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Sample records for immunization procedures directed

  1. A direct element resequencing procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, J. E.; Fulford, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Element by element frontal solution algorithms are utilized in many of the existing finite element codes. The overall computational efficiency of this type of procedure is directly related to the element data input sequence. Thus, it is important to have a pre-processor which will resequence these data so as to reduce the element wavefronts to be encountered in the solution algorithm. A direct element resequencing algorithm is detailed for reducing element wavefronts. It also generates computational by products that can be utilized in pre-front calculations and in various post-processors. Sample problems are presented and compared with other algorithms.

  2. 26 CFR 301.7507-8 - Procedure during immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure during immunity. 301.7507-8 Section... States § 301.7507-8 Procedure during immunity. (a) Statements to be filed. As long as complete or partial immunity is claimed, a bank within section 7507(b) shall file with each income tax return a statement...

  3. 26 CFR 301.7507-8 - Procedure during immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure during immunity. 301.7507-8 Section... States § 301.7507-8 Procedure during immunity. (a) Statements to be filed. As long as complete or partial immunity is claimed, a bank within section 7507(b) shall file with each income tax return a statement...

  4. 26 CFR 301.7507-8 - Procedure during immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure during immunity. 301.7507-8 Section... States § 301.7507-8 Procedure during immunity. (a) Statements to be filed. As long as complete or partial immunity is claimed, a bank within section 7507(b) shall file with each income tax return a statement...

  5. 26 CFR 301.7507-8 - Procedure during immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure during immunity. 301.7507-8 Section... States § 301.7507-8 Procedure during immunity. (a) Statements to be filed. As long as complete or partial immunity is claimed, a bank within section 7507(b) shall file with each income tax return a statement...

  6. 26 CFR 301.7507-8 - Procedure during immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure during immunity. 301.7507-8 Section... States § 301.7507-8 Procedure during immunity. (a) Statements to be filed. As long as complete or partial immunity is claimed, a bank within section 7507(b) shall file with each income tax return a statement...

  7. Direct Manipulation and Procedural Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, David

    Arguing that understanding what lies behind the apparent usability of direct manipulation style interfaces might not only help in building better interfaces, but can also draw attention to possible side effects, this paper uses examples from a prototype data manipulation system to pursue a characterization of direct manipulation interfaces as…

  8. 75 FR 29915 - Direct Final Rulemaking Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476) or you may visit http://dms.dot.gov . FOR... Transportation published a final rule adopting direct final rule procedures (69 FR 4455) and the Federal Railroad Administration published a final rule adopting direct final rule ] procedures on March 7, 2007 (72 FR...

  9. Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crewmember Immune Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond; Mehta, Satish; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2008-01-01

    There is ample evidence to suggest that space flight leads to immune system dysregulation. This may be a result of microgravity, confinement, physiological stress, radiation, environment or other mission-associated factors. The clinical risk (if any) from prolonged immune dysregulation during exploration-class space flight has not yet been determined, but may include increased incidence of infection, allergy, hypersensitivity, hematological malignancy or altered wound healing. Each of the clinical events resulting from immune dysfunction has the potential to impact mission critical objectives during exploration-class missions. To date, precious little in-flight immune data has been generated to assess this phenomenon. The majority of recent flight immune studies have been post-flight assessments, which may not accurately reflect the in-flight status of immunity as it resolves over prolonged flight. There are no procedures currently in place to monitor immune function or its effect on crew health. The objective of this Supplemental Medical Objective (SMO) is to develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. This SMO will assess immunity, latent viral reactivation and physiological stress during both short and long duration flights. Upon completion, it is expected that any clinical risks resulting from the adverse effects of space flight on the human immune system will have been determined. In addition, a flight-compatible immune monitoring strategy will have been developed with which countermeasures validation could be performed. This study will determine, to the best level allowed by current technology, the in-flight status of crewmembers' immune systems. The in-flight samples will allow a distinction between legitimate in-flight alterations and the physiological stresses of landing and readaptation which are believed to alter R+0 assessments. The overall status of the immune system during flight

  10. Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crewmember Immune Function SDBI-1900, SMO-015 - Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond; Mehta, Satish; Uchakin, Peter; Nehlsen-Cannarella, Sandra; Morukov, Boris; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2007-01-01

    There is ample evidence to suggest that space flight leads to immune system dysregulation. This may be a result of microgravity, confinement, physiological stress, radiation, environment or other mission-associated factors. The clinical risk from prolonged immune dysregulation during space flight are not yet determined, but may include increased incidence of infection, allergy, hypersensitivity, hematological malignancy or altered wound healing. Each of the clinical events resulting from immune dysfunction has the potential to impact mission critical objectives during exploration-class missions. To date, precious little in-flight immune data has been generated to assess this phenomenon. The majority of recent flight immune studies have been post-flight assessments, which may not accurately reflect the in-flight condition. There are no procedures currently in place to monitor immune function or its effect on crew health. The objective of this Supplemental Medical Objective (SMO) is to develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. This SMO will assess the clinical risks resulting from the adverse effects of space flight on the human immune system and will validate a flight-compatible immune monitoring strategy. Characterization of the clinical risk and the development of a monitoring strategy are necessary prerequisite activities prior to validating countermeasures. This study will determine, to the best level allowed by current technology, the in-flight status of crewmembers immune system. Pre-flight, in-flight and post-flight assessments of immune status, immune function, viral reactivation and physiological stress will be performed. The in-flight samples will allow a distinction between legitimate in-flight alterations and the physiological stresses of landing and readaptation which are believed to alter landing day assessments. The overall status of the immune system during flight (activation

  11. Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crewmember Immune Function - Short Duration Biological Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond; Pierson, Duane; Mehta, Satish; Morukov, Boris; Uchakin, Peter; Nehlsen-Cannarella, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crew Member Immune Function - Short Duration Biological Investigation (Integrated Immune-SDBI) will assess the clinical risks resulting from the adverse effects of space flight on the human immune system and will validate a flightcompatible immune monitoring strategy. Immune system changes will be monitored by collecting and analyzing blood, urine and saliva samples from crewmembers before, during and after space flight.

  12. 24 CFR 291.210 - Direct sales procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Direct sales procedures. 291.210... URBAN DEVELOPMENT HUD-OWNED PROPERTIES DISPOSITION OF HUD-ACQUIRED SINGLE FAMILY PROPERTY Sales Procedures § 291.210 Direct sales procedures. When HUD conducts the sales listed in § 291.90(c), it will...

  13. Bi-directional communication: Growth and immunity in domestic livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence continues to mount supporting the existence of bi-directional communication pathways between the animal’s growth axis and immune system. For more than three decades, researchers have sought, and identified, linkages between the somatotrophic axis and health in domestic livestock. Early inve...

  14. Bi-Directional Communication: Growth and Immunity in Domestic Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence continues to mount supporting the existence of bi-directional communication pathways between the animal’s growth axis and immune system. For more than three decades, researchers have sought, and identified, linkages between the somatotrophic axis and health in domestic livestock. Early inve...

  15. 78 FR 18285 - Direct Final Rulemaking Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Transportation's (DOT) complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... would be useful to its rulemaking activities. \\1\\ 69 FR 4455. \\2\\ See 70 FR 67318 (FTA), 72 FR 10086 (FRA), and 75 FR 29915 (FMCSA). Notice and comment rulemaking procedures are not required under...

  16. Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crewmember Immune Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this Supplemental Medical Objective (SMO) is to determine the status of the immune system, physiological stress and latent viral reactivation (a clinical outcome that can be measured) during both short and long-duration spaceflight. In addition, this study will develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. Pre-mission, in-flight and post-flight blood and saliva samples will be obtained from participating crewmembers. Assays included peripheral immunophenotype, T cell function, cytokine profiles, viral-specific immunity, latent viral reactivation (EBV, CMV, VZV), and stress hormone measurements. To date, 18 short duration (now completed) and 8 long-duration crewmembers have completed the study. The long-duration phase of this study is ongoing. For this presentation, the final data set for the short duration subjects will be discussed.

  17. 49 CFR 389.39 - Direct final rulemaking procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 389.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS RULEMAKING PROCEDURES-FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS Procedures for Adoption of Rules § 389.39 Direct...

  18. 49 CFR 389.39 - Direct final rulemaking procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 389.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS RULEMAKING PROCEDURES-FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS Procedures for Adoption of Rules § 389.39 Direct...

  19. 19 CFR 146.39 - Direct delivery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Direct delivery procedures. 146.39 Section 146.39 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Admission of Merchandise to a Zone § 146.39 Direct...

  20. 19 CFR 146.39 - Direct delivery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Direct delivery procedures. 146.39 Section 146.39 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Admission of Merchandise to a Zone § 146.39 Direct...

  1. 19 CFR 146.39 - Direct delivery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Direct delivery procedures. 146.39 Section 146.39 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Admission of Merchandise to a Zone § 146.39 Direct...

  2. 19 CFR 146.39 - Direct delivery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Direct delivery procedures. 146.39 Section 146.39 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Admission of Merchandise to a Zone § 146.39 Direct...

  3. 19 CFR 146.39 - Direct delivery procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct delivery procedures. 146.39 Section 146.39 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Admission of Merchandise to a Zone § 146.39 Direct...

  4. Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crewmember Immune Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond; Mehta, Satish; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence to suggest that space flight leads to immune system dysregulation, however the nature of the phenomenon as it equilibrates over longer flights has not been determined. This dysregulation may be a result of microgravity, confinement, physiological stress, radiation, environment or other mission-associated factors. The clinical risk (if any) for exploration-class space flight is unknown, but may include increased incidence of infection, allergy, hypersensitivity, hematological malignancy or altered wound healing. The objective of this Supplemental Medical Objective (SMO) is to determine the status of the immune system, physiological stress and latent viral reactivation (a clinical outcome that can be measured) during both short and long-duration spaceflight. In addition, this study will develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. Pre-mission, in-flight and post-flight blood and saliva samples will be obtained from participating crewmembers. Assays included peripheral immunophenotype, T cell function, cytokine profiles (RNA, intracellular, secreted), viral-specific immunity, latent viral reactivation (EBV, CMV, VZV), and stress hormone measurements. This study is currently ongoing. To date, 10 short duration and 5 long-duration crewmembers have completed the study. Technically, the study is progressing well. In-flight blood samples are being collected, and returned for analysis, including functional assays that require live cells. For all in-flight samples to date, sample viability has been acceptable. Preliminary data (n = 4/7; long/short duration, respectively) indicate that distribution of most peripheral leukocyte subsets is largely unaltered during flight. Exceptions include elevated T cells, reduced B/NK cells, increased memory T cells and increased central memory CD8+ T cells. General T cell function, early blastogenesis response to mitogenic stimulation, is markedly

  5. Using Response-Prompting Procedures during Small-Group Direct Instruction: Outcomes and Procedural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Lane, Justin D.; Elam, Katherine L.; Wolery, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Research was reviewed on small-group instruction for learners with disabilities. The review was conducted for articles published between 1990 and 2010 on the application of small-group direct instruction to teach discrete skills using prompting procedures. A total of 47 articles with 197 participants and 687 replications of effects was located.…

  6. Fast AT: A simple procedure for quasi direct orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez, M.; Colomina, I.

    2012-07-01

    Over the past two decades, the development of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology, inertial navigation technology and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) and their application to sensor orientation in photogrammetry and remote sensing has led to more precise, accurate, reliable and cost efficient orientation and calibration methods and procedures. Today, most airborne photogrammetric and remote sensing systems are equipped with GNSS receivers and inertial sensors. To a large extent and more or less independently from the imaging geometry and sensor type, orientation is performed with the "direct" and "integrated" methods. In this paper we introduce a new orientation method that we call "Fast AT" for frame images. The new method combines image measurements, ground control and aerial control observations in novel quantitative and qualitative ways. Depending on project specifications, Fast AT can be a robust alternative to direct orientation and, at the very least, a fast quality control tool for any orientation task. We analyze the performance of Fast AT with analogue and digital frame imagery and draw conclusions on its general properties.

  7. Humoral immune response directed against LEDGF in patients with VKH.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Senju, S; Shinohara, T; Nakatsura, T; Murata, Y; Ishihara, M; Nakamura, S; Ohno, S; Negi, A; Nishimura, Y

    2001-10-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. In Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, inflammatory disorders occur in multiple organs containing melanocytes, including uvea (resulting in acute bilateral panuveitis), skin (resulting in vitiligo and alopecia), central nervous system (resulting in meningitis) and inner ears (resulting in hearing loss and tinnitus). These inflammatory aspects are attributed to the destruction of melanocytes through immunological mechanisms. Studies have been carried out to elucidate the exact etiology and target autoantigen in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, but much remains to be investigated. Identification of target autoantigen is important to understand the etiology of autoimmune diseases, and for development of antigen-specific immuno-modulation therapy. To identify the target autoantigens in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, we made use of an immunoscreening of a bovine uveal cDNA expression library with serum samples obtained from patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. We identified an immunoreactive cDNA clone that encodes bovine lens epithelium derived growth factor. mRNA of human lens epithelium derived growth factor was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and it was expressed in human uvea, retina and melanocytes. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies were quantitated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using recombinant human lens epithelium derived growth factor. The prevalence of IgG anti-lens epithelium derived growth factor autoantibodies in patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (66.7% versus 21.6%, P<0.001). On the other hand, the prevalence of the autoantibody in patients with panuveitis of other etiology, Behçet's disease and sarcoidosis, was almost same as that in healthy controls. These results suggest that the humoral immune response agonist lens epithelium derived growth factor is not a mere secondary phenomena

  8. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  9. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  10. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  11. Coping strategies and immune neglect in affective forecasting: Direct evidence and key moderators

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Affective forecasting skills have important implications for decision making. However, recent research suggests that immune neglect – the tendency to overlook coping strategies that reduce future distress – may lead to affective forecasting problems. Prior evidence for immune neglect has been indirect. More direct evidence and a deeper understanding of immune neglect are vital to informing the design of future decision-support interventions. In the current study, young adults (N = 325) supplied predicted, actual, and recollected reactions to an emotionally-evocative interpersonal event, Valentine’s Day. Based on participants’ qualitative descriptions of the holiday, a team of raters reliably coded the effectiveness of their coping strategies. Supporting the immune neglect hypothesis, participants overlooked the powerful role of coping strategies when predicting their emotional reactions. Immune neglect was present not only for those experiencing the holiday negatively (non-daters) but also for those experiencing it positively (daters), suggesting that the bias may be more robust than originally theorized. Immune neglect was greater for immediate emotional reactions than more enduring reactions. Further, immune neglect was conspicuously absent from recollected emotional reactions. Implications for decision-support interventions are discussed. PMID:22375161

  12. MEMS reagent and sample handling procedure: Feasibility of viral antibody detection by passive immune agglutination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. D.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to develop a test requiring no preadsorption steps for the assessment of antibodies to rubella and mumps viruses using the passive immune agglutination (PIA) method. Both rubella and mumps antigens and antibodies were prepared. Direct PIA tests, using rubella antigen-coated beads, and indirect PIA tests, using rubella antibody-coated beads, were investigated. Attempts, using either method, were unsuccessful. Serum interference along with nonspecific agglutination of beads by the rubella antigen resulted in no specific response under the test conditions investigated. A new, highly sensitive approach, the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test system, is recommended to overcome the nonspecificity. This system is a logical outgrowth of some of the solid phase work done on MEMS and represents the next generation tests system that can be directly applied to early disease detection and monitoring.

  13. Direct ubiquitination of pattern recognition receptor FLS2 attenuates plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongping; Lin, Wenwei; Gao, Xiquan; Wu, Shujing; Cheng, Cheng; Avila, Julian; Heese, Antje; Devarenne, Timothy P.; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune responses are triggered by the activation of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). The Arabidopsis PRR FLS2 senses bacterial flagellin and initiates immune signaling by association with BAK1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the attenuation of FLS2 activation are largely unknown. We report that flagellin induces recruitment of two closely related U-box E3 ubiquitin ligases PUB12 and PUB13 to FLS2 receptor complex in Arabidopsis. BAK1 phosphorylates PUB12/13 and is required for FLS2-PUB12/13 association. PUB12/13 polyubiquitinate FLS2 and promote flagellin-induced FLS2 degradation, and the pub12 and pub13 mutants displayed elevated immune responses to flagellin treatment. Our study has revealed a unique regulatory circuit of direct ubiquitination and turnover of FLS2 by BAK1-mediated phosphorylation and recruitment of specific E3 ligases for attenuation of immune signaling. PMID:21680842

  14. A design procedure and handling quality criteria for lateral directional flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, G.; Henke, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    A practical design procedure for aircraft augmentation systems is described based on quadratic optimal control technology and handling-quality-oriented cost functionals. The procedure is applied to the design of a lateral-directional control system for the F4C aircraft. The design criteria, design procedure, and final control system are validated with a program of formal pilot evaluation experiments.

  15. The Procedurally Directive Approach to Teaching Controversial Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Maughn Rollins

    2014-01-01

    Recent articles on teaching controversial topics in schools have employed Michael Hand's distinction between "directive teaching," in which teachers attempt to persuade students of correct positions on topics that are not rationally controversial, and "nondirective teaching," in which teachers avoid persuading students on…

  16. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G proteins regulate immunity by directly coupling to the FLS2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Ding, Pingtao; Lian, Kehui; Wang, Jinlong; Ma, Miaomiao; Li, Lin; Li, Lei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Chen, She; Zhang, Yuelin; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis immune receptor FLS2 perceives bacterial flagellin epitope flg22 to activate defenses through the central cytoplasmic kinase BIK1. The heterotrimeric G proteins composed of the non-canonical Gα protein XLG2, the Gβ protein AGB1, and the Gγ proteins AGG1 and AGG2 are required for FLS2-mediated immune responses through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that in the pre-activation state, XLG2 directly interacts with FLS2 and BIK1, and it functions together with AGB1 and AGG1/2 to attenuate proteasome-mediated degradation of BIK1, allowing optimum immune activation. Following the activation by flg22, XLG2 dissociates from AGB1 and is phosphorylated by BIK1 in the N terminus. The phosphorylated XLG2 enhances the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely by modulating the NADPH oxidase RbohD. The study demonstrates that the G proteins are directly coupled to the FLS2 receptor complex and regulate immune signaling through both pre-activation and post-activation mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13568.001 PMID:27043937

  17. Using Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction Plus Feedback to Train Staff to Implement Direct Teaching Procedures.

    PubMed

    Giannakakos, Antonia R; Vladescu, Jason C; Kisamore, April N; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-06-01

    Direct teaching procedures are often an important part of early intensive behavioral intervention for consumers with autism spectrum disorder. In the present study, a video model with voiceover (VMVO) instruction plus feedback was evaluated to train three staff trainees to implement a most-to-least direct (MTL) teaching procedure. Probes for generalization were conducted with untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most, prompt delay) and with an actual consumer. The results indicated that VMVO plus feedback was effective in training the staff trainees to implement the MTL procedure. Although additional feedback was required for the staff trainees to show mastery of the untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most and prompt delay) and with an actual consumer, moderate to high levels of generalization were observed. PMID:27606244

  18. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  19. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor RF; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-01-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  20. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  1. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  2. Is there a direct role for erythrocytes in the immune response?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocytes are highly abundant circulating cells in the vertebrates, which, with the notable exception of mammals, remain nucleated throughout the entire life cycle. The major function associated with these cells is respiratory gas exchange however other functions including interaction with the immune system have been attributed to these cells. Many viral, prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens directly target this cell type and across the vertebrate group a significant number of related pathologies have been reported. Across the primary literature mechanisms of interaction, invasion and replication between viruses and erythrocytes have been well described however the functional response of the erythrocyte has been poorly studied. A fragmented series of reports spanning the vertebrates suggests that these cells are capable of functional responses to viral infection. In contrast, in-depth proteomic studies using human erythrocytes have strongly progressed throughout the past decade providing a rich source of information related to protein expression and potential function. Furthermore information at the gene expression level is becoming available. Here we provide a review of erythrocyte-pathogen interactions, erythrocyte functions in immunity and propose in light of recent -omics research that the nucleated erythrocytes may have a direct role in the immune response. PMID:21801407

  3. Directing traffic: IL-17 and IL-22 coordinate pulmonary immune defense.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Jeremy P; Kolls, Jay K

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory infections and diseases are among the leading causes of death worldwide, and effective treatments probably require manipulating the inflammatory response to pathogenic microbes or allergens. Here, we review mechanisms controlling the production and functions of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-22, cytokines that direct several aspects of lung immunity. Innate lymphocytes (γδ T cells, natural killer cells, innate lymphoid cells) are the major source of IL-17 and IL-22 during acute infections, while CD4(+) T-helper 17 (Th17) cells contribute to vaccine-induced immunity. The characterization of dendritic cell (DC) subsets has revealed their central roles in T-cell activation. CD11b(+) DCs stimulated with bacteria or fungi secrete IL-1β and IL-23, potent inducers of IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, recognition of viruses by plasmacytoid DCs inhibits IL-1β and IL-23 release, increasing susceptibility to bacterial superinfections. IL-17 and IL-22 primarily act on the lung epithelium, inducing antimicrobial proteins and neutrophil chemoattractants. Recent studies found that stimulation of macrophages and DCs with IL-17 also contributes to antibacterial immunity, while IL-22 promotes epithelial proliferation and repair following injury. Chronic diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have been associated with IL-17 and IL-22 responses directed against innocuous antigens. Future studies will evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of targeting the IL-17/IL-22 pathway in pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24942687

  4. Immune-Directed Support of Rich Microbial Communities in the Gut Has Ancient Roots

    PubMed Central

    Dishaw, Larry J.; Cannon, John P.; Litman, Gary W.; Parker, William

    2014-01-01

    The animal gut serves as a primary location for the complex host-microbe interplay that is essential for homeostasis and may also reflect the types of ancient selective pressures that spawned the emergence of immunity in metazoans. In this review, we present a phylogenetic survey of gut host-microbe interactions and suggest that host defense systems arose not only to protect tissue directly from pathogenic attack but also to actively support growth of specific communities of mutualists. This functional dichotomy resulted in the evolution of immune systems much more tuned for harmonious existence with microbes than previously thought, existing as dynamic but primarily cooperative entities in the present day. We further present the protochordate Ciona intestinalis as a promising model for studying gut host-bacterial dialogue. The taxonomic position, gut physiology and experimental tractability of Ciona offer unique advantages in dissecting host-microbe interplay and can complement studies in other model systems. PMID:24984114

  5. Biological and Protective Properties of Immune Sera Directed to the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Halbherr, Stefan J.; Ludersdorfer, Thomas H.; Ricklin, Meret; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Summerfield, Artur

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope of influenza A viruses contains two large antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Conventional influenza virus vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies that are predominantly directed to the HA globular head, a domain that is subject to extensive antigenic drift. Antibodies directed to NA are induced at much lower levels, probably as a consequence of the immunodominance of the HA antigen. Although antibodies to NA may affect virus release by inhibiting the sialidase function of the glycoprotein, the antigen has been largely neglected in past vaccine design. In this study, we characterized the protective properties of monospecific immune sera that were generated by vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles encoding NA. These immune sera inhibited hemagglutination in an NA subtype-specific and HA subtype-independent manner and interfered with infection of MDCK cells. In addition, they inhibited the sialidase activities of various influenza viruses of the same and even different NA subtypes. With this, the anti-NA immune sera inhibited the spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus and HA/NA-pseudotyped viruses in MDCK cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When chickens were immunized with NA recombinant replicon particles and subsequently infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus, inflammatory serum markers were significantly reduced and virus shedding was limited or eliminated. These findings suggest that NA antibodies can inhibit virus dissemination by interfering with both virus attachment and egress. Our results underline the potential of high-quality NA antibodies for controlling influenza virus replication and place emphasis on NA as a vaccine antigen. IMPORTANCE The neuraminidase of influenza A viruses is a sialidase that acts as a receptor-destroying enzyme facilitating the release of progeny virus from infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that monospecific anti-NA immune sera inhibited not

  6. Cavity-based linear polarizer immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Shen, Zhongxiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Wen

    2016-01-15

    We herein report a linear polarizer based on a 2D array of substrate integrated waveguide cavities, which can convert an arbitrary linearly polarized (LP) incident wave into an outgoing LP wave in a specified polarization direction with constant transmittance. Two orthogonal slots etched on the front surface of the cavity are utilized to couple a wave of arbitrary polarization into the cavity, while another slot on the back side helps to couple the field out along a desired polarization direction. Microwave experiments are performed as a proof of concept. The proposed polarizer exhibits very good performance with stable transmittance as 50% and a polarization extinction ratio over 45 dB. The new polarizer is potentially useful in novel polarization-selective devices that are immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave. PMID:26766730

  7. Considerations for the direct pulp capping procedure in primary teeth: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kopel, H M

    1992-01-01

    In reviewing the various studies concerning the direct pulp capping procedure in primary teeth, using rigid criteria for case selection and procedure appears to insure a significant amount of success. It is acknowledged that vital primary pulp tissue is capable of healing without resorting to complete pulpectomy, although statistically direct pulp capping has been found to be less successful in primary teeth than indirect pulp therapy or coronal amputation (pulpotomy). To achieve success for direct pulp capping in primary teeth, the considerations involve: selecting teeth with minimal or no clinical signs of pulpal inflammation; or pretreating the carious tooth with a sedative restoration before excavating the caries; disinfecting the cavity floor; enlarging the actual exposure, and flushing out dentinal debris with mild solutions; controlling bleeding by not allowing a clot to form; placing a hard-set, CaOH material over the exposure, followed by a fast-setting, zinc oxide-eugenol cement to achieve a hermetic seal; and lastly, placing a stainless steel crown to minimize microleakage and prevent a fractured or defective restoration. These procedural steps can hardly ensure complete success in direct pulp capping of a primary tooth; but, based on the many cited investigations in this review, a significant amount of success can be expected without resorting more frequently to invasive techniques. Surely the evidence presented leading to the feasibility of direct pulp capping in primary teeth merits further investigations, before dogmatically rejecting this procedure of pulp therapy. PMID:1583199

  8. Macrophage recognition of immune complexes: development and application of novel cell surface labeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Petty, H R; Dereski, W

    1985-07-16

    A fluorescein- and lactoperoxidase-conjugated ferritin-anti-ferritin immune complex has been prepared for cell surface labeling experiments on immune recognition and effector function. Lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been covalently coupled to affinity-purified anti-ferritin antibodies with p-benzoquinone by a modified version of the method of Ternynck and Avrameas [Ternynck, T., & Avrameas, S. (1976) Ann. Immunol. (Paris) 127C, 197]. The conjugate is a heterodimer of Mr230 000 with linkages to either or both of the heavy and light chains of the antibody, as judged by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the absence and presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. The conjugate retains antibody-binding activity as measured by a quantitative precipitin assay. When incorporated into immune complexes, the modified antibody also retains Fc receptor recognition ability as determined by erythrocyte-antibody rosette inhibition assays. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the antigen, ferritin, was monodisperse with complete apoprotein sheaths surrounding the core. Ferritin-anti-ferritin-LPO complexes were formed in 4-fold antigen excess. Complexes were verified by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Immune complexes were masked with "cold" iodine by use of the endogenous LPO activity. The complexes bound to cells at 4 degrees C as shown by electron microscopy and fluorescence video/intensification microscopy. The LPO delivered to the cell surface in this fashion can be utilized to iodinate the surface with 125I. Under saturation conditions, the labeling with local LPO delivery followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography is identical with labeling with free LPO. Labeling has also been conducted under conditions of substrate deficit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4052386

  9. Classical Item Analysis Using Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Direct Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A directly applicable latent variable modeling procedure for classical item analysis is outlined. The method allows one to point and interval estimate item difficulty, item correlations, and item-total correlations for composites consisting of categorical items. The approach is readily employed in empirical research and as a by-product permits…

  10. Comparison of Direct Instruction and Simultaneous Prompting Procedure on Teaching Concepts to Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Semiha; Vuran, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency, effectiveness, maintenance effects and social validity of two instructional methods, Direct Instruction and Simultaneous Prompting Procedure, on teaching concepts (long, old, few and thick) using a parallel treatments design. All sessions were conducted at a private special education center…

  11. 34 CFR 685.307 - Withdrawal procedure for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Withdrawal procedure for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program. 685.307 Section 685.307 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) WILLIAM D....

  12. 34 CFR 685.307 - Withdrawal procedure for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal procedure for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program. 685.307 Section 685.307 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD...

  13. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  14. A semi-direct procedure using a local relaxation factor and its application to an internal flow problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Generally, fast direct solvers are not directly applicable to a nonseparable elliptic partial differential equation. This limitation, however, is circumvented by a semi-direct procedure, i.e., an iterative procedure using fast direct solvers. An efficient semi-direct procedure which is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions is presented. The current procedure also possesses other highly desirable properties, i.e.: (1) the convergence rate does not decrease with an increase of grid cell aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate is estimated using the coefficients of the partial differential equation being solved.

  15. THE NEUROPEPTIDE VIP: DIRECT EFFECTS ON IMMUNE CELLS AND INVOLVEMENT IN INFLAMMATORY AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, Doina; Hooper, Kirsten M.; Kong, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent an important category of endogenous contributors to the establishment and maintenance of immune deviation in immune privileged organs such as the CNS, and in the control of acute inflammation in the peripheral immune organs. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a major immunoregulatory neuropeptide widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system. In addition to neurons, VIP is synthesized by immune cells which also express VIP receptors. Here we review the current information on VIP production and VIP receptor mediated effects in the immune system, the role of endogenous and exogenous VIP in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and present and future VIP therapeutic approaches. PMID:25422088

  16. Beginning of a novel frontier: T-cell-directed immune manipulation in lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Kühnl, Andrea; Chau, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors with monoclonal antibodies targeting the CTLA-4 or PD-1 axis have revolutionized treatment in some solid tumors, especially melanoma and lung. The role of the CTLA-4 and PD-1 pathways and their inhibition in lymphoma may be different compared to solid tumors. In heavily pretreated Hodgkin lymphoma, PD-1-directed treatment has led to high remission rates. Several studies are now conducted also including diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma. Besides antibody-based immunotherapy, treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells has also come back to the focus of recent studies. Clinical evidence of CAR T-cell treatment in B-cell malignancies is limited to small series, because of the dedicated resources needed. However, impressive response rates have been observed, but toxicities associated with cytokine release can be very severe and fatal. We herein review the background, early clinical evidence, and future perspectives of T-cell-directed immune manipulation for lymphomas including checkpoint inhibitors and CAR T-cell therapies. PMID:26581237

  17. Reliability of the direct observation of procedural skills assessment tool for ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Thillainathan, S; Graham, P L; Jolly, B; Wong, D M; Smith, N; Barrington, M J

    2016-03-01

    The Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) form is used as a workplace-based assessment tool in the current Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists curriculum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of DOPS when used to score trainees performing ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia. Reliability of an assessment tool is defined as the reproducibility of scores given by different assessors viewing the same trainee. Forty-nine anaesthetists were recruited to score two scripted videos of trainees performing a popliteal sciatic nerve block and an axillary brachial plexus block. Reliability, as measured by intraclass correlation coefficients, was -0.01 to 0.43 for the individual items in DOPS, and 0.15 for the 'Overall Performance for this Procedure' item. Assessors demonstrated consistency of scoring within DOPS, with significant correlation of sum of individual item scores with the 'Overall Performance for this Procedure' item (r=0.78 to 0.80, P<0.001), and with yes versus no responses to the 'Was the procedure completed satisfactorily?' item (W=24, P=0.0004, Video 1, and W=65, P=0.003, Video 2). While DOPS demonstrated a good degree of internal consistency in this setting, inter-rater reliability did not reach levels generally recommended for formative assessment tools. Feasibility of the form could be improved by removing the 'Was the procedure completed satisfactorily?' item without loss of information. PMID:27029652

  18. Immune checkpoint blockade in hepatocellular carcinoma: Current progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hato, Tai; Goyal, Lipika; Greten, Tim F.; Duda, Dan G.; Zhu, Andrew X.

    2014-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic approach for various malignancies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Preclinical and clinical studies have shown the potential benefit of modulating immunogenicity of HCC. In addition, recent advances in tumor immunology have broadened our understanding of the complex mechanism of immune evasion. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on HCC immunology, and discuss the potential of immune checkpoint blockade as a novel HCC therapy from the basic, translational, and clinical perspectives. PMID:24912948

  19. Effects of Direct-Fed Microbials on Growth Performance, Gut Morphometry, and Immune Characteristics in Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare growth performance, gut morphometry, and parameters of local and systemic immunity in broiler chickens fed for 22 consecutive days with a diet supplemented with one of eight Bacillus spp. as a direct-fed microbial (DFM), a commercial product incorporating three DF...

  20. Effects of direct-fed microbials on growth performance, gut morphometry, and immune characteristics in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare growth performance, gut morphometry, and parameters of local and systemic immunity in broiler chickens fed for 22 consecutive days with a diet supplemented with one of eight Bacillus spp. as a direct-fed microbial (DFM), a commercial product incorporating three DF...

  1. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Marie; Hägglöf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L.; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2+) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163+) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  2. Effect of supplementing direct-fed microbials on broiler performance, nutrient digestibilities, and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Waititu, S M; Yitbarek, A; Matini, E; Echeverry, H; Kiarie, E; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Nyachoti, C M

    2014-03-01

    Direct-fed microbials (DFM) are used to improve livestock health and performance. The effects of 2 DFM products, a blend of 3 Bacillus strains (DFMB) and a Propionibacteriumspp. (DFMP), on broiler performance, nutrient utilization, and immune responses were investigated. Day-old (n = 120) male broilers were divided into 24 groups of 5 birds and fed 3 wheat-based diets in mash form (8 groups per diet) from d 1 to 22. The control diet was fed without or with 7.5 × 10(4) cfu/g of either DFMB or DFMP. From d 19 to 21 fecal samples were collected for determination of total tract apparent retention (TTAR) of nutrients and AMEn. On d 21, feed intake and BW were determined. On d 22, 5 birds per treatment were killed by cervical dislocation to collect jejunal and ileal contents for determination of digesta viscosity and apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of nutrients, respectively, and ileum, cecal tonsil, and spleen tissues for Toll-like receptors (TLR) and cytokine expressions. Compared with the control, DFM did not affect BW gain and feed intake but DFMP reduced G:F (P < 0.01). Compared with the control (2,875 kcal/kg), birds fed on DFMB and DFMP had higher AMEn (2,979 and 2,916 kcal/kg, respectively; P < 0.05), whereas both DFM reduced the AID of DM (P < 0.001) and CP (P < 0.01). Furthermore, DFMP reduced TTAR of NDF (29.0 vs. 18.4%; P < 0.001), whereas both DFM increased TTAR of DM and fat (P < 0.001). Supplementing DFMP downregulated ileal expression of TLR-2b, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13, whereas DFMB downregulated TLR-2b, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 in all 3 tissues, IL-10 in the spleen, and upregulated IL-13 in the spleen. In conclusion, the DFM did not improve performance but increased the AMEn of diet by possibly increasing DM and fat retention. Overall, both DFM showed an antiinflammatory effect in the ileum, but DFMB had more effects on local and systemic immunity than DFMP. PMID:24604856

  3. Efficacy of the enamel matrix derivative in direct pulp capping procedures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Al-Fouzan, Khalid; Tay, Franklin

    2013-12-01

    The aim was to review the efficacy of the enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in direct pulp capping (DPC) procedures. Databases were explored using the following keywords: 'dental', 'dentine', 'enamel matrix derivative', 'pulp capping' and 'treatment'. The inclusion criteria were: (i) original studies; (ii) human and animal studies; (iii) reference list of potentially relevant original and review articles; (iv) intervention: effect of EMD on pulp-capping procedures; and (v) articles published only in English. Eight studies (four human and four animal) were included. Among the human studies, two studies reported that EMD is a more efficient DPC procedure compared with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2 ). One study reported Ca(OH)2 to be more efficient for DPC than EMD. One study reported no difference in the efficacies between EMD and Ca(OH)2 for DPC. All animal studies reported EMD to be more effective in reparative dentine formation in comparison with Ca(OH)2 . EMD can provide favourable results in DPC procedures. PMID:24279667

  4. Compendium of NPL listing policies and procedures, 1982 to 1985. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The compendium is a collection of NPL listing policy and procedure directives issued from 1982 to 1985. The contents include: Guidance for Establishing the National Priorities List, February 1982 (9320.1-01); Guidance for Establishing the National Priorities List, June 1982 (9320.1-02); Guidance for Proposed NPL Update No. 3, February 1984 (9320.3-04); Guidance for Updating the National Priorities List, May 1983 (9320.3-01); Instructions for Promulgating the National Priorities List Update, January 1984 (9320.3-02); National Priorities List Categorization, July 1984 (9320.1-04); NPL Information Update - Update No. 4, April 1985 (9320.3-05); Procedures for Updating the National Priorities List, May 1984, (9320.3-03); Promulgation of the National Priorities List, May 1983 (9320.1-03); RCRA/NPL Listing Policy, September 1986 (9320.1-05); and Updating the National Priorities List: Update No. 6 Proposal, September 1985 (9320.3-06).

  5. Immune activity elevates energy expenditure of house sparrows: a link between direct and indirect costs?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lynn B; Scheuerlein, Alex; Wikelski, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The activation of an immune response is beneficial for organisms but may also have costs that affect fitness. Documented immune costs include those associated with acquisition of special nutrients, as well as immunopathology or autoimmunity. Here, we test whether an experimental induction of the immune system with a non-pathological stimulant can elevate energy turnover in passerine birds. We injected phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), a commonly used mitogen that activates the cell-mediated immune response, into the wing web of house sparrows, Passer domesticus. We then examined energetic costs resulting from this immune activity and related those costs to other physiological activities. We found that PHA injection significantly elevated resting metabolic rate (RMR) of challenged sparrows relative to saline controls. We calculated the total cost of this immune activity to be ca. 4.20 kJ per day (29% RMR), which is equivalent to the cost of production of half of an egg (8.23 kJ egg(-1)) in this species. We suggest that immune activity in wild passerines increases energy expenditure, which in turn may influence important life-history characteristics such as clutch size, timing of breeding or the scheduling of moult. PMID:12590753

  6. Direct comparison of statistical damage frequency method and raster scan procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batavičiūtė, G.; Ščiuka, M.; Plerpaitė, V.; Melninkaitis, A.

    2015-11-01

    Presented study addresses the nano-size defects acting as damage precursors in nanosecond laser pulse irradiation regime. Defects embedded within the surface of glass are investigated in terms of defect ensembles. Damage frequency method and raster scan procedure are directly compared on the set of two samples: uncoated fused silica substrates and SiO2 monolayer films. The extracted defect ensembles appear to be different from each other. The limitations of compared methods such as pulse-to-pulse variation of laser intensity and sample contamination induced by laser ablation were identified as the main causes of observed differences.

  7. Effect of Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials on immune status in broiler chickens raised on fresh or used litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type of dietary direct-fed microbials (DFMs) or poultry litter could directly influence the composition of gut microbiota. Gut microbiota play an important role in shaping the developing immune system and maintaining homeostasis of the mature immune system in mammal and chickens. The present stu...

  8. PIF direct immune regulation: Blocks mitogen-activated PBMCs proliferation, promotes TH2/TH1 bias, independent of Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eytan R; Kirk, David; Todorova, Krassimira; McElhinney, James; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Fernández, Nelson

    2015-07-01

    PreImplantation Factor (PIF(9&15)) secreted by viable embryos exerts an essential transplant acceptance and immune regulatory role in pregnancy. Synthetic PIF replicates endogenous PIF's effect in pregnant and non-pregnant immune disorder models. PIF binds macrophages to regulate CD3/CD28-induced T-cell response. We present evidence that PIF regulates the co-stimulatory T-cell receptor, CD2, which binds to and is activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), a potent mitogen, confirming PIF's ability to systemically respond to diverse immune stimulants. PIF's effect on PHA-activated PBMC (male and non-pregnant females) proliferation and cytokine secretion was tested, showing that both PIF(9&15) block PHA-induced PBMC proliferation and promote anti-inflammatory IL10 secretion, while reducing pro-inflammatory IFNγ secretion. Thus favoring a T(H)2 cytokine bias. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, immunocytochemistry and Flex station experiments reveal that PIF effect is direct. PIF targets intracellular targets but does not affect early Ca(2+) mobilization. By promoting the CD2 receptor in activated T-cells and through inhibition of co-ligand CD58 expression, PIF regulates antigen-presenting cell (APC)-T-cell interactions required for PHA action. Structure-based design demonstrated that PIF15 offers improved target specificity as compared to PIF9. Collectively, PIF directly regulates mitogen-induced PBMC activation. Results support PIF translation for therapy of immune disorders. PMID:25766203

  9. Immunodominant Liver-Specific Expression Suppresses Transgene-Directed Immune Responses in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R.; Clay, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression

  10. Immunodominant liver-specific expression suppresses transgene-directed immune responses in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R; Clay, Timothy M; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-05-01

    Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best

  11. Development of a drift-correction procedure for a direct-reading spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure which provides automatic correction for drifts in the radiometric sensitivity of each detector channel in a direct-reading emission spectrometer is described. Such drifts are customarily controlled by the regular analyses of standards, which provide corrections for changes in the excitational, optical, and electronic components of the instrument. This standardization procedure, however, corrects for the optical and electronic drifts. It is a step that must be taken if the time, effort, and cost of processing standards is to be minimized. This method of radiometric drift correction uses a 1,000-W tungsten-halogen reference lamp to illuminate each detector through the same optical path as that traversed during sample analysis. The responses of the detector channels to this reference light are regularly compared with channel response to the same light intensity at the time of analytical calibration in order to determine and correct for drift. Except for placing the lamp in position, the procedure is fully automated and compensates for changes in spectral intensity due to variations in lamp current. A discussion of the implementation of this drift-correction system is included.

  12. Allergenic Can f 1 and its human homologue Lcn-1 direct dendritic cells to induce divergent immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Beate; Irsara, Christian; Gamper, Fabian S; Herrmann, Martin; Bindreither, Daniel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Reider, Norbert; Redl, Bernhard; Heufler, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Why and when the immune system skews to Th2 mediated allergic immune responses is still poorly characterized. With two homologous lipocalins, the major respiratory dog allergen Can f 1 and the human endogenous, non-allergenic Lipocalin-1, we investigated their impact on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The two lipocalins had differential effects on DC according to their allergenic potential. Compared to Lipocalin-1, Can f 1 persistently induced lower levels of the Th1 skewing maturation marker expression, tryptophan breakdown and interleukin (IL)-12 production in DC. As a consequence, T cells stimulated by DC treated with Can f 1 produced more of the Th2 signature cytokine IL-13 and lower levels of the Th1 signature cytokine interferon-γ than T cells stimulated by Lipocalin-1 treated DC. These data were partially verified by a second pair of homologous lipocalins, the cat allergen Fel d 4 and its putative human homologue major urinary protein. Our data indicate that the crosstalk of DC with lipocalins alone has the potential to direct the type of immune response to these particular antigens. A global gene expression analysis further supported these results and indicated significant differences in intracellular trafficking, sorting and antigen presentation pathways when comparing Can f 1 and Lipocalin-1 stimulated DC. With this study we contribute to a better understanding of the induction phase of a Th2 immune response. PMID:26218644

  13. Immunity induced by a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials is directly controlled by their chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gareth R.; Fierens, Kaat; Preston, Stephen G.; Lunn, Daniel; Rysnik, Oliwia; De Prijck, Sofie; Kool, Mirjam; Buckley, Hannah C.; O’Hare, Dermot; Austyn, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no paradigm in immunology that enables an accurate prediction of how the immune system will respond to any given agent. Here we show that the immunological responses induced by members of a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials are controlled purely by their physicochemical properties in a highly predictable manner. We show that structurally and chemically homogeneous layered double hydroxides (LDHs) can elicit diverse human dendritic cell responses in vitro. Using a systems vaccinology approach, we find that every measured response can be modeled using a subset of just three physical and chemical properties for all compounds tested. This correlation can be reduced to a simple linear equation that enables the immunological responses stimulated by newly synthesized LDHs to be predicted in advance from these three parameters alone. We also show that mouse antigen–specific antibody responses in vivo and human macrophage responses in vitro are controlled by the same properties, suggesting they may control diverse responses at both individual component and global levels of immunity. This study demonstrates that immunity can be determined purely by chemistry and opens the possibility of rational manipulation of immunity for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24799501

  14. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow? (a) If the Director pays fellowship award...

  15. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow? (a) If the Director pays fellowship award...

  16. Development of a nested PCR detection procedure for Nectria fuckeliana direct from Norway spruce bark extracts.

    PubMed

    Langrell, Stephen R H

    2005-01-01

    A pair of primers specific for Nectria fuckeliana, a bark infecting pathogen predominantly of Norway spruce (Picea abies), were designed from comparisons of nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nine isolates from Norway, Lithuania, Switzerland, Austria, Slovakia, Scotland (Larix sp.) and New Zealand (Pinus radiata), and other closely related nectriaceous species, including Neo. Neomacrospora, and 'N'. mammoidea, to which it exhibits taxonomic similarities. Complete ITS sequence homology was observed between each of the nine N. fuckeliana isolates, regardless of geographic provenance, including a previously published Danish strain. Primers Cct1 and Cct2 consistently amplified a single product of 360 bp from DNA prepared from 20 isolates covering the principle range of the disease from Central and Northern Europe, but not from other Neonectria, 'Nectria' or a range of species commonly encountered in forest ecosystems, as well as P. abies or P. radiata DNA. A quick, simple and efficient mechanical lysis procedure for the extraction of high quality total DNA from bark, coupled with post-extraction polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) chromatography purification, is described to facilitate successful PCR detection of N. fuckeliana direct from bark extracts. Detection of N. fuckeliana from bark preparations was only possible following nested PCR of PVPP purified extracts using universal primers ITS5 and 4 in first round amplification. The identity of products from bark tissues was confirmed by Southern hybridisation and sequencing. Using the above procedure, positive diagnosis of N. fuckeliana was achievable within 5 h and has the potential for full exploitation as both a forest management and ecological research tool. As the DNA extraction procedure described here has been successful in application against other tree species, it has potential for incorporation into other molecular diagnostic systems for other

  17. Angioseal™ as a hemostatic device for direct carotid puncture during endovascular procedures

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraens, Leopoldo; Ambekar, Sudheer; Vivas, Elio; Theron, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Direct carotid artery puncture (DCP) is employed in patients with tortuous anatomy and peripheral vascular disease when the peripheral arteries are not available for vascular access. Manual compression is the only method of achieving hemostasis following DCP and, till date, the use of a closure device for DCP has been reported in only one patient. In this study we sought to analyze our experience with the use of closure device for DCP. Methods This is a retrospective study of patients in whom Angioseal™ was used following DCP for neuroendovascular procedures. Medical charts and imaging of these patients was reviewed for any abnormalities pertaining to the use of the closure device. Results A total of eight patients were included in the study. Angioseal™ was used in all the patients. There were no complications related to the use of the closure device in any of the eight patients. Immediate post-procedure angiography done in one patient did not show any structural or hemodynamic abnormalities within the carotid artery lumen. At 6 months follow-up imaging, there was no evidence stenosis or vascular wall abnormality in any of the patients. There were no adverse clinical reactions related to the use of closure device. Conclusion In our experience, Angioseal™ may be a safe and off-label effective closure device for patients undergoing DCP for neuroendovascular procedures. It obviates the need for manual compression without causing any structural or hemodynamic changes within the carotid artery. Larger studies with longer follow-up are required to establish its safety in patients undergoing DCP. PMID:25964438

  18. Direct vision in minimally invasive epicardial procedures: preliminary tests of prototype instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Hack, B J; Ramon, S G; Hagen, Z A; Theran, M E; Burkhardt, J D; Gillies, G T

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the use of direct visualization to enhance minimally invasive epicardial procedures. A commercially available miniature camera was placed in a prototype subxiphoid introducer needle and bench top, in vitro and in vivo tests of system performance were made during simulated and actual attempts at pericardial access and cardio-endoscopy. This system had an unshielded field of view of 100° and a resolution of 220 × 224 pixels. When a sleeve used to maintain depth of field was slid past the distal tip of the camera probe, the field of view would decrease by ≈15° per millimetre of sleeve extension, but without loss of image quality. While tests during in vivo subxiphoid access in a porcine model revealed that the pericardial membrane was difficult to localize, the results also showed excellent resolution of the coronary arteries on the epicardial surface. These findings and potential improvements are discussed in detail. PMID:26005103

  19. Application of the Direct Distance Estimation procedure to eclipsing binaries in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Schiller, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    We alert the community to a paradigm method to calibrate a range of standard candles by means of well-calibrated photometry of eclipsing binaries in star clusters. In particular, we re-examine systems studied as part of our Binaries-in-Clusters program, and previously analyzed with earlier versions of the Wilson-Devinney light-curve modeling program. We make use of the 2010 version of this program, which incorporates a procedure to estimate the distance to an eclipsing system directly, as a system parameter, and is thus dependent on the data and analysis model alone. As such, the derived distance is accorded a standard error, independent of any additional assumptions or approximations that such analyses conventionally require.

  20. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) Heynh

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, B.L.; Best, T.R.; Gregg, M.M.; Barsel, S.E.; Poff, K.L. )

    1990-06-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable.

  1. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullen, B. L.; Best, T. R.; Gregg, M. M.; Poff, K. L.; Barsel, S-E (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable.

  2. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    PubMed

    Bullen, B L; Best, T R; Gregg, M M; Barsel S-E; Poff, K L

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable. PMID:11537704

  3. A Direct Screening Procedure for Gravitropism Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, Bertha L.; Best, Thérèse R.; Gregg, Mary M.; Barsel, Sara-Ellen; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable. PMID:11537704

  4. Direct and immune-mediated cytotoxicity of interleukin-21 contributes to antitumor effects in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shruti; Matthews, Julie; Parvin, Salma; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; Zhao, Dekuang; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Isik, Elif; Letai, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 in 95% of patients. MCL patients experience frequent relapses resulting in median survival of 3 to 5 years, requiring more efficient therapeutic regimens. Interleukin (IL)-21, a member of the IL-2 cytokine family, possesses potent antitumor activity against a variety of cancers not expressing the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) through immune activation. Previously, we established that IL-21 exerts direct cytotoxicity on IL-21R–expressing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that IL-21 possesses potent cytotoxicity against MCL cell lines and primary tumors. We identify that IL-21–induced direct cytotoxicity is mediated through signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-dependent cMyc upregulation, resulting in activation of Bax and inhibition of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. IL-21–mediated cMyc upregulation is only observed in IL-21–sensitive cells. Further, we demonstrate that IL-21 leads to natural killer (NK)-cell–dependent lysis of MCL cell lines that were resistant to direct cytotoxicity. In vivo treatment with IL-21 results in complete FC-muMCL1 tumor regression in syngeneic mice via NK- and T-cell–dependent mechanisms. Together, these data indicate that IL-21 has potent antitumor activity against MCL cells via direct cytotoxic and indirect, immune-mediated effects. PMID:26194763

  5. Interleukin-12-secreting human papillomavirus type 16-transformed cells provide a potent cancer vaccine that generates E7-directed immunity.

    PubMed

    Hallez, S; Detremmerie, O; Giannouli, C; Thielemans, K; Gajewski, T F; Burny, A; Leo, O

    1999-05-01

    The development of a vaccine that would be capable of preventing or curing the (pre)cancerous lesions induced by genital oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the focus of much research. Many studies are presently evaluating vaccines based on the viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins, both of which are continually expressed by tumor cells. The success of a cancer vaccine relies, in large part, on the induction of a tumor-specific Th1-type immunity. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of B7-related and/or interleukin-12 (IL-12)-expressing, non-immunogenic murine HPV16-transformed BMK-16/myc cells, to achieve this goal. BMK-16/myc cells engineered to express surface B7-1 or B7-2 molecules remain tumorigenic in syngeneic BALB/c mice, suggesting that expression of these molecules alone is not sufficient to induce tumor regression. In contrast, mice injected with tumor cells engineered to secrete IL-12 remained tumor-free, demonstrating that IL-12 expression is sufficient to induce tumor rejection. IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells were further shown to induce potent and specific long-term tumor resistance, even after irradiation. B7-1 was found to slightly but systematically improve anti-tumor immunity elicited by IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells. Injection of irradiated B7-1/IL-12+ BMK-16/myc cells generates long-lasting, Th1-type, BMK-16/myc-directed immunity in tumor-resistant mice. These mice display a memory-type, E7-specific, cell-mediated immune response, which is potentially significant for clinical applications. PMID:10209958

  6. The Host Immune Response to Tissue-Engineered Organs: Current Problems and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Katherine; Fishman, Jonathan M; De Coppi, Paolo; Birchall, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    As the global health burden of chronic disease increases, end-stage organ failure has become a costly and intractable problem. De novo organ creation is one of the long-term goals of the medical community. One of the promising avenues is that of tissue engineering: the use of biomaterials to create cells, structures, or even whole organs. Tissue engineering has emerged from its nascent stage, with several proof-of-principle trials performed across various tissue types. As tissue engineering moves from the realm of case trials to broader clinical study, three major questions have emerged: (1) Can the production of biological scaffolds be scaled up accordingly to meet current and future demands without generating an unfavorable immune response? (2) Are biological scaffolds plus or minus the inclusion of cells replaced by scar tissue or native functional tissue? (3) Can tissue-engineered organs be grown in children and adolescents given the different immune profiles of children? In this review, we highlight current research in the immunological response to tissue-engineered biomaterials, cells, and whole organs and address the answers to these questions. PMID:26701069

  7. Intentional and incidental encoding of item and associative information in the directed forgetting procedure.

    PubMed

    Hockley, William E; Ahmad, Fahad N; Nicholson, Rosemary

    2016-02-01

    The intentional and incidental encoding of individual words and associations between pairs of words was examined using the item-based directed forgetting procedure. Item and associative recognition were both greater for word pairs followed by a remember (R) cue than a forget (F) cue. Associative discrimination for F-cued pairs was above chance in most conditions, demonstrating that relational informational is encoded incidentally. Item, but not associative, discrimination increased with longer presentation time prior to the cue, indicating that the encoding of item information benefited from maintenance rehearsal but the encoding of relational information did not (Experiments 1A and 1B). The incidental encoding of associations was, though, greater for pairs of words with pre-experimental associations (e.g., needle point), but these pre-experimental associations did not improve memory for pairs that participants tried to remember (Experiment 2). This pattern of results for R- and F-cued pairs mimicked the age-related associative deficit observed by Ahmad, Fernandes, and Hockley (Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 22, 452-472 2015) in comparisons of associative memory between young and older adults. PMID:26407851

  8. Modeling of RF glow discharges by direct numerical procedure of the Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, N.; Makabe, T.

    1995-12-31

    In the previous papers, the authors performed a direct numerical procedure (DNP) of the Boltzmann equation with an algorithm of their own without any expansion of the velocity distribution in spatial homogeneity, in order to study and radio frequency (rf) electron transport. They further developed ;and applied the DNP to the modeling of an rf glow discharge with space and time variation of the electron velocity distribution. It has a great advantage in that the nonequilibrium characteristics of electrons in transport can be exactly expressed without statistical error. Only collision cross sections of the electron with the molecular are required for calculation without swarm parameters as for electrons, when the governing equation system is numerically simulated. It is of practical advantage to a gas mixture which results from the dissociation of an initial gas after discharge initiation. Capacitively couples parallel plate discharge with 20mm spacing is considered in the present modeling in order to simplify the model and to compare the plasma structure with the previous result using relaxation continuum model. Non reactive Ar with simple cross sections is employed as the source gas.

  9. Implementation of unsteady sampling procedures for the parallel direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, H. M.; Tseng, K.-C.; Wu, J.-S.; Jermy, M. C.; Huang, J.-C.; Krumdieck, S. P.

    2008-06-01

    An unsteady sampling routine for a general parallel direct simulation Monte Carlo method called PDSC is introduced, allowing the simulation of time-dependent flow problems in the near continuum range. A post-processing procedure called DSMC rapid ensemble averaging method (DREAM) is developed to improve the statistical scatter in the results while minimising both memory and simulation time. This method builds an ensemble average of repeated runs over small number of sampling intervals prior to the sampling point of interest by restarting the flow using either a Maxwellian distribution based on macroscopic properties for near equilibrium flows (DREAM-I) or output instantaneous particle data obtained by the original unsteady sampling of PDSC for strongly non-equilibrium flows (DREAM-II). The method is validated by simulating shock tube flow and the development of simple Couette flow. Unsteady PDSC is found to accurately predict the flow field in both cases with significantly reduced run-times over single processor code and DREAM greatly reduces the statistical scatter in the results while maintaining accurate particle velocity distributions. Simulations are then conducted of two applications involving the interaction of shocks over wedges. The results of these simulations are compared to experimental data and simulations from the literature where there these are available. In general, it was found that 10 ensembled runs of DREAM processing could reduce the statistical uncertainty in the raw PDSC data by 2.5-3.3 times, based on the limited number of cases in the present study.

  10. Direct-Fed Microbials and Their Impact on the Intestinal Microflora and Immune System of Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct-fed microbials (DFMs) are live microorganisms which confer a health benefit to the host. The mode of action of DFMs involves multiple mechanisms, including direct inhibition of enteric pathogens and indirectly through competitive exclusion of pathogens by the normal gut microbiota. Addition...

  11. Aire Enforces Immune Tolerance by Directing Autoreactive T Cells into the Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Lee, Victoria; Nishi, Saki; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-05-17

    The promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens in the thymus, driven in part by autoimmune regulator (Aire), is critical for the protection of peripheral tissues from autoimmune attack. Aire-dependent processes are thought to promote both clonal deletion and the development of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, suggesting that autoimmunity associated with Aire deficiency results from two failed tolerance mechanisms. Here, examination of autoimmune lesions in Aire(-/-) mice revealed an unexpected third possibility. We found that the predominant conventional T cell clonotypes infiltrating target lesions express antigen receptors that were preferentially expressed by Foxp3(+) Treg cells in Aire(+/+) mice. Thus, Aire enforces immune tolerance by ensuring that distinct autoreactive T cell specificities differentiate into the Treg cell lineage; dysregulation of this process results in the diversion of Treg cell-biased clonotypes into pathogenic conventional T cells. PMID:27130899

  12. MicroRNA-33-dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N; Gundra, U Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J; Steinberg, Gregory R; Zamore, Phillip D; Fisher, Edward A; Loke, P'ng; Moore, Kathryn J

    2015-12-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33-mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization-associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33-mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid-producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33-depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4(+) T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3(+) Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  13. 76 FR 63211 - Energy Efficiency Program: Test Procedures for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... procedure requirements under EPCA.\\3\\ 75 FR 52892. DOE published a supplemental notice of proposed... rounding and sampling. 76 FR 56347. However, that rulemaking was limited to the proposed test procedure... chapter 7 of the technical support document (TSD) for DOE's April 16, 2010 final rule (75 FR 20112)...

  14. Compendium of ERT surface-water and sediment sampling procedures. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) describes methods used for preventing or reducing cross-contamination, and provides general guidelines for sampling equipment decontamination procedures at a hazardous waste site. Preventing or minimizing cross-contamination in sampled media and in samples is important for preventing the introduction of error into sampling results and for protecting the health and safety of site personnel.

  15. A Procedure for Directing a Sign-Language Theatre Production for a Child Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Darlene Kaye

    This paper sets forth step-by-step procedures which novice sign-language theatre directors can use as a guide for their first sign-language theatre experiences. Since the procedures were developed during the production of a play for a mixed adult and child audience, it is assumed that the general guidelines set forth are applicable to a production…

  16. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Spiesschaert, Bart; McFadden, Grant; Hermans, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2011-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century. PMID:21658227

  17. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HTLV-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.

    This manual presents information about the disease, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and guidelines for service delivery to Montana residents who have been diagnosed with AIDS or related disorders. The first section describes the disease's causes, symptoms, and transmission; risk factors; high-risk populations; prevention suggestions;…

  18. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HIV. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena. Health Education Bureau.

    This volume consists of updated information to be inserted into a Montana AIDS Project manual on providing services to persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS/HIV), originally published in December 1985. The updates are mainly statistics and terminology, along with the addition of several new sections.…

  19. Immune modulation by Bacillus subtilus-based direct-fed microbials in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct-fed microbials (DFMs), also known as probiotics, have been successfully used to improve the balance of gut microbiota. Spores of Bacillus subtilis, have been used as DFMs for food animals and humans and our previous studies showed that dietary supplementation of broiler chickens with a B. su...

  20. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century. Table of contents Abstract 1. The virus 2. History 3. Pathogenesis and disease symptoms 4. Immunomodulatory proteins of MYXV 4.1. MYXV proteins with anti-apoptotic functions 4.1.1. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic molecules 4.1.2. Inhibition by protein-protein interactions by ankyrin repeat viral proteins 4.1.3. Inhibition of apoptosis by enhancing the degradation of cellular proteins 4.1.4. Inhibition of apoptosis by blocking host Protein Kinase R (PKR) 4.2. MYXV proteins

  1. Direct and indirect costs of co-infection in the wild: Linking gastrointestinal parasite communities, host hematology, and immune function☆

    PubMed Central

    Budischak, Sarah A.; Jolles, Anna E.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.

    2012-01-01

    Most animals are concurrently infected with multiple parasites, and interactions among these parasites may influence both disease dynamics and host fitness. However, the sublethal costs of parasite infections are difficult to measure and the effects of concomitant infections with multiple parasite species on individual physiology and fitness are poorly described for wild hosts. To understand the direct and indirect physiological costs of co-infection, we investigated the relationships among gastrointestinal parasite richness, species identity, and abundance and host hematological parameters, body condition, and investment in lymphocyte defenses. Using aggregate-scale parasite data from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), we found few direct or indirect associations between infection and hematology in male hosts, and no significant associations were observed in female hosts or with respect to body condition in either sex. These results suggest that only strong physiological effects are detectable with aggregate-scale parasite data, and that hematological variables may be more sensitive to changes in condition than standard body fat condition indices. Analyses accounting for parasite species identity in female buffalo revealed that different parasites show distinct relationships with host hematology, body condition, and immune investment. However, four of six species-specific associations were obscured when parasites were considered in combination. Overall, fitness-related physiological mediators such as hematological indices may provide assessments of direct and indirect effects of parasite infection, particularly when parasite species identity and community composition are considered. PMID:24533308

  2. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  3. Interleukin-19 induces angiogenesis in the absence of hypoxia by direct and indirect immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kako, Farah; Gabunia, Khatuna; Ray, Mitali; Kelemen, Sheri E; England, Ross N; Kako, Bashar; Scalia, Rosario G; Autieri, Michael V

    2016-06-01

    Neovascularization and inflammation are independent biological processes but are linked in response to injury. The role of inflammation-dampening cytokines in the regulation of angiogenesis remains to be clarified. The purpose of this work was to test the hypothesis that IL-19 can induce angiogenesis in the absence of tissue hypoxia and to identify potential mechanisms. Using the aortic ring model of angiogenesis, we found significantly reduced sprouting capacity in aortic rings from IL-19(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Using an in vivo assay, we found that IL-19(-/-) mice respond to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) significantly less than wild-type mice and demonstrate decreased capillary formation in Matrigel plugs. IL-19 signals through the IL-20 receptor complex, and IL-19 induces IL-20 receptor subunit expression in aortic rings and cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-dependent mechanism. IL-19 activates STAT3, and IL-19 angiogenic activity in aortic rings is STAT3-dependent. Using a quantitative RT-PCR screening assay, we determined that IL-19 has direct proangiogenic effects on aortic rings by inducing angiogenic gene expression. M2 macrophages participate in angiogenesis, and IL-19 has indirect angiogenic effects, as IL-19-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages secrete proangiogenic factors that induce greater sprouting of aortic rings than unstimulated controls. Using a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we determined that IL-19 induces expression of angiogenic cytokines in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Together, these data suggest that IL-19 can promote angiogenesis in the absence of hypoxia by at least two distinct mechanisms: 1) direct effects on vascular cells and 2) indirect effects by stimulation of macrophages. PMID:27053520

  4. Estimating Percent of Time and Rate Via Direct Observation: A Suggested Observational Procedure and Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saudargas, Richard A.; Lentz, Frances E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Using development of a State Event Observation System as an example, the decision rules and procedures for the constructing of standardized multiple behavior observational systems that provide accurate, reliable data for school-based assessment, intervention, and research are described. Reliability and validity data from the SECOS are provided.…

  5. Choosing a Treatment Procedure for Early Stuttering: Issues and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onslow, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Speech language pathologists providing early intervention services for stuttering are urged to evaluate conceptual and practical aspects of various intervention procedures. After a review of three treatment methods (environment manipulation, prolonged speech, and response-contingent stimulation), the article concludes that response-contingent…

  6. Verifying the Efficacy of Vocational Guidance Programs: Procedures, Problems, and Potential Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Justin C.; Dauwalder, Jean Pierre; Bonnett, Heather R.

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes 12 presentations in Group 7 of the 2007 joint symposium of the International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Society for Vocational Psychology, and National Career Development Association held in Padua, Italy, that focused on procedures for verifying the efficacy of vocational guidance programs. Three…

  7. Direct interactions of coxsackievirus B3 with immune cells in the splenic compartment of mice susceptible or resistant to myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D R; Wilson, J E; Carthy, C M; Yang, D; Kandolf, R; McManus, B M

    1996-01-01

    In vitro replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in cells of the immune system derived from uninfected adolescent A/J and C57BL/6J mice and replication of CVB3 in and association with immune cells from spleens of infected animals in vivo were assessed. Nonstimulated or mitogen-stimulated spleen cells were minimally permissive for viral replication during an 8-h period. Three days postinfection (p.i.), CVB3 RNA was localized in vivo to B cells and follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers in both A/J and C57BL/6J mice; however, extrafollicular localization was greater in C57BL/6J mice (P = 0.0054). Although the pattern of CVB3 RNA localization was different, the total load of infections virus (PFU per milligram of tissue) was not different. Splenic CVB3 titers (PFU per milligram of tissue) in both strains were maximal at day 3 or 4 p.i. and were back to baseline by day 7 p.i., with most infectious virus being non-cell associated. CVB3 titers (PFU per milligram of tissue) correlated directly with in situ hybridization positivity in splenic follicles and extrafollicular regions in both murine strains; however, follicular hybridization intensity was greater in A/J mice at day 5 p.i. (P = 0.021). Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 50.4% of total spleen cells positive for CVB3 antigen were B cells and 69.6% of positive splenic lymphocytes were B cells. Myocardial virus load in C57BL/6J mice was significantly lower than that in A/J mice at days 4 and 5 p.i. These data indicate that CVB3 replicates in murine splenocytes in vitro and in B cells and extrafollicular cells in vivo. PMID:8676490

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 Vpr induces differential regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules: Direct effect of Vpr on T cell activation and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi . E-mail: velpandi@pitt.edu

    2007-02-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral proteins disrupt the normal host cellular immune pathways thus exploiting the cellular machinery for replication, survival and to escape host immune attack. Here we evaluated the direct effects of HIV-1 Vpr-mediated immune modulation of infected T cells. Vpr specifically downregulated the expression of CD28 and increased the expression of CTLA-4, whereas no significant difference in the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR was observed. Interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) production in T cells was evaluated as a measure of the downstream effector functions. Results indicate that Vpr significantly inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and this may, in part, due to Vpr's ability to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and its transcriptional regulation. Together these results support that HIV-1 Vpr selectively dysregulates the immune functions at multiple levels and exerts its inhibitory effects in the presence of other viral proteins.

  9. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  10. World Health Organization's Innovative Direct Disbursement Mechanism for Payment of Grassroots Immunization Personnel and Operations in Nigeria: 2004–2015

    PubMed Central

    Yehualashet, Yared G.; Wadda, Alieu; Agblewonu, Koffi B.; Zhema, Theophilus; Ibrahim, Al-asi A.; Corr, Alhagie; Linkins, Jennifer; Mkanda, Pascal; Vaz, Rui G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Ashogbon, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Following the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate polio, the government of Nigeria, with support from partners, has been implementing several rounds of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) each year. In addition to the technical requirements, the success of the polio eradication initiative depends on timely provision of adequate financial resources. Disbursement of funds for SIAs and payment of allowances to numerous vaccination personnel at the grassroots level are enormous operational challenges in a country the size of Nigeria. Upon donors' request for a transparent and effective payment mechanism, the World Health Organization (WHO), in consultation with national counterparts, created the innovative direct disbursement mechanism (DDM) in 2004. The objective of the DDM was to timely deploy operational funds at the field level and directly pay vaccination personnel allowances at the grassroots level. Methods. A detailed operational guideline for funds disbursement was developed in close consultation with central and field stakeholders. Multiyear financial resource requirements and operational budgets for every campaign were produced by an interagency-coordinated finance subcommittee. The WHO engaged a bank and an accounting firm as DDM partners to support disbursement of and accounting for the SIA funds, respectively. The 37 WHO field offices were equipped with electronic financial systems to support the DDM process, and temporary payment sites were set up to facilitate payment to vaccination personnel at the grassroots level. Coordination meetings among DDM partners were held regularly to reconcile financial records and address operational challenges. Results. Between 2004 and 2014, DDM supported 99 polio and nonpolio vaccination campaigns, disbursing more than $370 million to about 16 million beneficiaries across 280 temporary payment sites. To mitigate security risks and reduce operational costs, the WHO and DDM

  11. Procedure for Direct Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Angle γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bediaga, I.; Blanco, R. E.; Göbel, C.; Méndez-Galain, R.

    1998-11-01

    A natural procedure is presented to measure the angle γ from the decay B+/--->π+/-π+π-. It is based in the Dalitz plot fitting analysis. Neither amplitudes nor strong phases have to be known a priori. We present simulations of this decay computing both statistical and theoretical uncertainties and analyze the experimental feasibility. We found that γ could be measured with a combined error of the order of 20° with 90% of C.L. after about a couple of years of running of the first generation of B factories.

  12. Three-dimensional viscous-flow computations using a directionally hybrid implicit-explicit procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Y. M.; Chaussee, D. S.

    A new, directionally dependent, hybrid numerical algorithm for solving the unsteady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations has been developed and used to compute the viscous supersonic flow over complex configurations, which may generate local regions of embedded subsonic or streamwise separated flows or both. The new hybrid implicit-explicit algorithm is derived from the more general implicit Beam-Warming algorithm and is particularly suitable for viscous computations in which the grid spacing in the direction outward from the body is considerably smaller than the spacing in the other two directions. Numerical results obtained from both the hybrid and implicit schemes are presented and compared on the basis of numerical stability, convergence history, and computer and core memory requirements.

  13. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids; Part I. Effects on growth performance, microbial populations and immune status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14 d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations following a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. Pigs were ch...

  14. Individually Guided Motivation: Goal-Setting Procedures to Develop Student Self-Direction and Prosocial Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausmeier, Herbert J.; And Others

    This paper describes research and development activities dealing with a system of individually guided motivation at a Wisconsin elementary school. Four general objectives for the project are stated. These deal with motivation for learning subject matter knowledge and skills, developing independence, assuming increasing self direction, and…

  15. Predictors of Differential Response to Cognitive, Experiential, and Self-Directed Psychotherapeutic Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Compared group cognitive therapy (CT); focused expressive psychotherapy; and supportive, self-directed therapy (S/SD) among 63 patients with major depressive disorder. Results suggest that patient characteristics can be used differentially to assign psychotherapy types. Externalizing patients and low defensive patients improved more in CT;…

  16. Common angiotensin receptor blockers may directly modulate the immune system via VDR, PPAR and CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Trevor G; Lee, Robert E; Marshall, Frances E

    2006-01-01

    Background There have been indications that common Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) may be exerting anti-inflammatory actions by directly modulating the immune system. We decided to use molecular modelling to rapidly assess which of the potential targets might justify the expense of detailed laboratory validation. We first studied the VDR nuclear receptor, which is activated by the secosteroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. This receptor mediates the expression of regulators as ubiquitous as GnRH (Gonadatrophin hormone releasing hormone) and the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH). Additionally we examined Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma), which affects the function of phagocytic cells, and the C-CChemokine Receptor, type 2b, (CCR2b), which recruits monocytes to the site of inflammatory immune challenge. Results Telmisartan was predicted to strongly antagonize (Ki≈0.04nmol) the VDR. The ARBs Olmesartan, Irbesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈10 nmol) are likely to be useful VDR antagonists at typical in-vivo concentrations. Candesartan (Ki≈30 nmol) and Losartan (Ki≈70 nmol) may also usefully inhibit the VDR. Telmisartan is a strong modulator of PPARgamma (Ki≈0.3 nmol), while Losartan (Ki≈3 nmol), Irbesartan (Ki≈6 nmol), Olmesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈12 nmol) also seem likely to have significant PPAR modulatory activity. Olmesartan andIrbesartan (Ki≈9 nmol) additionally act as antagonists of a theoretical modelof CCR2b. Initial validation of this CCR2b model was performed, and a proposed model for the AngiotensinII Type1 receptor (AT2R1) has been presented. Conclusion Molecular modeling has proven valuable to generate testable hypotheses concerning receptor/ligand binding and is an important tool in drug design. ARBs were designed to act as antagonists for AT2R1, and it was not surprising to discover their affinity for the structurally similar CCR2b. However, this study also found evidence that ARBs modulate the activation of two key

  17. Population-Level Impact of Ontario’s Infant Rotavirus Immunization Program: Evidence of Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rosella, Laura C.; Wang, Jun; Le Saux, Nicole; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Harris, Tara; Bolotin, Shelly; Deeks, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the direct and indirect population impact of rotavirus (RV) immunization on hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in Ontario before and after the publicly-funded RV immunization program. Methods Administrative data was used to identify ED visits and hospitalizations for all Ontarians using ICD-10 codes. We used two outcome definitions: RV-specific AGE (RV-AGE) and codes representing RV-, other viral and cause unspecified AGE (“overall AGE”). The pre-program and public program periods were August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2011; and August 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013, respectively. A negative binominal regression model that included the effect of time was used to calculate rates and rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for RV-AGE and overall AGE between periods, after adjusting for age, seasonality and secular trends. Analyses were conducted for all ages combined and age stratified. Results Relative to the pre-program period, the adjusted RRs for RV-AGE and overall AGE hospitalizations in the public program period were 0.29 (95%CI: 0.22–0.39) and 0.68 (95%CI: 0.62–0.75), respectively. Significant reductions in RV-AGE hospitalizations were noted overall and for the following age bands: < 12 months, 12–23 months, 24–35 months, 3–4 years, and 5–19 years. Significant declines in overall AGE hospitalizations were observed across all age bands, including older adults > = 65 years (RR 0.80, 95%CI: 0.72–0.90). The program was associated with adjusted RRs of 0.32 (95% CI: 0.20–0.52) for RV-AGE ED visits and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85–0.96) for overall AGE ED visits. Conclusions This large, population-based study provides evidence of the impact of RV vaccine in preventing hospitalizations and ED visits for RV-AGE and overall AGE, including herd effects. PMID:27168335

  18. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP) procedures under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF) field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany) using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany). The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N). The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation system. The irrigated tip

  19. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  20. Potential reference measurement procedures for PBDE in surface water at levels required by the EU Water Frame Directive.

    PubMed

    Swart, Claudia; Gantois, Fanny; Petrov, Panayot; Entwisle, John; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Nousiainen, Marjaana; Bílsel, Mine; Binici, Burcu; Gonzalez-Gago, Adriana; Pröfrock, Daniel; Gören, Ahmet C

    2016-05-15

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE), used as flame retardants, are named as priority substances in the Directive 2000/60/EC of the European parliament and of the council establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy. An annual average environmental quality standard (EQS) for inland surface waters of 0.0005 µg/L (0.0002 µg/L for other surface waters) for PBDE congeners involved in the technical penta-PBDE mixtures containing PBDE with five bromine atoms has been established. The directives focus especially on the congeners PBDE 28, 47, 99, 100, 153 and 154 contained in the penta-PBDE mixture. Up to now, no reference measurement procedures have been established reaching the limits of quantification (LOQs) and the associated uncertainties as defined in the directives with results traceable to the SI. Within a recent European project on metrology, different approaches for the traceable quantification of PBDE, based on liquid/liquid or solid phase extraction followed by the detection with gas chromatography coupled to either inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, were investigated and the related LOQs and expanded uncertainties of the results were compared. A complete uncertainty budget for each method was estimated according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). All presented analytical procedures can serve as reference measurement procedures regarding the LOQs and their associated expanded uncertainties for monitoring the six priority PBDEs named above. LOQs as low as 0.026 ng/kg with an associated expanded uncertainty of 0.002 ng/kg could be achieved. PMID:26992518

  1. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  2. Four-year Follow-up of a Direct Anatomical Fiber Post and Esthetic Procedures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Afm; Siqueira, Fsf; Davila-Sanchez, A; Gomes, G M; Reis, A; Gomes, J C

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the stability of fiber posts cemented in widened canal spaces over time is scarce in the literature. Thus, the purpose of this case report was to evaluate the performance of a direct anatomical post in a widened canal space over the course of four years. The present clinical case describes the rehabilitation of a widened canal space using a direct anatomical post (a resin composite combined with a prefabricated glass fiber post) associated with an all-ceramic crown and other restorative procedures. This technique is easy to perform and may solve some of the problems associated with the cementation of a poorly adapted fiber post in a widened canal space. PMID:27351079

  3. miR-146a is directly regulated by STAT3 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and involved in anti-tumor immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jian; Hou, Zhaohua; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in tumorigenesis, but their role in tumor-induced immune suppression is largely unknown. STAT3 signaling, a key pathway mediating immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment, is responsible for the transcription of several important miRNAs. In this study, we observed that miR-146a, a known important regulator of immune responses, was downregulated by blocking activated STAT3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Furthermore, miR-146a inhibition in HCC cells not only altered the STAT3 activation–associated cytokine profile but also reversed HCC-induced NK cell dysfunction in vitro and improved the anti-tumor effect of lymphocytes in vivo. Importantly, ChIP and luciferase reporter assays confirmed that STAT3 directly bound to the miR-146a promoter and induced miR-146a expression. These findings indicated that miR-146a expression was regulated by aberrantly activated STAT3 in HCC cells and exerted negative effects on anti-tumor immune response, which resulted in the upregulation of cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-17, VEGF and downregulation of type I IFN to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. This further insight into understanding the mechanism responsible for tumor-induced immune suppression highlights the potential application of miR-146a as a novel immunotherapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25607648

  4. Certification procedures for sirius red F3B (CI 35780, Direct red 80).

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W; Fagan, C; Kiernan, J A; Wickersham, T W

    2011-06-01

    Sirius red F3B (CI 35780, Direct red 80) is a polyazo dye used principally in staining methods for collagen and amyloid. For certification by the Biological Stain Commission, a sample of the dye must exhibit an absorption spectrum of characteristic shape with a maximum at 528-529 nm, a small shoulder near 500 nm and narrow peaks at 372, 281-282 and 230-235 nm. Spot tests (color changes with addition of concentrated H(2)SO(4) or HCl and subsequent dilution or neutralization) also are applied. The dye must perform satisfactorily in the picro-sirius red method for collagen by providing red staining of all types of collagen with yellow and green birefringence of fibers. Llewellyn's alkaline sirius red method applied to tissue known to contain amyloid must show red coloration of the products with green birefringence. Dye content, which does not influence significantly the staining properties of sirius red F3B, is not assayed. PMID:21417582

  5. Propanil Exposure Induces Delayed but Sustained Abrogation of Cell-Mediated Immunity through Direct Interference with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, James M.; Frankenberry, Marc A.; Schell, Todd D.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The postemergent herbicide propanil (PRN; also known as 3,4-dichloropropionanilide) is used on rice and wheat crops and has well-known immunotoxic effects on various compartments of the immune system, including T-helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages. It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1°) effectors of cell-mediated immunity. In this study we examined both the direct and indirect effects of PRN exposure on CTL activation and effector cell function to gauge its likely impact on cell-mediated immunity. Initial experiments addressed whether PRN alters the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway for antigen processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), thereby indirectly affecting effector function. These experiments demonstrated that PRN does not impair the activation of CTLs by PRN-treated APCs. Subsequent experiments addressed whether PRN treatment of CTLs directly inhibits their activation and revealed that 1° alloreactive CTLs exposed to PRN are unimpaired in their proliferative response and only marginally inhibited in their lytic activity. Surprisingly, secondary stimulation of these alloreactive CTL effectors, however, even in the absence of further PRN exposure, resulted in complete abrogation of CTL lytic function and a delayed but significant long-term effect on CTL responsiveness. These findings may have important implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of anomalies of cell-mediated immunity resulting from environmental exposure to various herbicides and other pesticides. PMID:16835059

  6. Periprocedural management of patients receiving a vitamin K antagonist or a direct oral anticoagulant requiring an elective procedure or surgery.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, A C; Al-Badri, A; Sherwood, M W; Douketis, J D

    2016-05-01

    The periprocedural management of patients receiving chronic therapy with oral anticoagulants (OACs), including vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin and direct OACs (DOACs), is a common clinical problem. The optimal perioperative management of patients receiving chronic OAC therapy is anchored on four key principles: (i) risk stratification of patient-related and procedure-related risks of thrombosis and bleeding; (ii) the clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event; (iii) discontinuation and reinitiation of OAC therapy on the basis of the pharmacokinetic properties of each agent; and (iv) whether aggressive management such as the use of periprocedural heparin bridging has advantages for the prevention of postoperative thromboembolism at the cost of a possible increase in bleeding risk. Recent data from randomized trials in patients receiving VKAs undergoing pacemaker/defibrillator implantation or using heparin bridging therapy for elective procedures or surgeries can now inform best practice. There are also emerging data on periprocedural outcomes in the DOAC trials for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the evidence for the periprocedural management of patients receiving chronic OAC therapy, focusing on recent randomized trials and large outcome studies, to address three key clinical scenarios: (i) can OAC therapy be safely continued for minor procedures or surgeries; (ii) if therapy with VKAs (especially warfarin) needs to be temporarily interrupted for an elective procedure/surgery, is heparin bridging necessary; and (iii) what is the optimal periprocedural management of the DOACs? In answering these questions, we aim to provide updated clinical guidance for the periprocedural management of patients receiving VKA or DOAC therapy, including the use of heparin bridging. PMID:26988871

  7. [Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with oral direct thrombin or factor Xa inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Sié, P; Samama, C-M; Godier, A; Rosencher, N; Steib, A; Llau, J-V; van der Linden, P; Pernod, G; Lecompte, T; Gouin-Thibault, I; Albaladejo, P

    2011-09-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. It is likely that patients on long-term treatment with DOAs will be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple, standardised laboratory assays, and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly from patient to patient. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low risk of haemorrhage, a therapeutic window of 48 h (last administration 24h before surgery, restart 24h after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination of the drug in all patients. The treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients with a high risk of thrombosis (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with an antecedent of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular weight, or unfractionated if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific anti-haemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa, or prothrombin concentrates, should not be given for prophylactic reversal, due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:21820844

  8. Characteristics of optical fire detector false alarm sources and qualification test procedures to prove immunity, phase 2, volume 3: Appendix 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedeke, A. D.; Gross, H. G.

    1995-05-01

    This study identified possible sources of UV, IR and visible radiations that may cause an optical fire detector to false alarm and/or affect its fire detection performance. The spectral irradiances of JP-4 pan fires and a multitude of lamps, hot bodies, and other of radiation stimuli that an optical detector may be exposed to in any type of aircraft shelter, hanger, facility, or ground location, were determined. Knowing the spectral irradiances of the required fire size and distance to be detected, it was then possible to determine at what distances would the potential false alarm source have to be to equal or exceed the fire's spectral irradiances in the 185nm - 250nm and 4.4lm bands. Considering the possible distance from detector to source, candidate false alarm sources were selected for detector immunity testing. Qualification test procedures were developed and tested. It was concluded that there are many possible false alarm sources and, if located too close to a detector, and the stimuli are modulated, most optical fire detectors would alarm.

  9. Induction of mucosal immune responses and protection of cattle against direct-contact challenge by intranasal delivery with foot-and-mouth disease virus antigen mediated by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Zhongwang; Lv, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Wenfa; Fang, Yuzhen; Chen, Haotai; Liu, Xinsheng; Shao, Junjun; Zhao, Furong; Ding, Yaozhong; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance specific mucosal, systemic, and cell-mediated immunity and to induce earlier onset of protection against direct-contact challenge in cattle by intranasal delivery of a nanoparticle-based nasal vaccine against type A foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). In this study, two kinds of nanoparticle-based nasal vaccines against type A FMD were designed: (1) chitosan-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) loaded with plasmid DNA (Chi-PLGA-DNA) and (2) chitosan-trehalose and inactivated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) (Chi-Tre-Inactivated). Cattle were immunized by an intranasal route with nanoparticles and then challenged for 48 hours by direct contact with two infected donor cattle per pen. Donors were inoculated intradermally in the tongue 48 hours before challenge, with 0.2 mL cattle-passaged FMDV. Serological and mucosal antibody responses were evaluated, and virus excretion and the number of contact infections were quantified. FMDV-specific secretory immunoglobulin (Ig)A (sIgA) antibodies in nasal washes were initially detected at 4 days postvaccination (dpv) with two kinds of nanoparticles. The highest levels of sIgA expression were observed in nasal washes, at 10 dpv, from animals with Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticles, followed by animals immunized once by intranasal route with a double dose of Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles and animals immunized by intranasal route three times with Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles (P<0.05). FMDV-specific IgA antibodies in serum showed a similar pattern. All animals immunized by intranasal route developed low levels of detectable IgG in serum at 10 dpv. Following stimulation with FMDV, the highest levels of proliferation were observed in splenocytes harvested from Chi-PLGA-DNA-immunized animals, followed by proliferation of cells harvested from Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticle-immunized animals (P<0.05). Higher protection rates were associated with the highest sIgA antibody responses induced in

  10. New directions in inflammation and immunity: the multi-functional role of the extracellular RNA/RNase system.

    PubMed

    Deindl, Elisabeth; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T

    2009-12-01

    In the mid-eighties of the last century, extracellular-proteolipid complexes have been identified in tumor patients and circulating RNA was suggested to represent a specific secretory product of cancer cells. The presence of specific types of RNA in a variety of cancer types proved to be useful in cancer diagnosis. It has been suggested that extracellular RNA and DNA are not inert molecules, but contain biological activities. Recent data have demonstrated that extracellular RNA is likely to present the up to now undefined "natural foreign surface", serving as an initiating factor in blood coagulation in vivo. Yet, extracellular RNA seems to have even more functions. Investigations on blood-brain-barrier have shown that extracellular RNA mediates endothelial permeability. Ample success has been achieved in administrating RNase in different animal models of vascular diseases, thereby significantly delaying thrombus formation and reducing cerebral edema formation with neuroprotection in acute stroke models. Furthermore, extracellular mammalian RNA was found to decrease tumor yield in a murine model system, suggesting that extracellular RNA might trigger immune response. Finally, extracellular nucleic acids were identified as danger signals involved in innate immunity related to neutrophil-mediated bacterial killing and haemocyte activation and coagulation in the insects. Thus, a new area of research on extracellular RNA functions with promising future perspectives just started in the field of inflammation and immunity. PMID:20361709

  11. Immunization: A Handbook for Schools. Vaccine-Preventable Communicable Disease Control. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of School Health Education and Services.

    This handbook was developed by the Bureau of School Health Education and Services of the New York State Education Department to provide school authorities with a guide for an effective school immunization program. It offers direction for local development of immunization policies and procedures, an overview of effective program activities, a…

  12. Increasing the Rigor of Procedural Fidelity Assessment: An Empirical Comparison of Direct Observation and Permanent Product Review Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Collier-Meek, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that procedural fidelity data are important for making valid decisions about intervention effectiveness, there is little empirical guidance for researchers and practitioners regarding how to assess procedural fidelity. A first step in moving procedural fidelity assessment research forward is to develop a…

  13. Systemic Bacterial Infection and Immune Defense Phenotypes in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sarah; Jacobson, Eliana; Chambers, Moria C.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the premier model organisms for studying the function and evolution of immune defense. Many aspects of innate immunity are conserved between insects and mammals, and since Drosophila can readily be genetically and experimentally manipulated, they are powerful for studying immune system function and the physiological consequences of disease. The procedure demonstrated here allows infection of flies by introduction of bacteria directly into the body cavity, bypassing epithelial barriers and more passive forms of defense and allowing focus on systemic infection. The procedure includes protocols for the measuring rates of host mortality, systemic pathogen load, and degree of induction of the host immune system. This infection procedure is inexpensive, robust and quantitatively repeatable, and can be used in studies of functional genetics, evolutionary life history, and physiology. PMID:25992475

  14. Containing "The Great Houdini" of viruses: combining direct acting antivirals with the host immune response for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Frelin, Lars; Brenndörfer, Erwin Daniel; Brass, Anette; Weiland, Ola; Chen, Margaret; Sällberg, Matti

    2013-01-01

    Presently the development of new therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is rapidly moving forward. Almost every week new data appear on how direct acting antivirals (DAAs) succeed or fail in clinical trials. Despite the potency of many of the DAA combinations, the effect exerted by ribavirin (RBV) is still needed for an effective therapy in many new DAA combinations. Due to the strong antiviral effect of DAAs, it is likely that a major complementary therapeutic effect exerted by RBV is immune modulation resulting in an increased barrier to development of resistance. For HCV genotype 1a infections elimination of pegylated interferon, is not possible in many DAA combinations without jeopardizing the results. The host immune response is thus likely to play a key role even during DAA-based therapies. Hence, T cells may recognize and eliminate viral variants with resistance to the DAAs. We herein show several examples where this may be the case, supporting the rationale of including the host response also in the new therapeutic regimens. This review will describe the potential benefits of combining various DAAs with means to activate the specific immune response against HCV. PMID:23911647

  15. Tremelimumab (anti-CTLA4) mediates immune responses mainly by direct activation of T effector cells rather than by affecting T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Burt, Deborah J; Ralph, Christy; Thistlethwaite, Fiona C; Hawkins, Robert E; Elkord, Eyad

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) blockade has shown antitumor activity against common cancers. However, the exact mechanism of immune mediation by anti-CTLA4 remains to be elucidated. Further understanding of how CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab mediates immune responses may allow a more effective selection of responsive patients. Our results show that tremelimumab enhanced the proliferative response of T effector cells (Teff) upon TCR stimulation, and abrogated Treg suppressive ability. In the presence of tremelimumab, frequencies of IL-2-secreting CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were increased in response to polyclonal activation and tumor antigens. Importantly, Treg frequency was not reduced in the presence of tremelimumab, and expanded Tregs in cancer patients treated with tremelimumab expressed FoxP3 with no IL-2 release, confirming them as bona fide Tregs. Taken together, this data indicates that tremelimumab induces immune responses mainly by direct activation of Teff rather than by affecting Tregs. PMID:21056008

  16. Protective immune-response of aluminium hydroxide gel adjuvanted phage lysate of Brucella abortus S19 in mice against direct virulent challenge with B. abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Jain, Lata; Rawat, Mayank; Prajapati, Awadhesh; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Bablu; Chaturvedi, V K; Saxena, H M; Ramakrishnan, Sarvanan; Kumar, Jatin; Kerketta, Priscilla

    2015-09-01

    The prophylactic efficacies of plain and alum adsorbed lysate were evaluated by direct virulent challenge in mice model. A recently isolated brucellaphage 'ϕLd' was used for generation of lysates. Twenty four h incubated Brucella abortus S19 broth cultures standardized to contain approximately 10(8) CFU/ml were found suitable for generation of lysates. Three lysate batches produced through separate cycles did not show any significant variation with respect to protein and polysaccharide contents, endotoxin level and phage counts, indicating that compositionally stable lysate preparations can be generated through an optimized production process. Three polypeptides of ∼16, 19 and 23 kDa could be identified as immuno-dominant antigens of the lysate which induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in a dose dependent manner. Results of efficacy evaluation trial confirmed dose-dependent protective potencies of lysate preparation. The lysate with an antigenic dose of 0.52 μg protein and 60 μg CHO adsorbed on aluminium gel (0.1 percent aluminium concentration) exhibited the highest protective potency which was greater than that induced by standard S19 vaccine. Phage lysate methodology provides a very viable option through which an improved immunizing preparation with all desirable traits can be developed against brucellosis, and integrated with immunization programmes in a more efficient manner. PMID:26156404

  17. Immunology-directed methods for distributed robotics: a novel immunity-based architecture for robust control and coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surya P. N.; Thayer, Scott M.

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithmic architecture for the coordination and control of large scale distributed robot teams derived from the constructs found within the human immune system. Using this as a guide, the Immunology-derived Distributed Autonomous Robotics Architecture (IDARA) distributes tasks so that broad, all-purpose actions are refined and followed by specific and mediated responses based on each unit's utility and capability to timely address the system's perceived need(s). This method improves on initial developments in this area by including often overlooked interactions of the innate immune system resulting in a stronger first-order, general response mechanism. This allows for rapid reactions in dynamic environments, especially those lacking significant a priori information. As characterized via computer simulation of a of a self-healing mobile minefield having up to 7,500 mines and 2,750 robots, IDARA provides an efficient, communications light, and scalable architecture that yields significant operation and performance improvements for large-scale multi-robot coordination and control.

  18. The Arabidopsis transcription factor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 is a direct substrate of MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 and regulates immunity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sining; Yang, Fan; Li, Lin; Chen, Huamin; Chen, She; Zhang, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are recognized by plant pattern recognition receptors to activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as other cytoplasmic kinases, integrate upstream immune signals and, in turn, dissect PTI signaling via different substrates to regulate defense responses. However, only a few direct substrates of these signaling kinases have been identified. Here, we show that PAMP perception enhances phosphorylation of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1), a transcription factor involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway, through pathogen-induced MAPKs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BES1 interacts with MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) and is phosphorylated by MPK6. bes1 loss-of-function mutants display compromised resistance to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. BES1 S286A/S137A double mutation (BES1(SSAA)) impairs PAMP-induced phosphorylation and fails to restore bacterial resistance in bes1 mutant, indicating a positive role of BES1 phosphorylation in plant immunity. BES1 is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3)-like kinase BR-insensitive2 (BIN2), a negative regulator of BR signaling. BR perception inhibits BIN2 activity, allowing dephosphorylation of BES1 to regulate plant development. However, BES1(SSAA) does not affect BR-mediated plant growth, suggesting differential residue requirements for the modulation of BES1 phosphorylation in PTI and BR signaling. Our study identifies BES1 as a unique direct substrate of MPK6 in PTI signaling. This finding reveals MAPK-mediated BES1 phosphorylation as another BES1 modulation mechanism in plant cell signaling, in addition to GSK3-like kinase-mediated BES1 phosphorylation and F box protein-mediated BES1 degradation. PMID:25609555

  19. MicroRNA-33–dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N.; Gundra, U. Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B.; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Loke, P’ng; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33–mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization–associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33–mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid–producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33–depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4+ T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3+ Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  20. CHOICE - Directed Study: Consequences of longterm- Confinement and Hypobaric HypOxia on Immunity in the Antarctic Concordia Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Pierson, Duane; Crucian, Brian; Chouker, Alexander; Feurecker, matthias; Salem, Alexander; Stowe, Raymond; Mehta, Satish; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    Concerning ground-based space physiological research, the choice of analog must carefully match the system of interest. For spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation (SAID), Antarctica winter-over has emerged as potentially the best terrestrial analog. The prolonged mission durations, extreme/dangerous environment, station-based lifestyle, isolation from outside world, disrupted circadian rhythms, and other psychological aspects make this analog extremely high fidelity for exploration-class space missions (long duration lunar, Mars). NASA, ESA and RSA are currently investigating SAID, with NASA currently operating the Integrated Immune flight study. It is desirable to have a ground analog for SAID validated, so that potential countermeasures might be validated terrestrially prior to during flight. For this presentation, NASA data collected on the winterover 2009 crewmembers, baseline through early deployment will be presented. Through early deployment (approximately 2-3 weeks at Concordia), phenotypic alterations included increased levels of memory T cells, shifts among the CD8+ T cell compartment to a more mature phenotype, and increases in constitutively activated T cells. CD8+/IFNg+ T cell percentages, and T cell blastogenesis functional responses were depressed early deployment as compared to healthy controls. In four compatible subjects, secreted T cell Th1/Th2 cytokines were measured following culture stimulation, and a Th2 shift was observed as compared to controls. Post-winter over frozen sample return will be required to determine if this shift persisted during the winter over period. Additionally, circadian rhythms remained altered compared to baseline, as determined through 5x daily cortisol measurements. Latent viral reactivation will not be determined until frozen sample return occurs.

  1. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship... NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a...

  2. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship... NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a...

  3. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship... NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a...

  4. A pilot study exploring the possibility of establishing guidance levels in x-ray directed interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, S.; Miller, D. L.; Vano, E.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Bernardi, G.; Cotelo, E.; Faulkner, K.; Nowotny, R.; Padovani, R.; Ramirez, A.

    2008-02-15

    This article summarizes the dosimetric results of an International Atomic Energy Agency coordinated research program to investigate the feasibility of adopting guidance levels for invasive coronary artery procedures. The main study collected clinical data from hospitals located in five countries. A total of 2265 coronary angiograms (CA) and 1844 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed. Substudies evaluated the dosimetric performance of 14 fluoroscopes, skin dose maps obtained using film, the quality of CA procedures, and the complexity of PCI procedures. Kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) guidance levels of 50 and 125 Gy cm{sup 2} are suggested for CA and PCI procedures. These levels should be adjusted for the complexity of the procedures performed in a given institution.

  5. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  6. Cells involved in the immune response. XXXVI. The thymic antigen-specific suppressor cell in the immunized rabbit is a T cell with receptors for FcG and the antigen and it acts, via a secreted suppressor factor, directly on the immune splenic AFC B cell to inhibit antibody secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Talor, E; Jodouin, C A; Richter, M

    1988-01-01

    Following i.v. immunization of the normal outbred rabbit with sheep (SRBC) or horse (HRBC) erythrocytes, antigen-specific suppressor cells are generated in the thymus capable of inhibiting the generation of haemolytic plaques by the autologous or allogeneic splenic antibody-forming cells (AFC) in the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. These suppressor cells secrete an antigen-specific suppressor factor in short-term (4-24 hr) culture in vitro. The suppressor cells are not detected in the thymus prior to Day 4, exhibit peak activity between Days 5 and 11 post-immunization, and decline slowly thereafter. Suppressor cells can no longer be detected in the thymus by Day 60 postimmunization. Suppressor cells are not detected in any of the other lymphoid organs of the immunized rabbit nor in any lymphoid organ in the unimmunized rabbit. The thymic suppressor cell is a T cell with surface receptors for the antigen (SRBC or HRBC) and for FcG. On the other hand, the AFC B cells generated in the spleen of the immunized rabbit possess cell-surface receptors for only the antigen and not for FcG. Both the suppressor cells and the secreted suppressor factor act directly on the AFC B lymphocytes to inhibit the generation of antigen-specific haemolytic plaques in the PFC assay. PMID:2455684

  7. Cellular and humoral immune responses to viral antigens create barriers to lung-directed gene therapy with recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Li, Q; Ertl, H C; Wilson, J M

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are an attractive vehicle for gene therapy to the lung in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). First-generation viruses deleted of E1a and E1b transduce genes into airway epithelial cells in vivo; however, expression of the transgene is transient and associated with substantial inflammatory responses, and gene transfer is significantly reduced following a second administration of the virus. In this study, we have used mice deficient in immunological effector functions in combination with adoptive and passive transfer techniques to define antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses that underlie these important limitations. Our studies indicate that major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes are activated in response to newly synthesized antigens, leading to destruction of virus infected cells and loss of transgene expression. Major histocompatibility complex class II-associated presentation of exogenous viral antigens activates CD4+ T-helper (TH) cells of the TH1 subset and, to a lesser extent, of the TH2 subset. CD4+ cell-mediated responses are insufficient in the absence of cytotoxic T cells to completely eliminate transgene containing cells; however, they contribute to the formation of neutralizing antibodies in the airway which block subsequent adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Definition of immunological barriers to gene therapy of cystic fibrosis should facilitate the design of rational strategies to overcome them. PMID:7884845

  8. The Effects of Direct Instruction Flashcard and Math Racetrack Procedures on Mastery of Basic Multiplication Facts by Three Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarr, Adam; Zielinski, Katie; Ruwe, Kellen; Sharp, Hannah; Williams, Randy L.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a typical third-grade boy and fifth-grade girl and a boy with learning disabilities could benefit from the combined use of Direct Instruction (DI) flashcard and math racetrack procedures in an after-school program. The dependent variable was accuracy and fluency of saying basic multiplication facts. A…

  9. Direct evidence for role of anti-saliva antibodies against salivary gland homogenate of P. argentipes in modulation of protective Th1-immune response against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Pushpanjali; Thakur, Ajit K; Purkait, Bidyut; Jamal, Fauzia; Singh, Manish K; Ahmed, Ghufran; Bimal, Sanjiva; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Subhankar K; Keshri, Srikant; Das, Pradeep; Narayan, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Currently the main concerns regarding control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by L. donovani are immunosuppression, relating toxicity of anti-leishmanial drug and little development in appropriate vaccine and vector (P. argentipes) control. Reports available from ex-vivo studies reflect significance of vector salivary gland homogenate (SGH) in reverting immunosuppression of infected VL subjects and as such the immunogenic nature of SGH can be a strategy to modulate immune system and anti-leishmanial function to enable immune response to control the disease. Several related studies also identified a better utility of vector anti-saliva antibodies in achieving such effects by an adoptive transfer approach instead of direct stimulation with SGH protein. However, conclusive evidences on VL cases are far beyond satisfactory to suggest role of SGH into modulation of host immune response in VL subjects in India. This study was under taken to make comparison on change in cytokines (TH1 and TH2) response pattern and anti-leishmanial macrophage (Mϕ) function following stimulation of their PBMCS with SGH protein derived from P. argentipes sand fly vector for VL or anti SGH antibodies raised in rabbit. This study reports for the first time that L. donovani sensitized healthy subject demonstrates an up-regulated Interferon-γ (TH1) and down regulate Interleukin-10 (TH2) production following stimulation of their PBMCs by P. argentipes anti-saliva antibodies accompanied with an improvement in anti-leishmanial Mϕ function for nitric oxide (NO) production. Subsequent experiments suggest that P. argentipes based anti-SGH antibodies when used to stimulate LD infected PBMCs in healthy subjects resulted in better clearance of Leishmania amastigotes load compare to SGH protein. Possibly the immunogenic components of anti-saliva an antibody maintains the level of protective cytokine (INF-γ) and seems to restrict the infection by host protection by vector saliva. PMID:27484246

  10. Directed selection of influenza virus produces antigenic variants that match circulating human virus isolates and escape from vaccine-mediated immune protection.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Anderson, Christopher S; Yang, Hongmei; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Fitzgerald, Theresa; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza vaccination does not provide 100% protection from infection, partly due to antigenic drift of the haemagglutinin (HA) protein. Low serum antibody titres increase the risk of infection. To determine whether there were additional correlates of risk, we examined the relationship between human serum immunity and antigenic variation in seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses. Seasonal H3N2 vaccine strains grown in the presence of heterogeneous human or mono-specific ferret antisera selected variants with mutations in the HA antigenic sites. Surprisingly, circulating strains infecting human subjects in the same seasons displayed mutations in the same positions, although only in one case did the change correspond to the same amino acid. Serum antibody titres were lower against both the in vitro selected and clinical isolates compared with the vaccine strains, suggesting that the mutations are relevant to vaccine failure. Antibody titres were also significantly lower in sera from infected subjects than in non-infected subjects, suggesting relatively poor responses to vaccination in the infected subjects. Collectively, the data suggest that risk from influenza infection is a result of poor response to vaccination, as well as encounter with drifted seasonal influenza virus antigenic variants. The results also show that directed selection under human immune pressure could reveal antigenic variants relevant to real-world drifted viruses, helping in annual vaccine re-formulation. PMID:26854888

  11. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  12. Direction for Alabama Reading Teachers #2: Ideas, Procedures, Techniques & Prescriptions for Teaching Basic Reading Skills. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Birmingham.

    Focusing upon reading problems and their identification, this handbook presents guidelines, procedures, techniques, and prescriptions for teaching basic reading skills to students who need assistance in becoming mature readers. The skills focused upon in the handbook are those of comprehension, oral reading, reading readiness, silent reading,…

  13. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients in Hierarchical Design Studies with Discrete Response Variables: A Note on a Direct Interval Estimation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling procedure that can be used to evaluate intraclass correlation coefficients in two-level settings with discrete response variables is discussed. The approach is readily applied when the purpose is to furnish confidence intervals at prespecified confidence levels for these coefficients in setups with binary or ordinal…

  14. Using Consensus Building Procedures with Expert Raters to Establish Comparison Scores of Behavior for Direct Behavior Rating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffery, Rose; Johnson, Austin H.; Bowler, Mark C.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Harrison, Sayward E.

    2015-01-01

    To date, rater accuracy when using Direct Behavior Rating (DBR) has been evaluated by comparing DBR-derived data to scores yielded through systematic direct observation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an alternative method for establishing comparison scores using expert-completed DBR alongside best practices in consensus building…

  15. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  16. Evaluation of solution procedures for material and/or geometrically nonlinear structural analysis by the direct stiffness method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricklin, J. A.; Haisler, W. E.; Von Riesemann, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the solution procedures available for the analysis of inelastic and/or large deflection structural behavior. A literature survey is given which summarized the contribution of other researchers in the analysis of structural problems exhibiting material nonlinearities and combined geometric-material nonlinearities. Attention is focused at evaluating the available computation and solution techniques. Each of the solution techniques is developed from a common equation of equilibrium in terms of pseudo forces. The solution procedures are applied to circular plates and shells of revolution in an attempt to compare and evaluate each with respect to computational accuracy, economy, and efficiency. Based on the numerical studies, observations and comments are made with regard to the accuracy and economy of each solution technique.

  17. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  18. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  19. Direct distal aortic arch graft cannulation after the elephant trunk procedure: technique for central cannulation during second-stage repair.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Pochettino, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Arterial cannulation after the elephant trunk (ET) procedure at the time of second-stage distal repair can be achieved through multiple routes. Common strategies for arterial perfusion at the time of second-stage aortic repair include retrograde perfusion (femoral/iliac vessels), transapical or left subclavian artery cannulation. In the event these cannulation options are not practical or advisable, we offer an alternative approach through cannulation of the distal aortic arch Dacron graft through the left thorax. Advantages include forward distal perfusion, minimal proximal ischaemic time, prevention of thromboembolic events from thrombus attached to the ET and avoidance of malperfusion syndromes. PMID:25281849

  20. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  1. 20 CFR 667.600 - What local area, State and direct recipient grievance procedures must be established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable to Job Corps are set forth at 20 CFR 670.990. (b) Each local area, State, and direct recipient... individuals. Such efforts must comply with the language requirements of 29 CFR 37.35 regarding the provision... do not apply to discrimination complaints brought under WIA section 188 and/or 29 CFR part 37....

  2. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... your healthy cells. How HIV Affects This Complex Process HIV disrupts this process by directly infecting the helper T-cells. Your ... T-cells are destroyed in the HIV replication process. For more information, see NIAID's The Immune System . ...

  3. Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income, Single-Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Blower-Door-Directed Infiltration Reduction Procedure, Field Test Implementation and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.B.

    2001-05-21

    A blower-door-directed infiltration retrofit procedure was field tested on 18 homes in south central Wisconsin. The procedure, developed by the Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation, includes recommended retrofit techniques as well as criteria for estimating the amount of cost-effective work to be performed on a house. A recommended expenditure level and target air leakage reduction, in air changes per hour at 50 Pascal (ACH50), are determined from the initial leakage rate measured. The procedure produced an average 16% reduction in air leakage rate. For the 7 houses recommended for retrofit, 89% of the targeted reductions were accomplished with 76% of the recommended expenditures. The average cost of retrofits per house was reduced by a factor of four compared with previous programs. The average payback period for recommended retrofits was 4.4 years, based on predicted energy savings computed from achieved air leakage reductions. Although exceptions occurred, the procedure's 8 ACH50 minimum initial leakage rate for advising retrofits to be performed appeared a good choice, based on cost-effective air leakage reduction. Houses with initial rates of 7 ACH50 or below consistently required substantially higher costs to achieve significant air leakage reductions. No statistically significant average annual energy savings was detected as a result of the infiltration retrofits. Average measured savings were -27 therm per year, indicating an increase in energy use, with a 90% confidence interval of 36 therm. Measured savings for individual houses varied widely in both positive and negative directions, indicating that factors not considered affected the results. Large individual confidence intervals indicate a need to increase the accuracy of such measurements as well as understand the factors which may cause such disparity. Recommendations for the procedure include more extensive training of retrofit crews, checks for minimum air exchange rates to insure air quality

  4. A comparison of the effect of water-delivered direct fed microbials or organic acids with an in-feed antibiotic on weanling pig growth performance, intestinal morphology, gut microbiota and immune status following a...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 days of age were used in a 14-days experiment to compare the effects of water delivered direct fed microbials (DFM) or a propionic acid (PA) based blend with an in-feed antibiotic on growth performance, intestinal morphology, gut microbiota and immune status following a Salm...

  5. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kevin A.; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Forster, Thorsten; Blanc, Mathieu; Lu, Hongjin; Crick, Peter J.; Yutuc, Eylan; Watterson, Steven; Martin, Kimberly; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Enright, Anton J.; Yamamoto, Mami; Pradeepa, Madapura M.; Lennox, Kimberly A.; Behlke, Mark A.; Talbot, Simon; Haas, Jürgen; Dölken, Lars; Griffiths, William J.; Wang, Yuqin; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN) signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1). Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway. PMID:26938778

  6. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  7. New procedure for direct measurements of absorbance of thin films of ultra-high absorbance UV blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Norman D.; Solsvik, A.; Murphy, L.; Stevenson, A.; O'Neill, M.; Moore, J.

    2005-06-01

    A novel method for the measurement of ultra-high absorbance liquids has been devised and details are given of a new ultra absorbance instrument developed specifically for these thin liquid film measurements. The instrument specifically constructed for monitoring and measuring sunscreen products has been tested using locally produced sunscreen products. This new approach has been made possible by the development of very accurate liquid micro-dispensers and details are given of the novel procedure to carry out these measurements. Detailed description of the apparatus construction is given with photographs of the apparatus. The work described is largely based on research and quality control measurements of Parasol suncare products. Results on the reproducibility of measurements taken with the UAI for a commercial range of factor 20 sunscreen liquid are given and these have been used to validate the performance of the instrument. It is believed that the absorbance measurements described here are perhaps the largest ever reported. In addition, the photostability of this product has been monitored in aging tests. Finally, some studies have been done on two other commercially available factor 20 products that show that these are significantly worse with regards to both protection from ageing and burn.

  8. Assessment of direct versus indirect magnetic bead-based T-cell isolation procedures followed by magnetic bead-based DNA isolation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anna; Bleck, Ellen; Schneider, Matthias; Pongratz, Georg; Vordenbäumen, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare direct and indirect bead-based T-cell isolation followed by magnetic bead-based DNA isolation. Methods T-cells were isolated by direct or indirect selection with magnetic bead coated antbiodies followed by magnetic bead-based automated DNA isolation in 10 healthy subjects. Purity of T-cells, purity of DNA (by A260/A280 ratio measurement) and DNA concentration were assessed. Results Direct and indirect labelling resulted in comparable T-cell purity (93.11±1.47% vs. 94.99±1.54%, p= 0.125) and DNA concentration per cell (50.97±14.15 ng/(mlxcell) vs. 49.53±13.62 ng/(mlxcell), p=0.492), while DNA purity was significantly higher after direct labelling (1.82±0.05 vs. 1.78±0.03, p=0.0488). Conclusions Both direct and indirect magnetic bead-based T-cell selection may be used prior to magnetic bead-based DNA isolation procedures. PMID:27547441

  9. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced them. Both branches of the immune system may interact in antitumor immune response. Major effector cells of the immune system that directly target thyroid cancer cells include dendritic cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes. A mixture of immune cells may infiltrate thyroid cancer microenvironment and the balance of protumor and antitumor activity of these cells may be associated with prognosis. Herein, we describe some evidences that immune response may be important for thyroid cancer progression and may help us identify more aggressive tumors, sparing the vast majority of patients from costly unnecessary invasive procedures. The future trend in thyroid cancer is an individualized therapy. PMID:25328756

  10. Application of the 2013 Wilson-Devinney Program’s Direct Distance Estimation procedure and enhanced spot modeling capability to eclipsing binaries in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Eugene F.; Schiller, Stephen J.

    2014-06-01

    A paradigm method to calibrate a range of standard candles by means of well-calibrated photometry of eclipsing binaries in star clusters is the Direct Distance Estimation (DDE) procedure, contained in the 2010 and 2013 versions of the Wilson-Devinney light-curve modeling program. In particular, we are re-examining systems previously studied in our Binaries-in-Clusters program and analyzed with earlier versions of the Wilson-Devinney program. Earlier we reported on our use of the 2010 version of this program, which incorporates the DDE procedure to estimate the distance to an eclipsing system directly, as a system parameter, and is thus dependent on the data and analysis model alone. As such, the derived distance is accorded a standard error, independent of any additional assumptions or approximations that such analyses conventionally require. Additionally we have now made use of the 2013 version, which introduces temporal evolution of spots, an important improvement for systems containing variable active regions, as is the case for the systems we are studying currently, namely HD 27130 in the Hyades and DS And in NGC 752. Our work provides some constraints on the effects of spot treatment on distance determination of active systems.

  11. New directional results and determination of absolute archaeointensity using both the classical Thellier and the multi-specimen procedures for two kilns excavated at Osterietta, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tema, Evdokia; Camps, Pierre; Ferrara, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    A detailed rock-magnetic and archaeomagnetic study has been carried out on two rescue excavation kilns discovered during the works to expand a highway at the location of Osterietta, in Northen Italy. Systematic archaeomagnetic sampling was carried out collecting 15 samples from the first kiln (OSA) and 8 samples from the second kiln (OSB), all of them oriented in situ with a magnetic compass and an inclinometer. Magnetic mineralogy measurements have been carried out in order to determine the main magnetic carrier of the samples and to check their thermal stability. Standard thermal demagnetization procedures have been used to determine the archaeomagnetic direction registered by the bricks during their last firing. Demagnetization results show a very stable characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). We averaged the directions for each kiln separately and calculated the statistical parameters assuming a Fisherian distribution. The archaeointensity of both kilns has also been recovered with both the classical Thellier-Thellier method and the multi-specimen procedure (MSP-DSC). During the Thellier experiments, regular partial thermoremanent magnetization checks have been performed and the effect of the anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) and cooling rate upon TRM intensity acquisition have been investigated in all samples. The multi-specimen procedure was performed with a very fast-heating oven developed at Montpellier (France). The intensity results obtained from both methods have been compared and the full geomagnetic field vector determined for each kiln has been used for archaeomagnetic dating. The obtained results show that the kilns were almost contemporaneous and their last use occurred in the 1750-1850 AD time interval.

  12. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  13. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  14. Siglecs and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv; Netravali, Ilka Arun; Cariappa, Annaiah; Mattoo, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Sialic acid binding Ig-like lectins or Siglecs vary in their specificity for sialic acid containing ligands and are mainly expressed by cells of the immune system. Many siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in innate immune cells that regulate inflammation mediated by DAMPs and PAMPs. This family also includes molecules involved in adhesion and phagocytosis and receptors that can associate with the ITAM containing DAP12 adaptor. Siglecs contribute to the inhibition of immune cells both by binding to cis-ligands (expressed in the same cells) as well as by responding to pathogen derived sialoglycoconjugates. They can help maintain tolerance in B lymphocytes, modulate the activation of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and contribute to the regulation of T cell function both directly and indirectly. Siglecs modulate immune responses influencing almost every cell in the immune system, and are of relevance both in health and disease. PMID:22224769

  15. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    PubMed Central

    de Roode, Jacobus C.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied. PMID:26466629

  16. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  17. Echinoderm immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  18. Assessing the utility of phase-space-localized basis functions: Exploiting direct product structure and a new basis function selection procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, James; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we show that it is possible to use an iterative eigensolver in conjunction with Halverson and Poirier's symmetrized Gaussian (SG) basis [T. Halverson and B. Poirier, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 224101 (2012)] to compute accurate vibrational energy levels of molecules with as many as five atoms. This is done, without storing and manipulating large matrices, by solving a regular eigenvalue problem that makes it possible to exploit direct-product structure. These ideas are combined with a new procedure for selecting which basis functions to use. The SG basis we work with is orders of magnitude smaller than the basis made by using a classical energy criterion. We find significant convergence errors in previous calculations with SG bases. For sum-of-product Hamiltonians, SG bases large enough to compute accurate levels are orders of magnitude larger than even simple pruned bases composed of products of harmonic oscillator functions.

  19. The intestinal microbiome, barrier function, and immune system in inflammatory bowel disease: a tripartite pathophysiological circuit with implications for new therapeutic directions

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, Stephen M.; Zisman, Timothy L.; Suskind, David L.; Damman, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the tripartite pathophysiological circuit of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), involving the intestinal microbiota, barrier function, and immune system. Dysfunction in each of these physiological components (dysbiosis, leaky gut, and inflammation) contributes in a mutually interdependent manner to IBD onset and exacerbation. Genetic and environmental risk factors lead to disruption of gut homeostasis: genetic risks predominantly affect the immune system, environmental risks predominantly affect the microbiota, and both affect barrier function. Multiple genetic and environmental ‘hits’ are likely necessary to establish and exacerbate disease. Most conventional IBD therapies currently target only one component of the pathophysiological circuit, inflammation; however, many patients with IBD do not respond to immune-modulating therapies. Hope lies in new classes of therapies that target the microbiota and barrier function. PMID:27366227

  20. Interventional procedure based on nanorobots propelled and steered by flagellated magnetotactic bacteria for direct targeting of tumors in the human body.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sylvain; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria used as bio-actuators may prove to be efficient propulsion mechanisms for future hybrid medical nanorobots when operating in the microvasculature. Here, we briefly describe a medical interventional procedure where flagellated bacteria and more specifically MC-1 Magnetotactic Bacteria (MTB) can be used to propel and steer micro-devices and nanorobots under computer control to reach remote locations in the human body. In particular, we show through experimental results the potential of using MTB-tagged robots to deliver therapeutic agents to tumors even the ones located in deep regions of the human body. We also show that such bacterial nanorobots can be tracked inside the human body for enhanced targeting under computer guidance using MRI as imaging modality. MTB can not only be guided and controlled directly towards a specific target, but we also show experimentally that these flagellated bacterial nanorobots can be propelled and steered in vivo deeply through the interstitial region of a tumor. The targeting efficacy is increased when combined with larger ferromagnetic micro-carriers being propelled by magnetic gradients generated by a MRI platform to carry and release nanorobots propelled by a single flagellated bacterium near the arteriocapillar entry. Based on the experimental data obtained and the experience gathered during several experiments conducted in vivo with this new approach, a general medical interventional procedure is briefly described here in a biomedical engineering context. PMID:19163210

  1. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  2. Bone dynamics in the upward direction after a maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure: serial segmentation using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Bark, Chung Wung; Lim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Yong-Gun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Maxillary sinus floor augmentation has been shown to be the most predictable surgical technique for enhancing the bone volume in the posterior area of the maxilla. The purpose of this study was to analyze the serial slice image segmentation of newly formed bone and bone substitutes after sinus floor elevation using synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT). Materials and methods Bone biopsy specimens were collected after 6 months of sinus floor augmentation. From the six bone biopsy specimens, the cross-sectional images at every 8 μm along the apical direction from the inferior border using serial segmentation from three-dimensional reconstructed X-ray images were analyzed. The amount of new bone and bone substitutes were measured at each slicing image (300–430 images per specimen). Results The bone dynamics between the new bone and bone substitutes along the inferior–superior direction in humans after maxillary sinus floor elevation (MSFE) were analyzed using the whole sample region. Although these observations suggest that the specimens are structurally inhomogeneous, sinus floor elevation was confirmed to be a reliable surgical procedure for increasing the amount of bone. Conclusion SR-μCT is highly effective for obtaining high-resolution images. An analysis of biological specimens using SR-μCT is quite reliable and this technique will be an important tool in the wide field of tissue engineering. PMID:26347146

  3. Injectable, spontaneously assembling inorganic scaffolds modulate immune cells in vivo and increase vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyun; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Choi, Youngjin; Lewin, Sarah A.; Verbeke, Catia S.; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Materials implanted in the body to program host immune cells are a promising alternative to transplantation of ex vivo–manipulated cells to direct an immune response, but required a surgical procedure. Here we demonstrate that high-aspectratio, mesoporous silica rods (MSRs) injected with a needle spontaneously assemble in vivo to form macroporous structures that provide a 3D cellular microenvironment for host immune cells. In mice, substantial numbers of DCs are recruited to the pores between the scaffold rods. The recruitment of DCs and their subsequent homing to lymph nodes can be modulated by sustained release of inflammatory signals and adjuvants from the scaffold. Moreover, injection of an MSR-based vaccine formulation enhances systemic TH1 and TH2 serum antibody and cytotoxic T cell levels compared to bolus controls. These findings suggest that injectable MSRs may serve as a multifunctional vaccine platform to modulate host immune cell function and provoke adaptive immune responses. PMID:25485616

  4. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  5. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  6. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  7. Persistence of long-lived plasma cells and humoral immunity in individuals responding to CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhoj, Vijay G; Arhontoulis, Dimitrios; Wertheim, Gerald; Capobianchi, James; Callahan, Colleen A; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Obstfeld, Amrom E; Lacey, Simon F; Melenhorst, Jan J; Nazimuddin, Farzana; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Maude, Shannon L; Wasik, Mariusz A; Bagg, Adam; Schuster, Stephen; Feldman, Michael D; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephen A; June, Carl H; Milone, Michael C

    2016-07-21

    The mechanisms underlying the maintenance of long-lasting humoral immunity are not well understood. Studies in mice indicate that plasma cells (PCs) can survive up to a lifetime, even in the absence of regeneration by B cells, implying the presence of long-lived PCs as a mechanism for long-lasting immunity. Evidence from humans treated with anti-CD20, which depletes circulating B cells, also suggests B-cell-independent long-term survival of some PCs. On the other hand, antibody responses may be sustained solely by short-lived PCs with repopulation from clonally related memory B cells. To explore PC longevity and humoral immunity in humans, we investigated the fate of PCs and their antibodies in adult and pediatric patients who received chimeric antigen receptor-based adoptive T-cell immunotherapy targeting CD19 to treat B-cell lineage malignancies (CTL019). Treatment with CTL019 is frequently associated with B-cell aplasia that can persist for years. Serum antibody titers to vaccine-related antigens were measured, and quantitative assessment of B cells and PCs in blood and bone marrow was performed at various time points before and after CTL019 therapy. While total serum immunoglobulin concentrations decline following CTL019-induced B-cell aplasia, several vaccine/pathogen-specific serum immunoglobulin G and A (IgG and IgA) titers remain relatively stable for at least 6 and 12 months posttreatment, respectively. Analysis of bone marrow biopsies after CTL019 revealed 8 patients with persistence of antibody-secreting PCs at least 25 months post-CTL019 infusion despite absence of CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of memory B-cell-independent, long-lived PCs in humans that contribute to long-lasting humoral immunity. PMID:27166358

  8. Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—a fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Damin, Isabel C F; López-Sánchez, José F; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M

    2015-03-01

    Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC-ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood. PMID:25618661

  9. Immunity challenge.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R John

    2003-06-11

    As people get older, their immune systems falter. The elderly are more susceptible to infections than youngsters are, and hyperactive inflammatory responses appear to contribute to some age-associated illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Investigating the effect of aging on the immune system was once a scientific stepchild, but card-carrying immunologists are now tackling the problem head-on. Despite the immune system's complexity, researchers have started to make sense of how its components change with age. As the research progresses, scientists hope to bolster elderly people's response to infectious diseases and quiet the inflammation that can make aging a painful experience. PMID:12844525

  10. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  11. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. An ... avoided, however, if global vaccination coverage improves. An estimated 19.4 million infants worldwide are still missing ...

  12. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and tissue repair. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... and adaptive immune systems. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    Today, children in the United States routinely get vaccines that protect them from more than a dozen ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ...

  14. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  15. Restriction-PCR fingerprinting of the immunoglobulin VH repertoire: direct detection of an immune response and global analysis of B cell clonality.

    PubMed

    White, H N

    1998-10-01

    Here we describe a method for fingerprinting the mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (VH) repertoire. Using a novel combination of existing techniques, large numbers of expressed VH genes can be simultaneously displayed as a fingerprint of VH gene fragments on a sequencing gel. This is achieved using isotype-specific reverse transcription-PCR amplification, restriction digestion and end-labeled primer run-offs. This technique (Res-PCR) allows analysis of the immune response, in this case to phenyloxazolone, in several different tissues and enables molecular cloning and sequencing of the VH genes involved in vivo. In addition, with Res-PCR, a "global" picture of expressed immunoglobulin genes is represented. This elucidates B cell clonality in different tissues and isotypes and detects a preference for shorter complementarity-determining region 3 in IgM-expressing cells. Res-PCR is a rapid and revealing method which will allow analysis of the complexity and sequence composition of the B cell immunoglobulin repertoire and so perhaps better define the B cell memory compartment and immune responses in vivo. PMID:9808196

  16. Evidence of direct estrogenic regulation of human corticotropin-releasing hormone gene expression. Potential implications for the sexual dimophism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, N C; Chrousos, G P

    1993-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays major roles in coordination of the stress response and regulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction, two important functions associated with sexual dimorphism. Two overlapping segments of the 5' flanking region of the human (h) CRH gene, the proximal 0.9 kb (containing two perfect half-palindromic estrogen-responsive elements [EREs]) and the 2.4 kb (including the former and containing two additional perfect half-palindromic EREs), were examined for their ability to confer estrogen-mediated transcriptional enhancement to a homologous or heterologous promoter. The level of estrogen-induced transactivation by the 0.9- and 2.4-kb segments was determined by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase analysis in CV-1 cells cotransfected with estrogen receptor (ER) cDNA expression plasmids, and found to be respectively approximately 10% and 20% of that of the strongly estrogen-responsive Xenopus vitellogenin A2 enhancer. Gel retardation and immunoprecipitation demonstrated specific association between the perfect half-palindromic EREs of hCRH gene and the DNA binding domain of hER in vitro. These findings may constitute the basis of sexual dimorphism in the expression of the CRH gene in the central nervous system and periphery, and might shed light in existing gender differences in stress response and immune regulation. Images PMID:8408641

  17. Directed interactions of block copolypept(o)ides with mannose-binding receptors: PeptoMicelles targeted to cells of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Heller, Philipp; Mohr, Nicole; Birke, Alexander; Weber, Benjamin; Reske-Kunz, Angelika; Bros, Matthias; Barz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell structures based on polypept(o)ides combine stealth-like properties of the corona material polysarcosine with adjustable functionalities of the polypeptidic core. Mannose-bearing block copolypept(o)ides (PSar-block-PGlu(OBn)) have been synthesized using 11-amino-3,6,9-trioxa-undecyl-2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-O-α-D-mannopyranoside as initiator in the sequential ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides. These amphiphilic block copolypept(o)ides self-assemble into multivalent PeptoMicelles and bind to mannose-binding receptors as expressed by dendritic cells. Mannosylated micelles showed enhanced cell uptake in DC 2.4 cells and in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and therefore appear to be a suitable platform for immune modulation. PMID:25560686

  18. Effects of Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials on growth performance, immune characteristics and resistance against experimental coccidiosis in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary Bacillus-based direct-fed microbials (DFMs) on cytokine expression patterns, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) subpopulation, splenocyte proliferation, macrophage functions and resistance against experimental coccidiosis ...

  19. Skin Immunization Obviates Alcohol-Related Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Rhonda M.; Stottlemyer, John Mark; Cline, Rachel A.; Donahue, Cara; Behari, Jaideep; Falo, Louis D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics suffer from immune dysfunction that can impede vaccine efficacy. If ethanol (EtOH)-induced immune impairment is in part a result of direct exposure of immune cells to EtOH, then reduced levels of exposure could result in less immune dysfunction. As alcohol ingestion results in lower alcohol levels in skin than blood, we hypothesized that the skin immune network may be relatively preserved, enabling skin-targeted immunizations to obviate the immune inhibitory effects of alcohol consumption on conventional vaccines. We employed the two most common chronic EtOH mouse feeding models, the liver-damaging Lieber-DeCarli (LD) and liver-sparing Meadows-Cook (MC) diets, to examine the roles of EtOH and/or EtOH-induced liver dysfunction on alcohol related immunosuppression. Pair-fed mice were immunized against the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) by DNA immunization or against flu by administering the protein-based influenza vaccine either systemically (IV, IM), directly to liver (hydrodynamic), or cutaneously (biolistic, ID). We measured resulting tissue EtOH levels, liver stress, regulatory T cell (Treg), and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations. We compared immune responsiveness by measuring delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and antibody induction as a function of delivery route and feeding model. We found that, as expected, and independent of the feeding model, EtOH ingestion inhibits DTH, CTL lysis, and antigen-specific total IgG induced by traditional systemic vaccines. On the other hand, skin-targeted vaccines were equally immunogenic in alcohol-exposed and non-exposed subjects, suggesting that cutaneous immunization may result in more efficacious vaccination in alcohol-ingesting subjects. PMID:26561838

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING INGESTION EXPOSURE FROM DAY 4 COMPOSITE MEASUREMENTS, THE DIRECT METHOD OF EXPOSURE ESTIMATION (IIT-A-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures undertaken for calculating ingestion exposure from Day 4 composite measurements from duplicate diet using the direct method of exposure estimation. This SOP uses data that have been properly coded and certified with appropria...

  1. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kistangari, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary or a secondary form. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age-specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP. This article summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. PMID:23714309

  2. Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Parasites Induce Innate Immunity through Classical Activation of Macrophages That Direct the Th1 Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Kruhlak, Michael; Ismail, Nevien; Debrabant, Alain; Joshi, Amritanshu B.; Akue, Adovi; Kukuruga, Mark; Takeda, Kazuyo; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) causes significant mortality and there is no effective vaccine. Previously, we have shown that genetically modified Leishmania donovani parasites, here described as live attenuated parasites, induce a host protective adaptive immune response in various animal models. In this study, we demonstrate an innate immune response upon infection with live attenuated parasites in macrophages from BALB/c mice both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro infection of macrophages with live attenuated parasites (compared to that with wild-type [WT] L. donovani parasites) induced significantly higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-12 [IL-12], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and IL-6), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCL-2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/CCL-3, and IP-10), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide, while concomitantly reducing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and arginase-1 activities, suggesting a dominant classically activated/M1 macrophage response. The classically activated response in turn helps in presenting antigen to T cells, as observed with robust CD4+ T cell activation in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice also demonstrated induction of an M1 macrophage phenotype, indicated by upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and downregulation of genes associated with the M2 phenotype, i.e., the IL-10, YM1, Arg-1, and MRC-1 genes, compared to WT L. donovani-infected mice. Furthermore, an ex vivo antigen presentation assay showed macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice induced higher IFN-γ and IL-2 but significantly less IL-10 production by ovalbumin-specific CD4+ T cells, resulting in proliferation of Th1 cells. These data suggest that infection with live attenuated parasites promotes a state of classical activation (M1 dominant) in macrophages that

  3. Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Parasites Induce Innate Immunity through Classical Activation of Macrophages That Direct the Th1 Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K; Kruhlak, Michael; Ismail, Nevien; Debrabant, Alain; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi; Kukuruga, Mark; Takeda, Kazuyo; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2015-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) causes significant mortality and there is no effective vaccine. Previously, we have shown that genetically modified Leishmania donovani parasites, here described as live attenuated parasites, induce a host protective adaptive immune response in various animal models. In this study, we demonstrate an innate immune response upon infection with live attenuated parasites in macrophages from BALB/c mice both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro infection of macrophages with live attenuated parasites (compared to that with wild-type [WT] L. donovani parasites) induced significantly higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-12 [IL-12], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and IL-6), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCL-2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/CCL-3, and IP-10), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide, while concomitantly reducing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and arginase-1 activities, suggesting a dominant classically activated/M1 macrophage response. The classically activated response in turn helps in presenting antigen to T cells, as observed with robust CD4(+) T cell activation in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice also demonstrated induction of an M1 macrophage phenotype, indicated by upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and downregulation of genes associated with the M2 phenotype, i.e., the IL-10, YM1, Arg-1, and MRC-1 genes, compared to WT L. donovani-infected mice. Furthermore, an ex vivo antigen presentation assay showed macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice induced higher IFN-γ and IL-2 but significantly less IL-10 production by ovalbumin-specific CD4(+) T cells, resulting in proliferation of Th1 cells. These data suggest that infection with live attenuated parasites promotes a state of classical activation (M1 dominant) in macrophages that

  4. DOPS (Direct Observation of Procedural Skills) in undergraduate skills-lab: Does it work? Analysis of skills-performance and curricular side effects

    PubMed Central

    Profanter, Christoph; Perathoner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sufficient teaching and assessing clinical skills in the undergraduate setting becomes more and more important. In a surgical skills-lab course at the Medical University of Innsbruck fourth year students were teached with DOPS (direct observation of procedural skills). We analyzed whether DOPS worked or not in this setting, which performance levels could be reached compared to tutor teaching (one tutor, 5 students) and which curricular side effects could be observed. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial in summer 2013 (April – June) four competence-level-based skills were teached in small groups during one week: surgical abdominal examination, urethral catheterization (phantom), rectal-digital examination (phantom), handling of central venous catheters. Group A was teached with DOPS, group B with a classical tutor system. Both groups underwent an OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) for assessment. 193 students were included in the study. Altogether 756 OSCE´s were carried out, 209 (27,6%) in the DOPS- and 547 (72,3%) in the tutor-group. Results: Both groups reached high performance levels. In the first month there was a statistically significant difference (p<0,05) in performance of 95% positive OSCE items in the DOPS-group versus 88% in the tutor group. In the following months the performance rates showed no difference anymore and came to 90% in both groups. In practical skills the analysis revealed a high correspondence between positive DOPS (92,4%) and OSCE (90,8%) results. Discussion: As shown by our data DOPS furnish high performance of clinical skills and work well in the undergraduate setting. Due to the high correspondence of DOPS and OSCE results DOPS should be considered as preferred assessment tool in a students skills-lab. The approximation of performance-rates within the months after initial superiority of DOPS could be explained by an interaction between DOPS and tutor system: DOPS elements seem to have improved

  5. HSV-1 amplicon vectors that direct the in situ production of foot-and-mouth disease virus antigens in mammalian cells can be used for genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Laimbacher, Andrea S; La Torre, Jose; Tribulatti, Virginia; Romanutti, Carina; Zamorano, Patricia; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel; Mattion, Nora

    2010-10-28

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors encoding heterologous antigens were capable to mediate in situ generation of protein synthesis and to generate a specific immune response to the corresponding antigens. In this study, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus antigens were used to generate a genetic vaccine prototype. The amplicons were designed to provide a high safety profile as they do not express any HSV-1 genes when packaged using a helper virus-free system, and they are able to encapsidate several copies of the transgene or allow the simultaneous expression of different genes. Virus-like particles were produced after cell processing of the delivered DNA. Inoculation of mice with 5 × 10(5) transducing units of amplicon vectors resulted in FMDV-specific humoral responses in the absence of adjuvants, which were dependent on the in situ de novo production of the vector-encoded antigens. Challenge of mice vaccinated with these amplicons with a high dose of live virus, resulted in partial protection, with a significant reduction of viremia. This work highlights the potential use of a HSV-1 amplicon vector platform for generation of safe genetic vaccines. PMID:20851082

  6. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  7. 28 CFR 35.178 - State immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State immunity. 35.178 Section 35.178 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.178 State immunity. A State shall not be...

  8. 28 CFR 35.178 - State immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State immunity. 35.178 Section 35.178 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.178 State immunity. A State shall not be...

  9. 28 CFR 35.178 - State immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State immunity. 35.178 Section 35.178 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.178 State immunity. A State shall not be...

  10. 28 CFR 35.178 - State immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State immunity. 35.178 Section 35.178 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.178 State immunity. A State shall not be...

  11. 28 CFR 35.178 - State immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State immunity. 35.178 Section 35.178 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.178 State immunity. A State shall not be...

  12. Making healthier or killing enemies? Bacterial volatile-elicited plant immunity plays major role upon protection of Arabidopsis than the direct pathogen inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Rouhallah; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles protect plants either by directly inhibiting a pathogenic fungus or by improving the defense capabilities of plants. The effect of bacterial volatiles on fungal growth was dose-dependent. A low dosage did not have a noticeable effect on Botrytis cinerea growth and development, but was sufficient to elicit induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bacterial volatiles displayed negative effects on biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface and in in planta leaf colonization of B. cinerea. However, bacterial volatile-mediated induced resistance was the major mechanism mediating protection of plants from B. cinerea. It was responsible for more than 90% of plant protection in comparison with direct fungal inhibition. Our results broaden our knowledge of the role of bacterial volatiles in plant protection. PMID:27574539

  13. Making healthier or killing enemies? Bacterial volatile-elicited plant immunity plays major role upon protection of Arabidopsis than the direct pathogen inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Rouhallah; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial volatiles protect plants either by directly inhibiting a pathogenic fungus or by improving the defense capabilities of plants. The effect of bacterial volatiles on fungal growth was dose-dependent. A low dosage did not have a noticeable effect on Botrytis cinerea growth and development, but was sufficient to elicit induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bacterial volatiles displayed negative effects on biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface and in in planta leaf colonization of B. cinerea. However, bacterial volatile-mediated induced resistance was the major mechanism mediating protection of plants from B. cinerea. It was responsible for more than 90% of plant protection in comparison with direct fungal inhibition. Our results broaden our knowledge of the role of bacterial volatiles in plant protection. PMID:27574539

  14. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kistanguri, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary form characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 × 109/L) in the absence of other causes or disorders that may be associated with thrombocytopenia, or a secondary form in which immune thrombocytopenia develops in association with another disorder that is usually immune or infectious. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP, with the risk of bleeding and related morbidity increased in elderly patients. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Thrombocytopenia is caused by antibodies that react with glycoproteins expressed on platelets and megakaryocytes (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, Ib/IX and others), causing shortened survival of circulating platelets and impairing platelet production. Diminished numbers and function of regulatory T cells, as well as the effects of cytotoxic T cells also contribute to the pathogenesis of ITP. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP, occasionally in conjunction with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and anti-Rh(D). However, these agents do not lead to durable remissions in the majority of adults with ITP, and considerable heterogeneity exists in the use of second line approaches, which may include splenectomy, Rituximab, or thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TRAs). This review summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding and management of ITP have been achieved over the last decade, though many questions remain. PMID:23714309

  15. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  16. Progranulin does not bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors and is not a direct regulator of TNF-dependent signaling or bioactivity in immune or neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Chang, Jianjun; Deng, Qiudong; Xu, Jie; Nguyen, Thi A; Martens, Lauren H; Cenik, Basar; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F; Chung, Jaegwon; Yu, Kimberley; Yu, Phillip; Herz, Joachim; Farese, Robert V; Kukar, Thomas; Tansey, Malú G

    2013-05-22

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in neurons and glia that is implicated in neuronal survival on the basis that mutations in the GRN gene causing haploinsufficiency result in a familial form of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recently, a direct interaction between PGRN and tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR I/II) was reported and proposed to be a mechanism by which PGRN exerts anti-inflammatory activity, raising the possibility that aberrant PGRN-TNFR interactions underlie the molecular basis for neuroinflammation in frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathogenesis. Here, we report that we find no evidence for a direct physical or functional interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Using coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we replicated the interaction between PGRN and sortilin and that between TNF and TNFRI/II, but not the interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Recombinant PGRN or transfection of a cDNA encoding PGRN did not antagonize TNF-dependent NFκB, Akt, and Erk1/2 pathway activation; inflammatory gene expression; or secretion of inflammatory factors in BV2 microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Moreover, PGRN did not antagonize TNF-induced cytotoxicity on dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells. Last, co-addition or pre-incubation with various N- or C-terminal-tagged recombinant PGRNs did not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene expression or cytokine secretion in any cell type examined, including BMDMs from Grn+/- or Grn-/- mice. Therefore, the neuroinflammatory phenotype associated with PGRN deficiency in the CNS is not a direct consequence of the loss of TNF antagonism by PGRN, but may be a secondary response by glia to disrupted interactions between PGRN and Sortilin and/or other binding partners yet to be identified. PMID:23699531

  17. Progranulin Does Not Bind Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptors and Is Not a Direct Regulator of TNF-Dependent Signaling or Bioactivity in Immune or Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Chang, Jianjun; Deng, Qiudong; Xu, Jie; Nguyen, Thi A.; Martens, Lauren H.; Cenik, Basar; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F.; Chung, Jaegwon; Yu, Kimberley; Yu, Phillip; Herz, Joachim; Farese, Robert V.; Kukar, Thomas; Tansey, Malú G.

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in neurons and glia that is implicated in neuronal survival on the basis that mutations in the GRN gene causing haploinsufficiency result in a familial form of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recently, a direct interaction between PGRN and tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR I/II) was reported and proposed to be a mechanism by which PGRN exerts anti-inflammatory activity, raising the possibility that aberrant PGRN–TNFR interactions underlie the molecular basis for neuroinflammation in frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathogenesis. Here, we report that we find no evidence for a direct physical or functional interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Using coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we replicated the interaction between PGRN and sortilin and that between TNF and TNFRI/II, but not the interaction between PGRN and TNFRs. Recombinant PGRN or transfection of a cDNA encoding PGRN did not antagonize TNF-dependent NFκB, Akt, and Erk1/2 pathway activation; inflammatory gene expression; or secretion of inflammatory factors in BV2 microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Moreover, PGRN did not antagonize TNF-induced cytotoxicity on dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells. Last, co-addition or pre-incubation with various N- or C-terminal-tagged recombinant PGRNs did not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene expression or cytokine secretion in any cell type examined, including BMDMs from Grn+/− or Grn−/− mice. Therefore, the neuroinflammatory phenotype associated with PGRN deficiency in the CNS is not a direct consequence of the loss of TNF antagonism by PGRN, but may be a secondary response by glia to disrupted interactions between PGRN and Sortilin and/or other binding partners yet to be identified. PMID:23699531

  18. Epidemic processes with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2003-09-01

    We study a model of directed percolation (DP) with immunization, i.e., with different probabilities for the first infection and subsequent infections. The immunization effect leads to an additional non-Markovian term in the corresponding field theoretical action. We consider immunization as a small perturbation around the DP fixed point in d<6, where the non-Markovian term is relevant. The immunization causes the system to be driven away from the neighborhood of the DP critical point. In order to investigate the dynamical critical behavior of the model, we consider the limits of low and high first-infection rate, while the second-infection rate remains constant at the DP critical value. Scaling arguments are applied to obtain an expression for the survival probability in both limits. The corresponding exponents are written in terms of the critical exponents for ordinary DP and DP with a wall. We find that the survival probability does not obey a power-law behavior, decaying instead as a stretched exponential in the low first-infection probability limit and to a constant in the high first-infection probability limit. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by optimized numerical simulations in 1+1 dimensions.

  19. Resistance of Female Mice to Vaginal Infection Induced by Herpesvirus hominis Type 2: Effects of Immunization with Mycobacterium bovis, Intravenous Injection of Specific Herpesvirus hominis Type 2 Antiserum, and a Combination of These Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M. B.; Larson, C. L.; Ushijima, R. N.; Anderson, F. D.

    1974-01-01

    The susceptibility of 4- to 6-week-old female white Swiss mice to intravaginal inoculation with Herpesvirus hominis type 2 (HVH2) and the effect of prior intravenous immunization with Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) and/or treatment with specific HVH2 antiserum (SAS) were investigated. Mice inoculated intravaginally developed vaginitis, posterior paralysis, encephalitis, and death. Prior immunization with BCG either had no effect or appeared in some cases to enhance the course of the disease, whereas a single 0.5-ml intravenous injection of SAS provided significant protection. However, synergistic interaction of BCG immunization and treatment with SAS produced the greatest degree of protection in mice challenged intravaginally with HVH2. PMID:4373394

  20. Pyroshock prediction procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    2002-05-01

    Given sufficient effort, pyroshock loads can be predicted by direct analytical procedures using Hydrocodes that analytically model the details of the pyrotechnic explosion and its interaction with adjacent structures, including nonlinear effects. However, it is more common to predict pyroshock environments using empirical procedures based upon extensive studies of past pyroshock data. Various empirical pyroshock prediction procedures are discussed, including those developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lockheed-Martin, and Boeing.

  1. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  2. Evolving Concepts: Immunity in Oncology from Targets to Treatments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hina; Gucalp, Rasim; Shapira, Iuliana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is associated with global immune suppression of the host. Malignancy-induced immune suppressive effect can be circumvented by blocking the immune checkpoint and tip the immune balance in favor of immune stimulation and unleash cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. Human antibodies directed against immune checkpoint proteins: cytotoxic T lymphocytes antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), have shown therapeutic efficacy in advanced melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer and other malignancies. Immune check point blockade antibodies lead to diminished tolerance to self and enhanced immune ability to recognize and eliminate cancer cells. As a class these agents have immune-related adverse events due to decreased ability of effector immune cells to discriminate between self and non-self. Seventy percent of patients participating in clinical trials have experienced anticancer activities and varying degrees of immune mediated dose-limiting side effects. PMID:26060497

  3. Direct measurement of peptide-specific CD8+ T cells using HLA-A2:Ig dimer for monitoring the in vivo immune response to a HER2/neu vaccine in breast and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Woll, Michael M; Fisher, Christine M; Ryan, Gayle B; Gurney, Jennifer M; Storrer, Catherine E; Ioannides, Constantin G; Shriver, Craig D; Moul, Judd W; McLeod, David G; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Peoples, George E

    2004-07-01

    HER2/neu is a proto-oncogene and a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family of proteins that is overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. We are currently conducting clinical trials with the HER2/neu E75 peptide vaccine in breast and prostate cancer patients. We have evaluated the use of HLA-A2 dimer molecule for the immunological monitoring of cancer patients receiving the E75 peptide vaccine. Peripheral blood samples from patients receiving the vaccine were stained with HLA-A2 dimers containing the vaccine peptide E75 or control peptides and analyzed by flow cytometry. We compared the HLA-A2 dimer assay to standard methods of immunologic monitoring (IFN-gamma release, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytotoxicity). The HLA-A2 dimer assay was also compared with the HLA-A2 tetramer assay. E75 peptide-specific CD8 T cells were detected directly in the peripheral blood of patients by staining with E75-HLA-A2 dimers and CD8 antibodies. T cell cultures generated by repeated stimulations using E75 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells showed increased staining with E75-peptide loaded HLA-A2 dimers. Simultaneously analysis by the dimer assay and standard immunologic assays demonstrated that the dimer-staining assay correlated well with these methods of immunologic monitoring. A direct comparison using E75-specific HLA-A2 tetramers and HLA-A2 dimers for the detection of E75-specific CD8 T cells in peripheral blood showed comparable results with the two assays. Our findings indicate that the HLA-A2 dimer is a powerful new tool for directly quantifying and monitoring immune responses of antigen-specific T cells in peptide vaccine clinical trials. PMID:15163902

  4. Development and Validation of a Fast Procedure to Analyze Amoxicillin in River Waters by Direct-Injection LC-MS/MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homem, Vera; Alves, Arminda; Santos, Lu´cia

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory application with a strong component in analytical chemistry was designed for undergraduate students, in order to introduce a current problem in the environmental science field, the water contamination by antibiotics. Therefore, a simple and rapid method based on direct injection and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass…

  5. The Differential Effects of Direct Instruction and Procedural Facilitators on the Writing Outcomes of Fifth-Grade Students with Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, DaShaunda; Houchins, David E.; Jolivette, Kristine; Heflin, Juane; Fredrick, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Effective written expression is a necessary form of communication and one of the most difficult tasks for students with disabilities to master. Few instructional strategies for writing have been validated specifically for students with emotional and behavior disorders. This single-subject study evaluated the effect of a Direct Instruction program…

  6. Immune Infiltration and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strasner, Amy; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammation influences prostate cancer (PCa) development and that immune cells are among the primary drivers of this effect. This information has launched numerous clinical trials testing immunotherapy drugs in PCa patients. The results of these studies are promising but have yet to generate a complete response. Importantly, the precise immune profile that determines clinical outcome remains unresolved. Individual immune cell types are divided into various functional subsets whose effects on tumor development may differ depending on their particular phenotype and functional status, which is often shaped by the tumor microenvironment. Thus, this review aims to examine the current knowledge regarding the role of inflammation and specific immune cell types in mediating PCa progression to assist in directing and optimizing immunotherapy targets, regimens, and responses and to uncover areas in which further research is needed. Finally, a summary of ongoing immunotherapy clinical trials in PCa is provided. PMID:26217583

  7. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Maher, George M

    2014-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is a relatively uncommon and generally benign condition presenting as abrupt onset of bruising, petechiae and thrombocytopenia in an otherwise healthy child due to production of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Diagnosis is largely clinical and laboratory investigation should be kept to a minimum. Indications for treatment have not been standardized and include bleeding, parental anxiety and quality of life. Multiple treatments are available that have been proven to increase the platelet count; the most commonly employed include IVIG, steroids and WinRho (anti-D). Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious potential complication but is extremely rare and splenectomy is reserved for chronically symptomatic patients who have not responded to other modalities. Identification of molecular targets may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:25423768

  8. [Results of fluorescence microscopy studies of bone healing by direct stimulation with bipolar impulse currents and with the interference current procedure in the animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Kleditzsch, J; Wolf, E

    1986-01-01

    42 cross-breed rabbit bastards of either sex were osteotomized on the left proximal third of the tibia. A teflonisolated stable plating was made by means of the polychromatically KF-AO-instrumentarium. The animals were fluorescentlabelled in weekly intervals. Tetraverinex, alizarin complexon, fluorexon, xylenol orange and calceine were used as colours. The animals were stimulated in the bipolar squaretopped pulse current procedure (1 Hz and 10 Hz, resp., +/- 25 and +/- 50 microA, resp., intensity, permanent stimulation) or in the interference current procedure (oscillation frequency 100 Hz, intensity 1 mA, 4 hours daily). An osteotomized group served as a control. The undecalcified bone sections were quantitatively measured in the area of the periosteal and endoosteal accummulation seams as well as in the area of the Haversians canals and compared by means of multiple variance analyses. A delay in the Haversian remodelling within the first 2 weeks was found in the animals only osteotomized. This delay could not be detected in all electrically stimulated groups. The electrical stimulation leads to a shortening of the fracture healing period by skipping the physiologically occurring delay of the Haversian remodelling in fractures and osteotomies. Further on there was derived a growth function of the osteones as a regression function r (t) = a + beta X e gamma t. For the rabbit the concrete formula expression r (t) = 50.9 X e-0.094 X t + 17.4 for the animals not treated and r (t) = 42.9 X e-0.067 X t + 8.5 for the electrical stimulated animals has been found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3485862

  9. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  10. Clinical Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ayumu; Kondo, Shunsuke; Tada, Kohei; Kitano, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has been remarkable. Most striking are the clinical development and approval of immunomodulators, also known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are directed to immune checkpoint molecules, which are expressed on immune cells and mediate signals to attenuate excessive immune reactions. Although mAbs targeting tumor associated antigens, such as anti-CD20 mAb and anti-Her2 mAb, directly recognize tumor cells and induce cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of immune checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of cancers. The first in class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4) mAb. Two pivotal phase III randomized controlled trials demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Several clinical trials have since investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for various cancers. In this review, we discuss the current development status of and future challenges in utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26161407

  11. Clinical Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ayumu; Kondo, Shunsuke; Tada, Kohei; Kitano, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has been remarkable. Most striking are the clinical development and approval of immunomodulators, also known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are directed to immune checkpoint molecules, which are expressed on immune cells and mediate signals to attenuate excessive immune reactions. Although mAbs targeting tumor associated antigens, such as anti-CD20 mAb and anti-Her2 mAb, directly recognize tumor cells and induce cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of immune checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of cancers. The first in class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4) mAb. Two pivotal phase III randomized controlled trials demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Several clinical trials have since investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for various cancers. In this review, we discuss the current development status of and future challenges in utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26161407

  12. Immune System Involvement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... swollen and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  13. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  14. Immunization and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunization & Pregnancy Vaccines help keep apregnant woman and her growing family healthy. Vaccine Before pregnancy Hepatitis A ... 232-4636) • English or Spanish National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Immunization Services Division CS238938B 03/ ...

  15. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances that are usually not harmful Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your ...

  16. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Ekkehard; Brünker, Peter; Moser, Samuel; Püntener, Ursula; Schmidt, Carla; Herter, Sylvia; Grau, Roger; Gerdes, Christian; Nopora, Adam; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Ferrara, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Jäger, Christiane; Strein, Pamela; Fertig, Georg; Friess, Thomas; Schüll, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Dal Porto, Joseph; Del Nagro, Christopher; Dabbagh, Karim; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Poppema, Sibrand; Klein, Christian

    2010-01-01

    CD20 is an important target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as autoimmune disorders. B-cell depletion therapy using monoclonal antibodies against CD20, such as rituximab, has revolutionized the treatment of these disorders, greatly improving overall survival in patients. Here, we report the development of GA101 as the first Fc-engineered, type II humanized IgG1 antibody against CD20. Relative to rituximab, GA101 has increased direct and immune effector cell-mediated cytotoxicity and exhibits superior activity in cellular assays and whole blood B-cell depletion assays. In human lymphoma xenograft models, GA101 exhibits superior antitumor activity, resulting in the induction of complete tumor remission and increased overall survival. In nonhuman primates, GA101 demonstrates superior B cell–depleting activity in lymphoid tissue, including in lymph nodes and spleen. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for the development of GA101 as a promising new therapy for the treatment of B-cell disorders. PMID:20194898

  17. [Treatment with inhibitors of new oral direct anticoagulants in patients with severe bleedings or urgent surgical procedures. The new dabigatran antidote: the place of idarucizumab in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Boda, Zoltán

    2016-03-20

    Only vitamin K antagonists could be applied as oral anticoagulants over the past six decades. Coumarols have narrow therapeutic range, and unpredictable anticoagulant effects are resulted by multiple drug interactions. Therefore, regular routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio is necessary. There are two groups of factor-specific anticoagulants: molecules with anti-FIIa (dabigatran) and anti-FXa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) effect. Author summarizes the most important clinical features of the new oral anticoagulants, their indications and the possibilities of laboratory controls. Bleedings are the most important side effects of anticoagulants. This review summarizes the current published evidences for new oral anticoagulants reversal (non-specific and specific) agents, especially in cases with severe acute bleedings or urgent surgery procedures. It reports on how to use inhibitors, the recommended doses and the most important clinical results. The review focuses on idarucizumab - already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency - which has a key role as the first specific inhibitor of dabigatran. PMID:26971644

  18. The immune consequences of preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jacqueline M.; Moss, Timothy J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth occurs in 11% of live births globally and accounts for 35% of all newborn deaths. Preterm newborns have immature immune systems, with reduced innate and adaptive immunity; their immune systems may be further compromised by various factors associated with preterm birth. The immune systems of preterm infants have a smaller pool of monocytes and neutrophils, impaired ability of these cells to kill pathogens, and lower production of cytokines which limits T cell activation and reduces the ability to fight bacteria and detect viruses in cells, compared to term infants. Intrauterine inflammation is a major contributor to preterm birth, and causes premature immune activation and cytokine production. This can induce immune tolerance leading to reduced newborn immune function. Intrauterine inflammation is associated with an increased risk of early-onset sepsis and likely has long-term adverse immune consequences. Requisite medical interventions further impact on immune development and function. Antenatal corticosteroid treatment to prevent newborn respiratory disease is routine but may be immunosuppressive, and has been associated with febrile responses, reductions in lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, and increased risk of infection. Invasive medical procedures result in an increased risk of late-onset sepsis. Respiratory support can cause chronic inflammatory lung disease associated with increased risk of long-term morbidity. Colonization of the infant by microorganisms at birth is a significant contributor to the establishment of the microbiome. Caesarean section affects infant colonization, potentially contributing to lifelong immune function and well-being. Several factors associated with preterm birth alter immune function. A better understanding of perinatal modification of the preterm immune system will allow for the refinement of care to minimize lifelong adverse immune consequences. PMID:23734091

  19. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  20. [Examination procedures].

    PubMed

    Vassault, A; Arnaud, J; Szymanovicz, A

    2010-12-01

    Examination procedures have to be written for each examination according to the standard requirements. Using CE marked devices, technical inserts can be used, but because of their lack of homogeneity, it could be easier to document their use as a standard procedure. Document control policy applies for those procedures, the content of which could be as provided in this document. Electronic manuals can be used as well. PMID:21613016

  1. Immune thrombocytopenia and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Srividhya; Robinson, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is not infrequently encountered during reproductive years with an estimated incidence of 0.1–1 per 1000 pregnancies. An international consensus group recently re-defined ITP and outlined standardized response criteria and up-to-date investigation and management. The pathogenesis encompasses autoantibody platelet destruction and immune-mediated decreased platelet production. Maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and have the potential to cause fetal and/or neonatal thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis and subsequent management of ITP in pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the midwife, obstetrician, haematologist and anaesthetist. Women with ITP diagnosed prior to pregnancy should receive preconception counselling to outline potential treatments and provide information regarding expected maternal and neonatal outcome. Management prior to 36 weeks aims to avoid treatment in the absence of bleeding and ensure an acceptable platelet count for planned procedures. At 34–36 weeks, women are generally reviewed to consider whether a tailored course of treatment is required in preparation for delivery. Further research is required to determine a suitable platelet count for neuraxial anaesthesia. The mode of delivery should be guided by obstetric indication. It is pertinent to consider both the risk of maternal bleeding and thrombosis in maternal ITP. The risk of neonatal intracranial haemorrhage in association with ITP is less than 1%. Postpartum a cord blood platelet count should be checked. Additional management is dependent upon the neonatal platelet count. Data collection using the new standardized terminology should provide robust comparable epidemiological data regarding ITP in pregnancy.

  2. The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional Angiography with a Flat Panel Detector of Direct Conversion Type in a Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Procedure for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kakeda, Shingo Korogi, Yukunori; Hatakeyama, Yoshihisa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Oda, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Wataru

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a three-dimensional (3D) angiography system using a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in treatments with subsegmental transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Thirty-six consecutive patients who underwent hepatic angiography were prospectively examined. First, two radiologists evaluated the degree of visualization of the peripheral branches of the hepatic arteries on 3D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Then the radiologists evaluated the visualization of tumor staining and feeding arteries in 25 patients (30 HCCs) who underwent subsegmental TACE. The two radiologists who performed the TACE assessed whether the additional information provided by 3D DSA was useful for treatments. In 34 (94.4%) of 36 patients, the subsegmental branches of the hepatic arteries were sufficiently visualized. The feeding arteries of HCCs were sufficiently visualized in 28 (93%) of 30 HCCs, whereas tumor stains were sufficiently visualized in 18 (60%). Maximum intensity projection images were significantly superior to volume recording images for visualization of the tumor staining and feeding arteries of HCCs. In 27 (90%) of 30 HCCs, 3D DSA provided additional useful information for subsegmental TACE. The high-quality 3D DSA with flat panel detector angiography system provided a precise vascular road map, which was useful for performing subsegmental TACE .of HCCs.

  3. A single-step procedure of recombinant library construction for the selection of efficiently produced llama VH binders directed against cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Damjana; Frković-Grazio, Snjezana; Baty, Daniel; Truan, Gilles; Komel, Radovan; Pompon, Denis

    2009-10-31

    Heavy chain antibodies are naturally occurring in camelidae (camels and llamas). Their variable domain (VHH) can be efficiently produced as a recombinant protein in E. coli with a large range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and immunotherapy. Standard cloning approach involves resolution of VHH from the heavy chain variable domain of conventional antibodies (VH) by a nested PCR amplification followed by a phage display based selection. Present work illustrates that in contrast to usual finding, specific, good affinity and efficiently expressed VH domain of conventional antibodies can be selected from the co-amplification products of VH and VHH cDNAs. Sequence analysis illustrated that following the two first rounds of selection against cancer markers, similar number of VH and VHH binders were observed. However, after a third round, the more specific binders directed against p53, VEGF, BCL-2 proteins surprisingly contain only VH specific hallmarks. Characterisation of the specificity, affinity and productivity of selected VH binders is described. Because llama VHs show higher sequence and structural homology with the human VH III group than llama VHHs (Vu et al., 1997), they constitute very interesting agents in therapeutic applications, especially in human immunotherapy and cancer treatment. PMID:19744487

  4. Infectious Diseases and Immunizations. Matrix No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sever, John L.

    This paper summarizes the major advances achieved by research in the fields of infectious diseases and immunizations during the 1970s, and delineates directions for future research in these fields. (Author/MP)

  5. Surgery and invasive procedures in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Recommendations of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis and the French Study Group on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Sié, Pierre; Samama, Charles M; Godier, Anne; Rosencher, Nadia; Steib, Annick; Llau, Juan V; Van der Linden, Philippe; Pernod, Gilles; Lecompte, Thomas; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs)--inhibitors of thrombin or factor-Xa--are expected to replace vitamin K antagonists in most of their indications. Patients receiving long-term treatment with DOAs are likely to be exposed to elective or emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Owing to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose perioperative management for optimal safety regarding the risk of bleeding and thrombosis. DOAs may increase surgical bleeding, they have no validated antagonists, they cannot be monitored by simple standardized laboratory assays and their pharmacokinetics vary significantly between patients. Although DOAs differ in many respects, the proposals in the perioperative setting need not be specific to each. For procedures with low haemorrhagic risk, a therapeutic window of 48 hours (last administration 24 hours before surgery, restart 24 hours after) is proposed. For procedures with medium or high haemorrhagic risk, we suggest stopping DOAs 5 days before surgery to ensure complete elimination in all patients. Treatment should be resumed only when the risk of bleeding has been controlled. In patients at high thrombotic risk (e.g. those in atrial fibrillation with a history of stroke), bridging with heparin (low molecular-weight heparin, or unfractionated heparin, if the former is contraindicated) is proposed. In an emergency, the procedure should be postponed for as long as possible (minimum 1-2 half-lives) and non-specific antihaemorrhagic agents, such as recombinant human activated factor VIIa or prothrombin complex concentrates should not be given for prophylactic reversal due to their uncertain benefit-risk. PMID:22152517

  6. DNA Methylation and Demethylation in Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Deleris, A; Halter, T; Navarro, L

    2016-08-01

    Detection of plant and animal pathogens triggers a massive transcriptional reprogramming, which is directed by chromatin-based processes, and ultimately results in antimicrobial immunity. Although the implication of histone modifications in orchestrating biotic stress-induced transcriptional reprogramming has been well characterized, very little was known, until recently, about the role of DNA methylation and demethylation in this process. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the dynamics and biological relevance of DNA methylation and demethylation in plant immunity against nonviral pathogens. In particular, we report the implications of these epigenetic regulatory processes in the transcriptional and co-transcriptional control of immune-responsive genes and discuss their relevance in fine-tuning antimicrobial immune responses. Finally, we discuss the possible yet elusive role of DNA methylation and demethylation in systemic immune responses, transgenerational immune priming, and de novo epiallelism, which could be adaptive. PMID:27491436

  7. Our Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  8. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  9. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations Print A A A Text Size What's in ... But in both cases, the protection is temporary. Immunization (vaccination) is a way of creating immunity to ...

  10. The modulation of immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Modulation of Immunity by Thymus-Derived Lymphocytes; Modulation of Immunity by Macrophages; Modulation of Immunity by Soluble Mediators; Viruses and the Immune Response; and Methanol Extraction Residue: Effects and Mechanisms of Action.