL/6 mice. Analysis of MSC-BFP grafts in the CNS of these mice confirmed our observation that peripheral monocytes/macrophages invade the MSC graft and that resident microglia surround the MSC graft site. Furthermore, analysis of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) expression revealed that mainly macrophages, but not microglia, express this M1 pro-inflammatory marker in the context of MSC grafting in the CNS. These results again highlight the complexity of cell implantation immunology in the CNS. PMID:24983456

  7. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+), cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+), T-helper cells (CD4+), B cells (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+), mast cells (CD117+), mononuclear cells (CD11c+), plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+), B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+) and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+) compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells) in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition. PMID:26413839

  8. Monarch-1 Activation in Murine Macrophage Cell Line (J774 A.1) Infected with Iranian Strain of Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Fata, A; Mahmoudian, MR; Varasteh, A; Sankian, M

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmania major is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the bite of the female phlebotomine sand flies. Leishmania major is able to escape the host immune defense and survive within macrophages. Modulation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor-Kappa B) activation and suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by L. major are the main evasion mechanisms that remain to be explored. This study aims to examine the expression level of the Monarch-1 in L. major-infected macrophages, as a negative regulator of the NF-κB activation. Methods Murine macrophage cell line (J774 A.1) was infected by metacyclic form of Leishmania promastigotes at macrophage/parasite ratio of 1:10. After harvesting infected cells at different times, total RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed for Monarch-1 by specific primers. Hypoxanthine Phospho-Ribosyl Transferase (HPRT) was used as an internal control to adjust the amount of mRNA in each sample. Results Semiquantitive analysis of Monarch-1 mRNA expression level showed a significant expression increase within 6 to 30 hours after L. major infection of macrophages when compared to the control macrophages. Conclusion Monarch-1 expression level reveals a significant increase in the early phase of macrophage infection with L. major, which in turn may suppress IL-12 production in Leishmania infected macrophages and deeply influence the relationship between host and parasite. PMID:23914232

  9. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  10. Immunosenescence in Monocytes, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells: Lessons Learned from the Lung and Heart

    PubMed Central

    Thoman, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of an immune challenge, healthy, aged individuals have a significantly higher basal inflammatory state where circulating levels of cytokines, including IL-6, TNF-? and IL-1?, are elevated[1]. This progressive pro-inflammatory state, termed inflamm-aging, affects the phenotype/function of cells present in the aged as well as renders the older individuals more susceptible to a poor prognosis after systemic insults. Although it is important to understand the mechanisms that underlie the progression of disease, most preclinical analyses of disease therapies are performed in young adult mice that have an intact, functional immune system. Oftentimes, this is not necessarily representative of the immune disposition in the aged, let alone diseased, aged. Herein, two distinct responses that are not only commonly associated with aging but that also have dendritic cells and/or monocytes and macrophages as key players are discussed: pulmonary infection and myocardial infarction. Although studies of pulmonary infection in the aged have progressed significantly, studies of monocytes and macrophages in inflammation and cardiac injury following ischemia in the aged have not been as forthcoming. Nonetheless, several elegant studies have established the dynamic role of monocytes and macrophages post infarction. These will be discussed in light of what is known with aging. PMID:25251662

  11. Characterization of PAMP/PRR interactions in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) macrophage-like primary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Callol, A; Roher, N; Amaro, C; MacKenzie, S

    2013-10-01

    The eel (Anguilla anguilla) has been identified as a vulnerable species with stocks dramatically declining over the past decade. In an effort to support the species from overfishing of wild stocks increased interest in eel aquaculture has been notable. In order to expand the scarce knowledge concerning the biology of this species significant research efforts are required in several fields of biology. The development of cell culture systems to study the immune response is a key step towards an increased understanding of the immune response and to develop resources to support further study in this threatened species. Macrophages are one of the most important effector cells of the innate immune system. The capacity to engulf pathogens and orchestrate the immune response relies on the existence of different surface receptors, such as scavenger receptors and toll-like receptors. We have developed and described an eel macrophage-like in vitro model and studied its functional and transcriptomic responses. Macrophage-like cells from both head kidney and purified peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained and phagocytic activity measured for different whole bacteria and yeast. Moreover, based on PAMP-PRR association the innate immune response of both head kidney and PBL derived macrophage-like cells was evaluated against different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Results highlight that peptidoglycan stimulation strongly induces inflammatory mRNA expression reflected in the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes IL1β and IL18 in PBL derived cells whereas IL8 is upregulated in head kidney derived cells. Furthermore TLR2 mRNA abundance is regulated by all stimuli supporting a multifunctional role for this pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) in eel macrophage-like cells. PMID:23911651

  12. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  13. Effects of linear cationic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides on immune-relevant genes in trout macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peter Chiou, P; Khoo, Jenny; Bols, Niels C; Douglas, Sue; Chen, Thomas T

    2006-01-01

    There are increasing evidence of the potential role of antimicrobial peptides in the regulation of immune responses in mammalian species. However, the effects of these peptides in fish have yet to be investigated. In this study, we examined the transcriptional expression profile of representative immune-relevant genes in a trout macrophage cell line, RTS11, in response to three linear cationic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (insect cecropin B, fish pleurocidin and a cecropin analogue CF17). The expression levels of two pro-inflammatory genes, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), increased in the peptide-treated RTS11 cells. The peptides did not appear to affect the expression levels of representative genes associated with antigen presentation, interferon response or JAK/STAT signal transduction. Furthermore, the induction of IL-1 beta and COX-2 in RTS11 by lipopolysaccharide was not adversely affected by these three antimicrobial peptides. Overall, the data indicate a pro-inflammatory effect of the three cationic antimicrobial peptides in the inflammatory response of salmonid species, suggesting a potential application of these peptides as immune adjuvant for fish vaccination. PMID:16352337

  14. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruochan; Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  15. Resident microglia, and not peripheral macrophages, are the main source of brain tumor mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mller, Annett; Brandenburg, Susan; Turkowski, Kati; Mller, Susanne; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-07-15

    Gliomas consist of multiple cell types, including an abundant number of microglia and macrophages, whereby their impact on tumor progression is controversially discussed. To understand their unique functions and consequently manipulate either microglia or macrophages in therapeutic approaches, it is essential to discriminate between both cell populations. Because of the lack of specific markers, generally total body irradiated chimeras with labeled bone marrow cells were used to identify infiltrated cells within the brain. However, total body irradiation (TBI) affects the blood-brain barrier integrity, which in turn potentially facilitates immune cell infiltration. In this study, changes on the blood-brain barrier were avoided using head-protected irradiation (HPI). Head protection and total body irradiated chimeras exhibited similar reconstitution levels of the myeloid cell lineage in the blood, enabling the comparable analyses of brain infiltrates. We demonstrate that the HPI model impeded a massive unspecific influx of donor-derived myeloid cells into naive as well as tumor-bearing brains. Moreover, experimental artifacts such as an enlarged distribution of infiltrated cells and fourfold increased tumor volumes are prevented in head-protected chimeras. In addition, our data evidenced for the first time that microglia are able to up-regulate CD45 and represent an inherent part of the CD45(high) population in the tumor context. All in all, HPI allowed for the unequivocal distinction between microglia and macrophages without alterations of tumor biology and consequently permits a detailed and realistic description of the myeloid cell composition in gliomas. PMID:25477239

  16. Anti-CD47 antibodymediated phagocytosis of cancer by macrophages primes an effective antitumor T-cell response

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Diane; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Willingham, Stephen B.; Contreras-Trujillo, Humberto; Fathman, John W.; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Seita, Jun; Inlay, Matthew A.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Miyanishi, Masanori; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization of the T-cell response against cancer has the potential to achieve long-lasting cures. However, it is not known how to harness antigen-presenting cells optimally to achieve an effective antitumor T-cell response. In this study, we show that anti-CD47 antibodymediated phagocytosis of cancer by macrophages can initiate an antitumor T-cell immune response. Using the ovalbumin model antigen system, anti-CD47 antibodymediated phagocytosis of cancer cells by macrophages resulted in increased priming of OT-I T cells [cluster of differentiation 8-positive (CD8+)] but decreased priming of OT-II T cells (CD4+). The CD4+ T-cell response was characterized by a reduction in forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells. Macrophages following anti-CD47mediated phagocytosis primed CD8+ T cells to exhibit cytotoxic function in vivo. This response protected animals from tumor challenge. We conclude that anti-CD47 antibody treatment not only enables macrophage phagocytosis of cancer but also can initiate an antitumor cytotoxic T-cell immune response. PMID:23690610

  17. Upregulation of Retinal Dehydrogenase 2 in Alternatively Activated Macrophages during Retinoid-dependent Type-2 Immunity to Helminth Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, Mara J.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Lim, K. C.; Girgis, Natasha M.; Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Fallon, Padraic G.; Premenko-Lanier, Mary; McKerrow, James H.; McCune, Joseph M.; Loke, P'ng

    2012-01-01

    Although the vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) plays a critical role in immune function, RA synthesis during infection is poorly understood. Here, we show that retinal dehydrogenases (Raldh), required for the synthesis of RA, are induced during a retinoid-dependent type-2 immune response elicited by Schistosoma mansoni infection, but not during a retinoid-independent anti-viral immune response. Vitamin A deficient mice have a selective defect in TH2 responses to S. mansoni, but retained normal LCMV specific TH1 responses. A combination of in situ imaging, intra-vital imaging, and sort purification revealed that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMφ) express high levels of Raldh2 during S. mansoni infection. IL-4 induces Raldh2 expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro and peritoneal macrophages in vivo. Finally, in vivo derived AAMφ have an enhanced capacity to induce Foxp3 expression in CD4+ cells through an RA dependent mechanism, especially in combination with TGF-β. The regulation of Raldh enzymes during infection is pathogen specific and reflects differential requirements for RA during effector responses. Specifically, AAMφ are an inducible source of RA synthesis during helminth infections and TH2 responses that may be important in regulating immune responses. PMID:22927819

  18. Induction of Macrophage-Like Immunosuppressive Cells from Mouse ES Cells That Contribute to Prolong Allogeneic Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hajime; Tsuji, Hyuma; Otsuka, Ryo; Baghdadi, Muhammad; Kojo, Satoshi; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in regenerative medicine has enabled the utilization of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a donor resource for transplantation. However, immune suppression is still needed when the donor-recipient combination is allogeneic. Protection of ESCs-derived grafts from host immune response might be achieved thought the utilization of immunosuppressive cells generated from ESCs. In the present study, we show that a certain fraction of immunosuppressive cells can be generated from ESCs and help to suppress immune response against allogeneic grafts. ESCs-derived suppressor cells (ES-SCs) resembled macrophages in terms of cell surface molecule and gene expressions. Furthermore, gene expression analysis including microarray showed that ES-SCs have M1/M2 hybrid phenotype with high expression of genes correlated to immunosuppression of T cell response. Indeed, ES-SCs were effective to block allogeneic T cell proliferation in a nitric oxide-dependent manner, and prolonged the survival of ESCs-derived embryoid bodies or cardiomyocytes grafts transplanted into mouse kidney capsule. Thus, we consider the potential use of these ESCs-derived macrophage-like immunosuppressive cells as cellular therapies to promote long-term graft survival in future therapies. PMID:25356669

  19. Oxygen plasma surface modification augments poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) cytocompatibility toward osteoblasts and minimizes immune activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Scislowska-Czarnecka, Anna; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Genet, Michel; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Pamula, Elzbieta; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report on modification of one of the model biomedical polymers, poly L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA; 85:15), by reactive ion etching (RIE) oxygen plasma treatment. PLGA's major disadvantage is high hydrophobicity which restrains binding of cell-adhesive proteins and host cells. In the current approach, we aimed to answer two questions: (1) will only short (10 s) and moderate (20-200 mTorr, 45-90 W) RIE oxygen plasma treatment, leading to decrease of water contact angle by only up to 10, sufficiently improve PLGA adherence to cells, and (2) how will this affect osteoblasts and activation of the immune system? All obtained modified PLGAs had improved hydrophilicity but unaltered roughness (as revealed by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy) resulting in significantly improved adhesion of osteoblasts (MG-63) and their low activation. Importantly, macrophages (RAW 264.7), one of the key cells initiating inflammation and bone resorption, responded significantly less vigorously to the modified polymers, expressing/releasing lower amounts of nitric oxide, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-6, IL-12p70, IFN-?, IL-10). We conclude that already slight RIE oxygen plasma modification of PLGA is sufficient to improve its surface properties, and enhance cytocompatibility. Most importantly, this type of modification prevents excessive immune response. PMID:26014580

  20. Suppression of Adaptive Immune Cell Activation Does Not Alter Innate Immune Adipose Inflammation or Insulin Resistance in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Ozcan, Lale; Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Tabas, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a major contributor to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whereas innate immune cells, notably macrophages, contribute to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation and insulin resistance, the role of adaptive immunity is less well defined. To address this critical gap, we used a model in which endogenous activation of T cells was suppressed in obese mice by blocking MyD88-mediated maturation of CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. VAT CD11c+ cells from Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control Myd88fl/fl mice were defective in activating T cells in vitro, and VAT T and B cell activation was markedly reduced in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl obese mice. However, neither macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation nor systemic inflammation were altered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl mice, thereby enabling a focused analysis on adaptive immunity. Unexpectedly, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and the glucose response to glucose and insulin were completely unaltered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control obese mice. Thus, CD11c+ cells activate VAT T and B cells in obese mice, but suppression of this process does not have a discernible effect on macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation or systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26317499

  1. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  2. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad G.; Tsai, Vicky W.W.; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H.; Breit, Samuel N.; Sawchenko, Paul E.; Brown, David A.

    2014-01-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity. PMID:24569378

  3. Strain- and host species-specific inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, and cell death in macrophages infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schaale, K; Peters, K M; Murthy, A M; Fritzsche, A K; Phan, M-D; Totsika, M; Robertson, A A B; Nichols, K B; Cooper, M A; Stacey, K J; Ulett, G C; Schroder, K; Schembri, M A; Sweet, M J

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the main etiological agent of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Little is known about interactions between UPEC and the inflammasome, a key innate immune pathway. Here we show that UPEC strains CFT073 and UTI89 trigger inflammasome activation and lytic cell death in human macrophages. Several other UPEC strains, including two multidrug-resistant ST131 isolates, did not kill macrophages. In mouse macrophages, UTI89 triggered cell death only at a high multiplicity of infection, and CFT073-mediated inflammasome responses were completely NLRP3-dependent. Surprisingly, CFT073- and UTI89-mediated responses only partially depended on NLRP3 in human macrophages. In these cells, NLRP3 was required for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) maturation, but contributed only marginally to cell death. Similarly, caspase-1 inhibition did not block cell death in human macrophages. In keeping with such differences, the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin mediated a substantial proportion of CFT073-triggered IL-1β secretion in mouse but not human macrophages. There was also a more substantial α-hemolysin-independent cell death response in human vs. mouse macrophages. Thus, in mouse macrophages, CFT073-triggered inflammasome responses are completely NLRP3-dependent, and largely α-hemolysin-dependent. In contrast, UPEC activates an NLRP3-independent cell death pathway and an α-hemolysin-independent IL-1β secretion pathway in human macrophages. This has important implications for understanding UTI in humans. PMID:25993444

  4. Secreted Candida parapsilosis lipase modulates the immune response of primary human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tth, Adl; Nmeth, Tibor; Csonka, Katalin; Horvth, Pter; Vgvlgyi, Csaba; Vizler, Csaba; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Gcser, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important opportunistic pathogen with increasing prevalence. Extracellular lipases have been shown to play an important role in the virulence of pathogenic Candida species. However, studying the role of secreted lipase in C. albicans is challenging due to the lack of a mutant strain deficient in all 10 lipase genes. In contrast, we have previously constructed a lipase mutant C. parapsilosis strain lacking both CpLIP1 and CpLIP2, and shown that it has significantly decreased virulence in various infection models, and is killed more efficiently by mouse macrophages. In the present study, we compared the response of human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages to a wild type (wt) as well as a lipase-deficient (lip?/?) C. parapsilosis strain that has been previously established in our lab. Although macrophages phagocytosed both strains with similar efficiency, lipase mutants were killed more efficiently according to fluorescent microscopic analysis. The more efficient killing of lip?/? cells was confirmed by CFU-determinations. Phagocytosis of wt and lip?/?C. parapsilosis was also examined by flow cytometry, revealing that both strains were internelized to the similar extent by macrophages. Additionally, quantitative imaging analysis revealed that the rate of phagolysosome fusion was higher in case of lip?/?C. parapsilosis. Interestingly, macrophages stimulated with lip?/?C. parapsilosis showed at least 1.5-fold higher expression of TNF?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and PTGS-2 after 12 h compared with those infected with wt C. parapsilosis, as determined by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the lip?/?C. parapsilosis strain induced significantly higher TNF?, IL-1?, IL-6, and IL-10 protein production in macrophages after 24 h compared with the wt strain. These findings confirm the role of fungal lipases as important virulence factors during C. parapsilosis infection. PMID:24626151

  5. Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Parasites Induce Innate Immunity through Classical Activation of Macrophages That Direct the Th1 Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K; Kruhlak, Michael; Ismail, Nevien; Debrabant, Alain; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi; Kukuruga, Mark; Takeda, Kazuyo; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2015-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) causes significant mortality and there is no effective vaccine. Previously, we have shown that genetically modified Leishmania donovani parasites, here described as live attenuated parasites, induce a host protective adaptive immune response in various animal models. In this study, we demonstrate an innate immune response upon infection with live attenuated parasites in macrophages from BALB/c mice both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro infection of macrophages with live attenuated parasites (compared to that with wild-type [WT] L. donovani parasites) induced significantly higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-12 [IL-12], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and IL-6), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCL-2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/CCL-3, and IP-10), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide, while concomitantly reducing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and arginase-1 activities, suggesting a dominant classically activated/M1 macrophage response. The classically activated response in turn helps in presenting antigen to T cells, as observed with robust CD4(+) T cell activation in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice also demonstrated induction of an M1 macrophage phenotype, indicated by upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and downregulation of genes associated with the M2 phenotype, i.e., the IL-10, YM1, Arg-1, and MRC-1 genes, compared to WT L. donovani-infected mice. Furthermore, an ex vivo antigen presentation assay showed macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice induced higher IFN-γ and IL-2 but significantly less IL-10 production by ovalbumin-specific CD4(+) T cells, resulting in proliferation of Th1 cells. These data suggest that infection with live attenuated parasites promotes a state of classical activation (M1 dominant) in macrophages that leads to the generation of protective Th1 responses in BALB/c mice. PMID:26169275

  6. Innate immune cells in ischaemic heart disease: does myocardial infarction beget myocardial infarction?

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2016-03-14

    Knowledge of macrophages in steady-state and diseased tissue is rapidly expanding, propelled by improved diagnostic capacity to detect and monitor cells in their native environments. In this review, we discuss implications for ischaemic heart disease and examine innate immune cell pathways that increase systemic leucocyte supply after myocardial infarction (MI). Acute MI alters the macrophage phenotype and supply chain from tissue resident to blood monocytes sourced from haematopoietic organs. That blood leucocytosis closely associates with cardiovascular mortality provides a strong motivation to understand why and how organ ischaemia alters cellular immunity. PMID:26351395

  7. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE?/?) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE?/? mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-? signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  8. Targeted prostaglandin E2 inhibition enhances antiviral immunity through induction of type I interferon and apoptosis in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, Franois; Jaworska, Joanna; Verway, Mark; Tzelepis, Fanny; Massoud, Amir; Gillard, Joshua; Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary; Xing, Zhou; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe; Fritz, Jrg H; Powell, William S; Divangahi, Maziar

    2014-04-17

    Aspirin gained tremendous popularity during the 1918 Spanish Influenza virus pandemic, 50 years prior to the demonstration of their inhibitory action on prostaglandins. Here, we show that during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was upregulated, which led to the inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production and apoptosis in macrophages, thereby causing an increase in virus replication. This inhibitory role of PGE2 was not limited to innate immunity, because both antigen presentation and T cell mediated immunity were also suppressed. Targeted PGE2 suppression via genetic ablation of microsomal prostaglandin E-synthase 1 (mPGES-1) or by the pharmacological inhibition of PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 substantially improved survival against lethal IAV infection whereas PGE2 administration reversed this phenotype. These data demonstrate that the mPGES-1-PGE2 pathway is targeted by IAV to evade host type I IFN-dependent antiviral immunity. We propose that specific inhibition of PGE2 signaling might serve as a treatment for IAV. PMID:24726877

  9. Communication of bone cells with hematopoiesis, immunity and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Asada, Noboru; Sato, Mari; Katayama, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The bone contains the bone marrow. The functional communication between bone cells and hematopoiesis has been extensively studied in the past decade or so. Osteolineage cells and their modulators, such as the sympathetic nervous system, macrophages and osteoclasts, form a complex unit to maintain the homeostasis of hematopoiesis, called the 'microenvironment'. Recently, bone-embedded osteocytes, the sensors of gravity and mechanical stress, have joined the microenvironment, and they are demonstrated to contribute to whole body homeostasis through the control of immunity and energy metabolism. The inter-organ communication orchestrated by the bone is summarized in this article. PMID:26512322

  10. Specific mediation of cellular immunity to Toxoplasma gondii in somatic cells of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chinchilla, M; Frenkel, J K

    1984-01-01

    Lymphocytes from mice immunized against Toxoplasma gondii protected T. gondii-infected macrophage and kidney cell cultures. After contact with antigens, supernatants of such immune lymphocytes, also contained a factor protective for T. gondii-infected macrophages and kidney cells. Supernatants were protective only when the lymphocytes and kidneys cells were isogeneic. Protection was specific in that supernatants from only T. gondii-immune, but not Besnoitia jellisoni-immune, lymphocytes provided protection against toxoplasmosis. Sixteen to 24 h were required for an appreciable amount of protective factor to be secreted; a similar absorption time was necessary for kidney cells to be protected. Peritoneal lymphocyte lysates, prepared as transfer factor, contained protective substances with a potency similar to that of lymphocyte supernatants, which were also strain restricted in their effect. PMID:6500716

  11. The Secretome of Hydrogel-Coembedded Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Instructs Macrophage Polarization in Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Joseph A.; Nadel, Ellen P.; Rabadi, May M.; Baskind, Matthew J.; Rajdev, Maharshi A.; Demaree, Cameron M.; Vasko, Radovan; Chugh, Savneek S.; Lamba, Rajat; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the delivery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) embedded in hyaluronic acid-based (HA)-hydrogels protects renal function during acute kidney injury (AKI) and promotes angiogenesis. We attempted to further ameliorate renal dysfunction by coembedding EPCs with renal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), while examining their paracrine influence on cytokine/chemokine release and proinflammatory macrophages. A live/dead assay determined whether EPC-MSC coculturing improved viability during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, and HA-hydrogel-embedded delivery of cells to LPS-induced AKI mice was assessed for effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal blood flow (RBF), circulating cytokines/chemokines, serum creatinine, proteinuria, and angiogenesis (femoral ligation). Cytokine/chemokine release from embedded stem cells was examined, including effects on macrophage polarization and release of proinflammatory molecules. EPC-MSC coculturing improved stem cell viability during LPS exposure, an effect augmented by MSC hypoxic preconditioning. The delivery of coembedded EPCs with hypoxic preconditioned MSCs to AKI mice demonstrated additive improvement (compared with EPC delivery alone) in medullary RBF and proteinuria, with comparable effects on serum creatinine, MAP, and angiogenesis. Exposure of proinflammatory M1 macrophages to EPC-MSC conditioned medium changed their polarization to anti-inflammatory M2. Incubation of coembedded EPCs-MSCs with macrophages altered their release of cytokines/chemokines, including enhanced release of anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. EPC-MSC delivery to endotoxemic mice elevated the levels of circulating M2 macrophages and reduced the circulating cytokines/chemokines. In conclusion, coembedding EPCs-MSCs improved their resistance to stress, impelled macrophage polarization from M1 to M2 while altering their cytokine/chemokines release, reduced circulating cytokines/chemokines, and improved renal and vascular function when MSCs were hypoxically preconditioned. Significance This report provides insight into a new therapeutic approach for treatment of sepsis and provides a new and improved strategy using hydrogels for the delivery of stem cells to treat sepsis and, potentially, other injuries and/or diseases. The delivery of two different stem cell lines (endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells; delivered alone and together) embedded in a protective bioengineered scaffolding (hydrogel) offers many therapeutic benefits for the treatment of sepsis. This study shows how hydrogel-delivered stem cells elicit their effects and how hydrogel embedding enhances the therapeutic efficacy of delivered stem cells. Hydrogel-delivered stem cells influence the components of the overactive immune system during sepsis and work to counterbalance the release of many proinflammatory and prodamage substances from immune cells, thereby improving the associated vascular and kidney damage. PMID:25947337

  12. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  13. Impact of carbon nanotubes and graphene on immune cells.

    PubMed

    Orecchioni, Marco; Bedognetti, Davide; Sgarrella, Francesco; Marincola, Francesco M; Bianco, Alberto; Delogu, Lucia Gemma

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that nanomaterials, alone or in concert with their specific biomolecular conjugates, can be used to directly modulate the immune system, therefore offering a new tool for the enhancement of immune-based therapies against infectious disease and cancer. Here, we revised the publications on the impact of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs), graphene and carbon nanohorns on immune cells. Whereas f-CNTs are the nanomaterial most widely investigated, we noticed a progressive increase of studies focusing on graphene in the last couple of years. The majority of the works (56%) have been carried out on macrophages, following by lymphocytes (30% of the studies). In the case of lymphocytes, T cells were the most investigated (22%) followed by monocytes and dendritic cells (7%), mixed cell populations (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, 6%), and B and natural killer (NK) cells (1%). Most of the studies focused on toxicity and biocompatibility, while mechanistic insights on the effect of carbon nanotubes on immune cells are generally lacking. Only very recently high-throughput gene-expression analyses have shed new lights on unrecognized effects of carbon nanomaterials on the immune system. These investigations have demonstrated that some f-CNTs can directly elicitate specific inflammatory pathways. The interaction of graphene with the immune system is still at a very early stage of investigation. This comprehensive state of the art on biocompatible f-CNTs and graphene on immune cells provides a useful compass to guide future researches on immunological applications of carbon nanomaterials in medicine. PMID:24885781

  14. Impact of carbon nanotubes and graphene on immune cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that nanomaterials, alone or in concert with their specific biomolecular conjugates, can be used to directly modulate the immune system, therefore offering a new tool for the enhancement of immune-based therapies against infectious disease and cancer. Here, we revised the publications on the impact of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs), graphene and carbon nanohorns on immune cells. Whereas f-CNTs are the nanomaterial most widely investigated, we noticed a progressive increase of studies focusing on graphene in the last couple of years. The majority of the works (56%) have been carried out on macrophages, following by lymphocytes (30% of the studies). In the case of lymphocytes, T cells were the most investigated (22%) followed by monocytes and dendritic cells (7%), mixed cell populations (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, 6%), and B and natural killer (NK) cells (1%). Most of the studies focused on toxicity and biocompatibility, while mechanistic insights on the effect of carbon nanotubes on immune cells are generally lacking. Only very recently high-throughput gene-expression analyses have shed new lights on unrecognized effects of carbon nanomaterials on the immune system. These investigations have demonstrated that some f-CNTs can directly elicitate specific inflammatory pathways. The interaction of graphene with the immune system is still at a very early stage of investigation. This comprehensive state of the art on biocompatible f-CNTs and graphene on immune cells provides a useful compass to guide future researches on immunological applications of carbon nanomaterials in medicine. PMID:24885781

  15. Exosome-like vesicles derived by Schistosoma japonicum adult worms mediates M1 type immune- activity of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Li, Zhitao; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoying; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released into the extracellular space upon fusion of the multi-vesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane, while initial studies described that the role of exosomes was a reticulocyte cargo-disposal mechanism allowing remodeling of the plasma membrane during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes. Recent studies indicate that exosomes are secreted by most cells and pathogens and play an important role in intercellular signaling and exert regulatory function by carrying bioactive molecules. As numerous pathogens, adult worm of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) reside in mesenteric veins of definitive host including man and mammal animals. It was reported that the worms or the eggs also have specialized secretion systems to export effector proteins or other molecules into host target cells. However, the mechanisms involved remained unclear. This study investigated the isolation of the exosome-like vesicles secreted by S. japonicum adult worms and its immune activity on microphage in vitro. In this report, we identified exosome-based secretion as a new mechanism for protein secretion by S. japonicum. Electron microscopy tomography revealed the previously unidentified ultrastructural detail of exosome-like vesicles with high resolution; they were found to be typical spherical shape and to have a diverse population that varies in size of 30-100nm. Exosome-like vesicles isolated from S. japonicum contained a significantly different protein compared with debris pelleted and the apoptosis body. We also demonstrate that macrophages were preferentially differentiated into the M1 subtype while being treated with S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles. This study reveals there are exosome-like vesicles derived by S. japonicum adult worms, and the exosome-like vesicles can mediate M1-type immune- activity of macrophage. PMID:25855345

  16. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon ?. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  17. Immune complexFc?R interaction modulates monocyte/macrophage molecules involved in inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    BARRIONUEVO, P; BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; FERNANDEZ, G C; GOMEZ, S; ALVES-ROSA, M F; PALERMO, M S; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Fc?Rs) from monocytes/macrophages and immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Recently, we have demonstrated that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-?-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. Taking into account that the regulation of MHC class II molecules is a crucial event in the immune response, in this report we extend our previous studies analysing the effect of STAT-1 phosphorylation in the down-regulatory process, the fate of the intracellular pool of MHC class II molecules and the effect of complement on MHC class II down-regulation induced by IC. We also studied the effect of IC on the expression of MHC class II (I-Ad) in macrophages using a mouse model of chronic inflammation. We demonstrate that IC induce a depletion not only on surface expressed but also on intracellular MHC class II content and that IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is not mediated by the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effect of IC is not specific for the down-regulation of MHC class II, for it could be restricted to other molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Our experiments also show that the activation of the complement system could be a crucial step on the regulation of the effect of IC on MHC class II expression. In agreement with our in vitro experiments using human monocytes, IC treatment reduces the expression of MHC class II in a mouse model of chronic inflammation. PMID:12869025

  18. Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Cindy; Gaber, Timo; Maurizi, Lionel; Hahne, Martin; Rauch, Roman; Hoff, Paula; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine. PMID:26056442

  19. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD. PMID:16456012

  20. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions.

    PubMed

    Lundholm, Marie; Hgglf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L; Stattin, Pr; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikstrm, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2(+)) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163(+)) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  1. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Marie; Hägglöf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L.; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2+) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163+) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  2. Identification of an immune-regulated phagosomal Rab cascade in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Gang; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-? (IFN-?) has been shown to regulate phagosome trafficking and function in macrophages, but the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we identify Rab20 as part of the machinery by which IFN-? controls phagosome maturation. We found that IFN-? stimulates the association of Rab20 with early phagosomes in macrophages. By using imaging of single phagosomes in live cells, we found that Rab20 induces an early delay in phagosome maturation and extends the time for which Rab5a and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) remain associated with phagosomes. Moreover, Rab20 depletion in macrophages abrogates the delay in phagosome maturation induced by IFN-?. Finally, we demonstrate that Rab20 interacts with the Rab5a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabex-5 (also known as RABGEF1) and that Rab20 knockdown impairs the IFN-?-dependent recruitment of Rabex-5 and Rab5a into phagosomes. Taken together, here, we uncover Rab20 as a key player in the Rab cascade by which IFN-? induces a delay in phagosome maturation in macrophages. PMID:24569883

  3. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  4. Drosophila blood cells and their role in immune responses.

    PubMed

    Vlisidou, Isabella; Wood, Will

    2015-04-01

    Drosophilamelanogaster has been extensively used to study the humoral arm of innate immunity because of the developmental and functional parallels with mammalian innate immunity. However, the fly cellular response to infection is far less understood. Investigative work on Drosophila haemocytes, the immunosurveillance cells of the insect, has revealed that they fulfil roles similar to mammalian monocytes and macrophages. They respond to wound signals and orchestrate the coagulation response. In addition, they phagocytose and encapsulate invading pathogens, and clear up apoptotic bodies controlling inflammation. This review briefly describes the Drosophila haematopoietic system and discusses what is currently known about the contribution of haemocytes to the immune response upon infection and wounding, during all stages of development. PMID:25688716

  5. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  6. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus.

    PubMed

    Behar, Samuel M; Carpenter, Stephen M; Booty, Matthew G; Barber, Daniel L; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-12-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease--the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  7. Primary Role for Toll-Like Receptor-Driven Tumor Necrosis Factor Rather than Cytosolic Immune Detection in Restricting Coxiella burnetii Phase II Replication within Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William P; Boyer, Mark A; Nguyen, Hieu T; Birdwell, L Dillon; Yu, Janet; Ribeiro, Juliana M; Weiss, Susan R; Zamboni, Dario S; Roy, Craig R; Shin, Sunny

    2016-04-01

    Coxiella burnetiireplicates within permissive host cells by employing a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate effector proteins that direct the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole. C57BL/6 mouse macrophages restrict the intracellular replication of theC. burnetiiNine Mile phase II (NMII) strain. However, eliminating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) permits bacterial replication, indicating that the restriction of bacterial replication is immune mediated. Here, we examined whether additional innate immune pathways are employed by C57BL/6 macrophages to sense and restrict NMII replication. In addition to the known role of TLR2 in detecting and restricting NMII infection, we found that TLR4 also contributes to cytokine responses but is not required to restrict bacterial replication. Furthermore, the TLR signaling adaptors MyD88 and Trif are required for cytokine responses and restricting bacterial replication. TheC. burnetiiNMII T4SS translocates bacterial products into C57BL/6 macrophages. However, there was little evidence of cytosolic immune sensing of NMII, as there was a lack of inflammasome activation, T4SS-dependent cytokine responses, and robust type I interferon (IFN) production, and these pathways were not required to restrict bacterial replication. Instead, endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced upon TLR sensing ofC. burnetiiNMII was required to control bacterial replication. Therefore, our findings indicate a primary role for TNF produced upon immune detection ofC. burnetiiNMII by TLRs, rather than cytosolic PRRs, in enabling C57BL/6 macrophages to restrict bacterial replication. PMID:26787725

  8. Regulation effect of polysaccharides from Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fr.) on the immune activity of mice macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang-Hong; Lu, Chuan-Li; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Li, Zi-Yi; Huang, Zhuo-Lie

    2014-02-01

    Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fr.) is widely consumed as a nutritious food due to its multiple health effects, especially immune function. This study was aimed at investigating its immune activity using the mice peritoneal macrophage model. Two polysaccharides, water and alkaline extraction of polysaccharides (W-PTR and A-PTR), from P. tuber-regium were used to test their immune functions and compare their possible activity differences. Results showed that both W-PTR and A-PTR showed a significant enhancement effect on the macrophage phagocytosis, and could activate the related enzymes, such as ATPases, lysozyme, and LDH, which are responsible for providing the maturation and proliferation process of macrophages with sufficient energy. In addition, levels of intracellular cytokines (IL-1, TNF-?, NO) were significantly increased after being treated with polysaccharides. A-PTR displayed a better performance than W-PTR in almost all tests. It is concluded that both polysaccharides could enhance the immune system by activating the macrophages and related enzymes, and induce the release of cytokines, indicating that polysaccharides are responsible for the immune function of Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fr.). PMID:24352758

  9. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection. PMID:25075784

  10. Macrophages and dendritic cells: the usual suspects in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kassiteridi, Christina; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the leading cause of death worldwide, is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease, which, clinically manifests from early lipid-rich lesions to plaque rupture and/or thrombosis in the arterial wall. The myeloid cell compartment, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is long known to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However their complex phenotypic heterogeneity hampers our full understanding of their role. Here, we review the biological and functional versatility of the myeloid cells in atherosclerosis. Several distinct subsets of macrophages and myeloid cells have been identified in atherosclerotic plaques, including subsets that are specific to atherosclerosis itself. Our ability to target them therapeutically is still limited. The challenge for the future will be the definition of treatments that target specific myeloid subsets to prevent the activation of pro-atherogenic myeloid cell subsets while preserving the anti-atherogenic and repairable function of myeloid cells. PMID:25808566

  11. Labeling of macrophage cell using biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Kwanghee; Wu, Jun Hua; Jeong, Jaeho; Song, Ah Young; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Young Keun

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the intrinsic cell labeling efficiency of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by a modified thermal decomposition method using nontoxic precursors and a biocompatible polymer surfactant. This method eliminates the current need for additional step of surface modification. The structural analysis reveals the highly crystalline feature of the nanoparticles, while the magnetic measurement shows their superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were efficiently incorporated into the murine macrophage cells (RAW264.7) without visible cytotoxicity. Cell labeling efficiency was found to be over 90% as measured by magnetically activated cell sorting and physical property measurement system. Therefore, such Fe3O4 nanoparticles could provide a useful magnetic cell labeling tool for macrophage cells using their phagocytic/endocytic activity and further apply to the other relevant biomedical applications.

  12. Viewing Malignant Melanoma Cells as Macrophage-Tumor Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) begins in the epidermis as the clonal emergence of melanocytes having a deregulated mitotic cycle. In a manner not yet understood, some descendents of these cells loosen their adhesions in situ and migrate into the dermis, thus initiating the processes of invasion and metastasis. These cells look and act much like macrophage-melanoma hybrids created in the lab or arising in mice. But genetic proof for hybrids in human melanoma is still lacking. Nonetheless, should tumor cell hybridization account for the invasive phenotype, this would surely evoke new therapeutic approaches regarding mechanisms of cell fusion and hybrid-specific molecular signatures. Here are described some of the remarkable phenotypic similarities between experimental macrophage-melanoma hybrids and CMM. The results suggest that invasive and metastatic CMM might well arise through fusion and genomic hybridization between melanoma cells and migratory bone marrow-derived cells. PMID:19262091

  13. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruochan; Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNF? release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, and TNF? neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. PMID:25684181

  14. Coagulation and the expression of cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J; Geczy, C

    1987-04-01

    Induction of monocyte/macrophage procoagulants may occur as the result of activation of the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response. Macrophage procoagulant inducing factor (MPIF), a soluble product of stimulated TDTH lymphocytes, may act together with two monokines, interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha, which induce thromboplastin on endothelial cells, to initiate the fibrin deposition which is a common feature of many diseases in which CMI plays a role. Murine MPIF is chemically distinct from a number of other well characterized lymphokines in that the two major activities, MPIF alpha and MPIF beta are heparin-binding proteins with high isoelectric points. Fractions highly enriched for MPIF induced interstitial fibrin deposition when injected intradermally. In addition, intense infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PWN) and mononuclear cells was seen 4-24 h following intradermal injection. In vitro experiments have confirmed that this lymphokine is a potent chemotactic agent for these cells. These results suggest that MPIF plays a central role in the expression of histopathological features of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Monocyte and macrophage procoagulants induced by MPIF would contribute significantly to the activation of coagulation which not only results in fibrin deposition but also in the production of activated serine proteases and fibrinopeptides which may potentiate an inflammatory response. PMID:3301639

  15. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  16. Intracellular replication of Staphylococcus aureus in mature phagolysosomes in macrophages precedes host cell death, and bacterial escape and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Flannagan, Ronald S; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E

    2016-04-01

    The success of Staphylococcus aureus as a pathogen is partly attributable to its ability to thwart host innate immune responses, which includes resisting the antimicrobial functions of phagocytes. Here, we have studied the interaction of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain USA300 with murine RAW 264.7 and primary human macrophages using molecular imaging and single cell analysis to obtain an unprecedented understanding of the interaction between the macrophage and MRSA. Herein we demonstrate that macrophages fail to control intracellular infection by MRSA USA300 despite trafficking the bacteria into mature phagolysosomes. Using fluorescence-based proliferation assays we also show that intracellular staphylococci proliferate and that replication commences while the bacteria are residing in mature phagolysosomes hours after initial phagocytosis. Finally, live-cell fluorescence video microscopy allowed for unprecedented visual insight into the escape of MRSA from macrophages, demonstrating that the macrophages die through a pathway characterized by membrane blebbing and activation of caspase-3 followed by acquisition of the vital dye propidium iodide. Moreover, cell death precedes the emergence of MRSA from infected macrophages, and these events can be ablated by prolonged exposure of infected phagocytes to gentamicin. PMID:26408990

  17. Progesterone-induced activation of membrane-bound progesterone receptors in murine macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Reese, Joshua; Zhou, Ying; Hirsch, Emmet

    2014-01-01

    Parturition is an inflammatory process mediated to a significant extent by macrophages. Progesterone maintains uterine quiescence in pregnancy, and a proposed functional withdrawal of progesterone classically regulated by nuclear progesterone receptors (nPRs) leads to labor. Progesterone can impact the functions of macrophages despite the reported lack of expression of nPRs in these immune cells. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of the activation of the putative membrane-associated progesterone receptor on the function of macrophages (a key cell for parturition) and discuss the implications of these findings for pregnancy and parturition. In murine macrophage cells (RAW264.7), activation of mPRs by progesterone modified to be active only extracellularly by conjugation to BSA (P4BSA, 1.010?7 mol/l) caused a pro-inflammatory shift in mRNA expression profile, with significant up-regulation of the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (Ptgs2), Il1B, and Tnf and down-regulation of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (Paqr7) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr). Pretreatment with PD98059, a MEK 1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced P4BSA-induced Il1B, Tnf and Ptgs2 mRNA. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by H89 blocked P4BSA-induced Il1B and Tnf mRNA levels. P4BSA induced rapid phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB, a downstream target of PKA). This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with PD98059 and H89, respectively, revealing that MEK1/2 and PKA are two of the components involved in mPR signaling. Taken together, these data demonstrate that changes in membrane progesterone receptor alpha expression and signaling in macrophages are associated with the inflammatory responses; and that these changes might contribute to the functional withdrawal of progesterone related to labor. PMID:25472814

  18. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  19. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  20. A novel lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) gene from sweetfish Plecoglossus altivelis: molecular characterization and its role in the immune response of monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin-Jiang; Chu, Chang-Qing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Jiong

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) belongs to the lipid transfer/LBP (LT-LBP) family, and plays a crucial role in the recognition of bacterial components that modulate cellular signals in phagocytic cells. Although several LBPs have been identified in teleosts, the effects of LBP homologs on teleost phagocytic cells are still obscure. Here, we report the cloning a novel full-length cDNA sequence of LBP-like protein (paLBP) gene from sweetfish, Plecoglossus altivelis. The paLBP cDNA encoded a 464 aa polypeptide, which was closest to that of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax). paLBP mRNA was detected mainly in the spleen, liver, and head kidney and levels dramatically increased in various tissues after Listonella anguillarum infection. In contrast to mammalian studies, paLBP mRNA could also be detected in sweetfish monocytes/macrophages. Recombinant paLBP showed LPS-binding activity and Western blot results revealed a significant increase of paLBP in the supernatant of sweetfish monocytes/macrophages challenged with L. anguillarum. Moreover, paLBP neutralization led to up-regulation of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA as well as respiratory burst activity in sweetfish monocytes/macrophages in response to L. anguillarum or LPS challenge. Therefore, these results suggest that paLBP is an inducible acute-phase protein mediating the immune response of sweetfish monocytes/macrophages upon bacterial challenge. PMID:24594008

  1. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe?/?Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP + macrophages dancing on the spot and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  2. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  3. BIGH3 protein and Macrophages in Retinal Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mondragon, Albert A.; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Moritz, Robert J.; Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Navarro, Mary M.; Kim, Hong Seok; Lee, Chi Fung; LeBaron, Richard G.; Asmis, Reto; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a pandemic disease with a higher occurrence in minority populations. The molecular molecular mechanism to initiate diabetes-associated retinal angiogenesis remains largely unknown. We propose an inflammatory pathway of diabetic retinopathy in which macrophages in the diabetic eye provides TGF? to retinal endothelial cells (REC) in the retinal microvasculature. In response to TGF?, REC synthesize and secrete a pro-apoptotic BIGH3 (TGF?-Induced Gene Human Clone 3) protein, which acts in an autocrine loop to induce REC apoptosis. Methods Rhesus monkey retinal endothelial cells (RhREC) were treated with dMCM (cell media of macrophages treated with high glucose and LDL) for apoptosis (TUNEL assays) and BIGH3 mRNA (qPCR) and protein (Western blots) expressions. Cells were also treated with TGF?1 and 2 for BIGH3 mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition assays were carried out using antibodies for TGF?1 and for BIGH3 to block apoptosis and mRNA expression. BIGH3 in cultured RhREC cells were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Distribution of BIGH3 and macrophages in the diabetic mouse retina was examined with IHC. Results RhRECs treated with dMCM or TGF? showed a significant increase in apoptosis and BIGH3 protein expression. Recombinant BIGH3 added to RhREC culture medium led to a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Antibodies (Ab) directed against BIGH3 and TGF?, as well as TGF? receptor blocker resulted in a significant reduction in apoptosis induced by either dMCM, TGF? or BIGH3. IHC showed that cultured RhREC constitutively expressed BIGH3. Macrophage and BIGH3 protein were co-localized to the inner retina of the diabetic mouse eye. Conclusion Our results support a novel inflammatory pathway for diabetic retinopathy. This pathway is initiated by TGF? released from macrophages, which promotes synthesis and release of BIGH3 protein by REC and REC apoptosis. PMID:25378215

  4. The Macrophage Switch in Obesity Development

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Naffah de Souza, Cristiane; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration in (white) adipose tissue (AT) during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In AT, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, AT M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with AT inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain AT homeostasis. Here, we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of AT macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26779183

  5. Dendritic Cells and Humoral Immunity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate the innate and adaptive immune systems to induce tolerance and immunity. DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants in the regulation of immune responses. Our recent studies suggest that humoral and cellular immunity is regulated by different myeloid DC subsets with distinct intrinsic properties in humans. While antibody response is preferentially mediated by CD14+ dermal DCs, cytotoxic T cell response is preferentially mediated by Langerhans cells (LCs). Thus, mechanisms whereby DCs induce humoral and cellular immunity appear to be fundamentally distinct. In this review, we will focus on the role of DCs in the development of humoral immunity. We will also discuss the mechanisms whereby DCs induce CD4+ T cells associated with the help of B cell response, including T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, and why human LCs lack this ability. PMID:20309010

  6. γδ T Cell and Other Immune Cells Crosstalk in Cellular Immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Wu, Kangni; Hu, Yongxian; Sheng, Lixia; Tie, Ruxiu; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells have been recognized as effectors with immunomodulatory functions in cellular immunity. These abilities enable them to interact with other immune cells, thus having the potential for treatment of various immune-mediated diseases with adoptive cell therapy. So far, the interactions between γδ T cell and other immune cells have not been well defined. Here we will discuss the interactivities among them and the perspective on γδ T cells for their use in immunotherapy could be imagined. The understanding of the crosstalk among the immune cells in immunopathology might be beneficial for the clinical application of γδ T cell. PMID:24741636

  7. Role of Copper Efflux in Pneumococcal Pathogenesis and Resistance to Macrophage-Mediated Immune Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael D. L.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Klein, Roger; Kelly, Jacqueline; Burnham, Corinna; Mann, Beth

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, the intracellular levels of metals are mediated by tightly controlled acquisition and efflux systems. This is particularly true of copper, a trace element that is universally toxic in excess. During infection, the toxic properties of copper are exploited by the mammalian host to facilitate bacterial clearance. To better understand the role of copper during infection, we characterized the contribution of the cop operon to copper homeostasis and virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Deletion of either the exporter, encoded by copA, or the chaperone, encoded by cupA, led to hypersensitivity to copper stress. We further demonstrated that loss of the copper exporter encoded by copA led to decreased virulence in pulmonary, intraperitoneal, and intravenous models of infection. Deletion of copA resulted in enhanced macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance in vitro. The attenuation phenotype of the copA mutant in the lung was found to be dependent on pulmonary macrophages, underscoring the importance of copper efflux in evading immune defenses. Overall, these data provide insight into the role of the cop operon in pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25667262

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, macrophages, and the innate immune response: does common variation matter?

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, William R.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Despite the discovery of the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus over 100 years ago and the availability of effective drugs for over 50 years, there remain a number of formidable challenges for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Understanding the genetic and immunologic factors that influence human susceptibility could lead to novel insights for vaccine development as well as diagnostic advances to target treatment to those who are at risk for developing active disease. Although a series of studies over the past 50 years suggests that host genetics influences resistance to TB, a comprehensive understanding of which genes and variants are associated with susceptibility is only partially understood. In this article, we review recent advances in our understanding of human variation of the immune system and its effects on macrophage function and influence on MTb susceptibility. We emphasize recent discoveries in human genetic studies and correlate these findings with efforts to understand how these variants alter the molecular and cellular functions that regulate the macrophage response to MTb. PMID:17850489

  9. Nanosized silver (II) pyridoxine complex to cause greater inflammatory response and less cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Avijit; Ju, Hee; Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-03-01

    With advancements in nanotechnology, silver has been engineered into a nanometre size and has attracted great research interest for use in the treatment of wounds. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have emerged as a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics because of their potential antimicrobial property. However, AgNPs also induce cytotoxicity, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cause mitochondrial damage to human cells. Pyridoxine possesses antioxidant and cell proliferation activity. Therefore, in the present investigation, a nanosilver-pyridoxine complex (AgPyNP) was synthesized, and its cytotoxicity and immune response was compared with AgNPs in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Results revealed that AgPyNPs showed less cytotoxicity compared with AgNPs by producing a smaller amount of ROS in RAW264.7 cells. Surprisingly, however, AgPyNPs caused macrophage RAW264.7 cells to secrete a larger amount of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and generate a more active inflammatory response compared to AgNPs. It activated TNF-α, NF-κB p65, and NF-κB p50 to generate a more vigorous immune protection that produces a greater amount of IL-8 compared to AgNPs. Overall findings indicate that AgPyNPs exhibited less cytotoxicity and evoked a greater immune response in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Thus, it can be used as a better wound-healing agent than AgNPs.

  10. A Novel Method Linking Antigen Presentation by Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages to CD8+?T Cell Polyfunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kirsty R.; Grant, Emma J.; Vissers, Marloes; Reading, Patrick C.; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A.; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    To understand the interactions between innate and adaptive immunity, and specifically how virally infected macrophages impact T cell function, novel assays examining the ability of macrophages to present antigen to CD8+ T cells are needed. In the present study, we have developed a robust in vitro assay to measure how antigen presentation by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) affects the functional capacity of autologous CD8+ T cells. The assay is based on the polyfunctional characteristics of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, and is thus called a Mac-CD8 Polyfunctionality Assay. Following purification of monocytes and their maturation to MDMs, MDMs were pulsed with an antigenic peptide to be presented to CD8+ T cells. Peptide-pulsed MDMs were then incubated with antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in order to assess the efficacy of antigen presentation to T cells. CD8+ T cell polyfunctionality was assessed by staining with mAbs to IFN-?, TNF-?, and CD107a in a multi-color intracellular cytokine staining assay. To highlight the utility of the Mac-CD8 Polyfunctionality Assay, we assessed the effects of influenza infection on the ability of human macrophages to present antigen to CD8+ T cells. We found that influenza infection of human MDMs can alter the effector efficacy of MDMs to activate more CD8+ T cells with cytotoxic capacity. This has important implications for understanding how the virus-infected macrophages affect adaptive immunity at the site of infection. PMID:24312096

  11. The Fungal Quorum-Sensing Molecule Farnesol Activates Innate Immune Cells but Suppresses Cellular Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. PMID:25784697

  12. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  13. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with nave or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice. PMID:26586698

  14. Immune chaperone gp96 drives the contributions of macrophages to inflammatory colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Crystal; Rachidi, Saleh; Hong, Feng; Sun, Shaoli; Ouyang, Xinshou; Wallace, Caroline; Zhang, Yongliang; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth; Wu, Jennifer; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2014-01-15

    Macrophages are important drivers in the development of inflammation-associated colon cancers, but the mechanistic underpinnings for their contributions are not fully understood. Furthermore, Toll-like receptors have been implicated in colon cancer, but their relevant cellular sites of action are obscure. In this study, we show that the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is essential in tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) to license their contributions to inflammatory colon tumorigenesis. Mice where gp96 was genetically deleted in a macrophage-specific manner exhibited reduced colitis and inflammation-associated colon tumorigenesis. Attenuation of colon cancer in these mice correlated strikingly with reduced mutation rates of β-catenin, increased efficiency of the DNA repair machinery, and reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 in the tumor microenvironment. The genotoxic nature of TAM-associated inflammation was evident by increased expression of genes in the DNA repair pathway. Our work deepens understanding of how TAM promote oncogenesis by altering the molecular oncogenic program within epithelial cells, and it identifies gp96 as a lynchpin chaperone needed in TAM to license their function and impact on expression of critical inflammatory cytokines in colon tumorigenesis. PMID:24322981

  15. Tissue-resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-resident macrophages are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. These range from dedicated homeostatic functions, such as clearance of cellular debris and iron processing, to central roles in tissue immune-surveillance, response to infection and the resolution of inflammation. Recent studies highlight marked heterogeneity in the origins of tissue macrophages that arise from hematopoietic versus self-renewing embryo-derived populations. We discuss the tissue–niche-specific factors that dictate cell phenotype, the definition of which will allow novel strategies to promote the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms that dictate tissue macrophage heterogeneity should explain why simplified paradigms of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. PMID:24048120

  16. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  17. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel.

    PubMed

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14(+) monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  18. Human intestinal epithelial cells express IL-10 through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated epithelial-macrophage crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jinhee; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Flores, Claudia; Kanagavelu, Saravana; Chung, Kristina D.; Alonso, Ana; Sotolongo, John; Ruiz, Jose; Manukyan, Armine; Chun, Sally; Singh, Gaurav; Pedro, Salas; Targan, Stephan R.; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    In the intestine, interaction between epithelial cells and macrophages creates a unique immunoregulatory microenvironment necessary to maintain local immune and tissue homeostasis. Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) have been shown to express IL-10, which keeps epithelial integrity. We have demonstrated that bacterial signaling through TLR4 induces 15-Deoxy-Delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) synthesis in intestinal macrophages by Cox-2 expression. Here we show that TLR4 signaling generates crosstalk between IECs and macrophages that enhances IL-10 expression in IECs. Direct stimulation of TLR4 leads to the expression of IL-10 in IECs, while the presence of macrophages in a transwell system induces another peak of IL-10 in IECs at a later time point. The second peak of the IL-10 expression is two times greater than the first peak. This late induction of IL-10 depends on a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ that is accumulated in IECs by TLR4-mediated inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway. TLR4 signaling in macrophages in turn synthesizes 15d-PGJ2 through p38 and ERK activation and Cox-2 induction, which activates PPARγ in IECs. These results suggest that TLR4 signaling maintains IL-10 production in IECs by generating epithelial-macrophage crosstalk, which is an important mechanism in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis mediated through host-bacterial interactions. PMID:25171731

  19. Innate Immunity, Decidual Cells, and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chang-Ching; Chao, Kuan-Chong

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) manifested by hypertension and proteinuria complicates 3% to 8% of pregnancies and is a leading cause of fetalmaternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It may lead to intrauterine growth restriction, preterm delivery, and long-term sequelae in women and fetuses, and consequently cause socioeconomic burden to the affected families and society as a whole. Balanced immune responses are required for the maintenance of successful pregnancy. Although not a focus of most studies, decidual cells, the major resident cell type at the fetalmaternal interface, have been shown to modulate the local immune balance by interacting with other cell types, such as bone marrow derived-immune cells, endothelial cells, and invading extravillous trophoblasts. Accumulating evidence suggests that an imbalanced innate immunity, facilitated by decidual cells, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PE. Thus, this review will discuss the role of innate immunity and the potential contribution of decidual cells in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:22814099

  20. Transcription of innate immunity genes and cytokine secretion by canine macrophages resistant or susceptible to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; da Costa, Luciana Fachini; Romão, Everton de Lima; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2015-01-15

    In this study we assessed the basal transcription of genes associated with innate immunity (i.e. Nramp1, NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9) in canine monocyte-derived macrophages from Leishmania-free dogs. Additionally, secretion of cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and nitric oxide in culture supernatants of macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum was also measured. Constitutive transcription of TLR9 and NOD2 were negligible; NOD1, TLR1, and TLR7 had low levels of transcription, whereas Nramp1 and TLR2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 had higher levels of constitutive transcription in canine monocyte-derived macrophages. There were no significant differences in transcription between macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of L. infantum. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in more resistant macrophages (designated as resistant) at 24h after infection when compared to less resistant macrophages (designated as susceptible), as well as the secretion of IFN-γ at 72 h post infection. Secretion of IL-10 was lower in resistant macrophages at 24h after infection. No detectable production of nitric oxide was observed. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between NOD2 transcript levels and intracellular survival of L. infantum in resistant macrophages. This study demonstrated that decreased intracellular survival of L. infantum in canine macrophages was associated with increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased production of IL-10; and that constitutive transcription of Nramp1, TLR and NLR does not interfere in intracellular survival of L. infantum. PMID:25466388

  1. Regulatory iNKT cells lack PLZF expression and control Treg cell and macrophage homeostasis in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Lydia; Michelet, Xavier; Zhang, Sai; Brennan, Patrick J.; Moseman, Ashley; Lester, Chantel; Besra, Gurdyal; Vomhof-Dekrey, Emilie E.; Tighe, Mike; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I.; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.; Sant’Angelo, Derek B.; von Andrian, Ulrich; Brenner, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    iNKT cells are CD1d-restricted lipid-sensing innate T cells that express the transcription factor PLZF. iNKT cells accumulate in adipose tissue, where they are anti-inflammatory, but the factors that contribute to their anti-inflammatory nature, and their targets in adipose tissue are unknown. Here we report that adipose tissue iNKT cells have a unique transcriptional program and produce interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-10. Unlike other iNKT cells, they lack PLZF, but express the transcription factor E4BP4, which controls their IL-10 production. Adipose iNKT cells are a tissue resident population that induces an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and, through production of IL-2, controls the number, proliferation and suppressor function of adipose regulatory T (Treg) cells. Thus, adipose tissue iNKT cells are unique regulators of immune homeostasis in this tissue. PMID:25436972

  2. Surface engineering of macrophages with nucleic acid aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shunsuke; Moriyama, Rui; Mori, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2015-11-26

    In order to enhance the interactions between macrophages and cancer cells, thiol-terminated nucleic acid aptamers were immobilized on methacryloyl-functionalised carbohydrates of macrophages. The adhesion of cancer cells on the surface modified macrophages was significantly accelerated. PMID:26468496

  3. Silencing Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Impaired the Inflammatory Response to Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Houxuan; Hong, Feifei; Pan, Shengbo; Lei, Lang; Yan, Fuhua

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipid contents in arterial walls. Previous studies suggest participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in lipid deposition and inflammatory response in vascular wall. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) is a cell surface receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which amplifies signal transduction of TLR pathway and enhances immune response to microbial infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on the expression of the TREM-1, as well as its engagement in proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation in RAW264.7 mice macrophages. oxLDL enhanced TREM-1 and TLR-4, but not TLR-2 gene expression in macrophages; furthermore, silencing TREM-1 expression by short hairpin interfering RNA inhibited lipid phagocytosis and proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in macrophages; moreover, application of synthetic antagonist, LP-17 polypeptide, reduced IL-6 production upon oxLDL stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, in macrophages, oxLDL enhanced expression of TREM-1, which amplifies the innate immune response of TLR pathway; activation of TREM-1 contributes to atherogenesis process by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation. PMID:26277357

  4. Polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis induced by a macrophage factor acting via T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waldrep, J C; Reese, A C

    1981-01-01

    New Zealand White rabbits were killed 7 days after immunization with 1 mg of alum precipitated, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) into each hind footpad and 3 days after intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate. When supernatants from cultures of purified, elicited macrophages were added to Mishell-Dutton cultures of primed popliteal lymphocytes, they induced synthesis of both general immunoglobulins and antibody specific for KLH. The active factor(s), polyclonal lymphocyte activator (PLA), appears to be a glycoprotein with a molecular weight between 150,000 and 200,000 daltons. Absorption with high concentrations of thymocytes but not bone marrow cells removed polyclonal stimulatory activity from peritoneal macrophage supernatants which contained PLA. Purified lymph-node B cells were stimulated by PLA only in the presence of T cells. In addition, supernatants from PLA activated, washed T cells were effective at inducing polyclonal B-cell activation. Thus, PLA appears to act indirectly on B cells by stimulating T cells to produce a soluble factor which induces polyclonal B-cell activation. Images Figure 2 PMID:6972349

  5. Crosstalk between colon cancer cells and macrophages via inflammatory mediators and CD47 promotes tumour cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Juhas, Maria; Sjlander, Anita

    2013-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) of the M2 phenotype are present in the stroma of many tumours and are frequently associated with the progression of several types of cancer. We investigated the role of M2 macrophages in colon cancer progression and found that human colon cancer tissue had elevated numbers of CD68(+) (macrophage marker) cells and CD206(+) (M2 macrophage marker) cells and increased CD47 expression. To explore potential interplay between colon cancer cells and M2 macrophages, we differentiated the monocyte cell line THP-1 into M1 and M2 macrophages (CD206(high) and Th2 cytokine-secreting cells), respectively. M2 macrophages migrated faster than M1 macrophages towards SW480-conditioned medium. Similarly, M2 macrophage-conditioned medium induced SW480 cell migration and CD47 expression. Factors released by macrophages were involved in this induction. In addition, SW480 cells migrated faster when co-cultured with M2 macrophages. Inhibition of CD47 with blocking antibodies or siRNA significantly reduced the migration of SW480 cells in the presence of M2 macrophages. This effect was further decreased via blocking antibodies against the CD47 ligand signal-regulatory protein ? (SIRP?). Additionally, cancer cells also secreted significant levels of IL-10, thereby promoting M2 macrophage differentiation. These findings indicate that a TAM-enriched tumour microenvironment promotes colon cancer cell migration and metastasis. PMID:23810249

  6. Tomato Aqueous Extract Modulates the Inflammatory Profile of Immune Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Mussler, Bernd; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients transiently or chronically modulate functional and biochemical characteristics of cells and tissues both in vivo and in vitro. The influence of tomato aqueous extract (TAE) on the in vitro inflammatory response of activated human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and macrophages was investigated. Its effect on endothelial dysfunction (ED) was analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), PBLs and HUVECs were incubated with TAE. They were activated with LPS or TNF-? in order to induce inflammatory processes and ED, respectively. Inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules were measured by immune assay-based multiplex analysis. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR. TAE altered the production of interleukins (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12) and chemokines (CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1?, CCL5/RANTES, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10) in PBLs. TAE reduced ED-associated expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) in endothelial cell. In macrophages, the production of nitric oxide, PGE?, cytokines and ILs (TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-12), which reflects chronic inflammatory processes, was reduced. Adenosine was identified as the main bioactive of TAE. Thus, TAE had cell-specific and context-dependent effects. We infer from these in vitro data, that during acute inflammation TAE enhances cellular alertness and therefore the sensing of disturbed immune homeostasis in the vascular-endothelial compartment. Conversely, it blunts inflammatory mediators in macrophages during chronic inflammation. A novel concept of immune regulation by this extract is proposed. PMID:26840280

  7. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent conversion of cultured macrophages into foam cells with antiallergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Kovanen, P T

    2000-12-01

    Degranulation of isolated, rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cholesteryl ester accumulation in cocultured macrophages with ensuing foam cell formation. This event occurs when the macrophages phagocytose LDL particles that have been bound to the heparin proteoglycans of exocytosed granules. In an attempt to inhibit such foam cell formation pharmacologically, rat peritoneal mast cells that had been passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin-IgE were treated with 2 mast cell-stabilizing antianaphylactic drugs, MY-1250 or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Both drugs were found to inhibit antigen (ovalbumin)-triggered release of histamine from the mast cells, revealing mast cell stabilization. In cocultures of rat peritoneal macrophages and passively sensitized mast cells, addition of MY-1250 before addition of the antigen resulted in parallel reductions in histamine release from mast cells, uptake of [(14)C]sucrose-LDL, and accumulation of LDL-derived cholesteryl esters in the cocultured macrophages. Similarly, when passively sensitized mast cells were stimulated with antigen in the presence of DSCG and the preconditioned media containing all substances released from the drug-treated mast cells were collected and added to macrophages cultured in LDL-containing medium, uptake and esterification of LDL cholesterol by the macrophages were inhibited. The inhibitory effects of both drugs were mast cell-specific because neither drug inhibited the ability of macrophages to take up and esterify LDL cholesterol. Analysis of heparin proteoglycan contents of the incubation media revealed that both drugs had inhibited mast cells from expelling their granule remnants. Thus, both MY-1250 and DSCG prevent mast cells from releasing the heparin proteoglycan-containing vehicles that bind LDL and carry it into macrophages. This study suggests that antiallergic pharmacological agents could be used in animal models to prevent mast cell-dependent formation of foam cells in vivo. PMID:11116078

  8. Immune Cells of the Human Peripheral Taste System: Dominant Dendritic Cells and CD4 T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Yee, Karen K.; Rawson, Nancy E.; Feldman, Lauren M.; Feldman, Roy S.; Breslin, Paul A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Taste loss or alterations can seriously impact health and quality of life due to the resulting negative influence on eating habits and nutrition. Infection and inflammation are thought to be some of the most common causes of taste perception disorders. Supporting this view, neuro-immune interactions in the peripheral gustatory system have been identified, underlying the importance of this tissue in mucosal immunity, but we have little understanding of how these interactions influence taste perception directly or indirectly. This limited understanding is evident by the lack of even a basic knowledge of the resident immune cell populations in or near taste tissues. The present study characterized the distribution and population of the major immune cells and their subsets in healthy human anterior, lingual, fungiform papillae (FP) using immunohistochemistry. Dendritic cells (DCs) were the predominant innate immune cells in this tissue, including four subtypes: CD11c+ DCs, DC-SIGN+ immature DCs, CD83+ mature DCs, and CD1a+ DCs (Langerhans cells). While most DCs were localized beneath the lamina propria and only moderately in the epithelium, CD1a + Langerhans cells were exclusively present within the epithelium and not in sub-strata. A small number of macrophages were observed. T lymphocytes were present throughout the FP with CD4+ T cells more prevalent than CD8+ T cells. Very few CD19+ B lymphocytes were detected. The results show that DCs, macrophages, and T lymphocytes are the constitutive guardians of human FP taste tissue, with DCs and CD4 T cells being dominant, while B lymphocytes are rare under normal, healthy conditions These observations provide a basic anatomical foundation for the immune response in the healthy human tongue as a basis for subsequent disease-related studies, but none of the present data indicate that the immune cell populations identified are, in fact, altered in individuals with abnormal taste perception. PMID:19268521

  9. Impact of Host Membrane Pore Formation by the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion System on the Macrophage Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kwuan, Laura; Adams, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are used by Gram-negative pathogens to form pores in host membranes and deliver virulence-associated effector proteins inside host cells. In pathogenic Yersinia, the T3SS pore-forming proteins are YopB and YopD. Mammalian cells recognize the Yersinia T3SS, leading to a host response that includes secretion of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Toll-like receptor (TLR)-independent expression of the stress-associated transcription factor Egr1 and the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and host cell death. The known Yersinia T3SS effector proteins are dispensable for eliciting these responses, but YopB is essential. Three models describe how the Yersinia T3SS might trigger inflammation: (i) mammalian cells sense YopBD-mediated pore formation, (ii) innate immune stimuli gain access to the host cytoplasm through the YopBD pore, and/or (iii) the YopB-YopD translocon itself or its membrane insertion is proinflammatory. To test these models, we constructed a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant expressing YopD devoid of its predicted transmembrane domain (YopDΔTM) and lacking the T3SS cargo proteins YopHEMOJTN. This mutant formed pores in macrophages, but it could not mediate translocation of effector proteins inside host cells. Importantly, this mutant did not elicit rapid host cell death, IL-1β secretion, or TLR-independent Egr1 and TNF-α expression. These data suggest that YopBD-mediated translocation of unknown T3SS cargo leads to activation of host pathways influencing inflammation, cell death, and response to stress. As the YopDΔTM Y. pseudotuberculosis mutant formed somewhat smaller pores with delayed kinetics, an alternative model is that the wild-type YopB-YopD translocon is specifically sensed by host cells. PMID:23297383

  10. Immune cell therapy in IBD.

    PubMed

    Dunkin, David; Mehandru, Saurabh; Colombel, Jean-Frdric

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic landscape of IBD has undergone a dramatic transformation since the advent of biologic therapies, especially TNF inhibitors. However, 30% of patients are primary nonresponders to biologic therapy and secondary failures are frequent. Due to substantial progress in our understanding of the biology of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and in the pathways of homing to the gastrointestinal tract, novel cell-based therapies for IBD have become possible. For example, although a reductionist view, one could envisage IBD as an imbalance between the proinflammatory effectors (such as Th17 cells) and the anti-inflammatory regulators (like Tregs). Here we focus on the development of ex vivo and in vivo approaches to enhance Tregs in the gastrointestinal tract. Specifically, herein we highlight a recently concluded phase 1/2a clinical trial that investigated the safety and efficacy of a single injection of escalating doses of autologous ovalbumin-specific Tregs in patients with active Crohn's disease refractory to conventional therapy. This therapy was well tolerated and demonstrated dose-related efficacy. We also discuss the potential of directing Tregs derived through intranasal as well as epicutaneous immunization to the gastrointestinal tract by enhancing their gut homing signature and their potential to decrease gastrointestinal inflammation. Finally, the strengths and pitfalls of these new therapeutic approaches are discussed as we move forward in this largely uncharted territory. PMID:25531354

  11. Macrophage Contact Dependent and Independent TLR4 Mechanisms Induce ?-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cucak, Helena; Mayer, Christopher; Tonnesen, Morten; Thomsen, Lise Hj; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is evolving into a global disease and patients have a systemic low-grade inflammation, yet the role of this inflammation is still not established. One plausible mechanism is enhanced expression and activity of the innate immune system. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and the function of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on pancreatic ?-cells in primary mouse islets and on the murine ?-cell line MIN6 in the presence or absence of macrophages. Diabetic islets have 40% fewer TLR4 positive ?-cells, but twice the number of TLR4 positive macrophages as compared to healthy islets. Healthy and diabetic islets respond to a TLR4 challenge with enhanced production of cytokines (510-fold), while the TLR4 negative ?-cell line MIN6 fails to produce cytokines. TLR4 stimulation induces ?-cell dysfunction in mouse islets, measured as reduced glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Diabetic macrophages from 4-months old mice have acquired a transient enhanced capacity to produce cytokines when stimulated with LPS. Interestingly, this is lost in 6-months old diabetic mice. TLR4 activation alone does not induce apoptosis in islets or MIN-6 cells. In contrast, macrophages mediate TLR4-dependent cell-contact dependent (3-fold) as well as cell-contact independent (2-fold) apoptosis of both islets and MIN-6 cells. Importantly, diabetic macrophages have a significantly enhanced capacity to induce ?-cell apoptosis compared to healthy macrophages. Taken together, the TLR4 responsiveness is elevated in the diabetic islets and mainly mediated by newly recruited macrophages. The TLR4 positive macrophages, in both a cell-contact dependent and independent manner, induce apoptosis of ?-cells in a TLR4 dependent fashion and TLR4 activation directly induces ?-cell dysfunction. Thus, targeting either the TLR4 pathway or the macrophages provides a novel attractive treatment regime for T2D. PMID:24594974

  12. Mycobacterium abscessus activates the macrophage innate immune response via a physical and functional interaction between TLR2 and dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Min; Yang, Chul-Su; Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Ki Hye; Shin, Sung Jae; Takahara, Kazuhiko; Lee, Sung Joong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2008-08-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (Mab) is an emerging and rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). Compared with M. tuberculosis, which is responsible for tuberculosis, much less is known about NTM-induced innate immune mechanisms. Here we investigated the involvement of pattern-recognition receptors and associated signalling in Mab-mediated innate immune responses. Mab activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and induced the secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12p40 in murine macrophages via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Notably, the activation of ERK1/2, but not p38, was crucial for Mab-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The ITAM-like motif of dectin-1 critically contributed to Mab internalization and cytokine secretion by macrophages. In addition, dectin-1, in cooperation with TLR2, was required for the efficient phagocytosis of Mab, ERK1/2 activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis showed the physical interaction and colocalization of dectin-1 with TLR2 following Mab stimulation. Moreover, dectin-1-induced Syk activation was essential for the production of inflammatory cytokines and the release of reactive oxygen species by Mab-infected macrophages. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Mab actively internalizes into and robustly activates innate immune responses in macrophages through a physical and functional interaction between TLR2 and dectin-1. PMID:18373632

  13. Alternatively Activated Macrophages Revisited: New Insights into the Regulation of Immunity, Inflammation and Metabolic Function following Parasite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jessica C.; Nair, Meera G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of macrophages in homeostatic conditions and the immune system range from clearing debris to recognizing and killing pathogens. While classically activated macrophages (CAMacs) are induced by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines and exhibit microbicidal properties, Th2 cytokines promote alternative activation of macrophages (AAMacs). AAMacs contribute to the killing of helminth parasites and mediate additional host-protective processes such as regulating inflammation and wound healing. Yet, other parasites susceptible to Th1 type responses can exploit alternative activation of macrophages to diminish Th1 immune responses and prolong infection. In this review, we will delineate the factors that mediate alternative activation (e.g. Th2 cytokines and chitin) and the resulting downstream signaling events (e.g. STAT6 signaling). Next, the specific AAMac-derived factors (e.g. Arginase1) that contribute to resistance or susceptibility to parasitic infections will be summarized. Finally, we will conclude with the discussion of additional AAMac functions beyond immunity to parasites, including the regulation of inflammation, wound healing and the regulation of metabolic disorders. PMID:24772059

  14. Interleukin-10 from T Cells, but Not Macrophages and Granulocytes, Is Required for Chronic Disease in Leishmania mexicana Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cutaneous disease of mice caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana requires interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Fc?RIII (an activating IgG receptor). Macrophages readily secrete IL-10 in response to IgG-coated amastigotes, making macrophages a prime candidate as the critical source of IL-10. However, indirect evidence suggested that macrophage IL-10 is not essential for chronic disease. I now show directly that mice lacking IL-10 from macrophages and granulocytes still have chronic disease, like wild-type C57BL/6 mice. However, T cell-derived IL-10 is required for chronic disease. CD4-cre IL-10flox/flox mice lack IL-10 from T cells (both CD4+ and CD8+) and heal their L. mexicana lesions, with parasite control. I had previously shown that depletion of CD25+ T cells had no effect on chronic disease, and thus, T cells other than CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells should be the important source of IL-10. Given that conventional T cells do not express Fc?Rs, there is likely to be an indirect pathway by which Fc?RIII on some other cell engaged by IgG1-amastigote immune complexes induces IL-10 from T cells. Further work is needed to delineate these pathways. PMID:25605773

  15. Integrated regulation of the cellular metabolism and function of immune cells in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yumiko; Manabe, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is known to associate with low-grade, sustained, systemic inflammation, which is considered to be a key pathological basis for obesity-associated diseases such as diabetes and atherosclerosis. Immune cells, including both lymphocytes and macrophages, play physiological and pathological roles in adipose tissue. They increasingly infiltrate obese adipose tissue as body weight is gained, after which the infiltrated cells promote adipose tissue inflammation and strongly impact systemic metabolism. Recent studies have shown that the immune and metabolic systems are highly integrated with one another. This recognition has provided new insight into the mechanisms of metabolic diseases. In addition to the link at the tissue level, studies have shown that immune cell function is coordinately regulated with cellular metabolism. This review summarizes the current understanding of the specific metabolic signatures adopted by lymphocytes and macrophages to mediate proper effecter function. These findings will be related to the regulation of adipose tissue homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:26728525

  16. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin ?M (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  17. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin ?(M) (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS. PMID:24423728

  18. Macrophages and ?-cells are responsible for CXCR2-mediated neutrophil infiltration of the pancreas during autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Julien; Lehuen, Agns

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) development results from the interaction between pancreatic ?-cells, and the innate and the adaptive immune systems culminating with the destruction of the insulin-secreting ?-cells by autoreactive T cells. This diabetogenic course starts during the first postnatal weeks by the infiltration of the pancreatic islets by innate immune cells and particularly neutrophils. Here, we aim to determine the cellular and molecular mechanism leading to the recruitment of this neutrophils in the pancreatic islets of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Here, we show that neutrophil recruitment in the pancreatic islets is controlled by inflammatory macrophages and ?-cells themselves. Macrophages and ?-cells produce the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, recruiting CXCR2-expressing neutrophils from the blood to the pancreatic islets. We further show that pancreatic macrophages secrete IL-1?-inducing CXCR2 ligand production by the ?-cells. Finally, the blockade of neutrophil recruitment at early ages using CXCR2 antagonist dampens the diabetogenic T-cell response and the later development of autoimmune diabetes, supporting the therapeutic potential of this approach. Subject Categories Immunology; Metabolism PMID:24968718

  19. Riboflavin deprivation inhibits macrophage viability and activity - a study on the RAW 264.7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Buchala, Beata; Plytycz, Barbara

    2013-08-28

    Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, as a precursor of the coenzymes FAD and FMN, has an indirect influence on many metabolic processes and determines the proper functioning of several systems, including the immune system. In the human population, plasma riboflavin concentration varies from 31 nM (in a moderate deficiency, e.g. in pregnant women) to 104 nM (in healthy adults) and 300 nM (in cases of riboflavin supplementation). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of riboflavin concentration on the activity and viability of macrophages, i.e. on one of the immunocompetent cell populations. The study was performed on the murine monocyte/macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line cultured in medium with various riboflavin concentrations (31, 104, 300 and 531 nM). The results show that riboflavin deprivation has negative effects on both the activity and viability of macrophages and reduces their ability to generate an immune response. Signs of riboflavin deficiency developed in RAW 264.7 cells within 4 d of culture in the medium with a low riboflavin concentration (31 nM). In particular, the low riboflavin content reduced the proliferation rate and enhanced apoptotic cell death connected with the release of lactate dehydrogenase. The riboflavin deprivation impaired cell adhesion, completely inhibited the respiratory burst and slightly impaired phagocytosis of the zymosan particles. In conclusion, macrophages are sensitive to riboflavin deficiency; thus, a low riboflavin intake in the diet may affect the immune system and may consequently decrease proper host immune defence. PMID:23415257

  20. In Vivo Inhibition of c-MYC in Myeloid Cells Impairs Tumor-Associated Macrophage Maturation and Pro-Tumoral Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pello, Oscar M.; De Juan, Alba; Lolo, Fidel; Andrés-Manzano, María Jesús; Serrano, Manuel; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Andrés, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1α) that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23028984

  1. In vivo inhibition of c-MYC in myeloid cells impairs tumor-associated macrophage maturation and pro-tumoral activities.

    PubMed

    Pello, Oscar M; Chvre, Raphael; Laoui, Damya; De Juan, Alba; Lolo, Fidel; Andrs-Manzano, Mara Jess; Serrano, Manuel; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Andrs, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1?) that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23028984

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: immune evasive, not immune privileged

    PubMed Central

    Ankrum, James A.; Ong, Joon Faii; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The diverse immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may be exploited for treatment of a multitude of inflammatory conditions. MSCs have long been reported to be hypoimmunogenic or immune privileged; this property is thought to enable MSC transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers and the creation of off-the-shelf therapies consisting of MSCs grown in culture. However, recent studies describing generation of antibodies against and immune rejection of allogeneic donor MSCs suggest that MSCs may not actually be immune privileged. Nevertheless, whether rejection of donor MSCs influences the efficacy of allogeneic MSC therapies is not known, and no definitive clinical advantage of autologous MSCs over allogeneic MSCs has been demonstrated to date. Although MSCs may exert therapeutic function through a brief hit and run mechanism, protecting MSCs from immune detection and prolonging their persistence in vivo may improve clinical outcomes and prevent patient sensitization toward donor antigens. PMID:24561556

  3. Antigen-Presenting Cell Candidates for HIV-1 Transmission in Human Distal Colonic Mucosa Defined by CD207 Dendritic Cells and CD209 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Preza, Gloria C.; Tanner, Karen; Elliott, Julie; Yang, Otto O.; Anton, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A common route for HIV-1 infection is sexual transmission across colorectal mucosa, which is thought to be 102,000 times more vulnerable to infection than that of the female genital tract. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against many pathogens but the antigen-presenting cells (APCs), key regulators of innate immunity and determinants of adaptive immunity, are not well defined in these target tissues. Using immunohistochemistry, dendritic cells expressing Langerin (CD207+), a lectin known to bind and internalize HIV-1, were detected in the periphery of colonic glands and sparsely scattered in the submucosa similarly in colorectal mucosa. This cell type, well known in skin, has generally not been reported in colonic/rectal mucosa. Unexpectedly, the largest APC population observed was a macrophage-like population expressing the well-characterized tissue macrophage markers CD68 and CD163. Confocal microscopy of these cells revealed colocalization of CD209 (DC-SIGN), a presumed dendritic cell marker believed to facilitate HIV-1 transmission, but not other dendritic cell markers. These results show evidence of the unconfirmed presence of Langerhans cells in colorectal mucosa and a predominance of macrophage-like APCs that express CD209 (DC-SIGN). These findings define potential target cells in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 transmission, which may have key implications for the study of early transmission events in normal colorectal mucosa, as well as other infectious diseases and primary immune diseases involving the gut. PMID:24134315

  4. Presence of T cells and macrophages in inflammatory vitiligo skin parallels melanocyte disappearance.

    PubMed Central

    Le Poole, I. C.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Westerhof, W.; Das, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of cellular immunity in the etiopathogenesis of the hypopigmentary disorder vitiligo is provided by rare cases of inflammatory vitiligo. Nonlesional, perilesional, and lesional skin biopsies from three inflammatory vitiligo patients were immunohistochemically analyzed. The composition of inflammatory infiltrates present in perilesional skin was analyzed by antibodies to T cells (CD2, CD3, CD4, and CD8), Langerhans cells (CD1a), and macrophages (CD36 and CD68). The presence of activation markers on inflammatory cells was evaluated by analysis of HLA-DR, interleukin-2 receptor, and HECA452 expression. The presence or absence of melanocytes was determined by the antibody NKI-beteb. Moreover, the abundance of matrix molecule tenascin was semi-quantified using T2H5. Results indicate that within perilesional skin, epidermis-infiltrating T cells exhibit an increased CD8/CD4 ratio and increased cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and interleukin-2 receptor expression. These cells are frequently juxtapositionally apposed to remaining melanocytes. In perilesional dermis, CD68+OKM5- macrophages were more numerous than in lesional or nonlesional skin. Keratinocytes as well as melanocytes consistently express major histocompatibility complex class II antigens along stretches of basal and suprabasal layers in perilesional epidermis. Moreover, inflammation is accompanied by increased tenascin content. Although these observations do not permit differentiation between the immune infiltrates being a result as opposed to the cause of the disease process, results presented in this study are very suggestive of involvement of local immune reactivity in melanocyte destruction. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8644862

  5. Inflammatory features of pancreatic cancer highlighted by monocytes/macrophages and CD4+ T cells with clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Komura, Takuya; Sakai, Yoshio; Harada, Kenichi; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Takabatake, Hisashi; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Wada, Takashi; Honda, Masao; Ohta, Tetsuo; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the most fatal of malignancies with an extremely poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to provide a detailed understanding of PDAC pathophysiology in view of the host immune response. We examined the PDAC tissues, sera, and peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients using immunohistochemical staining, the measurement of cytokine/chemokine concentrations, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry. The PDAC tissues were infiltrated by macrophages, especially CD33+CD163+ M2 macrophages and CD4+ T cells that concomitantly express programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). Concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-15, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and interferon-γ-inducible protein-1 in the sera of PDAC patients were significantly elevated. The gene expression profile of CD14+ monocytes and CD4+ T cells was discernible between PDAC patients and healthy volunteers, and the differentially expressed genes were related to activated inflammation. Intriguingly, PD-1 was significantly upregulated in the peripheral blood CD4+ T cells of PDAC patients. Correspondingly, the frequency of CD4+PD-1+ T cells was increased in the peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients, and this increase correlated to chemotherapy resistance. In conclusion, inflammatory conditions in both PDAC tissue and peripheral blood cells in PDAC patients were prominent, highlighting monocytes/macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells with influence of the clinical prognosis. We examined the inflammatory features of PDAC patients using the PDAC tissues, sera, and peripheral blood by immunohistochemical staining, measurement of cytokines/chemokines, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry. We foundg that monocyte/macrophage cells and CD4+ T cells were highlighted immune-mediating cells in local cancer tissue as well as in peripheral blood of PDAC patients, among which the important subfraction with clinical impact influencing PDAC prognosis by chemotherapy was involved. PMID:25827621

  6. Biosynthesis of anandamide and related acylethanolamides in mouse J774 macrophages and N18 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, V; De Petrocellis, L; Sepe, N; Buono, A

    1996-01-01

    Anandamide (arachidonoylethanolamide, AnNH) has been recently proposed as the endogenous ligand at the brain cannabinoid receptor CB1. Two alternative pathways have been suggested for the biosynthesis of this putative mediator in the central nervous system. Here we present data (1) substantiating further the mechanism by which AnNH is produced by phospholipase D (PLD)-catalysed hydrolysis of N-arachidonoylphosphatidylethanolamine in mouse neuroblastoma N18TG2 cells, and (2) suggesting for the first time that AnNH is biosynthesized via the same mechanism in a non-neuronal cell line, mouse J774 macrophages, together with other acylethanolamides and is possibly involved in the control of the immune/inflammatory response. Lipids from both neuroblastoma cells and J774 macrophages were shown to contain a family of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (N-aPEs), including the possible precursor of AnNH, N-arachidonoyl-PE. Treatment with exogenous PLD, but not with exogenous phospholipase A2 and ethanolamine, resulted in the production of a series of acylethanolamides (AEs), including AnNH, from both cell types. The formation of AEs was accompanied by a decrease in the levels of the corresponding N-aPEs. Enzymically active homogenates from either neuroblastoma cells or J774 macrophages were shown to convert synthetic N-[3H]arachidonoyl-PE into [3H]AnNH, thus suggesting that in both cells an enzyme is present which is capable of catalysing the hydrolysis of N-aPE(s) to the corresponding AE(s). Finally, as previously shown in central neurons, on stimulation with ionomycin, J774 macrophages also produced a mixture of AEs including AnNH and palmitoylethanolamide, which has been proposed as the preferential endogenous ligand at the peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 and, consequently, as a possible down-modulator of mast cells. On the basis of this as well as previous findings it is now possible to hypothesize for AnNH and palmitoylethanolamide, co-synthesized by macrophages, a role as peripheral mediators with multiple actions on blood cell function. PMID:8670178

  7. Expression of Fractalkine Receptor CX3CR1 on Cochlear Macrophages Influences Survival of Hair Cells Following Ototoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Eisuke; Shick, H. Elizabeth; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of innate immunity and macrophage recruitment to the inner ear after hair cell injury is a subject where little is known. In this paper, we demonstrate recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to the inner ear after kanamycin. We also examined the effect of fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) deletion in kanamycin ototoxicity. We observed more functional and structural damage in CX3CR1 null mice compared to wild-type and heterozygous littermates. In order to determine if increased susceptibility to kanamycin resulted from CX3CR1 deletion from cochlear leukocytes, we created bone marrow chimeras by transplanting CX3CR1-null bone marrow into wild-type mice whose native bone marrow was ablated by lethal irradiation. These mice were then treated with kanamycin sulfate. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR), hair cell counts, and numbers of macrophages recruited to the cochlea were recorded in irradiated mice that received either wild-type, CX3CR1 heterozygous, or CX3CR1 knockout bone marrow. A strong correlation was present between numbers of macrophages and hair cell death in recipients transplanted with CX3CR1 null marrow. No correlation between macrophage number and hair cell loss was present in mice transplanted with wild-type or CX3CR1 heterozygous marrow. We suggest that CX3CR1 plays a role in modulating the detrimental effects of cochlear macrophages after kanamycin ototoxicity. Our data point to the possibility that CX3CR1-deficient cochlear macrophages exacerbate kanamycin ototoxicity while CX3CR1-expressing monocytes do not. PMID:19936834

  8. Macrophages pulsed with Streptococcus pneumoniae elicit a T cell-dependent antibody response upon transfer into nave mice

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Colino, Jesus; Puliaev, Roman; Canaday, David H.; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are less effective than DC at priming nave CD4+ T cells, suggesting that DC are unique in initiating T cell-dependent antibody responses. We compared the ability of DC and macrophages, pulsed in vitro with Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), to elicit protein- and polysaccharide (PPS)-specific Ig isotype production upon adoptive transfer into nave mice. Pn-activated DC secreted more pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines, expressed higher levels of surface MHC-II and CD40, and presented Pn or recombinant pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) to a PspA-specific T hybridoma more efficiently than macrophages. However, upon adoptive transfer into nave mice, Pn-pulsed macrophages elicited an IgM and/or IgG anti-PspA and anti-PPS response comparable in serum titers and IgG isotype distribution to that induced by DC. The IgG anti-PspA, in contrast to the IgG anti-PPS, response to Pn-pulsed macrophages was T cell-dependent. Pn-pulsed macrophages that were paraformaldehyde-fixed prior to transfer or lacking expression of MHC-II or CD40 were highly defective in eliciting an anti-PspA response, although the anti-PPS response was largely unaffected. To our knowledge, these data are the first to indicate that macrophages can play an active role in the induction of a T cell-dependent humoral immune response in a nave host. PMID:18641316

  9. Macrophage and Innate Lymphoid Cell Interplay in the Genesis of Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hams, Emily; Bermingham, Rachel; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic pathological feature of an array of chronic diseases, where development of fibrosis in tissue can lead to marked alterations in the architecture of the affected organs. As a result of this process of sustained attrition to organs, many diseases that involve fibrosis are often progressive conditions and have a poor long-term prognosis. Inflammation is often a prelude to fibrosis, with innate and adaptive immunity involved in both the initiation and regulation of the fibrotic process. In this review, we will focus on the emerging roles of the newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the generation of fibrotic disease with an examination of the potential interplay between ILC and macrophages and the adaptive immune system. PMID:26635811

  10. Immune Modulation of Stem Cells and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, Arin B.; Olson, Eric N.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system, best known as the first line of defense against invading pathogens, is integral to tissue development, homeostasis and wound repair. In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation that cellular and humoral components of the immune system also contribute to regeneration of damaged tissues, including limbs, skeletal muscle, heart and the nervous system. Here, we discuss key findings that implicate inflammatory cells and their secreted factors in tissue replacement following injury via stem cells and other reparative mechanisms. We highlight clinical conditions that are amenable to immune-mediated regeneration and suggest immune targeting strategies for tissue regeneration. PMID:24996166

  11. T cell metabolic fitness in antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    T cell metabolism has a central role in supporting and shaping immune responses and may have a key role in antitumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1), to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here, we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment. PMID:25773310

  12. Steroid Hormone Signaling Is Essential to Regulate Innate Immune Cells and Fight Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jennifer C.; Brando, Ana S.; Leito, Alexandre B.; Mantas Dias, ngela Raquel; Sucena, lio; Jacinto, Antnio; Zaidman-Rmy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Coupling immunity and development is essential to ensure survival despite changing internal conditions in the organism. Drosophila metamorphosis represents a striking example of drastic and systemic physiological changes that need to be integrated with the innate immune system. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms that coordinate development and immune cell activity in the transition from larva to adult. Here, we reveal that regulation of macrophage-like cells (hemocytes) by the steroid hormone ecdysone is essential for an effective innate immune response over metamorphosis. Although it is generally accepted that steroid hormones impact immunity in mammals, their action on monocytes (e.g. macrophages and neutrophils) is still not well understood. Here in a simpler model system, we used an approach that allows in vivo, cell autonomous analysis of hormonal regulation of innate immune cells, by combining genetic manipulation with flow cytometry, high-resolution time-lapse imaging and tissue-specific transcriptomic analysis. We show that in response to ecdysone, hemocytes rapidly upregulate actin dynamics, motility and phagocytosis of apoptotic corpses, and acquire the ability to chemotax to damaged epithelia. Most importantly, individuals lacking ecdysone-activated hemocytes are defective in bacterial phagocytosis and are fatally susceptible to infection by bacteria ingested at larval stages, despite the normal systemic and local production of antimicrobial peptides. This decrease in survival is comparable to the one observed in pupae lacking immune cells altogether, indicating that ecdysone-regulation is essential for hemocyte immune functions and survival after infection. Microarray analysis of hemocytes revealed a large set of genes regulated at metamorphosis by EcR signaling, among which many are known to function in cell motility, cell shape or phagocytosis. This study demonstrates an important role for steroid hormone regulation of immunity in vivo in Drosophila, and paves the way for genetic dissection of the mechanisms at work behind steroid regulation of innate immune cells. PMID:24204269

  13. Immune Homeostatic Macrophages Programmed by the Bacterial Surface Protein NhhA Potentiate Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Sjölinder, Mikael; Gao, Yumin; Wan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis colonizes the nasopharyngeal mucosa of healthy populations asymptomatically, although the bacterial surface is rich in motifs that activate the host innate immunity. What determines the tolerant host response to this bacterium in asymptomatic carriers is poorly understood. We demonstrated that the conserved meningococcal surface protein NhhA orchestrates monocyte (Mo) differentiation specifically into macrophage-like cells with a CD200Rhi phenotype (NhhA-Mφ). In response to meningococcal stimulation, NhhA-Mφ failed to produce proinflammatory mediators. Instead, they upregulated interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Th2/regulatory T cell (Treg)-attracting chemokines, such as CCL17, CCL18, and CCL22. Moreover, NhhA-Mφ were highly efficient in eliminating bacteria. The in vivo validity of these findings was corroborated using a murine model challenged with N. meningitidis systematically or intranasally. The NhhA-modulated immune response protected mice from septic shock; Mo/Mφ depletion abolished this protective effect. Intranasal administration of NhhA induced an anti-inflammatory response, which was associated with N. meningitidis persistence at the nasopharynx. In vitro studies demonstrated that NhhA-triggered Mo differentiation occurred upon engaged Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1)/TLR2 signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and required endogenously produced IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Our findings reveal a strategy that might be adopted by N. meningitidis to maintain asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonization. PMID:26884432

  14. Immune surveillance of mammary tissue by phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Paape, M J; Shafer-Weaver, K; Capuco, A V; Van Oostveldt, K; Burvenich, C

    2000-01-01

    The leukocytes in milk consist of lymphocytes, neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages. Lymphocytes together with antigen-presenting cells function in the generation of an effective immune response. Lymphocytes can be divided into two distinct subsets, T- and B-lymphocytes, that differ in function and protein products. The professional phagocytic cells of the bovine mammary gland are PMN and macrophages. In the normal mammary gland macrophages are the predominate cells which act as sentinels to invading mastitis causing pathogens. Once the invaders are detected, macrophages release chemical messengers called chemoattractants that cause the directed migration of PMN into the infection. Migration of neutrophils into mammary tissue provides the first immunological line of defense against bacteria that penetrate the physical barrier of the teat canal. However, their presence is like a double-edged sword. While the PMN are phagocytosing and destroying the invading pathogens, they inadvertently release chemicals which induces swelling of secretory epithelium cytoplasm, sloughing of secretory cells, and decreased secretory activity. Permanent scarring will result in a loss of milk production. Resident and newly migrated macrophages help reduce the damage to the epithelium by phagocytosing PMN that undergo programmed cell death through a process called apoptosis. Specific ligands on the neutrophil surface are required for directed migration and phagocytosis. In response to infection, freshly migrated leukocytes express greater numbers of cell surface receptors for immunoglobulins and complement and are more phagocytic than their counterparts in blood. However, phagocytic activity rapidly decreases with continued exposure to inhibitory factors such as milk fat globules and casein in mammary secretions. Compensatory hypertrophy in non-mastitic quarters partially compensates for lost milk production in diseased quarters. Advances in molecular biology are making available the tools, techniques, and products to study and modulate host-parasite interactions. For example the cloning and expression of proteins that bind endotoxin may provide ways of reducing damaging effects of endotoxin during acute coliform mastitis. The successful formation of bifunctional monoclonal antibodies for the targeted lysis of mastitis causing bacteria represents a new line of therapeutics for the control of mastitis in dairy cows. PMID:10959434

  15. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  16. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Gran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  17. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  18. Inhibition of lipoxygenase pathway in macrophages co-cultivated with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Calorini, Lido; Bianchini, Francesca; Mannini, Antonella; Mugnai, Gabriele; Ruggieri, Salvatore

    2005-06-01

    Although there is a great deal of interest in the role played by tumor-associated macrophages in tumor progression, the knowledge of the biological mediators involved in the interplay between macrophages and tumor cells is still limited. In the present study, we investigated whether the lipoxygenase pathway in resident murine peritoneal macrophages is affected by contact with tumor cells of a different origin, e.g. murine B16 melanoma and L929 fibrosarcoma cells, and human Hs294T melanoma and HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experiments have been carried out by using macrophages co-cultivated with tumor cells at different ratios, in order to simulate the relative proportions between macrophages and tumor cells during the in vivo development of a tumor. Reverse phase HPLC analyses of the lipoxygenase products of resident peritoneal macrophages revealed a rather complex profile characterized by a high level of 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid followed by leukotriene B(4), 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and lipoxins. Macrophages co-cultivated with tumor cells, both murine and human, showed a marked reduction of lipoxygenase products, mainly in the co-cultures where tumor cells prevailed over macrophages. The characteristic profile of macrophage lipoxygenase products was re-established after removal of tumor cells from the co-cultures. The inhibitory effect on lipoxygenase pathways exerted by tumor cells, was not seen when macrophages were co-cultivated with normal primary murine and human fibroblasts. PMID:15890248

  19. Antibody-Dependent Phagocytosis of Tumor Cells by Macrophages: A Potent Effector Mechanism of Monoclonal Antibody Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gl, Nuray; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, it is impossible to imagine modern cancer treatment without targeted therapies, such as mAbs, that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Subsequently, mAbs can use a wide range of effector functions that mostly engage the immune system. mAbs can bridge immune effector cells with tumor cells, which can result in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Increasing evidence, however, identified macrophages as prominent effector cells and induction of antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis as one of the primary mechanisms of action mediated by mAbs. Macrophages are extremely effective in eliminating tumor cells from the circulation. Several immunosuppressive mechanisms may, however, hamper their function, particularly in solid malignancies. In this review, we discuss the evolving insight of macrophages as effector cells in mAb therapy and address novel (co)therapeutic strategies that may be used to fully unleash their cytotoxic capacity for the treatment of cancer. Cancer Res; 75(23); 5008-13. 2015 AACR. PMID:26573795

  20. Macrophages and mast cells in chronic cholecystitis and "normal" gall bladders.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, I; Hopwood, D

    1986-01-01

    An attempt was made to quantify mast cells using toluidine blue and macrophages, with alpha-1-antitrypsin as a marker, from adjacent sections in the mucosa of two groups of gall bladders showing either minimal inflammatory change or established chronic cholecystitis. The results were expressed as cells/mm2 of mucosa. Alpha-1-antitrypsin showed both macrophages and mast cells, and therefore an estimate of macrophage numbers was obtained by subtraction. Mast cells comprised more than 60% of the alpha-1-antitrypsin positive cells. There were significantly (p greater than 0.001) more mast cells and macrophages in minimal inflammatory gall bladder mucosa than in established chronic cholecystitis. Images PMID:2431004

  1. Siglec-9 modulated IL-4 responses in the macrophage cell line RAW264.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Shoji, Toru; Murase, Yusuke; Iijima, Shinji; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    Siglecs, an immunoglobulin-like lectin family that recognizes the sialic acid moiety, regulate various aspects of immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Siglecs on the macrophage cell line RAW264, which was stimulated with interleukin-4 (IL-4). The induction of arginase-1 (Arg1) by IL-4 was stronger in Siglec-9-expressing cells than in mock cells. Mutations in the cytoplasmic tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in Siglec-9 markedly reduced the expression of Arg1. The phosphorylation of Akt by IL-4 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without IL-4 was stronger in Siglec-9-expressing cells, indicating the enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK pathways, respectively. The enhanced expression of Arg1 was inhibited by MEK inhibitors, but not by PI-3K inhibitor. These results indicate that Siglec-9 affects several different signaling pathways in IL-4-stimulated macrophages, which resulted in enhanced induction of Arg1 in Siglec-9-expressing RAW264 cells. PMID:26540411

  2. Orchestration of Angiogenesis by Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Pagani, Arianna; Pulze, Laura; Albini, Adriana; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Noonan, Douglas M.; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) plays a major role in cancer and is indispensable for tumor progression. The TUMIC involves many players going well beyond the malignant-transformed cells, including stromal, immune, and endothelial cells (ECs). The non-malignant cells can acquire tumor-promoting functions during carcinogenesis. In particular, these cells can orchestrate the symphony of the angiogenic switch, permitting the creation of new blood vessels that allows rapid expansion and progression toward malignancy. Considerable attention within the context of tumor angiogenesis should focus not only on the ECs, representing a fundamental unit, but also on immune cells and on the inflammatory tumor infiltrate. Immune cells infiltrating tumors typically show a tumor-induced polarization associated with attenuation of anti-tumor functions and generation of pro-tumor activities, among these angiogenesis. Here, we propose a scenario suggesting that the angiogenic switch is an immune switch arising from the pro-angiogenic polarization of immune cells. This view links immunity, inflammation, and angiogenesis to tumor progression. Here, we review the data in the literature and seek to identify the conductors of this orchestra. We also suggest that interrupting the immune???inflammation???angiogenesis???tumor progression process can delay or prevent tumor insurgence and malignant disease. PMID:25072019

  3. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; O’Koren, Emily G.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Kan, Matthew J.; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R.; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions. PMID:26938654

  4. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (P<0.05) in production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic activity, and Toll-like receptor expression was observed in host cells incubated with iron-saturated lactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study reveals the possible mechanism of action against various intracellular pathogens such as Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Mycobacterium. The presence of iron in lactoferrin plays an important role in enhancing the various activities taking place inside these cells. This work provides a lot of information about targeting lactoferrin against many parasitic infections which can rule out the exact pathways for inhibition of diseases caused by intracellular microbes mainly targeting RBCs and macrophages for their survival. Therefore, this initial study can serve as a baseline for further evaluation of the mechanism of action of lactoferrin against parasitic diseases, which is not fully understood to date. PMID:26251568

  5. Tissue macrophage identity and self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Gentek, Rebecca; Molawi, Kaaweh; Sieweke, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are cellular components of the innate immune system that reside in virtually all tissues and contribute to immunity, repair, and homeostasis. The traditional view that all tissue-resident macrophages derive from the bone marrow through circulating monocyte intermediates has dramatically shifted recently with the observation that macrophages from embryonic progenitors can persist into adulthood and self-maintain by local proliferation. In several tissues, however, monocytes also contribute to the resident macrophage population, on which the local environment can impose tissue-specific macrophage functions. These observations have raised important questions: What determines resident macrophage identity and function, ontogeny or environment? How is macrophage proliferation regulated? In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the identity, proliferation, and turnover of tissue-resident macrophages and how they differ from freshly recruited short-lived monocyte-derived cells. We examine whether macrophage proliferation can be qualified as self-renewal of mature differentiated cells and whether the concepts and molecular pathways are comparable to self-renewal mechanisms in stem cells. Finally, we discuss how improved understanding of macrophage identity and self-renewal could be exploited for therapeutic intervention of macrophage-mediated pathologies by selectively targeting freshly recruited or resident macrophages. PMID:25319327

  6. Response of the rainbow trout monocyte/macrophage cell line, RTS11 to the water molds Achlya and Saprolegnia.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stephen C; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie J; Bols, Niels C; Dixon, Brian

    2007-03-01

    The Saprolegniales are responsible for various fish mycoses worldwide and considered the most important fungi afflicting fresh water fish. Saprolegniosis leads to massive epidermal destruction and macrophage recruitment, yet little is known regarding the cytological response of their piscine hosts. The objective of this study was to explore the response of fish macrophage to members of the Saprolegniales using the rainbow trout monocyte/macrophage cell line, RTS11. After 48 h in co-culture, RTS11 demonstrated chemotaxis, adherence and homotypic aggregation to both live and heat-killed fungal spores and mycelia. This aggregation was enhanced when using conditioned media from co-cultured RTS11 and Achlya, suggesting the presence of synergistic effectors of aggregation. Although fungal toxins were not evident, as cells remained viable throughout fungal overgrowth, phagocytosis was inhibited due to large fungal spore size, allowing these molds to evade macrophage defenses. Although class I MH and other viral response genes showed no significant change in expression, calreticulin and interleukin-8 were moderately up-regulated implicating calcium modulation and chemotactic response, respectively. Cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and the cytokines IL-1beta and TNFalpha were strongly up-regulated in the presence of Achlya, while gene expression of the class II major histocompatibility (MH II) receptor and associated molecules appeared down-regulated, suggesting fungal interference of immune function. Previous studies have shown an increased dependence of macrophage in immune function at low temperatures; based upon data presented here, this reduction of macrophage MH II receptor expression and inability to phagocytose spores may limit host response thereby providing increased susceptibility to these opportunistic pathogens. PMID:17204328

  7. Ongoing cell death and immune influences on regeneration in the vestibular sensory organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, M. E.; Matsui, J. I.; Simkus, E. L.; Ogilive, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Hair cells in the vestibular organs of birds have a relatively short life span. Mature hair cells appear to die spontaneously and are then quickly replaced by new hair cells that arise from the division of epithelial supporting cells. A similar regenerative mechanism also results in hair cell replacement after ototoxic damage. The cellular basis of hair cell turnover in the avian ear is not understood. We are investigating the signaling pathways that lead to hair cell death and the relationship between ongoing cell death and cell production. In addition, work from our lab and others has demonstrated that the avian inner ear contains a resident population of macrophages and that enhanced numbers of macrophages are recruited to sites of hair cells lesions. Those observations suggest that macrophages and their secretory products (cytokines) may be involved in hair cell regeneration. Consistent with that suggestion, we have found that treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone reduces regenerative cell proliferation in the avian ear, and that certain macrophage-secreted cytokines can influence the proliferation of vestibular supporting cells and the survival of statoacoustic neurons. Those results suggest a role for the immune system in the process of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  8. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  9. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  10. The Majority of In Vitro Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of Some Immune Enhancing Botanicals is Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified potent monocyte/macrophage activating bacterial lipoproteins within commonly used immune enhancing botanicals such as Echinacea, American ginseng and alfalfa sprouts. These bacterial lipoproteins, along with lipopolysaccharides, were substantially more potent than other bacteriall...

  11. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:25453226

  12. Vorinostat Modulates the Imbalance of T Cell Subsets, Suppresses Macrophage Activity, and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sijie; Meng, Xiangda; Zhang, Zhuhong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Yan, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory efficiency of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). EAU was induced in female C57BL/6J mice immunized with interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide. Vorinostat or the control treatment, phosphate-buffered saline, was administrated orally from 3 days before immunization until euthanasia at day 21 after immunization. The clinical and histopathological scores of mice were graded, and the integrity of the blood-retinal barrier was examined by Evans blue staining. T helper cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry, and the macrophage functions were evaluated with immunohistochemistry staining and immunofluorescence assays. The mRNA levels of tight junction proteins were measured by qRT-PCR. The expression levels of intraocular cytokines and transcription factors were examined by western blotting. Vorinostat relieved both clinical and histopathological manifestations of EAU in our mouse model, and the BRB integrity was maintained in vorinostat-treated mice, which had less vasculature leakage and higher mRNA and protein expressions of tight junction proteins than controls. Moreover, vorinostat repressed Th1 and Th17 cells and increased Th0 and Treg cells. Additionally, the INF-γ and IL-17A expression levels were significantly decreased, while the IL-10 level was increased by vorinostat treatment. Furthermore, due to the reduced TNF-α level, the macrophage activity was considerably inhibited in EAU mice. Finally, transcription factors, including STAT1, STAT3, and p65, were greatly suppressed by vorinostat treatment. Our data suggest that vorinostat might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in the management of uveitis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:26798022

  13. The role of CD40-CD154 interactions in the regulation of cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Miga, A; Masters, S; Gonzalez, M; Noelle, R J

    2000-05-01

    CD40 is expressed on a diverse array of cell types from the hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic compartments. Within the hematopoietic compartment, CD40 is found constitutively expressed on B cells, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. The function of CD40 in B cells has been documented as being essential in the control of humoral immunity. In DCs and macrophages, CD40 has been shown to be important in the induction of antigen-presenting cell (APC) maturation and effector function. CD40 is also expressed on non-hematopoietic cells like keratinocytes, epithelial cells, and vascular endothelial cells and has been shown to be functionally important on these cell types. PMID:10854177

  14. Heparin disaccharides inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by macrophages and arrest immune inflammation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Cahalon, L; Lider, O; Schor, H; Avron, A; Gilat, D; Hershkoviz, R; Margalit, R; Eshel, A; Shoseyev, O; Cohen, I R

    1997-10-01

    Inflammation is the clinical expression of chemical mediators such as the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-)-alpha produced by macrophages and other cells activated in the immune response. Hence, agents that can inhibit TNF-alpha may be useful in treating arthritis and other diseases resulting from uncontrolled inflammation. We now report that the cleavage of heparin by the enzyme heparinase I generates sulfated disaccharide (DS) molecules that can inhibit the production of TNF-alpha. Administration of nanogram amounts of the sulfated DS molecules to experimental animals inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity to a skin sensitizer and arrested the joint swelling of immunologically induced adjuvant arthritis. Notably, the sulfated DS molecules showed a bell-shaped dose-response curve in vitro and in vivo: decreased effects were seen using amounts of the DS molecules higher than optimal. Thus, molecular regulators of inflammation can be released from the natural molecule heparin by the action of an enzyme. PMID:9352356

  15. Activation of T cell death-associated gene 8 regulates the cytokine production of T cells and macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Onozawa, Yoshiko; Fujita, Yoshifumi; Kuwabara, Harumi; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Komai, Tomoaki; Oda, Tomiichiro

    2012-05-15

    An orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) which has been reported to be a proton sensor, inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by extracellular acidification. Recently, we have found that TDAG8 knockout mice showed significant exacerbation in various immune-mediated inflammation disease models. To elucidate the role of TDAG8, we screened an in-house library to find compounds which have a profile as a TDAG8 agonist using a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate assay. Among the screening hits, we focused on (3-[(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)thio]-1,6-dimethyl-5,6-dihydro-1H-pyridazino[4,5-e][1,3,4]thiadiazin-5-one) (named BTB09089). BTB09089 did not act on other proton sensing G-protein-coupled receptors such as G-protein-coupled receptor 4 (GPR4) nor ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1). Moreover, BTB09089 increased cAMP level in the splenocytes from wild-type littermates but not from TDAG8-deficient mice. Thus, BTB09089 was found to be a TDAG8 specific agonist. We then investigated the effects of BTB09089 on T cells and macrophages in vitro. In splenocytes, BTB09089 suppressed the production of IL-2 stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. In peritoneal exuded macrophages induced by thioglycollate, BTB09089 suppressed the production of TNF-? and IL-6 while it increased that of IL-10 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were observed in cells from wild type mice, but not those from TDAG8 knockout mice. These results indicate that activation of TDAG8 attenuates immune-mediated inflammation by regulating the cytokine production of T cells and macrophages. PMID:22445881

  16. From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts to control JD through traditional animal management practices are complicated by MAP’s ability to cause long-term environmental contamination as well as difficulties associated with diagnosis of JD in the pre-clinical stages. As such, there is particular emphasis on the development of an effective vaccine. This is a daunting challenge, in large part due to MAP’s ability to subvert protective host immune responses. Accordingly, there is a priority to understand MAP’s interaction with the bovine host: this may inform rational targets and approaches for therapeutic intervention. Here we review the early host defenses encountered by MAP and the strategies employed by the pathogen to avert or subvert these responses, during the critical period between ingestion and the establishment of persistent infection in macrophages. PMID:24885748

  17. Role of complement component C1q in phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes by murine macrophage-like cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Dominguez, C; Carrasco-Marin, E; Leyva-Cobian, F

    1993-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen of a great variety of cells. Among them, macrophages constitute the major effector cells of listerial immunity during the course of an infection. Although the molecular bases of L. monocytogenes attachment and entry to phagocytes are not completely understood, it has been demonstrated that C3b significantly increases L. monocytogenes uptake by macrophages via complement receptor type 3. The first component of complement, C1q, is present in organic fluids at a relatively high concentration, and C1q receptor sites in macrophages are also abundant. In the present report, results of studies on the role of C1q in the internalization and infectivity of L. monocytogenes by macrophages are presented. L. monocytogenes uptake is enhanced by prior treatment of bacteria with normal sera. Heated serum or C1q-deficient serum abrogates this enhancement. Purified C1q specifically restored uptake. This effect was blocked by the addition of F(ab')2 anti-C1q antibody but not by an irrelevant matched antibody. Direct binding of C1q to L. monocytogenes was specific, saturable, and dose dependent with both fluorescent and radiolabeled C1q. N-Acetyl-D-alanyl-L-isoglutamine, diaminopimelic acid, and L-rhamnose caused a significant dose-dependent inhibition of C1q binding to bacteria, suggesting that these molecules, at least, are involved in the attachment of C1q to L. monocytogenes cell wall. When C1q binding structures on macrophage-like cells were blocked with saturating concentrations of C1q, the uptake of C1q-opsonized bacteria was less than in untreated cells. These experiments demonstrate that, in addition to other reported mechanisms, L. monocytogenes binds C1q, which mediates enhanced uptake by macrophages through C1q binding structures. Images PMID:8359889

  18. Neutrophil Elastase-Generated Fragment of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Stimulates Macrophage and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurtagic, Elma; Rich, Celeste B.; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Elastase released from neutrophils as part of the innate immune system has been implicated in chronic diseases such as emphysema and cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that neutrophil elastase targets vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) for partial degradation to generate a fragment of VEGF (VEGFf) that has distinct activities. Namely, VEGFf binds to VEGF receptor 1 but not to VEGF receptor 2 and shows altered signaling compared to intact VEGF. In the present study we investigated the chemotactic function of VEGF and VEGFf released from cells by neutrophil elastase. We found that endothelial cells migrated in response to intact VEGF but not VEGFf whereas RAW 264.7 macrophages/monocytes and embryonic endothelial progenitor cells were stimulated to migrate by either VEGF or VEGFf. To investigate the role of elastase-mediated release of VEGF from cells/extracellular matrices, a co-culture system was established. High or low VEGF producing cells were co-cultured with macrophages, endothelial or endothelial progenitor cells and treated with neutrophil elastase. Elastase treatment stimulated macrophage and endothelial progenitor cell migration with the response being greater with the high VEGF expressing cells. However, elastase treatment led to decreased endothelial cell migration due to VEGF cleavage to VEGF fragment. These findings suggest that the tissue response to NE-mediated injury might involve the generation of diffusible VEGF fragments that stimulate inflammatory cell recruitment. PMID:26672607

  19. Candida albicans cell surface superoxide dismutases degrade host-derived reactive oxygen species to escape innate immune surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Frohner, Ingrid E; Bourgeois, Christelle; Yatsyk, Kristina; Majer, Olivia; Kuchler, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian innate immune cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the oxidative burst reaction to destroy invading microbial pathogens. Using quantitative real-time ROS assays, we show here that both yeast and filamentous forms of the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans trigger ROS production in primary innate immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Through a reverse genetic approach, we demonstrate that coculture of macrophages or myeloid dendritic cells with C. albicans cells lacking the superoxide dismutase (SOD) Sod5 leads to massive extracellular ROS accumulation in vitro. ROS accumulation was further increased in coculture with fungal cells devoid of both Sod4 and Sod5. Survival experiments show that C. albicans mutants lacking Sod5 and Sod4 exhibit a severe loss of viability in the presence of macrophages in vitro. The reduced viability of sod5Δ/Δ and sod4Δ/Δsod5Δ/Δ mutants relative to wild type is not evident with macrophages from gp91phox−/− mice defective in the oxidative burst activity, demonstrating a ROS-dependent killing activity of macrophages targeting fungal pathogens. These data show a physiological role for cell surface SODs in detoxifying ROS, and suggest a mechanism whereby C. albicans, and perhaps many other microbial pathogens, can evade host immune surveillance in vivo. PMID:19019164

  20. Manipulating the immune system: humoral versus cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    McNeela, E A; Mills, K H

    2001-09-23

    Many of the vaccines in use today were designed on an empirical basis with little understanding of the mechanism of protective immunity or knowledge of the protective antigens. Certain of these vaccines, based on killed or attenuated bacteria or viruses, are associated with unacceptable side-effects. New generation vaccines based on recombinant proteins or naked DNA have considerably improved safety profiles, but are often poorly immunogenic, especially when administered by mucosal routes. This is a particular problem with oral delivery; where high doses of antigen are required to generate even modest immune responses. In contrast, nasal delivery of antigens with a range of adjuvants or delivery systems has been shown to generate relatively potent immune responses and to protect against infection in animal models. Advances in immunology have demonstrated that a variety of cellular and humoral immune effector mechanisms, that are regulated by distinct Th1 and Th2 subtypes of T cells, mediate protection against different infectious diseases. The identification of adjuvants and immunomodulators, that can promote the selective induction of these distinct populations of T cells, has now made it possible to rationally design safe and effective mucosal vaccines against a range of infectious diseases of man. PMID:11516778

  1. Inhibitory receptor expression on neonatal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Walk, J; Westerlaken, G H A; van Uden, N O; Belderbos, M E; Meyaard, L; Bont, L J

    2012-01-01

    Neonates are born with quantitative and qualitative defects in both adaptive and innate immune responses. The immune system is regulated by several mechanisms, including the signalling of inhibitory receptors. Increased expression of inhibitory receptors may result in a higher threshold for activation and suppressed function of neonatal cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of seven inhibitory receptors is increased on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. In a healthy birth cohort, we examined the expression of seven inhibitory immune receptors on neonatal neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The expression of leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1), signal inhibitory receptor on leucocytes-1 (SIRL-1), CD31, signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), Siglec-9, CD200R, immune receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (IREM-1) and the membrane-bound ligand CD200 was studied by flow cytometry on leucocytes in cord blood (n = 14), neonatal venous blood (n = 24) and adult venous blood (n = 22). Expression of LAIR-1, CD31 and CD200 was increased consistently across all neonatal T cell subsets. Neonatal monocytes exhibited decreased expression of LAIR-1 and IREM-1 compared to adults. Furthermore, cord blood and neonatal venous blood samples contained a distinct LAIR-1-positive neutrophil population, which was not detected in adult blood. We demonstrated distinct expression of inhibitory receptors on neonatal peripheral blood immune cells in a healthy birth cohort. This is the first evidence that inhibitory receptors play a role in regulation of the neonatal immune system. Consistently increased inhibitory receptor expression on T cells may be an important mechanism in preventing the development of allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:22774991

  2. Inhibitory receptor expression on neonatal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Walk, J; Westerlaken, G H A; van Uden, N O; Belderbos, M E; Meyaard, L; Bont, L J

    2012-08-01

    Neonates are born with quantitative and qualitative defects in both adaptive and innate immune responses. The immune system is regulated by several mechanisms, including the signalling of inhibitory receptors. Increased expression of inhibitory receptors may result in a higher threshold for activation and suppressed function of neonatal cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of seven inhibitory receptors is increased on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. In a healthy birth cohort, we examined the expression of seven inhibitory immune receptors on neonatal neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells. The expression of leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1), signal inhibitory receptor on leucocytes-1 (SIRL-1), CD31, signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), Siglec-9, CD200R, immune receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (IREM-1) and the membrane-bound ligand CD200 was studied by flow cytometry on leucocytes in cord blood (n = 14), neonatal venous blood (n = 24) and adult venous blood (n = 22). Expression of LAIR-1, CD31 and CD200 was increased consistently across all neonatal T cell subsets. Neonatal monocytes exhibited decreased expression of LAIR-1 and IREM-1 compared to adults. Furthermore, cord blood and neonatal venous blood samples contained a distinct LAIR-1-positive neutrophil population, which was not detected in adult blood. We demonstrated distinct expression of inhibitory receptors on neonatal peripheral blood immune cells in a healthy birth cohort. This is the first evidence that inhibitory receptors play a role in regulation of the neonatal immune system. Consistently increased inhibitory receptor expression on T cells may be an important mechanism in preventing the development of allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:22774991

  3. The Isolation and Characterization of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Goncalves, Ricardo; Mosser, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that are widely distributed throughout the body. These cells can contribute to development and homeostasis and participate in innate and adaptive immune responses. The physiology of macrophages can vary tremendously depending on the environment in which they reside and the local stimuli to which they are exposed. Macrophages are prodigious secretory cells, and in that role can promote and regulate immune responses and contribute to autoimmune pathologies. Macrophages are highly phagocytic, and in this capacity have long been considered to be essential immune effector cells. The important roles of macrophages in maintaining homeostasis and in contributing to tissue remodeling and wound healing is sometimes overlooked because of their vital role in host defense. PMID:19016445

  4. Protection Of Alveolar Macrophages And MARC 145 Cells From Porcine Reproductive And Respiratory Syndrome Virus Challenge By Swine Interferon-Beta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferon beta, a type I IFN, is crucial in initiating the innate immune response and in the generation of the adaptive response. This study demonstrated the capacity of swine interferon beta (swIFN beta) to protect porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) and MARC145 cells from infection with porcine re...

  5. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection. PMID:26709698

  6. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection. PMID:26709698

  7. Tetherin Can Restrict Cell-Free and Cell-Cell Transmission of HIV from Primary Macrophages to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sebastian; Marsh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Bst-2/Tetherin inhibits the release of HIV by tethering newly formed virus particles to the plasma membrane of infected cells. Although the mechanisms of Tetherin-mediated restriction are increasingly well understood, the biological relevance of this restriction in the natural target cells of HIV is unclear. Moreover, whether Tetherin exerts any restriction on the direct cell-cell spread of HIV across intercellular contacts remains controversial. Here we analyse the restriction endogenous Tetherin imposes on HIV transmission from primary human macrophages, one of the main targets of HIV in vivo. We find that the mRNA and protein levels of Tetherin in macrophages are comparable to those in T cells from the same donors, and are highly upregulated by type I interferons. Improved immunocytochemistry protocols enable us to demonstrate that Tetherin localises to the cell surface, the trans-Golgi network, and the macrophage HIV assembly compartments. Tetherin retains budded virions in the assembly compartments, thereby impeding the release and cell-free spread of HIV, but it is not required for the maintenance of these compartments per se. Notably, using a novel assay to quantify cell-cell spread, we show that Tetherin promotes the transfer of virus clusters from macrophages to T cells and thereby restricts the direct transmission of a dual-tropic HIV-1. Kinetic analyses provide support for the notion that this direct macrophage-T cell spread is mediated, at least in part, by so-called virological synapses. Finally, we demonstrate that the viral Vpu protein efficiently downregulates the cell surface and overall levels of Tetherin, and thereby abrogates this HIV restriction in macrophages. Together, our study shows that Tetherin, one of the most potent HIV restriction factors identified to date, can inhibit virus spread from primary macrophages, regardless of the mode of transmission. PMID:24991932

  8. IL-10 Production in Macrophages Is Regulated by a TLR-Driven CREB-Mediated Mechanism That Is Linked to Genes Involved in Cell Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sanin, David E; Prendergast, Catriona T; Mountford, Adrian P

    2015-08-01

    IL-10 is produced by macrophages in diverse immune settings and is critical in limiting immune-mediated pathology. In helminth infections, macrophages are an important source of IL-10; however, the molecular mechanism underpinning production of IL-10 by these cells is poorly characterized. In this study, bone marrow-derived macrophages exposed to excretory/secretory products released by Schistosoma mansoni cercariae rapidly produce IL-10 as a result of MyD88-mediated activation of MEK/ERK/RSK and p38. The phosphorylation of these kinases was triggered by TLR2 and TLR4 and converged on activation of the transcription factor CREB. Following phosphorylation, CREB is recruited to a novel regulatory element in the Il10 promoter and is also responsible for regulating a network of genes involved in metabolic processes, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, skin-resident tissue macrophages, which encounter S. mansoni excretory/secretory products during infection, are the first monocytes to produce IL-10 in vivo early postinfection with S. mansoni cercariae. The early and rapid release of IL-10 by these cells has the potential to condition the dermal microenvironment encountered by immune cells recruited to this infection site, and we propose a mechanism by which CREB regulates the production of IL-10 by macrophages in the skin, but also has a major effect on their metabolic state. PMID:26116503

  9. IL-10 Production in Macrophages Is Regulated by a TLR-Driven CREB-Mediated Mechanism That Is Linked to Genes Involved in Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanin, David E.; Prendergast, Catriona T.

    2015-01-01

    IL-10 is produced by macrophages in diverse immune settings and is critical in limiting immune-mediated pathology. In helminth infections, macrophages are an important source of IL-10; however, the molecular mechanism underpinning production of IL-10 by these cells is poorly characterized. In this study, bone marrow–derived macrophages exposed to excretory/secretory products released by Schistosoma mansoni cercariae rapidly produce IL-10 as a result of MyD88-mediated activation of MEK/ERK/RSK and p38. The phosphorylation of these kinases was triggered by TLR2 and TLR4 and converged on activation of the transcription factor CREB. Following phosphorylation, CREB is recruited to a novel regulatory element in the Il10 promoter and is also responsible for regulating a network of genes involved in metabolic processes, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, skin-resident tissue macrophages, which encounter S. mansoni excretory/secretory products during infection, are the first monocytes to produce IL-10 in vivo early postinfection with S. mansoni cercariae. The early and rapid release of IL-10 by these cells has the potential to condition the dermal microenvironment encountered by immune cells recruited to this infection site, and we propose a mechanism by which CREB regulates the production of IL-10 by macrophages in the skin, but also has a major effect on their metabolic state. PMID:26116503

  10. Complement protein C1q directs macrophage polarization and limits inflammasome activity during the uptake of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Marie E; Clarke, Elizabeth V; Morgado, Pedro; Fraser, Deborah A; Tenner, Andrea J

    2012-06-01

    Deficiency in C1q, the recognition component of the classical complement cascade and a pattern recognition receptor involved in apoptotic cell clearance, leads to lupus-like autoimmune diseases characterized by auto-antibodies to self proteins and aberrant innate immune cell activation likely due to impaired clearance of apoptotic cells. In this study, we developed an autologous system using primary human lymphocytes and human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs) to characterize the effect of C1q on macrophage gene expression profiles during the uptake of apoptotic cells. C1q bound to autologous apoptotic lymphocytes modulated expression of genes associated with JAK/STAT signaling, chemotaxis, immunoregulation, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in LPS-stimulated HMDMs. Specifically, C1q sequentially induced type I IFNs, IL-27, and IL-10 in LPS-stimulated HMDMs and IL-27 in HMDMs when incubated with apoptotic lymphocyte conditioned media. Coincubation with C1q tails prevented the induction of type I IFNs and IL-27 in a dose-dependent manner, and neutralization of type I IFNs partially prevented IL-27 induction by C1q. Finally, C1q decreased procaspase-1 cleavage and caspase-1-dependent cleavage of IL-1? suggesting a potent inhibitory effect of C1q on inflammasome activation. These results identify specific molecular pathways induced by C1q to suppress macrophage inflammation and provide potential therapeutic targets to control macrophage polarization and thus inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:22523386

  11. Cellular interactions in bovine tuberculosis: release of active mycobacteria from infected macrophages by antigen?stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Libana, E; Aranaz, A; Aldwell, F E; McNair, J; Neill, S D; Smyth, A J; Pollock, J M

    2000-01-01

    The outcome of Mycobacterium bovis infections depends on the interactions of infected macrophages with T lymphocytes. Several studies in humans and in mouse models have suggested an important role for cytotoxicity in the protective immune response to mycobacterial infections, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been shown to elicit appropriate cytolytic activity. The present study investigated in vitro interactions of T cells with M. bovis?infected macrophages in bovine tuberculosis. The results showed that following interaction with antigen?stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected cattle, there was an increased presence of M. bovis in the extracellular compartment of infected macrophage cultures, as measured by incorporation of [3H]uracil into mycobacterial RNA. Furthermore, out of a panel of T?cell clones from infected cattle, it was found that a higher proportion of CD8+ clones produced an increase in the number of metabolically active extracellular M. bovis organisms compared with CD4+ clones. Finally, a positive correlation between percentage of antigen?dependent release of mycobacteria and total uracil uptake by M. bovis within culture systems was detected. This could be regarded as an indication of preferential intracellular control of mycobacteria by activated macrophages. PMID:10651937

  12. Productive infection of Piscirickettsia salmonis in macrophages and monocyte-like cells from rainbow trout, a possible survival strategy.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Vernica; Galanti, Norbel; Bols, Niels C; Marshall, Sergio H

    2009-10-15

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiologic agent of the salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), an endemic disease which causes significant losses in salmon production. This intracellular bacterium is normally cultured in salmonid epithelial cell lines inducing characteristic cytopathic effects (CPEs). In this study we demonstrate that P. salmonis is able to infect, survive, replicate, and propagate in the macrophages/monocytes cell line RTS11 derived from rainbow trout spleen, without inducing the characteristic CPEs and the host cells showing the same expression levels as non-infected control cell. On the other hand, bacteria were capable of expressing specific proteins within infected cells. Infected macrophages cease proliferation and a fraction of them detached from the plate, transform to non-adhesive, monocyte-like cells with proliferative activity. Productive infection of P. salmonis into salmonid macrophage/monocyte cells in culture provides an excellent model for the study of host-pathogen interactions, almost unknown in the case of P. salmonis. Our results suggest that the infection of cells from the salmonid innate immune system without inducing an important cell death response should lead to the persistence of the bacteria and consequently their dissemination to other tissues, favoring the evasion of the first line of defense against pathogens. PMID:19681041

  13. Soluble factors from colonic epithelial cells contribute to gut homeostasis by modulating macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kristek, Maja; Collins, Laura E; DeCourcey, Joseph; McEvoy, Fiona A; Loscher, Christine E

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal macrophages originate from inflammatory blood monocytes which migrate to the intestine, where they differentiate into anti-inflammatory macrophages through a number of transitional stages. These macrophages typically remain hypo-responsive to commensal bacteria and food Ags in the intestine, yet also retain the ability to react to invading pathogens. In this study we examined the role of epithelial cells in inducing this intestinal macrophage phenotype. Using an in vitro system we showed that, in two-dimensional culture, epithelial cell-derived factors from a murine cell line, CMT-93, are sufficient to induce phenotypic changes in macrophages. Exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages, J774A.1, to soluble factors derived from epithelial cells, induced an altered phenotype similar to that of intestinal macrophages with decreased production of IL-12p40, IL-6 and IL-23 and expression of MHC ?? and CD80 following TLR ligation. Furthermore, these conditioned macrophages showed enhanced phagocytic activity in parallel with low respiratory burst and NO production, similar to the response seen in intestinal macrophages. Our findings suggest a role for colonic epithelial cells in modulation of macrophage phenotype for maintenance of gut homeostasis. Further understanding of the cell interactions that maintain homeostasis in the gut could reveal novel therapeutic strategies to restore the balance in disease. PMID:25298104

  14. Reduced immune cell responses on nano and submicron rough titanium.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    Current bare metal stents can be improved by nanotechnology to support the simultaneous acceleration of endothelialization and consequent reduction of immune cell responses after implantation. In our prior study, electron beam deposition was utilized to create different scales of roughness on titanium stents including flat (F-Ti), a mixture of nanometer and submicron (S-Ti), and nanometer (N-Ti). Enhanced endothelial responses (adhesion, migration, and nitric acid/endothelin-1 secretion) on nanometer to submicron rough titanium were observed compared to flat titanium. The present study aimed to further investigate the influence of nano and submicron titanium surface features on immune cells. Initial monocyte adhesion was found to be reduced on nano and submicron surface features compared to a flat surface. In a model including both endothelial cells and monocytes, it was proven that the submicron surface gave rise to an endothelial cell monolayer which generated the highest amount of NOx and subsequently led to decreased adhesiveness of endothelial cells to monocytes. The analysis of monocyte morphology gave hints to less differentiated monocytes on a submicron surface. Furthermore, the adhesion of and pro-inflammatory cytokine release from macrophages were all reduced on nano and submicron titanium surface features compared to a flat surface. This study, thus, suggests that nano and submicron titanium surfaces should be further studied for improved vascular stent performance. PMID:25660564

  15. Dickkopf-3 Contributes to the Regulation of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun-Hui; Tounsi, Amel; Shridhar, Naveen; Küblbeck, Günter; Klevenz, Alexandra; Prokosch, Sandra; Bald, Tobias; Tüting, Thomas; Arnold, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to limit immune responses in vivo by multiple soluble factors. Dickkopf-3 (DKK3), a secreted glycoprotein, has recently been identified as a novel immune modulator. Since DKK3 has been reported to be produced by MSCs, we investigated whether DKK3 contributes to the immune suppression of anti-tumor responses by MSCs. Whereas wild-type MSCs inhibited immune responses against two different transplantation tumors, DKK3-deficient MSCs did not affect the rejection process. Increased CD8+ T cell and reduced M2-type macrophages infiltration was observed in tumors inoculated together with DKK3-deficient MSCs. Thus, DKK3 could alter the composition of the tumor stroma, thereby supporting the MSCs-mediated suppression of immune responses against these tumor transplants. PMID:26734010

  16. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  17. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called "effector" proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires' disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host-cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  18. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; De Palma, Michele

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  19. Dissociation of skeletal muscle for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells in macaques.

    PubMed

    Liang, Frank; Ploquin, Aurlie; Hernndez, Jos DelaO; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Lindgren, Gustaf; Stanley, Daphne; Martinez, Aiala Salvador; Brenchley, Jason M; Koup, Richard A; Lor, Karin; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2015-10-01

    The majority of vaccines and several treatments are administered by intramuscular injection. The aim is to engage and activate immune cells, although they are rare in normal skeletal muscle. The phenotype and function of resident as well as infiltrating immune cells in the muscle after injection are largely unknown. While methods for obtaining and characterizing murine muscle cell suspensions have been reported, protocols for nonhuman primates (NHPs) have not been well defined. NHPs comprise important in vivo models for studies of immune cell function due to their high degree of resemblance with humans. In this study, we developed and systematically compared methods to collect vaccine-injected muscle tissue to be processed into single cell suspensions for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells. We found that muscle tissue processed by mechanical disruption alone resulted in significantly lower immune cell yields compared to enzymatic digestion using Liberase. Dendritic cell subsets, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, B cells, T cells and NK cells were readily detected in the muscle by the classic human markers. The methods for obtaining skeletal muscle cell suspension established here offer opportunities to increase the understanding of immune responses in the muscle, and provide a basis for defining immediate post-injection vaccine responses in primates. PMID:26099800

  20. The role of chemokines in recruitment of immune cells to the artery wall and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Surmi, Bonnie K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2010-01-01

    The role of the immune system is to recognize pathogens, tumor cells or dead cells and to react with a very specific and localized response. By taking advantage of a highly sophisticated system of chemokines and chemokine receptors, leukocytes such as neutrophils, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes are targeted to the precise location of inflammation. While this is a beneficial process for acute infection and inflammation, recruitment of immune cells to sites of chronic inflammation can be detrimental. It is becoming clear that these inflammatory cells play a significant role in the initiation and progression of metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis and insulin resistance by infiltrating the artery wall and adipose tissue (AT), respectively. Data from human studies indicate that elevated plasma levels of chemokines are correlated with these metabolic diseases. Recruitment of macrophages to the artery wall is well known to be one of the first steps in early atherosclerotic lesion formation. Likewise, recruitment of macrophages to AT is thought to contribute to insulin resistance associated with obesity. Based on this knowledge, much recent work in these areas has focused on the role of chemokines in attracting immune cells (monocytes/macrophages in particular) to these 2 sites. Thus, understanding the potential for chemokines to contribute to metabolic disease can help direct studies of chemokines as therapeutic targets. In this article, we will review current literature regarding the role of chemokines in atherosclerosis and obesity-related insulin resistance. We will focus on novel work showing that chemokine secretion from endothelial cells, platelets, and adipocytes can contribute to immune cell recruitment, with a diagram showing the time course of chemokine expression and leukocyte recruitment to AT. We will also highlight a few of the less-commonly known chemokine-chemokine receptor pairs. Finally, we will discuss the potential for chemokines as therapeutic targets for treatment of atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. PMID:20026286

  1. Transfer of extracellular vesicles during immune cell-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Mittelbrunn, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transfer of molecules between cells during cognate immune cell interactions has been reported, and recently a novel mechanism of transfer of proteins and genetic material such as small RNA between T cells and APCs has been described, involving exchange of extracellular vesicles (EVs) during the formation of the immunological synapse (IS). EVs – a term that encompasses exosomes and microvesicles – have been implicated in cell-cell communication during immune responses associated with tumors, pathogens, allergies and autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on EV transfer as a mechanism for the exchange of molecules during immune cell-cell interactions. PMID:23278745

  2. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyeongjin

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  3. Keratinocyte growth factor augments pulmonary innate immunity through epithelium-driven, GM-CSF-dependent paracrine activation of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huixing; Suzuki, Takuji; Carey, Brenna; Trapnell, Bruce C; McCormack, Francis X

    2011-04-29

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is an epithelial mitogen that has been reported to protect the lungs from a variety of insults. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that KGF augments pulmonary host defense. We found that a single dose of intrapulmonary KGF enhanced the clearance of Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa instilled into the lungs 24 h later. KGF augmented the recruitment, phagocytic activity, and oxidant responses of alveolar macrophages, including lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide release and zymosan-induced superoxide production. Less robust alveolar macrophage recruitment and activation was observed in mice treated with intraperitoneal KGF. KGF treatment was associated with increased levels of MIP1γ, LIX, VCAM, IGFBP-6, and GM-CSF in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Of these, only GM-CSF recapitulated in vitro the macrophage activation phenotype seen in the KGF-treated animals. The KGF-stimulated increase in GM-CSF levels in lung tissue and alveolar lining fluid arose from the epithelium, peaked within 1 h, and was associated with STAT5 phosphorylation in alveolar macrophages, consistent with epithelium-driven paracrine activation of macrophage signaling through the KGF receptor/GM-CSF/GM-CSF receptor/JAK-STAT axis. Enhanced bacterial clearance did not occur in response to KGF administration in GM-CSF(-/-) mice, or in mice treated with a neutralizing antibody to GM-CSF. We conclude that KGF enhances alveolar host defense through GM-CSF-stimulated macrophage activation. KGF administration may constitute a promising therapeutic strategy to augment innate immune defenses in refractory pulmonary infections. PMID:21343299

  4. Lipids from Mycobacterium leprae cell wall are endowed with an anti-inflammatory property and inhibit macrophage function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moura, A C; Mariano, M

    1996-12-01

    In general, the majority of bacteria are pre-inflammatory when injected in experimental animals. However, Mycobacterium leprae has no inflammatory effect when injected into mouse footpad, but using the delipidated mycobacteria we observed a mild significant increase in footpad oedema. Other mycobacteria, Mycobacterium bovis-BCG or M. tuberculosis induce a strong paw oedema. Furthermore, M. leprae reduced locally the BCG-induced inflammatory reaction in mouse footpad, whereas delipidated M. leprae did not influence this reaction. Both M. leprae and M. leprae cell wall lipids blocked immune phagocytosis in vivo by inflammatory macrophages (from an induced focus). In contrast delipidated M. leprae stimulated the phagocytosis reaction. Neither intact M. leprae. delipidated M. leprae, nor its lipids had any toxic effect on macrophages or on cell migration. Although M. leprae did not interfere on cell influx and cell type in an induced-inflammatory site, this mycobacterium led to the appearance of a distinct cell population in vivo. The hypothesis is that M. leprae would transform macrophages in epithelioid cells, suggested by morphology analysis of cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorter and observed under optic microscopy. PMID:9014830

  5. T Cell Immune Reconstitution Following Lymphodepletion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten; Hakim, Frances T.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    T cell reconstitution following lymphopenia from chemotherapy or stem cell transplant is often slow and incompetent, contributing to the development of infectious diseases, relapse, and graft-versus-host disease. This is due to the fact that de novo T cell production is impaired following cytoreductive regimens. T cells can be generated from two pathways: 1) thymus derived through active thymopoiesis and 2) peripherally expanded clones through homeostatic proliferation. In the development of lymphopenia, the thymic pathway is commonly compromised in adults and T cells rely upon peripheral expansion to recover T cell numbers. This homeostatic proliferation exploits the high cytokine levels following lymphopenia to rapidly generate T cells in the periphery. Moreover, this early peripheral expansion of T cells can also be driven by exogenous antigen. This results in loss of T cell repertoire diversity and may predispose to auto- or alloimmunity. Alternatively, the high homeostatic proliferation following lymphopenia may facilitate expansion of anti-tumor immunity. Murine and human studies have provided insight into the cytokine and cellular regulators of these two pathways of T cell generation and the disparate portraits of T cell immunity created through robust thymopoiesis or peripheral expansion following lymphopenia. This insight has permitted the manipulation of the immune system to maximize anti-tumor immunity through lymphopenia and led to an appreciation of mechanisms that underlie graft vs. host disease. PMID:18023361

  6. Pituitary dendritic cells communicate immune pathogenic signals.

    PubMed

    Glennon, Erin; Kaunzner, Ulrike W; Gagnidze, Khatuna; McEwen, Bruce S; Bulloch, Karen

    2015-11-01

    This study reveals the presence of dendritic cells (DCs) in the pituitary gland, which play a role in communicating immune activation to the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Using enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eyfp) expression as a reporter for CD11c, a marker of DCs, we demonstrate anatomically the presence of CD11c/eyfp+ cells throughout the pituitary. Flow cytometric analysis shows that the predominant cellular phenotype of pituitary CD11c/eyfp+ cells resembles that of non-lymphoid DCs. In vivo and in vitro immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates these pituitary CD11c/eyfp+ DCs, but not eyfp(neg) cells, to increase levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. In vivo analysis of plasma glucocorticoid (GC) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels at this early phase of the immune response to LPS suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs within the pituitary may activate the release of GCs from the adrenals via ACTH. Pituitary CD11c/eyfp+ cells also express annexin A1 (ANXA1), indicating a role in GC signal attenuation. In summary, our data demonstrate that a resident DC population of the pituitary gland coordinates GC release in the early phase of systemic immune activation, thereby providing an essential immune signaling sentinel for the initial shaping of the systemic immune response to LPS. PMID:26188188

  7. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nicholas J.; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer. PMID:26884646

  8. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nicholas J; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer. PMID:26884646

  9. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators.

    PubMed

    Orona, N S; Tasat, D R

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5-200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO? 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO?. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O??). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O?? may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O?? may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium-related diseases. PMID:22561334

  10. Nanoparticle-induced exosomes target antigen-presenting cells to initiate Th1-type immune activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Motao; Tian, Xin; Song, Xiao; Li, Yiye; Tian, Yanhua; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-09-24

    The mechanisms associated with the induction of systemic immune responses by nanoparticles are not fully understood, but their elucidation is critical to address safety issues associated with the broader medical application of nanotechnology. In this study, a key role of nanoparticle-induced exosomes (extracellularly secreted membrane vesicles) as signaling mediators in the induction of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune activation is demonstrated. In vivo exposure to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) results in significant exosome generation in the alveolar region of Balb/c mice. These act as a source of nanoparticle-induced, membrane-bound antigen/signaling cargo, which transfer their components to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the reticuloendothelial system. Through exosome-initiated signals, immature dendritic cells (iDCs) undergo maturation and differentiation to the DC1 subtype, while macrophages go through classical activation and differentiation to the M1 subtype. Simultaneously, iDCs and macrophages release various Th1 cytokines (including interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor ?) driving T-cell activation and differentiation. Activated APCs (especially DC1 and M1 subtypes) consequently prime T-cell differentiation towards a Th1 subtype, thereby resulting in an orchestrated Th1-type immune response. Th1-polarized immune activation is associated with delayed-type hypersensitivity, which might underlie the long-term inflammatory effects frequently associated with nanoparticle exposure. These studies suggest that nanoparticle-induced exosomes provoke the immune activation and inflammatory responses that can accompany nanoparticle exposure. PMID:22674628

  11. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  12. Antitumor immune responses mediated by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; Nierkens, Stefan; Boes, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the induction of adaptive immune responses against malignant cells by virtue of their capacity to effectively cross-present exogenous antigens to T lymphocytes. Dying cancer cells are indeed a rich source of antigens that may be harnessed for the development of DC-based vaccines. In particular, malignant cells succumbing to apoptosis, rather than necrosis, appear to release antigens in a manner that allows for the elicitation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we describe the processes that mediate the cross-presentation of antigens released by apoptotic cancer cells to CD8+ T lymphocytes, resulting in the activation of protective tumor-specific immune responses. PMID:24482744

  13. Modeling of cell signaling pathways in macrophages by semantic networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Michael; Bellenson, Joel L; Shankey, Conor; Cherkasov, Artem

    2004-01-01

    Background Substantial amounts of data on cell signaling, metabolic, gene regulatory and other biological pathways have been accumulated in literature and electronic databases. Conventionally, this information is stored in the form of pathway diagrams and can be characterized as highly "compartmental" (i.e. individual pathways are not connected into more general networks). Current approaches for representing pathways are limited in their capacity to model molecular interactions in their spatial and temporal context. Moreover, the critical knowledge of cause-effect relationships among signaling events is not reflected by most conventional approaches for manipulating pathways. Results We have applied a semantic network (SN) approach to develop and implement a model for cell signaling pathways. The semantic model has mapped biological concepts to a set of semantic agents and relationships, and characterized cell signaling events and their participants in the hierarchical and spatial context. In particular, the available information on the behaviors and interactions of the PI3K enzyme family has been integrated into the SN environment and a cell signaling network in human macrophages has been constructed. A SN-application has been developed to manipulate the locations and the states of molecules and to observe their actions under different biological scenarios. The approach allowed qualitative simulation of cell signaling events involving PI3Ks and identified pathways of molecular interactions that led to known cellular responses as well as other potential responses during bacterial invasions in macrophages. Conclusions We concluded from our results that the semantic network is an effective method to model cell signaling pathways. The semantic model allows proper representation and integration of information on biological structures and their interactions at different levels. The reconstruction of the cell signaling network in the macrophage allowed detailed investigation of connections among various essential molecules and reflected the cause-effect relationships among signaling events. The simulation demonstrated the dynamics of the semantic network, where a change of states on a molecule can alter its function and potentially cause a chain-reaction effect in the system. PMID:15494071

  14. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages enhances the anti-tumor immunity induced by a Toll-like receptor agonist-conjugated peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kuan-Yin; Song, Ying-Chyi; Chen, I-Hua; Chong, Pele; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that lipopeptides can be used to elicit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral diseases and cancer. In our previous study, we determined that mono-palmitoylated peptides can enhance anti-tumor responses in the absence of adjuvant activity. To investigate whether di-palmitoylated peptides with TLR2 agonist activity are able to induce anti-tumor immunity, we synthesized a di-palmitic acid-conjugated long peptide that contains a murine CTL epitope of HPV E749–57 (Pam2IDG). Pam2IDG stimulated the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through TLR2/6. After immunization, Pam2IDG induced higher levels of T cell responses than those obtained with its non-lipidated counterpart (IDG). In the prophylactic model, Pam2IDG immunization completely inhibited tumor growth, whereas IDG immunization was unable to inhibit tumor growth. However, Pam2IDG immunization could not effectively inhibit the growth of established tumors. Therefore, we further investigated whether the depletion of immunosuppressive factors could improve the therapeutic effects of Pam2IDG. Our data indicate that treatment with Pam2IDG combined with clodronate/liposome delays tumor growth and increases the survival rate. We also observed that the therapeutic effects of Pam2IDG are improved by diminishing the function of tumor-associate macrophages (TAMs) and through the use of an IL10 receptor blocking antibody or a Cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) inhibitor. In conclusion, the depletion of TAMs may enhance the anti-tumor immunity of a TLR2 agonist-conjugated peptide. PMID:25483652

  15. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Activates Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Signaling To Block Apoptotic Cell Death in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is an intrinsic immune defense mechanism in the host response to microbial infection. Not surprisingly, many pathogens have evolved various strategies to manipulate this important pathway to benefit their own survival and dissemination in the host during infection. To our knowledge, no attempts have been made to explore the host cell survival signals modulated by the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. Here, we show for the first time that during early stages of infection, internalized enterococci can prevent host cell (RAW264.7 cells, primary macrophages, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts [MEFs]) apoptosis induced by a wide spectrum of proapoptotic stimuli. Activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of the caspase 3 substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase were inhibited in E. faecalis-infected cells, indicating that E. faecalis protects macrophages from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase 3 activation. This antiapoptotic activity in E. faecalis-infected cells was dependent on the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which resulted in the increased expression of the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 and decreased expression of the proapoptotic factor Bax. Further analysis revealed that active E. faecalis physiology was important for inhibition of host cell apoptosis, and this feature seemed to be a strain-independent trait among E. faecalis isolates. Employing a mouse peritonitis model, we also determined that cells collected from the peritoneal lavage fluid of E. faecalis-infected mice showed reduced levels of apoptosis compared to cells from uninfected mice. These results show early modulation of apoptosis during infection and have important implications for enterococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25267834

  16. Macrophages are crucial for epithelial cell death and adipocyte repopulation during mammary gland involution.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jenean; Martinson, Holly; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Schedin, Pepper

    2012-01-01

    Mammary gland development is dependent on macrophages, as demonstrated by their requirement during the expansion phases of puberty and pregnancy. Equally dramatic tissue restructuring occurs following lactation, when the gland regresses to a state that histologically resembles pre-pregnancy through massive programmed epithelial cell death and stromal repopulation. Postpartum involution is characterized by wound healing-like events, including an influx of macrophages with M2 characteristics. Macrophage levels peak after the initial wave of epithelial cell death, suggesting that initiation and execution of cell death are macrophage independent. To address the role of macrophages during weaning-induced mammary gland involution, conditional systemic deletion of macrophages expressing colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was initiated just prior to weaning in the Mafia mouse model. Depletion of CSF1R(+) macrophages resulted in delayed mammary involution as evidenced by loss of lysosomal-mediated and apoptotic epithelial cell death, lack of alveolar regression and absence of adipocyte repopulation 7 days post-weaning. Failure to execute involution occurred in the presence of milk stasis and STAT3 activation, indicating that neither is sufficient to initiate involution in the absence of CSF1R(+) macrophages. Injection of wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) or M2-differentiated macrophages into macrophage-depleted mammary glands was sufficient to rescue involution, including apoptosis, alveolar regression and adipocyte repopulation. BMDMs exposed to the postpartum mammary involution environment upregulated the M2 markers arginase 1 and mannose receptor. These data demonstrate the necessity of macrophages, and implicate M2-polarized macrophages, for epithelial cell death during normal postpartum mammary gland involution. PMID:22129827

  17. Ca2+ Signaling but Not Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Is Required for the Function of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Zee, Isabelle; Concepcion, Axel R; Maus, Mate; Shaw, Patrick; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Zahra, Aleena; Kozhaya, Lina; Weidinger, Carl; Philips, Jennifer; Unutmaz, Derya; Feske, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels is essential for immunity to infection. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins in the plasma membrane and activated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM)1 and STIM2 in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 genes that abolish SOCE cause severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections due to impaired T cell function. SOCE has also been observed in cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) and may provide Ca(2+) signals required for their function. The specific role of SOCE in macrophage and DC function, as well as its contribution to innate immunity, however, is not well defined. We found that nonselective inhibition of Ca(2+) signaling strongly impairs many effector functions of bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow-derived DCs, including phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, and priming of T cells. Surprisingly, however, macrophages and DCs from mice with conditional deletion of Stim1 and Stim2 genes, and therefore complete inhibition of SOCE, showed no major functional defects. Their differentiation, FcR-dependent and -independent phagocytosis, phagolysosome fusion, cytokine production, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and their ability to present Ags to activate T cells were preserved. Our findings demonstrate that STIM1, STIM2, and SOCE are dispensable for many critical effector functions of macrophages and DCs, which has important implications for CRAC channel inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to suppress pathogenic T cells while not interfering with myeloid cell functions required for innate immunity. PMID:26109647

  18. The Metabolic Prospective and Redox Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Carter, A Brent

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage plasticity is an important feature of these innate immune cells. Macrophage phenotypes are divided into two categories, the classically activated macrophages (CAM, M1 phenotype) and the alternatively activated macrophages (AAM, M2 phenotype). M1 macrophages are commonly associated with the generation of proinflammatory cytokines, whereas M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory and often associated with tumor progression and fibrosis development. Macrophages produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence suggests ROS can potentially regulate macrophage phenotype. In addition, macrophages phenotypes are closely related to their metabolic patterns, particularly fatty acid/cholesterol metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in macrophage polarization with special attention to their relevance to specific disease conditions and metabolic regulation of polarization. Understanding these metabolic switches can facilitate the development of targeted therapies for various diseases. PMID:26962470

  19. B Cells Modulate Mucosal Associated Invariant T Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Rezwan, Tasmia; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2014-01-01

    A common finding when measuring?T cell immunity to enteric bacterial vaccines in humans is the presence of background responses among individuals before immunization. Yet the nature of these background responses remains largely unknown. Recent findings show the presence in uninfected individuals of mucosal associated invariant?T (MAIT) cells that mount broad spectrum immune responses against a variety of microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Therefore, we investigated whether MAIT immune responses to intestinal bacteria might account for the background responses observed before immunization. Here we measured MAIT immune responses to commensal and enteric pathogenic bacteria in healthy individuals with no history of oral immunization with enteric bacteria. We found that MAIT cells were activated by B cells infected with various bacteria strains (commensals and pathogens from the Enterobacteriaceae family), but not by uninfected cells. These responses were restricted by the non-classical MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1) and involved the endocytic pathway. The quality of these responses (i.e., cytokine profile) was dependent on bacterial load but not on the level expression of MR1 or bacterial antigen on B cell surface, suggesting that a threshold level of MR1 expression is required to trigger MAIT activation. These results provide important insights into the role of B cells as a source of antigen-presenting cells to MAIT cells and the gut immune surveillance of commensal microbiota. PMID:24432025

  20. Role of immune cells in animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Wang Ip, Chi; Kroner, Antje; Fischer, Stefan; Berghoff, Martin; Kobsar, Igor; Murer, Mathias; Martini, Rudolf

    2006-01-01

    Mice expressing half of the normal dose of protein zero (P0+/- mice) or completely deficient gap-junction protein connexin 32 -/- mice mimic demyelinating forms of inherited neuropathies, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies type 1B and CMT type 1X, respectively. In both models, an almost normal myelin formation is observed during the first months of life, followed by a slowly progressing demyelinating neuropathy. In both models, there is a substantial increase of CD8+ T-lymphocytes and macrophages within the demyelinating nerves. Recently, this has also been observed in mice mildly overexpressing human peripheral myelin protein 22 kD mimicking the most common form of CMT, CMT type 1A. In all demyelinating models, the macrophages show close contacts with intact myelin sheaths or demyelinated axons, suggesting an active role of these cells in myelin degeneration. Additionally, fibroblast-like cells contact macrophages, suggesting a functional role of fibroblast-like cells in macrophage activation. By cross-breeding P0+/- and gap-junction protein connexin 32-/- mice with immunodeficient recombination activating gene-1-deficient mutants, a substantial alleviation of the demyelinating phenotype was observed. Similarly, cross-breeding of P0+/- mice with mutants with a defect in macrophage activation led to an alleviated phenotype as well. These findings demonstrate that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating neuropathies. In contrast, in P0-/- mice, which display a compromised myelin compaction and axonal loss from onset, immune cells appear to have a neuroprotective effect because cross-breeding with recombination activating gene-1 mutants leads to an aggravation of axonopathic changes. In the present review, we discuss the influence of the immune system on inherited de- and dysmyelination regarding disease mechanisms and possible clinical implications. PMID:16775375

  1. Lung interstitial macrophages alter dendritic cell functions to prevent airway allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bedoret, Denis; Wallemacq, Hugues; Marichal, Thomas; Desmet, Christophe; Quesada Calvo, Florence; Henry, Emmanuelle; Closset, Rodrigue; Dewals, Benjamin; Thielen, Caroline; Gustin, Pascal; de Leval, Laurence; Van Rooijen, Nico; Le Moine, Alain; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Cataldo, Didier; Drion, Pierre-Vincent; Moser, Muriel; Lekeux, Pierre; Bureau, Fabrice

    2009-12-01

    The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC-driven Th2 cell response to harmless inhaled antigens, thereby promoting allergic asthma. However, only a small fraction of people exposed to environmental LPS develop allergic asthma. What prevents most people from mounting a lung DC-driven Th2 response upon exposure to LPS is not understood. Here we have shown that lung interstitial macrophages (IMs), a cell population with no previously described in vivo function, prevent induction of a Th2 response in mice challenged with LPS and an experimental harmless airborne antigen. IMs, but not alveolar macrophages, were found to produce high levels of IL-10 and to inhibit LPS-induced maturation and migration of DCs loaded with the experimental harmless airborne antigen in an IL-10-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that specific in vivo elimination of IMs led to overt asthmatic reactions to innocuous airborne antigens inhaled with low doses of LPS. This study has revealed a crucial role for IMs in maintaining immune homeostasis in the respiratory tract and provides an explanation for the paradox that although airborne LPS has the ability to promote the induction of Th2 responses by lung DCs, it does not provoke airway allergy under normal conditions. PMID:19907079