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Sample records for immunocompetent child caused

  1. Scedosporium apiospermum causing otomycosis in an immunocompetent child with tympanostomy tubes: Management of this rare entity.

    PubMed

    Salamat, A A; Archer, C; Basarab, A; Eren, E; Batty, V; Patel, S; Salib, R J; Burgess, A; Ismail-Koch, H

    2015-10-01

    Infection following a tympanostomy tube insertion is a common occurrence. Scedosporium apiospermum is a filamentous fungus mainly isolated in water and soil. There have been no reported cases of S. apiospermum infection of an immunocompetent individual with a tympanostomy tube in situ. A child was referred with unilateral otorrhoea failing to respond to conventional treatment in the community. S. apiospermum was identified following specialist testing. An extended course of anti-fungal treatment led to complete resolution. Due to the rare occurrence of aural S. apiospermum and unreported nature, it should be managed in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:26298623

  2. Chromoblastomycosis Associated with Bone and Central Nervous Involvement System in an Immunocompetent Child Caused by Exophiala Spinifera

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Mahantesh, S; Mannapur, Rajeshwari; Shivappa, Sanjay K

    2016-01-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by specific group of dematiaceous fungi. The infection results from traumatic injury and is seen more commonly on feet and lower legs. It is rarely seen in children and metastatic spread to other systems is exceptionally rare. We report a 12-year-old immunocompetent male child diagnosed with chromoblastomycosis on the lower leg, who in a span of few months developed osteomyelitis and left hemiparesis. Fungal culture showed growth of Exophiala spinifera. Child showed good improvement with voriconazole and itraconazole after 1 year of treatment. Skin lesions healed with minimal scarring and his power improved. PMID:27293256

  3. Chromoblastomycosis Associated with Bone and Central Nervous Involvement System in an Immunocompetent Child Caused by Exophiala Spinifera.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Mahantesh, S; Mannapur, Rajeshwari; Shivappa, Sanjay K

    2016-01-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by specific group of dematiaceous fungi. The infection results from traumatic injury and is seen more commonly on feet and lower legs. It is rarely seen in children and metastatic spread to other systems is exceptionally rare. We report a 12-year-old immunocompetent male child diagnosed with chromoblastomycosis on the lower leg, who in a span of few months developed osteomyelitis and left hemiparesis. Fungal culture showed growth of Exophiala spinifera. Child showed good improvement with voriconazole and itraconazole after 1 year of treatment. Skin lesions healed with minimal scarring and his power improved. PMID:27293256

  4. Abdominal Lymphonodular Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Child

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Mehjabeen; Qureshi, Sonia; Shakoor, Sadia; Fatima, Saira; Mir, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience with an apparently immunocompetent child presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin without focal signs. Investigations revealed lymphadenopathy at lung hila, mesentery, and porta hepatis. The child had received at least two months of empiric antituberculous therapy (ATT) before she came to us. A CT-guided biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation. PAS stain showed yeasts which stained blue with Alcian blue, suggesting C. neoformans. PMID:26649217

  5. Tuberculous liver abscess in an immunocompetent child with pulmonary tuberculosis as a cause of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Bahar; Somer, Ayper; Hatipoğlu, Nevin; Keser, Melike; Yekeler, Ensar; Gün, Feryal; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Salman, Tansu; Salman, Nuran

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of FUO. A case of prolonged fever with hepatic and pulmonary tuberculosis as a final diagnosis is herein presented. A 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy presented with an axillary temperature of up to 39.5ºC for the previous 3 weeks. His medical history revealed an occasional increase in body temperature up to 38.5ºC for the last 6 months. Physical examination revealed coarse breath sounds on the basal lung area. Chest X-ray showed mediastinal lymphadenomegaly and computed tomography revealed paratracheal conglomerated lymph nodes and a groundglass appearance on the right lung. There were multiple contrast-enhanced, hypoechoic nodules with central necrosis in the liver parenchyma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Open liver biopsy yielded chronic granulomatous inflammation compatible with pathological findings of tuberculosis infection. The culture specimen was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient improved rapidly after antituberculous therapy was initiated. Tuberculosis, especially in its disseminated form, poses a distinct diagnostic challenge in cases of prolonged fever with unproven etiology, and thus persistence should be exercised in disclosing the cause of such fevers. PMID:26613227

  6. Bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompetent child: the first reported case.

    PubMed

    Paul, M A; Fleischer, A B; Wieselthier, J S; White, W L

    1994-12-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis, an infectious process associated with Rochalima spp., was thought until recently to be restricted to HIV-infected or otherwise immunosuppressed patients. In 1993, bacillary angiomatosis was reported in several immunocompetent adults. An extensive literature review failed to find references to bacillary angiomatosis in immunocompetent children. We describe a 6-year-old female who presented with a single, rapidly growing, friable, erythematous papule on her neck. Histologic examination of a biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. The patient was otherwise healthy, and her physical examination was normal. Laboratory studies, including HIV serology, were normal. The patient was treated with six weeks of oral erythromycin without evidence of recurrence. We present and discuss the implications of the first case of bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompetent child. PMID:7899186

  7. Osteomyelitis Because of Mycobacterium Xenopi in an Immunocompetent Child.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Martin; Seidl, Maximilian; Henneke, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old, immunocompetent boy with chronic osteomyelitis of the calcaneus caused by Mycobacterium xenopi. Of note, typical histopathology was not visible on the first biopsy and developed only later over a period of 6 weeks, highlighting the difficult differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:26418244

  8. Unexpected postmortem diagnosis of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Karimi, Mehran; Navabii, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. is a rare opportunistic infection, difficult to diagnose and treat, which causes death in almost all cases. Here, the authors report a 5-year-old Iranian immunocompetent girl who died of fulminant acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in Iran. PMID:22679147

  9. Lung Disease Caused by Mycobacterium malmoense in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Yoon, Jung A; Kim, Junhwan; Yi, Sangyoung; Sung, Heungsup; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea. We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics. PMID:26175789

  10. Multifocal tuberculosis of long bones in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Taghi; Shirazi, Mehdi Ramezan; Daneshjoo, Khadijeh

    2016-05-01

    Although tuberculosis (TB) is prevalent in many parts of the world, multifocal TB involvement of bones is rare. It is believed that less than 5% of skeletal TB is multifocal. We report a case of multifocal TB of long bones in an immunocompetent child. We describe the radiological and diagnostic features of TB osteomyelitis and outline its therapy and prognosis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, such a case with multiple long bone involvement without articular sequel and visceral involvement/constitutional symptoms has not been reported previously in the literature. PMID:26600081

  11. Scedosporium apiospermum skeletal infection in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Stripeli, Fotini; Pasparakis, D; Velegraki, Aristea; Lebessi, E; Arsenis, G; Kafetzis, D; Tsolia, M

    2009-06-01

    Abstract This is a case of Scedosporium apiospermum skeletal infection in a 10-year-old immunocompetent girl whose chief complaint was left knee swelling and pain. The child had a history of a bicycle accident two months before with a resultant deep penetrating trauma. Systematic administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics for 10 days was used, with no clinical improvement. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and arthrotomy of the affected joint revealed findings suggestive of osteomyelitis. Empirical intravenous antimicrobial therapy was instituted for a total of two months but one month after completion of antibacterial therapy the child returned to the hospital because of persistent knee swelling and pain. Following a new arthrotomy, Scedosporium apiospermum was isolated. The patient was cured with intravenous administration of voriconazole without any side effects and has no evidence of relapse after four years of follow-up. PMID:19191169

  12. [Cryptococcus meningitis in an immunocompetent child: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Hagerimana, R; Diagne, N S; Faye, M W; Sène, M S; Sow, A D; Sène-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndiaye, M M

    2010-07-01

    Cryptococcus meningitis is uncommon in childhood. We report a Senegalese case of cryptococcus meningitis diagnosed in an apparently immunocompetent child. A 9-year-old boy was admitted for acute meningoencephalitis. A computerized tomography scan of the brain showed an ischemic lesion in the left caudate and study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed cytological and biochemical abnormalities and Cryptococcus neoformans on direct exam and culture. HIV and syphilis antibodies were negative and the blood CD4 lymphocyte count was 804/mm(3). The child had no immunocompromising factors such as hematologic abnormalities, solid tumor, or undernutrition. He was treated with fluconazole intravenously, but clinical outcome was unsuccessful. The patient died after 1 month from cardiovascular and respiratory distress. PMID:20400277

  13. Aspergillus flavus-Induced Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Nawal; Hussain, Ibrahim; Jumaa, Suleiman; Al-Shail, Essam A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aspergillosis is an extremely rare manifestation of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompetent children and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We report a 12-year-old immunocompetent male child who was referred to the King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in May 2010 after a sudden-onset headache and loss of consciousness. Brain imaging revealed a large right space-occupying occipital lesion and the patient underwent a craniotomy and resection. Histopathology of the lesion revealed necrotising granulomatous fungal encephalitis with many hyphae engulfed by multinucleated giant histiocytes. Two days later, a computed tomography scan showed debulking of the fungal mass and the patient was discharged on oral voriconazole. However, imaging at a six-week follow-up showed progression of the abnormality. A residual or persistent fungal brain lesion was suspected. Further neurosurgical resection of the lesion was performed and cultures showed growth of Aspergillus flavus. The patient was treated successfully with antifungal therapy over the following two years. PMID:27226920

  14. Coccidioidomycosis causing osteomyelitis of the hand in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Berli, Jens U; Campbell, Wayne N; Katz, Ryan D

    2015-09-01

    Coccidioidomycosis osteomyelitis is a rare entity considered even more rare when identified in the immunocompetent patient. In non-endemic areas, the diagnosis of a fungus-causing osteomyelitis is often delayed or overlooked. This results in delayed or inappropriate treatment. We present the case of a 35-year-old immunocompetent male immigrant from India who was ultimately diagnosed as having Coccidioidomycosis immitis osteomyelitis of his ring finger metacarpal. His initial surgery included drainage and bacterial cultures only. When he failed to improve, he presented for a second opinion. The patient's origin and travel history coupled with the appearance of rapid bone destruction on plain radiographs prompted a second operation for tissue biopsy and culture for bacteria, fungus, and mycobacteria cultures. This case highlights the importance of a thorough clinical history in deriving an appropriate differential diagnosis prior to surgical intervention. PMID:26330797

  15. Liver abscess caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seu Hee; Kim, Min Ja; Roh, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Yoon, Young Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Invasive infections caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis are very rare in humans. We experienced an unusual case of liver abscess due to B. vesicularis in an immunocompetent young male. The patient was successfully treated by liver abscess drainage and with antimicrobial therapy of ceftriaxone followed by ampicillin/sulbactam. The organism found in the aspiration culture of the abscess material was initially reported, by using a VITEK 2 system, as Sphingomonas paucimobilis. However, later, B. vesicularis was confirmed as the true pathogen through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first case of liver abscess caused by B. vesicularis. PMID:22767540

  16. Cytomegalovirus-associated colitis causing diarrhea in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan; Olchovsky, David; Pokroy, Russell; Ezra, David

    2006-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis rarely occurs in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disabling and life threatening diarrhea in an immunocompetent elderly woman due to CMV colitis. The diagnosis of CMV was based on histological examination of tissues biopsied at colonoscopy, positive CMV antigen and high CMV-IgM titer in peripheral blood samples and a good response to systemic gancyclovir treatment. We conclude that CMV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of colitis in elderly immunocompetent patients. PMID:17106945

  17. Endocarditis by Kocuria rosea in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Jorge Salomão; Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco da; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Kocuria rosea belongs to genus Kocuria (Micrococcaceae family, suborder Micrococcineae, order Actinomycetales) that includes about 11 species of bacteria. Usually, Kocuria sp are commensal organisms that colonize oropharynx, skin and mucous membrane; Kocuria sp infections have been described in the last decade commonly affecting immunocompromised patients, using intravenous catheter or peritoneal dialysis. These patients had mainly bacteremia/recurrent sepsis. We hereby describe the case of a 10-year-old girl, immunocompetent, who had endocarditis/sepsis by K. rosea which was identified in five different blood cultures by Vitek 2 ID-GPC card (BioMérieux, France). Negative HIV serology, blood count within normal range of leukocytes/neutrophils and lymphocytes, normal fractions of the complement, normal level of immunoglobulins for the age; lymphocyte immunophenotyping was also within the expected values. Thymus image was normal at chest MRI. No catheters were required. Identification of K. rosea was essential to this case, allowing the differentiation of coagulase-negative staphylococci and use of an effective antibiotic treatment. Careful laboratory analysis of Gram-positive blood-born infections may reveal more cases of Kocuria sp infections in immunocompetent patients, which may collaborate for a better understanding, prevention and early treatment of these infections in pediatrics. PMID:25523077

  18. Endobronchial avium mycobacteria infection in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Perisson, Caroline; Nathan, Nadia; Thierry, Briac; Corvol, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    A 12-month-old boy, with no medical history, was admitted for dyspnoea with no cough or fever. Chest auscultation revealed an expiratory wheezing with decreased right-sided breath sounds. Chest imaging revealed subcarinal adenopathy and a nodule in the right principal bronchus (RB). Bronchoscopy showed a major obstruction of the RB by a granuloma, and a smaller granuloma in the left principal bronchus. The granulation tissue was removed by laser section. Histological examination revealed a necrotising granulomatous inflammation, culture showed a Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Tests to rule out tuberculosis and immunodeficiency were negative. The diagnosis of an MAC endobronchial granuloma was ascertained and a multidrug therapy associating clarithromycin, rifampin and ethambutol was started. The clinical outcome was good after 3 months of treatment and the bronchoscopy normalised after 1 year. Although rare, the frequency of MAC respiratory infections in immunocompetent children can increase. Reporting these cases should help to optimise diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24252838

  19. Mycetoma of the foot caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola in an immunocompetent traveler.

    PubMed

    Chazan, Bibiana; Colodner, Raul; Polacheck, Itzhack; Shoufani, Aziz; Rozenman, Dganit; Raz, Raul

    2004-01-01

    Cylindrocarpon is a cosmopolitan soil fungus, which rarely causes human disease. It has infrequently been reported as causing keratitis, mycetoma, osteomyelitis and peritonitis in chronic peritoneal ambulatory dialysis patients and disseminated infection in leukemic neutropenic hosts. This report describes a case of invasive infection caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola, localized in the right foot of an otherwise immunocompetent traveler. PMID:15544718

  20. Osteomyelitis caused by Sporothrix schenckii in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Laura Cunha; Barroso, Paulo Feijo; Tonomura, Elise; Akiti, Tiyomi; Rodrigues, Káris Maria de Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most common subcutaneous mycosis in South America and its association with zoonotic transmission remains a relevant public health problem in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The disease most commonly presents as subacute or chronic cutaneous lesions, although dissemination to various organs and systems occurs in rare cases, mainly in immunosuppressed individuals. This report describes a case of sporotrichosis with severe bone and subcutaneous damage in an immunocompetent patient who did not exhibit the characteristic skin lesions of sporotrichosis, including ulcers, nodules, and lymphangitis. PMID:27598646

  1. Cerebral abscess caused by Capnocytophaga spp in an immunocompetent subject: case report.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, B; Galgani, I; Trezzi, M; Toti, M

    2008-09-01

    Capnocytophaga spp are Gram-negative bacteria commonly identified as oral saprophytes of humans, dogs and cats; they rarely cause invasive infections in immunocompetent subjects. This case report is about a rare case of cerebral abscess caused by Capnocytophaga spp in an immunocompetent subject who had no risk factors for Capnocytophaga invasive infections (oral alterations, traumatic or iatrogenic lesions of pharynx and/or oesophagus, recent dog bite). We also report Capnocytophaga spp naturally resistant to metronidazole, this being the cause of inefficacy of this drug usually included in empiric chemotherapy of cerebral abscess. PMID:18843215

  2. Gastroenteritis caused by the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Saková, Kamila; Kvĕtoňová, Dana; Kicia, Marta; Wesołowska, Maria; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype, which has been reported previously in hedgehogs and horses, was identified as the cause of the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis in an immunocompetent man in the Czech Republic. This is the first report of human illness caused by the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. PMID:24131692

  3. Cerebral macroabscess caused by Candida albicans in an immunocompetent patient: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Sônia M.; Campolina, Sabrina; Rosa, Carlos A.; Gontijo, Marcus; Tirone, Thelma; Assunção, Claudia B.; Freire, Tarcísio F.A.; Christo, Paulo P.; Caligiorne, Rachel B.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the history of a 24-year-old immunocompetent man with an expansive lesion in the brainstem that, after many misdiagnoses, was found to be caused by a Candida albicans abscess. One year after surgery and 3 months of fluconazole treatment, the patient was asymptomatic and all image and laboratory tests were normal. PMID:24567895

  4. Vaccine-associated herpes zoster ophthalmicus [correction of opthalmicus] and encephalitis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Chouliaras, Giorgos; Spoulou, Vana; Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judith; Theodoridou, Maria

    2010-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vaccine has diminished the consequences of chicken pox in terms of health and economical burden. The increasing number of doses administered worldwide has revealed rare but important adverse effects that had not occurred during clinical trials. We report here the case of an immunocompetent 3(1/2)-year-old girl who developed encephalitis and herpes zoster opthalmicus 20 months after her immunization with varicella-zoster virus vaccine. Molecular analysis confirmed the vaccine strain as the causative agent. After an intravenous course with acyclovir, the child made a full recovery with no neurologic sequelae. PMID:20194287

  5. Aspergillus flavus-Induced Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Child: Case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Maskari, Nawal; Hussain, Ibrahim; Jumaa, Suleiman; Al-Shail, Essam A

    2016-05-01

    Intracranial aspergillosis is an extremely rare manifestation of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompetent children and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We report a 12-year-old immunocompetent male child who was referred to the King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in May 2010 after a sudden-onset headache and loss of consciousness. Brain imaging revealed a large right space-occupying occipital lesion and the patient underwent a craniotomy and resection. Histopathology of the lesion revealed necrotising granulomatous fungal encephalitis with many hyphae engulfed by multinucleated giant histiocytes. Two days later, a computed tomography scan showed debulking of the fungal mass and the patient was discharged on oral voriconazole. However, imaging at a six-week follow-up showed progression of the abnormality. A residual or persistent fungal brain lesion was suspected. Further neurosurgical resection of the lesion was performed and cultures showed growth of Aspergillus flavus. The patient was treated successfully with antifungal therapy over the following two years. PMID:27226920

  6. Apophysomyces elegans: a novel cause of endogenous endophthalmitis in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Dave, Vivek Pravin; Sharma, Savitri; Yogi, Rohit; Reddy, Swapna

    2014-12-01

    A 20-year-old male presented with sudden onset redness, pain, and decreased vision in his left eye. Best-corrected visual acuity in the left eye was noted to be perception of light positive with inaccurate projection. On clinical examination, he was diagnosed to have left eye endogenous endophthalmitis. Smear and culture of vitreous biopsy were positive for Apophysomyces elegans, a fungus known to cause extensive soft tissue infections systemically characteristically in immunocompetent individual. The patient was treated aggressively with topical, systemic, and intravitreal antifungals but had a poor visual and anatomical outcome. This is a first known report of endogenous endophthalmitis due to Apophysomyces elegans. PMID:25183462

  7. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis in immunocompetent patients: two new cases caused by Exophiala jeanselmei and Cladophialophora carrionii.

    PubMed

    Parente, José Napoleão Tavares; Talhari, Carolina; Ginter-Hanselmayer, Gabriele; Schettini, Antônio Pedro Mendes; Eiras, Josie da Costa; de Souza, João Vicente Braga; Tavares, Ronald; Buzina, Walter; Brunasso, Alexandra Maria Giovanna; Massone, Cesare

    2011-05-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is a distinct mycotic infection of the skin or internal organs caused by darkly pigmented (dematiaceous) fungi, which are widely distributed in the environment. Phaeohyphomycosis is most frequently an opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed patients (HIV, corticotherapy, transplant patients) or is frequently associated with chronic diseases and diabetes. The spectrum of the disease is broad and includes superficial infections, onychomycosis, subcutaneous infections, keratitis, allergic disease, pneumonia, brain abscesses and disseminated disease. Rarely, immunocompetent patients may be affected. We describe two new cases of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis in immunocompetent patients: in the first patient, the causative agent was Exophiala jeanselmei, a common cause of phaeohyphomycosis; and in the second, Cladophialophora carrionii, which could be identified by culture. Cladophialophora carrionii is mainly the aetiological agent of chromoblastomycosis and only rarely the cause of phaeohyphomycosis. The first patient was treated with surgical excision and oral itraconazole, and the second patient responded to oral itraconazole only. Lesions improved in both patients and no recurrence was observed at follow-up visits. PMID:19811614

  8. Immunocompetent young man with cerebral abscess and cortical venous infarction mimicking cerebritis caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Milnik, Annette; Gazis, Angelos; Tammer, Ina; Bartels, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Gemella morbillorum is an anaerobic gram-positive diplococcus and in most cases a harmless commensal, which occasionally causes infections in the central nervous system. We report on an immunocompetent young man with focal neurological symptoms and cephalgia caused by a cerebral abscess. Although successful treatment was done with neurosurgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, he suffered from a venous infarction 5 weeks after first diagnosis, which mimicked cerebritis as an early stage of relapsing abscess. Imaging and investigation of cerebrospinal fluid was necessary for sufficient differential diagnosis and antibiotic therapy could be stopped after altogether 8 weeks of treatment. In summary, G morbillorum causes not only biphasic infections, but also can be accompanied by infarction in the central nervous system despite sufficient antibiotic therapy. PMID:23355562

  9. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  10. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  11. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Yao, Dongqi; Walline, Joseph; Xu, Jun; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55) in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Methods We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15) detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI), respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively). The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant. Conclusions HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of

  12. Encephalitis with convulsive status in an immunocompetent pediatric patient caused by Bartonella henselae.

    PubMed

    Cerpa Polar, Rosario; Orellana, Gabriela; Silva Caso, Wilmer; Sánchez Carbonel, José; Santisteban, Javier; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Santisteban, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Cat scratch's disease caused by Bartonella henselae, is known to be a self-limited benign process in immunocompetent children. The association with neurologic manifestations is very uncommon especially in patient with no immunologic defects and in cases without specific treatment. A 7 years old male patient, without any immunocompromised defect, presented an atypic presentation of the cat scratch disease. The patient came to the hospital in two opportunities in a status epilepticus, in both cases the diagnosis was encephalitis by Bartonella henselae and the evolution with treatment was monitored with PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in cerebrospinal fluid and blood, as well as IFI (IgM, IgG) serology (indirect immunofluorescence). The patient had a favorable clinical and laboratory evolution for 6 months showing no recurrence of the disease. PMID:27262077

  13. Herpes zoster as a cause of viral meningitis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Kangath, Raghesh Varot; Lindeman, Tracey Einem; Brust, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A 30-year-old Caucasian woman, without significant medical history or immunosuppression, presented with a 7-day history of severe headache and neck pain. The patient was presumed to have tension headache versus migraine, but was admitted because her symptoms did not resolve. A lumbar puncture was performed showing lymphocytic pleocytosis suggestive of aseptic meningitis and the patient was started on broad-spectrum antibiotics and acyclovir. After admission, a rash was discovered on her left lumbar region with vesicles on top of an erythematous base. Varicella PCR was conducted on the patient's cerebrospinal fluid which was positive. Upon further history, patient was found to have previous varicella infection as a child, but no prior episodes of dermatomal zoster. Therefore, this patient was found to have aseptic meningitis and cutaneous manifestation of disseminated varicella-zoster despite immunocompetence. Antibacterial treatment was discontinued and she was continued on acyclovir for 7 days with transition to valacyclovir for 2 additional weeks with good treatment response and symptom resolution. PMID:23307457

  14. Primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent host

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Noritaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary extraintestinal complications caused by Yersinia enterocolitica are extremely rare, especially in the form of skin and soft-tissue manifestations, and little is known about their clinical characteristics and treatments. We presented our case and reviewed past cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica. We report a case of primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Y enterocolitica in an immunocompetent 70-year-old woman with keratodermia tylodes palmaris progressiva. She presented to an outpatient clinic with redness, swelling, and pain of the left ring finger and left upper arm without fever or gastrointestinal symptoms 3 days before admission. One day later, ulceration of the skin with exposed bone of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger developed, and cefditoren pivoxil was described. However, she was admitted to our hospital due to deterioration of symptoms involving the left finger and upper arm. Cefazolin was initiated on admission, then changed to sulbactam/ampicillin and vancomycin with debridement of the left ring finger and drainage of the left upper arm abscess. Wound culture grew Y enterocolitica serotype O:8 and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Blood cultures were negative and osteomyelitis was ruled out. Vancomycin was switched to ciprofloxacin, then skin and soft-tissue manifestations showed clear improvement within a few days. The patient received 14 days of ciprofloxacin and oral amoxicillin/clavulanate and has since shown no recurrence. We reviewed 12 cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica from the literature. In several past cases, portal entry involved failure of the skin barrier on distal body parts. Thereafter, infection might have spread to the regional lymph nodes from the ruptured skin. Y enterocolitica is typically resistant to aminopenicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins. In most cases, these inefficient

  15. Eikenella corrodens: an unusual cause of severe parapneumonic infection and empyema in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyler, S. L.; Antony, S.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, Eikenella corrodens has increasingly been recognized for its pathogenic potential. Previously identified as an organism most likely to cause opportunistic infection in the immunocompromised host, Eikenella more recently has been implicated in a number of clinical infections in non-immunocompromised patients. We report a case of community-acquired pneumonia, caused by Eikenella, in a patient with diabetes mellitus and a past history of testicular cancer. A review of the literature was conducted in order to review other cases of pulmonary infection with Eikenella, in immunocompetent adults. The condition was diagnosed in 15 patients, occurring most often in men with a mean age of 50. Patients most often presented with fever, cough and pleuritic chest pain. Complications often involved parapneumonic effusion, empyema, and necrotic parenchymal disease. Mortality rates appear to be low. Eikenella is most often susceptible to ampicillin and has variable susceptibility to aminoglycosides. The addition of clindamycin in non-immunocompromised patients with Eikenella infection, co-infected with other pathogens, also appears to be useful. Surgical intervention plays an important role in the recovery of these patients. PMID:11446395

  16. Primary cutaneous cryptococcosis in an eight-year-old immunocompetent child: how to treat?

    PubMed

    Lenz, D; Held, J; Goerke, S; Wagner, D; Tintelnot, K; Henneke, P; Hufnagel, M

    2015-01-01

    Here we report on a case of primary cryptococcal skin infection in an immunocompetent 8-year-old boy. The infection first manifested itself as a subcutaneous abscess around the proximal joint of his right thumb after a minor injury from contact with a thorny shrub. After surgical incision and drainage was performed, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans was the only pathogen cultured from the lesion. An agglutination test for the capsular antigen in serum displayed negative results and the immunological work-up revealed no underlying immunodeficiency. A "watch and wait" strategy - one without systemic antifungal treatment - was adopted and this resulted in uneventful healing. In summary, primary cryptococcal skin infections in immunocompetent hosts may be managed successfully by surgical treatment in combination with careful clinical follow-up. This approach may help avoid unnecessary antimicrobial treatments. PMID:25565197

  17. Endobronchial leiomyoma in an immunocompetent four-year-old female child.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Aggarwal, Riti; Rijal, Prashant; Chugh, Krishan

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary leiomyoma are uncommonly encountered benign mesenchymal neoplasms in children, usually found in immunosuppressed individuals in association with human immunodeficiency virus or Ebstein-Barr virus infection. We describe an interesting case of a 4-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with pleural effusion and lung collapse secondary to endobronchial leiomyoma. She underwent a left thoracotomy and a left pneumonectomy for excision of the bronchial mass. PMID:24585919

  18. Common and New Acyclovir Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Mutants Causing Bilateral Recurrent Herpetic Keratitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dongli; Kaye, Stephen B.; Hopkins, Mark; Kirwan, Ruaidhri; Hart, Ian J.; Coen, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated thymidine kinase (tk) mutants isolated during multiple episodes of recurrent bilateral acyclovir resistant herpes simplex keratitis in an immunocompetent patient. From one eye, we found a single guanine insertion, previously shown to greatly reduce TK expression, and from the other, a previously unidentified substitution, which genetic experiments confirmed confers drug resistance. The substitution, although distant from substrate binding sites, reduced thymidine phosphorylation 10–20-fold, and acyclovir phosphorylation >100-fold. This phenotype should permit reactivation from latency to cause recurrent disease. The results may have implications for the prevalence and prevention of acyclovir resistance in patients with herpes simplex keratitis. PMID:23945375

  19. Pneumocystis carinii causes a distinctive interstitial pneumonia in immunocompetent laboratory rats that had been attributed to "rat respiratory virus".

    PubMed

    Henderson, K S; Dole, V; Parker, N J; Momtsios, P; Banu, L; Brouillette, R; Simon, M A; Albers, T M; Pritchett-Corning, K R; Clifford, C B; Shek, W R

    2012-05-01

    A prevalent and distinctive infectious interstitial pneumonia (IIP) of immunocompetent laboratory rats was suspected to be caused by a putative virus, termed rat respiratory virus, but this was never substantiated. To study this disease, 2 isolators were independently populated with rats from colonies with endemic disease, which was perpetuated by the regular addition of naive rats. After Pneumocystis was demonstrated by histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the lungs of rats from both isolators and an earlier bedding transmission study, the relationship between Pneumocystis and IIP was explored further by analyzing specimens from 3 contact transmission experiments, diagnostic submissions, and barrier room breeding colonies, including 1 with and 49 without IIP. Quantitative (q) PCR and immunofluorescence assay only detected Pneumocystis infection and serum antibodies in rats from experiments or colonies in which IIP was diagnosed by histopathology. In immunocompetent hosts, the Pneumocystis concentration in lungs corresponded to the severity and prevalence of IIP; seroconversion occurred when IIP developed and was followed by the concurrent clearance of Pneumocystis from lungs and resolution of disease. Experimentally infected immunodeficient RNU rats, by contrast, did not seroconvert to Pneumocystis or recover from infection. qPCR found Pneumocystis at significantly higher concentrations and much more often in lungs than in bronchial and nasal washes and failed to detect Pneumocystis in oral swabs. The sequences of a mitochondrial ribosomal large-subunit gene region for Pneumocystis from 11 distinct IIP sources were all identical to that of P. carinii. These data provide substantial evidence that P. carinii causes IIP in immunocompetent rats. PMID:22308234

  20. Frosted branch angiitis caused by Varicella Zoster virus in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Javadzadeh, Ali; Hedayatfar, Alireza; Rahmani, Shahrzad; Ghanooni, Amir Hossein; Mahmoodian, Reihaneh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Frosted branch angiitis(FBA) is a panuveitis with sheating of all retinal vesssels. Case presentation: Herein we report an immunocompetent person who presented with fever, headache, atypical rash, and hazy vision. Ophthalmoscopy of both eyes revealed perivascular sheathing with frosted branch angiitis pattern in veins, patchy retinal hemorrhages. Aqueous PCR analysis turned positive for VZV. Discussion: This case illustrates that VZV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retinal perivasculitis. Since a rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial for prompt administration of antiviral therapy, PCR-based analysis of aqueous humor is a valuable tool for detecting viruses. PMID:26622973

  1. Superficial Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Aureobasidium melanogenum Mimicking Tinea Nigra in an Immunocompetent Patient and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Tu, Mei-Eng; Sun, Pei-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans is a ubiquitous black yeast-like fungus belonging to order Dothideales. It was regarded as a contaminant, but is now considered a pathogen causing a wide range of human infections. We report a case of superficial phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent patient with clinical presentations mimicking tinea nigra. On microscopic examination of lesion scales, multiple thick-walled, pigmented oval spores with septa were noted. A fungus with black mucoid colonies was repeatedly isolated from the lesions during the treatment course. This fungus was identified as A. melanogenum on the basis of morphological characteristics and subsequently confirmed by sequencing internal transcribed spacers of ribosomal DNA. The clinical presentations and microscopic findings of lesion scales were considerably similar to those of tinea nigra. However, fungal culturing proved that the causative pathogen was A. melanogenum rather than Hortaea werneckii. The patient might have acquired this infection during gardening activities. We also reviewed reported cases of cutaneous A. pullulans infection. PMID:26883514

  2. Primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Primary extraintestinal complications caused by Yersinia enterocolitica are extremely rare, especially in the form of skin and soft-tissue manifestations, and little is known about their clinical characteristics and treatments. We presented our case and reviewed past cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica. We report a case of primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Y enterocolitica in an immunocompetent 70-year-old woman with keratodermia tylodes palmaris progressiva. She presented to an outpatient clinic with redness, swelling, and pain of the left ring finger and left upper arm without fever or gastrointestinal symptoms 3 days before admission. One day later, ulceration of the skin with exposed bone of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger developed, and cefditoren pivoxil was described. However, she was admitted to our hospital due to deterioration of symptoms involving the left finger and upper arm. Cefazolin was initiated on admission, then changed to sulbactam/ampicillin and vancomycin with debridement of the left ring finger and drainage of the left upper arm abscess. Wound culture grew Y enterocolitica serotype O:8 and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Blood cultures were negative and osteomyelitis was ruled out. Vancomycin was switched to ciprofloxacin, then skin and soft-tissue manifestations showed clear improvement within a few days. The patient received 14 days of ciprofloxacin and oral amoxicillin/clavulanate and has since shown no recurrence. We reviewed 12 cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica from the literature. In several past cases, portal entry involved failure of the skin barrier on distal body parts. Thereafter, infection might have spread to the regional lymph nodes from the ruptured skin. Y enterocolitica is typically resistant to aminopenicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins. In most cases, these inefficient

  3. Amphotericin B Resistant Apophysomyces elegans Causing Rhino-oculo-Cerebral Mucormycosis in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Debasis; Kotwal, Aarti; Kakati, Barnali; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2015-08-01

    Mucormycosis, an angioinvasive infection is caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Mucormycetes. Reports of this disease are on the rise over the past few decades. Rhino-oculo-Cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic of this entity. We report here a case of rhinooculocerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) due to Apophysomyces elegans (A. elegans) in a 45-year-old diabetic lady with background illness of hypothyroidism and polyradiculoneuropathy. Though this condition is usually managed with surgical debridement of the affected tissue and medical therapy with Amphotericin B, the isolate recovered in our case was found to be resistant to Amphotericin B. PMID:26435947

  4. Amphotericin B Resistant Apophysomyces elegans Causing Rhino-oculo-Cerebral Mucormycosis in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debasis; Kakati, Barnali; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis, an angioinvasive infection is caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Mucormycetes. Reports of this disease are on the rise over the past few decades. Rhino-oculo-Cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic of this entity. We report here a case of rhinooculocerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) due to Apophysomyces elegans (A. elegans) in a 45-year-old diabetic lady with background illness of hypothyroidism and polyradiculoneuropathy. Though this condition is usually managed with surgical debridement of the affected tissue and medical therapy with Amphotericin B, the isolate recovered in our case was found to be resistant to Amphotericin B. PMID:26435947

  5. Atypical manifestation of cat-scratch disease: isolated epigastric pain in an immunocompetent, 12-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Kayemba-Kay’s, Simon; Kovács, Tamas; Rakotoharinandrasana, Iarolalao; Benosman, Sidi Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a 12-year-old immunocompetent girl with hepato splenic cat-scratch disease (CSD). Her sole inaugural complaint was isolated epigastric pain. She fully recovered, with normalized abdominal CT scan following 2 weeks course of Azythromycin®. CSD should be included in differential diagnosis in children with epigastric pain, especially in those with domestic pets. PMID:26273467

  6. An Unusual Presentation of Disseminated Histoplasmosis: Case Report and Review of Pediatric Immunocompetent Patients from India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poojan; Capoor, Malini R; Singh, Mukul; Gupta, Arpita; Chhakchhuak, Arini; Debatta, Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Histoplasmosis is a progressive disease caused by dimorphic intracellular fungi and can prove fatal. Usually, it is present in immunocompromised individuals and immunocompetent individuals in the endemic zones. We report an unusual presentation of progressive disseminated histoplasmosis. The patient in the present case report was immunocompetent child and had fever, bone pains, gradual weight loss, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Disseminated histoplasmosis (DH) was diagnosed on microscopic examination and fungal culture of bone marrow, blood, skin biopsy and lymph node aspirate. The patient died on seventh day of amphotericin B. In the absence of predisposing factors and classical clinical presentation of febrile neutropenia, lung, adrenal and oropharyngeal lesions, the disease posed a diagnostic challenge. Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children can be fatal despite timely diagnosis and therapy. In India, disseminated histoplasmosis is seen in immunocompetent hosts. All the pediatrics immunocompetent cases from India are also reviewed. PMID:26126955

  7. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  8. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Eom, Joong Sik

    2016-03-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  9. Aggressive cutaneous zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces variabilis in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaydani, Ibrahim A.; Al-Hakami, Ahmed M.; Joseph, Martin R.P.; Kassem, Walid M.; Almaghrabi, Mohamed K.; Nageeb, Abdalla; Hamid, Mohamed E.

    2015-01-01

    A zygomycetous fungus was observed in a biopsy of a 9-year-old male. The patient was presented with severe cutaneous lesions subsequent to a traumatic car accident. Following fungal detection, antifungal treatment was prescribed but condition deteriorated rapidly and above knee amputation was done as lifesaving and to control fungal infection. Analysis of the 28 S rRNA gene (accession KT149770) aligned the isolate with members of the genus Apophysomyces and the pathogen was identified as Apophysomces variabilis. PMID:26858932

  10. Aggressive cutaneous zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces variabilis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaydani, Ibrahim A; Al-Hakami, Ahmed M; Joseph, Martin R P; Kassem, Walid M; Almaghrabi, Mohamed K; Nageeb, Abdalla; Hamid, Mohamed E

    2015-12-01

    A zygomycetous fungus was observed in a biopsy of a 9-year-old male. The patient was presented with severe cutaneous lesions subsequent to a traumatic car accident. Following fungal detection, antifungal treatment was prescribed but condition deteriorated rapidly and above knee amputation was done as lifesaving and to control fungal infection. Analysis of the 28 S rRNA gene (accession KT149770) aligned the isolate with members of the genus Apophysomyces and the pathogen was identified as Apophysomces variabilis. PMID:26858932

  11. Coxsackievirus A6 and Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: Three Case Reports of Familial Child-to-Immunocompetent Adult Transmission and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Karolina; Martinetti, Gladys; Lucchini, Renzo; Kaya, Gürkan; Mainetti, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a highly contagious viral infection characterized by typical maculopapular or vesicular eruptions on the hands and feet and in the oral cavity. It affects predominantly children and/or immunocompromised adults. It usually follows a benign and self-limiting course. However, HFMD cases with severe or lethal complications such as encephalitis, meningitis, pulmonary edema and myocarditis have also been reported, mostly in children, but also in adults. High infectivity of HFMD has contributed to several large outbreaks of this disease in recent decades in East and Southeast Asia, the United States and Finland. The most common pathogens were Coxsackievirus A16, Enterovirus 71 and, recently, also Coxsackieviruses A6 and A10. Differences in the course of HFMD have been observed, depending on the virus type. Recently, many cases of atypical HFMD have been described in the literature with unusual morphology and/or localization of skin lesions. Atypical HFMD manifestations including vesiculobullous exanthema, often on the trunk or extremities, and perioral zone involvement were often caused by Coxsackievirus A6 infections. We present 3 cases of familial transmission of HFMD caused by Coxsackievirus A6 with some atypical features, benign course and complete recovery among immunocompetent adults. PMID:24019771

  12. Primary central nervous system lymphoma with lymphomatosis cerebri in an immunocompetent child: MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun K; Sharma, Punit; Suman, Sudhir K C; Faizi, Nauroze A; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is extremely rare in immunocompetent children. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings of such a case in a 14-year old immunocompetent boy. In this patient, PCNSL was associated with lymphomatosis cerebri. Familiarity with the findings of this rare condition will improve the diagnostic confidence of the nuclear radiologist and avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:23743243

  13. Pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Lucy; Santoro, Jonathan D; Milla, Carlos; Bhargava, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are bacteria of low virulence that cause infection classically in immunocompromised hosts with the lungs as the primary site of infection in the majority of cases. Patients with cystic fibrosis have pulmonary disease characterized by frequent and progressive bacterial infections. Reports of Nocardia spp. isolation in CF are rare in the literature and may represent colonization or active infection, the significance and optimal treatment of which are unknown. We report the second case to date of Nocardia transvalensis pulmonary infection in an immunocompetent patient with CF and the first in a child under the age of eighteen. PMID:25960909

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  16. Tigecycline salvage therapy for necrotizing fasciitis caused by Vibrio vulnificus: Case report in a child.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-San; Hung, Min-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chung; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tang, Hung-Jen

    2016-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Vibrio vulnificus is rarely reported in children. We describe a 12-year-old immunocompetent boy with necrotizing fasciitis caused by V. vulnificus. He was cured by radical and serial debridement and salvage therapy with intravenous cefpirome plus tigecycline. The in vitro antibacterial activity of combination regimens and a literature review of pediatric V. vulnificus infection are described. PMID:23751766

  17. Does clutch size evolve in response to parasites and immunocompetence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Moller, A.P.; Merino, S.; Clobert, J.

    2001-01-01

    Parasites have been argued to influence clutch size evolution, but past work and theory has largely focused on within-species optimization solutions rather than clearly addressing among-species variation. The effects of parasites on clutch size variation among species can be complex, however, because different parasites can induce age-specific differences in mortality that can cause clutch size to evolve in different directions. We provide a conceptual argument that differences in immunocompetence among species should integrate differences in overall levels of parasite-induced mortality to which a species is exposed. We test this assumption and show that mortality caused by parasites is positively correlated with immunocompetence measured by cell-mediated measures. Under life history theory, clutch size should increase with increased adult mortality and decrease with increased juvenile mortality. Using immunocompetence as a general assay of parasite-induced mortality, we tested these predictions by using data for 25 species. We found that clutch size increased strongly with adult immunocompetence. In contrast, clutch size decreased weakly with increased juvenile immunocompetence. But, immunocompetence of juveniles may be constrained by selection on adults, and, when we controlled for adult immunocompetence, clutch size decreased with juvenile immunocompetence. Thus, immunocompetence seems to reflect evolutionary differences in parasite virulence experienced by species, and differences in age-specific parasite virulence appears to exert opposite selection on clutch size evolution.

  18. Extra-axial primary non-Hodgkin's CNS lymphoma mimicking meningioma, in a 5-year-old immunocompetent child: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Mukesh Kumar; Ojha, Balkrishna; Jaiswal, Manish; Sagar, Mala

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 5-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with features of raised intracranial pressure with left eye ptosis of 1-month duration. CT scan and MRI of the brain showed an extra-axial, intensely contrast enhancing lesion in the left temporoparieto-occipital region, consistent with meningioma. On open tissue biopsy and immunohistochemistry staining, a diagnosis of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. Six cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisolone regimen were given and showed a good clinical outcome without any recurrence during follow-up of 5 months. PMID:27118750

  19. Child deaths of unknown cause: review of 7 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Kathryn A; Marshall, William N

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the Pima County (Arizona) Child Fatality Review Team, we sought to describe the nature of unknown cause pediatric deaths. Of 1,150 total deaths (1995-2001), 22 were unknown cause and 3 had only a mode of death on the death certificate. There were 15 infants <6 months, 4 children 1-4 years, 2 children 5-9 years, 1 preteen (10-14 years), and 3 aged 15-17 years. Four patterns were seen: those resembling SIDS but with confounding history, autopsy, or scene investigation; sleeping toddlers with respiratory symptoms; children with underlying conditions not expected to cause death; and deaths without complete investigation. PMID:15583775

  20. Disseminated Nocardia farcinica in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Boamah, H; Puranam, P; Sandre, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a gram-positive, partially acid-fast, methenamine silver-positive aerobic actinomycete that is infrequently associated with nocardiosis. The relative frequency of Nocardia farcinica isolates in nocardiosis is unknown but thought to be under diagnosis. It is increasingly been recognized in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated Nocardia farcinica causing brain abscess in 55 year old immunocompetent man who was successfully treated with long term antibiotics. The present report illustrates that early detection and treatment of disseminated Nocardia farcinica can lead to a good outcome. PMID:27617207

  1. Crusted Demodicosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Demodicosis refers to the infestation by Demodex spp., a saprophytic mite of the pilosebaceous unit. Demodex proliferation can result in a number of cutaneous disorders including pustular folliculitis, pityriasis folliculorum, papulopustular, and granulomatous rosacea, among others. We report the case of a 7-year-old female presenting with pruritic grayish crusted lesions over her nose and cheeks, along with facial erythema, papules, and pustules. The father referred chronic use of topical steroids. A potassium hydroxide mount of a pustule scraping revealed several D. folliculorum mites. Oral ivermectin (200 μg/kg, single dose) plus topical permethrin 5% lotion applied for 3 consecutive nights were administered. Oral ivermectin was repeated every week and oral erythromycin plus topical metronidazole cream was added. The facial lesions greatly improved within the following 3 months. While infestation of the pilosebaceous unit by Demodex folliculorum mites is common, only few individuals present symptoms. Demodicosis can present as pruritic papules, pustules, plaques, and granulomatous facial lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of facial crusted demodicosis in an immunocompetent child. The development of symptoms in this patient could be secondary to local immunosuppression caused by the chronic use of topical steroids. PMID:25371830

  2. Crusted demodicosis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-González, Guillermo Antonio; Herz-Ruelas, Maira Elizabeth; Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Demodicosis refers to the infestation by Demodex spp., a saprophytic mite of the pilosebaceous unit. Demodex proliferation can result in a number of cutaneous disorders including pustular folliculitis, pityriasis folliculorum, papulopustular, and granulomatous rosacea, among others. We report the case of a 7-year-old female presenting with pruritic grayish crusted lesions over her nose and cheeks, along with facial erythema, papules, and pustules. The father referred chronic use of topical steroids. A potassium hydroxide mount of a pustule scraping revealed several D. folliculorum mites. Oral ivermectin (200 μg/kg, single dose) plus topical permethrin 5% lotion applied for 3 consecutive nights were administered. Oral ivermectin was repeated every week and oral erythromycin plus topical metronidazole cream was added. The facial lesions greatly improved within the following 3 months. While infestation of the pilosebaceous unit by Demodex folliculorum mites is common, only few individuals present symptoms. Demodicosis can present as pruritic papules, pustules, plaques, and granulomatous facial lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of facial crusted demodicosis in an immunocompetent child. The development of symptoms in this patient could be secondary to local immunosuppression caused by the chronic use of topical steroids. PMID:25371830

  3. Visceral basidiobolomycosis: An overlooked infection in immunocompetent children

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Hassan, Kamal Osman; Samaan, Sandra Moustafa; Ali, Mansour J

    2015-01-01

    Visceral basidiobolomycosis is an unusual fungal infection of viscera caused by saprophyte Basidiobolus ranarum. It is very rare in healthy children and poses a diagnostic challenge due to the non-specific clinical presentation and the absence of predisposing factors. We report a case of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis in a 4-year-old healthy girl who presented with a short history of abdominal pain, bleeding per rectum, fever, and weight loss. The diagnosis was based on high eosinophilic count, classical histopathology findings of fungal hyphae (the Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon), and positive fungal culture from a tissue biopsy. Fungal infection was successfully eradicated with a combined approach of surgical resection of the infected tissue and a well-monitored course of antifungal therapy. The atypical clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques, and the role of surgery in the management of a rare and lethal fungal disease in an immunocompetent child are discussed. PMID:26612126

  4. First Description of Oral Cryptococcus neoformans Causing Osteomyelitis of the Mandible, Manubrium and Third Rib with Associated Soft Tissue Abscesses in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    DiNardo, Andrew R.; Schmidt, Davin; Mitchell, Angela; Kaufman, Yoav; Tweardy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of disseminated cryptococcal infections occur in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with only 11-14% of cases occurring in patients without AIDS. Most non-AIDS related cases (75%) occur in patients with another immune deficiency. Here, we present the first case of mucocutaneous cryptococcal disease in an immunocompetent host, review the epidemiology of risk factors associated with disseminated cryptococcal disease, and describe a rational workup for a possible acquired immunodeficiency. While rare, 25% of non-AIDS related cryptococcal disease will occur in individuals without an identifiable immunodeficiency and should prompt a work up for cell-mediated immunodeficiency and monitored for closely for progression of other opportunistic infections.

  5. Pneumocystis jirovecii Transmission from Immunocompetent Carriers to Infant

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Laura; de la Horra, Carmen; Montes-Cano, Marco A.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Respaldiza, Nieves; Friaza, Vicente; Morilla, Rubén; Gutiérrez, Sonia; Varela, José M.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of Pneumocystis jirovecii transmission from colonized grandparents to their infant granddaughter. Genotyping of P. jirovecii showed the same genotypes in samples from the infant and her grandparents. These findings support P. jirovecii transmission from immunocompetent carrier adults to a susceptible child. PMID:18598635

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii transmission from immunocompetent carriers to infant.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Laura; de la Horra, Carmen; Montes-Cano, Marco A; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso; Respaldiza, Nieves; Friaza, Vicente; Morilla, Rubén; Gutiérrez, Sonia; Varela, José M; Medrano, Francisco J; Calderón, Enrique J

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of Pneumocystis jirovecii transmission from colonized grandparents to their infant granddaughter. Genotyping of P. jirovecii showed the same genotypes in samples from the infant and her grandparents. These findings support P. jirovecii transmission from immunocompetent carrier adults to a susceptible child. PMID:18598635

  7. Disseminated Histoplasmosis with Haemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Pratibha Balasaheb; Chandak, Sachet Vijay; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a devastating syndrome due to uninhibited immune activation. Disseminated histoplasmosis is a rare cause of HLH. There have been few case reports and series demonstrating a relation between the two disease entities in immunosuppressed hosts. HLH secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis is even rarer in an immunocompetant host. We report a rare case of HLH triggered by disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetant patient. PMID:27134914

  8. Disseminated Histoplasmosis with Haemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, Amey Dilip; Sonawane, Pratibha Balasaheb; Chandak, Sachet Vijay; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-03-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a devastating syndrome due to uninhibited immune activation. Disseminated histoplasmosis is a rare cause of HLH. There have been few case reports and series demonstrating a relation between the two disease entities in immunosuppressed hosts. HLH secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis is even rarer in an immunocompetant host. We report a rare case of HLH triggered by disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetant patient. PMID:27134914

  9. [CMV-associated gastric ulcer in an immunocompetent male patient].

    PubMed

    Kastenbauer, U; Ließ, H; Kremer, M

    2016-07-01

    This article reports the case of a 45-year-old male immunocompetent patient who presented with acute epigastric pain and vomiting. Diagnostic tests confirmed a recent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection as a contributory cause of a florid gastric ulcer. Primary CMV infections affecting the upper gastrointestinal tract are rare in immunocompetent adults. In this case treatment with a proton pump inhibitor and eradication of concomitant Helicobacter pylori colonization led to a full recovery. Anti-CMV treatment was not necessary. PMID:27080250

  10. Lipotropes, immunocompetence, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Newbene, P M; Nauss, K M; de Camargo, J L

    1983-05-01

    Lipotropes (choline, methionine, folic acid, and vitamin B12) are required for normal metabolic function at the cellular and subcellular levels. Deficiencies of any or all of them to a point of influence on methyl group metabolism has a profound effect on synthesis of cellular macromolecules and on cell proliferation. Lipotrope deficiency results in a diminished immunocompetence and an increased susceptibility to a number of types of cancer in experimental animals. A challenge now being addressed is to identify the linkage between lipotropes, the immune system, and cancer and to determine mechanisms which can be useful in cancer prevention. PMID:6187450

  11. [Organic causes of bad visual development in the child].

    PubMed

    Roche, Olivier; Dufier, Jean-Louis

    2007-11-30

    The eye trouble of organic origin must be diagnosed and treated before the installation of an irreversible amblyopia. This early diagnosis rests on the observation of the child by his parents but especially on the knowledge of the various clinical signs by the general practitioner or the pediatrist. Thus, the blindness and the behaviors which is referred to it (leucocorie, strabism, nystagmus, or sometimes exophtalmy) must alert the doctor who will then address the child towards the ophthalmologist. This one will be able to highlight a malformation of the anterior segment, a cataract or glaucoma, an ocular inflammation or its after-effects, retinal, orbital or optical ways anomaly. The treatment will have to then allow a fast visual rehabilitation in order to treat the residual amblyopia as fast as possible. In some cases, it will direct the child and his parents towards a structure specialized in order to develop to the maximum of the sometimes unexpected visual capacities. PMID:18326437

  12. [Perforation of the eardrum caused by child abuse].

    PubMed

    Gindesgaard, Christian Banner; Møller, Troels Reinholdt

    2011-09-26

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) is a complex, multifaceted form of child abuse that presents a challenge to all health-care providers. Diagnosis is difficult in cases of MSBP, and it is imperative to recognise the clinical features of MSBP in both the child and the perpetrator. All members of the health-care team must stay objective in the interactions with families where MSBP is suspected and make referrals to the proper agencies. A case is presented to explain the medical and social complexities associated with nursing and diagnosing MSBP. This article also provides a brief review of the definition of MSBP. PMID:21958485

  13. [A case of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent infant].

    PubMed

    Pattarino, G; Arrigoni, S; Grazioli, R; De Palma, A; di Natale, B

    2006-08-01

    Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis is a rare affection after the neonatal period, but in immunocompromised patients. Listeria Monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium frequently causing infection in pregnant women, in patients with cell-mediated immunity deficit and in the early and late stages of life. We present a case of Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent nomad 8-month-child, preceded by gastroenteritis. Although gastrointestinal symptoms may be due to intestinal infection by Listeria, the concomitant presence of other bacteric or viral enteric pathogens may have promoted bacterium intestinal translocation and generated disseminated disease. The main transmission route of infection after the neonatal period is ingestion of contaminated food. A diet history was taken after isolation of the bacterium in liquor and showed that the child was an eater of undercooked hot-dogs. Despite the frequency of clinical complication in such affection, the outcome in this patient was a complete recovery. Although the infection is extremely infrequent in healthy children, physicians should always consider Listeria as a possible etiologic agent of meningitis in pediatric patients, regardless of their age or immunological status, especially in patients living in precarious sanitary conditions, where weaning times and conditions are not respected and a suitable food cooking is not assured. PMID:17008849

  14. Bordetella bronchoseptica pneumonia with shock in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Tamion, F; Girault, C; Chevron, V; Pestel, M; Bonmarchand, G

    1996-01-01

    Bordetella bronchoseptica is a rarely reported cause of human infection, but is a common respiratory tract commensal of mammals. Human infection with B. bronchoseptica is almost always associated with severe underlying disease and contact with an appropriate animal reservoir. We report a case of pneumonia with shock caused by B. bronchoseptica in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:8792492

  15. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome caused by ocular glucocorticoids in a child.

    PubMed

    Messina, Maria Francesca; Valenzise, Mariella; Aversa, Salvatore; Arrigo, Teresa; De Luca, Filippo

    2009-01-01

    A boy aged 7.6 years presented to our Unit of Paediatric Endocrinology for evaluation of obesity. Progressive weight gain (10 kg) started 6 months earlier after an accidental penetrating orbital injury on the right eye. During this period the child has been treated with oral betamethasone (0.5 mg/day) for 1 month and dexamethasone 2% ocular drops (2 hourly by day) for 6 months. Physical examination showed he was 113.5 cm in height (-1.5 SD), weight 36.0 kg, blood pressure 110/90 mmHg (90th centile), body mass index 28 (+5 SD), truncal obesity, buffalo hump, "moon-face", increased lanugo hair and supraclavicular fullness. Endocrinological work-up revealed undetectable levels of basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), basal and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and 24 h urine excretion cortisol, confirming the diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. The abrupt withdrawal of ocular glucocorticoids by the parents evoked two adrenal crises; 4 months later the patient recovered. In conclusion, we would alert doctors that every formulation of glucocorticoids, no ocular drops excluded, can determine severe systemic side effects and iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. PMID:21686405

  16. [Cerebral Aspergillus abscess in immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Pianetti Filho, Geraldo; Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Giannetti, Alexandre Varela; Darwich, Rogério

    2005-12-01

    We report an unusual case of brain aspergillosis with multiple recurrent abscess in a 40 year-old immunocompetent woman, with good therapeutical outcome. The patient presented a subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm and was submitted to a craniotomy for aneurysm surgery. Five months later, she developed multiple Aspergillus cerebral abscess. Two craniotomies and amphotericin B became necessary during treatment. Fourteen years later, she is asymptomatic. Treatment of brain aspergillosis abscess implied the combination of both surgical and drug therapy with amphotericin B. PMID:16400435

  17. Recurrent varicella in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Joseph; Greenfield, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection causes 2 distinct disease processes. Primary VZV infection results in varicella (chickenpox), a common generalized eruption, and subsequent reactivation of VZV classically results in herpes zoster (shingles), which presents as a unilateral, dermatomal eruption. Although a single VZV infection typically confers protection against its reactivation, recurrent varicella rarely is reported, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present the case of a 52-year-old black woman with an intact immune system who demonstrated 3 VZV infections. PMID:26919358

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis causing cervical myelopathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kun Soo; Jung, Youn Young; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a disorder of the phagocytic system, is a rare condition. Moreover, spinal involvement causing myelopathy is even rare and unusual. Here, we report a case of atypical LCH causing myelopathy, which was subsequently treated by corpectemy and fusion. A 5-year-old boy presented with 3 weeks of severe neck pain and limited neck movement accompanying right arm motor weakness. CT scans revealed destruction of C7 body and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumoral process at C7 with cord compression. Interbody fusion using cervical mesh packed by autologus iliac bone was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. After the surgery, the boy recovered from radiating pain and motor weakness of right arm. Despite the rarity of the LCH in the cervical spine, it is necessary to maintain our awareness of this condition. When neurologic deficits are present, operative treatment should be considered. PMID:20617093

  19. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Causing Cervical Myelopathy in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kun Soo; Jung, Youn Young

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a disorder of the phagocytic system, is a rare condition. Moreover, spinal involvement causing myelopathy is even rare and unusual. Here, we report a case of atypical LCH causing myelopathy, which was subsequently treated by corpectemy and fusion. A 5-year-old boy presented with 3 weeks of severe neck pain and limited neck movement accompanying right arm motor weakness. CT scans revealed destruction of C7 body and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumoral process at C7 with cord compression. Interbody fusion using cervical mesh packed by autologus iliac bone was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. After the surgery, the boy recovered from radiating pain and motor weakness of right arm. Despite the rarity of the LCH in the cervical spine, it is necessary to maintain our awareness of this condition. When neurologic deficits are present, operative treatment should be considered. PMID:20617093

  20. Invasive lung infection by Scedosporium apiospermum in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Agatha, David; Krishnan, Krishnan Usha; Dillirani, Ved-achalam; Selvi, Rangam

    2014-01-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum previously known as Monospermum apiospermum is a ubiquitous fungus found in soil, polluted water and sewage. It causes broad spectrum of diseases, including soft tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, ophthalmic infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, meningitis, brain abscesses, endocarditis and disseminated infection. In recent years, it has been shown to be pathogenic for both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients. It is a significant opportunist with very high levels of antifungal resistance. We report here a case of invasive lung infection due to S. apiospermum in an immunocompetent patient who responded to antifungal therapy and surgical treatment. PMID:25308027

  1. Chromoblastomycosis caused by Cladophialophora carrionii in a child from India.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkumar, Narayanappa Shiroorkar; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2011-07-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It usually occurs following trauma with vegetative matter and mainly affects middle-aged male agricultural workers. Only a few cases have been reported in children. The lesions commonly involve the lower limbs, while the upper limbs and face are only rarely affected. We report a case of cutaneous chromoblastomycosis of the left arm, caused by Cladophialophora carrionii, in a 9-year-old boy from India, who was earlier misdiagnosed as cutaneous tuberculosis. The patient showed a good response to treatment with itraconazole and terbinafine. PMID:21795827

  2. Plastic bronchitis caused by neoplastic infiltrates in a child.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Tamar; Wexler, Isaiah D; Shoseyov, David; Weintraub, Michael; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-09-01

    We report on a case of a 7-year-old girl admitted for pneumonia not responding to oral antibiotics. During hospitalization, her pulmonary status deteriorated as a result of significant atelectasis. An extensive workup revealed an anaplastic large-cell lymphoma with neoplastic cells, found in both a biopsied lymph node and pleural fluid aspirate. Bronchoscopic examination showed nearly complete obstruction of the left side by bronchial casts composed of tumor cells, fibrin, and necrotic material, consistent with plastic bronchitis. Neoplastic infiltration of the bronchi should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disease entities causing plastic bronchitis in children. PMID:16779857

  3. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman*

    PubMed Central

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient. PMID:23539012

  4. Candida Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kivnick, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting are common during the first half of pregnancy and usually require only supportive measures. When symptoms are progressive and weight loss occurs, treatable causes should be sought by means of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We report a case of an immunocompetent gravida with invasive Candida albicans esophagitis. Case: The immunocompetent primigravida developed progressive nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and a 4.1 kg weight loss during the second trimester of pregnancy. Treatment with metoclopramide and cimetidine for presumed gastroesophageal reflux was not effective. The patient had normal T-cell CD4 and CD8 subsets and was human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody negative. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed C. albicans esophagitis which was treated with oral nystatin. The esophagitis had resolved completely when reassessed postpartum. The use of histamine2 blockers is associated with an increased risk for fungal esophagitis and may have been a contributing cause in this case. Conclusion: Pregnant patients with persistent nausea, vomiting, and weight loss should be evaluated by endoscopy for fungal esophagitis. PMID:18475336

  5. Intestinal histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Zi-Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To present a retrospective analysis of clinical and endoscopic features of 4 cases of immunocompetent hosts with intestinal histoplasmosis (IH). METHODS: Four immunocompetent adults were diagnosed with IH between October 2005 and March 2015 at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were summarized and analyzed retrospectively. GMS (Gomori methenamine silver), PAS (periodic acid-Schiff) and Giemsa staining technique were used to confirm Histoplasma capsulatum(H. capsulatum). The symptoms, signs, endoscopic presentations, radiographic imaging, pathological stain results and follow-up are presented as tables and illustrations. RESULTS: The cases were male patients, ranging from 33 to 61 years old, and primarily presented with non-specific symptoms such as irregular fever, weight loss, abdominal pain and distention. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy were the most common signs. Endoscopic manifestations were localized or diffuse congestion, edema, ulcers, and polypoid nodules with central erosion involving the terminal ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum, similar to intestinal tuberculosis, tumor, and inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous yeast-like pathogens testing positive for PAS and GMS stains but negative for Giemsa were detected in the cytoplasm of the histiocytes, which were highly suggestive of H. capsulatum. CONCLUSION: Immunocompetent individuals suffering from histoplasmosis are rarely reported. It is necessary that gastroenterologists and endoscopists consider histoplasmosis as a differential diagnosis, even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27099446

  6. The Cause of Child Abuse and Neglect and Their Effects on the Development of Children in Samaru Zaria, Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amdi, Veronica

    1990-01-01

    Initial discussion of the definition, types, causes, and effects of child abuse and neglect is followed by a description of a study of child abuse in Samaru Village of Nigeria and the effects of such abuse on the development of the child. (BG)

  7. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer. PMID:24568756

  8. [Chronic Salmonella typhimurium diarrhea in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mellado-Ferreiro, M; Jarne-Betrán, V; Arteaga-Mazuelas, M; Abínzano-Guillén, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea caused by infection in immunocompetent patients is an infrequent condition in developed countries, although certain pathogens,generally parasites (Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli,Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Strongyloides, Ameba,Trichuris and Schistosoma) and some bacteria (Aeromonas,Plesiomonas, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile, Salmonella or Mycobacterium tuberculosis)can cause persistent diarrhea.We present the case of a patient who showed Salmonella typhimurium in his stool culture and recovered following treatment with levofloxacin for 7 days. PMID:27125610

  9. Septic shock, necrotizing pneumonitis, and meningoencephalitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Eliane R; Souza, Daniela C; Góes, Patricia F; Bousso, Albert

    2009-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative agent of respiratory infection in childhood. Although the infection caused by M. pneumoniae is classically described as benign, severe and life-threatening pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications can occur. This study describes the first case of septic shock related to M. pneumoniae in a child with necrotizing pneumonitis, severe encephalitis, and multiple organs involvement, with a favorable outcome after lobectomy and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:19023109

  10. Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis in an immunocompetent host: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Zenkner, Francis de Moura; França, Josiane; Santos, Breno Riegel

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 53-year-old man with a long history of alcohol abuse, with Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis, an organism that rarely causes human infection and is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. The patient improved with high-dose ampicillin and gentamicin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first Brazilian reported case of E. gallinarum meningitis and probably the first case described in an immunocompetent host. PMID:20464133

  11. Pleural Nocardiosis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mantur, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare infection that has attracted attention with its increased rate of occurrence in the recent years. In India there is a rare documentation of the pleural involvement in nocardiosis. We report here a case of pleural nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis in patients with pleural lesions. PMID:26894067

  12. Herpes zoster duplex bilateralis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Gahalaut, Pratik; Chauhan, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus causes both chicken pox and herpes zoster. The phenomenon of herpes zoster occurring concurrently in two non-contiguous dermatomes involving different halves of the body is termed herpes zoster duplex bilateralis (HZDB). Few cases, reported in the literature, were seen in either an immunosuppressed host or in the older age group. Here we present a case of HZDB in an immunocompetent host, probably the first in India. PMID:23130258

  13. Enterococcus faecium small colony variant endocarditis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Egido, S Hernández; Ruiz, M Siller; Inés Revuelta, S; García, I García; Bellido, J L Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Small colony variants (SCV) are slow-growing subpopulations of bacteria usually associated with auxotrophism, causing persistent or recurrent infections. Enterococcus faecalis SCV have been seldom described, and only one case of Enterococcus faecium SCV has been reported, associated with sepsis in a leukaemia patient. Here we report the first case described of bacteraemia and endocarditis by SCV E. faecium in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:26862434

  14. CAUSE OF DEATH AND THE QUEST FOR MEANING AFTER THE LOSS OF A CHILD

    PubMed Central

    LICHTENTHAL, WENDY G.; NEIMEYER, ROBERT A.; CURRIER, JOSEPH M.; ROBERTS, KAILEY; JORDAN, NANCY

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns of making meaning among 155 parents whose children died from a variety of violent and non-violent causes. Findings indicated 53% of violent loss survivors could not make sense of their loss, as compared to 32% of non-violent loss survivors. Overall, there was overlap in sense-making strategies across different causes of death, with many parents invoking spiritual and religious meanings and the cultivation of empathy for the suffering of others. Nonetheless, violent loss survivors described the imperfection of the world and brevity of life more frequently in their narrative responses than parents who lost a child to natural causes, who in turn were more likely to find benefit in the loss in terms of personal growth. Violent loss survivors—and especially those losing a child to homicide—also reported enhanced appreciation of life more frequently than survivors of non-violent losses, and surviving a child’s suicide was specifically associated with a change in priorities in the sample. Findings are discussed in terms of common and distinctive themes in meaning making that clinicians may encounter when working with parental bereavement, and the implications these carry for finding spiritual and secular significance in a traumatic loss. PMID:24520890

  15. Methemoglobinemia due to quinine causing severe acute kidney injury in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kudale, S.; Sethi, S. K.; Dhaliwal, M.; Kher, V.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital methemoglobinemia is a rare condition resulting from a deficiency of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-cytochrome b5 reductase. Acquired methemoglobinemia may result due to certain drugs, chemicals and food items. Information on epidemiological determinants from India is sparse. This report describes methemoglobinemia in a 4-year-old child after parenteral administration of quinine causing acute kidney injury. This case emphasizes the need of awareness of potential adverse events of antimalarial drugs. Prompt management of methemoglobinemia is essential to avoid potential life-threatening complications. PMID:25484537

  16. Generalised stunting of roots in an epileptic child: is long-term phenytoin therapy the cause?

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Garima; Pandey, Ramesh K; Kumar, Dipanshu

    2012-01-01

    Long-term phenytoin therapy is known to cause disturbance in calcium and bone homeostasis. Dental tissues being calcified tissues can also be affected by this derangement of mineral metabolism, especially during developmental phases. This report describes a case of an epileptic child who presented with short roots, enlarged pulp chambers, blunt apices and delayed eruption of permanent dentition, which might be attributed to long-term phenytoin therapy. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness among the clinicians about its possible dental implications and emphasise upon the need of regular dental check-ups in epileptic children. PMID:22761220

  17. Acute community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia in a presumed immunocompetent host

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Varun; Rajagopalan, Natarajan; C, Shivaprasad; Patil, Mahantesh; Varghese, Jaicob

    2012-01-01

    Infection from Aspergillus results in a wide range of diseases from simple Aspergillus pneumonia to fatal invasive Aspergillosis. Though the fungus is known to predominantly affect the immunocompromised host, it has also been known to cause acute pneumonia in immunocompetent hosts which is invariably fatal. It presents as an acute pneumonia with bilateral chest infiltrates on radiograph. Early clinical suspicion and microbiological identification by measures such as broncho alveolar lavage and initiation of therapy with voricanozole significantly increase the chances of survival. In this article the authors discuss a case of acute community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia in an immunocompetent host who survived due to early identification and prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal medication. PMID:22605848

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Esophagitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Candelaria, Angela; Kwak, Ye Eun; Loeser, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is commonly identified in immunosuppressed patients. It is rare among immunocompetent patients and almost all of the reported cases are due to HSV-1 infection. HSV-2 esophagitis is extremely rare. We report the case of a young immunocompetent male who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and epigastric pain. Endoscopy showed multitudes of white nummular lesions in the distal esophagus initially suspected to be candida esophagitis. However, classic histopathological findings of multinucleated giant cells with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions and positive HSV-2 IgM confirmed the diagnosis of HSV-2 esophagitis. The patient rapidly responded to acyclovir treatment. Although HSV-2 is predominantly associated with genital herpes, it can cause infections in other parts of the body previously attributed to only HSV-1 infection. PMID:27195158

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Esophagitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult.

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Candelaria, Angela; Kwak, Ye Eun; Loeser, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is commonly identified in immunosuppressed patients. It is rare among immunocompetent patients and almost all of the reported cases are due to HSV-1 infection. HSV-2 esophagitis is extremely rare. We report the case of a young immunocompetent male who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and epigastric pain. Endoscopy showed multitudes of white nummular lesions in the distal esophagus initially suspected to be candida esophagitis. However, classic histopathological findings of multinucleated giant cells with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions and positive HSV-2 IgM confirmed the diagnosis of HSV-2 esophagitis. The patient rapidly responded to acyclovir treatment. Although HSV-2 is predominantly associated with genital herpes, it can cause infections in other parts of the body previously attributed to only HSV-1 infection. PMID:27195158

  20. Causes and determinants of inequity in maternal and child health in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inequities in health are a major challenge for health care planners and policymakers globally. In Vietnam, rapid societal development presents a considerable risk for disadvantaged populations to be left behind. The aim of this review is to map the known causes and determinants of inequity in maternal and child health in Vietnam in order to promote policy action. Methods A review was performed through systematic searches of Pubmed and Proquest and manual searches of “grey literature.” A thematic content analysis guided by the conceptual framework suggested by the Commission on Social Determinants of Health was performed. Results More than thirty different causes and determinants of inequity in maternal and child health were identified. Some determinants worth highlighting were the influence of informal fees and the many testimonies of discrimination and negative attitudes from health staff towards women in general and ethnic minorities in particular. Research gaps were identified, such as a lack of studies investigating the influence of education on health care utilization, informal costs of care, and how psychosocial factors mediate inequity. Conclusions The evidence of corruption and discrimination as mediators of health inequity in Vietnam calls for attention and indicates a need for more structural interventions such as better governance and anti-discriminatory laws. More research is needed in order to fully understand the pathways of inequities in health in Vietnam and suggest areas for intervention for policy action to reach disadvantaged populations. PMID:22883138

  1. 'It was caused by the carelessness of the parents': cultural models of child malnutrition in southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Flax, Valerie L

    2015-01-01

    Parents' conceptions of child growth, health and malnutrition are culturally bound, making information about local understandings of malnutrition and its causes necessary for designing effective nutrition programmes. This study used ethnographic methods to elucidate cultural models of child care and malnutrition among the Yao of southern Malawi. Data were collected in six rural villages from 28 key informant interviews with village chiefs and traditional healers among others and 18 focus group discussions with parents and grandmothers of young children. For the Yao, lack of parental care is a key cause of poor child health and can lead to thinness (kunyililika) or swelling (kuimbangana). Parents are said to be careless if they are not attentive to the child's needs, are unable to provide adequate quality or quantity of food, or fail to follow sexual abstinence rules. Maintaining abstinence protects the family and failure to do so causes the transfer of 'heat' from a sexually active parent to a 'cold' child and results in child health problems, including signs and symptoms of malnutrition. These findings indicate that the Yao understanding of care is much broader than the concept of care during feeding described in the nutrition literature. In addition, the Yao note the importance of several key feeding practices supported by international agencies and understand the influence of illness on child nutritional status. These congruencies with the public health frame should be used together with information about the cultural context to design more socially and emotionally relevant care and nutrition programmes among the Yao. PMID:23941316

  2. CNS toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rajoo; Radhan, Prabhu; Anand, Rajamani; Subramanian, Ilanchezhian; Santosham, Roy; Sai, Venakata

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serious and life-threatening disease in humans with a high prevalence in immunocompromised persons. The disease has a wide spectrum, depending on the immune status of the person. A CNS manifestation of toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent person is very rare and often undetected. Our case of CNS toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent person emphasizes the radiological diagnosis, which was further confirmed by advanced microbiology technique. PMID:27141248

  3. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient. PMID:27376217

  4. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  5. Hyperammonemic coma caused by Providencia rettgeri infection in a child with prune belly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murray, T; Comeau, L L

    2001-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in the absence of liver disease caused by a urinary tract infection with a previously unreported organism. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit. Patient: Critically ill child who presented with hyperammonemic coma. INTERVENTION: Bladder drainage and antimicrobial therapy for the urinary tract infection. Measurements: Rapid resolution of the hyperammonemia. MAIN RESULTS: Rapid improvement in the patient's neurologic status and a return to his baseline function without neurologic deficit. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with abnormal urinary collecting systems who present with altered mental status should have a serum ammonia concentration sent as part of the initial evaluation. We have added Providencia species to the list of documented causative organisms in this rare association between urinary tract infections and hyperammonemia. PMID:12797879

  6. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  7. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus tamarii in an immunocompetent host

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sadhna; Yenigalla, Bindu Madhav; Naidu, Sujeet Kumar; Pidakala, Premalatha

    2013-01-01

    Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare disease usually caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus ustus. It is usually seen in immunocompromised hosts, though some cases are also reported in immunocompetent hosts. We present a case of an immunocompetent farmer who presented with generalised nodules and plaques, mimicking erythema nodosum leprosum but turned out to be cutaneous aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus tamarii. The characteristic ascospores of Aspergillus species were found in skin lesions on fungus isolated in culture. The patient showed excellent response to antifungal therapy. PMID:23970496

  8. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae. PMID:27583077

  9. Disseminated Histoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Patient Diagnosed on Bone Marrow Aspirate - A Rare Presentation from a Non-Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Nidhya; Sharma, Reetika; Phansalkar, Manjiri Dilip; Varghese, Renug'Boy

    2015-12-01

    Histoplasmosis causing systemic fungal infection is commonly seen in endemic areas. In India, disease prevalence is more in eastern part of the country and there have been very few reports from southern part of India. The occurrence of disseminated histoplasmosis in immunocompetent individual is rare. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual with no underlying risk factors. The disease was not suspected clinically and was diagnosed by bone marrow aspirate incidentally. PMID:26816901

  10. [Aspergillus fumigatus mediastinitis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient after heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Acuña, Mirta; Farfán, Felipe; Cofré, Fernanda; Benadof, Dona

    2016-02-01

    Postsurgical aspergillosis occurs primarily in immunocompetent patients whose main predisposing factor is the loss of skin and mucosal integrity during surgery. Local infection tends to be destructive and refractory to treatment and relapses are common. It is important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of slowly progressive and destructive surgical site infections with negative bacterial cultures. We present the case of a child who developed Aspergillus fumigatus mediastinitis months after heart surgery. PMID:26965883

  11. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture treatment in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Glas, Ariene Wypkjen; Jüttner, Anna M F M; Kooter, Albertus Jozef

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year old male with no significant medical history was admitted to our hospital with a painful, red, swollen right arm and fever. The rash and swelling had started in the cubital fossa. 7 days earlier, needles had been placed exactly at that site during an acupuncture treatment. After deterioration of his condition, surgical exploration of the arm revealed necrotising fasciitis. Although acupuncture is a relatively safe intervention, serious complications do occur. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture has been described in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge this is the first immunocompetent patient with necrotising fasciitis and toxic shock, caused by acupuncture. PMID:27413025

  12. Acute systemic histoplasmosis associated with chorioretinitis in an immunocompetent adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Brian; Shen, Christopher; Mastellone, Joseph; Chaum, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Summary Histoplasmosis is an endemic, systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. A minority of patients develop asymptomatic chorioretinitis known as presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS), which is typically associated with chorioretinal scarring and peripapillary atrophy and occasionally with choroidal neovascularization secondary to maculopathy. We report a case of acute severe bilateral chorioretinitis associated with disseminated H. capsulatum in an immunocompetent adolescent boy living in an endemic area. The chorioretinitis did not respond to systemic antifungal therapy, but both his systemic illness and ocular lesions resolved with the addition of systemic steroids. PMID:23362391

  13. Research opportunities on immunocompetence in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beisel, W. R. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The most significant of the available data on the effects of space flight on immunocompetences and the potential operational and clinical significance of reported changes are as follows: (1) reduced postflight blastogenic response of peripheral lymphocytes from space crew members; (2) postflight neutrophilia persisting up to 7 days; (3) gingival inflammation of the Skylab astronauts; (4) postflight lymphocytopenia, eosinopenia, and monocytopenia; (5) modifications and shifts in the microflora of space crews and spacecraft; and (6) microbial contamination of cabin air and drinking water. These responses and data disclose numerous gaps in the knowledge that is essential for an adequate understanding of space-related changes in immunocompetence.

  14. Tackling Teacher Turnover in Child Care: Understanding Causes and Consequences, Identifying Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale-Jinks, Claudia; Knopf, Herman; Kemple, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    "Teacher turnover," the number of teachers who leave a program during a year has numerous detrimental effects that can lower the quality of care received by children and families. High rates of teacher turnover, high child-to-adult ratios, and poorly trained staff characterize poor-quality child care in the United States. In fact, high rates of…

  15. Accidental ingestion of Ecstasy by a toddler: unusual cause for convulsion in a febrile child.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A J; Egleston, C V

    1997-05-01

    The case is reported of a toddler who presented with an apparent febrile convulsion. The final diagnosis was that of accidental ingestion of Ecstasy. The child made an uneventful recovery. Ecstasy toxicity should be added to the list of differential diagnoses in a child presenting with fever and an unexplained seizure. PMID:9193992

  16. Accidental ingestion of Ecstasy by a toddler: unusual cause for convulsion in a febrile child.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, A J; Egleston, C V

    1997-01-01

    The case is reported of a toddler who presented with an apparent febrile convulsion. The final diagnosis was that of accidental ingestion of Ecstasy. The child made an uneventful recovery. Ecstasy toxicity should be added to the list of differential diagnoses in a child presenting with fever and an unexplained seizure. PMID:9193992

  17. Understanding the Use of Psychotropic Medications in the Child Welfare System: Causes, Consequences, and Proposed Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Zakia; Calleja, Nancy G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the progressively increasing number of children prescribed psychotropic medication, while findings have illustrated significantly greater usage among child welfare-involved children. These findings have raised serious concerns among mental health and child welfare professionals as well as the general public. To…

  18. Post-tsunami primary Scedosporium apiospermum osteomyelitis of the knee in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Andrea; Drago, Gabriele; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is a filamentous fungus present in soil and polluted waters that may cause infection by direct inoculation. Osteomyelitis represents a challenge both for diagnosis and treatment. We report a case of post-tsunami primary S. apiospermum osteomyelitis of the knee in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:23523561

  19. [Potential nosocomial disseminated infection due to Nocardia asteroides after a prosthesis insertion in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mrozek, N; Hamizi, S; Gourdon, F; Laurichesse, H; Beytout, J; Lesens, O

    2008-12-01

    Nocardia infections are rare and usually occurred in immunocompromised patients with systemic dissemination from a lung infection. We report a case of an immunocompetent patient in whom Nocardia asteroides had cause psoas and cerebral abcess without pulmonary infection, a short period after a hip prosthesis insertion. The clinical history is highly suggestive of a hospital-acquired infection. PMID:18395304

  20. Cryptococcal Brainstem Abscess Mimicking Brain Tumors in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jong Hee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, Seoung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Usually fungal infections caused by opportunistic and pathogenic fungi had been an important cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. However clinical data and investigations for immunocompetent pathogenic fungal infections had been rare and neglected into clinical studies. Especially Cryptococcal brainstem abscess cases mimicking brain tumors were also much more rare. So we report this unusual case. This 47-year-old man presented with a history of progressively worsening headache and nausea for 1 month and several days of vomituritions before admission. Neurological and laboratory examinations performed demonstrated no abnormal findings. Previously he was healthy and did not have any significant medical illnesses. A CT and MRI scan revealed enhancing 1.8×1.7×2.0 cm mass lesion in the left pons having central necrosis and peripheral edema compressing the fourth ventricle. And also positron emission tomogram scan demonstrated a hot uptake of fluoro-deoxy-glucose on the brainstem lesion without any evidences of systemic metastasis. Gross total mass resection was achieved with lateral suboccipital approach with neuronavigation system. Postoperatively he recovered without any neurological deficits. Pathologic report confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans and he was successively treated with antifungal medications. This is a previously unreported rare case of brainstem Cryptococcal abscess mimicking brain tumors in immunocompetent host without having any apparent typical meningeal symptoms and signs with resultant good neurosurgical recovery. PMID:25674344

  1. Cytomegalovirus appendicitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph E; McCormack, Michael; Gurung, Ananta; Passarelli, James; Landry, Marie L; Golden, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common viral pathogen. Asymptomatic infection or a mononucleosis syndrome are the most common manifestations in otherwise healthy individuals. End-organ disease is rare in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we describe a case of CMV appendicitis in a patient without an immune-compromising condition. PMID:26942831

  2. Clostridium septicum Empyema in an Immunocompetent Woman

    PubMed Central

    Granok, Alexander B.; Mahon, Patrick A.; Biesek, Genesio W.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a Clostridium septicum empyema in an immunocompetent woman following operation for an incarcerated internal hernia. The patient was successfully treated with pleural decortication and an extended course of postoperative antibiotics. This is the first report of such an infection in the medical literature. PMID:20490275

  3. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient*

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  4. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  5. Fulminant Endophthalmitis in a Child Caused by Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Detected by Specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Kallinich, Tilmann; von Bernuth, Horst; Kuhns, Martin; Elias, Johannes; Bertelmann, Eckart; Pleyer, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    This case report describes a local Neisseria meningitidis eye infection with a long protracted course in a seemingly healthy previously vaccinated child. Bacterial infection was detected by polymerase chain reaction techniques. PMID:27000867

  6. Tuberculosis of the Thyroid in a Child: A Rare cause of Thyromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sugandha; Girhotra, Manish; Zafar, Naushad

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of thyroid gland is extremely rare in children. We describe the case of a 6-year girl child, presenting with a multinodular thyroid swelling. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed extensive necrosis with few epithelioid cell granulomas and occasional acid-fast bacilli, suggesting a diagnosis of tuberculosis. The child was put on anti-tuberculous drugs with significant improvement. Tuberculosis of the thyroid gland, although rare, should be considered in differential diagnosis of thyroid swelling, especially in endemic areas. PMID:26816678

  7. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  8. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  9. Pyogenic granuloma as a cause of bone loss in a twelve-year-old child: report of case.

    PubMed

    Goodman-Topper, E D; Bimstein, E

    1994-01-01

    The pyogenic granuloma frequently appears between the ages of eleven and forty years. It is a benign soft tissue lesion of inflammatory origin, which may be misdiagnosed as a neoplastic tumor due to its rapid development. Definitive diagnosis can only be made by histopathologic examination. Treatment is by conservative local excision. The present manuscript reports on the diagnosis and treatment of such a lesion, which caused significant maxillary bone loss in a twelve-year-old child. PMID:8182202

  10. First Human Case of Meningitis and Sepsis in a Child Caused by Actinobacillus suis or Actinobacillus equuli

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Pecile, Patrizia; Moriondo, Maria; Petricci, Patrizia; Becciani, Sabrina; Chiappini, Elena; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Rossolini, Gian Maria; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first human case of meningitis and sepsis caused in a child by Actinobacillus suis or A. equuli, a common opportunistic pathogen of swine or horses, respectively. Identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry and real-time PCR assay. A previous visit to a farm was suspected as the source of infection. PMID:25878346

  11. Mother to child transmission of hepatitis B virus: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A M; Raghavendran, A; Sivakumar, J; Radhakrishnan, M; Rose, W; Abraham, P

    2015-02-01

    Mother to child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important public health issue. India introduced HBV vaccine in 10 states as part of its Universal Immunization Program (UIP). Here we show evidence of mother-to-child transmission of HBV in three families from Jharkhand and Bihar states where HBV vaccination is not yet included in the UIP. This report illustrates the need for active screening of HBV in pregnant women and implementation of HBV vaccine across all states in India to reduce the burden of disease. PMID:25657134

  12. Hepatosplenic Cat Scratch Disease in Immunocompetent Adults

    PubMed Central

    García, Juan C.; Núñez, Manuel J.; Castro, Begoña; Fernández, Jesús M.; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is the most frequent presentation of Bartonella henselae infection. It has a worldwide distribution and is associated with a previous history of scratch or bite from a cat or dog. CSD affects children and teenagers more often (80%) than adults, and it usually has a self-limiting clinical course. Atypical clinical course or systemic symptoms are described in 5%–20% of patients. Among them, hepatosplenic (HS) forms (abscess) have been described. The majority of published cases have affected children or immunosuppressed patients. Few cases of HS forms of CSD in immunocompetent adult hosts have been reported, and data about the management of this condition are scarce. Herein, we present 3 new cases of HS forms of CSD in immunocompetent adults and review 33 other cases retrieved from the literature. We propose an approach to clinical diagnosis and treatment with oral azithromycin. PMID:25398062

  13. Malignant lues in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Alves, João; António, Ana Marta; Matos, Diogo; Coelho, Ricardo; Cachão, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Malignant lues is a rare form of secondary syphilis mostly associated with HIV infection. It is an uncommon presentation of syphilis even rarer in immunocompetent patients. We present the case of a 57-year-old homosexual man referred to our department due to a 4-month history of a disseminated, slightly painful, nodular-ulcerative cutaneous eruption associated with low-grade fever, malaise and aesthenia. Regarding the clinical features and serological and histopathological findings, the diagnosis of syphilis maligna was assumed. Serology for HIV was repeatedly negative. This case is interesting, not only because a very uncommon form of secondary syphilis was identified but also for being diagnosed in an immunocompetent patient. Lack of awareness of this type of presentation delays the diagnosis and treatment, leading to an increase in morbidity and spread of infection. PMID:25015934

  14. Histopathology of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunocompetent laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HYUN-SOO; DO, SUNG-IM; KIM, YOUN WHA

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of idiopathic pulmonary lesions in laboratory rats, characterized by lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia with dense perivascular lymphoid cuffs, has been reported over the past decade. Although the term rat respiratory virus (RRV) was adopted to confer a putative viral etiology to the idiopathic pulmonary lesions, the etiology of this disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, inflammatory lesions have been observed in the lungs of immunocompetent laboratory rats similar to those previously described. Based on the latest evidence indicating that Pneumocystis carinii (P. carinii), and not putative RRV, causes infectious interstitial pneumonia in laboratory rats, the present study investigated whether the pulmonary lesions observed were caused by P. carinii infection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, free of known pathogens, were introduced into a rat colony positive for RRV-type lesions. Routine histopathological examinations were performed on the rat lung tissues following exposure. The presence of Pneumocystis organisms was confirmed using Grocott’s methenamine silver (GMS) staining. At week 3 following introduction, a few small lymphoid aggregates were located adjacent to the edematous vascular sheath. By week 5, foci of dense perivascular lymphoid cuffing were observed. Multifocal lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia and prominent lymphoid perivascular cuffs were observed between week 7 and 10. GMS staining confirmed the presence of Pneumocystis cysts. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrated that P. carinii caused lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia in a group of laboratory rats. The observations strongly support the conclusion that P. carinii infection in immunocompetent laboratory rats causes the lung lesions that were previously attributed to RRV. PMID:25009598

  15. Malignant syphilis in an immunocompetent female patient.

    PubMed

    Requena, Camila Bueno; Orasmo, Cínthia Rosane; Ocanha, Juliana Polizel; Barraviera, Silvia Regina Catharino Sartore; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon manifestation of secondary syphilis, in which necrotic lesions may be associated with systemic signs and symptoms. Generally it occurs in an immunosuppressed patient, mainly HIV-infected, but might be observed on those who have normal immune response. Since there is an exponential increase in the number of syphilis cases, more diagnoses of malignant syphilis must be expected. We report a case in an immunocompetent female patient. PMID:25387504

  16. Bartonella henselae endocarditis in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A H; Greenough, T C; Balady, G J; Regnery, R L; Anderson, B E; O'Keane, J C; Fonger, J D; McCrone, E L

    1995-10-01

    We describe a case of aggressive Bartonella henselae endocarditis in an immunocompetent man who owned a cat. Aortic valve replacement was required, and his infection was diagnosed by histology, serology, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. The manifestations of his disease included mediastinal lymphadenopathy, glomerulonephritis, myocarditis, and a petechial rash; the unusual finding of a positive titer of c-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies was noted. Serological titers were markedly elevated for > 1 year despite clinical improvement. PMID:8645787

  17. What Happened to My Child? Unknown Causes of Developmental Disability and Research in Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pevsner, Jonathan; Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    At one time or the other, virtually every parent has gone to the doctor concerned about his or her child. Thanks to the advances of modern medicine, the doctor can diagnose the problem most of the time and treat it successfully. Many potential problems, some life-threatening like diphtheria and neural tube defects, can even be prevented altogether…

  18. Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm: A Rare Cause of Hemoptysis in a Child.

    PubMed

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Karande, Sunil; Yadav, Subhash; Pardeshi, Kirti

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms of pulmonary vasculature are uncommon occurrences that contribute to mortality and morbidity, without timely diagnosis and intervention. We report a fatal massive hemoptysis in a child due to a consolidation-related pulmonary arterial pseudoaneurysm, an extremely rare phenomenon. PMID:26366670

  19. Determination of Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Regarding Factors Causing Home Accidents and Prevention in Mothers with a Child Aged 0-5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akturk, Ümmühan; Erci, Behice

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, it was aimed to determine knowledge, "attitudes" and "behaviors" in mothers with a child aged 0-5 years regarding factors causing "home accidents" and prevention. Method: The target population of the study consisted of mothers with a child aged 0-5 years who were admitted to pediatrics ward…

  20. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Dendrinos, John; Nikitiadis, Emanuel; Vrioni, Georgia; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults. PMID:27429814

  1. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dendrinos, John; Nikitiadis, Emanuel; Vrioni, Georgia; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults. PMID:27429814

  2. Acquired constriction ring syndrome as a cause of inconsolable cry in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vinay; Singh, Pankaj; Sharma, Amit; Sarkar, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Acute constriction ring syndrome (ACRS) is a rare clinical condition characterized by formation of a circumferential constriction ring around an appendage or genitalia. Cases are mostly reported in infants and young children. Early recognition and a definitive treatment are of paramount importance in order to avoid irreversible ischemia and possible auto-amputation. We describe a case of a 14-month-old child presented to casualty with a history of refusal to feed and inconsolable cry. Parents noticed a recent swelling of left third toe. On careful examination the child was found to have an acquired constriction ring secondary to a tightly wrapped hair around left third toe. An urgent surgical decompression was done by the orthopaedic team with complete resolution of symptoms. We summarized the pathophysiology of ACRS underlining the need of awareness in treating physicians. The possible medico legal implications should be kept in mind bearing a suggested link with non-accidental injury. PMID:18702819

  3. An Arrow Poison (Abrus Precatorius) Causing Fatal Poisoning in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Patil, SV; Akki, AS; Lakhkar, Bhavana; Badiger, Sharan

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion of whole seeds of Abrus precatorius often does not produce serious illness. It generally presents initially with gastrointestinal manifestations. Haemolysis, acute renal damage, hepatotoxicity and seizures are the other manifestations. Herewith we report a child with accidental ingestion of abrus precatorius seeds who presented with altered sensorium and convulsions. The case is being reported on account of its rarity in its initial neurological manifestation and has not been reported earlier in paediatric age group. PMID:27134959

  4. Hypoplastic epiglottis in a nonsyndromic child: a rare cause of chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Ankit; Singh, Varinder

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 2-year-old girl born out of a nonconsanguineous marriage who presented with dry cough since birth, which was often associated with feeding. She never had any choking or cyanotic/apneic spells. Her voice and cry were normal. She was born at term with no obvious congenital anomalies or perinatal problems. The child never had any other significant illness or respiratory distress to warrant hospital admission. On examination, she was a healthy-looking child without any abnormal syndromic facies or craniofacial or any other congenital anomaly. Flexible bronchoscopy done under sedation and local anesthesia revealed a rounded, short, stump-like hypoplastic epiglottis with a smooth contour. The rest of the laryngeal apparatus and the trachea-bronchial tree had normal appearance. The parents were advised to feed the child in a propped-up position and thickening of feeds to avoid aspirations. She remains well under follow-up. Hypoplastic epiglottis is a rare congenital anomaly of the upper airway, which can present with chronic cough. Endoscopic evaluation of the upper airway should be considered early in children presenting with cough associated with feeding problems. PMID:24036820

  5. Illness through the eyes of the child: the development of children's understanding of the causes of illness.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Hendrik M; Baars, Rolanda M; Chaplin, John; Zwinderman, Koos H

    2004-12-01

    In this study 158 children, 80 children with diabetes mellitus and 78 healthy classmates, were interviewed about their concept of different types of illness (a cold, diabetes, infection, the most and least serious disease) and illness-related concepts (pain, becoming ill and going to the doctor or hospital). Special attention was given to the relationship between development of thinking and the variables anxiety, locus of control and family- and school functioning. The results show that the ideas of the children about the causes of illness follow a sequence of developmental stages, described as 'Through the Eyes of the Child' (TEC) model. Perception seems to be the child's central auto regulative system of cognitive development. The findings suggest that thinking about illness develops relatively independently of other influences. The practical relevance of knowing how children's thinking about illness develops is elaborated in terms of their implications for health education. Immature thoughts of children about illness can be detected and accepted and not dismissed as irrational. With the help of this model, health education of the child can be facilitated. PMID:15582342

  6. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  7. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  8. Illusory ownership of a virtual child body causes overestimation of object sizes and implicit attitude changes

    PubMed Central

    Banakou, Domna; Groten, Raphaela; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    An illusory sensation of ownership over a surrogate limb or whole body can be induced through specific forms of multisensory stimulation, such as synchronous visuotactile tapping on the hidden real and visible rubber hand in the rubber hand illusion. Such methods have been used to induce ownership over a manikin and a virtual body that substitute the real body, as seen from first-person perspective, through a head-mounted display. However, the perceptual and behavioral consequences of such transformed body ownership have hardly been explored. In Exp. 1, immersive virtual reality was used to embody 30 adults as a 4-y-old child (condition C), and as an adult body scaled to the same height as the child (condition A), experienced from the first-person perspective, and with virtual and real body movements synchronized. The result was a strong body-ownership illusion equally for C and A. Moreover there was an overestimation of the sizes of objects compared with a nonembodied baseline, which was significantly greater for C compared with A. An implicit association test showed that C resulted in significantly faster reaction times for the classification of self with child-like compared with adult-like attributes. Exp. 2 with an additional 16 participants extinguished the ownership illusion by using visuomotor asynchrony, with all else equal. The size-estimation and implicit association test differences between C and A were also extinguished. We conclude that there are perceptual and probably behavioral correlates of body-ownership illusions that occur as a function of the type of body in which embodiment occurs. PMID:23858436

  9. A very rare cause of chronic foot pain in a child: metatarsal tubercular osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jatin; Agnihotri, Akhil; Jaiswal, Yashwardhan; Mehtani, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Pure tubercular osteomyelitis without joint involvement is rare and easily missed. Moreover the lesion is common in spine and large joints like hip and knee. The involvement of isolated metatarsal has been described rarely, only as few sporadic case reports. We present one such case of isolated first metatarsal involvement in an 8-year-old child who presented with chronic pain in left foot for over 6 months. The X-rays suggested a lytic lesion and lesion was confirmed on histopathology and acid-fast bacteria staining. The patient was treated with multidrug antitubercular chemotherapy. The results were excellent with complete healing of the lesion. PMID:25038501

  10. A Child with Intestinal Basidiobolomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Arjmand, Reza; Karimi, Abdollah; Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Kadivar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are not common in children, especially in immunocompetent ones. In this case report we describe a child who was presented with abdominal pain and mass, bloody diarrhea and fever. He was treated for amebiasis, but due to treatment failure and deterioration of his condition, he underwent a laparatomy. Histologic examination of the excised bowel in the second look revealed Basidiobolomycosis, a fungus belonging to the order Entomophthorales. The signs, symptoms, treatment and diagnosis of the present case indicate that fungal infections must be considered not only in immunocompromised patients with abdominal pain and mass, but also in apparently immunocompetent ones. PMID:23115443

  11. Pleiotropic effects of juvenile hormone in ant queens and the escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Treanor, David; Hughes, William O H

    2016-01-13

    The ubiquitous trade-off between survival and costly reproduction is one of the most fundamental constraints governing life-history evolution. In numerous animals, gonadotropic hormones antagonistically suppressing immunocompetence cause this trade-off. The queens of many social insects defy the reproduction-survival trade-off, achieving both an extraordinarily long life and high reproductive output, but how they achieve this is unknown. Here we show experimentally, by integrating quantification of gene expression, physiology and behaviour, that the long-lived queens of the ant Lasius niger have escaped the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off by decoupling the effects of a key endocrine regulator of fertility and immunocompetence in solitary insects, juvenile hormone (JH). This modification of the regulatory architecture enables queens to sustain a high reproductive output without elevated JH titres and suppressed immunocompetence, providing an escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off that may contribute to the extraordinary lifespan of many social insect queens. PMID:26763704

  12. A Case of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis Endocarditis with Mycotic Aneurysm in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Baddour, Larry M.; Burgess, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Scopulariopsis is a genus of mold that is usually associated with onychomycosis and rarely causes complicated infection in immunocompetent persons. We describe a case of an immunocompetent 65-year-old male with a history of mitral valve repair with prosthetic ring placement who developed acute left posterior knee pain. Imaging showed a left popliteal artery aneurysm and thrombus, and further evaluation with transesophageal echocardiogram demonstrated two large, mobile mitral valve vegetations. He underwent debridement and replacement of the mitral valve, followed by debridement of the left popliteal artery with peroneal artery bypass. The intraoperative cultures grew Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. Due to the resistant nature of the organism, he was initially treated with combination antifungals including liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, and voriconazole and was continued on chronic suppression with posaconazole with no evidence of recurrence. Scopulariopsis is a rare cause of fungal endocarditis. Treatment of Scopulariopsis endocarditis is challenging and is not well understood due to its rarity. PMID:25866512

  13. [Oral Burkitt lymphoma in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Chbicheb, S; Hakkou, F; El Wady, W

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of Burkitt lymphoma of the jaws in an immunocompetent adolescent, revealed by intraoral swelling. An orthopantomogram showed multiple osteolytic lesions. Biopsy revealed Burkitt lymphoma. The disease was treated with chemotherapy. Complete remission was attained 15 months after the end of treatment. Burkitt lymphomas accounts for 30-40% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in children, with diagnosis confirmed by histology. Immunophenotyping completes the diagnosis by identifying the presence of B markers. Chemotherapy is currently the main treatment of BL, because of the high chemosensitivity of the tumor and its low radiosensitivity. Overall survival in localized stages is close to 100%. PMID:22285713

  14. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, Nicolien M; Arts, Peer; van Uden, Ingeborg W M; Hoischen, Alexander; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Netea, Mihai G; de Jong, Brigit A

    2016-03-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a demyelinating disease of the brain, is typically diagnosed in immunocompromised persons. Here, we describe the diagnostic challenge of PML in an apparently immunocompetent patient. Thorough analyses, including cytokine release assays and whole exome sequencing, revealed a deficit in the antiviral interferon gamma production capacity of this patient and compound heterozygous mutations in BCL-2-associated athanogene 3. Interestingly, both factors are associated with reduced expression of John Cunningham virus T-antigen, a protein that plays a key role in viral replication in infected cells. After validation in other patients, our findings may contribute to novel insights into the etiology and possibly treatment of PML. PMID:27042682

  15. [Osteomyelitis due to Yokenella regensburgei following craniotomy in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Penagos, Sara Catalina; Gómez, Sebastián; Villa, Pablo; Estrada, Santiago; Agudelo, Carlos Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The gram-negative bacillus Yokenella regensburgei (of the Enterobacteriaceae family) can be found in groundwater and foodstuffs, as well as the digestive tracts of insects and reptiles. Although it has been isolated from humans since its original description, it has rarely been reported as a cause of infection, and then, only in immunosuppressed patients. We report the first case of post-surgical secondary osteomyelitis due to Y. regensburgei in an immunocompetent woman who had undergone a craniotomy. PMID:26844435

  16. Angiodysplasia in a Child as a Cause of Lower GI Bleeding: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Abdoon, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Angiodysplasia or vascular ectasia of the colon is a rare but important cause of recurrent lower gastro-intestinal bleeding in children and should be kept in mind as a diagnostic possibility. This case reports of intermittent rectal bleeding with early presentation caused by angiodysplasia. Therefore, early diagnosis of this rare lesion is important to avoid a possible fatal outcome, and thus the pediatrician should be aware of this lesion as a rare cause of intestinal bleeding in children. PMID:22125700

  17. Hypertensive retinopathy in a child caused by pheochromocytoma: identification after a failed school vision screening.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Michael D; Wise, Richard; Forbes, Brian; Hedrick, Holly L; Levin, Alex V

    2012-02-01

    A 7-year-old girl was referred for ophthalmological examination after the result of a routine school vision screening identified unilateral vision loss. Fundus examination showed bilateral but markedly asymmetric macular exudates and optic disk edema. After the results of two blood pressure measurements were within normal limits, a third markedly elevated measurement revealed malignant hypertension and led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma, a rare catecholamine-secreting tumor. The tumor was resected, and 6 months later the patient's blood pressure had normalized; however, although visual acuity had improved to 20/20 in the right eye, it remained 20/200 in the left eye, with decreased disk edema but the persistence of the macular exudates. The identification of an abdominal malignancy through a school vision screening may have saved this child's life. The need for repeated blood pressure measurement is also highlighted. PMID:22245022

  18. Disseminated Cryptococcal infection in an immunocompetent host mimicking plasma cell disorder: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Limei, Michelle Poon

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Cryptococcosis is a potentially fatal fungal infection caused mainly by Cryptocococcus neoformans (CN) species and it rarely infects immunocompetent hosts. The outcomes are better only if the condition is suspected and diagnosed early and treatment is instituted. PMID:25984313

  19. Ileal perforation caused by cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Van Schaeybroeck, S; Hiele, M; Miserez, M; Croes, R

    2002-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman developed a small bowel perforation due to cytomegalovirus infection. She did not taken any immunosuppressive medication and her cellular immunity was normal. Surgical resection and antiviral therapy with ganciclovir led to complete recovery. As far as we know, this paper reports the first case of small bowel perforation due to cytomegalovirus infection in a non-immunocompromised patient. Nevertheless the patient was known with diabetes mellitus. It should be emphasised that elderly patients have impaired immune defences and may be unsuspected hosts of opportunistic infections. PMID:12212357

  20. Dasatinib-Induced CMV Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Rare Complication of a Common Drug.

    PubMed

    Davalos, Fidencio; Chaucer, Benjamin; Zafar, Wahib; Salman, Shamim; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-06-01

    Dasatinib is a common anticancer drug used in the treatment of leukemia. Several side effects have been reported, the most common being myelosuppression, diarrhea, edema, and nausea. Three papers have been published reporting hepatic side effects of dasatinib treatment. A rare side effect of dasatinib treatment is reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Never before has dasatinib therapy shown to be the cause of CMV hepatitis in an immunocompetent patient. We present a case of an immunocompetent patient who was treated with the standard dose of dasatinib therapy and subsequently developed CMV hepatitis. Well-known side effects of dasatinib therapy are understood and documented; unknown adverse drug reactions can occur and should be monitored for. This is a significant finding given the high rate of CMV seropositivity in the general population. PMID:27267844

  1. Disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an immunocompetent 8-year old boy.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Regina Eziuka; Olomukoro, Chikodili N; Owa, Adewale B

    2013-08-01

    Varicella results from a primary infection with the varicella virus while herpes zoster is caused by a reactivation of a latent infection. Dissemination of herpes zoster is uncommon in immunocompetent individuals. Reports of disseminated herpes zoster in children are even less common than in adults. An unusual case of disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an 8-year old immunocompetent black boy is presented. He had a previous primary Varicella zoster virus infection at three years of age. In the current report, he presented during an on-going chicken pox outbreak and survived with no significant complications. A breakthrough varicella virus re-infection or a reactivation is possible, both of which could present as zoster. This case emphasizes the need for prevention of varicella virus infection through universal childhood immunization and effective infection control strategies in health care settings. PMID:24765504

  2. Oral chemical burns caused by self-medication in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Lívia Azeredo A; Kuchler, Erika Calvano; de Andrade Risso, Patrícia; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2009-01-01

    There are few published reports that discuss oral burns in children. Electrical, chemical, and thermal agents are the main causative agents of these burns. Some chemicals can cause burning in the mucosa of cheeks, lips, tongue, and palate. Because of the clinical state of acute pain associated with lack of or inadequate care to relieve the symptoms, some patients use self-medication. The purpose of this work is to report the case of oral chemical burns caused by topical self-medication for tooth pain relief, and also to discuss the clinical presentation and the treatment performed. PMID:19506514

  3. Childhood scurvy: an unusual cause of refusal to walk in a child.

    PubMed

    Alqanatish, J T; Alqahtani, F; Alsewairi, W M; Al-kenaizan, S

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy, or vitamin C deficiency, is rarely presented to a rheumatology clinic. It can mimic several rheumatologic disorders. Although uncommon, it may present as pseudovasculitis or chronic arthritis. Scurvy still exists today within certain populations, particularly in patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities, psychiatric illness or unusual dietary habits.Scurvy presentation to the rheumatologist varies from aches and mild pains to excruciating bone pain or arthritis. Musculoskeletal and mucocutaneous features of scurvy are often what prompts referrals to pediatric rheumatology clinics. Unless health care providers inquire about nutritional habits and keep in mind the risk of nutritional deficiency, it will be easy to miss the diagnosis of scurvy. Rarity of occurrence as compared to other nutritional deficiencies, combined with a lack of understanding about modern-day risk factors for nutritional deficiency, frequently leads to delayed recognition of vitamin C deficiency. We report a case of scurvy in a mentally handicapped Saudi child, who presented with new onset inability to walk with diffuse swelling and pain in the left leg. Skin examination revealed extensive ecchymoses, hyperkeratosis and follicular purpura with corkscrew hairs, in addition to gingival swelling with bleeding. Clinical diagnosis of scurvy was rendered and confirmed by low serum vitamin C level. The patient did extremely well with proper nutritional support and vitamin C supplementation. It has been noticed lately that there is increased awareness about scurvy in rheumatology literature. A high index of suspicion, together with taking a thorough history and physical examination, is required for diagnosis of scurvy in patient who presents with musculoskeletal symptoms. Nutritional deficiency should also be considered by the rheumatologist formulating differential diagnosis for musculoskeletal or mucocutaneous complaints in children, particularly those at risk. PMID:26063195

  4. Telling Their Stories: Primary Care Practitioners' Experience Evaluating and Reporting Injuries Caused by Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Emalee G.; Jones, Rise; Sege, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To learn about primary care physicians' experiences in identifying and reporting injuries caused by physical abuse. Method: Two qualitative analysts facilitated a focus group of six Chicago area, primary care physicians. Physicians representing diverse practice settings were selected to participate in the discussion. The analysts…

  5. Cause of Death and the Quest for Meaning after the Loss of a Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Neimeyer, Robert A.; Currier, Joseph M.; Roberts, Kailey; Jordan, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns of making meaning among 155 parents whose children died from a variety of violent and non-violent causes. Findings indicated 53% of violent loss survivors could not make sense of their loss, as compared to 32% of non-violent loss survivors. Overall, there was overlap in sense-making strategies across different causes…

  6. Extradural Giant Multiloculated Arachnoid Cyst Causing Spinal Cord Compression in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Serdar; Anik, Ihsan; Gocmen, Selcuk; Sirin, Sait

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are rare expanding lesions in the spinal canal. Enlargement may cause progressive signs and symptoms caused by spinal cord compression. They are associated with trauma, surgery, arachnoiditis, and neural tube defects. Most nontraumatic spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are thought to be congenital. Design: Case report and literature review. Findings: A 9-year-old boy with mild paraparesis was found to have an extradural multiloculated arachnoid cyst with fibrous septa at T4-L3 levels and anterior compression and displacement of the spinal cord. Conclusions: Definitive treatment of arachnoid cyst entails radical cyst removal and dura cleft repair. Formation of a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula may require external lumbar drainage. PMID:18795482

  7. A rare case of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Fonsecaea pedrosoi in a child with nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayyar, C.; Gulati, N.; Sherwal, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Dematiaceous fungi are the etiological agents of phaeohyphomycosis and are now increasingly being recognized for causing disease in humans. A high level of suspicion and routine fungal cultures are required to identify these cases. There is no consensus regarding their management. Here, an unusual presentation of phaeohyphomycosis (secondary to Fonsecaea pedrosoi) presenting as a disseminated infection in a case of nephrotic syndrome is described. PMID:27194840

  8. Post endodontic Aspergillosis in an immunocompetent individual

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aadithya B.; Nunia, Kalpana; Mohanty, Sujata; Gupta, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive aspergillosis in immunocompetent individuals subsequent to post endodontic treatment can involve the maxillary antrum. An early and accurate diagnosis will aid in prompt and effective treatment. A 35 year old female patient reported with a painful nasomaxillary swelling. Previous records revealed the failure of the endodontic treatment of maxillary left second premolar which was subsequently extracted. Root piece was accidently left behind which resulted in a painful nasomaxillary swelling. The extraction socket was curetted and tissue was sent for histopathological examination, which revealed abundant septate fungal hyphae with numerous spores characteristic of Aspergillus. The patient showed marked improvement in the symptoms with systemic itraconazole at 3 months follow up and complete resolution occurred within 6 months. Inclusion of aspergilloma infections in the differential diagnosis is advocated when patients present with post-endodontic nasomaxillary swelling. Key words:Aspergillosis, fungal sinusitis, post root canal treatment. PMID:26535103

  9. Asian-Indian Parents' Attributions about the Causes of Child Behavior: A Replication and Extension with Parents from Chennai, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montemayor, Raymond; Ranganathan, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Using hypothetical vignettes, 152 parents of children 10-17 years old living in Chennai, India, made attributions about whether the origins of 2 positive and 2 negative behaviors performed by their own child or another child were due to the child's personality or the situation, or to parenting or nonparenting influences based on the frequency,…

  10. Acquired unilateral pes planus in a child caused by a ruptured plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament.

    PubMed

    Shuen, Vivien; Prem, Hari

    2009-05-01

    A traumatic cause for acquired pes planus in children is uncommon and it is not often considered as a primary diagnosis. We describe a patient, who ruptured her plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament and presented late with an acquired unilateral flat foot similar to a tibialis posterior rupture. Corrective surgery in the form of calcaneal osteotomy with iliac graft lengthening and medial advancement of tibialis posterior achieved excellent results with patient remaining asymptomatic and returning to routine activities. In the presence of an acute traumatic onset of unilateral pes planus, spring ligament and tibialis posterior tendon rupture should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:19373112

  11. Heat stroke-like episode in a child caused by zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Yamashita, Y; Satoi, M; Togo, A; Wada, N; Matsuishi, T; Ohnishi, A; Kato, H

    1997-07-01

    A 2-year-old mentally retarded boy with frontal lobe epilepsy presented with an episode that resembled heat stroke during the administration of zonisamide. He developed hyperpyrexia with oligohidrosis and central neurological symptoms, including, chorea-like involuntary movements, resting tremor, and cogwheel rigidity. A sweat test using pilocarpine iontophoresis revealed a marked reduction in the sweat response, which suggested a postganglionic sweating dysfunction. A skin biopsy examined by light and electron microscopy showed no morphological abnormality in the sweat glands. The oligohidrosis caused by zonisamide was reversible in that the patient regained the ability to sweat within 2 weeks of the cessation of drug administration. Children receiving zonisamide should be monitored for oligohidrosis and the development of neurological symptoms associated with an elevation of body temperature. PMID:9253492

  12. Time to focus child survival programmes on the newborn: assessment of levels and causes of infant mortality in rural Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Fikree, Fariyal F.; Azam, Syed Iqbal; Berendes, Heinz W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Population-based surveys were conducted in selected clusters of Pakistan's least developed provinces, Balochistan and North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), to assess levels and causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality. METHODS: Interviews were conducted in a total of 54 834 households: Balochistan, 20 486; NWFP, 26 175; and FATA, 8173. Trained interviewers administered questionnaires after obtaining verbal informed consent from the respondents. Verbal autopsy interviews were conducted for infant deaths reported for the previous year. FINDINGS: The infant mortality rate based on combined data from the different sites was 99.7 per 1000 live births (range 129.0-70.1). The contribution of neonatal deaths to all infant deaths was much higher for NWFP (67.2%), where the overall rate was lowest, than for Balochistan (50.8%) and FATA (56.8%). Around 70% of all neonatal deaths occurred in the early neonatal period. The three main clinical causes of infant deaths were diarrhoea syndrome (21.6%), tetanus (11.7%) and acute respiratory infections (11.6%). In the neonatal period, however, tetanus (18.3%), small size for gestational age or low birth weight (15.3%), and birth injury (12.0%) accounted for nearly half (45.6%) of all deaths, while the contributions of diarrhoea syndrome (5.1%) and acute respiratory infections (6.0%) were less significant (11.1%). Tetanus was the cause of death for 21.7% and 17.1% of all infant deaths in FATA and NWFP respectively. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there should be a shift in child survival programmes to give greater emphasis to maternal and neonatal health, in particular to maternal tetanus immunization, safe delivery and cord care. PMID:12075362

  13. Listeria meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent person.

    PubMed

    Drnda, Alija; Koluder, Nada; Hadzic, Amir; Bajramovic, Nermina; Baljic, Rusmir; Mulabdic, Velida

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a small, aerobic or facultative anaerobic, non-sporulating gram positive bacillus that can be isolated from soil, vegetation or animal reservoirs. There are six species of Listeria, and only L. monocytogenes is pathogenic for humans. Human disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised people, neonates and in pregnancy, while the cases in immunocompetent people are rare. CNS manifestations of the disease can be in form of meningitis, encephalitis, and also cerebritis and abscess since L. monocytogenes shows tropism for brain and brain stem as well for the meninges. In this case we presented 55 year old male patient with etiologically confirmed listerial meningoencephalitis, transferred from regional hospital tothe Clinic for Infectious Diseases with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis. Disease started 4 days before the admission. Prior to this the patient was completely healthy. In his history he denied any preexisting disease. At admittance he was febrile, with altered consciousness, disoriented, showing ocular deviation, dystaxia, and with completely positive meningeal signs. Neurologist diagnosis was rhombencephalitis. CSF analysis showed mildly opalescent liquor with pleocytosis 546/mm3 and polymorphonuclear cell predominance >70%. CSF culture showed positive isolate of L. monocytogenes. Initial therapy was: Penicillin G and Chloramphenicol, together with all other supportive and symptomatic therapy. After initial therapy and based on antibiogram, ampicillin was administered for4 weeks, followed by imipenemum for 10 days. Control CSF analysis showed pleocytosis and increased protein level and the patient was discharged as recovered with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis PMID:19537672

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Effective Communication of Spouse and Father-Child Relationship (Test Pattern Causes to Education Parents)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ataeifar, Robabeh; Amiri, Sholeh; Ali Nadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research is targeted with the plan of father-child model or effective relationship mediating of spouses or investigating attachment style, personality traits, communication skills, and spouses' sexual satisfaction. Based on this, 260 people (father and child) were selected through random sampling method based on share. Participants were…

  15. The Causes and Consequences of Child Poverty in the United States. Innocenti Occasional Papers, Number 10. Special Subseries: Child Poverty in Industrialized Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danziger, Sheldon; Stern, Jonathan

    This report addresses the sources and remedies for child poverty in the United States through a review of the effects of trends, policies, and changes in social relationships; and an analysis of data concerning poverty and children. An introduction sketches the present condition of children in poverty and the policies and attitudes of the past 30…

  16. Atypical Cutaneous Sporotrichosis in an Immunocompetent Adult: Response to Potassium Iodide.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nikita; Chander, Ram; Jain, Arpita; Sanke, Sarita; Garg, Taru

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous sporotrichosis, also known as "Rose Gardener's disease," caused by dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenkii, is usually characterized by indolent nodular or nodulo-ulcerative lesions arranged in a linear pattern. We report bizarre nonlinear presentation of Sporotrichosis, in an immunocompetent adult occurring after a visit to Amazon rain forest, speculating infection with more virulent species of Sporothrix. The diagnosis was reached with the help of periodic acid-Schiff positive yeast cells and cigar shaped bodies seen in skin biopsy along with the therapeutic response to potassium iodide. PMID:27057047

  17. Atypical Cutaneous Sporotrichosis in an Immunocompetent Adult: Response to Potassium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nikita; Chander, Ram; Jain, Arpita; Sanke, Sarita; Garg, Taru

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous sporotrichosis, also known as “Rose Gardener's disease,” caused by dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenkii, is usually characterized by indolent nodular or nodulo-ulcerative lesions arranged in a linear pattern. We report bizarre nonlinear presentation of Sporotrichosis, in an immunocompetent adult occurring after a visit to Amazon rain forest, speculating infection with more virulent species of Sporothrix. The diagnosis was reached with the help of periodic acid-Schiff positive yeast cells and cigar shaped bodies seen in skin biopsy along with the therapeutic response to potassium iodide. PMID:27057047

  18. Herpes simplex Virus Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Patient with Ebstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tzouvala, M; Gaglia, A; Papantoniou, N; Triantafyllou, K; Karamanolis, G

    2008-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis can cause transient immune deficiency which may predispose to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the immunocompetent host. We report the case of a 15-year-old male who presented with severe odynophagia and herpes labialis during the course of Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis that had been diagnosed ten days before. Esophagoscopy revealed extensive ulcerations with distinct borders and whitish exudates at the mid and distal esophagus. Polymerase chain reaction detected HSV-1 DNA in the biopsy specimens. The patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir. The symptoms resolved rapidly within 3 days, in accordance with improved endoscopic findings. PMID:21897798

  19. Asian-Indian parents' attributions about the causes of child behavior: a replication and extension with parents from Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Raymond; Ranganathan, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Using hypothetical vignettes, 152 parents of children 10-17 years old living in Chennai, India, made attributions about whether the origins of 2 positive and 2 negative behaviors performed by their own child or another child were due to the child's personality or the situation, or to parenting or nonparenting influences based on the frequency, intensity, and cross-situational consistency of the behavior. Parents attributed the positive behaviors of all children to the personality of the child and to parenting. Parents attributed negative behavior of their own children to situational influences and nonparenting effects, but attributed the negative behavior of other children to their personality and to parenting, a pattern that enhances and reinforces parent self-esteem. Results were discussed in terms of the self-serving bias and the actor-observer bias, cognitive distortions that protect and enhance parents' views of themselves and their children. PMID:23264991

  20. Keratomycosis caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola.

    PubMed

    Mangiaterra, M; Giusiano, G; Smilasky, G; Zamar, L; Amado, G; Vincentín, C

    2001-02-01

    We present a case of keratomycosis caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola in a 30-year-old immunocompetent male patient living in a rural area of Formosa Province (north-eastern Argentina). No ocular trauma is reported in his case history. There are no previous reports of infections caused by this fungus in Argentina. PMID:11270403

  1. Deriving causes of child mortality by re–analyzing national verbal autopsy data applying a standardized computer algorithm in Uganda, Rwanda and Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Li, Mengying; Cummings, Stirling; Black, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal 4, reliable information on causes of child mortality is critical. With more national verbal autopsy (VA) studies becoming available, how to improve consistency of national VA derived child causes of death should be considered for the purpose of global comparison. We aimed to adapt a standardized computer algorithm to re–analyze national child VA studies conducted in Uganda, Rwanda and Ghana recently, and compare our results with those derived from physician review to explore issues surrounding the application of the standardized algorithm in place of physician review. Methods and Findings We adapted the standardized computer algorithm considering the disease profile in Uganda, Rwanda and Ghana. We then derived cause–specific mortality fractions applying the adapted algorithm and compared the results with those ascertained by physician review by examining the individual– and population–level agreement. Our results showed that the leading causes of child mortality in Uganda, Rwanda and Ghana were pneumonia (16.5–21.1%) and malaria (16.8–25.6%) among children below five years and intrapartum–related complications (6.4–10.7%) and preterm birth complications (4.5–6.3%) among neonates. The individual level agreement was poor to substantial across causes (kappa statistics: –0.03 to 0.83), with moderate to substantial agreement observed for injury, congenital malformation, preterm birth complications, malaria and measles. At the population level, despite fairly different cause–specific mortality fractions, the ranking of the leading causes was largely similar. Conclusions The standardized computer algorithm produced internally consistent distribution of causes of child mortality. The results were also qualitatively comparable to those based on physician review from the perspective of public health policy. The standardized computer algorithm has the advantage of requiring minimal

  2. Acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In healthy subjects, Cytomegalovirus infection can be asymptomatic or manifest as mononucleosis syndrome, but organ disease has also been reported. However, in immunocompromised patients this infection can lead to its most significant and severe disease and even mortality. When Cytomegalovirus causes a gastrointestinal tract infection, it more commonly manifests with luminal tract disease and is usually characterized by ulcerative lesions. Appendicitis is a rare manifestation, and has been reported mainly in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients or patients with other causes of immunocompromise. Case presentation The authors report on a case of acute primary Cytomegalovirus infection complicated with acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent 24-year-old Caucasian man also suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations, serology results, as well as microbiological and histological findings. Treatment consisted of surgery and anti-Cytomegalovirus therapy. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus should be included among the etiologic agents of acute appendicitis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no definitive data regarding the frequency of Cytomegalovirus appendicitis and the role of anti-Cytomegalovirus treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-negative and apparently immunocompetent subjects. PMID:24612821

  3. Pulmonary Nocardiosis in the Immunocompetent Host: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Inderjit; West, Frances Mae; Sanders, Abraham; Hartman, Barry; Zappetti, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is commonly recognized as an opportunistic infection in patients with predisposing immunosuppressive conditions. However, reports of pulmonary nocardiosis in the immunocompetent host are rare. Here, we report a case series of four patients with pulmonary nocardiosis without a predisposing condition. PMID:26491594

  4. Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient after dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Wu, Xingtong; Zhou, Dong

    2011-02-01

    Invasive intracranial aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients remains a rarity. We report such a case in a male who developed symptoms after a dental extraction. Attention should be paid to atypical central nervous system symptoms after dental procedures; early diagnosis and management are of great importance to improve outcomes. PMID:21047191

  5. Bilateral disseminated herpes zoster in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Yumiko; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Yoshikawa, Yoshiaki; Tanioka, Miki; Fujisawa, Akihiro; Endo, Yuichiro

    2013-02-01

    Herein we report a rare case of disseminated herpes zoster(HZ) infection involving two widely separated bilateral dermatomes in an immunocompetent host. HZ involving two widely separated areas simultaneously is referred to as HZ duplex bilateralis. It is very rare, with an incidence of less than 0.1 percent of all HZ cases, and usually develops in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23473283

  6. Pulmonary embolism and acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Del Borgo, Cosmo; Gianfreda, Romina; Belvisi, Valeria; Citton, Rita; Soscia, Fabrizio; Notarianni, Ermanno; Tieghi, Tiziana; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria

    2010-12-01

    A case of an immunocompetent man with acute CMV infection associated with a pulmonary embolism is described. Acute CMV infection could be a risk factor for developing thromboembolism. Pulmonary embolism should be included in differential diagnosis in patients with acute CMV infections and pulmonary opacities. PMID:21196823

  7. Do men’s faces really signal heritable immunocompetence?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the literature on human mate choice, masculine facial morphology is often proposed to be an intersexual signal of heritable immunocompetence, and hence an important component of men’s attractiveness. This hypothesis has received considerable research attention, and is increasingly treated as plausible and well supported. In this article, we propose that the strength of the evidence for the immunocompetence hypothesis is somewhat overstated, and that a number of difficulties have been under-acknowledged. Such difficulties include (1) the tentative nature of the evidence regarding masculinity and disease in humans, (2) the complex and uncertain picture emerging from the animal literature on sexual ornaments and immunity, (3) the absence of consistent, cross-cultural support for the predictions of the immunocompetence hypothesis regarding preferences for masculinized stimuli, and (4) evidence that facial masculinity contributes very little, if anything, to overall attractiveness in real men. Furthermore, alternative explanations for patterns of preferences, in particular the proposal that masculinity is primarily an intrasexual signal, have been neglected. We suggest that immunocompetence perspectives on masculinity, whilst appealing in many ways, should still be regarded as speculative, and that other perspectives–and other traits–should be the subject of greater attention for researchers studying human mate preferences. PMID:23555177

  8. Immediate dietary effects on migrating Mormon cricket immunocompetence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mormon crickets form bands and walk over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Radio-tracking adult members of a Mormon cricket band in a high Sonoran desert of Utah, we investigated a potential trade-off between immunocompetence and migratory velocity. We asked: does acce...

  9. Asbestos-Induced Cellular and Molecular Alteration of Immunocompetent Cells and Their Relationship with Chronic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Maeda, Megumi; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Kojima, Yoko; Tabata, Rika; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos causes lung fibrosis known as asbestosis as well as cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos is a mineral silicate containing iron, magnesium, and calcium with a core of SiO2. The immunological effect of silica, SiO2, involves the dysregulation of autoimmunity because of the complications of autoimmune diseases found in silicosis. Asbestos can therefore cause alteration of immunocompetent cells to result in a decline of tumor immunity. Additionally, due to its physical characteristics, asbestos fibers remain in the lung, regional lymph nodes, and the pleural cavity, particularly at the opening sites of lymphatic vessels. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation in these areas due to the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. As a consequence, immunocompetent cells can have their cellular and molecular features altered by chronic and recurrent encounters with asbestos fibers, and there may be modification by the surrounding inflammation, all of which eventually lead to decreased tumor immunity. In this paper, the brief results of our investigation regarding reduction of tumor immunity of immunocompetent cells exposed to asbestos in vitro are discussed, as are our findings concerned with an investigation of chronic inflammation and analyses of peripheral blood samples derived from patients with pleural plaque and mesothelioma that have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:22500091

  10. Conundrum of Autism: A Review of Its Causes and Significant Impact on the Education of a School Age Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwokeafor, Cosmas U.

    2009-01-01

    Autism is a brain development disorder that is characterized by impaired social interaction, communication, restricted and repetitive behavior which starts before a child is three years old. As a result of the outcome of set of signs such as restricted and repetitive behaviors, autism distinguishes itself from milder Autism Spectrum Disorders…

  11. Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection among immunocompromised and immunocompetent humans in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    ABU-AKKADA, Somaia Saif; EL KERDANY, Eman Dorry Hussein; MADY, Rasha Fadly; DIAB, Radwa Galal; KHEDR, Gehan Abd Elatti; ASHMAWY, Karam Imam; LOTFY, Wael Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Encephalitozoon cuniculi infects a wide range of homoeothermic animals, including man. Complications due to this microsporidian have been reported only in immunocompromised patients. Reports on E. cuniculi in immunocompetent humans are lacking, most probably, because it is not linked to any clinical manifestations in such hosts. The present work was carried out with the aim of studying, for the first time in Egypt, the prevalence of E. cuniculi infection of urinary tract among non-HIV immunocompromised patients and immunocompetent individuals. It tested also the influence of some factors on the risk of infection. Methods: Blood and urine samples were collected from 88 persons (44 non-HIV immunocompromised patients and 44 subjects as immunocompetent control group). IFAT serological assay and Weber’s green modified trichrome stain (MTS) urine smears were carried out. Molecular study by PCR was also performed to detect DNA of E. cuniculi in urine samples. A full history sheet was fulfilled for each subject to test the suspected risk factors. Results: The IFAT examination confirmed the presence of antibodies against E. cuniculi in 44.3% of the human subjects. The seroprevalence of E. cuniculi was significantly higher in the immunocompromised patients compared with the immunocompetent individuals (77.3% versus 11.4%). Compared with IFAT (the gold standard), the sensitivity and specificity of Weber’s green MTS smears were 69.23% and 89.80%. By using PCR, no positive cases were detected among human subjects. Conclusion: A high prevalence of E. cuniculi infection in the studied individuals was noted. Although infection was found in some immunocompetent individuals, the immune status of the host remains the corner stone for occurrence of the infection. PMID:26811722

  12. Invasive aspergillosis presenting as swelling of the buccal mucosa in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Nagarjuna, Muralidhara; Shetty, Samarth; Kumar, Pradeep; Bhat, Venkatraman; Salins, Paul C

    2015-02-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in nature but have low virulence and cause disease usually when the host defenses are compromised. Fungal infections of the central nervous system are rare and are usually seen in immunocompromised patients. However, in recent years, there has been an increase in the number of central nervous system fungal infections in immunocompetent individuals. Intracranial fungal granulomas are rare space-occupying lesions. Among these, Aspergillus granuloma is the most common. Craniocerebral involvement by aspergillosis usually occurs via the hematogenous route or through contiguous spread from the paranasal sinuses. Predominant symptoms associated with cranial fungal granuloma include headache, vomiting, proptosis, and visual disturbances. Common signs include papilledema, cranial neuropathy, hemiparesis, and meningismus. We present a case of invasive Aspergillus granuloma in an immunocompetent individual, who presented with a palpable mass in the buccal mucosa following removal of an impacted mandibular third molar but with no other characteristic signs and symptoms of invasive fungal granuloma. To our knowledge, there is no documentation of aspergillosis presenting as a swelling in the buccal mucosa. Unexplained swellings in the buccal mucosa should be viewed with a high degree of suspicion and investigated thoroughly at the earliest. PMID:25487984

  13. Susceptibility to disease varies with ontogeny and immunocompetence in a threatened amphibian.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Amalina; Bower, Deborah S; Stockwell, Michelle P; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Ontogenetic changes in disease susceptibility have been demonstrated in many vertebrate taxa, as immature immune systems and limited prior exposure to pathogens can place less developed juveniles at a greater disease risk. By causing the disease chytridiomycosis, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infection has led to the decline of many amphibian species. Despite increasing knowledge on how Bd varies in its effects among species, little is known on the interaction between susceptibility and development within host species. We compared the ontogenetic susceptibility of post-metamorphic green and golden bell frogs Litoria aurea to chytridiomycosis by simultaneously measuring three host-pathogen responses as indicators of the development of the fungus-infection load, survival rate, and host immunocompetence-following Bd exposure in three life stages (recently metamorphosed juveniles, subadults, adults) over 95 days. Frogs exposed to Bd as recently metamorphosed juveniles acquired higher infection loads and experienced lower immune function and lower survivorship than subadults and adults, indicating an ontogenetic decline in chytridiomycosis susceptibility. By corresponding with an intrinsic developmental maturation in immunocompetence seen in uninfected frogs, we suggest these developmental changes in host susceptibility in L. aurea may be immune mediated. Consequently, the physiological relationship between ontogeny and immunity may affect host population structure and demography through variation in life stage survival, and understanding this can shape management targets for effective amphibian conservation. PMID:27021312

  14. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Nader; Izhakain, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual. PMID:26819795

  15. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Nader; Izhakain, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual. PMID:26819795

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent baker.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Cerlier, Alexandre; Cassagne, Carole; Coulange, Mathieu; Legré, Regis; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infection caused by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is rare. We report the first case of osteomyelitis caused by S. cerevisiae (baker's yeast) in a post-traumatic patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after surgical debridement, prolonged antifungal treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. PMID:27347482

  17. Simultaneous Chronic Invasive Fungal Infection and Tracheal Fungus Ball Mimicking Cancer in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Erdoğan; Çörtük, Mustafa; Gül, Şule; Mert, Ali; Boyacı, Hilal; Çam, Ertan; Dincer, H Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the lung are uncommon and mainly affect people with immune deficiency. There are crucial problems in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidiasis are the most common opportunistic fungal infections. Aspergillus species (spp.) are saprophytes molds that exist in nature as spores and rarely cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. In patients with immune deficiency or chronic lung disease, such as cavitary lung disease or bronchiectasis, Aspergillus may cause a variety of aspergillosis infections. Here we present a case of a 57-year-old patient without immunodeficiency or chronic lung disease who was diagnosed with endotracheal fungus ball and chronic fungal infection, possibly due to Aspergillus. Bronchoscopic examination showed a paralyzed right vocal cord and vegetating mass that was yellow in color, at the posterior wall of tracheal lumen. After 3 months, both the parenchymal and tracheal lesions were completely resolved. PMID:27418930

  18. Simultaneous Chronic Invasive Fungal Infection and Tracheal Fungus Ball Mimicking Cancer in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Çetinkaya, Erdoğan; Gül, Şule; Mert, Ali; Boyacı, Hilal; Çam, Ertan; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the lung are uncommon and mainly affect people with immune deficiency. There are crucial problems in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidiasis are the most common opportunistic fungal infections. Aspergillus species (spp.) are saprophytes molds that exist in nature as spores and rarely cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. In patients with immune deficiency or chronic lung disease, such as cavitary lung disease or bronchiectasis, Aspergillus may cause a variety of aspergillosis infections. Here we present a case of a 57-year-old patient without immunodeficiency or chronic lung disease who was diagnosed with endotracheal fungus ball and chronic fungal infection, possibly due to Aspergillus. Bronchoscopic examination showed a paralyzed right vocal cord and vegetating mass that was yellow in color, at the posterior wall of tracheal lumen. After 3 months, both the parenchymal and tracheal lesions were completely resolved. PMID:27418930

  19. Osteitis of the fourth metatarsal caused by a date palm thorn in a child: why the dorsum of the foot is the most commonly injured site.

    PubMed

    Madhar, Mohammed; Sammous, Younes; Bouslous, Jamal; Messaoudi, Tarik; Chafik, Rachid; Elhaoury, Hanane; Saidi, Halim; Fikry, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    The palms are frequent in the region of eastern Morocco. An insidious onset of a lytic lesion in the base of the fourth metatarsal caused by a date palm thorn in a 20-year-old patient is presented. An untreated embedded thorn can cause late complications, including periostitis or osteomyelitis. In most cases, removal of the foreign body is easy, and no surgical care is needed. If detected, these injuries can be treated without complications. In children, however, the diagnosis can be very easily missed, especially if the child has aphasia and deafness, which was present in our patient. These can influence communication between the child and family, such that the patient is unable to inform the family about what object pricked him (e.g., date palm thorn, toothpick, insect) and is unable to tell the family that the foreign object remains embedded. This major communication issue between the child and family can result in potentially avoidable complications such as osteitis. No other issues were present in our patient that could have caused a delay in diagnosis, such as fear of punishment or fear of medical treatment. We present a case of date palm thorn-induced periostitis of the base of the fourth metatarsal. Surgical exploration revealed a 2.5-cm palm tree thorn embedded in granulation tissue, forming an abscess. The lesion was successfully treated by curettage of the lesion and removal of the thorn embedded in the periosteum of the metatarsal base. The purpose of the present report was to explain the mechanism of this rare entity and the frequency of this lesion on the dorsal aspect of the foot rather than on the plantar. Despite the absence of a definite history of trauma, organic foreign material should be in the differential diagnosis of a lytic lesion of the bone, especially in patients who have a problem with deafness or aphasia. PMID:23158504

  20. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. PMID:27511757

  1. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  2. Post varicella zoster virus myelitis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amor, Sana; Lammouchi, Turkia; Benslamia, Lamia; Benammou, Soufiene

    2011-04-01

    We report 2 immunocompetent patients with myelitis. The first was a 55-year old man who developed myelitis after intercostal herpes zoster. The second was a 19-year-old boy who presented with myelopathy after varicella infection. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) myelitis was diagnosed based on the close temporal relationship between rash and onset of clinical symptoms, and by the elevated rate of anti-VZV IgG in the CSF without oligoclonal bands in the first case, and presence of VZV DNA in the second. The course was favorable after a 3-day course of corticosteroids and 3 weeks of acyclovir. Varicella-zoster virus myelitis is uncommon; it affects essentially immunodepressed patients. We highlight the importance of considering the possibility of VZV myelitis, even in immunocompetent patients. The combination of corticoids and acyclovir must be instituted, quickly, to improve functional outcome. PMID:21427667

  3. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  4. Subcutaneous infection by Ochroconis mirabilis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dongmei; Lu, Guixia; Mei, Huan; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Samerpitak, Kittipan; Deng, Shuwen; Shen, Yongnian; Liu, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the taxonomy of Ochroconis (Ascomycota, Pezizomycotina, Venturiales, Sympoventuriaceae) has been revised with the recognition of an additional genus, Verruconis. Ochroconis comprises mesophilic saprobes that occasionally infect vertebrates which mostly are cold-blooded, while Verruconis contains thermophilic species which is a neurotrope in humans and birds. On the basis of molecular data it is noted that only a single Ochroconis species regularly infects immunocompetent human hosts. Here we report a subcutaneous infection due to Ochroconis mirabilis in a 50-year-old immunocompetent female patient. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests revealed that terbinafine was the most effective drug. The patient was successfully cured with oral administration of terbinafine 250 mg daily in combination with 3 times of topical ALA-photodynamic therapy for 9 months. PMID:27182484

  5. Subcutaneous infection by Ochroconis mirabilis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongmei; Lu, Guixia; Mei, Huan; de Hoog, G Sybren; Samerpitak, Kittipan; Deng, Shuwen; Shen, Yongnian; Liu, Weida

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the taxonomy of Ochroconis (Ascomycota, Pezizomycotina, Venturiales, Sympoventuriaceae) has been revised with the recognition of an additional genus, Verruconis. Ochroconis comprises mesophilic saprobes that occasionally infect vertebrates which mostly are cold-blooded, while Verruconis contains thermophilic species which is a neurotrope in humans and birds. On the basis of molecular data it is noted that only a single Ochroconis species regularly infects immunocompetent human hosts. Here we report a subcutaneous infection due to Ochroconis mirabilis in a 50-year-old immunocompetent female patient. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests revealed that terbinafine was the most effective drug. The patient was successfully cured with oral administration of terbinafine 250 mg daily in combination with 3 times of topical ALA-photodynamic therapy for 9 months. PMID:27182484

  6. Asymptomatic “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” Infections in Immunocompetent Humans

    PubMed Central

    Siński, Edward; Kowalec, Maciej; Zajkowska, Joanna; Pancewicz, Sławomir A.

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, human infections with “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” have mainly been restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report here the first cases of asymptomatic “Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis” infection in immunocompetent humans (5/316 [1.6%] were infected). Due to the potential threats of infections with “Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis” in healthy persons to the safety of the blood supply, further study of this phenomenon is required. PMID:24899023

  7. Asymptomatic "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infections in immunocompetent humans.

    PubMed

    Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Siński, Edward; Kowalec, Maciej; Zajkowska, Joanna; Pancewicz, Sławomir A

    2014-08-01

    In Europe, human infections with "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" have mainly been restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report here the first cases of asymptomatic "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infection in immunocompetent humans (5/316 [1.6%] were infected). Due to the potential threats of infections with "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis" in healthy persons to the safety of the blood supply, further study of this phenomenon is required. PMID:24899023

  8. Quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Torres, A; Casanova, J F; Nistal, M; Regadera, J

    1997-01-01

    The immunocompetent cells present in the different histological patterns of 43 testicular germ cell tumours were evaluated. CD3 + and CD45RO + (UCHL1 +) T lymphocytes, CD68 + and MAC 387 + macrophages, CD20 + (L26 +) B lymphocytes, and kappa and lambda + plasma cells were counted. The number of immunocompetent cells per mm2 of tumour tissue, excluding the necrotic areas, was evaluated. Microscopic fields were randomly selected by two observers. In order to guarantee randomization each surface was divided into parts, numbered through a lattice, and some fields were chosen via a random numbers table. This procedure yielded significantly different counts from those obtained on subjective selection. The number of T-lymphocytes and macrophages was higher in seminomas than in the non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumours (P < 0.05) Embryonal carcinomas had more T-lymphocytes than immature teratomas. No significant differences were found among testicular germ cell tumours with regards to the B-lymphocytes, with the exception of the high number of B-lymphocytes in mature teratomas. Kappa + and lambda + plasma cells were few in the testicular germ cell tumours. Randomization in the quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours is a good means for evaluation of immune response in all the tumour mass, not only in the areas with the most intense inflammatory cell infiltrate, and permits comparison of testicular germ cell tumours with other malignant tumours. Study of immunocompetent cells in every histological type of testicular germ cell tumour is useful in comparing them with other extra-testicular germ cell tumours. PMID:9023554

  9. Scedosporium apiospermum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent man with silicosis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Kennedy, Karina J

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiosporum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent 69-year-old man with a history of silicosis. Delayed diagnosis and institution of antifungal therapy was associated with neurological impairment, with subsequent complications resulting in death, highlighting the need for early diagnostic aspiration of brain abscesses non-responsive to antibiotics. We propose that, in the absence of identifiable immunosuppression, silicosis may have been a contributing factor to the development of central nervous system infection. PMID:24432222

  10. Corynebacterium mucifaciens in an immunocompetent patient with cavitary pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium mucifaciens has been mainly isolated from skin, blood and from other normally-sterile body fluids. It has rarely been described as a human pathogen since its description. Case presentation We herein report the first case of cavitary pneumonia due to C. mucifaciens in an immunocompetent man returning from Maghreb. Conclusion C. mucifaciens should be considered as important human pathogen in patients with severe illness and compatible history of exposure even in individuals with no clearly identified immunosuppression. PMID:21162757

  11. ACQUIRED MULTIFOCAL TUFTED ANGIOMAS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT YOUNG ADULT

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Biswas, Surajit Kumar; Barma, Kuntal Deb

    2011-01-01

    Tufted angioma (TA) is a rare benign vascular neoplasm, localized to the skin and subcutaneous tissues, occurring primarily on the trunk and extremities of children. The lesions are usually asymptomatic but, rarely, paroxysmal painful episodes may be associated. The occurrence of eruptive TA is still rarer and had been described almost exclusively in association with immunocompromised states. We report here a case of acquired painful multifocal tufted angiomas on the face and neck in an immunocompetent young adult. PMID:21965850

  12. Scedosporium apiospermum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent man with silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Kennedy, Karina J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiosporum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent 69-year-old man with a history of silicosis. Delayed diagnosis and institution of antifungal therapy was associated with neurological impairment, with subsequent complications resulting in death, highlighting the need for early diagnostic aspiration of brain abscesses non-responsive to antibiotics. We propose that, in the absence of identifiable immunosuppression, silicosis may have been a contributing factor to the development of central nervous system infection. PMID:24432222

  13. Nondermatophytic onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Shah, S R; Dalal, B D; Modak, M S

    2016-03-01

    Fusarium onychomycosis is not uncommon in tropical countries but is worth reporting. We report a case of nondermatophytic onychomycosis by Fusarium oxysporum in an immunocompetent woman from Buldhana district of Maharashtra (India). Bilateral involvement of great toe nail, chronic duration and acquisition of infection due to peculiar practice of daily pasting floors with mud and dung, is interesting. The case was successfully treated with topical and oral terbinafine with a dose of 250mg daily for 3 weeks. PMID:26852190

  14. Paecilomyces lilacinus Vaginitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Ron; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus, an environmental mold found in soil and vegetation, rarely causes human infection. We report the first case of P. lilacinus isolated from a vaginal culture in a patient with vaginitis. PMID:14519255

  15. Vaccination and all-cause child mortality from 1985 to 2011: global evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Mark E; Canning, David

    2015-11-01

    Based on models with calibrated parameters for infection, case fatality rates, and vaccine efficacy, basic childhood vaccinations have been estimated to be highly cost effective. We estimated the association of vaccination with mortality directly from survey data. Using 149 cross-sectional Demographic and Health Surveys, we determined the relationship between vaccination coverage and the probability of dying between birth and 5 years of age at the survey cluster level. Our data included approximately 1 million children in 68,490 clusters from 62 countries. We considered the childhood measles, bacillus Calmette-Guérin, diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus, polio, and maternal tetanus vaccinations. Using modified Poisson regression to estimate the relative risk of child mortality in each cluster, we also adjusted for selection bias that resulted from the vaccination status of dead children not being reported. Childhood vaccination, and in particular measles and tetanus vaccination, is associated with substantial reductions in childhood mortality. We estimated that children in clusters with complete vaccination coverage have a relative risk of mortality that is 0.73 (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.77) times that of children in a cluster with no vaccinations. Although widely used, basic vaccines still have coverage rates well below 100% in many countries, and our results emphasize the effectiveness of increasing coverage rates in order to reduce child mortality. PMID:26453618

  16. Fulminant Cytomegalovirus Myocarditis in an Immunocompetent Host: Resolution with Oral Valganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anupam; Padala, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of fulminant myocarditis after a primary cytomegalovirus infection, in a previously healthy 72-year-old woman. The infection underwent clinical and immunologic resolution consequent to treatment with oral valganciclovir. In an immunocompetent host, the primary cytomegalovirus infection is usually asymptomatic or manifests itself as a heterophile-negative mononucleosis-like syndrome. Cytomegalovirus myocarditis is uncommon in immunocompetent patients. After presenting our case, we review the literature on cytomegalovirus myocarditis in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25425988

  17. In kittiwakes food availability partially explains the seasonal decline in humoral immunocompetence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gasparini, J.; Roulin, A.; Gill, V.A.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Boulinier, T.

    2006-01-01

    1. The immune system plays an important role in fitness, and interindividual variation in immunocompetence is due to several factors including food supply. 2. Seasonal variation in food resources may therefore explain why immunocompetence in bird nestlings usually declines throughout the breeding season, with chicks born early in the season receiving more food than chicks born later, and thereby possibly developing a more potent immune system. Although there are studies supporting this hypothesis, none has been experimental. 3. We performed an experiment in the kittiwake Rissa tridactyla by manipulating the food supply of pairs that were left to produce a first brood, and of pairs that were induced to produce a late replacement brood. 4. If food supply mediates, at least partially, seasonal variations in chick immunocompetence, non-food-supplemented chicks would show a stronger seasonal decline in immunocompetence than food-supplemented chicks. 5. Food supplementation improved humoral immunocompetence (the production of immunoglobulins Y), but not T-cell immunocompetence (phytohaemagglutinin, PHA response). T-cell immunocompetence of food-supplemented and non-food- supplemented chicks decreased through the season but to a similar extent, whereas the humoral immunocompetence of non-food-supplemented chicks decreased more strongly than that of food-supplemented chicks. 6. Our results suggest that the seasonal decline in humoral immunocompetence can be explained, at least partly, by variations in food supply throughout the breeding season. ?? 2006 British Ecological Society.

  18. Child Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... develops, it becomes a regular part of your child's behavior. This makes it more difficult to treat. ... it's not always easy to know when your child has a serious problem. Everyday stresses can cause ...

  19. Child Behavior Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... a death in the family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. ... The behavior is also not appropriate for the child's age. Warning signs can include Harming or threatening ...

  20. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  1. A rare cause of severe periorbital edema and dermonecrotic ulcer of the eyelid in a child: brown recluse spider bite.

    PubMed

    Taşkesen, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Sedat; Taş, Taşkin; Keklikçi, Uğur; Taş, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    Spider bites are a worldwide problem. Brown recluse spider bites can lead to severe local or systemic clinical effects, such as edema, necrotic ulcer, rashes, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, malaise, arthralgia, myalgia, hemolysis, leukocytosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal failure, and death. Eyelid bites from brown recluse spiders are rare. We report a child with severe facial edema and a dermonecrotic ulcer on the eyelid. Upon laboratory examination, leukocytosis with a significant left shift was detected. The patient was treated with antibiotics, systemic corticosteroid and conservative therapy that included saline compresses and ocular lubrication. No surgical excision was required. Vision was not impaired. A dermonecrotic ulcer is a severe complication of brown recluse spider bites. Since the diagnosis is difficult, clinical and epidemiological findings and a detailed history are important for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21534346

  2. Mycobacterium abscessus: Causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention – related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  3. Mycobacterium abscessus: causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Mishra, V; Sorabjee, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention-related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure. PMID:25766351

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Vaccinating Immunocompetent ≥65 Year Olds with the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in England

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently a large clinical trial showed that the use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) among immunocompetent individuals aged 65 years and over was safe and efficacious. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating immunocompetent 65 year olds with PCV13 vaccine in England. England is a country with universal childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programme in place (7-valent (PCV7) since 2006 and PCV13 since 2010), as well as a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPV23) vaccination programme targeting clinical risk-groups and those ≥65 years. Method A static cohort cost-effectiveness model was developed to follow a cohort of 65 year olds until death, which will be vaccinated in the autumn of 2016 with PCV13. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of the results. Results The childhood vaccination programme with PCV7 has induced herd protection among older unvaccinated age groups, with a resultant low residual disease burden caused by PCV7 vaccine types. We show similar herd protection effects for the 6 additional serotypes included in PCV13, and project a new low post-introduction equilibrium of vaccine-type disease in 2018/19. Applying these incidence projections for both invasive disease and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and using recent measures of vaccine efficacy against these endpoints for ≥65 year olds, we estimate that vaccination of a cohort of immunocompetent 65 year olds with PCV13 would directly prevent 26 cases of IPD, 69 cases of CAP and 15 deaths. The associated cost-effectiveness ratio is £257,771 per QALY gained (using list price of £49.10 per dose and £7.51 administration costs) and is therefore considered not cost-effective. To obtain a cost-effective programme the price per dose would need to be negative. The results were sensitive to disease incidence, waning vaccine protection and case fatality rate; despite this, the overall conclusion was robust

  5. Transient bacteraemia due to Chryseobacterium indologenes in an immunocompetent patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Silvano; Russo, E; De Simone, G; Gioia, R; Noviello, S; Vitolo, M; Rega, M R; Massari, A; Posteraro, L

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency unit with diffuse headache, visus reduction, and paraesthesias of the trigeminal area and the left hand. Three days after admission she showed shaking chills, vomiting, and sudden onset of fever (39·4°C). Blood cultures were performed soon after fever onset. Fever persisted for the whole day, decreasing slowly after 12 hours. No empirical antibiotic treatment was started in order to better define the diagnosis. Fever completely disappeared the day after. Two blood cultures for aerobes were positive for Chryseobacterium indologenes. The patient was discharged with the diagnosis of transient bacteraemia and transferred to the neurology unit for further investigations. C. indologenes infections are described in 31 studies with a total of 171 cases (pneumonia and bacteraemia being the most frequent). Our case is the first report of transient bacteraemia caused by C. indologenes in an immunocompetent, non-elderly patient without needing medical devices. PMID:25096711

  6. Propionibacterium Acnes Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Man in the Absence of Prior Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Masannat, Fares; Baka, J Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a rare, but established, cause of intracranial abscesses. We describe a case of P. acnes brain abscess in an immunocompetent man without prior neurosurgery. A 49-year old man with mild psoriasis presented with a two-week history of gait changes, generalized weakness and a two-day history of headaches, aphasia and confusion. Imaging revealed a left thalamic mass and surgical biopsy suggested a pyogenic abscess. Cultures of biopsy samples of the abscess grew P. acnes alone. MRI and serial neurological exam showed marked clinical improvement with intravenous antibiotics. The significant reduction in the abscess was sustained on MRI obtained at six weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, P. acnes must be considered as a differential diagnosis in individuals presenting with features suggestive of a brain abscess even in the absence of immunosuppression or previous neurosurgery. PMID:26999913

  7. DISSEMINATED REFRACTARY TUBERCULOSIS WITH BICEPS TENDON INVOLVEMENT IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis Oliveira, Marcelo; Schiefer, Márcio; da Silva, Marcos Britto; Fontenelle, César; Júnior, Yonder Archanjo Ching-San; Franco, José Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors report a rare case of disseminated tuberculosis which had compromised the long head of biceps tendon and shoulder joint, during standard drug therapy. Methods: On a first sight, the accurate diagnosis wasn't accomplished and the patient had been treated with physiotherapy for rotator cuff tear. However, the patient presented with a fast growing mass in anterior region of the proximal third of the arm, complaining of pain increase. Aspirative punction of the mass revealed a yellow fluid and the laboratorial analysis confirmed infection by M. Tuberculosis. The patient was treated with surgical debridement and his drug therapy was changed. Results: Resolution of infectious status and complete shoulder function restoration was succeeded. Conclusion: Due to its high prevalence in Brazil, tuberculosis must always be considered as a possible cause of inflammatory joint disease, even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27004180

  8. Strongyloidiasis in the immunocompetent: an overlooked infection.

    PubMed

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj; Karmacharya, Paras

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infestation caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. Most cases are asymptomatic; however, symptomatic patients may present with a wide range of non-specific cutaneous, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal symptoms posing a diagnostic dilemma and delay in diagnosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old female who presented with months of generalized pruritus and abdominal discomfort along with persistent eosinophilia due to strongyloidiasis, which completely resolved with treatment. PMID:27609726

  9. Infective Meningitis Caused by Phialemonium curvatum

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yueli; Bu, Hui; He, Yunying; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by rarely encountered fungal pathogens have increased in recent decades. Phialemonium species are widely distributed in the environment and are also involved in human infections, affecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The present study describes a case of meningitis caused by Phialemonium curvatum. PMID:24850352

  10. Herpes zoster-associated acute urinary retention in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Hortense, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster-associated urinary retention is an uncommon event related to virus infection of the S2-S4 dermatome. The possible major reasons are ipsilateral hemicystitis, neuritis-induced or myelitis-associated virus infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompetent female patient who presented an acute urinary retention after four days under treatment with valacyclovir for gluteal herpes zoster. The patient had to use a vesical catheter, was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and fully recovered after eight weeks. PMID:25387508

  11. Visceral leishmaniasis with pleural effusion in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Senjuti; Saha, Moutushi; Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Jayati

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is usually characterized by splenomegaly, pallor and fever. Pleural effusion is an uncommon feature of this disease, which is encountered in immunocompromised patients. Here, we report a case of VL with pleural effusion in an immunocompetent patient. Pulmonary symptoms in VL are usually related to bacterial lung infection, vagal nerve compression by splenomegaly, and hypoalbuminaemia with mild pulmonary edema. Our patient presented with cough and chest pain. The clinical features of this case were baffling since they mimicked that of pulmonary tuberculosis. This case report emphasizes the need to recognize the diverse nature of presentation of this curable yet fatal infectious disease. PMID:24669085

  12. Direct Invasion of the Optic Nerves, Chiasm, and Tracts by Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Merkler, Alexander E; Gaines, Nathan; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Schuetz, Audrey N; Lavi, Ehud; Simpson, Sara A; Dinkin, Marc J

    2015-10-01

    Cryptococcus spp is a common fungal infection and frequent cause of meningitis in immunocompromised patients; however, immunocompetent patients are also at risk of infection. Visual loss often occurs via elevated intracranial hypertension but can rarely occur through direct optic nerve, chiasm, or tract invasion. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with decreased acuity in both eyes. She had generalized visual field constriction in the right eye and temporal hemianopsia in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits showed multiple areas of ill-defined enhancement in the optic chiasm and tracts as well as in the diaphragmatic sella, prepontine and interpeduncular cisterns, and along cranial nerves VI, VII, and VIII bilaterally. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed 34 white blood cells, hypoglycorrhachia, and negative cryptococcal antigen and bacterial and fungal cultures. A transphenoidal biopsy of the dura and pituitary gland was unremarkable. Empiric steroids resulted in marked improvement in visual acuity in both eyes, but while tapering steroids, she developed rapid visual loss bilaterally. Repeat CSF performed 6 weeks later demonstrated a cryptococcal antigen titer of 1:512. Retroactive staining of the pituitary biopsy was positive for mucicarmine, a component of the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus spp. After induction therapy with amphotericin B and flucytosine and 1 year of fluconazole, her visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. In summary, Cryptococcus can affect immunocompetent patients and often presents with insidious, chronic meningitis. Visual loss is common in cryptococcal meningitis but usually results from fulminant papilledema related to elevated intracranial pressure. In rare cases, direct nerve or chiasm infiltration by the fungus results in vision loss. PMID:26425249

  13. Surgical Treatment Alone of Cerebral Aspergillosis in Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Beraldo, Daniel; Guerra, Ramon; Alvarenga, Vinícius; Crepaldi, Letícia

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillosis is a disease that predominantly affects immunocompromised patients. The incidence in immunocompetents is rare, and manifestation is generally pulmonary. Few reports in the literature refer to isolated cerebral aspergillosis in individuals with no chronic comorbidities. We describe a case of a 59-year-old rural worker without previous pathologies who had a partial convulsive crisis in a subtle form, with self-limiting and nonrecurrent secondary generalization. Diagnostic investigation demonstrated a subcortical tumorlike lesion in the right precentral gyrus by nuclear magnetic resonance that allowed en bloc microsurgical resection, with histopathologic findings indicating cerebral aspergillosis. Because of the delay in obtaining the result of the biopsy due to technical difficulties with analysis, the diagnosis was delayed. The patient was clinically stable, with imaging without modifications and with negative serologic tests, so it was decided to follow the patient without antifungal therapy, which was successful. This was a case of isolated cerebral aspergillosis in an immunocompetent individual who was successfully treated by complete resection of the lesion alone, without combined antifungal therapy. PMID:26238939

  14. Pulmonary cryptococcoma: a rare and challenging diagnosis in immunocompetent patients

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nicole; Cavallaro, Marina Costa; Lopes, Mariana Pezzute; Fernandez, Johana Marlen Jerias; Otoch, José Pinhata; Ferreira, Cristiane Rubia

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal infection is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients, although immunocompetent patients may also be infected. The pathogen’s portal of entry is the respiratory tract; however, the central nervous system is predominantly involved. Pulmonary involvement varies from interstitial and alveolar infiltrations to large masses, which are frequently first interpreted as lung neoplasm. The diagnosis of pulmonary cryptococcosis, in these cases, is frequently challenging, which, in most cases, requires histopathological examination. The authors report the case of a young female patient who presented a 20-day history of chest pleuritic pain and fever at the onset of symptoms. HIV serology was negative and CD4 count was normal. The imaging work-up was characterized by a huge opacity in the left inferior pulmonary lobe with a wide pleural base. Computed tomography showed a heterogeneous mass involving the bronchial tree. Mediastinal involvement was poor, and there was a splenomegaly. The patient underwent an exploratory thoracotomy and inferior lobectomy. The histopathological examination revealed a cryptococcoma. As the serum antigenemia was positive, the patient was scheduled for long-term treatment with fluconazole. The authors call attention to including the cryptococcal infection in the differential diagnosis of lung mass, mainly when localized in the lung bases in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26484332

  15. Polyuria and polydipsia in a young child: diagnostic considerations and identification of novel mutation causing familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Matthew D; Fenwick, Raymond G; Brosnan, Patrick G

    2012-12-01

    A 3-year 5-month-old boy was seen for second opinion regarding polydipsia and polyuria. Previously, a diagnosis of primary polydipsia was made after normal urine concentration after overnight water deprivation testing. The boy's father, paternal grandfather, and paternal aunt had diabetes insipidus treated with desmopressin acetate. Based on this young boy's symptoms, ability to concentrate urine after informal overnight water deprivation, and family history of diabetes insipidus, we performed AVP gene mutation testing. Analysis of the AVP gene revealed a novel mutation G54E that changes a normal glycine to glutamic acid, caused by a guanine to adenine change at nucleotide g.1537 (exon 2) of the AVP gene. Commonly, patients with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNHDI) present within the first 6 years of life with progressively worsening polyuria and compensatory polydipsia. Since these patients have progressive loss of arginine vasopressin (AVP), they may initially respond normally to water deprivation testing and have normal pituitary findings on brain MRI. Genetic testing may be helpful in these patients, as well as preemptively diagnosing those with a mutation, thereby avoiding unnecessary surveillance of those unaffected. PMID:20401697

  16. Non-healing genital herpes mimicking donovanosis in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Khute, Prakash; Patel, Anjali; Gupta, Somesh

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical presentations of herpetic infection in immunocompetent individuals are common, they very rarely have the extensive, chronic and verrucous appearances seen in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of genital herpes manifesting as painless chronic non-healing genital ulcers with exuberant granulation tissue in an immunocompetent man. Owing to this morphology, the ulcers were initially mistaken for donovanosis. To the best of our knowledge, such a presentation of genital herpes in an immunocompetent individual has not been described previously. PMID:25614521

  17. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  18. Visceral Leishmaniasis with Endobronchial Involvement in an Immunocompetent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kotsifas, Konstantinos; Metaxas, Eugenios; Koutsouvelis, Ioannis; Skoutelis, Athanassios; Kara, Panayiota; Tatsis, George

    2011-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by fever, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Cough may be a presenting symptom as well. However, pulmonary involvement is considered rare and mainly described in immunocompromised patients. We describe a case of an immunocompetent adult whose clinical presentation was dominated by cough and hemoptysis. Bronchoscopy revealed a discreet polypoid mucosal endobronchial lesion whose biopsy yielded Leishmania amastigotes within histiocytes. Transbronchial needle biopsy of a right paratracheal lymph node was also positive. Leishmania amastigotes were also found on bone marrow and liver biopsies. Treatment with IV Amphotericin B was successful. In conclusion, cough should not be overlooked as a presenting symptom of visceral leishmaniasis and may be a sign of pulmonary involvement. PMID:21577261

  19. Visceral leishmaniasis with endobronchial involvement in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Kotsifas, Konstantinos; Metaxas, Eugenios; Koutsouvelis, Ioannis; Skoutelis, Athanassios; Kara, Panayiota; Tatsis, George

    2011-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by fever, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Cough may be a presenting symptom as well. However, pulmonary involvement is considered rare and mainly described in immunocompromised patients. We describe a case of an immunocompetent adult whose clinical presentation was dominated by cough and hemoptysis. Bronchoscopy revealed a discreet polypoid mucosal endobronchial lesion whose biopsy yielded Leishmania amastigotes within histiocytes. Transbronchial needle biopsy of a right paratracheal lymph node was also positive. Leishmania amastigotes were also found on bone marrow and liver biopsies. Treatment with IV Amphotericin B was successful. In conclusion, cough should not be overlooked as a presenting symptom of visceral leishmaniasis and may be a sign of pulmonary involvement. PMID:21577261

  20. An unusual case of invasive aspergillosis in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Afsal P; Dhunputh, Pushwinder; Chiluka, Raghuvaran; Umakanth, Shashikiran

    2015-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a highly lethal opportunistic infection that poses a significant threat to immunocompromised patients. With studies suggesting that the incidence of this disease is increasing, and mortality rates remain high, early diagnosis and treatment are very important to improve patient survival. We present the case of a 33-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with a history of cough and severe breathlessness, and was diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis. This case emphasises the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion and also of remembering that invasive aspergillosis is no longer only a disease of immunocompromised individuals. In addition, this case tells us that aspergillosis is one of the new emerging infections in intensive care units. PMID:26123468

  1. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis with Disseminated Infection in Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, Gabriel; Ricart de Mesones, Antoni; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Marron-Moya, Maria Teresa; Rosell, Antoni; Mañez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a rare pathology with increasing incidence mainly in critical care settings and recently in immunocompetent patients. The mortality of the disease is very high, regardless of an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Here, we report a case of a 56 yr old previously healthy woman who was found unconscious at home and admitted to the emergency room with mild respiratory insufficiency. In the first 24 hours she developed an acute respiratory failure with new radiographic infiltrates requiring Intensive Care Unit admission. A severe obstructive pattern with impossibility of ventilation because of bilateral atelectasis was observed, requiring emergent venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device insertion. Bronchoscopy revealed occlusion of main bronchi, demonstrating by biopsy an invasive infection by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus. Despite an aggressive treatment and vital support the patient had a fatal outcome. The forensic study confirms the diagnosis of IPA but also revealed the presence of disseminated aspergillosis. PMID:27445566

  2. Primary Aspergillus sellar abscess simulating pituitary tumor in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Taohui; Zhang, Na; Wang, Long; Jiao, Jiantong; Zhao, Yiqing; Li, Zheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with headache, dizziness, and decreased visual acuity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sellar mass with sphenoid sinus extension. The result of hormone showed an obviously high prolactin (815 ng/mL). The mass was resected and diagnosed with aspergillosis pathologically. Postoperatively, the level of prolactin dramatically decreased, and the patient received medical treatment with voriconazole and caspofungin. During a 6-month follow-up, the patient's headache and dizziness disappeared, and visual acuity improved. Therefore, aspergillus sellar abscess could result in hyperprolactinemia and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a sellar mass, even in immunocompetent patients. A combination of surgery and antifungal therapy could reduce the hyperprolactinemia and improve symptoms. PMID:25675014

  3. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Stittelaar, Koert J.; de Waal, Leon; van Amerongen, Geert; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J.B.; Fraaij, Pieter L.A.; van Baalen, Carel A.; van Kampen, Jeroen J.A.; van der Vries, Erhard; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (105 TCID50) administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI). Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies. PMID:27314379

  4. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts.

    PubMed

    Stittelaar, Koert J; de Waal, Leon; van Amerongen, Geert; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; Fraaij, Pieter L A; van Baalen, Carel A; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; van der Vries, Erhard; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; de Swart, Rik L

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (10⁵ TCID50) administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI). Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies. PMID:27314379

  5. Recurrent abscesses due to Finegoldia magna, Dermabacter hominis and Staphylococcus aureus in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Bemer, P; Touchais, S; Asseray, N; Corvec, S

    2009-10-01

    A case of recurrent abscesses in an immunocompetent patient is reported, involving the opportunistic human pathogen Dermabacter hominis, the virulent anaerobic pathogen Finegoldia magna and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:19332143

  6. The United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1959): Genesis, Transformation and Dissemination of a Treaty (Re)Constituting a Transnational Cause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the 20th century, the social and legal status of the child evolved considerably. One remarkable illustration of this process can be seen by tracing the evolution of specific international treaties on the rights of the child. Although developments in national legislation inspired the authors of these treaties, it was through…

  7. Take Care of Your Child's Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baby teeth hold space for adult teeth. Take care of your child’s teeth to protect your child from tooth decay (cavities). Tooth decay can: Cause your child pain Make it hard for your child to chew ...

  8. Death of an Adult Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... iGive.com Purchase Through AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate Death of an Adult Child The death of any child, regardless of cause or age, ... the situations that may have caused their child’s death. Judgmental statements from others indicating that the child ...

  9. Airway centered invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Hong Lyeol; Kim, Lucia; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Yeo Ju; Lee, Ha Young

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a major problem that occurs in severely immunocompromised patients. Airway centered invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is rare in patients with normal immunity or those without critical illness. Computed tomography (CT) is a very useful diagnostic modality, yielding characteristic imaging findings for early diagnosis of this infection in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. We describe the case of an immunocompetent patient with airway centered invasive aspergillosis, who was successfully treated with voriconazole. PMID:27076982

  10. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults. PMID:25139919

  11. Isolated Pancreatic Histoplasmosis: An Unusual Suspect of Pancreatic Head Mass in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Avin; Garg, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is endemic to the Mississippi and Ohio River valley regions in the US. It usually affects patients with underlying immunodeficiency but can also be seen in immunocompetent hosts. Although gastrointestinal involvement is common in the setting of disseminated histoplasmosis, isolated gastrointestinal involvement is uncommon. We report a case of isolated pancreatic histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent patient, presenting as painless jaundice and pancreatic head mass. PMID:26828075

  12. [Herpes zoster in immunocompetent pregnant women and their perinatal outcome].

    PubMed

    Casanova Román, Gerardo; Reyna Figueroa, Jesús; Figueroa Damián, Ricardo; Ortiz Ibarra, Javier

    2004-02-01

    A prospective and descriptive study was done in pregnant women diagnosed with herpes zoster, to know the demographic characteristics and clinical manifestations as well as maternal and/or neonatal complications to cause by this viral infection during pregnancy. The study included all pregnant women diagnosed with herpes zoster at the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Instituto Nacional de Perinatologia México, between 1994 and 2002. A total of 17 women were included in the study. All were given clinical and ultrasound follow-up to discard any maternal or fetal complications also at the moment of birth. A review in the newborn was made to establish the demographic, anthropometric and clinical characteristics; also the data collected included mother's age, gestational age at the moment of diagnosis with herpes zoster, anatomical lesion site, treatments administered, ultrasound characteristics, newborn's gestational age, weight, height, Apgar at birth and type of delivery. The most frequent site (58.8%) for herpes zoster lesions on the mother was the intercostal area, followed by the scapular region, the lumbar region and the limbs. None of the patients experienced complications during pregnancy, including post-herpetic pain. Sixteen of the newborns had no complications and one was a stillborn due to 60% of placental separation. These findings suggest a benign evolution of herpes zoster during pregnancy, supporting similar findings in the literature. No complications during pregnancy are suggested, and no phenotypical alterations occurred in the child at the moment of birth. PMID:15216903

  13. Diagnostic Challenges of Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Individual Masquerading as Chronic Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Kedar R; Roberts, Amity L; Curtis, Mark T; Fortuna, Danielle; Dharia, Robin; Sheehan, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can cause disseminated meningoencephalitis and evade immunosurveillance with expression of a major virulence factor, the polysaccharide capsule. Direct diagnostic assays often rely on the presence of the cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan capsular antigen (CrAg) or visualization of the capsule. Strain specific phenotypic traits and environmental conditions influence differences in expression that can thereby compromise detection and timely diagnosis. Immunocompetent hosts may manifest clinical signs and symptoms indolently, often expanding the differential and delaying appropriate treatment and diagnosis. We describe a 63-year-old man who presented with a progressive four-year history of ambulatory dysfunction, headache, and communicating hydrocephalus. Serial lumbar punctures (LPs) revealed elevated protein (153-300 mg/dL), hypoglycorrhachia (19-47 mg/dL), lymphocytic pleocytosis (89-95% lymphocyte, WBC 67-303 mg/dL, and RBC 34-108 mg/dL), and normal opening pressure (13-16 cm H2O). Two different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CrAg assays were negative. A large volume CSF fungal culture grew unencapsulated C. neoformans. He was initiated on induction therapy with amphotericin B plus flucytosine and consolidation/maintenance therapy with flucytosine, but he died following discharge due to complications. Elevated levels of CSF Th1 cytokines and decreased IL6 may have affected the virulence and detection of the pathogen. PMID:27525140

  14. Diagnostic Challenges of Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Individual Masquerading as Chronic Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Danielle; Dharia, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can cause disseminated meningoencephalitis and evade immunosurveillance with expression of a major virulence factor, the polysaccharide capsule. Direct diagnostic assays often rely on the presence of the cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan capsular antigen (CrAg) or visualization of the capsule. Strain specific phenotypic traits and environmental conditions influence differences in expression that can thereby compromise detection and timely diagnosis. Immunocompetent hosts may manifest clinical signs and symptoms indolently, often expanding the differential and delaying appropriate treatment and diagnosis. We describe a 63-year-old man who presented with a progressive four-year history of ambulatory dysfunction, headache, and communicating hydrocephalus. Serial lumbar punctures (LPs) revealed elevated protein (153–300 mg/dL), hypoglycorrhachia (19–47 mg/dL), lymphocytic pleocytosis (89–95% lymphocyte, WBC 67–303 mg/dL, and RBC 34–108 mg/dL), and normal opening pressure (13–16 cm H2O). Two different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CrAg assays were negative. A large volume CSF fungal culture grew unencapsulated C. neoformans. He was initiated on induction therapy with amphotericin B plus flucytosine and consolidation/maintenance therapy with flucytosine, but he died following discharge due to complications. Elevated levels of CSF Th1 cytokines and decreased IL6 may have affected the virulence and detection of the pathogen. PMID:27525140

  15. Tuberculous Empyema Necessitatis in a 40-Year-Old Immunocompetent Male

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Sheikholeslami, Roya; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Empyema necessitans (EN) is a kind of empyema that diffuses to extrapleural space and can involve chest pain. Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common cause of EN. This disease can be found in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals but is usually seen in the immunocompromised individuals. Because of long duration and ambiguous symptoms of the disease, diagnosis can be hard. The disease can be treated both medically and surgically. Missing the disease can lead to undesirable effects on patient's condition and health care setting. This problem can be seen in endemic area in which controlling of TB is hard. Report of the disease in local health care center for desirable treatment and health maintenance is necessary. We explained a rare case of pulmonary TB in a patient that was healthy in other fields and just showed the minimum systemic symptoms. The patient came with a mass in lower part of back of chest cage, with a mild pain. The imaging survey showed EN. Smear and Ziehl-Neelsen stains from subcutaneous aspiration were positive for TB. This case showed importance of clinical view and awareness of this silent but serious disease in endemic area especially for TB. PMID:27555974

  16. Acute hepatic injury with amphotericin B deoxycholate in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jamie L; Bell, Allison M

    2016-01-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is rarely used due to its adverse effect profile, which includes nephrotoxicity, infusion-related reactions, and hepatotoxicity. The incidence of hepatotoxicity related to AmBd is 18-23%, but the reports of this adverse effect are mainly in immunocompromised patients receiving chemotherapy. We report a case of AmBd-related acute hepatic injury in an immunocompetent male with multiple medical problems. The patient initially had acute hepatic injury likely caused by poor nutritional status and a diagnosis of failure to thrive, but was recovering. He was also diagnosed with bilateral renal fungal mycetomas and received systemic treatment initially with micafungin and then fluconazole after urine cultures returned with the growth of Candida glabrata. Therapy was expanded to systemic AmBd when the fungal balls persisted. The patient subsequently developed hepatic re-injury with 1 dose of AmBd, and the therapy was discontinued. Caution should be exerted when utilizing AmBd in treating patients with previous hepatic injury. PMID:27440960

  17. Acute hepatic injury with amphotericin B deoxycholate in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jamie L.; Bell, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is rarely used due to its adverse effect profile, which includes nephrotoxicity, infusion-related reactions, and hepatotoxicity. The incidence of hepatotoxicity related to AmBd is 18–23%, but the reports of this adverse effect are mainly in immunocompromised patients receiving chemotherapy. We report a case of AmBd-related acute hepatic injury in an immunocompetent male with multiple medical problems. The patient initially had acute hepatic injury likely caused by poor nutritional status and a diagnosis of failure to thrive, but was recovering. He was also diagnosed with bilateral renal fungal mycetomas and received systemic treatment initially with micafungin and then fluconazole after urine cultures returned with the growth of Candida glabrata. Therapy was expanded to systemic AmBd when the fungal balls persisted. The patient subsequently developed hepatic re-injury with 1 dose of AmBd, and the therapy was discontinued. Caution should be exerted when utilizing AmBd in treating patients with previous hepatic injury.

  18. Treatment Response and Outcomes in Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease vs Lymphoma in Immunocompetent Patients.

    PubMed

    Trusson, R; Serre, J E; Szwarc, I; Brunot, V; Garrigue, V; Delmas, S; Kanouni, T; Cartron, G; Mourad, G

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation may carry a poorer prognosis than lymphoma in immunocompetent individuals, but comparative data are lacking. In a retrospective, single-center, case-control study, 21 cases of PTLD were identified in patients undergoing kidney transplantation since 2000, and compared to 42 nontransplanted controls cared for in the same institution and matched for age, prognostic index, and cerebral localization. Two-year and 5-year overall survival was 57% and 44%, respectively, in PTLD patients and 71% and 58% in controls (log-rank test P = .20). On multivariable analysis, overall survival was similar for PTLD and control patients (hazard ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 3.61, P = .16). Response rate to first-line chemotherapy was similar between the 2 groups. Death was due to progression of the disease in 46% vs 94% of PTLD and control patients, respectively (P < .01), or sepsis in 31% vs 0% (P = .03). Treatment-related mortality was significantly higher in PTLD (19%) than in controls (0%, P = .03). In conclusion, response to first-line chemotherapy and overall survival are similar in PTLD and control patients, whereas causes of death were significantly different. Better prevention and management of infectious complications could improve the results in PTLD patients. PMID:27569924

  19. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started. PMID:20467849

  20. Immunopathological assessments of human Blastocystis spp. in experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Hassanin, Kamel M A; Abdel-Razik, Abdel-Razik H; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis spp., one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. The host's immune response against Blastocystis spp. infection has also not been defined yet. Therefore, this research aimed to assess the potential pathogenicity of this parasite and its ability to modulate the immune response in experimental infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice. These results demonstrated that the infected immunosuppressed mice were more affected than infected immunocompetent mice. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in the infected immunosuppressed mice showed that Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the layers. Moreover, the epithelia showed exfoliation and inflammatory cell infiltration in submucosa compared to that of the infected immunocompetent mice. As well, examination of the large intestine of the infected immunosuppressed group showed severe goblet cell hyperplasia. Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the large intestine layers compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infected immunosuppressed mice compared to that of the infected immunocompetent ones (p ≤ 0.004 and p ≤ 0.002, respectively). However, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was significantly downregulated in the infected immunosuppressed group compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group one at 10 days postinfection (p ≤ 0.002 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively). The results of this study revealed that Blastocystis spp. affected the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups of mice compared to healthy normal (naive) group. Additionally, these data showed that there was a significant upregulation (p ≤ 0.005) of the locally

  1. Phenotypes including immunocompetence in scavenging local chicken ecotypes in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Msoffe, P L; Minga, U M; Olsen, J E; Yongolo, M G; Juul-Madsen, H R; Gwakisa, P S; Mtambo, M M

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the variations in physical characters and immunocompetence among scavenging local chicken ecotypes in Tanzania. Eighty-four adult scavenging local chickens from four eco-climatic regions of Tanzania were studied. Measurements of adult body weight, body length, shank length and egg weight and observations of plumage colour and pattern, earlobe colour, skin colour and the shape of the comb were conducted. The antibody response to sheep red blood cells, serum haemolytic complement and the cutaneous response to phytohaemagglutinin-P were assessed. Five ecotypes were identified and named Mbeya, Morogoro-medium, Ching'wekwe, Kuchi and Singamagazi. Singamagazi and Kuchi were significantly heavier, with longer shanks and heavier eggs than the other ecotypes. The average adult body weight for males ranged from 1621 g (Mbeya) to 2915 g (Singamagazi). Average female weights ranged from 1108 g (Morogoro-medium) to 2020 g (Singamagazi). Mean egg weights ranged from 37.65 g (Ching'wekwe) to 45.61 (Singamagazi). The Kuchi had mostly rose and walnut combs, while the other ecotypes were mostly single combed. In each ecotype there were chickens with a high or low antibody response to red blood cells, but there was a significant difference between the ecotypes. PMID:11474868

  2. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a HIV Negative, Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare demyelinating disease most common in immunodeficient patients. It occurs due to reactivation of the John Cunningham Virus (JCV) and carries a poor prognosis, with a median life expectancy of 6 months. We report a case of a 66-year-old man with a history of HCV related cirrhosis (HCV) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who was found to have PML in the setting of a negative viral load in the CSF and a CD4+ >200. He initially presented with two weeks of mild confusion and word-finding difficulty concerning for hepatic encephalopathy. An MRI was notable for extensive T2/FLAIR hyperintensity signal in the left temporal lobe. Brain biopsy was positive for JCV. PML is rare in immunocompetent individuals, especially in the setting of a negative viral load. It is possible, however, that transient states of immunosuppression may have been responsible in this case. Although viral load was reported as negative, virus may still have been detected but was below the quantifiable threshold. It is important for clinicians to note that a negative result does not necessarily exclude the possibility of PML, and care should be taken to review lab values on viral load in closer detail. PMID:27529042

  3. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host. PMID:27506800

  4. [Hyaline-vascular Multicentric Castleman's Disease in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Zapata-Bonilla, Sergio Armando; López Vargas, Roberto; Scherling-Ocampo, Aldo Alfonso; Morales Leyte, Ana Lilia; García Ilizaliturri, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy, immunocompetent 67-year-old female presented with a one-month history of general symptoms, weight loss, night fevers, and bilateral lower extremity edema. On admission she had severe anemia, acute kidney injury, and multiple lymphadenopathies. An excisional biopsy of one of the axillary lymphadenopathies confirmed hyaline-vascular Castleman's disease. This rare disease is a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder that affects the normal lymph node architecture. According to its location it can be divided in unicentric (localized) or multicentric disease; it can be further divided according to histopathology in hyaline-vascular or plasmatic cells variety. Clinical presentation relates more to histopathological variety than to centricity. Human herpes virus 8 is ubiquitous in this disease and, along with interleukin 6, plays an important role in pathogenesis and symptoms presentation. Surgery is the go-to treatment of localized disease, while systemic chemotherapy is the option in multicentric disease. Communication between the clinical and anatomopathological teams is crucial; lag in diagnosis can lead to futile investigations in search of other diseases and delay in treatment. PMID:26526479

  5. Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting as Unilateral Deafness in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Andre; Ikpatt, Offiong Francis; Chapman-Fredericks, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old HIV-negative white male presented with right ear deafness, right axillary lymphadenopathy, and weight loss. Laboratory findings included anemia, marked leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the peripheral smear demonstrated the presence of increased circulating blast-like cells of intermediate size, with basophilic cytoplasm and nuclei with open chromatin. MRI of the brain was compatible with hemorrhagic labyrinthitis. Excisional biopsy of the axillary mass revealed an enlarged lymph node with effaced architecture and “starry sky” appearance. The cells expressed CD20, CD10, BCL6, and surface kappa immunoglobulin light chain, with a high proliferative index by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy was hypercellular (approximately 95%), with blast-like cells virtually replacing all hematopoietic elements. Routine karyotype as well as FISH analysis of bone marrow cells demonstrated rearrangement of the MYC gene at chromosome 8q24 region, IGH/MYC fusion, and additional signal for IGH gene. We present herein a case of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma occurring in a previously healthy HIV-negative male. The unusual clinical findings in this case include the relatively older age at presentation (55 years), an immunocompetent patient who had nodal involvement and leukemic phase of Burkitt, coupled with partial deafness. A brief educational review of this neoplasm is made. PMID:23049564

  6. Immunocompetent molecules and their response network in horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Horseshoe crab hemocyte selectively responds to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which depends critically on the proteolytic activity of the LPS-responsive serine protease zymogen factor C. In response to stimulation by LPS, the hemocyte secretes several kinds of immunocompetent proteins. The coagulation cascade triggered by LPS or beta-1,3-D-glucans (BDG) results in the formation of coagulin fibrils that are subsequently stabilized by transglutaminase (TGase)-dependent cross-linking. Invading pathogens are recognized and agglutinated by lectins and then killed by antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, LPS-triggered hemocyte exocytosis is enhanced by a feedback mechanism in which the antimicrobial peptides serve as endogenous mediators. Factor C also acts as an LPS-sensitive complement C3 convertase. In addition, a sub-cuticular epidermis-derived protein forms a TGase-stabilized mesh at sites of injury. Horseshoe crabs have a sophisticated innate immune response network that coordinately effects pathogen recognition and killing, prophenoloxidase activation, complement activation and TGase-dependent wound healing. PMID:21528696

  7. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  8. Relative immunocompetence of the newborn harbour seal, Phoca vitulina.

    PubMed

    Ross, P S; de Swart, R L; Visser, I K; Vedder, L J; Murk, W; Bowen, W D; Osterhaus, A D

    1994-09-01

    The immune system of many mammalian species is not fully developed at birth, with newborns obtaining temporary immunological protection from maternal antibodies. Little is known of the immune system of the harbour seal, and developmental aspects of its immune system have not been systematically studied. We collected blood and milk samples from nine free-ranging mother-pup pairs throughout the lactation period on Sable Island, Canada, in an effort to characterise developmental aspects of the immune system of this newborn pinniped. Pup lymphocytes responded stronger to the mitogens concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen than the lymphocytes of their mothers. In contrast to newborn cats and dogs, newborn seal pups developed high specific antibody responses after immunisation with an inactivated rabies vaccine. Circulating levels of total IgG in newborn pups were low (3% of maternal levels), but increased rapidly after colostrum intake (to 65% of maternal levels after 15 days). A similar pattern of increase in pup serum was observed for phocine distemper virus specific antibodies which had been detected in the serum and milk of mothers, suggesting that the transfer of colostral antibodies is an important feature of temporary protection for the pup. We speculate that the relative immunocompetence of the harbour seal at birth reflects an adaptation to its relatively short nursing period and limited maternal care. PMID:7810064

  9. Disseminated cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis by M. chelonae after sclerotherapy of varicose veins in a immunocompetent patient: a case report*

    PubMed Central

    Murback, Nathalia Dias Negrão; Higa Júnior, Minoru German; Pompílio, Maurício Antônio; Cury, Eunice Stella Jardim; Hans Filho, Gunter; Takita, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are saprophytic organisms not transmitted from person to person, which affect mainly immunosuppressed but also immunocompetent individuals. We present a case of atypical mycobacteriosis after a vascular procedure, with widespread cutaneous lesions associated with polyarthralgia. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The patient showed improvement after treatment with three antibiotics. Mycobacterium chelonae causes skin lesions after invasive procedures. The clinical form depends on the immune state of the host and on the entry points. The diagnosis is based essentially on culture and the mycobacteria is identified by PCR. We highlight the importance of investigating atypical mycobacteriosis when faced with granulomatous lesions associated with a history of invasive procedures. PMID:26312697

  10. Computed Tomography Features of Pulmonary Nocardiosis in Immunocompromised and Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehrian, Payam; Esfandiari, Ehsan; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Memari, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Nocardiosis primarily occurs in the setting of immunocompromising conditions. However, it may also occur in immunocompetent patients. We described computed tomography features of pulmonary nocardiosis and compared immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Material/Methods CT images of 25 patients (Mean age of 39.5 years; 76% male) with pulmonary nocardiosis proved by bronchoalveolar lavage or biopsy were reviewed by two experienced pulmonary radiologists and detailed findings were reported on. Fourteen patients (56%) were immunocompetent, while 44% had an underlying immunocompromising condition, including chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) (n=4), diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=2), malignancy (n=2), HIV (n=1), concomitant CGD and DM (n=1), and steroid therapy for nephrotic syndrome (n=1). Results Most patients had bilateral involvement with no zonal predominance. Multiple pulmonary nodules (96%) were the most common CT findings, followed by consolidation (76%) and cavity (52%). Other findings included bronchiectasis (48%), pleural thickening (40%), ground glass opacity (32%), mass-like consolidation (20%), intrathoracic lymphadenopathy (16%), pleural effusion (12%), reticular infiltration (4%), and pericardial effusion (4%). There was no statistically significant difference in the CT findings of immunocompromised and immunocompetent groups. Conclusions Pulmonary nocardiosis presents mainly as multiple pulmonary nodules, consolidations, and cavity in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. However, these features are more suggestive of nocardiosis in the setting of an underling immunocompromised condition. PMID:25584096

  11. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  12. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  13. Child Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... content Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Child Development Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z ... Z # Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Child Development Cancel Submit Search The CDC Child Development Note: ...

  14. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... puts a child at risk of harm. Child abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Neglect, or not providing for a child's needs, is also a form of abuse. Most abused children suffer greater emotional than physical ...

  15. Child Poverty and Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evidence on the prevalence of child poverty in Britain including: (1) how child poverty has changed over the last 20 years; (2) how child poverty in Britain compares with that in other countries; (3) characteristics of poor children; (4) impact of poverty on child well-being; and (5) government attempts to abolish child poverty. (SD)

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans as a cause of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Alexander T; Al Kharrat, Tamim; Kourtis, Athena P

    2010-06-01

    The most frequent manifestations of Cryptococcus neoformans (CN) disease are systemic infections in immunocompromised patients and localized pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. Such pulmonary cryptococcosis can range from asymptomatic infection to frank pneumonia that can be severe. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a rare severe form of pneumonitis caused by a variety of infectious and toxic agents or connective tissue diseases. BOOP due to Cryptococcus neoformans has very rarely been reported; there have been only five such case reports, mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report herein on a case of CN-associated BOOP in an immunocompetent individual and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this entity. PMID:20169387

  17. Aspergillus Septic Arthritis of the Hip in an Immunocompetent Middle-aged Female with Undiagnosed Recurrent Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Song, Joo Ho; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk; Kim, Hee Joong

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Aspergillus septic hip arthritis in an immunocompetent patient with undiagnosed recurrent pulmonary aspergillosis who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Biopsy specimens of synovium revealed fungal hyphae, confirming Aspergillus infection. Aspergillus septic hip arthritis can occur in immunocompetent patients, and arthroscopy can be a noninvasive surgical option in these cases. PMID:27536626

  18. Easing Your Child's Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Child's Allergies For starters, pay attention to pollen levels, FDA advises To use the sharing features ... be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens such as mold, ...

  19. Child Behavior Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... misbehave some times. And some may have temporary behavior problems due to stress. For example, the birth ... family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. They involve a pattern ...

  20. Attributions of Stability, Control and Responsibility: How Parents of Children with Intellectual Disabilities View Their Child's Problematic Behaviour and Its Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Woolfson, Lisa Marks; Hunter, Simon C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disabilities have high rates of behaviour problems. This study explored parents' causal beliefs and attributions for general problematic child behaviour in children with different aetiologies of intellectual disabilities. Materials and Methods: Ten parents of children with intellectual disabilities…

  1. Learner Pregnancy--Perceptions on Its Prevalence and the Child Support Grant (CSG) Being the Possible Cause in South African Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naong, Matsidiso Nehemia

    2011-01-01

    Learner pregnancy has recently become a thorn in the flesh for most schools in South Africa, and documentary evidence shows that its prevalence is greater amongst Black public schools than White schools. Within its discourse, more often than not, the Child Support Grant (CSG) has featured prominently in the perceived increase in the pregnancy rate…

  2. Genetic, molecular and physiological basis of variation in Drosophila gut immunocompetence

    PubMed Central

    Bou Sleiman, Maroun S.; Osman, Dani; Massouras, Andreas; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Gut immunocompetence involves immune, stress and regenerative processes. To investigate the determinants underlying inter-individual variation in gut immunocompetence, we perform enteric infection of 140 Drosophila lines with the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila and observe extensive variation in survival. Using genome-wide association analysis, we identify several novel immune modulators. Transcriptional profiling further shows that the intestinal molecular state differs between resistant and susceptible lines, already before infection, with one transcriptional module involving genes linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism contributing to this difference. This genetic and molecular variation is physiologically manifested in lower ROS activity, lower susceptibility to ROS-inducing agent, faster pathogen clearance and higher stem cell activity in resistant versus susceptible lines. This study provides novel insights into the determinants underlying population-level variability in gut immunocompetence, revealing how relatively minor, but systematic genetic and transcriptional variation can mediate overt physiological differences that determine enteric infection susceptibility. PMID:26213329

  3. Acute Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Host as a Reason for Upper Right Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kai Oliver; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich; Gingert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infections are widely distributed with a seroprevalence of up to 100%. The majority of the cases take a silent course or deal with unspecific clinical symptoms. Complications in immunocompetent patients are rare but may affect the liver and lead up to an acute organ failure. In this case report, we describe a 35-year-old immunocompetent female with an acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting as acute hepatitis with ongoing upper right abdominal pain after cholecystectomy. Upper right abdominal pain is a common symptom with a wide range of differential diagnoses. If common reasons can be excluded, we want to sensitize for cytomegalovirus infection as a minor differential diagnosis even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27403100

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis initially presenting with eye symptoms in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Wang, Peipei; Ye, Ling; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Yu, Songping

    2016-01-01

    Although cryptococcal meningitis (CM) typically occurs in immunocompromised hosts, immunocompetent humans are susceptible to CM. In humans with an intact immune system, CM presents with signs and symptoms typical of meningitis, including fever, headache and neck stiffness. The present study reported the case of a female immunocompetent patient who presented visual blurring in both eyes and bilateral papilledema for ~1 month. Following hospital admission, the patient was diagnosed with optic nerve inflammation and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and oral prednisone. However, the initial symptoms failed to improve and the patient developed a headache. The microscopic examination and India ink test performed using the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient showed the presence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Following combined treatment with amphotericin B and fluconazole, the patient made a full recovery with total resolution of the initial symptoms. This case demonstrates that CM in immunocompetent patients may initially include eye symptoms, which may result in a delayed diagnosis of CM. PMID:27446330

  5. A Case of Healthcare Associated Pneumonia Caused by Chryseobacterium indologenes in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Nemli, Salih Atakan; Demirdal, Tuna; Ural, Serap

    2015-01-01

    Chryseobacterium indologenes is nonmotile, oxidase, and indole positive Gram-negative aerobic bacilli which is widely found in plants, soil, foodstuffs, and water. It can colonize hospital environment due to ability to survive in chlorine-treated water supplies. Chryseobacteria can also colonize patients via contaminated medical devices such as respirators, intubation tubes, humidifiers, intravascular catheters, and prosthetic valves. Immune suppression, comorbidities, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and extreme age are other important risk factors for Chryseobacterium infections. We report a case of an 82-year-old male admitted to our hospital with the complaint of altered mental status with history of trauma, and recent orthopedic and neurosurgery operations. He was transferred to neurosurgery intensive care unit due to respiratory failure. Urine culture yielded extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) (+). E. coli and C. indologenes were isolated from transtracheal aspirate. He was treated with ertapenem, and levofloxacin and discharged with full recovery. PMID:25628903

  6. A Case of Healthcare Associated Pneumonia Caused by Chryseobacterium indologenes in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nemli, Salih Atakan; Demirdal, Tuna; Ural, Serap

    2015-01-01

    Chryseobacterium indologenes is nonmotile, oxidase, and indole positive Gram-negative aerobic bacilli which is widely found in plants, soil, foodstuffs, and water. It can colonize hospital environment due to ability to survive in chlorine-treated water supplies. Chryseobacteria can also colonize patients via contaminated medical devices such as respirators, intubation tubes, humidifiers, intravascular catheters, and prosthetic valves. Immune suppression, comorbidities, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and extreme age are other important risk factors for Chryseobacterium infections. We report a case of an 82-year-old male admitted to our hospital with the complaint of altered mental status with history of trauma, and recent orthopedic and neurosurgery operations. He was transferred to neurosurgery intensive care unit due to respiratory failure. Urine culture yielded extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) (+). E. coli and C. indologenes were isolated from transtracheal aspirate. He was treated with ertapenem, and levofloxacin and discharged with full recovery. PMID:25628903

  7. Melioidosis as a cause of acute abdomen in immuno-competent male from eastern India.

    PubMed

    Karuna, Tadepalli; Khadanga, Sagar; Dugar, Dharmendra; Sau, Biyanka; Bhoi, Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Though melioidosis is rare in India, it has gained importance as one of the most potent emerging infections. In India, the cases have been under-reported because of the lack of awareness. The majority of cases present with multifocal pyogenic infections with septicemia. We present an unusual case of melioidosis presenting as acute intestinal perforation. The organism was ceftazidime resistant, and we successfully treated the case with imipenem and doxycyclin. This case highlights ruling out the possibility of melioidosis in acute abdomen and existence of ceftazidime resistant cases in India. PMID:25949062

  8. Melioidosis as a Cause of Acute Abdomen in Immuno-Competent Male from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Karuna, Tadepalli; Khadanga, Sagar; Dugar, Dharmendra; Sau, Biyanka; Bhoi, Priyadarshini

    2015-01-01

    Though melioidosis is rare in India, it has gained importance as one of the most potent emerging infections. In India, the cases have been under-reported because of the lack of awareness. The majority of cases present with multifocal pyogenic infections with septicemia. We present an unusual case of melioidosis presenting as acute intestinal perforation. The organism was ceftazidime resistant, and we successfully treated the case with imipenem and doxycyclin. This case highlights ruling out the possibility of melioidosis in acute abdomen and existence of ceftazidime resistant cases in India. PMID:25949062

  9. Onycholysis and Chromonychia: A Case Caused by Trichosporon inkin

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Springall, María Fernanda; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts cause only 5-10% of onychomycosis; the most common yeast is Candida albicans, and rarely Trichosporon spp. is found. Recently, it has become an important cause of fungemia with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. Superficial infections caused by Trichosporon spp., including piedra and onychomycosis, occur in immunocompetent patients. Herein, we report a case of a fungal nail infection characterized by onycholysis and chromonychia caused by Trichosporon inkin. PMID:27171745

  10. Onycholysis and Chromonychia: A Case Caused by Trichosporon inkin.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Springall, María Fernanda; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Yeasts cause only 5-10% of onychomycosis; the most common yeast is Candida albicans, and rarely Trichosporon spp. is found. Recently, it has become an important cause of fungemia with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. Superficial infections caused by Trichosporon spp., including piedra and onychomycosis, occur in immunocompetent patients. Herein, we report a case of a fungal nail infection characterized by onycholysis and chromonychia caused by Trichosporon inkin. PMID:27171745

  11. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma in an Immunocompetent 71-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Claudia; Loiacono, Ferdinando; De Cobelli, Francesco; Foppoli, Marco; Margonato, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Isolated cardiac lymphomas are very rare, especially in immunocompetent patients. As a consequence, little is known about the best therapeutic management and about patients' outcomes in these cases. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most frequent subtype; anthracycline-based chemotherapy has been the most successful treatment. We describe the case of a primary cardiac lymphoma in an immunocompetent 71-year-old man. As of December 2015, the patient had been in clinical remission for 2 years. The most relevant literature on primary cardiac lymphoma is reported and discussed. PMID:26664312

  12. Quantitative Analysis of α-L-Iduronidase Expression in Immunocompetent Mice Treated with the Sleeping Beauty Transposon System

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L.; Hall, Bryan C.; Bell, Jason B.; McIvor, R. Scott; Hackett, Perry B.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon system, a non-viral, integrating vector that can deliver the alpha-L-iduronidase-encoding gene, is efficient in correcting mucopolysaccharidosis type I in NOD/SCID mice. However, in previous studies we failed to attain reliable long-term alpha-L-iduronidase expression in immunocompetent mice. Here, we focused on achieving sustained high-level expression in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. In our standard liver-directed treatment we hydrodynamically infuse mice with plasmids containing a SB transposon-encoding human alpha-L-iduronidase, along with a source of SB transposase. We sought to 1) minimize expression of the therapeutic enzyme in antigen-presenting cells, while avoiding promoter shutdown and gender bias, 2) increase transposition efficiency and 3) improve immunosuppression. By using a liver-specific promoter to drive IDUA expression, the SB100X hyperactive transposase and transient cyclophosphamide immunosuppression we achieved therapeutic-level (>100 wild-type) stabilized expression for 1 year in 50% of C57BL/6 mice. To gain insights into the causes of variability in transgene expression, we quantified the rates of alpha-L-iduronidase activity decay vis-a-vis transposition and transgene maintenance using the data obtained in this and previous studies. Our analyses showed that immune responses are the most important variable to control in order to prevent loss of transgene expression. Cumulatively, our results allow transition to pre-clinical studies of SB-mediated alpha-L-iduronidase expression and correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type I in animal models. PMID:24205141

  13. Case report: Infrapatellar bursitis caused by Prototheca wickerhamii

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Dorien; de Haan, Roel; Van der Werff ten Bosch, Jutte; Van Hecke, Wim; Symoens, Françoise; Van den Borre, Ina; Allard, Sabine; De Bel, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old immunocompetent man presented with an infrapatellar bursitis caused by Prototheca wickerhamii. Because of clinical and microbiological relapse two weeks after bursectomy, six weekly injections of 5 mg of conventional amphotericin B were chosen for intrabursal treatment. Four months after completion of the treatment, the patient remains cured. PMID:24371726

  14. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice - A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 106, 1 x 104, 1 x 102 and 4 x 100 spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 106, 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species. PMID:26890814

  15. Delta-24-RGD Oncolytic Adenovirus Elicits Anti-Glioma Immunity in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Ruisaard, Kathryn E.; Fan, Xuejun; Tian, Weihua; Gumin, Joy; Lamfers, Martine L.; Kleijn, Anne; Lang, Frederick F.; Yung, Wai-Kwan Alfred; Vence, Luis M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests anti-cancer immunity is involved in the therapeutic effect induced by oncolytic viruses. Here we investigate the effect of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus on innate and adaptive anti-glioma immunity. Design Mouse GL261-glioma model was set up in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mouse for Delta-24-RGD treatment. The changes of the immune cell populations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. The anti-glioma immunity was evaluated with functional study of the splenocytes isolated from the mice. The efficacy of the virotherapy was assessed with animal survival analysis. The direct effect of the virus on the tumor-associated antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells was analyzed with an in vitro ovalbumin (OVA) modeling system. Results Delta-24-RGD induced cytotoxic effect in mouse glioma cells. Viral treatment in GL261-glioma bearing mice caused infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells, instigating a Th1 immunity at the tumor site which resulted in specific anti-glioma immunity, shrunken tumor and prolonged animal survival. Importantly, viral infection and IFNγ increased the presentation of OVA antigen in OVA-expressing cells to CD8+ T-cell hybridoma B3Z cells, which is blocked by brefeldin A and proteasome inhibitors, indicating the activity is through the biosynthesis and proteasome pathway. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Delta-24-RGD induces anti-glioma immunity and offers the first evidence that viral infection directly enhances presentation of tumor-associated antigens to immune cells. PMID:24827739

  16. Reduced Immunocompetent B Cells and Increased Secondary Infection in Elderly Patients With Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Kametani, Yoshie; Komori, Yukako; Chiba, Sayuri; Sato, Takehito; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocyte exhaustion was recently recognized as a mechanism of immunosuppression in sepsis. While B cells are known to play pivotal roles in bacterial infection and sepsis, changes in B-cell-mediated humoral immunity have not been evaluated in critically ill septic patients. We aimed to investigate changes in humoral immunity caused by defective B-cell function during severe sepsis. Thirty-three severe sepsis patients and 44 healthy subjects were prospectively enrolled. Blood was collected from patients within 72 h of and 8 to 11 h after sepsis onset to measure B-cell subtypes, serum immunoglobulin M concentration, and CpG-B oligodeoxynucleotide-induced immunoglobulin M (IgM) production ex vivo. Participants were divided into two age groups: adults (18-64 years) and elderly (≥65 years). The fraction of CD21 exhausted B cells in acute sepsis patients (3.18%) was higher than that observed in healthy donors (0.77%, respectively, P <0.01). Significantly, serum IgM in elderly septic patients (≥65 years) was negatively correlated with acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (r = -0.57, P <0.05). Consistently, in B cells stimulated ex vivo, both aging and sepsis induced significant reductions in supernatant IgM (P <0.01). This finding was clinically relevant, as elderly patients with decreased IgM production might be more susceptible to infection by Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Reduced immunocompetent B cells may be related to increased secondary infection after sepsis, especially in the elderly. Finally, impaired humoral immunity with increased CD21 exhausted B cells and insufficient immunoglobulin M production may be a critical immunological change in sepsis. PMID:27172158

  17. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or become violent. An older child may use drugs or alcohol, try to run away or abuse others. Child abuse is a serious problem. If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, call the police or your local child welfare agency.

  18. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Due to Rhodococcus equi in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Napoleão, Fátima; Vieira Damasco, Paulo; Ferreira Camello, Thereza Cristina; Damasceno do Vale, Márcio; Braga de Andrade, Arnaldo Feitosa; Hirata, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2005-01-01

    A case of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent individual was successfully treated by combining surgery and antibiotics. The R. equi-targeted antimicrobial agents erythromycin and rifampin were used only after surgical resection of the lesion and identification of the infective organism. PMID:15695730

  19. Colonic involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis of an immunocompetent adult: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histoplasmosis is a common opportunistic fungal infection that is observed almost exclusively in immunodeficient patients, especially those with AIDS. Immunocompetent individuals that suffer from histoplasmosis are rarely reported, especially those with disseminated lesions, such as disseminated histoplasmosis. The observation of disseminated histoplasmosis with prominent gastrointestinal involvement, no respiratory symptoms (which is presumed to be the portal of infection), gastrointestinal pathological changes, and minor digestive system disorders make this case study exceedingly rare. Case presentation We report the case of a 33-year-old immunocompetent male who presented with fever and weight loss. Based on investigations, the patient showed pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone marrow involvement and marked colonic involvement. Finally, disseminated histoplasmosis was diagnosed and confirmed by stained smears of fine needle aspirates and biopsy from lesions in the bone marrow and colon. The patient showed appreciable regression of lesions following prompt treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate, and was treated thereafter with oral itraconazole following discharge from hospital. Conclusion Disseminated histoplasmosis could be underestimated in immunocompetent patients. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, regardless of pulmonary symptoms, and whether in endemic or non-endemic areas. Early and accurate diagnosis is extremely important for the appropriate treatment of infection and to improve disease outcome. PMID:23514617

  20. Clinical Presentation of Herpes Zoster in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hospitalized Children Treated With Acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, Ernest; Szenborn, Leszek; Lis, Izabela; Jaroszewska, Anna; Czeladzka, Justyna

    2016-07-01

    Herpes zoster, defined as the reactivation of a latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, used to be a serious disease in immunocompromised children until recently. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation of herpes zoster in hospitalized immunocompromised children compared with hospitalized immunocompetent counterparts. We reviewed the hospital charts of 72 children aged 6 months to 18 years diagnosed with herpes zoster and treated with acyclovir in our department covering a 19-year period. Forty-six of the children were immunocompromised which was mainly due to hematologic diseases. There were no differences in the age at which herpes zoster occurred, length of hospitalization, and the location or extent of the skin eruption. General symptoms were observed more frequently in the hospitalized immunocompetent patients compared with the hospitalized immunocompromised children (80% vs. 56%). The average age at which primary VZV infection occurred was higher among the immunocompromised children than the immunocompetent children with the latter group suffering from significantly more primary VZV infections during infancy. The presentation of herpes zoster in immunocompromised children is similar to that of herpes zoster in hospitalized immunocompetent children. PMID:27347778

  1. Anaplasmataceae-Specific PCR for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Guidance for Symptomatic Neoehrlichiosis in Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Julia; Mitteregger, Dieter; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Ramharter, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Neoehrlichia is increasingly being recognized worldwide as a tickborne pathogen. We report a case of symptomatic neoehrlichiosis in an immunocompetent Austria resident who had recently returned from travel in Tanzania. The use of Anaplasmataceae-specific PCR to determine the duration of antimicrobial therapy seems reasonable to avert recrudescence. PMID:26811875

  2. Engraftment of Human Glioblastoma Cells in Immunocompetent Rats through Acquired Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Huszthy, Peter C.; Sakariassen, Per Ø.; Espedal, Heidi; Brokstad, Karl A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Miletic, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of glioblastoma patient biopsy spheroids to the brain of T cell-compromised Rowett (nude) rats has been established as a representative animal model for human GBMs, with a tumor take rate close to 100%. In immunocompetent littermates however, primary human GBM tissue is invariably rejected. Here we show that after repeated passaging cycles in nude rats, human GBM spheroids are enabled to grow in the brain of immunocompetent rats. In case of engraftment, xenografts in immunocompetent rats grow progressively and host leukocytes fail to enter the tumor bed, similar to what is seen in nude animals. In contrast, rejection is associated with massive infiltration of the tumor bed by leukocytes, predominantly ED1+ microglia/macrophages, CD4+ T helper cells and CD8+ effector cells, and correlates with elevated serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-18 and TNF-α. We observed that in nude rat brains, an adaptation to the host occurs after several in vivo passaging cycles, characterized by striking attenuation of microglial infiltration. Furthermore, tumor-derived chemokines that promote leukocyte migration and their entry into the CNS such as CXCL-10 and CXCL-12 are down-regulated, and the levels of TGF-β2 increase. We propose that through serial in vivo passaging in nude rats, human GBM cells learn to avoid and or/ suppress host immunity. Such adapted GBM cells are in turn able to engraft in immunocompetent rats without signs of an inflammatory response. PMID:26291724

  3. Anaplasmataceae-Specific PCR for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Guidance for Symptomatic Neoehrlichiosis in Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Schwameis, Michael; Auer, Julia; Mitteregger, Dieter; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Ramharter, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-02-01

    Candidatus Neoehrlichia is increasingly being recognized worldwide as a tickborne pathogen. We report a case of symptomatic neoehrlichiosis in an immunocompetent Austria resident who had recently returned from travel in Tanzania. The use of Anaplasmataceae-specific PCR to determine the duration of antimicrobial therapy seems reasonable to avert recrudescence. PMID:26811875

  4. Plasmablastic lymphoma exclusively involving bones mimicking osteosarcoma in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Azmal Kabir; Im, Hyung-Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been known that plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a neoplasm of immunocompromised patients occurring in soft tissue of oral cavity or in the vicinity whereas bone is an unlikely site to harbor PBL. However, its occurrence is increasingly being reported in immunocompetent individuals in either osseous or extra-oral sites. To our best knowledge, F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of PBL involving bones in an immunocompetent patient have not been reported, yet . Case summary: We report a case of PBL involving multiple bones in an immunocompetent patient. Features of different imaging modalities including F-18 Fluoro-deoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were correlated well as findings of osteosarcoma in mandible with metastatic lesions. However, the histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of bone tissues from 2 separate biopsy sites revealed features of PBL. Conclusion: awareness to F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of PBL involving bones in an immunocompetent patient may prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:27428232

  5. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection. PMID:23427437

  6. Immunocompetence of breeding females is sensitive to cortisol levels but not to communal rearing in the degu (Octodon degus).

    PubMed

    Ebensperger, Luis A; León, Cecilia; Ramírez-Estrada, Juan; Abades, Sebastian; Hayes, Loren D; Nova, Esteban; Salazar, Fabián; Bhattacharjee, Joydeep; Becker, María Inés

    2015-03-01

    One hypothesis largely examined in social insects is that cooperation in the context of breeding benefits individuals through decreasing the burden of immunocompetence and provide passive immunity through social contact. Similarly, communal rearing in social mammals may benefit adult female members of social groups by reducing the cost of immunocompetence, and through the transfer of immunological compounds during allonursing. Yet, these benefits may come at a cost to breeders in terms of a need to increase investment in individual immunocompetence. We examined how these potential immunocompetence costs and benefits relate to reproductive success and survival in a natural population of the communally rearing rodent, Octodon degus. We related immunocompetence (based on ratios of white blood cell counts, total and specific immunoglobulins of G isotype titers) and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGC) levels of adults immunized with hemocyanin from the mollusk Concholepas concholepas to measures of sociality (group size) and communal rearing (number of breeding females). Offspring immunocompetence was quantified based on circulating levels of the same immune parameters. Neither female nor offspring immunocompetence was influenced by communal rearing or sociality. These findings did not support that communal rearing and sociality enhance the ability of females to respond to immunological challenges during lactation, or contribute to enhance offspring condition (based on immunocompetence) or early survival (i.e., to 3months of age). Instead, levels of humoral and cellular components of immunocompetence were associated with variation in glucorcorticoid levels of females. We hypothesize that this covariation is driven by physiological (life-history) adjustments needed to sustain breeding. PMID:25497887

  7. Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... go to the caregiver's home. Finally, there are child care centers. You need to choose the one that works for your family. It is important to get to know your child's caregivers. They will be a big part of ...

  8. Child Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. ... same sex. Peer approval becomes very important. Your child may try new behaviors to be part of " ...

  9. First autologous cell therapy of cerebral palsy caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in a child after cardiac arrest-individual treatment with cord blood.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hamelmann, E

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage. PMID:23762741

  10. Management of granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in immunocompetent adult patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Jonathan Richard; Waqar, Mueez; Cooke, Richard P D; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis, is an infrequent, opportunistic infection of the central nervous system that accounts for 5-10% of all intracranial fungal pathology. It is uncommon in immunocompetent patients and has a significant disease burden, with high morbidity and mortality, even with appropriate treatment. Basic principles of abscess management should be employed, including aspiration and targeted anti-fungal therapy for 12-18 months. However, reported outcomes with a purely minimally invasive approach are poor and there should be a low threshold for surgical excision, especially in resource poor settings and in patients with deteriorating neurology harbouring sizeable masses. Evidence favouring gross total excision over subtotal resection is lacking, however. It is notable that these recommendations are largely based on retrospective case series and isolated case reports. There is a need therefore for international collaboration to evaluate management strategies for immunocompetent patients with cerebral aspergillosis. PMID:26853515

  11. Cytomegalovirus reactivation in critically ill immunocompetent hosts: A decade of progress and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charles H.; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an undisputed pathogen in humans with severe immunocompromise that has historically been thought to carry little consequence in immunecompetent hosts. During the past decade, however, accumulating data suggest that significant numbers of immunocompetent humans reactivate HCMV during critical illness, and that these reactivation episodes are associated with worsened outcomes. Because most people are infected with this ubiquitous virus by adulthood, confirming pathogenicity has now become a clinical priority. In this article, we will review the incidence and implications of reactivation, the relevant immune responses and reactivation triggers relevant to the immunocompetent host. We will summarize the progress made during the past ten years, outline work ongoing in this field, and identify the major gaps remaining in our emerging understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:21439328

  12. Disseminated cryptococcosis presenting as mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Masahide; Saka, Hideo; Kajikawa, Shigehisa; Murakami, Ayuka; Ishida, Akane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We herein report a rare case of disseminated cryptococcosis presenting as mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy in a young immunocompetent man. A previously healthy 26‐year‐old man presented with persistent headache and nonproductive cough. Chest computed tomography indicated mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. Cryptococcal lymphadenitis and meningitis was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound‐guided transbronchial needle aspiration and central spinal fluid examination, respectively. He received liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine followed by fluconazole and finally improved. PMID:27512567

  13. Aspergillus pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis in an immunocompetent individual: A diagnostic conundrum with therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Balan Louis; Agarwal, Ritesh; Gupta, Kirti; Shivaprakash, M R

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus tracheobronchitis is an extremely uncommon manifestation of Aspergillus infection. Most of the cases described in the literature are in the immunosuppressed individuals and is almost uniformly fatal. Immunocompetent individuals do manifest the disease, but the disease if diagnosed early can be appropriately treated and thus can be life-saving. Here, we describe a similar case which was diagnosed only at autopsy. PMID:27625454

  14. Cystoisospora belli Infection of the Gallbladder in Immunocompetent Patients: A Clinicopathologic Review of 18 Cases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keith K; Goyne, Hannah E; Hernandez-Gonzalo, David; Miller, Kennon A; Tuohy, Marion; Procop, Gary W; Lamps, Laura W; Patil, Deepa T

    2016-08-01

    Cystoisospora belli, previously known as Isospora belli, is an obligate intracellular coccidian parasite that is most often associated with gastrointestinal disease in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we detail the clinicopathologic features of 18 cases of Cystoisospora infection affecting the gallbladder in immunocompetent individuals and compare them with a control group. Each case was reviewed for cholecystitis (none, acute, chronic), epithelial disarray, presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes (none, rare [≤5 per 20 epithelial cells], present [>5 per 20 epithelial cells]), architectural distortion, intramucosal eosinophilia, and mural thickening/serositis. The mean age of patients with Cystoisospora infection was 33 years and the male to female ratio 1:4.3. Cholecystectomy was performed for biliary dyskinesia (n=7), abdominal pain (n=7), suspected cholelithiasis (n=5), and cholecystitis (n=3). In 2 cases, Cystoisospora was found in donor gallbladders resected at the time of liver transplantation. Each case was characterized by eosinophilic, oval or banana-shaped intraepithelial parasites within perinuclear parasitophorous vacuoles. Most cases showed epithelial disarray and minimal intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Of the 11 cases with an average follow-up of 15 months, none had evidence of disease related to Cystoisospora infection within the biliary tract or elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We present the largest series of gallbladder cystoisosporiasis in immunocompetent patients to date. Cystoisospora infection is underrecognized in the gallbladders of immunocompetent patients, in part due to the subtle findings in routine cholecystectomy specimens. On the basis of the clinical follow-up, gallbladder cystoisosporiasis in immunocompetent individuals appears to be a self-limited infection. PMID:27158759

  15. Ganciclovir therapy for cytomegalovirus-associated liver disease in immunocompetent or immunocompromised children.

    PubMed

    Nigro, G; Krzysztofiak, A; Bartmann, U; Clerico, A; Properzi, E; Valia, S; Castello, M

    1997-01-01

    Ganciclovir therapy was given intravenously to 20 children with cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated liver disease, of whom 6 were immunocompetent and 14 were immunocompromised (9 had AIDS and 5 had solid tumors). Immunocompetent children had isolated liver disease diagnosed at birth (4 children), or systemic congenital CMV infection including liver disease (2 children). Ganciclovir was used following two regimens: A) 5 mg/kg twice daily for 8 to 86 days (mean 21); B) 7.5 mg/kg twice daily for 14 days followed by 10 mg/kg three times weekly for three months. CMV infection was diagnosed by viral isolation, detection of viral antigens, and/or CMV DNA from blood and urine. All immunocompetent children had negative CMV culture and CMV DNA detection from blood and/or urine after 14 weeks of treatment. However, the three children who were treated with regimen B showed normal ALT levels at the end of the maintenance course, whereas the children who received ganciclovir with regimen A had normal ALT levels only after about 1 year. All children with tumors initiated regimen B, but only three, who had negative CMV detection and markedly decreased ALT levels, received full treatment; of the remaining two children, one recovered after only an initial course, and the other had therapy interrupted because of hepatic failure and died 9 days later. In contrast, the children with AIDS received several ganciclovir courses for different periods at the lower dosage: they generally improved during treatment but did not recover completely, and five children died with active CMV infections. Based on our study, CMV-associated liver disease can be efficiently treated with ganciclovir both in immunocompetent and immunodeficient children. However, a single ganciclovir course including a higher dosage and prolonged therapy appeared to be more effective than several courses with lower dosages. PMID:9349303

  16. [Cerebral trunk abscess due to Neisseria meningitidis in a 28-year-old immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Faisant, C; Cochin, J P; Rapoport, N; Evreux, F; Vaschalde, Y

    2012-03-01

    Meningococcal disease can manifest in very different clinical situations. Meningococcal meningitis and fulminant meningococcemia (or purpura fulminans) are the most common forms of these infections, but many other manifestations can be seen including septic arthritis, pericarditis, pleurisy and conjunctivitis. Brain abscesses have also been described; they are a rare complication of meningococcal disease. We report the case of a 28-year-old immunocompetent patient who developed meningococcal infection associated with brain abscesses and oligo-arthritis. PMID:22284670

  17. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  18. Aspergillus pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis in an immunocompetent individual: A diagnostic conundrum with therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Balan Louis; Agarwal, Ritesh; Gupta, Kirti; Shivaprakash, M R

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus tracheobronchitis is an extremely uncommon manifestation of Aspergillus infection. Most of the cases described in the literature are in the immunosuppressed individuals and is almost uniformly fatal. Immunocompetent individuals do manifest the disease, but the disease if diagnosed early can be appropriately treated and thus can be life-saving. Here, we describe a similar case which was diagnosed only at autopsy. PMID:27625454

  19. Development of an orthotopic model of invasive pancreatic cancer in an immunocompetent murine host

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, William W.; Winer, Daniel; Kenkel, Justin A.; Choi, Okmi; Shain, Alan H.; Pollack, Jonathan R.; French, Randy; Lowy, Andrew M.; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The most common preclinical models of pancreatic adenocarcinoma utilize human cells or tissues that are xenografted into immunodeficient hosts. Several immunocompetent, genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer exist; however, tumor latency and disease progression in these models are highly variable. We sought to develop an immunocompetent, orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer with rapid and predictable growth kinetics. Experimental Design Cell lines with epithelial morphology were derived from liver metastases obtained from KrasG12D/+;LSL-Trp53R172H/+;Pdx-1-Cre mice. Tumor cells were implanted in the pancreas of immunocompetent, histocompatible B6/129 mice, and the mice were monitored for disease progression. Relevant tissues were harvested for histological, genomic and immunophenotypic analysis. Results All mice developed pancreatic tumors by 2 weeks. Invasive disease and liver metastases were noted by 6-8 weeks. Histological examination of tumors demonstrated cytokeratin-19-positive adenocarcinoma with regions of desmoplasia. Genomic analysis revealed broad chromosomal changes along with focal gains and losses. Pancreatic tumors were infiltrated with dendritic cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages and T lymphocytes. Survival was decreased in RAG-/- mice, which are deficient in T cells, suggesting that an adaptive immune response alters the course of disease in wild-type mice. Conclusions We have developed a rapid, predictable orthotopic model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in immunocompetent mice that mimics human pancreatic cancer with regard to genetic mutations, histological appearance and pattern of disease progression. This model highlights both the complexity and relevance of the immune response to invasive pancreatic cancer and may be useful for the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutic agents. PMID:20534740

  20. Disseminated cryptococcosis presenting as mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yasushi; Oki, Masahide; Saka, Hideo; Kajikawa, Shigehisa; Murakami, Ayuka; Ishida, Akane

    2016-07-01

    We herein report a rare case of disseminated cryptococcosis presenting as mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy in a young immunocompetent man. A previously healthy 26-year-old man presented with persistent headache and nonproductive cough. Chest computed tomography indicated mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. Cryptococcal lymphadenitis and meningitis was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and central spinal fluid examination, respectively. He received liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine followed by fluconazole and finally improved. PMID:27512567

  1. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis associated with ocular lesion in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Karina Bittencourt; Landeiro, Luana Gomes; Diniz, Lucia Martins; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old female patient, previously healthy, immunocompetent, presented left bulbar conjunctiva lesions and nodular-ulcerated lesions on the arms and cervical region, besides left cervical and retroauricular lymphadenopathy. She had previous contact with domestic cats that excoriated her face. The diagnosis was conclusive of disseminated sporotrichosis through clinical and epidemiological history and cultures of skin and ocular secretions. It evolved with good response to oral antifungal therapy. PMID:27579758

  2. A Novel Mutation Causing 17-β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 3 Deficiency in an Omani Child: First Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sinani, Aisha; Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah S.; Al-Kindi, Manal; Al-Kusaibi, Ghariba; Al-Azkawi, Hanan; Nahavandi, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    This is the first case report in Oman and the Gulf region of a 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (17-β-HSD3) deficiency with a novel mutation in the HSD17B3 gene that has not been previously described in the medical literature. An Omani child was diagnosed with 17-β-HSD3 deficiency and was followed up for 11 years at the Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic, Royal Hospital, Oman. He presented at the age of six weeks with ambiguous genitalia, stretched penile and bilateral undescended testes. Ultrasound showed no evidence of any uterine or ovarian structures with oval shaped solid structures in both inguinal regions that were confirmed by histology to be testicular tissues with immature seminiferous tubules only. The diagnosis was made by demonstrating low serum testosterone and high androstenedione, estrone, and androstenedione:testosterone ratio. Karyotyping confirmed 46,XY and the infant was raised as male. Testosterone injections (25mg once monthly) were given at two and six months and then three months before his surgeries at five and seven years of age when he underwent multiple operations for orchidopexy and hypospadias correction. At the age of 10 years he developed bilateral gynecomastia (stage 4). Laboratory investigations showed raised follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, androstenedione, and estrone with low-normal testosterone and low androstendiol glucurunide. Testosterone injections (50mg once monthly for six months) were given that resulted in significant reduction in his gynecomastia. Molecular analysis revealed a previously unreported homozygous variant in exon eight of the HSD17B3 gene (NM_000197.1:c.576G>A.Trp192*). This variant creates a premature stop codon, which is very likely to result in a truncated protein or loss of protein production. This is the first report in the medical literature of this novel HSD17B3 gene mutation. A literature review was conducted to identify the previous studies related to this disorder. PMID

  3. Detection and molecular characterization of multiple strains of Picobirnavirus causing mixed infection in a diarrhoeic child: Emergence of prototype Genogroup II-like strain in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Nagashima, Shigeo; Ghosh, Souvik; Nataraju, Seegekote M; Rajendran, Krishnan; Manna, Byomkesh; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Niyogi, Swapan K; Kanungo, Suman; Sur, Dipika; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Krishnan, Triveni

    2011-01-01

    Background: Picobirnaviruses (PBVs) associated with viral gastroenteritis were reported from humans and several animal species to date. PBVs belonging to family Picobirnaviridae under proposed order Diplornavirales are small, non-enveloped, with bisegmented dsRNA genome. Methods: PBV was detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver staining. Confirmatory RT-PCR using primer pair PicoB25 (+) and PicoB43 (-) for genogroup I PBV and PicoB23(+) and PicoB24(-) for genogroup II PBV, resulted in amplicons of 201bp and 369bp respectively. The amplicons of genogroup I PBV were cloned and sequenced; amplicon of genogroup II PBV was directly sequenced. Further, the phylogenetic relationship and genetic diversity of strains from Kolkata was compared with hitherto reported PBV strains. Results: In PAGE, a faecal specimen showed three sets of PBV with large profile bisegmented genomic RNA with slight variation in migration pattern. Molecular cloning experiments confirmed that PBV/ Human/INDIA/GPBV6/2007 had mixed infection comprising four different strains of PBV genogroup I [GPBV6C1P-GPBV6C4P] and one PBV genogroup II strain [GPBV6G2P]. Conclusion: Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of gene segment 2 of GPBV6 clones (C1, C2, C3 and C4) revealed low nucleotide identities (59-63%) and distant genetic relatedness to other human and porcine genogroup I picobirnaviruses. The strain GPBV6G2P represents another PBV genogroup II strain after prototype strain 4-GA-91/USA as genogroup II PBVs have seldom been reported to date, except from Kolkata, India and Netherlands. We are reporting the first incidence of detection of multiple strain (mixed) infection of picobirnavirus [genogroups I and II] from a diarrhoeic child in a slum community of Kolkata, India. PMID:21537403

  4. A Letter to the Parent(s) of a Child with Developmental Apraxia of Speech. Part II: The Nature and Causes of DAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Penelope K.

    2000-01-01

    One of a series of letters to parents of children with developmental apraxia of speech (DAS), this letter discusses issues and current thinking about the nature and causes of the disorder. These include the idea that DAS is a disorder of overall language development or that DAS is a problem of the "motor-programming" system for speech. An…

  5. Acute Cytomegalovirus Infection as a Cause of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Francesca; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Mojoli, Francesco; Baldanti, Fausto; Brunetti, Enrico; Pascarella, Michela; Giordani, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Acute Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is an unusual cause of venous thromboembolism, a potentially life-threatening condition. Thrombus formation can occur at the onset of the disease or later during the recovery and may also occur in the absence of acute HCMV hepatitis. It is likely due to both vascular endothelium damage caused by HCMV and impairment of the clotting balance caused by the virus itself. Here we report on two immunocompetent women with splanchnic thrombosis that occurred during the course of acute HCMV infection. Although the prevalence of venous thrombosis in patients with acute HCMV infection is unknown, physicians should be aware of its occurrence, particularly in immunocompetent patients presenting with fever and unexplained abdominal pain. PMID:24959338

  6. The relation between child death and child maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, C; Isaac, R

    2006-01-01

    The death of a child is a sentinel event in a community, and a defining marker of a society's policies of safety and health. Child death as a result of abuse and neglect is a tragic outcome that occurs in all nations of the world. The true incidence of fatal child abuse and neglect is unknown. The most accurate incidence data of such deaths have been obtained from countries where multi‐agency death review teams analyse the causes of child fatalities, as is done in the United States and Australia. PMID:16492892

  7. Sustained Viremia and High Viral Load in Respiratory Tract Secretions Are Predictors for Death in Immunocompetent Adults with Adenovirus Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Yu, Xiaomin; Li, Hui; Cao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The predictors for fatal adenovirus (AdV) pneumonia among immunocompetent adults are unclear. Laboratory-confirmed, hospitalized AdV pneumonia adults were prospectively enrolled in Beijing Chao-Yang hospital from March to June 2013. Clinical data and serial whole blood and respiratory tract secretions from such patients were collected. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the viral load. A total of 14 AdV pneumonia cases were consecutively enrolled, and four of them were fatal. Ten cases were caused by AdV-55, three by AdV-7 and one by AdV-3. There were no differences in age, gender or underlying diseases between the patients in the fatal cases and surviving cases. At admission (on day 5–7 after illness onset), the patients in fatal cases presented higher initial viral loads in respiratory tract secretions (8.578 ± 2.115 vs 6.263 ± 1.225 Log10 copies/ml, p = 0.023). All patients in fatal cases presented with viremia on day 12–14 (100% vs 66.7%, p = 0.017). A higher initial viral load in the respiratory tract and sustained viremia (more than 2 weeks) may be predictors for fatal clinical outcomes. PMID:27532864

  8. Chronic bilateral hearing loss in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Asli G.; Nazliel, Bijen; Oner, Yusuf; Erdem, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Congenital, infectious, toxic, and demyelinating disorders are common etiological causes of deafness. Tuberculous meningitis, as one of the infectious causes, should be considered in the differential diagnosis since tuberculosis represents an endemic public health problem in developing countries. Multiple cranial nerve palsies can be expected due to basal meningitis; however, presentation with bilateral hearing loss is quite rare. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent mortality and residual neurologic deficits. The focus of this discussion is a 42-year-old female presenting with bilateral hearing loss and nonspecific complaints who was finally diagnosed with chronic tuberculous meningitis. We also demonstrate the characteristic radiological and histopathological findings. PMID:25274594

  9. Child Development

    MedlinePlus

    As children grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. Children grow and mature at very different rates. It's ...

  10. An Immunocompromised Child with Bloodstream Infection Caused by Two Escherichia coli Strains, One Harboring NDM-5 and the Other Harboring OXA-48-Like Carbapenemase.

    PubMed

    Hasassri, M Earth; Boyce, Thomas G; Norgan, Andrew; Cunningham, Scott A; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Weissman, Scott; Patel, Robin; Banerjee, Ritu; Pogue, Jason M; Kaye, Keith S

    2016-06-01

    We describe a 16-year-old neutropenic patient from the Middle East with bloodstream infection caused by two carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli isolates that we characterized by whole-genome sequencing. While one displayed meropenem resistance and was blaNDM positive, the other demonstrated meropenem susceptibility yet harbored blaOXA181 (which encodes a blaOXA48-like enzyme). This report highlights the challenge of laboratory detection of blaOXA48-like enzymes and the clinical implications of genotypic resistance detection in carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27217442

  11. The Child, The Family and Responsible Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This booklet presents evidence which links the effects of unplanned pregnancies on the health of the mother and child. The first section identifies the causes of high mortality and morbidity rates among children. Teenage child-bearing, child-bearing past the age of 35, family size and birth intervals are discussed. The second section presents…

  12. Child Deaths in New Jersey: Social Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Charles J.

    This report discusses trends in the causes of child deaths in New Jersey in recent years and closely examines child deaths in the state in 1974. Demographic data on child deaths are reported with an emphasis on types of deaths in which neglect or nonaccidental injury are likely to have been a factor. Death certificate data were obtained from the…

  13. Child Labor and School Attendance in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of child labor in the world and estimates show that it continues to grow. This paper examines the causes and magnitude of child labor in Kenya. Unlike previous studies that examined child labor as only an economic activity, this paper includes household chores. Including household chores is important…

  14. Myristoylation negative msbB-mutants of probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 retain tumor specific colonization properties but show less side effects in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Stritzker, Jochen; Hill, Philip J; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Szalay, Aladar A

    2010-01-01

    Specific colonization of solid tumors by bacteria opens the way to novel approaches in both tumor diagnosis and therapy. However, even non-pathogenic bacteria induce responses by the immune system, which could be devastating for a tumor bearing patient. As such effects are caused e.g., by the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, a msbB-mutant of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 strain was investigated. Bacteria of the mutant strain did not show any growth defects in culture media when compared to wild-type E. coli Nissle 1917 but were unable to myristoylate lipid A, had less toxic effects on immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and were still able to specifically colonize tumors. Therefore, the modification of lipid A could result in bacterial strains that might be better suited for diagnosis and therapy of tumors than the corresponding wild-type strains, even if those are not considered pathogenic or are of probiotic background. PMID:21326939

  15. Myristoylation negative msbB-mutants of probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 retain tumor specific colonization properties but show less side effects in immunocompetent mice

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Hill, Philip J; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2010-01-01

    Specific colonization of solid tumors by bacteria opens the way to novel approaches in both tumor diagnosis and therapy. However, even non-pathogenic bacteria induce responses by the immune system, which could be devastating for a tumor bearing patient. As such effects are caused e.g., by the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, a msbB-mutant of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 strain was investigated. Bacteria of the mutant strain did not show any growth defects in culture media when compared to wild-type E. coli Nissle 1917 but were unable to myristoylate lipid A, had less toxic effects on immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and were still able to specifically colonize tumors. Therefore, the modification of lipid A could result in bacterial strains that might be better suited for diagnosis and therapy of tumors than the corresponding wild-type strains, even if those are not considered pathogenic or are of probiotic background. PMID:21326939

  16. Report of an immunocompetent case with disseminated infection due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum: Identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Eren, Esma; Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Atalay, Altay; Demiraslan, Hayati; Parkan, Omur; Koc, Nedret

    2016-03-01

    Nocardia otitidiscaviarum belongs to the agents of opportunistic infections seen in immunocompromised patients, but may occur rarely in immunocompetent patients. In this report we described a case of a previously healthy 69-year-old woman with cerebral and retroperitoneal abscess due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum. The patient was admitted to hospital because of loss of strength in her right arm and leg. Nocardia spp. was isolated from the abscess material. The intracranial lesions were drained by stereotactic craniotomy. The large abscess located around the left kidney was drained and microscopic examination of aspirated material showed Nocardia spp. For species identification, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was carried out and was 100% concordant with Nocardia otitidiscaviarum. Use of 16S rDNA gene sequencing for identification permits detection of rare aetiologic agents that cause brain abscesses. PMID:27031902

  17. Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia after ESWL in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, M; Boel, A; Van Vaerenbergh, K; De Beenhouwer, H

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, especially in young and sexually active women. Presence in blood cultures is rare and often attributed to contamination. When bacteremia is significant, it occurs mostly in patients with hematologic malignancies and is predominantly catheter-related. However, we describe a case of significant bacteremia with S. saprophyticus associated with urinary tract infection after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of an ureterolithiasis in an otherwise healthy patient. PMID:25523318

  18. Rash - child under 2 years

    MedlinePlus

    ... you use? Do you put anything on the skin (creams, lotions, oils, perfumes)? Is your child taking any ... Microscopic examination of a sample of the affected skin Depending ... may prescribe a cream for diaper rash caused by yeast. If the ...

  19. Rash - child under 2 years

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the child at night to minimize scratching. Drying soaps and anything that has caused irritation in ... cream or ointment immediately after baths to avoid drying. Hot or long baths, or bubble baths, may ...

  20. Preventing Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvy, Kerby T.

    1975-01-01

    Focuses on two major and general approaches to analyzing the problems of child abuse; briefly discusses the prevention implications; deals with the individual physical abuse of children, with particular emphasis on the relationship between theoretical formulations of the causes of individual physical abuse and preventative programs; and, finally,…

  1. The Hyperactive Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1987-01-01

    The newsletter's main article focuses on hyperactivity and attention deficit disorder. The causes of hyperactivity, which affects 3-5 percent of all children, are elusive but may include neurological immaturity, inherent genetic problems, or fetal exposure to harmful substances. Patterns of behavior that typify a hyperactive child include a short…

  2. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  3. Everolimus for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma probably causing seizure aggravation in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Woerle, H; Strobl, K; Bast, T

    2014-04-01

    We are reporting on a 13.5-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) who was treated with everolimus because of giant cell astrocytoma and bilateral angiomyolipoma. She suffered from pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy with clusters of tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. Treatment with carbamazepine and sulthiame had led to a stable situation for more than 2.5 years. The dosage of everolimus had to be increased and refractory status epilepticus followed after 12 days. In the absence of any other possible cause, we believe that the status epilepticus was provoked by everolimus. So far, only a few cases of possible seizure aggravation by everolimus have been reported. The clinical relevance of possible negative effects in epileptic patients remains unclear. Similar observations should be documented and reported. PMID:24293099

  4. Disseminated varicella-zoster virus in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Petrun, Branden; Williams, Victoria; Brice, Sylvia

    2015-03-01

    Varicella-zoster is the virus that causes varicella (chicken pox), herpes zoster (shingles), and rarely, severe disseminated disease including diffuse rash, encephalitis, hepatitis, and pneumonitis. Disseminated disease is most often seen in immunocompromised patients. We describe a case of disseminated zoster in an immunocompentent patient who had previously been immune to VZV. This case is also unusual in that his clinical presentation was most consistent with varicella while his laboratory data was most consistent with herpes zoster. For the purpose of rapid diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy, clinicians should be aware of these more atypical presentations of VZV infection. PMID:25780980

  5. Colonic Spirochetosis in a 60-Year-Old Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Taiwo; Peng, Jennifer L.; Choi, Euna; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes, a genetically and morphologically distinct group of bacteria, are thin, spiral-shaped, and highly motile. They are known causes of several human diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever, and leptospirosis. We report a case of colonic spirochetosis in a healthy patient presenting for surveillance colonoscopy. The diagnosis of intestinal spirochetosis was made accidentally during the histological examination of colonic polyps, which were removed during colonoscopy. We also performed an extensive review on intestinal spirochetosis with a focus on clinical presentation and outcomes of reported cases from the past two decades. PMID:27570780

  6. Child Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadoon, Muna; Al-Sharbati, Marwan; Nour, Ibtisam El; Al-Said, Basma

    2012-01-01

    Child maltreatment (CM) is common worldwide, and can take many forms. It may even endanger the child’s life, especially when younger children are the victims. CM affects the child’s quality of life and consequently leads to long term issues to be dealt with by the child, family and community. This case series discusses six children who have been subjected to CM, and diagnosed by the child protection team of the departments of Child Health and Behavioural Medicine at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Oman. The aim of this case series is to increase the level of awareness of CM among Oman’s medical professionals and to highlight the difficulties encountered in diagnosing and providing optimal care for these children. Although treatment is provided in Oman’s health care system, it is clear that there are gaps in the existing system which affect the quality of child protection services provided to the children and their families. PMID:22375265

  7. Scoliosis surgery - child

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal curvature surgery - child; Kyphoscoliosis surgery - child; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - child; VATS - child ... Before surgery, your child will receive general anesthesia. This will make ... and unable to feel pain during the operation. During ...

  8. Gastrointestinal granuloma due to Candida albicans in an immunocompetent cat

    PubMed Central

    Duchaussoy, Anne-Claire; Rose, Annie; Talbot, Jessica J.; Barrs, Vanessa R.

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5 year-old cat was admitted to the University of Melbourne Veterinary Teaching Hospital for chronic vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a focal, circumferential thickening of the wall of the duodenum extending from the pylorus aborally for 3 cm, and an enlarged gastric lymph node. Cytology of fine-needle aspirates of the intestinal mass and lymph node revealed an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate and numerous extracellular septate acute angle branching fungal-type hyphae. Occasional hyphae had globose terminal ends, as well as round to oval blastospores and germ tubes. Candida albicans was cultured from a surgical biopsy of the duodenal mass. No underlying host immunodeficiencies were identified. Passage of an abrasive intestinal foreign body was suspected to have caused intestinal mucosal damage resulting in focal intestinal candidiasis. The cat was treated with a short course of oral itraconazole and all clinical signs resolved. PMID:26862475

  9. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  10. The visually impaired child.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lisa; Kaufman, Lawrence M

    2003-02-01

    This article discusses the causes of childhood blindness and how the primary care provider may begin the appropriate steps toward diagnosing and managing the visually impaired child. Community resources (see Box 3) and low-vision programs in schools should be used so that parents do not need to reinvent strategies to raise a blind child. Worldwide, childhood blindness, which places is a tremendous burden on families and communities of the third world, is mostly preventable with improved hygiene, diet, and immunization. PMID:12713115

  11. Externa otitis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma

    PubMed Central

    Neji, Sourour; Ines, Hadrich; Houaida, Trabelsi; Malek, Mnejja; Fatma, Cheikhrouhou; Hayet, Sellami; Fattouma, Makni; Mounôm, Ghorbel; Ali, Ayadi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of otomycosis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma in an immunocompetent 32 years old man who was suffering from hypoacusia and purulent otorrhea. Isolates were identified as Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria sp. on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Pseudallescheria apiosperma was correctly identified by PCR sequencing of ITS regions and β-tubulin gene. In this case the contamination could be due to intensive activity of gardening with poor hygiene. PMID:24432231

  12. Onychomycosis due to Cunninghamella bertholletiae in an Immunocompetent Male from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Tadepalli, Karuna; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Asati, Dinesh P.; Biswas, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails seen frequently in immune competent and immune compromised patients due to dermatophytes, Candida spp., Fusarium spp., Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Penicillium spp., and Aspergillus spp. We report a case of onychomycosis in a young immunocompetent male who presented onycholysis of a solitary nail without inflammation. The etiological agent was diagnosed to be Cunninghamella bertholletiae, a fungus pertaining to the order Mucorales (subdivision Mucoromycotina) and known for some of the invasive lesions among immunocompromised patients. This case demonstrates the association of onychomycosis with Cunninghamella bertholletiae in an immune competent individual, not reported so far. PMID:26640729

  13. CMV Colitis in Immunocompetent Patients: 2 Cases of a Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Paparoupa, Maria; Schmidt, Viola; Weckauf, Helgard; Ho, Huy; Schuppert, Frank

    2016-01-01

    CMV infections are generally thought to be opportunistic by immunosuppression. Many literature cases though indicate that CMV infections can be also observed in immunocompetent patients. We present an unusual case of an extensive concentric benign stenosis due to CMV colitis and a case of coexistence with Crohn's Disease, both observed in nonimmunosuppressed individuals. The right diagnosis was set after implementation of multiple unsuccessful treatment strategies. Our purpose is therefore to familiarize clinicians involved with the diagnosis and treatment of gastroenterological diseases with this entity. PMID:27190660

  14. Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis with Clinically Evident Splenomegaly in an Immunocompetent Host, First Case Reported in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Garrett R.; Libke, Robert D.; Billelo, John F.; Parks, Nancy A.; Pollard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the southwestern United States, Central and South America. We report a case of a previously healthy person who presented with respiratory failure and disseminated Coccidioidomycosis who eventually had a fatal outcome. Coccidioidomycosis, or “Valley Fever” has been called the “great imitator” (1) as it can have a wide variety of clinical presentations. This case is unique as it represents the first described case of an immunocompetent host with rapidly progressing, disseminated coccidioidomycosis with clinically apparent splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. PMID:21264046

  15. Mycobacterium avium lung disease combined with a bronchogenic cyst in an immunocompetent young adult.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Soo; Han, Joungho; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Je Hyeong; Koh, Won-Jung

    2013-01-01

    We report a very rare case of a bronchogenic cyst combined with nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in an immunocompetent patient. A 21-year-old male was referred to our institution because of a cough, fever, and worsening of abnormalities on his chest radiograph, despite anti-tuberculosis treatment. Computed tomography of the chest showed a large multi-cystic mass over the right-upper lobe. Pathological examination of the excised lobe showed a bronchogenic cyst combined with a destructive cavitary lesion with granulomatous inflammation. Microbiological culture of sputum and lung tissue yielded Mycobacterium avium. The patient was administered anti-mycobacterial treatment that included clarithromycin. PMID:23346002

  16. Pulmonary scedosporiosis mimicking aspergilloma in an immunocompetent host: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Fasih Ur; Irfan, Muhammad; Fasih, Naima; Jabeen, Kauser; Sharif, Hasanat

    2016-02-01

    A case of localized lung scedosporiosis is reported here that mimicked aspergilloma in an immunocompetent host. Through this case the importance of considering Scedosporium spp. in differential diagnosis of locally invasive lung infections and fungal ball is highlighted. As it is difficult to differentiate Scedosporium from Aspergillus on clinical grounds, microscopy, radiology and histopathology, this case is further emphasizing the significance of the definitive etiological characterization of Scedosporium through culture or molecular diagnostic tools. Accurate identification of Scedosporium, surgical resection and high-dose voriconazole has been associated with favorable outcome in most reported cases of scedosporiosis. PMID:26353885

  17. Immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhen-ge; Ren, Xiao-hua; Wang, Sha-sha; Liang, Xin-hua; Tang, Ya-ling

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models can closely mimic human oral squamous epithelial carcinogenesis, greatly expand the in vivo research possibilities, and play a critical role in the development of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. With the development of the recent research on the contribution of immunity/inflammation to cancer initiation and progression, mouse models have been divided into two categories, namely, immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models. And thus, this paper will review these two kinds of models applied in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to provide a platform to understand the complicated histological, molecular, and genetic changes of oral squamous epithelial tumorigenesis. PMID:26869799

  18. Herpes Zoster Duplex Bilateralis in Immuno-Competent Patients: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dalela, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Zoster is a common viral disorder, occurs due to reactivation of latent Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) usually in adults or elderly patients, usually confined to a single dermatome. Herpes zoster duplex is a rare but well established entity which is simultaneous, occurring of herpes zoster at two different non contiguous dermatomes, can be unilateralis or bilateralis. Here we are reporting two cases of herpes zoster duplex bilateralis, in case-1 lesions occurs in two different distant dermatomes while in case-2 it appeared in a single dermatome but both sides were involved. Both the patients were healthy immuno-competent male. PMID:26816979

  19. Severe Mycobacterium tuberculosis-related immune reconstitution syndrome in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Chandrasekharan, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    We present a young immunocompetent male with diagnosed sputum culture-positive tuberculosis on intensive phase with observed daily four-drug antituberculosis therapy. He presented at 1-month of treatment with sequential bilateral pneumothoraces, increase in cavitation and consolidation and respiratory failure. Repeat smears for acid-fast bacilli had downgraded, and cultures were negative. Quantiferon-GOLD (initially negative) was now strongly positive. A diagnosis of possible immune reconstitution syndrome was considered and 0.25 mg/kg/day oral steroids administered. We also discuss an approach to differential diagnosis of a patient worsening on treatment for microbiologically confirmed tuberculosis in this manuscript. PMID:25624652

  20. Severe Mycobacterium tuberculosis-related immune reconstitution syndrome in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Chandrasekharan, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    We present a young immunocompetent male with diagnosed sputum culture-positive tuberculosis on intensive phase with observed daily four-drug antituberculosis therapy. He presented at 1-month of treatment with sequential bilateral pneumothoraces, increase in cavitation and consolidation and respiratory failure. Repeat smears for acid-fast bacilli had downgraded, and cultures were negative. Quantiferon-GOLD (initially negative) was now strongly positive. A diagnosis of possible immune reconstitution syndrome was considered and 0.25 mg/kg/day oral steroids administered. We also discuss an approach to differential diagnosis of a patient worsening on treatment for microbiologically confirmed tuberculosis in this manuscript. PMID:25624652

  1. Aerosols transmit prions to immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Haybaeck, Johannes; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Klevenz, Britta; Schwarz, Petra; Margalith, Ilan; Bridel, Claire; Mertz, Kirsten; Zirdum, Elizabeta; Petsch, Benjamin; Fuchs, Thomas J; Stitz, Lothar; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    Prions, the agents causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, colonize the brain of hosts after oral, parenteral, intralingual, or even transdermal uptake. However, prions are not generally considered to be airborne. Here we report that inbred and crossbred wild-type mice, as well as tga20 transgenic mice overexpressing PrP(C), efficiently develop scrapie upon exposure to aerosolized prions. NSE-PrP transgenic mice, which express PrP(C) selectively in neurons, were also susceptible to airborne prions. Aerogenic infection occurred also in mice lacking B- and T-lymphocytes, NK-cells, follicular dendritic cells or complement components. Brains of diseased mice contained PrP(Sc) and transmitted scrapie when inoculated into further mice. We conclude that aerogenic exposure to prions is very efficacious and can lead to direct invasion of neural pathways without an obligatory replicative phase in lymphoid organs. This previously unappreciated risk for airborne prion transmission may warrant re-thinking on prion biosafety guidelines in research and diagnostic laboratories. PMID:21249178

  2. An immunocompetent patient with a vesicular rash and neurological symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chad J; Said, Sarmad; Teleb, Mohamed; Rosa, Paola; Didia, S Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Viral infection is the most common cause of aseptic meningitis with the most frequent virus associated with aseptic meningitis being enteroviruses (coxsackievirus and echovirus). In viral meningitis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shows a mild pleocytosis with a lymphocytic predominance, elevated protein, and normal glucose level. Nucleic acid amplification methods have greatly improved the detection of viral pathogens. In our case, a 47-year-old Caucasian female patient presented with a persistent throbbing headache for six days, localized at the frontal area, associated with photophobia, and exacerbated by bright lights and loud noises. Physical examination revealed nuchal rigidity and a vesicular rash at the right T4-T6 dermatome region. CSF findings were consistent with aseptic meningitis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive for VZV. Clinical improvement in meningeal signs and symptoms occurred after the initiation of acyclovir to complete a total 10-day course. There are no published data revealing that acyclovir will modify the course of VZV meningitis, but it is important to recognize the potential clinical benefit with the early initiation of antiviral therapy, especially if a zoster rash is discovered on examination. However, this is rarely the case because the majority of VZV meningitis will not present with a rash. Even though the reactivation of VZV is not usually associated with clinical meningitis, it is important to consider VZV in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting without a rash with CNS disease. PCR has been proven to be a useful and quick diagnostic tool in the early diagnosis of VZV-associated neurological disease. PMID:24367380

  3. Postoperative Abdominal Infection Caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Young; Lee, Woon Kee; Seo, Yiel-Hea

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum is a non-spore forming, gram-positive, aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacillus. It is the causative organism of erythrasma, a common superficial infection of skin, which typically presents as reddish-brown macular patches. To date, it has rarely been found to cause invasive disease, although other non-diphtheria corynebacteria are becoming increasingly common as opportunistic pathogens. We report on a rare case of abdominal infection due to C. minutissimum in an immunocompetent adult who was successfully treated with intravenous amoxicillin/sulbactam. PMID:25566407

  4. Postoperative Abdominal Infection Caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Young; Lee, Woon Kee; Seo, Yiel-Hea; Park, Yoon Soo

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum is a non-spore forming, gram-positive, aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacillus. It is the causative organism of erythrasma, a common superficial infection of skin, which typically presents as reddish-brown macular patches. To date, it has rarely been found to cause invasive disease, although other non-diphtheria corynebacteria are becoming increasingly common as opportunistic pathogens. We report on a rare case of abdominal infection due to C. minutissimum in an immunocompetent adult who was successfully treated with intravenous amoxicillin/sulbactam. PMID:25566407

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas caviae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Simit; Mukhopadhyay, Prabir; Chatterjee, Mitali; Bandyopadhyay, Manas K; Bandyopadhyay, Maitreyi; Ghosh, Tapashi; Samaddar, Debopriyo

    2012-01-01

    Aeromonads are rarely associated with human intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases and syndromes, ranging from relatively mild illnesses such as acute gastroenteritis to life-threatening conditions, including septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and myonecrosis. Among the aeromonas species known to cause human infection, Aeromonas caviae has been associated with septicemia and only one reported case of human soft tissue infection. Most of the infections due to aeromonas occur in immunocompromised patients. Herein we describe a successfully treated case of post-traumatic skin and soft-tissue infections due to A. caviae in an otherwise immunocompetent individual. PMID:23826556

  6. Protective Vaccination against Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Tumors under Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressive Conditions: A Preclinical Study Using a Natural Outbred Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Müller, Martin; Geissler, Edward K.; Nindl, Ingo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Certain cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are ubiquitous and acquired early during childhood, can cause a variety of skin tumors and are likely involved in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, the burden of these clinical manifestations demands for a prophylactic approach. To evaluate whether protective efficacy of a vaccine is potentially translatable to patients, we used the rodent Mastomys coucha that is naturally infected with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). This skin type papillomavirus induces not only benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas, thereby allowing a straightforward read-out for successful vaccination in a small immunocompetent laboratory animal. Here, we examined the efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine on either previously or newly established infections. VLPs raise a strong and long-lasting neutralizing antibody response that confers protection even under systemic long-term cyclosporine A treatment. Remarkably, the vaccine completely prevents the appearance of benign as well as malignant skin tumors. Protection involves the maintenance of a low viral load in the skin by an antibody-dependent prevention of virus spread. Our results provide first evidence that VLPs elicit an effective immune response in the skin under immunocompetent and immunosuppressed conditions in an outbred animal model, irrespective of the infection status at the time of vaccination. These findings provide the basis for the clinical development of potent vaccination strategies against cutaneous HPV infections and HPV-induced tumors, especially in patients awaiting organ transplantation. PMID:24586150

  7. Disobedient Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... friendless, or even suicidal If your family has developed a pattern of responding to disagreements with physical or emotional abuse If you or your spouse or child use alcohol or other drugs to feel better ...

  8. Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    Children's healthy development depends on safe and positive experiences when they are very young. If you work or go to school, you want to know that your child is in good hands while you are away. You may ...

  9. Report of Two Fatal Cases of Mycobacterium mucogenicum Central Nervous System Infection in Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Foucault, Cedric; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Neurological infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have rarely been reported. We recently investigated two unrelated immunocompetent patients, one with community-acquired lymphocytic meningitis and the other with cerebral thrombophlebitis. Mycobacterium mucogenicum was isolated in pure culture and detected by PCR sequencing of cerebrospinal fluid samples. Both patients eventually died. The two isolates exhibited an overlapping antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. They were susceptible in vitro to tetracyclines, macrolides, quinolones, amikacin, imipenem, cefoxitin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and resistant to ceftriaxone. They shared 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with M. mucogenicum ATCC 49650T over 1,482 bp. Their partial rpoB sequences shared 97.8% and 98.1% similarity with M. mucogenicum ATCC 49650T, suggesting that the two isolates were representative of two sequevars of M. mucogenicum species. This case report should make clinicians aware that M. mucogenicum, an RGM frequently isolated from tap water or from respiratory specimens and mostly without clinical significance, can even be encountered in the central nervous system of immunocompetent patients. PMID:16517863

  10. Gastritis as a manifestation of primary CMV infection in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Pedro; Dias, Nuno; Marques, Nuno; Saraiva da Cunha, José

    2015-01-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease spectrum is very wide, with symptomatic infections being rare in immunocompetent hosts. We present the case of a 31-year-old immunocompetent man diagnosed with CMV gastritis in the context of primary infection. The most important laboratory abnormalities leading to diagnosis were: elevation of liver enzymes (3-4× the upper limit of normal), thrombocytopenia (133 G/L), lymphocytosis (55%-4.2 G/L) with activated lymphocytes, CMV IgM positive (negative IgG), CMV viral load of 5700 copies/mL (real-time PCR); autoimmunity study showed antiparietal cell antibodies; abdominal ultrasonography detected homogenous splenomegaly (14.6×13.4 cm) and endoscopy unveiled superficial erosions of the gastric antrum that were biopsied. Anatomopathology and immunohistochemistry of the samples identified cytomegalic inclusions in endothelial cells. Cellular and humoral immunity deficits were excluded. As the patient developed severe asthaenia, adynamia and epigastric pain, he was administered gancyclovir 5 mg/kg intravenously twice daily for 7 days, with resolution of symptoms and gastric lesions confirmed by re-evaluation through endoscopy. PMID:26150611

  11. The neonicotinoids thiacloprid, imidacloprid, and clothianidin affect the immunocompetence of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annely; Gorenflo, Anna; Siede, Reinhold; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    A strong immune defense is vital for honey bee health and colony survival. This defense can be weakened by environmental factors that may render honey bees more vulnerable to parasites and pathogens. Honey bees are frequently exposed to neonicotinoid pesticides, which are being discussed as one of the stress factors that may lead to colony failure. We investigated the sublethal effects of the neonicotinoids thiacloprid, imidacloprid, and clothianidin on individual immunity, by studying three major aspects of immunocompetence in worker bees: total hemocyte number, encapsulation response, and antimicrobial activity of the hemolymph. In laboratory experiments, we found a strong impact of all three neonicotinoids. Thiacloprid (24h oral exposure, 200 μg/l or 2000 μg/l) and imidacloprid (1 μg/l or 10 μg/l) reduced hemocyte density, encapsulation response, and antimicrobial activity even at field realistic concentrations. Clothianidin had an effect on these immune parameters only at higher than field realistic concentrations (50-200 μg/l). These results suggest that neonicotinoids affect the individual immunocompetence of honey bees, possibly leading to an impaired disease resistance capacity. PMID:26776096

  12. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  13. [Investigation of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and colonization in iatrogenically immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Özkoç, Soykan; Bayram Delibaş, Songül

    2015-04-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a potentially life-threatening infection for the immunocompromized patients. However, Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization can also be detected in healthy individuals and in patients with various underlying lung diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunocompetent and iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients in terms of PCP and P.jirovecii colonization. A total of 92 patients (66 male, 26 female; age range: 18-93 years, median: 58.5) who underwent bronchoscopy due to various pulmonary symptoms between January 2011-April 2014, were included in the study. Of these patients, 65 were under immunosuppressive therapy (38 were treated with anti-cancer drugs, 15 with anti-rejection/immunomodulatory drugs and 12 with corticosteroids), while 27 were immunocompetent. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids were evaluated for the presence of P.jirovecii mitochondrial gene coding ribosomal large subunit (mtLSUrRNA) with nested PCR (nPCR) method. All of the samples were also examined by Giemsa and Gomori's methenamine silver (GMG) staining methods. P.jirovecii DNA was detected in 31 (33.7%) out of 92 BAL samples by nPCR. Although six immunosuppressed patients were positive in the first round of amplification, 26 of 65 (40%) immunosuppressed and five of 27 (18.5%) immunocompetent patients were positive with nPCR. P.jirovecii cysts and trophozoites were detected in only five (16.1%) of the 31 nPCR positive samples. The probability of being immunosuppressive among nPCR positive cases was statistically higher than nPCR negative cases (χ²= 3.940; p= 0.047). This difference was more significant in organ transplant recipients and patients under anti-rejection/immunomodulatory treatment (χ²= 6.715, p= 0.01; χ²= 5.550, p= 0.018, respectively). When clinical, laboratory and radiological findings of nPCR positive patients were considered, five patients (2 kidney transplant, 1 bone marrow transplant, 1 interstitial lung disease and 1 lung

  14. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice--A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-02-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4), 1 x 10(2) and 4 x 10(0) spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species. PMID:26890814

  15. Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Autoantibodies Are a Risk Factor for Central Nervous System Infection by Cryptococcus gattii in Otherwise Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saijo, Tomomi; Chen, Jianghan; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Yi, Jin; Sorrell, Tania C.; Bennett, John E.; Holland, Steven M.; Browne, Sarah K.; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcosis is caused by either Cryptococcus neoformans or C. gattii. While cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is caused mostly by C. neoformans in immunocompromised patients, the risk factors remain unclear for patients with no known immune defect. Recently, anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies were detected in the plasma of seven “immunocompetent” cryptococcosis patients, and the cryptococcal strains from these patients were reported as C. neoformans (three strains), C. gattii (one strain), and Cryptococcus (three strains not identified to the species level). We identified all three strains that had not been identified to the species level as C. gattii. Notably, the three strains that were reported as C. neoformans but were unavailable for species confirmation originated from Sothern California and Thailand where C. gattii is endemic. Most clinical laboratories designate C. neoformans without distinguishing between the two species; hence, these three strains could have been C. gattii. Since C. gattii infects more immunocompetent patients than C. neoformans, we pursued the possibility that this antibody may be more prevalent in patients infected with C. gattii than in those infected with C. neoformans. We screened the plasma of 20 healthy controls and 30 “immunocompetent” patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis from China and Australia (multiple ethnicities). Anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies were detected only in the plasma of seven patients infected by C. gattii and one healthy volunteer and in none infected by C. neoformans. While plasma from these C. gattii patients completely prevented GM-CSF-induced p-STAT5 in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), plasma from one healthy volunteer positive for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies caused only partial blockage. Our results suggest that anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies may predispose otherwise immunocompetent individuals to

  16. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject. PMID:15292826

  17. [The effect of in vitro X-irradiated blood transfusions on the morphostructure of immunocompetent organs and their nerve elements].

    PubMed

    Iulish, E I

    1991-01-01

    A study was made of changes that occur in the rat thymus, spleen, lymph nodes, their nerve elements, and spinal ganglia under the effect of the in vitro X-irradiated blood transfusions. Parallelism was noted in the activation of the immunocompetent organ morphostructures, the rate of reactive alterations in nerve elements, and the improvement of the immunity indices. PMID:1887004

  18. Dynamics of circulating gamma delta T cell activity in an immunocompetent mouse model of high-grade glioma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human gamma delta T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 m...

  19. Testosterone treatment is immunosuppressive in superb fairy-wrens, yet free-living males with high testosterone are more immunocompetent.

    PubMed

    Peters, A

    2000-05-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis proposes that the immunosuppressive effect of testosterone enforces honesty of sexual signalling via a physiological trade-off between signal intensity and immunocompetence. However, evidence that testosterone is immunosuppressive is scant, particularly in birds. I studied the correlation between immunocompetence and testosterone in superb fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus), a species with intense intersexual selection. Males are seasonally dichromatic and testosterone increases during the moult from dull brown eclipse plumage into bright nuptial plumage. I determined the primary antibody response to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in (i) control and testosterone-implanted males in captivity, and (ii) a cross-section of free-living males with basal and elevated testosterone (in eclipse plumage, moulting and in nuptial plumage). Experimental treatment with testosterone decreased the likelihood of an antibody response to SRBCs in captive birds. In contrast, free-living males which had acquired the nuptial plumage and had naturally elevated testosterone were more likely to respond to SRBCs than males in eclipse plumage with basal testosterone levels. The association between higher immunocompetence and higher immunosuppressive testosterone could arise if both are positively correlated with male phenotypic quality In addition, the association could result if males compensate for potential immunosuppression by enhancing their humoral immune responses, particularly since high testosterone is linked to other demanding activities such as moulting and courtship displays. PMID:10853730

  20. Cytomegalovirus Colitis and Subsequent New Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in an Immunocompetent Host: A Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tipu V.; Toms, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: CMV colitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • diarrhea • jaundice Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Flexible sigmoidoscopy • colonoscopy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Infection with gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus in an immunocompetent host is a rather rare occurrence in the literature. There are a few reports of gastrointestinal infection in the immunocompetent who are then subsequently given a new diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. It is speculated that the initial cytomegalovirus colitis infection triggers the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. Case Report: Herein we report a case of cytomegalovirus colitis and new diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease identified in a 40-year-old immunocompetent adult man who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection requiring anti-viral therapy, which successfully treated the episode of cytomegalovirus infection. He then went on to have persistent symptomatic inflammatory bowel disease confirmed by pathology. Conclusions: In this paper we will review the literature and explore the rare case of cytomegalovirus colitis in the immunocompetent host and discuss the pathology, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cytomegalovirus colitis. PMID:27460032

  1. Immediate Protein Dietary Effects on Movement and the Generalised Immunocompetence of Migrating Mormon Crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Mormon crickets form large migratory bands that march over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Immune defense is particularly relevant to survival in migratory bands, but little is known about the role of nutrition in insect immunocompetence. We hypothesized that imm...

  2. Brain abscess from a peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent child: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    A brain abscess is uncommon but potentially lethal. Common predisposing risk factors include congenital cyanotic heart disease, immunocompromised status, and the presence of septic foci. We describe a left frontal brain abscess accompanied by fever, headache, and weight loss for a 3-month period. The presumptive source of the brain abscess involved a left peritonsillar abscess. To the best of our knowledge, one similar case was reported in the literature in 1929. The specific signs of peritonsillar abscess in our patient included trismus, decreased phonation, and a muffled voice. The peritonsillar abscess was not clinically diagnosed, but incidentally detected on lower axial sections of cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Fever and trismus improved after surgical drainage of the peritonsillar abscess. The cerebral abscess was conservatively treated with intravenous antibiotics. The patient developed hydrocephalus as a sequela to the involvement of the basal meninges. PMID:23127268

  3. Scoliosis surgery - child

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal curvature surgery - child; Kyphoscoliosis surgery - child; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - child; VATS - child ... may also do the procedure using a special video camera. A surgical cut in the back is ...

  4. Your Child's Checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... Your Child's Checkup: 13 Years Your Child's Checkup: 14 Years Your Child's Checkup: 15 Years Your Child's ...

  5. A “Bone Marrow Score” for Predicting Hematological Disease in Immunocompetent Patients With Fevers of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ching-Fen; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Yang, Sheng-Hsiang; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Fung, Chang-Phone; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Delayed diagnosis of hematological malignancies in immunocompetent patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains an exhausting challenge for non-hematologist physicians. This retrospective cohort study aimed to establish a scoring system, “bone marrow (BM) score”, to identify FUO patients who require early bone marrow biopsy (BMB) to diagnose hematological disease. Two cohorts, comprising 85 (training) and 20 (validation) eligible immunocompetent patients, with FUOs diagnosed between January 1, 2006 and July 31, 2013, underwent BMBs and were enrolled in the study. Demographic, laboratory, imaging, diagnostic, and outcome data were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Factors associated with hematological etiologies diagnosed using BMBs in the training cohort were identified and scored according to the relative hazards. These were further validated using the validation cohort. For the training cohort, 29 of 85 (34.1%) patients had hematological etiologies diagnosed using BMB. Seven factors significantly predicted the diagnostic yield of hematological diseases in the BM and were scored, with the 6 points for leucoerythroblastic changes in peripheral blood smears, 5.5 for elevated ferritin level (>1000 ng/mL), 4 for splenomegaly, 2 for thrombocytopenia, 1.5 for each of elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels and anemia, and 1 for neutropenia. When the cut-off value of the scoring system was set to 6, its sensitivity and specificity to diagnose hematological diseases in the BM of immunocompetent FUO patients were 93% and 58%, respectively. For the validation cohort, 7 of 20 (35%) patients had hematological disease, and all had BM scores higher than the cut-off, with the sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 77%, respectively. As immunocompetent FUO patients with hematological disease have poor prognoses, the “BM score” is valuable for non-hematologist physicians to identify immunocompetent FUO patients requiring early BMB. PMID:25501092

  6. Effects of egg storage on hatchability, chick quality, performance and immunocompetence parameters of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Goliomytis, Michael; Tsipouzian, Theofania; Hager-Theodorides, Ariadne L

    2015-09-01

    Pre-incubation egg storage is a necessity for the poultry industry. This study evaluated the effects of pre-incubation storage length of broiler eggs on hatchability, 1-day-old chick quality, subsequent performance, and immunocompetence. To this end, a total of 360 hatching eggs were stored for 4, 12, or 16 d prior to incubation. Hatchability and chick quality were assessed at hatch, and growth performance and immunocompetence parameters were assessed during a 35 d rearing period. Hatchability of set and fertile eggs, and embryonic mortality, were not affected by egg storage. On the contrary, 1-day-old chick BW and length were linearly negatively correlated with egg storage length (P-linear<0.05). Nevertheless, BW corrected for egg weight prior to setting was unaffected, and corrected chick length was positively affected by storage length. One-day-old chick Tona score, navel quality, and post-hatch growth performance (BW at 7 and 35 d, cumulative feed intake, and feed conversion ratio at 35 d) were unaffected by egg storage (P, P-linear>0.05). Lymphoid organ weights at 2 and 35 d, the titre of maternal anti-NDV antibodies, most of the thymocyte subpopulations defined by CD3, CD4, and CD8 cell surface expression in the thymus of 2-d-old chicks, cellular responses to the PHA skin test, humoral responses to primary SRBC, and NDV immunizations were also not influenced by length of storage (P, P-linear>0.05). On the contrary, the length of egg storage was found to negatively influence the abundance of CD3+CD4-CD8- thymocytes that represent the majority of γδ-T cells in the thymus of 2-day-old chicks, as well as the humoral response to booster NDV immunization of the birds. In brief, pre-incubation storage of broiler hatching eggs for up to 16 d did not affect most developmental and growth parameters investigated, except for BW and length at hatch. Egg storage was found to suppress some aspects of the immunocompetence of the birds, particularly aspects of acquired

  7. Child Labor in Pakistan: A Study of the Lahore Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mian Aftab

    1991-01-01

    Child labor is exceptionally extensive in Pakistan. An interview survey in the Lahore area documented the magnitude, causes, and effects of child labor. Steps for fighting this problem are recommended. (BC)

  8. Disseminated Varicella-Zoster Virus After Vaccination in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Allison H; Hoss, Elika; Orenstein, Robert; Budavari, Adriane I

    2016-06-01

    Severe adverse events associated with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccination are rare. The authors describe a 53-year-old woman with no known immunodeficiency who presented with diffuse pruritic rash 17 days after receiving the varicella virus vaccine live. She had a low level of white blood cells and received a diagnosis of thrombocytopenia with elevated aminotransferase levels. Punch biopsy demonstrated positive VZV immunostaining and viral culture positive for VZV. After treatment with acyclovir, her rash improved and her white blood cell and platelet counts returned to normal. Mild reactions to vaccines including localized rash are well recognized. Disseminated infections have been reported in patients with congenital and acquired immunodeficiency, but systemic postvaccination infections are rare in immunocompetent adults. This case highlights the importance of recognizing adverse events associated with vaccination. PMID:27214778

  9. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells

    PubMed Central

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Crippa, Massimo P.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  10. Pneumocystis jiroveci Dihydropteroate Synthase Genotypes in Immunocompetent Infants and Immunosuppressed Adults, Amiens, France

    PubMed Central

    Totet, Anne; Latouche, Sophie; Lacube, Philippe; Pautard, Jean-Claude; Jounieaux, Vincent; Raccurt, Christian; Roux, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    To date, investigations of Pneumocystis jiroveci circulation in the human reservoir through the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus analysis have only been conducted by examining P. jirovecii isolates from immunosuppressed patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Our study identifies P. jirovecii genotypes at this locus in 33 immunocompetent infants colonized with P. jirovecii contemporaneously with a bronchiolitis episode and in 13 adults with PCP; both groups of patients were monitored in Amiens, France. The results have pointed out identical features of P. jirovecii DHPS genotypes in the two groups, suggesting that in these two groups, transmission cycles of P. jirovecii infections are linked. If these two groups represent sentinel populations for P. jirovecii infections, our results suggest that all persons parasitized by P. jirovecii, whatever their risk factor for infection and the form of parasitism they have, act as interwoven circulation networks of P. jirovecii. PMID:15200857

  11. Spontaneous Partial Vanishing Cytomegalovirus Pseudotumour of Colon in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dasar, Santosh K; Joshi, Shyamsundar K; Rao, Ravikala Vittal

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pseudotumour of the gastrointestinal tract, is a rare benign entity which is treated with antiviral medications and known to resolve spontaneously in a few cases. This is a case report of a 58-year-old man who presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography of abdomen and pelvis showed apple core lesion involving proximal transverse colon, ceacum, ascending colon, ileoceacal valve and terminal ileum. Synchronous carcinoma of colon was suspected. At laparotomy, there was growth palpable only in the proximal transverse colon. Histological findings of biopsy specimen revealed CMV pseudotumour. CMV pseudo tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of apple core lesions of the colon even in immunocompetent adults. Endoscopy and biopsy are strongly recommended before surgery in colonic mass lesions to make a definitive diagnosis and to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26436017

  12. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells.

    PubMed

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E; Crippa, Massimo P

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  13. Immunocompetence, developmental stability and wingspot size in the damselfly Calopteryx splendens L.

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M J; Koskimäki, J; Taskinen, J; Tynkkynen, K; Suhonen, J

    2000-01-01

    Calopteryx splendens males exhibit a remarkable variation in wing pigmentation both within and between populations. In this study, we examined whether the wingspots of male C. splendens are related to male quality. We measured the nylon implant encapsulation rate for 85 males and found that males with larger wingspots had a faster encapsulation rate, indicating a better immunocompetence. We also found that the encapsulation rate was positively correlated with the density of haemocytes in the haemolymph. Another measurement of male quality, fluctuating asymmetry of wingspots, correlated negatively with the size of the wingspots. Males with asymmetrical wingspots also had lower encapsulation rates than more symmetrical males. Our results suggest that the size of wingspot is an indicator of male quality in C. splendens. PMID:11133037

  14. Support for the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in the wild: hormonal manipulation decreases survival in sick damselflies.

    PubMed

    González-Tokman, Daniel M; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto; González-Santoyo, Isaac; Baena-Díaz, Fernanda S; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2012-10-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH) states that hormones enhance sexual trait expression but impair immunity. Previous tests of the ICHH have been hampered by experimental design problems. Here, we report on an experimental test of the ICHH that includes manipulations of both hormones and infections in males of the territorial damselfly, Hetaerina americana, with accurate survival measurements. We conducted a fully factorial experiment subjecting each individual to one of three topical treatments: methoprene (a juvenile hormone analog), acetone, or control, and one of three injection treatments: bacteria, PBS, or control. We measured survival of manipulated males in both the wild and in captivity. As predicted, survival was most heavily impaired in methoprene-bacteria males than in the other groups in the wild, and no survival differences emerged in captive animals. This result confirms that survival is one cost an animal pays for increased hormonal levels. This corroborates theoretical predictions of the ICHH. PMID:23025617

  15. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Criblez, Dominique H.; Dellon, Evan S.; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  16. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dorothee; Criblez, Dominique H; Dellon, Evan S; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  17. Reduced plant nutrition under elevated CO2 depresses the immunocompetence of cotton bollworm against its endoparasite

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Sun, Yucheng; Ge, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the immunocompetence of herbivore insects under elevated CO2 is an important step in understanding the effects of elevated CO2 on crop-herbivore-natural enemy interactions. Current study determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the immune response of Helicoverpa armigera against its parasitoid Microplitis mediator. H. armigera were reared in growth chambers with ambient or elevated CO2, and fed wheat grown in the concentration of CO2 corresponding to their treatment levels. Our results showed that elevated CO2 decreases the nutritional quality of wheat, and reduces the total hemocyte counts and impairs the capacity of hemocyte spreading of hemolymph of cotton bollworm larvae, fed wheat grown in the elevated CO2, against its parasitoid; however, this effect was insufficient to change the development and parasitism traits of M. mediator. Our results suggested that lower plant nutritional quality under elevated CO2 could decrease the immune response of herbivorous insects against their parasitoid natural enemies. PMID:24687002

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in immunocompetent hosts without radiation or chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Akanksha; Ring, Aaron M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Schnorr, Peter John; Gordon, Sydney; Le, Alan C; Kwon, Hye-Sook; Ring, Nan Guo; Volkmer, Jens; Ho, Po Yi; Tseng, Serena; Weissman, Irving L; Shizuru, Judith A

    2016-08-10

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation can cure diverse diseases of the blood system, including hematologic malignancies, anemias, and autoimmune disorders. However, patients must undergo toxic conditioning regimens that use chemotherapy and/or radiation to eliminate host HSCs and enable donor HSC engraftment. Previous studies have shown that anti-c-Kit monoclonal antibodies deplete HSCs from bone marrow niches, allowing donor HSC engraftment in immunodeficient mice. We show that host HSC clearance is dependent on Fc-mediated antibody effector functions, and enhancing effector activity through blockade of CD47, a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint, extends anti-c-Kit conditioning to fully immunocompetent mice. The combined treatment leads to elimination of >99% of host HSCs and robust multilineage blood reconstitution after HSC transplantation. This targeted conditioning regimen that uses only biologic agents has the potential to transform the practice of HSC transplantation and enable its use in a wider spectrum of patients. PMID:27510901

  19. Reduced plant nutrition under elevated CO2 depresses the immunocompetence of cotton bollworm against its endoparasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jin; Sun, Yucheng; Ge, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Estimating the immunocompetence of herbivore insects under elevated CO2 is an important step in understanding the effects of elevated CO2 on crop-herbivore-natural enemy interactions. Current study determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the immune response of Helicoverpa armigera against its parasitoid Microplitis mediator. H. armigera were reared in growth chambers with ambient or elevated CO2, and fed wheat grown in the concentration of CO2 corresponding to their treatment levels. Our results showed that elevated CO2 decreases the nutritional quality of wheat, and reduces the total hemocyte counts and impairs the capacity of hemocyte spreading of hemolymph of cotton bollworm larvae, fed wheat grown in the elevated CO2, against its parasitoid; however, this effect was insufficient to change the development and parasitism traits of M. mediator. Our results suggested that lower plant nutritional quality under elevated CO2 could decrease the immune response of herbivorous insects against their parasitoid natural enemies.

  20. [Change in phospholipid content in platelets, immunocompetent cells and myometrial tissue in patients with internal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Damirov, M M; Kulakov, V I; Sliusra', N N; Bakuleva, L P; Kargapolov, A V

    1994-01-01

    A method of flow horizontal chromatography has been developed permitting investigation of blood and tissue cellular phospholipids ruling out lipid peroxidation effects on cellular membranes. Phospholipid levels of blood and myometrial tissue cells were measured by this method in 67 patients with histologically verified internal endometriosis. Phospholipid and phosphatidyl inosite levels in platelets and immunocompetent cells of these patients reliably differed from those in healthy women. Phosphatidyl inosite levels of heterotopic endometrial tissue was increased by 1.4 times vs. the norm on an average. In parallel with this, a reliable change of phosphatidyl cholines and inosites levels in endometriosis foci were detected as against their levels in intact tissue. The authors suggest a method for the diagnosis of internal endometriosis by phosphatidyl inosite levels in blood lymphocytes. PMID:8209956

  1. Child Find

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This brochure describes "Child Find," a component of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth through 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.

  2. Child Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your child's plate fruits and vegetables Choose healthy sources of protein, such as lean meat, nuts, and eggs Serve whole-grain breads and cereals because they are high in fiber. Reduce refined grains. Broil, grill, or steam foods instead of frying them Limit fast food and ...

  3. Child CPR

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Child - CPR (1:11) QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms and Conditions All rights reserved. 2011 American National Red Cross.

  4. Improved local and systemic anti-tumor efficacy for irreversible electroporation in immunocompetent versus immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Neal, Robert E; Rossmeisl, John H; Robertson, John L; Arena, Christopher B; Davis, Erica M; Singh, Ravi N; Stallings, Jonathan; Davalos, Rafael V

    2013-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal focal ablation technique that uses a series of brief but intense electric pulses delivered into a targeted region of tissue, killing the cells by irrecoverably disrupting cellular membrane integrity. This study investigates if there is an improved local anti-tumor response in immunocompetent (IC) BALB/c versus immunodeficient (ID) nude mice, including the potential for a systemic protective effect against rechallenge. Subcutaneous murine renal carcinoma tumors were treated with an IRE pulsing protocol that used 60% of the predicted voltage required to invoke complete regressions in the ID mice. Tumors were followed for 34 days following treatment for 11 treated mice from each strain, and 7 controls from each strain. Mouse survival based on tumor burden and the progression-free disease period was substantially longer in the treated IC mice relative to the treated ID mice and sham controls for both strains. Treated IC mice were rechallenged with the same cell line 18 days after treatment, where growth of the second tumors was shown to be significantly reduced or prevented entirely. There was robust CD3+ cell infiltration in some treated BALB/C mice, with immunocytes focused at the transition between viable and dead tumor. There was no difference in the low immunocyte presence for untreated tumors, nude mice, and matrigel-only injections in both strains. These findings suggest IRE therapy may have greater therapeutic efficacy in immunocompetent patients than what has been suggested by immunodeficient models, and that IRE may invoke a systemic response beyond the targeted ablation region. PMID:23717630

  5. Improved Local and Systemic Anti-Tumor Efficacy for Irreversible Electroporation in Immunocompetent versus Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Robert E.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Arena, Christopher B.; Davis, Erica M.; Singh, Ravi N.; Stallings, Jonathan; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal focal ablation technique that uses a series of brief but intense electric pulses delivered into a targeted region of tissue, killing the cells by irrecoverably disrupting cellular membrane integrity. This study investigates if there is an improved local anti-tumor response in immunocompetent (IC) BALB/c versus immunodeficient (ID) nude mice, including the potential for a systemic protective effect against rechallenge. Subcutaneous murine renal carcinoma tumors were treated with an IRE pulsing protocol that used 60% of the predicted voltage required to invoke complete regressions in the ID mice. Tumors were followed for 34 days following treatment for 11 treated mice from each strain, and 7 controls from each strain. Mouse survival based on tumor burden and the progression-free disease period was substantially longer in the treated IC mice relative to the treated ID mice and sham controls for both strains. Treated IC mice were rechallenged with the same cell line 18 days after treatment, where growth of the second tumors was shown to be significantly reduced or prevented entirely. There was robust CD3+ cell infiltration in some treated BALB/C mice, with immunocytes focused at the transition between viable and dead tumor. There was no difference in the low immunocyte presence for untreated tumors, nude mice, and matrigel-only injections in both strains. These findings suggest IRE therapy may have greater therapeutic efficacy in immunocompetent patients than what has been suggested by immunodeficient models, and that IRE may invoke a systemic response beyond the targeted ablation region. PMID:23717630

  6. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells promote survival of fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yunchuan; Su, Linlin; Chang, Peng; Wang, Xujie; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Hu, Xiaolong; Hu, Dahai; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-05-01

    Autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can protect fat grafts in cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). However, diabetes alters the intrinsic properties of ADSCs and impairs their function so that they lack these protective effects. We investigate whether allogeneic ADSCs from healthy donors could protect fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats. Syngeniec adipose tissues and ADSCs were derived from diabetic Lewis (LEW) rats, whereas allogeneic ADSCs were from healthy brown-Norway rats. A grafted mixture containing 0.7 ml granule fat and 0.3 ml 6 × 10(6) allogeneic/syngeneic ADSCs was injected subcutaneously on the skulls of diabetic LEW rats. Fat samples were harvested to evaluate the levels of injury and vascularization as shown by perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The immune response was evaluated with a lymphocytotoxicity test and the CD4/CD8 ratio in peripheral blood at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was measured at 3 months. Healthy allogeneic ADSCs increased the expression levels of perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was improved by allogeneic ADSCs at 3 months. ADSCs were demonstrated to have low immunogenicity by the lymphocyte proliferation test and immunophenotype including MHC and co-stimulatory markers. The lymphocytotoxicity test and CD4/CD8 ratio indicated no obvious immune response elicited by allogeneic ADSCs. Thus, healthy allogeneic ADSCs can promote the survival of fat grafts in this immunocompetent diabetic rat model, with little or no obvious immune rejection. PMID:26662284

  7. Comparative Effects of Ibandronate and Paclitaxel on Immunocompetent Bone Metastasis Model

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kang, Ho Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bone metastasis invariably increases morbidity and mortality. This study compares the effects of ibandronate and paclitaxel on bone structure and its mechanical properties and biochemical turnover in resorption markers using an immunocompetent Walker 256-Sprague-Dawley model, which was subjected to tumor-induced osteolysis. Materials and Methods Seventy rats were divided equally into 4 groups: 1) sham group (SHAM), 2) tumor group (CANC), 3) ibandronate treated group (IBAN), and 4) paclitaxel treated group (PAC). Morphological indices [bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp)] and mechanical properties (failure load, stiffness) were evaluated after thirty days of treatment period. Bone resorption rate was analysed using serum deoxypyridinoline (Dpd) concentrations. Results Morphological indices showed that ibandronate (anti-resorptive drug) had a better effect in treating tumor-induced architectural changes in bone than paclitaxel (chemotherapeutic drug). The deterioration in bone architecture was reflected in the biomechanical properties of bone as studied with decreased failure load (Fx) and stiffness (S) of the bone on the 30th day post-surgery. Dpd concentrations were significantly lower in the IBAN group, indicating successful inhibition of bone resorption and destruction. Conclusion Ibandronate was found to be as effective as higher doses of paclitaxel in maintaining stiffness of bone. Paclitaxel treatment did not appear to inhibit osteoclast resorption, which is contrary to earlier in-vitro literature. Emphasis should be placed on the use of immunocompetent models for examining drug efficacy since it adequately reflects bone metastasis in clinical scenarios. PMID:26446649

  8. Child abuser stereotypes: consensus among clinicians.

    PubMed

    Krowchuk, H V

    1989-02-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of nurses' stereotypes of child abusers. Ninety-four registered nurses completed a questionnaire that measured subjects' knowledge of child abuse; professional contact with perpetrators and victims of abuse; knowledge of the causes of child abuse; and child abuser stereotypes. Results reveal a consensus among the subjects as to the stereotypes associated with child abusers. This study supports the notion that nurses stereotype individuals on the basis of demographic characteristics. This study also raises questions regarding the bias that may result from the use of child abuser stereotypes. Clinical decision-making processes could become compromised if biased judgements are used in planning nursing care for clients diagnosed as child abusers. PMID:2930179

  9. Behavioural consequences of child abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al Odhayani, Abdulaziz; Watson, William J.; Watson, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the consequences of abuse on childhood behavioural development, to highlight some behavioural clues that might alert physicians to ongoing child abuse, and to explore the specific role of the family physician in this clinical situation. Sources of information A systematic search was used to review relevant research, clinical review articles, and child protection agency websites. Main message A child’s behaviour is an outward manifestation of inner stability and security. It is a lens through which the family physician can observe the development of the child throughout his or her life. All types of abuse are damaging to children—physically, emotionally, and psychologically—and can cause long-term difficulties with behaviour and mental health development. Family physicians need to be aware of and alert to the indicators of child abuse and neglect so that appropriate interventions can be provided to improve outcomes for those children. Conclusion Child abuse might cause disordered psychological development and behaviour problems. Family physicians have an important role in recognizing behaviour clues that suggest child abuse and in providing help to protect children. PMID:23946022

  10. [Child marriage in India].

    PubMed

    Wen, J

    1984-07-29

    Child marriages have been practiced in India for thousands of years. Even though its popularity has now decreased due to changes in law and society, it is still a major problem, causing a great deal of hardship. Even though laws prohibited child marriage as early as 1860, statistics show that, on the average, Indians marry very young (1972: females at age 17; males at age 22 years of age; 34 females and 13 males under age 15). The following are incentives to marry young and have large families: 1) religion teaches that only those with descendants go to heaven; 2) unmarried women are traditionally scorned; and 3) most importantly, economic reasons encourage people to have large families as soon as possible, e.g., male children are encouraged to marry to obtain the dowry as soon as possible and children are considered a source of income in India. Child marriage in India causes the following problems: 1) a high infant mortality rate, as much as 75% in rural areas; 2) an imbalance in the male to female ratio (1901: 970 females/1000 males; 1971: 930 females/1000 males) because women who marry young tend to lose their health earlier; 3) a population explosion: in 1971, the Indian population was found to be increasing at the rate of 225/1000. PMID:12159404

  11. Child homicide spectrum.

    PubMed

    Jason, J

    1983-06-01

    Violence toward children is an acknowledged pediatric problem, but physicians may not be aware that it is a leading cause of pediatric mortality. Therefore, I used homicide data for persons younger than 18 years of age to characterize child homicide. There are two broad categories: The first predominates until the victim age of 3 years, is intrafamilial, and is associated with bodily force and poorly defined precipitating events. It might be described as fatal child abuse. The second type predominates after the victim age of 12 years, is extrafamilial, involves guns or knives, occurs during arguments or criminal acts by the offender, and may represent children unsupervised in an adult environment. Homicides that occur in children between 3 and 12 years of age are a mixture of these two types. PMID:6846292

  12. The Nature, Extent and Causes of Abuse of Children with Disabilities in Schools in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumba, Almon; Abosi, Okey C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that the exact number of children with disabilities in Botswana is unknown. A study on child abuse sought to determine: the forms of child abuse perpetrated on children with disabilities; the extent of child abuse; and the causes of child abuse of children with disabilities. A questionnaire on child abuse was adapted and used to…

  13. Intracranial inflammatory granuloma caused by toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Hua; Guo, Fu You; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serous parasitic zoonosis caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii worldwide. Human beings acquire the disease by eating infected meat containing T. gondii cysts, by ingesting water or vegetables contaminated with oocysts shed in the feces of an infected cat, and by transmission from mother to fetus. Cerebral toxoplasmosis is one of the most serious complications in immunocompromised individuals such as HIV-infected patients, with a high mortality rate, whereas the incidence of cerebral toxoplasmosis is extremely rare in immunocompetent persons. Due to the low incidence and the high rate of misdiagnosis, cerebral toxoplasmosis was occasionally described in sporadic cases. (1) Furthermore, the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis is rather difficult because the clinical manifestations are non-specific and are not sufficiently characteristic for a definite diagnosis. It mimics several other infectious diseases or primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor. (2) In the present study, we reported an exceedingly rare cerebral toxoplasmosis with obvious space-occupying lesion occurring in the left temporal lobe of an immunocompetent adult patient. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of acquired cerebral toxoplasmosis in China. PMID:25175876

  14. The Demise of Child-Rearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winik, Lyric Wallwork

    2000-01-01

    Discusses child rearing and parenting in the US, suggesting that children are becoming more and more unseen and unheard while their parents go off to be entertained. The paper examines root causes and revolutionary changes; Locke's 17th-century child rearing beliefs; Wesley's tough love philosophy; Rousseau's natural goodness beliefs; other…

  15. The Social Definition of Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberger, Sharon D.; Tennen, Howard A.

    The lack of uniform definition of child abuse has caused researchers and practitioners to center debate on whether abuse should be defined according to the characteristics of the parental act or its consequences to the child. To examine how the situational context and the characteristics of the individual applying the label of abuse affect…

  16. Essentials for Attorneys in Child Support Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Michael R.; And Others

    This handbook presents a course developed to provide a national perspective for attorneys who represent state and local child support enforcement agencies operating under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act. The introduction provides an overview of the child support problem in the United States, citing causes and effects of the problem and…

  17. The Principal's Role in Reporting Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Beth

    1991-01-01

    The role of the principal in identifying and reporting child abuse and neglect is discussed in this bulletin. Although all 50 states and the District of Columbia have laws that require educators to report cases in which they have knowledge or reasonable cause to suspect child abuse, passage of legislation does not always lead to compliance.…

  18. Acute Chiasmal Abscess Resulting from Perineural Extension of Invasive Sino-Orbital Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Leyngold, Ilya; Olivi, Alessandro; Ishii, Masaru; Blitz, Ari; Burger, Peter; Subramanian, Prem S.; Gallia, Gary

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intracranially invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis is a rare entity seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals. We report a unique case of an acute chiasmal abscess resulting from perineural extension of an indolent invasive sino-orbital aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient. CASE DESCRIPTION A 61-year-old healthy Ukrainian man presented with severe left retro-orbital pain and a gradual ipsilateral monocular vision loss with rapid progression to a contralateral temporal visual field cut. He was found to have an intracranially invasive sino-orbital Aspergillus fumigatus infection with perineural extension along the optic nerve complicated by an acute chiasmal abscess. RESULTS The patient was managed with surgical debridement and adjuvant antifungal chemotherapy. The patient’s life and vision were preserved. CONCLUSIONS The case demonstrates that it is possible to successfully control advanced intracranial aspergillosis with tissue-sparing surgery and adjuvant antifungal chemotherapy in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:23973515

  19. [The presence of mycobacteria in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from an immunocompetent patient does not necessarily imply tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, Frédéric; Marcq, Laurent; Novellas, Sébastien; Chyderiotis, Georges; Haudebourg, Juliette; Benchetrit, Maxime; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most frequently identified mycobacterium in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of immunocompetent patients. Lung infections due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rare in such patients and then often occur in the context of pre-existing chronic lung disease. We report the case of an immunocompetent 85-year-old woman without pre-existing lung disease in whom M. abscessus was recovered from BALF. Cytological examination of the BALF revealed an increased number of neutrophils and some acid-fast bacilli, all located within neutrophil cytoplasm. This case report contributes a cytological description of BALF in the context of M. abscessus infection, which is poorly detailed in the literature. PMID:20005441

  20. Foundations of Child Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Emanuel, Ed.; And Others

    Twenty-eight papers examine basic theories and clinical methods in child psychiatry. Theories and methods discussed concern child psychiatry and the World Health Organization, pediatrics, child disturbances, observation, the psychodiagnostic approach, longitudinal research in child development, the comparative approach to early child development,…

  1. Battered Child Syndrome; a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Arastoo; Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Fekri, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    One of the important and usual missed causes of pediatric traumas is child abuse. This ominous phenomenon, which can be presented physically, psychologically, sexually, and emotionally has grown significantly in recent years. Many children are not diagnosed in the early stages of evaluation. Battered Child Syndrome is used to describe the clinical condition of the child serious physical abuse by parents or caregivers. Medical staff should always keep the syndrome in their mind for those brought to the emergency department with trauma. In this report, we described a patient complained of dysphagia following a falling from a height and multiple epidural hematomas and final diagnosis of battered child syndrome. PMID:26495388

  2. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum

    PubMed Central

    Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and occasionally, liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects. PMID:25100894

  3. Innocent Victims: NCJW Manual on Child Abuse and Neglect Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Jewish Women, New York, NY.

    The manual was written by the National Council of Jewish Women to provide guidelines for volunteer legislative action and community service for individuals in the area of child abuse and neglect. After an overview which details some of the causes of child abuse, information on child abuse and neglect legislation in each state is presented.…

  4. The Individual Child. Caring for Children No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lois B.; Leeper, Ethel M.

    Discussed are ways to meet the needs of the individual preschool child within the child care center. Ways in which each child is unique are given to include type of personality rate of development, attitude toward the world, and coping method. Discussed are causes of individual differences including heredity and environment, prenatal and postnatal…

  5. Child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-04-01

    Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death of children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidence-based recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats for most infants up to 2 years of age; (2) forward-facing car safety seats for most children through 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats for most children through 8 years of age; and (4) lap-and-shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated with some decrease in protection; therefore, parents should be encouraged to delay these transitions for as long as possible. These recommendations are presented in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate implementation of the recommendations by pediatricians to their patients and families and should cover most situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges all pediatricians to know and promote these recommendations as part of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health-supervision visit. PMID:21422088

  6. Child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-04-01

    Despite significant reductions in the number of children killed in motor vehicle crashes over the past decade, crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for children 4 years and older. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics continues to recommend inclusion of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health-supervision visit. This technical report provides a summary of the evidence in support of 5 recommendations for best practices to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence that all pediatricians should know and promote in their routine practice. These recommendations are presented in the revised policy statement on child passenger safety in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate their implementation by pediatricians with their patients and families. The algorithm is designed to cover the majority of situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. In addition, a summary of evidence on a number of additional issues that affect the safety of children in motor vehicles, including the proper use and installation of child restraints, exposure to air bags, travel in pickup trucks, children left in or around vehicles, and the importance of restraint laws, is provided. Finally, this technical report provides pediatricians with a number of resources for additional information to use when providing anticipatory guidance to families. PMID:21422094

  7. Ileostomy and your child

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000069.htm Ileostomy and your child To use the sharing features on this page, ... health counselor may help you. Caring for Your Child's Ileostomy Your child will need help and support. ...

  8. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual abuse is one form of child abuse. It includes a wide range of actions between a child ... to children or pressuring them for sex is sexual abuse. Using a child for pornography is also sexual ...

  9. Child Care Aware

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connected With Enews Subscribe Child Care Aware® of America Overview Vision & Mission Audience Partners Child Care Providers ... Public Policy Agenda 2016-2017 Child Care in America: 2016 State Fact Sheets We Can Do Better – ...

  10. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000001.htm Asthma - child - discharge To use the sharing features on ... for your child. Take charge of your child's asthma at home Make sure you know the asthma ...

  11. Use of whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls.

    PubMed

    Redig, P T; Dunnette, J L; Sivanandan, V

    1984-11-01

    Mitogen-induced whole blood lymphocyte stimulation tests for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were developed. Combinations of incubation times, blood dilutions, concentrations of [3H]thymidine and [125I]2-deoxyuridine, antibiotics, phytohemagglutinin-P, and concanavalin A were tested for their effects on the stimulation index (SI). An antibiotic combination of gentamicin plus amphotericin B yielded low SI with lymphocytes from bald eagles, but not with lymphocytes from great horned owls or red-tailed hawks. Penicillin plus streptomycin caused no such depression of SI. Lymphocytes from all 3 species yielded maximum responses with a 48-hour prelabel and 12- to- 16 hour postlabel incubation period at 41 C and 1:20 blood dilution. Optimal mitogen concentrations for lymphocytes from bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls were 25 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of phytohemagglutinin-P/well, respectively, and 2.5 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of concanavalin A/well, respectively. Differences in SI were not seen between the 2 radioactive labels. The optimal concentration of the [3H]thymidine label ranged from 0.06 to 0.125 microCi/well. PMID:6524727

  12. Self-Medication and the Only Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Ronald L.; Lerner, Steven E.

    1972-01-01

    Study results reveal certain personal conflicts predisposing the use of tranquilizers, related to the family structure unique to the only child. Further research is required to substantiate these findings and related causes. (Author)

  13. Educators, Schools, and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhurst, Diane D.

    The booklet provides an overview on the school-related issues involved in child abuse and neglect. Definitions, causes, and effects of abuse and neglect are reviewed in the first chapter; guidelines for identifying physical and sexual abuse, neglect, and emotional maltreatment are offered in chapter 2. Aspects of reporting abuse are noted as are…

  14. Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... CHILD'S ACADEMIC SUCCESS Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series PDF (1 MB) For ... Acknowledgements Tips to Help Your Child through Early Adolescence No Child Left Behind < Previous page | ^ Top ^ | Next ...

  15. Pulmonary immune responses to Aspergillus fumigatus in an immunocompetent mouse model of repeated exposures.

    PubMed

    Buskirk, Amanda D; Templeton, Steven P; Nayak, Ajay P; Hettick, Justin M; Law, Brandon F; Green, Brett J; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a filamentous fungus that produces abundant pigmented conidia. Several fungal components have been identified as virulence factors, including melanin; however, the impact of these factors in a repeated exposure model resembling natural environmental exposures remains unknown. This study examined the role of fungal melanin in the stimulation of pulmonary immune responses using immunocompetent BALB/c mice in a multiple exposure model. It compared conidia from wild-type A. fumigatus to two melanin mutants of the same strain, Δarp2 (tan) or Δalb1 (white). Mass spectrometry-based analysis of conidial extracts demonstrated that there was little difference in the protein fingerprint profiles between the three strains. Field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the immunologically inert Rodlet A layer remained intact in melanin-deficient conidia. Thus, the primary difference between the strains was the extent of melanization. Histopathology indicated that each A. fumigatus strain induced lung inflammation, regardless of the extent of melanization. In mice exposed to Δalb1 conidia, an increase in airway eosinophils and a decrease in neutrophils and CD8(+) IL-17(+) (Tc17) cells were observed. Additionally, it was shown that melanin mutant conidia were more rapidly cleared from the lungs than wild-type conidia. These data suggest that the presence of fungal melanin may modulate the pulmonary immune response in a mouse model of repeated exposures to A. fumigatus conidia. PMID:23919459

  16. Evidence for the involvement of opioid neuropeptides in the adherence and migration of immunocompetent invertebrate hemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, G B; Leung, M K; Zhao, X H; Scharrer, B

    1989-01-01

    Evidence for the participation of opioid neuropeptides in immunoregulatory activities, especially cellular adherence and migration, has been obtained in representatives of two phyla of invertebrates, the mollusc Mytilus edulis and the insect Leucophaea maderae. The injection of a synthetic analog of [Met]enkephalin [( D-Ala2,Met5]enkephalinamide, DAMA; 10(-6) M) had a stimulatory, naloxone-reversible effect on the directed migration of immunocompetent hemocytes. Incubation of hemolymph in the presence of exogenous or endogenous opioid material significantly enhanced the adherence of hemocytes on albumin-coated slides as demonstrated by use of indirect Zeiss-Zonax reflectance computer analysis. Conversely, hemocyte adherence was markedly reduced by the addition of naloxone (10(-8) M) to the incubation medium, either alone or in combination with DAMA. The antagonistic effects of naloxone on the stimulatory activities of opioids indicate that, like those previously reported in mammals, they are receptor-mediated. The presence of an endogenous [Met]enkephalin-like material was demonstrated in cell-free hemolymph as well as sequestered hemocytes by use of high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. These results demonstrate that the capacity of immunocytes to release and respond to opioid neuropeptide messengers is not restricted to mammalian organisms but was developed early in the course of evolution. Images PMID:2536172

  17. Course of induced infection by Eimeria krijgsmannni in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuina; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Tsujio, Masashi; Mizuno, Masanobu; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Matsui, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the utility of Eimeria krijgsmanni as a novel mouse eimerian parasite for elucidating the biological diversity. The parasite showed notable infectivity to mice with various levels of immune status and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including coccidiostat. However, the detailed lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni had not yet been determined and this information was lacking in discussion of previous findings. In the present study, we clarified the morphological characteristics of E. krijgsmanni and its lifecycle in normal mice, and examined the effects in immunodeficient mice and lifecycle stage for challenge infections after the primary inoculation. In immunocompetent mice, the lifecycle consisted of four asexual stages and the sexual sages followed by formation of oocysts during the prepatent periods. Interestingly, the second-generation meronts were detected in all observation periods after the disappearance of the other stages. For the challenge infection of immunodeficient mice, all developmental stages except for the second generation meronts were temporarily vanished. This finding suggests a "rest" or marked delay in development and a "restart" of the promotion toward the next generations. The second generation meronts may play an important role in the lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni. PMID:26377842

  18. Allogeneic and Xenogeneic Transplantation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Immunocompetent Recipients Without Immunosuppressants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their immunomodulatory capabilities. In particular, their immunosuppressive property is believed to permit their allogeneic or even xenogeneic transplantation into immunocompetent recipients without the use of immunosuppressants. Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC), owing to its ease of isolation from an abundant tissue source, is a promising MSC for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. ADSC has been shown to lack major histocompatibility complex-II expression, and its immunosuppressive effects mediated by prostaglandin E2. Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of ADSCs was able to control graft-versus-host disease. In regard to xenotransplantation a total of 27 preclinical studies have been published, with 20 of them performed with the investigators' intent. All 27 studies used ADSCs isolated from humans, possibly due to the wide availability of lipoaspirates. On the other hand, the recipients were mouse in 13 studies, rat in 11, rabbit in 2, and dog in 1. The targeted diseases varied greatly but all showed significant improvements after ADSC xenotransplantation. For clinical application in human medicine, ADSC xenotransplantation offers no obvious advantage over autotransplantation. But in veterinary medicine, xenotransplantation with porcine ADSC is a practical alternative to the costly and inconvenient autotransplantation. PMID:22621212

  19. Clinical data analysis of 19 cases of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Mao-Mao; Pu, Zeng-Hui; Wang, Yun-Qiang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and imaging changes of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults. A retrospective study was performed on 19 adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia cases in Yantai, whereby the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Of 19 cases, 14 (73.68%) had fever and 17 (89.47%) had cough symptoms. Moreover, 14 cases (73.68%) had normal white blood cell counts, while 11 cases (57.89%) exhibited a reduction in lymphocyte proportion. Among the 19 cases, 17 cases exhibited lesions in a single lung, while 2 cases involved bilateral lungs. The lesions predominantly exhibited ground glass-like changes. The clinical manifestations of adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia patients with normal immune functions were mild, with such presenting symptoms as fever, cough, and sputum; most patients did not exhibit high levels of white blood cells or low lymphocyte counts, and the imaging features (ground glass-like effusion) were indicative of single-lung involvement. PMID:26770532

  20. Pulmonary immune responses to Aspergillus fumigatus in an immunocompetent mouse model of repeated exposures

    PubMed Central

    Buskirk, Amanda D.; Templeton, Steven P.; Nayak, Ajay P.; Hettick, Justin M.; Law, Brandon F.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a filamentous fungus that produces abundant pigmented conidia. Several fungal components have been identified as virulence factors, including melanin; however, the impact of these factors in a repeated exposure model resembling natural environmental exposures remains unknown. This study examined the role of fungal melanin in the stimulation of pulmonary immune responses using immunocompetent BALB/c mice in a multiple exposure model. It compared conidia from wild-type A. fumigatus to two melanin mutants of the same strain, Δarp2 (tan) or Δalb1 (white). Mass spectrometry-based analysis of conidial extracts demonstrated that there was little difference in the protein fingerprint profiles between the three strains. Field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the immunologically inert Rodlet A layer remained intact in melanin-deficient conidia. Thus, the primary difference between the strains was the extent of melanization. Histopathology indicated that each A. fumigatus strain induced lung inflammation, regardless of the extent of melanization. In mice exposed to Δalb1 conidia, an increase in airway eosinophils and a decrease in neutrophils and CD8+ IL-17+ (Tc17) cells were observed. Additionally, it was shown that melanin mutant conidia were more rapidly cleared from the lungs than wild-type conidia. These data suggest that the presence of fungal melanin may modulate the pulmonary immune response in a mouse model of repeated exposures to A. fumigatus conidia. PMID:23919459

  1. The distinct distributions of immunocompetent cells in rat dentin pulp after pulpotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nakatomi, Chihiro; Sugiyama, Goro; Matsuo, Kou; Jimi, Eijiro

    2015-04-01

    Pulpotomy involves the removal of the coronal portion of pulp, including the diseased tissue, with the intent of maintaining the vitality of the remaining pulpal tissue via a therapeutic dressing. Once odontoblasts suffer injuries, the differentiation of mesenchymal cells is induced from the precursor cell population in the dental pulp, and these cells are recruited to the injured site to differentiate into odontoblasts. However, the involvement of immunocompetent cells during pulpal regeneration remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of macrophages that infiltrated wound healing sites in rats between 1 and 28 days after pulpotomy (dap). During the inflammatory phase, ED1(+) (CD68(+) ) macrophages significantly increased throughout root pulp, especially apical to the demarcation zone, and this population persisted until 3 dap before decreasing gradually until 28 dap. OX6(+) macrophages expressing class II MHC also increased in the apical pulp at 1 dap and declined thereafter. However, OX6(+) cells appeared prior to dentin bridge formation at 3 dap and appeared again apical to the dentin bridge during the healing stage at 14 dap. The shift from ED1(+) cells in the inflammation phase to OX6(+) cells during dentin bridge formation might contribute to wound healing. PMID:25371095

  2. A Case of Nocardia farcinica Pneumonia and Mediastinitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyoung; Kang, Minkyu; Kim, Juri; Jung, Sohee; Park, Junhung; Lee, Dongkyu

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are aerobic, gram-positive pathogens found worldwide in soil. Nocardia is considered an opportunistic pathogen, and its infection mostly occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of Nocardia farcinica induced mediastinitis and pneumonia that occurred in a 64-year-old male patient who had no significant medical history except for hypertension. He visited another hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and left chest wall pain. The symptoms arose 7 days ago without any trauma and they worsened. A mediastinal mass was found on computed tomography scan. After being transferred to our hospital for further evaluation, he was diagnosed with mediastinitis and pneumonia. As N. farcinica was found to be the causative organism by 16S rRNA sequencing, proper antibiotic therapy including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was initiated immediately. After this, the patient improved and he was discharged. If an infection has a disseminating course, nocardiosis cannot be excluded even in immunocompetent patients. Once the diagnosis is established, prompt antibiotic therapy should be performed based on the severity. PMID:27066088

  3. Reduced immunocompetence of nestlings in replacement clutches of the European magpie (Pica pica)

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, G.; Soler, J. J.; Møller, A. P.

    1997-01-01

    Laying date is one of the most important determinants of reproductive success and recruitment probability in birds. Late breeders usually fledge fewer chicks than individuals with earlier breeding dates, and fledglings produced late in the season have high mortality rates. Food availability and nestling mass have been evoked as the principal mechanistic links between laying date and offspring survival. Here we suggest that another factor may actually account for the difference in survival rate between early and late offspring: immunocompetence. We predicted that nestlings produced later in the season or in replacement clutches should have lower immune responses when challenged with an antigen, than early nestlings or nestlings produced in first clutches. This hypothesis was tested in a population of magpies (Pica pica), in which we experimentally induced breeding failure in a group of nests and compared the immune response of nestlings in replacement clutches with the immune response of first clutch nestlings. Cellular immune response, as measured by wing web swelling (a correlate of T-lymphocyte production after injection of phytohaemagglutinin-P), significantly decreased with hatching date and was significantly lower in nestlings of replacement clutches. Furthermore, coefficients of intraclutch variation in immune response were higher in nestlings of replacement clutches. This experiment demonstrates an inverse relationship between immune responsiveness and breeding date, and reduced recruitment probability of late nestlings may be a direct consequence of their inability to cope with parasites.

  4. Co-infection of Scedosporium apiospermum and Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Seok; Choi, Misoo; Nam, Chan Hee; Kim, Jee Young; Hong, Seung Phil; Kim, Myung Hwa; Park, Byung Cheol

    2014-10-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with multiple, scaly, erythematous, grouped papules, nodules and plaques with tenderness ranging from the right forearm to hand dorsum and the right lower leg for 2-3 months. Five months prior to presentation, the patient had received an antibiotic skin test on his right forearm. Lesions appeared approximately 2-3 months after the antibiotic skin test, slowly progressing without clinical improvement. Culture for fungus on the right forearm revealed growth of Scedosporium apiospermum. The tissue acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture for the right forearm and right leg revealed growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria which was Mycobacterium chelonae, and subsequent tissue polymerase chain reaction of both sites reported positive signs of M. chelonae. On diastase periodic acid-Schiff stain of the biopsy specimen of the right forearm, fungal hyphae were found while rod-shaped bacilli could be seen in AFB stain for the biopsy specimen of the right leg. The patient was treated with oral clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin along with an oral antifungal agent for 13 weeks. After the treatment, the lesions subsided and left a scar. We report a rare case of co-infection of S. apiospermum and M. chelonae in an immunocompetent host. PMID:25228156

  5. Human herpesvirus 6-related fulminant myocarditis and hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yilan L; Parker, Mark E; Nuovo, Gerard; Miller, Joel B

    2009-05-01

    A 59-year-old previously healthy man had flulike symptoms of fever and diarrhea for a week, which worsened despite treatment with antibiotics. After admission, his medical condition rapidly deteriorated with renal failure, heart failure, and a marked increase of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. The patient died of a cardiac arrhythmia 3 days after the admission. The autopsy showed diffuse myocarditis with a granulocytic and monocytic infiltrate, necrotizing arteritis of the coronary arteries, and fulminant hepatitis, with microvesicular steatosis and necrosis. Cell-free serum showed high copies of human herpesvirus 6 B variant DNA by polymerase chain reaction. Human herpesvirus 6 B was identified in the heart, liver, lung, and spleen by immunohistochemistry. No parvovirus B19 was evident in the heart by immunohistochemistry. Human herpesvirus 6 is increasingly found in association with myocarditis in immunocompromised patients; however, histopathologic features and the clinical severity of this disease have not yet been clearly defined. Only 4 to 5 cases of human herpesvirus 6 fulminant myocarditis have been reported, all in young children or immunosuppressed patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the English literature of human herpesvirus 6 fulminant myocarditis and hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult with a fatal outcome. In addition, several pathologic features of our case have not been previously reported. PMID:19144379

  6. A Case of Nocardia farcinica Pneumonia and Mediastinitis in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyoung; Kang, Minkyu; Kim, Juri; Jung, Sohee; Park, Junhung; Lee, Dongkyu; Yoon, Heejung

    2016-04-01

    Nocardia species are aerobic, gram-positive pathogens found worldwide in soil. Nocardia is considered an opportunistic pathogen, and its infection mostly occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of Nocardia farcinica induced mediastinitis and pneumonia that occurred in a 64-year-old male patient who had no significant medical history except for hypertension. He visited another hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and left chest wall pain. The symptoms arose 7 days ago without any trauma and they worsened. A mediastinal mass was found on computed tomography scan. After being transferred to our hospital for further evaluation, he was diagnosed with mediastinitis and pneumonia. As N. farcinica was found to be the causative organism by 16S rRNA sequencing, proper antibiotic therapy including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was initiated immediately. After this, the patient improved and he was discharged. If an infection has a disseminating course, nocardiosis cannot be excluded even in immunocompetent patients. Once the diagnosis is established, prompt antibiotic therapy should be performed based on the severity. PMID:27066088

  7. Kinetics of some immunological and biochemical changes of immunocompetent cells during tumor growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Hrivnáková, A; Babusíková, O

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of lymphocyte response in peripheral blood, the tumor draining lymph node, spleen and thymus, was followed in a model system of syngeneically transplanted rat MC-1 tumor. Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of lymphoid cells was determined by the automatic mode of measurement. The results revealed a two-phase pattern of EPM changes during the course of cancer growth. The first phase (day 3 to 6 following intramuscular injection of tumor cells) was characterized by a prevalence of high-mobility cells, while in the second phase (day 14 to 20), depletion of high-mobility cells was compensated for by an increased number of low-mobility cells. The mean EPM value was found to be increased only in the thymus at that time. Changes in the adenosine deaminase activity proved to be most expressive in the tumor draining lymph node and in the second phase also in splenic and thymic lymphocytes. An increased percentage of active lymphocytes with compact nucleoli with nucleolonemas became evident already on the 3rd day in all the lymphoid organs followed. The response was two-phasic only in the lymphocyte population of the peripheral blood, while their percentage in the other organs remained higher even on day 20. Changes in the proportion of high- and low-mobility cells in the lymphoid organs followed here, in correlation with the adenosine deaminase activity and the percentage of active lymphocytes, were interpreted as a response of immunocompetent cells in animals with a growing tumor. PMID:3785465

  8. Mistletoe extract-induced effects on immunocompetent cells: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Stein, G M; Berg, P A

    1997-04-01

    Cytotoxic as well as immunomodulatory effects of mistletoe extracts and their components have been described and seem to depend upon the host tree, the manufacturing process and the composition of the different components present in the extracts. In vitro studies showed that a fermented mistletoe extract derived from Viscum album L. grown on pine trees was less cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) than other preparations. This finding could be related to its very low content of mistletoe lectins. Furthermore, this extract stimulated PBMC from healthy and especially allergic donors who had never received any mistletoe treatment. By analysing these in vitro reactions, an involvement of CD4+ T helper cells and CD14+ monocytes/macrophages was observed, suggesting an interaction of the specific and nonspecific immune system. In the supernatants of stimulated PBMC from healthy individuals, type-1 (interferon-gamma and interleukin-2) and type-2 (interleukin-4 and interleukin-5) associated cytokines were detected in about 20%. In patients with colorectal tumours, however, reduced frequency, suggesting a functional impairment of certain immunocompetent cells in these patients. These studies may help to evaluate properties of the natural and the specific immune system. PMID:9179366

  9. Immunodeficiency induced by child abuse.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Tanegashima, A; Yamamoto, H; Saijoh, K

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who died from sepsis from cellulitis of the neck caused by a right ear injury. The autopsy findings showed severe involution of the thymus and atrophy of lymphoid tissues. The impairment of T- and B-cell functions was demonstrated both histologically and immunohistologically. Thymic involution caused by child abuse might lead to secondary immunodeficiency. PMID:15335522

  10. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  11. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  12. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  13. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  14. Child Welfare Workers, Police, and Child Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shireman, Joan; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Uses three different samples of child abuse and neglect complaints drawn from the files of a juvenile court, a child welfare agency, and a police department, to investigate the factors which contribute to the decision to remove a child from his/her family. (Author/CM)

  15. Child Abuse: Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy L.-Y.

    The purpose of this paper was to elaborate on the definitions of child abuse in order to improve the understanding of child abuse. The definitions given by the U.S. House Joint Committee on Child Abuse in the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and in research by Holden (1984), are cited. These definitions refer to the nature of abusive acts…

  16. Child Support Report, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 12 monthly issues of the 1998 "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Editorials and information on events and conferences of interest and…

  17. Child Support Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2001 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  18. Child Support Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the twelve issues of "Child Support Report" newsletter published during 1997. Monthly issues typically explore problems related to child support enforcement, report on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarize research related to child support. Editorials and information on events…

  19. Child Support Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2002 of the Child Support Report, which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  20. Child Support Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2000 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  1. THE DIFFICULT CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROUCEK, JOSEPH S.

    THIS BOOK CONSISTS OF 16 ESSAYS BY SPECIALISTS ON PROBLEMS WHICH MAY MAKE A CHILD DIFFICULT. EACH AUTHOR DISCUSSES ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS, CHARACTERISTICS, AND HOW DIFFICULTIES MAY BE REDUCED. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE CONSIDERED--(1) "THE CREATIVE CHILD" BY E.P. TORRANCE, (2) "THE INATTENTIVE CHILD" BY I.W. SCHERER, (3) "THE CHILD WITH LANGUAGE…

  2. Child Support Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 1999 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Editorials and information on events and conferences of interest and funding…

  3. Toilet Training Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be present when you go to the bathroom and make your child feel comfortable in the bathroom. Allow your child to see urine and bowel ... begin teaching your child to go to the bathroom. Keep your child in loose, easily removable pants. ...

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in Immunocompetent Patients with Delayed Hypersensitivity to Sulfonamide Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Dickey, Allison; Yale, Steven; Trepanier, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity (HS) reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics occur uncommonly, but with potentially severe clinical manifestations. A familial predisposition to sulfonamide HS is suspected, but robust predictive genetic risk factors have yet to be identified. Strongly linked genetic polymorphisms have been used clinically as screening tests for other HS reactions prior to administration of high-risk drugs. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate for genetic risk of sulfonamide HS in the immunocompetent population using genome-wide association. Methods Ninety-one patients with symptoms after trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) attributable to “probable” drug HS based on medical record review and the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, and 184 age- and sex-matched patients who tolerated a therapeutic course of TMP-SMX, were included in a genome-wide association study using both common and rare variant techniques. Additionally, two subgroups of HS patients with a more refined clinical phenotype (fever and rash; or fever, rash and eosinophilia) were evaluated separately. Results For the full dataset, no single nucleotide polymorphisms were suggestive of or reached genome-wide significance in the common variant analysis, nor was any genetic locus significant in the rare variant analysis. A single, possible gene locus association (COL12A1) was identified in the rare variant analysis for patients with both fever and rash, but the sample size was very small in this subgroup (n = 16), and this may be a false positive finding. No other significant associations were found for the subgroups. Conclusions No convincing genetic risk factors for sulfonamide HS were identified in this population. These negative findings may be due to challenges in accurately confirming the phenotype in exanthematous drug eruptions, or to unidentified gene-environment interactions influencing sulfonamide HS. PMID:27272151

  5. Cardiac tumorgenic potential of induced pluripotent stem cells in an immunocompetent host with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafeeq PH; Ashraf, Muhammad; Buccini, Stephanie; Shujia, Jiang; Haider, Husnain Kh

    2011-01-01

    Aim Genetic reprogramming of somatic cells with stemness genes to restore their pluripotent status is being studied extensively to generate pluripotent stem cells as an alternative to embryonic stem cells. This study was designed to examine the effectiveness of skeletal myoblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (SkiPS) from young male Oct4/GFP transgenic mice for regeneration of the infarcted heart. Methods & results A mouse model of permanent coronary artery ligation was developed in young female immunocompetent C57BL/6J or C57BL/6x129S4 SV/jae Oct4/GFP mice. SkiPS labeled with Q-dots (3 × 105 in 10 μl basal Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium) were transplanted in and around the area of infarct immediately after coronary artery ligation (n = 16) under direct vision. Control mice (n = 12) were injected with the same number of skeletal myoblasts. Histological studies documented successful engraftment of SkiPS in all the surviving animals 4 weeks later. However, six of the 16 SkiPS-transplanted (37.5%) animal hearts showed intramural teratomas, whereas no tumor growth was observed in the control mice. Q-dot-labeled donor cells were also observed at the site of tumors. Histological studies revealed that teratomas were composed of cells from all of the three embryonic germ layers. Ultra-structure studies confirmed the histological findings and showed regions with well-organized myofibrillar structures in the tumors. Conclusion Undifferentiated induced pluripotent stem cells should not be recommended for cardiac transplantation unless screened for specific teratogenic precursors or predifferentiated into cardiac lineage prior to transplantation. PMID:21391851

  6. Epstein–Barr virus dynamics in asymptomatic immunocompetent adults: an intensive 6-month study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kristin H; Webb, Chiu-Ho; Schmeling, David O; Brundage, Richard C; Balfour, Henry H

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) dynamics in asymptomatic immunocompetent persons provides a baseline for defining quantitative thresholds associated with EBV disease. Studying latent membrane protein (LMP)-1 sequence variation over time could establish the rates of reactivation and superinfection, and also trace transmission. Twelve asymptomatic adult subjects were evaluated prospectively nine times over 6 months. EBV serum antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay. EBV DNA in oral and whole-blood samples was quantitated by real-time (TaqMan) PCR and analyzed for LMP-1 sequence variability. All 11 antibody positive subjects had EBV DNA detected in their oral compartment at least once during the 6-month study. The quantities ranged from 1.70 to 4.91 log10 copies EBV per ml of oral cell pellet. One subject was continuously viremic for 79 days. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 63 (24%) of 260 samples from 11 antibody-positive subjects and in 0/27 samples from an antibody-negative subject. The quantities in positive samples ranged from 1.7 to 4.9 log10 copies EBV per ml. EBV LMP-1 gene sequence variations in subjects were constant over time regardless of the compartment sampled. Subjects 18–30 years old had EBV DNA detected more frequently than subjects >30 years old (38/108 positive samples versus 25/152; P<0.001). In conclusion, EBV DNA shedding is common in asymptomatic adults. The younger adults shed more frequently, which may reflect a shorter time from their primary EBV infection to sampling. The LMP-1 sequence analysis method employed here could be used to trace person-to-person transmission because patterns remained almost identical over time. PMID:27350880

  7. Defining New Therapeutics Using a More Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Amelia K.; Brien, James D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Johnson, Syd; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John; Sarathy, Vanessa V.; Barrett, Alan D.; Shresta, Sujan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT With over 3.5 billion people at risk and approximately 390 million human infections per year, dengue virus (DENV) disease strains health care resources worldwide. Previously, we and others established models for DENV pathogenesis in mice that completely lack subunits of the receptors (Ifnar and Ifngr) for type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling; however, the utility of these models is limited by the pleotropic effect of these cytokines on innate and adaptive immune system development and function. Here, we demonstrate that the specific deletion of Ifnar expression on subsets of murine myeloid cells (LysM Cre+ Ifnarflox/flox [denoted as Ifnarf/f herein]) resulted in enhanced DENV replication in vivo. The administration of subneutralizing amounts of cross-reactive anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies to LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice prior to infection with DENV serotype 2 or 3 resulted in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection with many of the characteristics associated with severe DENV disease in humans, including plasma leakage, hypercytokinemia, liver injury, hemoconcentration, and thrombocytopenia. Notably, the pathogenesis of severe DENV-2 or DENV-3 infection in LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice was blocked by pre- or postexposure administration of a bispecific dual-affinity retargeting molecule (DART) or an optimized RIG-I receptor agonist that stimulates innate immune responses. Our findings establish a more immunocompetent animal model of ADE of infection with multiple DENV serotypes in which disease is inhibited by treatment with broad-spectrum antibody derivatives or innate immune stimulatory agents. PMID:26374123

  8. Glioblastoma Eradication Following Immune Checkpoint Blockade in an Orthotopic, Immunocompetent Model.

    PubMed

    Reardon, David A; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Klein, Sarah R; Ligon, Keith L; Rodig, Scott J; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Jones, Kristen L; Conway, Amy Saur; Liao, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Jun; Wen, Patrick Y; Van Den Abbeele, Annick D; Hodi, F Stephen; Qin, Lei; Kohl, Nancy E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Dranoff, Glenn; Freeman, Gordon J

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and its ligand PD-L1, has demonstrated exciting and durable remissions across a spectrum of malignancies. Combinatorial regimens blocking complementary immune checkpoints further enhance the therapeutic benefit. The activity of these agents for patients with glioblastoma, a generally lethal primary brain tumor associated with significant systemic and microenvironmental immunosuppression, is not known. We therefore systematically evaluated the antitumor efficacy of murine antibodies targeting a broad panel of immune checkpoint molecules, including CTLA-4, PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 when administered as single-agent therapy and in combinatorial regimens against an orthotopic, immunocompetent murine glioblastoma model. In these experiments, we observed long-term tumor-free survival following single-agent anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, or anti-CTLA-4 therapy in 50%, 20%, and 15% of treated animals, respectively. Combination therapy of anti-CTLA-4 plus anti-PD-1 cured 75% of the animals, even against advanced, later-stage tumors. In long-term survivors, tumor growth was not seen upon intracranial tumor rechallenge, suggesting that tumor-specific immune memory responses were generated. Inhibitory immune checkpoint blockade quantitatively increased activated CD8(+) and natural killer cells and decreased suppressive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment and draining cervical lymph nodes. Our results support prioritizing the clinical evaluation of PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 single-agent targeted therapy as well as combination therapy of CTLA-4 plus PD-1 blockade for patients with glioblastoma. PMID:26546453

  9. Child labor: a forgotten focus for child welfare.

    PubMed

    Otis, J; Pasztor, E M; McFadden, E J

    2001-01-01

    Child labor is driven by child and family impoverishment, market forces, and political apathy concerning the rights of the child. Although a fundamental concern of the early 20th century child welfare system, today child labor is often seen as outside the scope of child welfare and child protective services. Making child labor a focus of child advocacy activity once again could do much to better the lives of children. PMID:11678418

  10. First Report of Acute Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Rothia Mucilaginosa after Phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ramos, Pablo; Del Moral-Ariza, Amparo; Alonso-Maroto, José M; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Calandria-Amigueti, José M; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Rodríguez de la Rúa, Enrique

    2016-03-21

    We aimed at reporting the first case of rapidly progressive acute postoperative endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in an immunocompetent patient caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. An immunocompetent patient manifested endophthalmitis signs 48 hours after an uncomplicated cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. A bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae was cultured in the vitreous biopsy, namely R. mucilaginosa. The patient did not show a favorable clinical response after vitrectomy and systemic, intravitreal, and topical fortified antibiotics. The patient's eye was very painful, and consequently, it deemed necessary to perform an evisceration. R. mucilaginosa may be an aggressive etiologic agent for postoperative endophthalmitis. Although the isolated R. mucilaginosa was susceptible to empirical treatment, it was impossible to control the infection with standard treatment, probably due to its ability to create a biofilm around the intraocular lens. PMID:27103973

  11. First Report of Acute Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Rothia Mucilaginosa after Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Ramos, Pablo; Del Moral-Ariza, Amparo; Alonso-Maroto, José M.; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Calandria-Amigueti, José M.; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at reporting the first case of rapidly progressive acute postoperative endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in an immunocompetent patient caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. An immunocompetent patient manifested endophthalmitis signs 48 hours after an uncomplicated cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. A bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae was cultured in the vitreous biopsy, namely R. mucilaginosa. The patient did not show a favorable clinical response after vitrectomy and systemic, intravitreal, and topical fortified antibiotics. The patient’s eye was very painful, and consequently, it deemed necessary to perform an evisceration. R. mucilaginosa may be an aggressive etiologic agent for postoperative endophthalmitis. Although the isolated R. mucilaginosa was susceptible to empirical treatment, it was impossible to control the infection with standard treatment, probably due to its ability to create a biofilm around the intraocular lens. PMID:27103973

  12. Child deaths in South Africa: Lessons from the child death review pilot.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Shanaaz; Martin, Lorna J; Coetzee, David; Scott, Chris; Brijmohun, Yasheen

    2016-09-01

    South Africa (SA) has not met the child mortality target for the Millennium Development Goals, despite having invested substantially in programmes and policies to achieve these targets. The scale-up of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission programmes reduced HIV transmission from mother to child, but this has not been sustained owing to limitations in community-based child health services. Child mortality has declined, but has now plateaued. Children continue to die from preventable and treatable causes of death. Current data sources are incomplete, and do not provide information on deaths occurring out of health facilities. The child death review (CDR) pilot explores the pattern of child deaths and informs prevention strategies to improve child survival in SA. In this editorial we draw on the conclusions of the CDR pilot, where multiagency teams were established to investigate non-natural and unexpected deaths referred to two mortuary sites in order to strengthen child health and protection response systems and to prevent child deaths. PMID:27601103

  13. Metabolic, Immune, Epigenetic, Endocrine and Phenotypic Abnormalities Found in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease May Be Caused by Congenital and/or Acquired Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prandota, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    "Toxoplasma gondii" is a protozoan parasite that infects about a third of human population. It is generally believed that in immunocompetent hosts, the parasite infection takes usually asymptomatic course and induces self-limiting disease, but in immunocompromised individuals may cause significant morbidity and mortality. "T. gondii" uses sulfated…

  14. Vitamin A supplementation enhances Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) early juvenile's immunocompetence: New insights on potential underlying pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; López-Joven, Carmen; Andree, Karl B; Roque, Ana; Gisbert, Enric

    2015-10-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) has been considered since the 1990's to be a promising flatfish species for diversifying European marine aquaculture. However, pathogen outbreaks leading to high mortality rates can impair Senegalese sole commercial production at the weaning phase. Different approaches have been shown to improve fish immunocompetence; with this in mind the objective of the work described herein was to determine whether increased levels of dietary vitamin A (VA) improve the immune response in early juveniles of Senegalese sole. For this purpose, Senegalese sole were reared and fed with Artemia metanauplii containing increased levels of VA (37,000; 44,666; 82,666 and 203,000 total VA IU Kg(-1)) from 6 to 60 days post-hatch (early juvenile stage). After an induced bacterial infection with a 50% lethal dose of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, survival rate, as well as underlying gene expression of specific immune markers (C1inh, C3, C9, Lgals1, Hamp, LysC, Prdx1, Steap4 and Transf) were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed higher doses of dietary VA were more resistant to the bacterial challenge. The lower mortality was found to be related with differential expression of genes involved in the complement system and iron availability. We suggest that feeding metamorphosed Senegalese sole with 203,000 total VA IU Kg(-1) might be an effective, inexpensive and environmentally friendly method to improve Senegalese sole immunocompetence, thereby improving survival of juveniles and reducing economic losses. PMID:26272637

  15. “Glowing Head” Mice: A Genetic Tool Enabling Reliable Preclinical Image-Based Evaluation of Cancers in Immunocompetent Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Day, Chi-Ping; Carter, John; Ohler, Zoe Weaver; Bonomi, Carrie; El Meskini, Rajaa; Martin, Philip; Graff-Cherry, Cari; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Tüting, Thomas; Van Dyke, Terry; Hollingshead, Melinda; Merlino, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical therapeutic assessment currently relies on the growth response of established human cell lines xenografted into immunocompromised mice, a strategy that is generally not predictive of clinical outcomes. Immunocompetent genetically engineered mouse (GEM)-derived tumor allograft models offer highly tractable preclinical alternatives and facilitate analysis of clinically promising immunomodulatory agents. Imageable reporters are essential for accurately tracking tumor growth and response, particularly for metastases. Unfortunately, reporters such as luciferase and GFP are foreign antigens in immunocompetent mice, potentially hindering tumor growth and confounding therapeutic responses. Here we assessed the value of reporter-tolerized GEMs as allograft recipients by targeting minimal expression of a luciferase-GFP fusion reporter to the anterior pituitary gland (dubbed the “Glowing Head” or GH mouse). The luciferase-GFP reporter expressed in tumor cells induced adverse immune responses in wildtype mouse, but not in GH mouse, as transplantation hosts. The antigenicity of optical reporters resulted in a decrease in both the growth and metastatic potential of the labeled tumor in wildtype mice as compared to the GH mice. Moreover, reporter expression can also alter the tumor response to chemotherapy or targeted therapy in a context-dependent manner. Thus the GH mice and experimental approaches vetted herein provide concept validation and a strategy for effective, reproducible preclinical evaluation of growth and response kinetics for traceable tumors. PMID:25369133

  16. Treatment paradox in musculo-skeletal tuberculosis in an immunocompetent adult male; a case report from a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chaskar, Priyanka; Rana, Geetika; Anuradha; Duggal, Nandini; Arora, Jyoti

    2015-04-01

    Paradoxical reactions like immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) as seen with patients on retroviral treatment in HIV infection, have also been identified in HIV sero-negative patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis especially lymph-node tuberculosis. Musculo-skeletal tuberculosis presenting as a cold abscess of the anterior chest wall is a rare entity which poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A 35-year-old immunocompetent male came with complains of painless lump on right side of his chest over 9th and 10th intercostal space which gradually increased and extended upto 11th rib area. Clinically, diagnosis of cold abscess was made and anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) was started. Despite of being on ATT for 3 weeks, patient developed pain and signs of inflammation. Fluid was aspirated and sent for biochemical and microbiological investigations. The aspirated fluid was positive for acid fast bacilli by ZN stain and grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture, sensitive to first line ATT. Pyogenic and fungal culture was negative. This case presented as an anterior chest wall cold abscess which deteriorated on initiation of first line ATT, thus creating a suspicion of resistance to ATT which was cleared on ATT susceptibility testing. Hence, this case underlines the possibility of treatment paradoxes seen in immunocompetent musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. PMID:26046019

  17. Suicide among American Indian Adolescents. Some Facts about the Rising Rate of Suicide among American Indian Adolescents; Information on Causes and Warning Signs; and Examples of Effective Efforts and Prevention Resources. Linkages for Indian Child Welfare Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Irving N.

    Suicide among American Indian adolescents has increased by almost 1000% over the past 20 years to become, as in Anglo society, the second most frequent cause of death in the 10 to 20 year old age group. The two major causes of adolescent suicide are acute stress and chronic depression. Environmental factors contributing to American Indian suicides…

  18. Quantitative functional MRI in a clinical orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer in immunocompetent Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Zheng, Linfeng; Li, Weiguo; Gordon, Andrew C; Huan, Yi; Shangguan, Junjie; Procissi, Daniel; Bentrem, David J; Larson, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate feasibility of performing quantitative MRI measurements in an immuno-competent rat model of pancreatic cancer by comparing in vivo anatomic and quantitative imaging measurements to tumor dissemination observations and histologic assays at necropsy. Meterials and methods: Rat ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cell line and Lewis rats were used for these studies. 108 DSL-6A/C1 cells were injected subcutaneously into the right flank of donor rats. Donor tumors reaching 10 mm were excised, and 1 mm3 tumor fragments were implanted within recipient rat pancreas during mini-laparotomy. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were performed using a Bruker 7.0T ClinScan. After MRI, all animals underwent autopsy. Primary tumor size was measured, and dissemination score was used to assess local invasion and distant metastasis. Primary tumor and all sites of metastases were harvested and fixed for H&E, Masson’s trichrome, and rat anti-CD34 staining. Trichrome slides were scanned and digitized for measurement of fibrotic tissue areas. Anti-CD34 slides were used for microvessel density (MVD) measurements. Results: Primary tumors, local invasion, and distant metastases were confirmed for all rats. No significant differences were found between in vivo MRI measurements (48.7 ± 5.3 mm) and ex vivo caliper measurements (43.6 ± 3.6 mm) of primary tumor sizes (p > .05). Spleen, liver, diaphragm, peritoneum, and abdominal wall metastases were observed on MRI but smaller lung, mediastinum, omen, and mesentery metastases were only observed at necropsy. Contrast uptake observed during DCE measurements was significantly greater in both primary and metastatic tumor tissues compared to skeletal muscle and normal liver tissues. Both primary and metastatic tumors were hyper-intense in T2-weighted images and hypo-intense in T1-weighted images, but no differences were found between quantitative T2 measurements in

  19. High-Fat Diet Promotion of Endometriosis in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model is Associated With Altered Peripheral and Ectopic Lesion Redox and Inflammatory Status.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa E; Melnyk, Stepan B; Simmen, Frank A; Yang, Yanqing; Pabona, John Mark P; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2016-07-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition that causes considerable morbidity due to associated infertility, debilitating pelvic pain and inflammatory dysfunctions. Diet is a highly modifiable risk factor for many chronic diseases, but its contribution to endometriosis has not been extensively investigated, due partly to the paradoxical inverse association between obesity and disease incidence. Nevertheless, chronic exposure to dietary high-fat intake has been linked to greater systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, both features of women with endometriosis. Here, we evaluated the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) (45% fat kcal) on endometriosis progression using an immunocompetent mouse model where ectopic lesion incidence was induced in wild-type recipients by ip administration of endometrial fragments from transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 9-null donor mice. We show that HFD significantly increased ectopic lesion numbers in recipient mice with no significant weight gain and modifications in systemic ovarian steroid hormone and insulin levels, relative to control diet-fed (17% fat kcal) mice. HFD promotion of lesion establishment was associated with reductions in stromal estrogen receptor 1 isoform and progesterone receptor expression, increased F4/80-positive macrophage infiltration, higher stromal but not glandular epithelial proliferation, and enhanced expression of proinflammatory and prooxidative stress pathway genes. Lesion-bearing HFD-fed mice also displayed higher peritoneal fluid TNFα and elevated local and systemic redox status than control diet-fed counterparts. Our results suggest that HFD intake exacerbates endometriosis outcome in the absence of ovarian dysfunction and insulin resistance in mice and warrants further consideration with respect to clinical management of endometriosis progression and recurrence in nonobese patients. PMID:27175969

  20. Murine Norovirus 1 Infection Is Associated with Histopathological Changes in Immunocompetent Hosts, but Clinical Disease Is Prevented by STAT1-Dependent Interferon Responses▿

    PubMed Central

    Mumphrey, Shannon M.; Changotra, Harish; Moore, Tara N.; Heimann-Nichols, Ellen R.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Reilly, Michael J.; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Shukla, Deepti; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2007-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the major cause of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. However, little is known regarding their pathogenesis or the immune responses that control them because until recently there has been no small animal model or cell culture system of norovirus infection. We recently reported the discovery of the first murine norovirus, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), and its cultivation in macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro. We further defined interferon receptors and the STAT-1 molecule as critical in both resistance to MNV-1-induced disease in vivo and control of virus growth in vitro. To date, neither histopathological changes upon infection nor viral replication in wild-type mice has been shown. Here we extend our studies to demonstrate that MNV-1 replicates and rapidly disseminates to various tissues in immunocompetent mice and that infection is restricted by STAT1-dependent interferon responses at the levels of viral replication and virus dissemination. Infection of wild-type mice is associated with histopathological alterations in the intestine (mild inflammation) and the spleen (red pulp hypertrophy and white pulp activation); viral dissemination to the spleen, liver, lung, and lymph nodes; and low-level persistent infection in the spleen. STAT-1 inhibits viral replication in the intestine, prevents virus-induced apoptosis of intestinal cells and splenocytes, and limits viral dissemination to peripheral tissues. These findings demonstrate that murine norovirus infection of wild-type mice is associated with initial enteric seeding and subsequent extraintestinal spread, and they provide mechanistic evidence of the role of STAT-1 in controlling clinical norovirus-induced disease. PMID:17229692

  1. Uptake of a nido-carboranylporphyrin by human glioma xenografts in athymic nude mice and by syngeneic ovarian carcinomas in immunocompetent mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B. ); Joel, D.D.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Micca, P.L.; Tran, K.P.; Finkel, G.C.; Slatkin, D.N. )

    1990-09-01

    A tetraphenylporphyrin bearing four dicarbollide ((B{sub 9}C{sub 2}H{sub 11}){sup {minus}}) cages linked to the o-phenyl ring positions by anilide bonds, known as boronated tetraphenylporphyrin (BTPP), has been synthesized in excellent yield from tetra-(o-aminophenyl)porphyrin and carborane carbonyl chloride followed by base-assisted cage opening and ion exchange to give the highly water-soluble potassium salt. Preliminary studies showed that BTPP accumulates in liver and in a syngeneic ovarian carcinoma, but not in normal brain parenchyma, of mice infused with BTPP subcutaneously for 6 or 7 days via surgically implanted osmotic minipumps. In this study, the uptake of boron was measured in human gliomas xenografted subcutaneously to athymic nude mice in which BTPP was infused intraperitoneally or subcutaneously or both for 3 or 7 days by using similar minipumps. Immunocompetent mice bearing a syngeneic ovarian carcinoma were similarly infused to provide comparative data. Bulk concentrations of boron up to 18 {mu}g/g of glioma and up to 45 {mu}g/g of carcinoma were observed when up to 102 {mu}g/g of tissue was present in the liver after 7 days of BTPP infusion. Glioma boron concentrations were increased by {approx}80% on the average correspondingly greater amounts of BTPP were infused in only 3 days. Cell counts and chemical tests on blood samples from individual mice indicate that BTPP causes moderate hepatotoxicity and thromboxytopenia. This hepatohematic toxicity syndrome should be taken into account if BTPP or a similar agent is used for boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) of human malignancies.

  2. A Beneficial Collaboration: Child Care and Child Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Describes potential collaborations between child care and child support enforcement agencies (CSEA). Child care resource and referral agencies can distribute information about child support enforcement and paternity establishment. CSEAs can provide training to child care providers. Child care subsidies may be linked to cooperation with the CSEA.…

  3. Office of Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 OCC has a variety of resources and tools related to the law. Visit our Reauthorization site to find webinars, program instructions, and other guidance and information. > What is the Office of Child Care (OCC)? The Office of Child ...

  4. Fussy or irritable child

    MedlinePlus

    ... home Irregular day-to-day schedule Using your parenting skills, you should be able to calm your child and make things better. Getting your child on a regular eating, sleeping, and daily schedule can also help.

  5. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  6. Normal Child Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... age. Development can be uneven, too, with a child's social development lagging behind his intellectual growth, or vice versa. ... members, and others. They may interfere with the child's intellectual development. They may be forbidden by law, ethics, religion, ...

  7. Child Dental Health

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy teeth are important to your child's overall health. From the time your child is born, there are things you can do to promote healthy teeth and prevent cavities. For babies, you should clean ...

  8. Toilet Teaching Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... child small rewards, such as stickers or time reading with Mommy, every time your child goes in ...

  9. What makes a child a 'competent' child?

    PubMed

    van Rooyen, Amanda; Water, Tineke; Rasmussen, Shayne; Diesfeld, Kate

    2015-12-01

    Competence is a vital component of the informed consent process. The perceived level of a child's competence may influence their degree of participation in health decisions that affect them. It is the responsibility of the health professional to gauge a child's level of competence. Child competence, however, is not a static attribute that is linked to age. Rather, it is dynamic, changing in nature and dependent on a child's previous experiences, personal attributes, network of relationships around them and cultural and environmental context. Consequently, there is no single verified assessment tool to assist in the recognition of competence for New Zealand children. Adding to this complexity are the unclear interpretations of New Zealand health legislation and policy regarding whether or not a child can legally consent or refuse healthcare advice and treatment without the consent of a legal guardian. Under the Care of Children Act 2004 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights 1996, the Health and Disability Commissioner states "a child may consent themselves [to health treatment] if and when the child achieves sufficient understanding and maturity to understand fully what is proposed". This paper poses the question: What is 'competency' and how is this decided? For the purpose of this article, 'child' pertains to those under the age of 16 years. PMID:26913912

  10. Child Care Subsidies and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    Child care subsidies are an important part of federal and state efforts to move welfare recipients into employment. One of the criticisms of the current subsidy system, however, is that it overemphasizes work and does little to encourage parents to purchase high-quality child care. Consequently, there are reasons to be concerned about the…

  11. Mother-Child Planning and Child Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauvain, Mary; Perez, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated child compliance and maternal instruction during planning. Based on the Child Behavior Checklist and free-play observations, 40 mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children were assigned to a group with children who behaved within the normal range of compliance (n = 20) or a group with children with high rates of…

  12. Caregiver-fabricated illness in a child: a manifestation of child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Emalee G; Macmillan, Harriet L

    2013-09-01

    Caregiver-fabricated illness in a child is a form of child maltreatment caused by a caregiver who falsifies and/or induces a child's illness, leading to unnecessary and potentially harmful medical investigations and/or treatment. This condition can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Although caregiver-fabricated illness in a child has been widely known as Munchausen syndrome by proxy, there is ongoing discussion about alternative names, including pediatric condition falsification, factitious disorder (illness) by proxy, child abuse in the medical setting, and medical child abuse. Because it is a relatively uncommon form of maltreatment, pediatricians need to have a high index of suspicion when faced with a persistent or recurrent illness that cannot be explained and that results in multiple medical procedures or when there are discrepancies between the history, physical examination, and health of a child. This report updates the previous clinical report "Beyond Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: Identification and Treatment of Child Abuse in the Medical Setting" The authors discuss the need to agree on appropriate terminology, provide an update on published reports of new manifestations of fabricated medical conditions, and discuss approaches to assessment, diagnosis, and management, including how best to protect the child from further harm. PMID:23979088

  13. Spleen removal - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... for your child to return to school or daycare. This may be as soon as 2 to 3 weeks after surgery. Your child's activity restrictions will depend on: The type of surgery (open or laparoscopic) Your child's age The reason for ...

  14. Child Care Bulletin, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Marilyn, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document is comprised of six issues of the Child Care Bulletin, a bimonthly publication of the National Child Care Information Center. The January-February issue focuses on involving communities in child care planning. Topics discussed in this issue include: community mobilization strategies, assessing needs and establishing goals, and…

  15. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  16. Child Care Design Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Anita Rui

    This book provides architects, interior designers, developers, and child-care professionals with detailed information on the planning and design of child care centers. Part 1 examines the current state of child care in the United States and offers an overall philosophical concert--the spirit of place--as the framework for all center design. Part 2…

  17. Supporting Each Child's Spirit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Jennifer J.; Buchanan, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In using developmentally appropriate practices, teachers should intentionally address all aspects of a child's being, the spiritual along with the physical and the cognitive. Because spirituality is a vital part of human nature, a whole-child teaching approach must include the part of the child some call spirituality. Many have attempted to…

  18. Child Care Update: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Vic; And Others

    This paper provides information on child care needs, existing services, and special topics related to child care in Dane County, Wisconsin. Section I describes and compares needs and services; indicates locations of current full-day services; and offers specific recommendations for expanding child care. Section II concerns cost and affordability…

  19. Research priorities on ending child marriage and supporting married girls.

    PubMed

    Svanemyr, Joar; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Raj, Anita; Travers, Ellen; Sundaram, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years the issue of child marriage has received growing political and programmatic attention. In spite of some progress in a number of countries, global rates have not declined over the past decade. Knowledge gaps remain in understanding trends, drivers and approaches to ending child marriage, especially to understand what is needed to achieve results on a large scale. This commentary summarizes the outcomes of an Expert Group Meeting organized by World Health Organization to discuss research priorities on Ending Child Marriage and Supporting Married Girls. It presents research gaps and recommends priorities for research in five key areas; (i) prevalence and trends of child marriage; (ii) causes of child marriage (iii) consequences of child marriage; (iv) efforts to prevent child marriage; (v) efforts to support married girls. PMID:26336068

  20. The favoured child?

    PubMed

    Jones, D; Dickenson, D; Devereux, J

    1994-06-01

    This case conference concerns a child who has been in care following a diagnosis of emotional abuse and a serious incident of physical abuse. She wants to return home again, and her parents, who had previously scapegoated her, now blame the family's previous ills on her sister instead. The Children Act 1989 gives considerable weight to the child's wishes, but what if the child returns home and is re-abused? In this case conference a child psychiatrist, a philosopher and a lawyer discuss the issues of clinicians' responsibilities, moral luck, and child care law. PMID:8083871