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Sample records for immunoglobulin lambda variable

  1. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for the protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspot motifs were also identified suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in an increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination. PMID:26791019

  2. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Immunoglobulin light chain variable region gene sequences for human antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide are dominated by a limited number of V kappa and V lambda segments and VJ combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, E E; Shackelford, P G; Insel, R A; Quinn, A; Wilson, P M; Carroll, W L

    1992-01-01

    The immune repertoire to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (Hib PS) appears to be dominated by certain light chain variable region genes (IgVL). In order to examine the molecular basis underlying light chain bias, IgVL genes have been cloned from a panel of heterohybridomas secreting human anti-Hib PS (antibody) (anti-Hib PS Ab). One hybridoma, representative of the predominant serum clonotype of anti-Hib PS Ab in older children and adults following immunization or Hib infection, uses a V kappa II segment identical to the germline gene A2, and a JK3 segment. A second kappa hybridoma uses a member of the V kappa I family and a JK4 segment. Four lambda antibodies, all cross-reactive with the structurally related antigen Escherichia coli K100 PS, use V lambda VII segments which are 96-98% homologous to one another, and may originate from a single germline gene. Two additional lambda antibodies, not K100-cross-reactive, are encoded by members of the V lambda II family. All lambda antibodies use highly homologous J lambda 2 or J lambda 3 segments. The VJ joints of all lambda antibodies and the V kappa II-encoded antibody are notable for the presence of an arginine codon, suggesting an important role in antigen binding. Although more complex than heavy chain variable region gene usage, a significant portion of serum anti-Hib PS Ab is likely to be encoded by a limited number of V kappa and V lambda segments and VJ combinations, which may be selectively expressed during development, or following antigen exposure. Images PMID:1541667

  4. Equine cutaneous amyloidosis derived from an immunoglobulin lambda-light chain. Immunohistochemical, immunochemical and chemical results.

    PubMed

    Linke, R P; Geisel, O; Mann, K

    1991-09-01

    Amyloid deposits from equine cutaneous nodular amyloidosis associated with extramedullary plasmacytoma were classified immunohistochemically as equine immunoglobulin lambda-light chain-derived and designated eA lambda (HIP). For chemical identification, the amyloid fibril proteins were separated on Sephadex G-100 in 6M guanidine.HCl. Polypeptides of predominantly 24 kDa and 50 kDa were found by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. They have preponderance of immunoglobulin lambda-antigenic determinants as detected by immunodiffusion and immunoblotting. Since the N-terminus of the major proteins was blocked, peptides were generated with trypsin and endoproteinase Asp-N and then isolated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Automatic amino-acid sequence determination of seven peptides showed novel sequences. Data bank comparison indicated that these peptides were derived from a monoclonal immunoglobulin lambda-light and a gamma-heavy chain. The light chain was considered to be the leading amyloidogenic polypeptide, since it was the predominant component in a virtually pure amyloid fibril preparation. Thus, immunoglobulin lambda-light chain-derived amyloidosis, so far established only in man and cat, has now also been identified in the horse. PMID:1772596

  5. Nephrotic Syndrome Secondary to Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal Immunoglobulin Deposits of Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongseok; Braunhut, Beth L.; Walker, Courtney N.; Bhati, Waheed; Sussman, Amy N.; Anwer, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 46-year-old woman with history of refractory nephrotic syndrome and hypertension who presented with worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Work-up for both autoimmune and infectious diseases and hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma were negative. Kidney biopsy demonstrated glomerular sclerotic change with lambda light chain deposits in the subendothelial space, which is consistent with proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit (PGNMID). The patient was treated with bortezomib and dexamethasone without clinical improvement and eventually became hemodialysis dependent. PMID:25136462

  6. Variant translocation of the bcl-2 gene to immunoglobulin. lambda. light chain gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, M.; Cossman, J.; Longo, D.; Croce, C.M.; Tsujimoto, Y. )

    1989-04-01

    The bcl-2 gene has been identified as a gene directly involved in the consistent chromosome translocation t(14;18), which is found in {approx} 90% of human follicular lymphoma cases, and is a prime candidate for the oncogene playing a crucial role in follicular lymphomagenesis. In this paper, the authors describe a case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia showing the juxtaposition of the bcl-2 gene on chromosome 18 to immunoglobulin {lambda} light chain (Ig{lambda}) gene on chromosome 22 in a head-to-head configuration. Sequencing analysis of the joining site of the bcl-2 gene and Ig{lambda} gene has shown that the breakpoint is within the 5{prime} flanking region of the bcl-2 gene and about 2.2 kilobases 5{prime} to the joining segment of Ig{lambda} locus in a germ-line configuration. The extranucleotide, commonly appearing at the joining site of the t(14;18) translocation involving the IgH locus, is absent from the joining site of bcl-2 and Ig{lambda}. The lack of extranucleotide suggests that the juxtaposition of the bcl-2 and Ig{lambda} genes occurred during physiological rearrangement of the Ig{lambda} gene since it has been shown that the rearrangement of the Ig{lambda} locus is not accompanied by extranucleotides.

  7. Absence of {lambda} immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A.; White, B.N.; Holden, J.J.A.

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter{r_arrow}22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned {lambda} immunoglobulin ({lambda} Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 {lambda} Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the {lambda} Ig gene region. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Immunoglobulin G kappa [IgG kappa] and IgG lambda paraproteinemia in a child with AIDS and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Seeborg, Filiz Odabasi; Gay, Hannah; Schmiege, Lorenz M; Bernard, David; Shearer, William T

    2005-11-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with AIDS, extremely elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and IgG kappa [IgG(kappa)] and IgG lambda [IgG(lambda)] paraproteinemia. This paraproteinemia partially responded to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of controlling B-cell activation. PMID:16275950

  9. [Monoclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG lambda) with antiethinylestradiol activity, oral contraceptives, and arterial pulmonary thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Beaumont, J L; Lemort, N

    1975-06-23

    In a 36-year-old woman taking an oral contraceptive containing 50 mug of ethinyloestradiol each day, a pulmonary arterial thrombosis and a monoclonal gammapathia were associated. The monoclonal IgI lambda Mai... was prepared. When purified, this IgG lambda binds ethinyloestradiol with strong affinity (Ka= 2.7 times 10(7)M-1) and also 17-beta-oestradiol with a little less affinity (Ka = 0.4 times 10(7)M-1. For those ligands each IgG lambda Mai... molecule has two sites of same affinity and specificity so that a Scatchard plot of the experimental values gives a straight line. It is likely that the antibody sites of the IgG lambda Mai... are the binding sites. These facts support the hypothesis of an immunological mechanism of the thromboembolic disease which may be induced by oral contraceptives. PMID:808320

  10. PU.1 is a component of a multiprotein complex which binds an essential site in the murine immunoglobulin lambda 2-4 enhancer.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, C F; Singh, H; Storb, U

    1993-10-01

    B-cell-specific enhancers have been identified in the immunoglobulin lambda locus 3' of each constant-region cluster. These enhancers contain two distinct domains, lambda A and lambda B, which are essential for enhancer function. lambda B contains a near-consensus binding site for the Ets family of transcription factors. In this study, we have identified a B-cell-specific protein complex which binds the lambda B motif of the lambda 2-4 enhancer in vitro and appears necessary for the activity of the enhancer in vivo, since mutations in lambda B which prevent this interaction also eliminate enhancer function. This complex contains PU.1, a member of the Ets family, and a transcriptional activator whose expression is restricted to cells of the hematopoietic system with the exception of T lymphocytes. In addition, it contains a factor which binds specifically to a region adjacent to the PU.1 binding site. This factor cannot bind lambda B autonomously but appears to require interaction with the PU.1 protein to stabilize its association with the DNA. This complex may be identical or related to the PU.1/NF-EM5 complex which interacts with a homologous DNA element in the immunoglobulin kappa 3' enhancer. PMID:8413244

  11. Frequent N addition and clonal relatedness among immunoglobulin lambda light chains expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovia and PBL, and the influence of V lambda gene segment utilization on CDR3 length.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), B-lineage cells in the synovial membrane secrete large amounts of immunoglobulin that contribute to tissue destruction. The CDR3 of an immunoglobulin light chain is formed by rearrangements of VL and JL gene segments. Addition of non-germline-encoded (N) nucleotides at V(D)J joins by the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) enhances antibody diversity. TdT was previously thought to be active in B cells only during heavy chain rearrangement, but we and others reported unexpectedly high levels of N addition in kappa light chains. We also found clonally related kappa chains bearing unusually long CDR3 intervals in RA synovium, suggesting oligoclonal expansion of a set of atypical B lymphocytes. In this study, we analyzed lambda light chain expression to determine if N addition occurs throughout immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and to compare CDR3 lengths of lambda and kappa light chains in RA patients and normal individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of V lambda III transcripts was performed on RA synovia and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and normal PBL for which kappa repertoires were previously analyzed. Representative lambda + PCR products were cloned and sequenced. RESULTS: Analysis of 161 cDNA clones revealed that N addition occurs in lambda light chains of RA patients and normal controls. The lambda light chain repertoires in RA were enriched for long CDR3 intervals. In both RA and controls, CDR3 lengths were strongly influenced by which V lambda gene segment was present in the rearrangement. Five sets of clonally related sequences were found in RA synovia and PBL; one set was found in normal PBL. CONCLUSIONS: In humans, unlike mice, N addition enhances antibody diversity at all stages of immunoglobulin assembly, and the structural diversity of lambda CDR3 intervals is greater than that of kappa light chains. Clonally related V lambda

  12. Immunoglobulin G concentration in canine colostrum: Evaluation and variability.

    PubMed

    Mila, Hanna; Feugier, Alexandre; Grellet, Aurélien; Anne, Jennifer; Gonnier, Milène; Martin, Maelys; Rossig, Lisa; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Canine neonates are born hypogammaglobulinemic, and colostrum is their main source of immunoglobulins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immune quality of canine colostrum and its variability both among bitches and among mammary glands. The immune quality was estimated from immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration (ELISA test). The correlation of IgG concentration with refractometry was evaluated. From a total of 44 bitches from 13 different breeds from a single breeding kennel, samples of colostrum and blood were collected one day after the parturition onset. Colostrum was collected separately from each pair of mammary glands (180 pairs). The mean colostrum IgG concentration in our population was 20.8 ± 8.1g/L (ranging from 8.0 to 41.7 g/L) with no influence of breed size, litter size, age of dam or serum IgG concentration. Colostrum IgG concentration varied widely among pairs of mammary glands within one bitch (variation coefficient: 42 ± 32.1%). Nevertheless, no single pair of mammary glands was found to produce regularly a secretion of higher quality. No difference in IgG concentration was recorded between anterior and posterior pairs either. The BRIX index and the refractive index were significantly, but moderately correlated with colostrum IgG concentration (r=0.53 and 0.42, respectively). This study demonstrates a great variability in immune quality of colostrum among bitches and among mammary glands within one bitch. Further studies on the suckling behavior of puppies and on determination of the minimal immune quality of colostrum are required to evaluate their impact of this high variability on neonatal mortality in dogs. PMID:26186389

  13. Subclustering of human immunoglobulin kappa light chain variable region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, J.H.; Mountain, J.L.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The human immunoglobulin kappa light chain (IgK) locus includes multiple variable region gene segments (V[sub k]) that can be divided into four subgroups. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify specifically gene segments of the V[sub k]I, V[sub k]II, and V[sub k]III subgroups using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Product sequences were subcloned, sequenced, and compared. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences within each subgroup indicate that some subgroups can be subdivided further into [open quotes]sub-subgroups.[close quotes] The history of V[sub k] segment duplications apparently includes at least two separate periods, the first giving rise to the subgroups and the second generating further complexity within each subgroup. Duplications of large pieces of DNA (demonstrated by others through pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) also played a role. Rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous base changes between pairs of sequences suggest that natural selection has played a major role in the evolution of the V[sub k] variable gene segments, leading to sequence conservation in some regions and to increased diversity in others. 34 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Deletion of the immunoglobulin kappa chain intron enhancer abolishes kappa chain gene rearrangement in cis but not lambda chain gene rearrangement in trans.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, S; Zou, Y R; Bluethmann, H; Kitamura, D; Muller, U; Rajewsky, K

    1993-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) secreted from a plasma cell contain either kappa or lambda light chains, but not both. This phenomenon is termed isotypic kappa-lambda exclusion. While kappa-producing cells have their lambda chain genes in germline configuration, in most lambda-producing cells the kappa chain genes are either non-productively rearranged or deleted. To investigate the molecular mechanism for isotypic kappa-lambda exclusion, in particular the role of the Ig kappa intron enhancer, we replaced this enhancer by a neomycin resistance (neoR) gene in embryonic stem (ES) cells. B cells heterozygous for the mutation undergo V kappa-J kappa recombination exclusively in the intact Ig kappa locus but not in the mutated Ig kappa locus. Homozygous mutant mice exhibited no rearrangements in their Ig kappa loci. However, splenic B cell numbers were only slightly reduced as compared with the wild-type, and all B cells expressed lambda chain bearing surface Ig. These findings demonstrate that rearrangement in the Ig kappa locus is not essential for lambda gene rearrangement. We also generated homozygous mutant mice in which the neoR gene was inserted at the 3' end of the Ig kappa intron enhancer. Unexpectedly, mere insertion of the neoR gene showed some suppressive effect on V kappa-J kappa recombination. However, the much more pronounced inhibition of V kappa-J kappa recombination by the replacement of the Ig kappa intron enhancer suggests that this enhancer is essential for V kappa-J kappa recombination. Images PMID:8508766

  15. Developmental progression of equine immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region diversity.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Tseng, Chia T; King, Rebecca A; Felippe, M Julia B

    2013-09-01

    Humoral immunity is a critical component of the immune system that is established during fetal life and expands upon exposure to pathogens. The extensive humoral immune response repertoire is generated in large part via immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain variable region diversity. The horse is a useful model to study the development of humoral diversity because the placenta does not transfer maternal antibodies; therefore, Igs detected in the fetus and pre-suckle neonate were generated in utero. The goal of this study was to compare the equine fetal Ig VDJ repertoire to that of neonatal, foal, and adult horse stages of life. We found similar profiles of IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ gene usage throughout life, including predominant usage of IGHV2S3, IGHD18S1, and IGHJ1S5. CDR3H lengths were also comparable throughout life. Unexpectedly, Ig sequence diversity significantly increased between the fetal and neonatal age, and, as expected, between the foal and adult age. PMID:23567345

  16. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Thrombocytopenia in common variable immunodeficiency patients – clinical course, management, and effect of immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Siedlar, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Szaflarska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency of humoral immunity with heterogeneous clinical features. Diagnosis of CVID is based on hypogammaglobulinaemia, low production of specific antibodies, and disorders of cellular immunity. The standard therapy includes replacement of specific antibodies with human immunoglobulin, prophylaxis, and symptomatic therapy of infections. High prevalence of autoimmunity is characteristic for CVID, most commonly: thrombocytopaenia and neutropaenia, celiac disease, and systemic autoimmune diseases. The study included seven children diagnosed with CVID and treated with immunoglobulin substitution from 2 to 12 years. Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed prior to CVID in four children, developed during immunoglobulin substitution in three children. In one boy with CVID and thrombocytopaenia, haemolytic anaemia occurred, so a diagnosis of Evans syndrome was established. Therapy of thrombocytopaenia previous to CVID included steroids and/or immunoglobulins in high dose, and azathioprine. In children with CVID on regular immunoglobulin substitution, episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia were associated with infections and were treated with high doses of immunoglobulins and steroids. In two patients only chronic thrombocytopaenia was noted. Splenectomy was necessary in one patient because of severe course of thrombocytopaenia. The results of the study indicated a supportive role of regular immunoglobulin substitution in patients with CVID and chronic thrombocytopaenia. However, regular substitution of immunoglobulins in CVID patients did not prevent the occurrence of autoimmune thrombocytopaenia episodes or exacerbations of chronic form. In episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia or exacerbations of chronic thrombocytopaenia, infusions of immunoglobulins in high dose are effective, despite previous regular substitution in the replacing dose. PMID:26155188

  18. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs. PMID:25644595

  19. Renal granuloma and immunoglobulin M-complex glomerulonephritis: a case of common variable immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Geneviève; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Sartelet, Hervé; Saint-Cyr, Claire; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2009-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by reduced serum immunoglobulin levels and recurrent bacterial infections. Granulomatous infiltrations are occasionally found in the lymphoid or solid organs of affected patients, but renal involvement is rare. We present a case of possible CVID with interstitial noncaseating granuloma and immunoglobulin (IgM)-complex glomerulonephritis with a membranoproliferative pattern and with a favorable response to corticosteroids, intravenously administered immunoglobulins (IVIGs) and rituximab. CVID must be included in the differential diagnosis of renal granuloma and should be differentiated from sarcoidosis to ensure appropriate therapy. PMID:18696117

  20. Variable outflow in the O6ef star Lambda Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leep, E. M.; Conti, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper analyzes spectroscopic data from the UV region using the Copernicus satellite on six consecutive days in September, 1975. It is found that the P Cygni lines of C III at 1175 A and of N V at 1238 and 1242 A show little or no variation in their profiles. The results indicate that the changes in the 4686-A H II and H-alpha can be interpreted as a variable outflow near the surface of the star, either due to random density inhomogeneities propagating outward, or the effects of rotation of a nonspherical star, or both. Insufficient data exist at present to distinguish between periodic and random fluctuations.

  1. Recurrent myelitis in common variable immunodeficiency successfully managed with high-dose subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Pettinari, Lucia; Marinangeli, Lucia; Logullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute myelitis is an aetiologically heterogeneous inflammatory disorder of the spinal cord. We report on a 71-year-old woman with a recurrent cervical and thoracic myelitis who presented with a new relapse of the disease. Neuromyelitis optica was ruled out such as other possible causes of acute and/or recurrent myelopathy. Serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody responses were consistent with the diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). She was treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin. As a remission-maintaining drug, we decided to treat her with subcutaneous immunoglobulin (CSL Behring) at 0.2 g/kg/week at doses higher than usually employed in replacement therapy in CVID. At 3-year follow-up, the response to treatment was good. No relapses occurred. Our case suggests the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in maintaining remission and in sparing prednisone in a woman with recurrent myelitis associated with CVID. PMID:22878981

  2. Recurrent myelitis in common variable immunodeficiency successfully managed with high-dose subcutaneous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Pettinari, Lucia; Marinangeli, Lucia; Logullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute myelitis is an aetiologically heterogeneous inflammatory disorder of the spinal cord. We report on a 71-year-old woman with a recurrent cervical and thoracic myelitis who presented with a new relapse of the disease. Neuromyelitis optica was ruled out such as other possible causes of acute and/or recurrent myelopathy. Serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody responses were consistent with the diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). She was treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin. As a remission-maintaining drug, we decided to treat her with subcutaneous immunoglobulin (CSL Behring) at 0.2 g/kg/week at doses higher than usually employed in replacement therapy in CVID. At 3-year follow-up, the response to treatment was good. No relapses occurred. Our case suggests the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in maintaining remission and in sparing prednisone in a woman with recurrent myelitis associated with CVID. PMID:22878981

  3. [Lupus nephritis associated with common variable immunodeficiency: favourable outcome with intravenous immunoglobulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Geneviève, M; Bonnet, F; Michaux, C; Geffroy, C-E; Vandenhende, M-A; Combe, C; Morlat, P

    2012-06-01

    We report a 24-year-old woman who presented with a nephrotic syndrome as the revealing manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and an associated hypogammaglobulinemia related to a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Outcome of SLE was favourable with intravenous immunoglobulin treatment solely. Relationships between SLE and CVID are discussed. PMID:22560369

  4. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  5. Variable Region Identical Immunoglobulins Differing in Isotype Express Different Paratopes*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Cowburn, David; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The finding that the antibody (Ab) constant (C) region can influence fine specificity suggests that isotype switching contributes to the generation of Ab diversity and idiotype restriction. Despite the centrality of this observation for diverse immunological effects such as vaccine responses, isotype-restricted antibody responses, and the origin of primary and secondary responses, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this phenomenon are not understood. In this study, we have taken a novel approach to the problem by probing the paratope with 15N label peptide mimetics followed by NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Specifically, we have explored the hypothesis that the C region imposes conformational constraints on the variable (V) region to affect paratope structure in a V region identical IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 mAbs. The results reveal isotype-related differences in fluorescence emission spectroscopy and temperature-related differences in binding and cleavage of a peptide mimetic. We conclude that the C region can modify the V region structure to alter the Ab paratope, thus providing an explanation for how isotype can affect Ab specificity. PMID:22930758

  6. Uracil residues dependent on the deaminase AID in immunoglobulin gene variable and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Martomo, Stella A; McClure, Rhonda L; Yang, William; Vaisman, Alexandra; Gramlich, Hillary S; Schatz, David G; Woodgate, Roger; Wilson, David M; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates diversity of immunoglobulin genes through deamination of cytosine to uracil. Two opposing models have been proposed for the deamination of DNA or RNA by AID. Although most data support DNA deamination, there is no physical evidence of uracil residues in immunoglobulin genes. Here we demonstrate their presence by determining the sensitivity of DNA to digestion with uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and abasic endonuclease. Using several methods of detection, we identified uracil residues in the variable and switch regions. Uracil residues were generated within 24 h of B cell stimulation, were present on both DNA strands and were found to replace mainly cytosine bases. Our data provide direct evidence for the model that AID functions by deaminating cytosine residues in DNA. PMID:21151102

  7. Cloning of multiple copies of immunoglobulin variable kappa genes in cosmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, R; Gorski, J; Mach, B

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of cloning large segments of DNA in cosmid vectors offers distinct advantages, in particular for the study of multigene families. Large size fragments of mouse embryo DNA were successfully cloned in the cosmid pHC 79. Twelve recombinants hybridizing specifically to an immunoglobulin kappa chain variable region probe were identified. In 9 of these recombinants, the size of the insert ranges from 30 to 43 kilobases. Factors affecting the cloning efficiency of a complex mammalian genome in cosmids were studied. The stability of these recombinant cosmids and the preparation of recombinant cosmid DNA are also discussed. Images PMID:6269060

  8. A family of variable immunoglobulin and lect in domain containing molecules in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Duval, David; Mouahid, Gabriel; Emans, Rémi; Allienne, Jean-François; Galinier, Richard; Genthon, Clémence; Dubois, Emeric; Pasquier, Louis Du; Adema, Coen M; Grunau, Christoph; Mitta, Guillaume; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Technical limitations have hindered comprehensive studies of highly variable immune response molecules that are thought to have evolved due to pathogen-mediated selection such as Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) from Biomphalaria glabrata. FREPs combine upstream immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) domains with a C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain (FreD) and participate in reactions against trematode parasites. From RNAseq data we assembled a de novo reference transcriptome of B. glabrata to investigate the diversity of FREP transcripts. This study increased over two-fold the number of bonafide FREP subfamilies and revealed important sequence diversity within FREP12 subfamily. We also report the discovery of related molecules that feature one or two IgSF domains associated with different C-terminal lectin domains, named C-type lectin-related proteins (CREPs) and Galectin-related protein (GREP). Together, the highly similar FREPs, CREPs and GREP were designated VIgL (Variable Immunoglobulin and Lectin domain containing molecules). PMID:25451302

  9. Intravenous immunoglobulin induces proliferation and immunoglobulin synthesis from B cells of patients with common variable immunodeficiency: a mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of IVIg in primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Fournier, Emilie M; Maddur, Mohan S; Vani, Janakiraman; Wootla, Bharath; Sibéril, Sophie; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Berdah, Mikael; Crabol, Yoann; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lévy, Yves; Mouthon, Luc; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Hermine, Olivier; Kaveri, Srini V

    2011-02-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is associated with low serum immunoglobulin concentrations and an increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. The treatment of choice for CVID patients is replacement intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. IVIg has been beneficial in preventing or alleviating the severity of infections and autoimmune and inflammatory process in majority of CVID patients. Although the mechanisms of action of IVIg given as 'therapeutic high dose' in patients with autoimmune diseases are well studied, the underlying mechanisms of beneficial effects of IVIg in primary immunodeficiencies are not completely understood. Therefore we investigated the effect of 'replacement dose' of IVIg by probing its action on B cells from CVID patients. We demonstrate that IVIg at low doses induces proliferation and immunoglobulin synthesis from B cells of CVID patients. Interestingly, B cell stimulation by IVIg is not associated with induction of B cell effector cytokine IFN-γ and of transcription factor T-bet. Together, our results indicate that in some CVID patients, IVIg rectifies the defective signaling of B cells normally provided by T cells and delivers T-independent signaling for B cells to proliferate. IVIg 'replacement therapy' in primary immunodeficiencies is therefore not a merepassive transfer of antibodies to prevent exclusively the recurrent infections; rather it has an active role in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory responses through modulating B cell functions and thus imposing dynamic equilibrium of the immune system. PMID:20970960

  10. lambda lambda. hypernuclei and the. lambda lambda. interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1986-01-01

    Variational calculations of ..cap alpha..-cluster models for /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He, /sup 9//sub ..lambda lambda../Be have been made. These calculations require a knowledge of the ..cap alpha lambda.. potential which is obtained in several ways including the use of five-body Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of /sup 5//sub ..lambda../He. We discuss the ..lambda lambda.. interaction strengths and the relation between the /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He and /sup 10//sub ..lambda lambda../Be binding energies and, in particular, the dependence of these on the ..cap alpha lambda.. potential. For all our ..cap alpha lambda.. potentials the binding energy of /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He predicted from /sup 10//sub ..lambda lambda../Be is 1 MeV or more below the experimental value. A brief discussion is given of the implication of the phenomenological strength of ..lambda lambda.. interaction we obtain and also the implication of ..lambda lambda.. hypernuclei for the H-dibaryon. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens. PMID:26853951

  12. Conserved aromatic residues as determinants in the folding and assembly of immunoglobulin variable domains.

    PubMed

    Campion, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Detailed analysis of amino acid distribution, focusing on the "framework" regions of both heavy- and light-chain variable immunoglobulin (Ig) domains, distinguished those conserved sequence elements shared by both heavy-chain (VH) and light-chain (VL) domains from those conserved determinants unique to either VH or VL domains alone. Mapping of conserved chemical functionality onto characterized PDB structures showed the analogous placement and utilization of shared determinants in VH and VL structures that are generally similar. Identical Arginine-Aspartic acid ion-pairs located symmetrically on the lateral surfaces of VH and VL domains, respectively, as well as paired glutamine residues that constitute a central contact site between VH and VL domains represent clearly shared molecular features. Three sites of shared aromaticity were found localized to symmetrical sites lining the inaccessible interface of the VH-VL duplex, suggesting an expanded role for strategically conserved aromatic residues from a postulated determinant of individual Ig domain folding to now implicate conserved aromatic sites in the subsequent multi-subunit assembly of native antibody superstructure. Differential domain-specific conservation, representing evolutionary diversification and molecular asymmetry between heavy- and light-chain variable domains was limited, but included amino acids from each functional class and must be evaluated with regard to their possible involvement in heterologous aspects of IgV protein structure-function. PMID:26742085

  13. Immunoglobulin kappa light chain variable region gene complex organization and immunoglobulin genes encoding anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, R; Strohal, R; Balderas, R S; Johnson, M E; Noonan, D J; Duchosal, M A; Dixon, F J; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the genetic origin of autoantibody production in several strains of mice that spontaneously develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of gene loci encoding kappa light chain variable regions (Igk-V) demonstrated, as shown previously for the Ig heavy chain locus, that autoantibody production and disease occur in different Igk-V haplotypes. Moreover, autoimmune mice with known genetic derivation inherited their Igk-V loci essentially unaltered from their nonautoimmune ancestors. New Zealand black lupus mice, with unknown genetic derivation, had a possibly recombinant Igk-V haplotype, composed of V kappa loci that were primarily indistinguishable from those of nonautoimmune strains from either of the two potential donor haplotypes. The heavy and light chain gene segments (variable, diversity, joining) encoding anti-DNA antibodies were diverse and often closely related, or even identical, to those found in antibodies to foreign antigens in normal mice. Only 1 of 11 sequenced variable region genes could not be assigned to existing variable region gene families; however, corresponding germline genes were present in the genome of normal mice as well. These data argue against abnormalities in the genes and mechanisms generating antibody diversity in lupus mice and suggest a remarkable genetic and structural diversity in the generation of anti-DNA binding sites. Images PMID:3138286

  14. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with the proximal immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M A; Gibson, W T; Ebers, G C; Cox, D W

    1991-01-01

    15 immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (CH) and variable region (VH) polymorphisms were selected to span the entire length of the heavy chain cluster. These polymorphisms were examined in 34 sib pairs concordant for multiple sclerosis (MS) and in 23 sporadic MS patients. Allele frequencies were calculated for the 2 MS patient groups and compared with those found in a control population from the same geographical location and of similar ethnic background. No significant association was found between MS and the 7 CH region polymorphisms examined. However, a significant correlation between the MS phenotype and a VH2 family polymorphism was observed in both MS patient populations (familial MS patients chi 2 = 8.16, P less than 0.005; sporadic MS patients chi 2 = 8.90, P less than 0.005). One allele of the VH2-5 gene segment was found to be over-represented in both MS groups. VH2-5 has recently been physically mapped close to the CH region, between 180 and 360 kb away. These results indicate that a locus near or within the CH-proximal VH region is associated with increased susceptibility to MS. Images PMID:1672695

  15. Inhibition by small-molecule ligands of formation of amyloid fibrils of an immunoglobulin light chain variable domain

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Salwinski, Lukasz; Phillips, Martin L; Ly, Alan T; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2015-01-01

    Overproduction of immunoglobulin light chains leads to systemic amyloidosis, a lethal disease characterized by the formation of amyloid fibrils in patients' tissues. Excess light chains are in equilibrium between dimers and less stable monomers which can undergo irreversible aggregation to the amyloid state. The dimers therefore must disassociate into monomers prior to forming amyloid fibrils. Here we identify ligands that inhibit amyloid formation by stabilizing the Mcg light chain variable domain dimer and shifting the equilibrium away from the amyloid-prone monomer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10935.001 PMID:26576950

  16. Immunoglobulin VH clan and family identity predicts variable domain structure and may influence antigen binding.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, P M; Mortari, F; Newton, J A; Schroeder, H W

    1992-01-01

    Mammalian immunoglobulin VH families can be grouped into three distinct clans based upon sequence conservation in two of the three framework (FR) intervals. Through replacement/silent site substitution analysis, molecular modeling and mathematical evaluation of known immunoglobulin crystal structures, we demonstrate that this conservation reflects preservation of protein sequence and structure. Each clan contains a characteristic FR 1 interval that is solvent-exposed and structurally separated from the antigen binding site. Families within a clan contain their own unique FR 3 interval that is capable of either influencing the conformation of the antigen binding site or interacting directly with antigen. Our results provide a structural context for theories that address differential use of VH families in the immune response. Images PMID:1537339

  17. Anaphylaxis to IGIV in immunoglobulin-naïve common variable immunodeficiency patient in the absence of IgG anti-IgA antibodies: successful administration of low IgA-containing immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Asal; Caperton, Caroline; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Although severe reactions to immunoglobulin preparations have been frequently reported, IgE antibodies against IgA are usually not investigated; and occur predominantly in previously sensitized patients. The purpose is to report anaphylaxis to IGIV during initial infusion in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency with absent IgA without prior sensitization and in the absence of detectable IgG anti-IgA antibodies, and positive skin tests for immediate hypersensitivity to four different preparations of IGIV, one subcutaneous immunoglobulin preparation, and to purified IgA. Patient was treated without side effects with IGIV preparation depleted of IgA to which immediate hypersensitivity skin test was negative. This case demonstrates that patients with CVID with no IgA and without prior exposure to immunoglobulin or plasma may develop anaphylaxis following initial infusion of IGIV, which appears to be due to IgE anti-IgA, and independent of IgG anti-IgA antibodies. Since there is no good correlation between anaphylaxis/anaphylactic reactions and IgG anti-IgA antibodies, and IgE anti-IgA antibody test is commercially unavailable, we suggest that the patients with CVID with absence of IgA might be skin tested for immediate hypersensitivity prior to initiation of immunoglobulin administration. However, such recommendation may require studies on a large number of patients with CVID with no detectable IgA. PMID:27190527

  18. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes. PMID:26219564

  19. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene utilization by B cell hybridomas derived from rheumatoid synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M; Longhurst, C; Haynes, G; Plater-Zyberk, C; Malcolm, A; Maini, R N

    1992-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects synovial joints. Activated B lymphocytes and plasma cells are present in the synovial tissue and are thought to contribute to the immunopathology of the rheumatoid joint. To investigate rheumatoid synovial B lymphocytes, we have generated B cell hybridomas from synovial tissue of an RA patient. Here we describe the immunoglobulin VH gene repertoire of eight IgM- and 10 IgG-secreting synovial-derived hybridomas. The VH4 gene family is highly represented (38.5%) in this panel of hybridomas compared with the frequency of VH4 gene expression in circulating B lymphocytes reported previously (19-22%) and with the VH4 gene frequency we observed in a panel of hybridomas derived in the same manner from the spleen and tonsil of normal individuals (19%). The increased frequency of VH4 gene expression was not due to the expansion of a single B cell clone in vivo as none of these hybridomas was clonally related. Two synovial-derived hybridomas secreted autoantibodies; one (VH3+) secreted an IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) and the other (VH4+) secreted IgM with polyreactive binding to cytoskeletal proteins and cardiolipin. The antibodies secreted by the remaining synovial-derived hybridomas were not reactive with the autoantigens tested. The VH gene usage in a proportion (5/17) of synovial-derived hybridomas that expressed CD5 antigen provided preliminary evidence that CD5+ B cells in RA synovium have a similar increase of VH4 gene expression reported for CD5+ B cells from normal individuals and patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. PMID:1379132

  20. In vivo modulation of the expressions of Fas and CD25 by intravenous immunoglobulin in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Artac, Hasibe; Kara, Reyhan; Reisli, Ismail

    2010-03-01

    Although the presence of physiologic anti-CD95 (Fas, APO-1) autoantibodies in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations is known, the effects of these antibodies in patients with common variable immunodeficiency are unclear (CVID). The aim of the study was to assess the effects of IVIG in Fas expression, activation markers and the subsets of T cells in patients with CVID. We studied 15 cases with CVID and 10 healthy controls with no signs of immunodeficiency. The Fas expression of T cells, activation markers (CD25, CD69 and HLA-DR) and T-cell subsets were analyzed by four-color flow cytometry. We found that the Fas expression of CD3+ T cells in patients was significantly higher than in controls. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Fas expression of CD3+ T cells and CD4+ T cells, and the CD25 expression of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells after IVIG supplementation (P < 0.05). The CD69 and HLA-DR expressions of T cells and CD8+ T cells were not affected by IVIG infusion. Our observation showed that IVIG replacement causes an increase in the Fas and CD25 expressions in patients with CVID. These data suggest that the Fas protein may have an important role in the effects of IVIG for the control of autoimmunity in patients with CVID, as well as in the generation of autoimmune disease. PMID:19730984

  1. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  2. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene repertoire and B-cell receptor stereotypes in Indian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rani, Lata; Mathur, Nitin; Gogia, Ajay; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Atul; Dube, Divya; Kaur, Punit; Gupta, Ritu

    2016-10-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the geographical bias in immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) gene usage lead us to analyze IGHV gene usage and B-cell receptor stereotypy in 195 patients from India. IGHV3, IGHV4, and IGHV1 families were the most frequently used. 20.5% sequences had stereotyped BCR and were clustered in 12 pre-defined and 6 novel subsets. Unmutated IGHV was significantly associated with reduced time to first treatment (p < 0.033) and poor overall survival (OS; p = 0.01). We observed a significant difference in OS between IGHV1, IGHV3, and IGHV4 family cases (p = 0.045) in early stage patients. Regarding subfamily usage, only IGHV1-69 expression was found to have statistically significant poor outcome (p = 0.017). Our results from the analysis of various molecular and clinical features suggest that the expression of specific IGHV gene influences the outcome in early stage CLL, and hence its assessment may be added to the clinical leukemia laboratory armamentarium. PMID:26942309

  3. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  4. Exceptional Amyloid β Peptide Hydrolyzing Activity of Nonphysiological Immunoglobulin Variable Domain Scaffolds*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Hiroaki; Planque, Stephanie; Sapparapu, Gopal; Boivin, Stephane; Hara, Mariko; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2008-01-01

    Nucleophilic sites in the paired variable domains of the light and heavy chains (VL and VH domains) of Ig can catalyze peptide bond hydrolysis. Amyloid β (Aβ)-binding Igs are under consideration for immunotherapy of Alzheimer disease. We searched for Aβ-hydrolyzing human IgV domains (IgVs) in a library containing a majority of single chain Fv clones mimicking physiological VL-VH-combining sites and minority IgV populations with nonphysiological structures generated by cloning errors. Random screening and covalent selection of phage-displayed IgVs with an electrophilic Aβ analog identified rare IgVs that hydrolyzed Aβ mainly at His14-Gln15. Inhibition of IgV catalysis and irreversible binding by an electrophilic hapten suggested a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. Structural analysis indicated that the catalytic IgVs are nonphysiological structures, a two domain heterodimeric VL (IgVL2-t) and single domain VL clones with aberrant polypeptide tags (IgVL-t′). The IgVs hydrolyzed Aβ at rates superior to naturally occurring Igs by 3-4 orders of magnitude. Forced pairing of the single domain VL with VH or VL domains resulted in reduced Aβ hydrolysis, suggesting catalysis by the unpaired VL domain.Ångstrom level amino acid displacements evident in molecular models of the two domain and unpaired VL domain clones explain alterations of catalytic activity. In view of their superior catalytic activity, the VL domain IgVs may help attain clearance of medically important antigens more efficiently than natural Igs. PMID:18974093

  5. Over 30% of patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma express the same immunoglobulin heavy variable gene: ontogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Bikos, V; Darzentas, N; Hadzidimitriou, A; Davis, Z; Hockley, S; Traverse-Glehen, A; Algara, P; Santoro, A; Gonzalez, D; Mollejo, M; Dagklis, A; Gangemi, F; Bosler, D S; Bourikas, G; Anagnostopoulos, A; Tsaftaris, A; Iannitto, E; Ponzoni, M; Felman, P; Berger, F; Belessi, C; Ghia, P; Papadaki, T; Dogan, A; Degano, M; Matutes, E; Piris, M A; Oscier, D; Stamatopoulos, K

    2012-07-01

    We performed an immunogenetic analysis of 345 IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ rearrangements from 337 cases with primary splenic small B-cell lymphomas of marginal-zone origin. Three immunoglobulin (IG) heavy variable (IGHV) genes accounted for 45.8% of the cases (IGHV1-2, 24.9%; IGHV4-34, 12.8%; IGHV3-23, 8.1%). Particularly for the IGHV1-2 gene, strong biases were evident regarding utilization of different alleles, with 79/86 rearrangements (92%) using allele (*)04. Among cases more stringently classified as splenic marginal-zone lymphoma (SMZL) thanks to the availability of splenic histopathological specimens, the frequency of IGHV1-2(*)04 peaked at 31%. The IGHV1-2(*)04 rearrangements carried significantly longer complementarity-determining region-3 (CDR3) than all other cases and showed biased IGHD gene usage, leading to CDR3s with common motifs. The great majority of analyzed rearrangements (299/345, 86.7%) carried IGHV genes with some impact of somatic hypermutation, from minimal to pronounced. Noticeably, 75/79 (95%) IGHV1-2(*)04 rearrangements were mutated; however, they mostly (56/75 cases; 74.6%) carried few mutations (97-99.9% germline identity) of conservative nature and restricted distribution. These distinctive features of the IG receptors indicate selection by (super)antigenic element(s) in the pathogenesis of SMZL. Furthermore, they raise the possibility that certain SMZL subtypes could derive from progenitor populations adapted to particular antigenic challenges through selection of VH domain specificities, in particular the IGHV1-2(*)04 allele. PMID:22222599

  6. Molecular bases of genetic diversity and evolution of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) gene locus in leporids

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana; Lanning, Dennis; Alves, Paulo C.; Mage, Rose G.; Knight, Katherine L.; van der Loo, Wessel; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    The rabbit has long been a model for studies of the immune system. Work using rabbits contributed both to the battle against infectious diseases such as rabies and syphilis, and to our knowledge of antibodies' structure, function, and regulated expression. With the description of rabbit Ig allotypes, the discovery of different gene segments encoding immunoglobulins became possible. This challenged the “one gene-one protein” dogma. The observation that rabbit allotypic specificities of the variable regions were present on IgM and IgG molecules also led to the hypothesis of Ig class switching. Rabbit allotypes contributed to the documentation of phenomena such as allelic exclusion and imbalance in production of allelic gene products. During the last 30 years, the rabbit Ig allotypes revealed a number of unique features, setting them apart from mice, humans and other mammals. Here, we review the most relevant findings concerning the rabbit IGHV. Among these are the preferential usage of one VH gene in VDJ rearrangements, the existence of trans-species polymorphism in the IGHV locus revealed by serology and confirmed by sequencing IGHV genes in Lepus, the unusually large genetic distances between allelic lineages and the fact that the antibody repertoire is diversified in this species only after birth. The Whole Genome Sequence of rabbit, plus re-sequencing of additional strains and related genera, will allow further evolutionary investigations of antibody variation. Continued research will help define the roles that genetic, allelic and population diversity at antibody loci may play in host-parasite interactions. PMID:21594770

  7. New diagnostic criteria for common variable immune deficiency (CVID), which may assist with decisions to treat with intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, R; Woon, S-T; Gillis, D; Koopmans, W; Steele, R

    2013-11-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most frequent symptomatic primary immune deficiency in adults. The standard of care is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or subcutaneous immunoglobulin (scIG) therapy. The cause of CVID is currently unknown, and there is no universally accepted definition of CVID. This creates problems in determining which patients will benefit from IVIG/scIG treatment. In this paper, we review the difficulties with the commonly used European Society of Immune Deficiencies (ESID) and the Pan American Group for Immune Deficiency (PAGID) definition of CVID. We propose new criteria for the diagnosis of CVID, which are based on recent scientific discoveries. Improved diagnostic precision will assist with treatment decisions including IVIG/scIG replacement. We suggest that asymptomatic patients with mild hypogammaglobulinaemia are termed hypogammaglobulinaemia of uncertain significance (HGUS). These patients require long-term follow-up, as some will evolve into CVID. PMID:23859429

  8. New diagnostic criteria for common variable immune deficiency (CVID), which may assist with decisions to treat with intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Ameratunga, R; Woon, S-T; Gillis, D; Koopmans, W; Steele, R

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most frequent symptomatic primary immune deficiency in adults. The standard of care is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or subcutaneous immunoglobulin (scIG) therapy. The cause of CVID is currently unknown, and there is no universally accepted definition of CVID. This creates problems in determining which patients will benefit from IVIG/scIG treatment. In this paper, we review the difficulties with the commonly used European Society of Immune Deficiencies (ESID) and the Pan American Group for Immune Deficiency (PAGID) definition of CVID. We propose new criteria for the diagnosis of CVID, which are based on recent scientific discoveries. Improved diagnostic precision will assist with treatment decisions including IVIG/scIG replacement. We suggest that asymptomatic patients with mild hypogammaglobulinaemia are termed hypogammaglobulinaemia of uncertain significance (HGUS). These patients require long-term follow-up, as some will evolve into CVID. PMID:23859429

  9. Total Proteome Analysis Identifies Migration Defects as a Major Pathogenetic Factor in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region (IGHV)-unmutated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Gina L.; Zhuang, Jianguo; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Till, Kathleen J.; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian G.; Oates, Melanie; Park, Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pettitt, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region defines two clinically distinct forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) known as mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (UM-CLL). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse clinical outcome associated with UM-CLL, total proteomes from nine UM-CLL and nine M-CLL samples were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based mass spectrometry. Based on the expression of 3521 identified proteins, principal component analysis separated CLL samples into two groups corresponding to immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutational status. Computational analysis showed that 43 cell migration/adhesion pathways were significantly enriched by 39 differentially expressed proteins, 35 of which were expressed at significantly lower levels in UM-CLL samples. Furthermore, UM-CLL cells underexpressed proteins associated with cytoskeletal remodeling and overexpressed proteins associated with transcriptional and translational activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that UM-CLL cells are less migratory and more adhesive than M-CLL cells, resulting in their retention in lymph nodes, where they are exposed to proliferative stimuli. In keeping with this hypothesis, analysis of an extended cohort of 120 CLL patients revealed a strong and specific association between UM-CLL and lymphadenopathy. Our study illustrates the potential of total proteome analysis to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer. PMID:25645933

  10. Total proteome analysis identifies migration defects as a major pathogenetic factor in immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV)-unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Gina L; Zhuang, Jianguo; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Till, Kathleen J; Jithesh, Puthen V; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian G; Oates, Melanie; Park, Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region defines two clinically distinct forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) known as mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (UM-CLL). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse clinical outcome associated with UM-CLL, total proteomes from nine UM-CLL and nine M-CLL samples were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based mass spectrometry. Based on the expression of 3521 identified proteins, principal component analysis separated CLL samples into two groups corresponding to immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutational status. Computational analysis showed that 43 cell migration/adhesion pathways were significantly enriched by 39 differentially expressed proteins, 35 of which were expressed at significantly lower levels in UM-CLL samples. Furthermore, UM-CLL cells underexpressed proteins associated with cytoskeletal remodeling and overexpressed proteins associated with transcriptional and translational activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that UM-CLL cells are less migratory and more adhesive than M-CLL cells, resulting in their retention in lymph nodes, where they are exposed to proliferative stimuli. In keeping with this hypothesis, analysis of an extended cohort of 120 CLL patients revealed a strong and specific association between UM-CLL and lymphadenopathy. Our study illustrates the potential of total proteome analysis to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer. PMID:25645933

  11. Lambda Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael

    2014-06-01

    There is an explosion in the quantity and quality of IMINT data being captured in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) today. While automated exploitation techniques involving computer vision are arriving, only a few architectures can manage both the storage and bandwidth of large volumes of IMINT data and also present results to analysts quickly. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been actively researching in the area of applying Big Data cloud computing techniques to computer vision applications. This paper presents the results of this work in adopting a Lambda Architecture to process and disseminate IMINT data using computer vision algorithms. The approach embodies an end-to-end solution by processing IMINT data from sensors to serving information products quickly to analysts, independent of the size of the data. The solution lies in dividing up the architecture into a speed layer for low-latent processing and a batch layer for higher quality answers at the expense of time, but in a robust and fault-tolerant way. This approach was evaluated using a large corpus of IMINT data collected by a C-130 Shadow Harvest sensor over Afghanistan from 2010 through 2012. The evaluation data corpus included full motion video from both narrow and wide area field-of-views. The evaluation was done on a scaled-out cloud infrastructure that is similar in composition to those found in the Intelligence Community. The paper shows experimental results to prove the scalability of the architecture and precision of its results using a computer vision algorithm designed to identify man-made objects in sparse data terrain.

  12. Shell-model predictions for Lambda Lambda hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, A.; Millener, D.

    2011-06-02

    It is shown how the recent shell-model determination of {Lambda}N spin-dependent interaction terms in {Lambda} hypernuclei allows for a reliable deduction of {Lambda}{Lambda} separation energies in {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclei across the nuclear p shell. Comparison is made with the available data, highlighting {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 11}Be and {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 12}Be which have been suggested as possible candidates for the KEK-E373 HIDA event.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a single variable domain of the immunoglobulin superfamily in amphioxus, Amphi-IgSF-V

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yanjie; Chen, Rong; Wang, Zhenbao; Tariq, Mansoor; Xia, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Amphioxus is regarded as an essential animal model for the study of immune evolution. Discovery of new molecules with the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) variable (V) domain in amphioxus would help in studying the evolution of IgSF V molecules in the immune system. A protein was found which just contains only one IgSF V domain in amphioxus, termed Amphi-IgSF-V; it has over 30% sequence identity to the V domains of human immunoglobulins and mammalian T-cell receptors. In order to clarify the three-dimensional structure of this new molecule in amphioxus, Amphi-IgSF-V was expressed, purified and crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.95 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.9, c = 135.5 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.58 Å3 Da−1 and 52.38%, respectively. The results will provide structural information to study the evolution of IgSF V molecules in the immune system. PMID:25084385

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a single variable domain of the immunoglobulin superfamily in amphioxus, Amphi-IgSF-V.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yanjie; Chen, Rong; Wang, Zhenbao; Tariq, Mansoor; Xia, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Amphioxus is regarded as an essential animal model for the study of immune evolution. Discovery of new molecules with the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) variable (V) domain in amphioxus would help in studying the evolution of IgSF V molecules in the immune system. A protein was found which just contains only one IgSF V domain in amphioxus, termed Amphi-IgSF-V; it has over 30% sequence identity to the V domains of human immunoglobulins and mammalian T-cell receptors. In order to clarify the three-dimensional structure of this new molecule in amphioxus, Amphi-IgSF-V was expressed, purified and crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.95 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.9, c = 135.5 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.58 Å(3) Da(-1) and 52.38%, respectively. The results will provide structural information to study the evolution of IgSF V molecules in the immune system. PMID:25084385

  15. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10−10 M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  16. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10(-10) M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  17. Study of {Lambda}-{Lambda} oscillation in quantum coherent {Lambda}{Lambda} by using J/{psi}{yields}{Lambda}{Lambda} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Xianwei; Li Haibo; Lu Gongru

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of searching for the {Lambda}-{Lambda} oscillations for coherent {Lambda}{Lambda} production in the J/{psi}{yields}{Lambda}{Lambda} decay process. The sensitivity of measurement of {Lambda}-{Lambda} oscillation in the external field at BES-III experiment is considered. These considerations indicate an alternative way to probe the {Delta}B=2 amplitude in addition to neutron oscillation experiments. Both coherent and time-dependent information can be used to extract the {Lambda}-{Lambda} oscillation parameter. With one year's luminosity at BES-III, we can set an upper limit of {delta}m{sub {Lambda}{Lambda}<}10{sup -15} MeV at 90% confidence level, corresponding to about 10{sup -6} s of {Lambda}-{Lambda} oscillation time.

  18. Bronchoalveolar lavage of cranial and caudal lung regions in selected normal calves: cellular, microbiological, immunoglobulin, serological and histological variables.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, J K; Viel, L; Shewen, P E; Willoughby, R A; Martin, S W; Valli, V E

    1988-01-01

    Of a group of 30 clinically normal male Holstein calves two to eight weeks of age, six two week old and six four week old calves met various radiographical and clinicopathological criteria for normality. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy on cranial and caudal lung regions in all 30 calves and samples analyzed for free cells, microorganisms, and immunoglobulins. Lateral chest radiographs and lung biopsies were also conducted on each calf. Calves were euthanized and necropsied ten days after bronchoalveolar lavage was conducted. Reported in this paper are results from the 12 normal calves. Microorganisms were present in small numbers in the lower respiratory tract of some normal calves. There were no differences in the above parameters between cranial and caudal lobes. There were statistically significant changes in bronchoalveolar lavage cell proportions with age although there were no detectable differences in clinical signs. Four week old calves had a lower percentage of macrophages and a higher percentage of epithelial cells than two week old animals (p less than 0.05). There was also a trend toward an increased percentage of neutrophils in older calves but this was not significant (p greater than 0.05). Total bronchoalveolar lavage protein also appeared to increase with age (p less than 0.05). In both groups a higher proportion of IgG2 in bronchoalveolar lavage compared to serum was found, suggesting the presence of a local selective transfer mechanism into respiratory secretions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3370559

  19. Efficiency of immunoglobulin G replacement therapy in common variable immunodeficiency: correlations with clinical phenotype and polymorphism of the neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux-Gruart, V; Chapel, H; Chevret, S; Lucas, M; Malphettes, M; Fieschi, C; Patel, S; Boutboul, D; Marson, M-N; Gérard, L; Lee, M; Watier, H; Oksenhendler, E

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID) is based on replacement therapy using intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Interindividual variation of IgG dose is common. A total of 380 CVID patients on stable IgG replacement from two prospective cohorts were analysed. An 'efficiency' index was defined as the ratio of serum IgG trough level minus IgG residual to the average weekly dose of IgG infusion. A reduced efficiency of IgG was associated independently with the i.v. route (P < 0·001) and with the presence of at least one CVID disease-related phenotype (lymphoproliferation, autoimmune cytopenia or enteropathy) (P < 0·001). High IgG efficiency was noted in patients homozygotes for the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) 3/3 polymorphism of the neonatal Fc receptor gene [IgG Fc fragment receptor transporter alpha chain (FCGRT)] promoter, and this was particularly significant in patients treated with IVIG (P < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, FCGRT VNTR 3/3 genotype (P = 0·008) and high serum albumin (P < 0·001) were associated independently with increased efficiency of i.v. Ig. PMID:23286945

  20. Efficiency of immunoglobulin G replacement therapy in common variable immunodeficiency: correlations with clinical phenotype and polymorphism of the neonatal Fc receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux-Gruart, V; Chapel, H; Chevret, S; Lucas, M; Malphettes, M; Fieschi, C; Patel, S; Boutboul, D; Marson, M-N; Gérard, L; Lee, M; Watier, H; Oksenhendler, E

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID) is based on replacement therapy using intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Interindividual variation of IgG dose is common. A total of 380 CVID patients on stable IgG replacement from two prospective cohorts were analysed. An ‘efficiency’ index was defined as the ratio of serum IgG trough level minus IgG residual to the average weekly dose of IgG infusion. A reduced efficiency of IgG was associated independently with the i.v. route (P < 0·001) and with the presence of at least one CVID disease-related phenotype (lymphoproliferation, autoimmune cytopenia or enteropathy) (P < 0·001). High IgG efficiency was noted in patients homozygotes for the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) 3/3 polymorphism of the neonatal Fc receptor gene [IgG Fc fragment receptor transporter alpha chain (FCGRT)] promoter, and this was particularly significant in patients treated with IVIG (P < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, FCGRT VNTR 3/3 genotype (P = 0·008) and high serum albumin (P < 0·001) were associated independently with increased efficiency of i.v. Ig. PMID:23286945

  1. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  2. Altered phenotypic expression of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes in Alicia rabbits probably reflects a small deletion in the VH genes closest to the joining region.

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, M; Newman, B A; Young-Cooper, G O; Alexander, C B; Meier, D; Kelus, A S; Mage, R G

    1990-01-01

    Rabbits of the Alicia strain have a mutation (ali) that segregates with the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (lgh) locus and has a cis effect upon the expression of heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes encoding the a2 allotype. In heterozygous a1/ali or a3/ali rabbits, serum immunoglobulins are almost entirely the products of the normal a1 or a3 allele and only traces of a2 immunoglobulin are detectable. Adult homozygous ali/ali rabbits likewise have normal immunoglobulin levels resulting from increased production of a-negative immunoglobulins and some residual ability to produce the a2 allotype. By contrast, the majority of the immunoglobulins of wild-type a2 rabbits are a2-positive and only a small percentage are a-negative. Genomic DNAs from homozygous mutant and wild-type animals were indistinguishable by Southern analyses using a variety of restriction enzyme digests and lgh probes. However, when digests with infrequently cutting enzymes were analyzed by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis, the ali DNA fragments were 10-15 kilobases smaller than the wild type. These fragments hybridized to probes both for VH and for a region of DNA a few kilobases downstream of the VH genes nearest the joining region. We suggest that this relatively small deletion affects a segment containing 3' VH genes with important regulatory functions, the loss of which leads to the ali phenotype. These results, and the fact that the 3' VH genes rearrange early in B-cell development, indicate that the 3' end of the VH locus probably plays a key role in regulation of VH gene expression. Images PMID:2115171

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy in common variable immunodeficiency induces B cell depletion through differentiation into apoptosis-prone CD21(low) B cells.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Milica; Marrapodi, Ramona; Camponeschi, Alessandro; Lazzeri, Cristina; Todi, Laura; Quinti, Isabella; Fiorilli, Massimo; Visentini, Marcella

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), besides its use as replacement therapy in patients with antibody deficiencies, is broadly used as an immunomodulatory agent for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. The mechanisms of action of IVIG include Fc receptor blockade, inhibition of cytokines and growth factors, modulation of macrophages and dendritic cells, enhancement of regulatory T cells, and modulation of B cells through the FcγRIIB receptor and CD22. Recent studies suggest that in vitro exposure of human B cells to IVIG determines functional changes reminiscent of anergy and that IVIG treatment of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) induces in B cells ERK activation, a feature of anergy. Here, we show that IVIG therapy drives the B cells of patients with CVID to down-regulate CD21 expression and to assume the peculiar phenotype of the anergic-like, apoptosis-prone CD21(low) B cells that are spontaneously expanded in a subset of CVID and in some other immunological disorders. The CD21(low) B cells newly generated after IVIG infusion undergo spontaneous apoptosis upon in vitro culture. Furthermore, IVIG infusion is rapidly followed by a significant, although discrete, decrease in the number of circulating B cells, but not of T cells or of natural killer cells. These findings suggest that IVIG therapy may constrain antibody responses by inducing B cell depletion through differentiation into CD21(low) B cells that undergo accelerated apoptosis. PMID:25407649

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement induces an in vivo reduction of inflammatory monocytes and retains the monocyte ability to respond to bacterial stimulation in patients with common variable immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Filomena Monica; Prezzo, Alessandro; Conti, Valentina; Bilotta, Caterina; Pulvirenti, Federica; Iacobini, Metello; Quinti, Isabella

    2015-09-01

    Intravenous IgG administration induces significant modifications in the innate and adaptive compartment of the immune system including the monocyte/macrophage system. We analyzed the in vivo effect of IgG administered at replacement dosages on the frequency of monocytes subsets, on the modulation of CD11b and sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin receptor (Siglec 9) expression and on monocytes production of reactive oxygen species. We showed that patients with Common Variable Immune Deficiency have an increased frequency pro-inflammatory intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes and an increased expression of CD11b and Siglec 9 on monocytes. IgG administered at replacement dosages exerted an in vivo anti-inflammatory effect as shown by a reduction of circulating monocytes, of intermediate pro-inflammatory monocytes, of CD11b and Siglec 9 expression and of ex vivo monocytes oxidative burst. Nevertheless, intravenous IgG administration did not affect the monocyte functional ability to respond to a bacterial stimulation in terms of CD11b and Siglec 9 expression and reactive oxygen species production. PMID:26232049

  5. The establishment of a human myeloma cell line elaborating lambda-light chain protein.

    PubMed

    Niho, Y; Shibuya, T; Yamasaki, K; Kimura, N

    1984-05-01

    A human myeloma cell line (KMM-56) producing lambda-light chain protein was established in vitro by cultivation of the cells in the pleural effusion obtained from a patient with IgD-lambda-myeloma. The cells proliferate in suspension and do not aggregate or attach to the culture dish. Surface marker analysis revealed that the cells were negative for E-rosette, and surface immunoglobulin. Immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, and immunofluorescence with various antibodies demonstrated no heavy chains, while lambda-light chains were detected in the cytoplasm of the cells. Using the immunodiffusion technique, only lambda-light chains were detected in the frozen and thawed cell extract, the concentrated supernatant of the cell culture, and the urine of the patient. Electron microscopic examination revealed the plasmablastoid appearance of the cells. This cell line may be useful for future studies of human immunoglobulin genes and for the material of human-human hybridoma, which could produce monoclonal human immunoglobulin. PMID:6429256

  6. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  7. The immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: affected-sib-pair analysis and association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Veijola, R.; Knip, M.; Puukka, R.; Reijonen, H.; Cox, D. W.; Ilonen, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (VH) polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) by using a set of polymorphic loci that span approximately 1,000 kb of the VH region on chromosome 14q32. One hundred one Finnish families with at least two children affected with IDDM were studied. Conventional RFLPs determined by hybridization were used, since no microsatellite repeat markers have been available for this gene region. No evidence for linkage between the VH genes and IDDM could be obtained from haplotype-sharing analysis among the 133 diabetic sib pairs. The frequencies of various VH genotypes were also compared between 101 familial IDDM cases and 114 controls derived from the Finnish background population. The distribution of the genotypes at the VH2-B5 locus was significantly different between these groups (P=.004), the 3.4/3.4 genotype being less common in the IDDM cases. In addition, a different genotype distribution at the VH5-B2 locus was observed in the diabetic subjects (P = .022). When the IDDM cases were stratified by presence or absence of the high-risk HLA-DQB1*0302 allele, no differences in VH genotype frequencies were observed between the 0302-positive and 0302-negative cases. In the transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (TDT), no differences were found between the expected and observed frequencies of the transmitted alleles at the VH2-B5 or VH5-B2 locus. In conclusion, significant differences in VH genotype distributions were observed between the familial IDDM cases and the controls, but the observed associations could not be confirmed by the TDT. Haplotype sharing analysis provided no evidence for genetic linkage between the VH gene region and IDDM. Images Figure 1 PMID:8755935

  8. Complete Haplotype Sequence of the Human Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Variable, Diversity, and Joining Genes and Characterization of Allelic and Copy-Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Corey T.; Steinberg, Karyn M.; Huddleston, John; Warren, Rene L.; Malig, Maika; Schein, Jacqueline; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Joy, Jeffrey B.; Scott, Jamie K.; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Holt, Robert A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Breden, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (IGH) encodes variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and constant (IGHC) genes and is responsible for antibody heavy-chain biosynthesis, which is vital to the adaptive immune response. Programmed V-(D)-J somatic rearrangement and the complex duplicated nature of the locus have impeded attempts to reconcile its genomic organization based on traditional B-lymphocyte derived genetic material. As a result, sequence descriptions of germline variation within IGHV are lacking, haplotype inference using traditional linkage disequilibrium methods has been difficult, and the human genome reference assembly is missing several expressed IGHV genes. By using a hydatidiform mole BAC clone resource, we present the most complete haplotype of IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ gene regions derived from a single chromosome, representing an alternate assembly of ∼1 Mbp of high-quality finished sequence. From this we add 101 kbp of previously uncharacterized sequence, including functional IGHV genes, and characterize four large germline copy-number variants (CNVs). In addition to this germline reference, we identify and characterize eight CNV-containing haplotypes from a panel of nine diploid genomes of diverse ethnic origin, discovering previously unmapped IGHV genes and an additional 121 kbp of insertion sequence. We genotype four of these CNVs by using PCR in 425 individuals from nine human populations. We find that all four are highly polymorphic and show considerable evidence of stratification (Fst = 0.3–0.5), with the greatest differences observed between African and Asian populations. These CNVs exhibit weak linkage disequilibrium with SNPs from two commercial arrays in most of the populations tested. PMID:23541343

  9. Radioimmunoassay of free light chains of immunoglobulins in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.L.; Gowland, E.; Ward, I.D.; Scarffe, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays for kappa and lambda light chains of immunoglobulins in urine are described. The assays, which involve antisera to free light chains, were sufficiently sensitive to measure the light chains in unconcentrated urine from healthy subjects. The usefulness of the assays in clinical practice is illustrated by measurements of light chain excretion by patients, including serial studies on patients undergoing treatment for myeloma.

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment of the post-polio syndrome: sustained effects on quality of life variables and cytokine expression after one year follow up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Expression of inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has led to the hypothesis of intrathecal chronic inflammation to explain the denervation observed in post-polio syndrome (PPS). It has been shown that therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improves physical performance and dampens down the inflammatory process at 6 months in PPS patients. We here examined the effects of IVIG on cytokine expression and clinical outcome one year after IVIG treatment. Methods From a previous study with 135 PPS patients included, 41 patients were further evaluated before un-blinding for one year (21 placebo and 20 treated with IVIG, Xepol® 50 mg/ml), and were assessed for clinical variables by performing the Short Form-36 survey (SF-36) questionnaire assessment, the 6 minute walk distance test (6MWT) and registering pain level by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) after IVIG treatment. A separate cohort of 37 PPS patients went through lumbar puncture (LP) at baseline and 20 patients, treated with IVIG, repeated the LP one year later. Thirty patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND) were used as control group. Inflammatory cytokines TNF, TGFβ, IFNγ, IL-23, IL-13 and IL-10 were measured in blood cells and CSF cells with RT-PCR. Results Scores of the physical components of SF-36 were significantly higher at the one year follow up time-point in the IVIG-treated patients when compared to baseline as well as to the control subjects. Pain VAS score and 6MWT improved significantly in the IVIG-treated patients when compared with baseline Relative expression of TNF and IFN-γ in both PBMCs and CSF from PPS patients were increased compared to OND subjects at baseline (p < 0.05). One year after IVIG-treatment a decreased expression of IFN-γ and IL23 was found in CSF of PPS patients, while anti-inflammatory IL-13 was increased (p < 0.05). Conclusions IVIG has effects on relevant QoL variables and inflammatory cytokines up to one year in

  11. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  12. Variable region sequences and idiotypic expression of a protective human immunoglobulin M antibody to capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis group B and Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, F H; Lucas, A H; Raff, H V; Granoff, D M

    1994-01-01

    We determined the heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain variable (V) region nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the human immunoglobulin M(kappa) monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5E1, which is specific for the polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli K1 and Neisseria meningitidis group B (poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid]) and which is protective in animal models of infection. The 5E1 VH gene is a member of the VHIIIb family and is 97% homologous to the 9.1 germ line gene. The 5E1 VL gene is a member of the kappa I subgroup and is 98% homologous to the germ line gene, 15A, also known as KLO12. The VL and/or VH genes used by 5E1 are highly homologous to the V genes encoding antibodies to the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide and to antibodies reactive with self-antigens such as erythrocyte "i," DNA, and thyroid peroxidase. We also produced three murine anti-idiotype (Id) MAbs against 5E1. All three anti-Ids recognize a minor subset of antimeningococcal B polysaccharide antibodies present in serum from normal adults. Two of the anti-Ids define distinct Ids associated with antibodies having kappa I-15A V regions. These 15A-associated Ids are expressed by some heterologous human antimeningococcal B polysaccharide MAbs, and they also are independently expressed by two human MAbs that are specific for either the H. influenzae b polysaccharide or the i erythrocyte antigen and that utilize the kappa I-15A V region. Taken together, these data indicate that the 5E1 antibody uses V regions that recur in the human antibody repertoires to this polysaccharide and to structurally dissimilar polysaccharides and autoantigens. Thus, the poor immunogenicity of poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid] cannot be explained by the unavailability of certain critical VH and VL genes required for generation of antibody response. PMID:8168940

  13. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes. PMID:24603015

  14. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-01

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst). PMID:17930660

  15. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  16. Life of Lambda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futhey, Tracy

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses the four key questions related to the National LambdaRail (NLR) networking technology. NLR uses Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) to enable multiple networks to coexist on a national fiber footprint, and is owned and operated not by carriers, but by the research and education community. The NLR Board…

  17. Five-Body Cluster Structure of the Double-{Lambda} Hypernucleus {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyama, E.; Kamimura, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Motoba, T.

    2010-05-28

    Energy levels of the double {Lambda} hypernucleus, {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 11}Be are calculated within the framework of a {alpha}{alpha}n{Lambda}{Lambda} five-body model. Interactions between constituent particles are determined so as to reproduce reasonably the observed low-energy properties of the {alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{alpha}n nuclei and the existing data for {Lambda}-binding energies of the {alpha}{Lambda}, {alpha}{alpha}{Lambda}, {alpha}n{Lambda}, and {alpha}{alpha}n{Lambda} systems. An effective {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is constructed so as to reproduce, within the {alpha}{Lambda}{Lambda} three-body model, the B{sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}of {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 6}He, which was extracted from the emulsion experiment, the NAGARA event. With no adjustable parameters for the {alpha}{alpha}n{Lambda}{Lambda} system, B{sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}of the ground and bound excited states of {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 11}Be are calculated with the Gaussian expansion method. The Hida event, recently observed at KEK-E373 experiment, is interpreted as an observation of the ground state of the {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 11}Be.

  18. Transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda} hyperons in quasireal photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Marukyan, H.; Rostomyan, A.; Taroian, S.; Zohrabian, H.; Amarian, M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Tchuiko, B.; Andrus, A.; Bailey, P.; Bouwhuis, M.; Chiang, H. C.

    2007-11-01

    The HERMES experiment has measured the transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda} hyperons produced inclusively in quasireal photoproduction at a positron beam energy of 27.6 GeV. The transverse polarization P{sub n}{sup {lambda}} of the {lambda} hyperon is found to be positive while the observed {lambda} polarization is compatible with zero. The values averaged over the kinematic acceptance of HERMES are P{sub n}{sup {lambda}}=0.078{+-}0.006(stat){+-}0.012(syst) and P{sub n}{sup {lambda}}=-0.025{+-}0.015(stat){+-}0.018(syst) for {lambda} and {lambda}, respectively. The dependences of P{sub n}{sup {lambda}} and P{sub n}{sup {lambda}} on the fraction {zeta} of the beam's light-cone momentum carried by the hyperon and on the hyperon's transverse momentum p{sub T} were investigated. The measured {lambda} polarization rises linearly with p{sub T} and exhibits a different behavior for low and high values of {zeta}, which approximately correspond to the backward and forward regions in the center-of-mass frame of the {gamma}*N reaction.

  19. Reinvestigating the Lambda Boo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Corbally, C. J.; Gray, R. O.; Murphy, S.; Neff, J. E.; Desai, A.; Newsome, I.; Steele, P.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar nature of Lambda Bootis was first introduced in 1943. Subsequently, Lambda Boo stars have been slowly recognized as a group of A-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements, although C, N, O, and S can be near solar. MK classification criteria include broad hydrogen lines, a weak metallic-line spectrum compared to MK standards, coupled with a particularly weak Mg II 4481 line. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star-HR 8799 and a probable Lambda Boo star-Beta Pictoris. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. However, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. The Lambda Boo class has become somewhat of a "grab bag" for any peculiar A-type stars that didn't fit elsewhere. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ low abundances and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a refined working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their existing spectra. After applying a consistent set of optical/UV classification criteria, we identified over 60 confirmed and over 20 probable Lambda Boo stars among all stars that have been suggested as Lambda Boo candidates. We are obtaining new observations for those probable Lambda Boo stars. We also have explored the possible link between debris disks and Lambda Boo Stars.

  20. Improved Measurement of the Form Factors in the Decay {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{yields}{lambda}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}

    SciTech Connect

    Hinson, J.W.; Huang, G.S.; Lee, J.; Miller, D.H.; Pavlunin, V.; Rangarajan, R.; Sanghi, B.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Park, C.S.; Park, W.; Thayer, J.B.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Gao, Y.S.; Liu, F.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.

    2005-05-20

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have studied the distribution of kinematic variables in the decay {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{yields}{lambda}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}. By performing a four-dimensional maximum likelihood fit, we determine the form factor ratio, R=f{sub 2}/f{sub 1}=-0.31{+-}0.05(stat){+-}0.04(syst), the pole mass, M{sub pole}=[2.21{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.14(syst)] GeV/c{sup 2}, and the decay asymmetry parameter of the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, {alpha}{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}}=-0.86{+-}0.03(stat){+-}0.02(syst), for =0.67 (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2}. We compare the angular distributions of the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and {lambda}{sub c}{sup -} and find no evidence for CP violation: A{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}}=(({alpha}{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}}+{alpha}{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}})/({alpha}{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}}-= {alpha}{sub {lambda}}{sub {sub c}}))=0.00{+-}0.03(stat){+-}0.01(syst){+-}0.02, where the third error is from the uncertainty in the world average of the CP-violating parameter, A{sub {lambda}}, for {lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup -}.

  1. Existence of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H: A variational Monte Carlo search

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad

    2005-02-01

    A variational Monte Carlo (VMC) calculation for the binding energy B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} of the lightest hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H has been performed in the four-body {lambda}{lambda}pn model. A range of input {lambda}{lambda} potentials of moderate strength produce a particle-stable {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H for the simulated NSC97e and f {lambda}N potentials, whereas the phenomenological Minnesota {lambda}N potential needs a much stronger {lambda}{lambda} potential to bind. The VMC results for B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} agree with the prediction of the stochastic variational model but contradict the recent Faddeev-Yakubovsky calculation. As reported earlier, B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} is sensitive to the triplet {lambda}N channel for a given {lambda}{lambda} potential. The B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H in the three-body {lambda}{lambda}d cluster model is consistent with but slightly lower than the Faddeev calculation. The VMC method predicts a stable {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H system in both models and thus offers the possibility of identifying {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H in a future extension of E906 or of a related experiment at KEK, provided the simulated potentials are true representations of realistic Nijmegen potentials.

  2. Lambda Calculi: A Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Chris

    One of the universal notions of programming languages is functional abstraction. The methods of Java and the functions defined and used in functional programming languages, such as Haskell, are instances of this general notion. The inspiration for this form of abstraction mechanism comes from Mathematical Logic; notably Church's λ(lambda)-calculi and Schönfinkel's and Curry's Combinatory Logic. A proper study of these foundations leads to a better understanding of some of the fundamental issues in Computer Science.

  3. {Lambda}* hypernuclei with chiral dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Uchino, Toshitaka; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Oka, Makoto

    2011-10-21

    As a strangeness S = -1 and baryon number B = 2 system, the two-body bound state of {Lambda}* = {Lambda}(1405) and a nucleon is studied. To solve the {Lambda}*N system, we construct the {Lambda}*N potential by extending the Juelich model with couplings estimated in the chiral unitary approach. We have the {Lambda}*N quasi-bound state with the mass, M{sub {Lambda}}*N{approx}2366 MeV which is shallowly bound with the binding energy B{approx}9 MeV in terms of the K-barNN system. Decay width of the fall apart process, where the {Lambda}*N resonance decays to {pi}{Sigma}N with a nucleon being as a spectator, is estimated to be {Gamma}{sub F.A}{approx}49 MeV.

  4. Immunoglobulin treatment in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L J; Hoepelman, I M; Ellerbroek, P M

    2011-05-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are characterised by recurrent respiratory tract infections and the inability to produce effective immunoglobulin (Ig) responses. The best-known primary antibody deficiencies are common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency, and selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins (SADNI). Therapy in these patients consists of prophylactic antibiotics and/or Ig replacement therapy. Diagnostic delay remains common owing to limited awareness of the presenting features and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. Replacement therapy with immunoglobulins increases life expectancy and reduces the frequency and severity of infections, but the effect on end-organ damage is still unknown. Both intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) treatment appear to be safe, with comparable efficacy. A starting dose of 300-400 mg/kg/month in IVIg and 100 mg/week for SCIg is recommended. IgG trough levels should be >5 g/L for patients with agammaglobulinaemia and 3 g/L greater than the initial IgG level for patients with CVID; however, the clinical response should be foremost in choosing the dose and trough level. Infusion-related adverse reactions are generally mild owing to improved manufacturing processes. In this paper, aspects of Ig replacement therapy in primary antibody-deficient patients will be addressed. PMID:21276714

  5. Immunoglobulin levels in Iraq.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agidi, S K; Papiha, S S; Roberts, D F

    1977-01-01

    In a study of immunoglobulin levels in 192 apparently healthy individuals in Iraq, regional differences occur in IgE and IgG. The main levels of IgG, IgM and IgA tend to be low, and of IgE clearly elevated. It is suggested that this pattern may be explained by the presence of intestinal parasites which stimulate IgE production. The genetic differences that exist between the regional populations, and the occurrence of associations of immunoglobulin level with several polymorphic systems, suggests the possibility of a genetic element in the regional immunoglobulin differences. PMID:908174

  6. Spin correlations in the {Lambda}{Lambda} and {Lambda}{Lambda}-bar systems generated in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lyuboshitz, V. L.; Lyuboshitz, V. V.

    2010-05-15

    Spin correlations for the {Lambda}{Lambda} and {Lambda}{Lambda}-bar pairs, generated in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and related angular correlations at the joint registration of hadronic decays of two hyperons, in which space parity is not conserved, are analyzed. The correlation tensor components can be derived from the double angular distribution of products of two decays by the method of 'moments'. The properties of the 'trace' of the correlation tensor (a sum of three diagonal components), determining the relative fractions of the triplet states and singlet state of respective pairs, are discussed. Spin correlations for two identical particles ({Lambda}{Lambda}) and two nonidentical particles ({Lambda}{Lambda}-bar) are considered from the viewpoint of the conventional model of one-particle sources. In the framework of this model, correlations vanish at sufficiently large relative momenta. However, under these conditions, in the case of two nonidentical particles ({Lambda}{Lambda}-bar) a noticeable role is played by two-particle annihilation (two-quark, two-gluon) sources, which lead to the difference of the correlation tensor from zero. In particular, such a situation may arise when the system passes through the 'mixed phase.'

  7. Preparations of intravenous immunoglobulins diminish the number and proinflammatory response of CD14+CD16++ monocytes in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients.

    PubMed

    Siedlar, Maciej; Strach, Magdalena; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Lenart, Marzena; Szaflarska, Anna; Węglarczyk, Kazimierz; Rutkowska, Magdalena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Zembala, Marek

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) on monocyte subpopulations and cytokine production in patients with CVID. The absolute number of CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes decreased on average 2.5-fold 4h after IVIG and after 20h returned to the baseline. The cytokine level in the supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after ex vivo LPS stimulation demonstrated the >2-fold decrease in TNF production 4h after IVIG. The TNF expression, which is higher in the CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes, was decreased in these cells by IVIG in 4/7 CVID cases. In vitro exposure of the healthy individuals' monocytes to the IVIG preparation resulted in reduced TNF production, which was overcome by blockade of the FcγRIIB in the CD14(+)CD16(++) CD32B(high) monocytes. Our data suggest that reduction in the number of CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes and the blockade of their cytokine production via triggering CD32B can contribute to the anti-inflammatory action of IVIG. PMID:21300572

  8. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care. PMID:19883425

  9. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: Poster presentations

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-01-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and α2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care. PMID:19883425

  10. Tertiary structure of human {Lambda}6 light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Solomon, A.; Weiss, D. T.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center /Graduate School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is a disease process characterized by the pathologic deposition of monoclonal light chains in tissue. To date, only limited information has been obtained on the molecular features that render such light chains amyloidogenic. Although protein products of the major human V kappa and V lambda gene families have been identified in AL deposits, one particular subgroup--lambda 6--has been found to be preferentially associated with this disease. Notably, the variable region of lambda 6 proteins (V lambda 6) has distinctive primary structural features including the presence in the third framework region (FR3) of two additional amino acid residues that distinguish members of this subgroup from other types of light chains. However, the structural consequences of these alterations have not been elucidated. To determine if lambda 6 proteins possess unique tertiary structural features, as compared to light chains of other V lambda subgroups, we have obtained x-ray diffraction data on crystals prepared from two recombinant V lambda 6 molecules. These components, isolated from a bacterial expression system, were generated from lambda 6-related cDNAs cloned from bone marrow-derived plasma cells from a patient (Wil) who had documented AL amyloidosis and another (Jto) with multiple myeloma and tubular cast nephropathy, but no evident fibrillar deposits. The x-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that the two-residue insertion located between positions 68 and 69 (not between 66 and 67 as previously surmised) extended an existing loop region that effectively increased the surface area adjacent to the first complementarity determining region (CDR1). Further, an unusual interaction between the Arg 25 and Phe 2 residues commonly found in lambda 6 molecules was noted. However, the structures of V lambda 6 Wil and Jto also differed from each other, as evidenced by the presence in the latter of certain ionic and hydrophobic interactions that we posit increased protein

  11. Molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory idiotope on antibodies encoded by immunoglobulin variable-region genes from various families.

    PubMed Central

    Zaghouani, H; Bonilla, F A; Meek, K; Bona, C

    1989-01-01

    The idiotype defined by the levan-specific BALB/c myeloma protein ABPC48 (A48) has previously been encountered only in antibodies the variable regions of which derive from the VHX24 and V kappa 10 gene families. We have demonstrated expression of the idiotope recognized by the monoclonal anti-A48 idiotype antibody IDA10 on five monoclonal antibodies from different mouse strains, with different specificities including foreign and self antigens and deriving their variable regions from families other than VHX24 and V kappa 10. We analyzed variable region protein structure (deduced from nucleotide sequences) and hydrophilicity profiles of idiotype+ and idiotype- antibodies. We identified four surface-exposed areas (one in the heavy chain and three in the light chain) that may contribute to expression of the idiotope defined by antibody IDA10. Images PMID:2494665

  12. {Lambda} single-particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1995-08-01

    We are continuing our work on the {Lambda} hyperon single-particle (s.p.) energies and their interpretation in terms of the basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions. In particular we are interpreting the results obtained by S.C. Pieper, A. Usmani and Q.N. Usmani. We obtain about 30 MeV for the repulsive contribution of the three-body {Lambda}NN forces in nuclear matter. We are able to exclude purely {open_quotes}dispersive{close_quotes} {Lambda}NN forces. We are investigating the mix of dispersive and two-pion-exchange {Lambda}NN forces which provide a fit to the s.p. data. For interactions, which provide a fit to the s.p. data, the {Lambda} binding energy as a function of the nuclear matter density shows characteristic saturation features with a maximum at a density not very different from that of normal nuclear matter. We obtain a more precise measure of the space-exchange part of the {Lambda}-nuclear force than was previously available, corresponding to an exchange parameter {approx_equal} 0.32. The space-exchange force is rather directly related to the effective mass of a {Lambda} in the nuclear medium and turns out to be about 70% of its free mass. As a result, we also obtain a much better value for the p-state {Lambda}-nucleus potential which is about 40% of the s-state potential. The A binding to nuclear matter is determined to be {approx_equal} 28 MeV.

  13. HERMES measurements of {lambda} polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Rith, Klaus

    2007-06-13

    The HERMES experiment at DESY has measured the transfer of polarization from longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV positrons to {lambda} hyperons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from unpolarized gas targets internal to the electron/positron ring of the HERA collider. The longitudinal spin transfer coefficient is found to be D{sub LL'}{sup {lambda}} = 0.11 {+-} 0.10 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst) at an average fractional energy carried by the {lambda} hyperon = 0.45.

  14. Immunoparesis in MGUS - Relationship of uninvolved immunoglobulin pair suppression and polyclonal immunoglobuline levels to MGUS risk categories.

    PubMed

    Pika, T; Lochman, P; Sandecka, V; Maisnar, V; Minarik, J; Tichy, M; Zapletalova, J; Solcova, L; Scudla, V; Hajek, R

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is an asymptomatic, potentially malignant condition. It has been established that annually approximately 1-2% of MGUS cases transforms into one of the malignant forms of monoclonal gammopathies. Progression risk factors include the quantity and type of M-protein, and namely the ratio of free light immunoglobulin chains (FLC). These factors, enable purposeful stratification of MGUS individuals. Some authors consider suppression of polyclonal immunoglobulin levels to be another progression factor. The aim of the study was to compare polyclonal immunoglobulin (PIg) levels with uninvolved heavy/light chain pair (HLC) levels in order to verify the degree of immunoparesis depending on MGUS risk category (0-3). The analyzed set consisted of 159 serum samples from MGUS patients (102 IgG, 57 IgA), who were stratified into 4 risk groups (0 - low, 1 - low-intermediate, 2 - high-intermediate and 3 - high risk of transformation). The results of analysis showed that with increasing degree of MGUS increases risk of immune paresis defined by decreasing levels of polyclonal immunoglobulins, ie. IgA and IgM in the case of IgG MGUS, respectively, IgG and IgM in case of IgA MGUS. Significant differences were also found when analyzing the levels of uninvolved HLC pairs IgG kappa (resp. IgG lambda) in IgG lambda (IgG kappa) dominant secretion. In the case of MGUS with IgA isotype, the results were similar. Discovery of the connection between the degree of immunosuppression and the level of MGUS risk contributes to our understanding of the relationship between biology, development and potential malignant transformation of MGUS. It is apparent that uninvolved HLC pair assay enables more reliable identification of at-risk MGUS patients than a simple quantitative assay for polyclonal immunoglobulins alone. PMID:26278155

  15. [Glomerulopathies with organized monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits].

    PubMed

    Touchard, Guy; Bridoux, Frank; Goujon, Jean-Michel

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum of glomerular disorders with organized immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits is heterogeneous. It encompasses 2 mains categories: glomerulopathies with fibrillary deposits are mostly represented by immunoglobulinic amyloidosis (most commonly AL amyloidosis, characterized by monoclonal light chain deposits often of the lambda isotype), and pseudo-amyloid fibrillary glomerulonephritis in which deposits predominantly contain polyclonal IgG4. Glomerulopathies with microtubular deposits include cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis (type I and type II, with or without detectable serum cryoglobulin) and glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal Ig deposits (GOMMID) also referred to as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Pathological diagnosis requires meticulous studies by light microscopy (with systematic Congo red staining), immunofluorescence with specific conjugates, and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies are required to differentiate amyloid fibrils (8 to 10 nm in external diameter), pseudo-amyloid fibrils (15-20 nm) and microtubules (10 to 50 nm in external diameter, with a central hollow core). Glomerular deposits in type I cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis are arranged into parallel straight microtubules similar to those observed in GOMMID, but with different topography that allows distinction between the two entities. Glomerular substructures composed of circulating Igs should be distinguished from collagen fibrils that are commonly observed in glomerular disorders with or without deposition of monoclonal or polyclonal Igs. PMID:26810049

  16. Experimental Studies of Hypernuclear Structure and the {lambda}N and {lambda}NN Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, H.

    2008-04-29

    The {lambda}NN three-body force, through {lambda}N-{sigma}N coupling, plays an important role in the structure of {lambda} hypernuclei. We have been studying the {lambda}N interaction via hypernuclear {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments and obtained the effective interaction strengths of the spin-dependent {lambda}N interactions. In addition, a possible effect of the {lambda}NN three-body force is being investigated from precise level schemes of light {lambda} hypernuclei. The {lambda}NN three-body force can also be studied from the structure of neutron-rich {lambda} hypernuclei by using the ({pi}{sup -},K{sup +}) reaction.

  17. Rearrangements and deletions of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the double-producing B cell lymphoma I.29.

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, J; Marcu, K B; Sirlin, S; Alhadeff, B; Hammerling, U

    1982-01-01

    The B cell lymphoma I.29 consists of a mixture of cells expressing membrane-bound immunoglobulin M (IgM) (lambda) and IgA (lambda) of identical idiotypes. Whereas most of the cells express either IgM or IgA alone, 1 to 5% of the cells in this tumor express IgM and IgA simultaneously within the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane (R. Sitia et al., J. Immunol. 127:1388-1394, 1981; R. Sitia, unpublished data). When IgM+ cells are purified from the lymphoma and passaged in mice or cultured, a portion of the cells convert to IgA+. These properties suggest that some cells of the I.29 lymphoma may undergo immunoglobulin heavy chain switching, although it is also possible that the mixed population was derived by a prior switching event in a clone of cells. We performed Southern blotting experiments on genomic DNAs isolated from populations of I.29 cells containing variable proportions of IgM+ and IgA+ cells and on a number of cell lines derived from the lymphoma. The results were consistent with the deletion model for heavy chain switching, as the IgM+ cells contained rearranged mu genes and alpha genes in the germ line configuration on both the expressed and nonexpressed heavy chain chromosomes, whereas the IgA+ cells had deleted both mu genes and contained one rearranged and one germ line alpha gene. In addition, segments of DNA located within the intervening sequence 5' to the mu gene, near the site of switch recombination, were deleted from both the expressed and the nonexpressed chromosomes. Although mu genes were deleted from both chromosomes in the IgA+ cells, the sites of DNA recombination differed on the two chromosomes. On the expressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S alpha sequences, whereas on the nonexpressed chromosome, Smu sequences were recombined with S gamma 3 sequences. Images PMID:6290869

  18. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  19. Measurements of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) decays into {lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0} and {lambda}{lambda}{eta}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.

    2007-11-01

    Using 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} and 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected by the BESII detector at the BEPC, branching fractions or upper limits for the decays J/{psi} and {psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0} and {lambda}{lambda}{eta} are measured. For the isospin violating decays, the upper limits are determined to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0})<6.4x10{sup -5} and B[{psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0}]<4.9x10{sup -5} at the 90% confidence level. The isospin conserving process J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta} is observed for the first time, and its branching fraction is measured to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta})=(2.62{+-}0.60{+-}0.44)x10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second one is systematic. No {lambda}{lambda}{eta} signal is observed in {psi}(2S) decays, and B[{psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta}]<1.2x10{sup -4} is set at the 90% confidence level. Branching fractions of J/{psi} decays into {sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{lambda} and {sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{lambda} are also reported, and the sum of these branching fractions is determined to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{lambda}+c.c.)=(1.52{+-}0.08{+-}0.16)x10{sup -3}.

  20. [Immunoglobulin deficiency after repeated plasmapheresis].

    PubMed

    Stebler, C; Tichelli, A; Dazzi, H; Wernli, M; Gratwohl, A; Speck, B

    1991-02-01

    In 10 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome the level of globulins and immunoglobulins before and after plasmapheresis was investigated. As a plasma substitute either PPL (in 8 patients) or a plasma substitute solution rich in immunoglobulins (in 2 patients) was used. When plasma was substituted with PPL, the globulins and immunoglobulins dropped to a mean of 40% of the initial value (range 30-60%) after the first plasmapheresis. With daily or alternate day plasmapheresis, the globulins only partially recovered. Before the second plasmapheresis they were still reduced to a mean of 50% (range 20-50%), and dropped further with ongoing exchanges to a mean of 33% (range 20-50%) as measured before the third plasmapheresis. Accordingly, there was a loss of immunoglobulins of similar magnitude. With the use of a plasma substitute solution rich in immunoglobulins (IRP), globulins could be maintained at normal levels. The lowest immunoglobulin values measured after plasmapheresis were 6 g/l (normal range 8-17 g/l). One patient developed gram-negative septicaemia after plasmapheresis with PPL, possibly due to a low immunoglobulin concentration. We conclude that a plasma substitute solution rich in immunoglobulins should be used for therapeutic plasmapheresis in order to maintain physiological immunoglobulin concentrations. PMID:2003210

  1. {Lambda}K*{Lambda}(1116) photoproduction and nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Nam, Seung-il; Oh, Yongseok

    2011-10-21

    In this presentation, we report our recent studies on the {Lambda}K*{Lambda}(1116) photoproduction off the proton target, using the tree-level Born approximation, via the effective Lagrangian approach. In addition, we include the nine (three- or four-star confirmed) nucleon resonances below the threshold {radical}(s{sub th}){approx_equal}2008 MeV, to interpret the discrepancy between the experiment and previous theoretical studies, in the vicinity of the threshold region. From the numerical studies, we observe that the S{sub 11}(1535) and S11(1650) play an important role for the cross-section enhancement near the {radical}(s{sub th}). It also turns out that, in order to reproduce the data, we have the vector coupling constants gK*S{sub 11}(1535){Lambda} = (7.0{approx}9.0) and gK*S{sub 11}(1650){Lambda} (5.0{approx}6.0).

  2. Biology of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Berlot, Giorgio; Rossini, Perla; Turchet, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IvIg) are often administered to critically ill patients more as an act of faith than on the basis of relevant clinical studies. This particularly applies to the treatment of sepsis in adult patients, in whom the current guidelines even recommend against their use, despite that many studies demonstrated either their beneficial effects in different subsets of patients and that some preparations of IvIg are more effective than other. The biology of Ig are reviewed, aiming to a more in-depth understanding of their properties in order to clarify their possible indications in different clinical settings. PMID:25674545

  3. Human Immunoglobulin (Ig)M+IgD+ Peripheral Blood B Cells Expressing the CD27 Cell Surface Antigen Carry Somatically Mutated Variable Region Genes: CD27 as a General Marker for Somatically Mutated (Memory) B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Rajewsky, Klaus; Küppers, Ralf

    1998-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)M+IgD+ B cells are generally assumed to represent antigen-inexperienced, naive B cells expressing variable (V) region genes without somatic mutations. We report here that human IgM+IgD+ peripheral blood (PB) B cells expressing the CD27 cell surface antigen carry mutated V genes, in contrast to CD27-negative IgM+IgD+ B cells. IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells resemble class-switched and IgM-only memory cells in terms of cell phenotype, and comprise ∼15% of PB B lymphocytes in healthy adults. Moreover, a very small population (<1% of PB B cells) of highly mutated IgD-only B cells was detected, which likely represent the PB counterpart of IgD-only tonsillar germinal center and plasma cells. Overall, the B cell pool in the PB of adults consists of ∼40% mutated memory B cells and 60% unmutated, naive IgD+CD27− B cells (including CD5+ B cells). In the somatically mutated B cells, VH region genes carry a two- to threefold higher load of somatic mutation than rearranged Vκ genes. This might be due to an intrinsically lower mutation rate in κ light chain genes compared with heavy chain genes and/or result from κ light chain gene rearrangements in GC B cells. A common feature of the somatically mutated B cell subsets is the expression of the CD27 cell surface antigen which therefore may represent a general marker for memory B cells in humans. PMID:9802980

  4. The Major Phase-Variable Outer Membrane Protein of Escherichia coli Structurally Resembles the Immunoglobulin A1 Protease Class of Exported Protein and Is Regulated by a Novel Mechanism Involving Dam and OxyR

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ian R.; Owen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Here we report the characterization of an Escherichia coli gene (agn43) which encodes the principal phase-variable outer membrane protein termed antigen 43 (Ag43). The agn43 gene encodes a precursor protein of 107 kDa containing a 52-amino-acid signal sequence. Posttranslational processing generates an α43 subunit (predicted Mr of 49,789) and a C-terminal domain (β43) with features typical of a bacterial integral outer membrane protein (predicted Mr of 51,642). Secondary structure analysis predicts that β43 exists as an 18-stranded β barrel and that Ag43 shows structural organization closely resembling that of immunoglobulin A1 protease type of exoprotein produced by pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus spp. The correct processing of the polyprotein to α43 and β43 in OmpT, OmpP, and DegP protease-deficient E. coli strains points to an autocatalytic cleavage mechanism, a hypothesis supported by the occurrence of an aspartyl protease active site within α43. Ag43, a species-specific antigen, possesses two RGD motifs of the type implicated in binding to human integrins. The mechanism of reversible phase variation was studied by immunochemical analysis of a panel of well-defined regulatory mutants and by analysis of DNA sequences upstream of agn43. Evidence strongly suggests that phase variation is regulated by both deoxyadenosine methylase (Dam) and by OxyR. Thus, oxyR mutants are locked on for Ag43 expression, whereas dam mutants are locked off for Ag43 expression. We propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of phase switching in which OxyR competes with Dam for unmethylated GATC sites in the regulatory region of the agn43 gene. PMID:10094691

  5. A new three-baryon-force in {lambda}{lambda} hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2008-04-29

    We describe a few-body calculation of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H as well as {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He taking account fully coupled-channel two-baryon potentials acting among the octet of baryons. The wave function includes not only pnn{lambda}{lambda} and ppnn{xi}{sup -} components but also pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0}, ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -}, pnn{sigma}{sup 0}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{sigma}{sup 0}{sigma}{sup -}. An effective YY potential based on Nijmegen model D is used. We find that the pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -} components play an important role in producing the {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H bound state. The present result requires the introduction of a new coupled-channel three-body-force, N{lambda}{lambda}--NN{xi}, if the intermediate pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -} states are eliminated from the model space.

  6. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin ... of immunoglobulin A, one of the most common antibodies in the body. Antibodies are proteins made by ...

  7. Update on the hyper immunoglobulin M syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E Graham; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2010-01-01

    The Hyper-immunoglobulin M syndromes (HIGM) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders resulting in defects of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR), with or without defects of somatic hypermutation (SHM). They can be classified as defects of signalling through CD40 causing both a humoral immunodeficiency and a susceptibility to opportunistic infections, or intrinsic defects in B cells of the mechanism of CSR resulting in a pure humoral immunodeficiency. A HIGM picture can also be seen as part of generalized defects of DNA repair and in antibody deficiency syndromes, such as common variable immunodeficiency. CD40 signalling defects may require corrective therapy with bone marrow transplantation. Gene therapy, a potential curative approach in the future, currently remains a distant prospect. Those with a defective CSR mechanism generally do well on immunologoblulin replacement therapy. Complications may include autoimmunity, lymphoid hyperplasia and, in some cases, a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. PMID:20180797

  8. Six-Body variational Monte Carlo study of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Q.N.; Sharma, Bhupali; Bodmer, A.R.

    2004-12-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations are carried out for {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He using realistic NN, NNN, and phenomenological {lambda}N and {lambda}NN interactions. For the {lambda}{lambda} interaction we employ the various phase equivalent Nijmegen interactions. By incorporating the various components of {lambda}-nuclear interactions in stages, and keeping B{sub {lambda}}({sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He) around 3.12 MeV, it is demonstrated that the incremental energy {delta}B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} for {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He is sensitive to the three-body {lambda}NN force and the exchange part of the {lambda}N interaction. The {lambda}{lambda} interaction obtained is only somewhat weaker than the {lambda}N interaction. We also report the results for the rearrangement energy of the {alpha} core. We discuss the implications of our results.

  9. Study of B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} and B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}K

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Hsiao, Y.-K.; Chua, C.-K.

    2009-06-01

    We study the doubly charmful two-body and three-body baryonic B decays B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} and B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K. As pointed out before, a naive estimate of the branching ratio O(10{sup -8}) for the latter decay is too small by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude compared to experiment. Previously, it has been shown that a large enhancement for the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K production can occur due to a charmoniumlike resonance (e.g. X(4630) discovered by Belle) with a mass near the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} threshold. Motivated by the BABAR's observation of a resonance in the {lambda}{sub c}K system with a mass of order 2930 MeV, we study in this work the contribution to B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K from the intermediate state {xi}{sub c}(2980) which is postulated to be a first positive-parity excited D-wave charmed baryon state. Assuming that a soft qq quark pair is produced through the {sigma} and {pi} meson exchanges in the configuration for B{yields}{xi}{sub c}(2980){lambda}{sub c} and {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}, it is found that branching ratios of B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K and B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} are of order 3.5x10{sup -4} and 5x10{sup -5}, respectively, in agreement with experiment except that the prediction for the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}K{sup -} is slightly smaller. In conjunction with our previous analysis, we conclude that the enormously large rate of B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K arises from the resonances {xi}{sub c}(2980) and X(4630)

  10. Immunoglobulin profile in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M S; Dhar, N K; Agrawal, P; Khurana, S K; Neena, B; Malik, S C

    1992-08-01

    The present study was conducted on 40 new consecutive schizophrenic patients admitted in the psychiatry ward. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was done by Research Diagnosis Criteria (RDC). Serum immunoglobulins were were estimated in schizophrenic patients and were age and sex matched with 40 healthy individuals, comprising the control group. The IgG and IgA mean levels of schizophrenic patients were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the normal healthy individuals. There were however no significant differences between the schizophrenic patients and control group regarding total proteins, albumin and globulin levels. In subtypes of schinophrenia based on phenomenology only, paranoid group scored significantly higher (p < 0.01) IgG and IgA mean values than other types of Schizophrenia (catatonic, disorganised and undifferentiated). PMID:1473841

  11. Longitudinal Polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Hyperons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozhnikov, M. G.

    2007-06-13

    The longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized positive muons is studied in the COMPASS (CERN NA58) experiment. Preliminary results on the longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  12. {lambda}NN Three-Body Force due to Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Akaishi, Yoshinori; Myint, Khin Swe

    2008-04-29

    The overbinding problem of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He is solved by introducing a concept of coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling which is equivalent to a {lambda}NN three-body force. This three-body force is coherently enhanced in the 0{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}He. The 0{sup +}-1{sup +} splitting in these hypernuclei is mainly due to coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling and partly due to the {lambda}N spin-spin interaction. A {lambda}NN three-body potential is derived from the coupled-channel treatment. The origin of the repulsive and attractive nature of the three-body force is discussed. Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling becomes more important in neutron-rich hypernuclei and especially in neutron-star matter at high densities. The possible existence of ''hyperheavy hydrogen'', {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H, is suggested.

  13. Immunoglobulin Resistance in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartas, Georgios A.; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Pham-Peyton, Chi; Tsounias, Emmanouil; Bricker, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for immunoglobulin resistance, including clinical symptoms such as arthritis and the pH of intravenous immunoglobulin. Methods: The data of children with Kawasaki disease who had received immunoglobulin were evaluated. Data regarding the brand of immunoglobulin administered were abstracted from the pharmacy records. Results: Eighty consecutive children with Kawasaki disease were evaluated (Mdnage=28 months, 66% male). The prevalence of immunoglobulin resistance was 30%. Arthritis was a presenting symptom in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease in 8% (6/80, all male) and was seen in significant association with immunoglobulin resistance in comparison to those without arthritis (16.7% vs. 0.2%, p=0.008). Next, the immunoglobulin brand types were divided into two groups: the relatively high pH group (n=16), including Carimune (pH 6.6±0.2), and the low pH group (n=63), including Gamunex (pH 4–4.5) or Privigen (pH 4.6–5). Overall, no significant difference in immunoglobulin responsiveness was found between the low pH and the high pH groups (73% vs. 56%, p=0.193), although the low pH group showed a trend toward a larger decrease in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.048), lower steroid use (p=0.054), and lower coronary involvement (p=0.08) than those in the high pH group. Conclusions: Children presenting with arthritis in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease may be at risk for immunoglobulin resistance. PMID:25852966

  14. Observation of B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K{sup 0} and B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K*{sup 0} at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.-W.; Wang, M.-Z.; Chao, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Lin, S.-W.; Shiu, J.-G.; Wei, J.-T.; Adachi, I.; Dalseno, J.; Hazumi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.

    2009-03-01

    We study the charmless decays B{yields}{lambda}{lambda}h, where h stands for {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sup 0},K*{sup +}, or K*{sup 0}, using a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K{sup 0} and B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K*{sup 0} with branching fractions of (4.76{sub -0.68}{sup +0.84}(stat){+-}0.61(syst))x10{sup -6} and (2.46{sub -0.72}{sup +0.87}{+-}0.34)x10{sup -6}, respectively. The significances of these signals in the threshold-mass enhanced mass region, M{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}<2.85 GeV/c{sup 2}, are 12.4{sigma} and 9.3{sigma}, respectively. We also update the branching fraction B(B{sup +}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K{sup +})=(3.38{sub -0.36}{sup +0.41}{+-}0.41)x10{sup -6} with better accuracy, and report the following measurement or 90% confidence level upper limit in the threshold-mass-enhanced region: B(B{sup +}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}K*{sup +})=(2.19{sub -0.88}{sup +1.13}{+-}0.33)x10{sup -6} with 3.7{sigma} significance; B(B{sup +}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup +})<0.94x10{sup -6}. A related search for B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}D{sup 0} yields a branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}D{sup 0})=(1.05{sub -0.44}{sup +0.57}{+-}0.14)x10{sup -5}. This may be compared with the large, {approx}10{sup -4}, branching fraction observed for B{sup 0}{yields}ppD{sup 0}. The M{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} enhancements near threshold and related angular distributions for the observed modes are also reported.

  15. Photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) Hyperon

    SciTech Connect

    Z. W. Zhao, H. Y. Lu, L. Graham, K. Park, R. W. Gothe

    2010-08-01

    The photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) on both the proton and neutron have been studied by using the CLAS eg3 run data set. The reactions are gammad-->K+Lambda*(n) and gammad-->K0Lambda*(p) with Lambda*-->pK-. Preliminary total and differential cross sections have been extracted in the photon energy region 1.75 GeVLambda*(1520) on the neutron is reported, and we will extend the results on the proton to higher energies than in previous studies.

  16. Detection of free immunoglobulin light chains in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Pels, Hendrik-Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma depends on histopathology of brain biopsies, because no reliable disease marker in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been identified yet. B-cell lymphomas such as CNS lymphomas are clonally restricted and express either kappa or lambda immunoglobulin light chains. The aim of this study was to find out a potential diagnostic value of free immunoglobulin light chains released into the CSF of CNS lymphoma patients. Kappa (kappa) and lambda (lambda) free immunoglobulin light chains (FLC) were measured in CSF and serum samples collected from 21 patients with primary and secondary CNS lymphomas and 14 control patients with different neurologic disorders. FLC concentrations and ratios were compared between patient groups and were further analyzed in correlation with clinical, cytopathological, and radiological findings. FLC concentrations for all patients were lower in CSF when compared to serum. In patients with CNS lymphoma, the FLC ratios in CSF were higher (range 392-0.3) compared to control patients (range 3.0-0.3). Irrespective of cytopathological proven lymphomatous meningitis, in 11/21 lymphoma CSF samples the FLC ratios were markedly above 3.0 indicating a clonally restricted B-cell population. Increased FLC ratios in CSF were found in those patients showing subependymal lymphoma contact as detected in magnetic resonance imaging. In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that a significant proportion of patients with CNS lymphomas display a markedly increased FLC ratio in the CSF. PMID:20528903

  17. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G1-kappa fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grove, P; Neale, P H; Peck, M; Schiller, B; Haas, M

    1998-01-01

    We report here a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis arising in a 43-year-old man with a polyclonal gammopathy, who presented with progressive renal insufficiency, microscopic hematuria, and mild proteinuria (0.7 g/d). Ultrastructural studies showed deposits of randomly oriented fibrils in the glomerular mesangium and adjacent portions of some glomerular basement membranes, with a mean fibril thickness of 14.3 nm, highly consistent with fibrillary glomerulonephritis. The Congo red stain was negative on histologic sections. Immunofluorescence studies revealed strong mesangial and focal glomerular capillary staining for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, complement (C) 3, and kappa light chains, with minimal staining for IgA, IgM, C1q, or lambda light chains. The IgG present was entirely of the IgG1 subclass. This case is quite unusual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis, which typically presents with polyclonal IgG deposits and IgG4 as the dominant IgG subclass present. Monoclonal deposits are more frequently associated with immunotactoid glomerulopathy, characterized ultrastructurally by microtubule-like structures 30 to 50 nmn thick, often in parallel arrays. The present case illustrates that although fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy might be distinguishable on ultrastructural grounds, there is overlap between these two entities with respect to the potential composition of the glomerular deposits present. PMID:9556416

  18. Immunoglobulin levels in infantile pneumocystosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohout, Elfriede; Post, Cornelius; Azadeh, Bahram; Dutz, Werner; Bandarizadeh, Bashi; Kadivar, Darius

    1972-01-01

    Two hundred and twelve determinations of IgA, IgG, and IgM were performed in 50 infants during an epidemic of interstitial plasma cell pneumonia. Criteria for diagnosis are discussed. The immunoglobulin levels in pneumocystic, non-pneumocystic, and normal American infants are compared. An analysis of the findings in individual cases reveals a time-related immunoglobulin response, which helps to elucidate the pathogenicity of the disease. PMID:4536973

  19. Optimization of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chain Analysis for Subclassification of Cardiac Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Halushka, Marc K; Eng, George; Collins, A Bernard; Judge, Daniel P; Semigran, Marc J; Stone, James R

    2015-06-01

    Accurate and rapid classification of cardiac amyloidosis is important for patient management. We have optimized the use of serum free light chain kappa and lambda values to differentiate immunoglobulin light chain amyloid (AL) amyloidosis from transthyretin amyloid and amyloid A using 85 cases of tissue-proven cardiac amyloidosis, in which there was direct classification of amyloidosis by mass spectrometry or immunofluorescence. The serum free light chain kappa/lambda ratios were non-overlapping for the three major groups: AL-lambda (0.01-0.41, n = 30), non-AL (0.52-2.7, n = 43), and AL-kappa (6.7-967, n = 12). A kappa/lambda ratio value between 0.5 and 5.0 had 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for distinguishing AL amyloidosis from non-AL amyloidosis. This optimized range for serum light chain kappa/lambda ratio provides extremely robust classification of cardiac amyloidosis. Cases of cardiac amyloidosis in which the serum kappa/lambda free light chain ratio falls close to these new cutoff values may benefit most from direct amyloid subtyping. PMID:25925232

  20. Superfluidity of {Lambda} hyperons in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. N.; Shen, H.

    2010-02-15

    We study the {sup 1}S{sub 0} superfluidity of {Lambda} hyperons in neutron star matter and neutron stars. We use the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory to calculate the properties of neutron star matter. In the RMF approach, the meson-hyperon couplings are constrained by reasonable hyperon potentials that include the updated information from recent developments in hypernuclear physics. To examine the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap of {Lambda} hyperons, we employ several {Lambda}{Lambda} interactions based on the Nijmegen models and used in double-{Lambda} hypernuclei studies. It is found that the maximal pairing gap obtained is a few tenths of a MeV. The magnitude and the density region of the pairing gap are dependent on the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction and the treatment of neutron star matter. We calculate neutron star properties and find that whether the {sup 1}S{sub 0} superfluidity of {Lambda} hyperons exists in the core of neutron stars mainly depends on the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction used.

  1. Serologically defined V region subgroups of human lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A; Weiss, D T

    1987-08-01

    The availability of numerous antisera prepared against lambda-type Bence Jones proteins and lambda chains of known amino acid sequence has led to the differentiation and classification of human lambda light chains into one of five V lambda subgroups. The five serologically defined subgroups, V lambda I, V lambda II, V lambda III, V lambda IV, and V lambda VI, correspond to the chemical classification that is based on sequence homologies in the first framework region (FR1). Proteins designated by sequence as lambda V react with specific anti-lambda II antisera and are thus included in the V lambda II subgroup classification. The isotypic nature of the five V lambda subgroups was evidenced through analyses of lambda-type light chains that were isolated from the IgG of normal individuals. Based on analyses of 116 Bence Jones proteins, the frequency of distribution of the lambda I, lambda II/V, lambda III, lambda IV, and lambda VI proteins in the normal lambda chain population is estimated to be 27%, 37%, 23%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. This distribution of V lambda subgroups was comparable to that found among 82 monoclonal Ig lambda proteins. Considerable V lambda intragroup antigenic heterogeneity was also apparent. At least two sub-subgroups were identified among each of the five major V lambda subgroups, implying the existence of multiple genes in the human V lambda genome. The V lambda classification of 54 Ig lambda proteins obtained from patients with primary or multiple myeloma-associated amyloidosis substantiated the preferential association of lambda VI light chains with amyloidosis AL and the predominance of the normally rare V lambda VI subgroup in this disease. PMID:3110284

  2. Modeling Uncertainties in Power System by Generalized Lambda Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qing

    2014-06-01

    This paper employs the generalized lambda distribution (GLD) to model random variables with various probability distributions in power system. In the context of the probability weighted moment (PWM), an optimization-free method is developed to assess the parameters of GLD. By equating the first four PWMs of GLD with those of the target random variable, a polynomial equation with one unknown is derived to solve for the parameters of GLD. When employing GLD to model correlated multivariate random variables, a method of accommodating the dependency is put forward. Finally, three examples are worked to demonstrate the proposed method.

  3. Measurement of the Lambda 0(b) -> Lambda +(c) pi- branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Yi; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} branching ratio in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 65 pb{sup -1} data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The measurement starts from reconstructing two decay modes: {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}; and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. The authors obtained 96 {+-} 13 {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} and 321 {+-} 22 {bar B}{sup 0} candidates from the CDF Run II Two-Track Hadronic Trigger data sample. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then measured based on the equation: f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}) = BR(D{sup +} {yields} K{pi}{pi}) N{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} {epsilon}{sub B{sup 0}}/BR({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{pi}) N{sub {bar B}{sup 0}} {epsilon}{sub {Lambda}{sub b}}. The measurement gives f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.66 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst) {+-} 0.18(BR). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is then extracted, giving BR({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (6.6 {+-} 1.2(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) {+-} 2.3(BR+FR)) x 10{sup -3}. The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample they reconstructed in this analysis is the largest fully reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample in existence. The result they report here on the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is the world's first such measurement.

  4. Ultraviolet flare on Lambda Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Guinan, E. F.; Dupree, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    On November 5, 6, 1982, a luminous, flarelike brightening of the ultraviolet emissions was observed with IUE from the active RS CVn type star Lambda And during the phase of rotation period corresponding to maximum area coverage of the visible hemisphere by starspots and active regions. Enhancements during the flare in the ultraviolet emission lines as large as factors of several and in the ultraviolet continuum up to 80 percent persisted for over 5 hours. The bulk of the radiative output of the flare occurred in Mg II h and k and H I Ly-alpha. Because of the long duration and extreme luminosity of the event, the energy radiated by the flare alone is in excess of 10 to the 35th ergs just in the ultraviolet region. This is the most energetic stellar flare ever recorded in the ultraviolet. In addition, it is the first ultraviolet flare observed from a giant star. In comparison to the largest solar flares, the flare on Lambda And is at least three orders of magnitude more energetic in similar emission lines.

  5. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  6. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  7. Polarization Effects in Lambda and Anti-Lambda Production at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Belostotski, S. L.

    2009-08-04

    Study of the LAMBDA and LAMBDA hyperon production in the HERMES experiment is discussed. The data were collected using a 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized positron (or electron) beam of the HERA accelerator and a polarized or unpolarized target. The transverse polarizations (perpendicular to the production plane) of the LAMBDA and LAMBDA hyperons have been measured. The spin transfer K{sub LL} from the longitudinally polarized target has been found for inclusively detected LAMBDA and LAMBDA events. Longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} from the beam to the LAMBDA hyperon in the deep inelastic scattering regime has been analyzed. The D{sub LL} for LAMBDA has been measured for the first time.

  8. Study of Lambda+(c) Cabibbo favored decays containing a Lambda baryon in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-05-01

    Using data from the FOCUS experiment (FNAL-E831), they study the decay of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons into final states contain a {Lambda} hyperon. The branching fractions of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} into {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} relative to that into pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} are measured to be 0.217 {+-} 0.013 {+-} 0.020, 0.508 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.024 and 0.142 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.022, respectively. New measurements are also reported. Further, an analysis of the subresonant structure for the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode is presented.

  9. Transverse polarization of {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hyperons in quasireal photoproduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Amarian, M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Andrus, A.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Hafidi, K.; Jackson, H. E.; Potterveld, D. H.; Reimer, P. E.; Sanjiev, I.; Physics; Yerevan Physics Inst.; Inst. Nazionaled di Fisica Nucleare; Inst. High Energy Physics

    2007-11-01

    The HERMES experiment has measured the transverse polarization of Lambda and {ovr Lambda} hyperons produced inclusively in quasireal photoproduction at a positron beam energy of 27.6 GeV. The transverse polarization P{sub n}{sup Lambda} of the Lambda hyperon is found to be positive while the observed {ovr Lambda} polarization is compatible with zero. The values averaged over the kinematic acceptance of HERMES are P{sub n}{sup Lambda} =0.078 {+-} 0.006(stat) {+-} 0.012(syst) and P{sub n}{sup {ovr Lambda}} = -0.025 {+-} 0.015(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) for Lambda and {ovr Lambda}, respectively. The dependences of P{sub n}{sup Lambda} and P{sub n}{sup {ovr Lambda}} on the fraction zeta of the beam's light-cone momentum carried by the hyperon and on the hyperon's transverse momentum p{sub T} were investigated. The measured Lambda polarization rises linearly with p{sub T} and exhibits a different behavior for low and high values of zeta, which approximately correspond to the backward and forward regions in the center-of-mass frame of the gamma*N reaction.

  10. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  11. Double Lambda and Xi hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuma

    2014-09-01

    Nuclei with double strangeness (S = -2) provide the key information to understand Baryon-Baryon interaction under the SU(3)f symmetry. Therefore we have carried out the experiments at KEK for quarter a century. Recently, the interaction in S = -2 sector is noted to derive the information of the EOS of neutron star. The Lambda-Lambda interaction has been presented to be weak attractive by NAGARA event which showed the production and decay of 6He double-hypernucleus. The event also presented the lower mass limit of H dibaryon. In other five events, we obtained the knowledge about an excitation level of 10Be double-hypernucleus under the consistency with NAGARA event. Moreover, very recently, we have discovered a Xi-14N system which was deeply bound far from the atomic 3D level (0.17 MeV) for a captured Xi hyperon. Since a 8Li nucleus was associated with the decay of one of twin-hypernuclei, the event was uniquely identified as Xi- + 14N ==> 10BeL + 5HeL. The system was selected from 8 million pictures on the test running for development of ``Overall Scanning'' to be used in the coming experiment. This is the first evidence of Xi hypernucleus to be bound and it is impacting for the study of Xi-N interaction. At J-PARC facility, for the further study of hyperon-hyperon interaction, we plan to perform the E07 experiment at J-PARC. In the workshop, we will review the above knowledge obtained by the experiments at KEK-PS, and discuss developed technologies to detected 102 or more double-hypernuclei in the E07 experiment at J-PARC. Nuclei with double strangeness (S = -2) provide the key information to understand Baryon-Baryon interaction under the SU(3)f symmetry. Therefore we have carried out the experiments at KEK for quarter a century. Recently, the interaction in S = -2 sector is noted to derive the information of the EOS of neutron star. The Lambda-Lambda interaction has been presented to be weak attractive by NAGARA event which showed the production and decay of 6He

  12. Recent developments in Lambda networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    About 6 years ago the first baby-steps were made on opening up dark fiber and DWDM infrastructure for direct use by ISP's after the transformation of the old style Telecom sector into a market driven business. Since then Lambda workshops, community groups like GLIF and a number of experiments have led to many implementations of hybrid national research and education networks and lightpath-based circuit exchanges as pioneered by SURFnet in GigaPort and NetherLight in collaboration with StarLight in Chicago and Canarie in Canada. This article looks back on those developments, describes some current open issues and research developments and proposes a concept of terabit networking.

  13. Alternatives to Goodman and Kruskal's Lambda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavig, Gordon R.

    1979-01-01

    Lambda and kappa coefficients of nominal scale association are developed for research hypotheses that involve predictions of modality, agreement, or some theoretically specified configuration. The proposed new coefficient is offered as an alternative to Goodman and Kruskal's lambda. (Author/CTM)

  14. Chronic myopathy due to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Kwan, Justin Y.; Wang, Qian; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Tsokos, Maria; Arai, Andrew E.; Burch, Warner M.; Dispenzieri, Angela; McPherron, Alexandra C.; Gahl, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy associated with a plasma cell dyscrasia is a rare cause of muscle hypertrophy. It can be a challenging diagnosis, since pathological findings are often elusive. In addition, the mechanism by which immunoglobulin light-chain deposition stimulates muscle overgrowth remains poorly understood. We present a 53–year old female with a 10-year history of progressive generalized muscle overgrowth. Congo-red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed perivascular lambda light chain amyloid deposits, apparent only in a second muscle biopsy. The numbers of central nuclei and satellite cells were increased, suggesting enhanced muscle progenitor cell formation. Despite the chronicity of the light chain disease, the patient showed complete resolution of hematologic findings and significant improvement of her muscle symptoms following autologous bone marrow transplantation. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and therapy for this treatable cause of a chronic myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23465863

  15. Photoproduction of the {Lambda}*(1520) Hyperon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z. W.; Lu, H. Y.; Graham, L.; Park, K.; Gothe, R. W.

    2010-08-05

    The photoproduction of the {Lambda}*(1520) on both the proton and neutron have been studied by using the CLAS eg3 run data set. The reactions are {gamma}d{yields}K{sup +{Lambda}}*(n) and {gamma}d{yields}K{sup 0{Lambda}}*(p) with {Lambda}*{yields}pK{sup -}. Preliminary total and differential cross sections have been extracted in the photon energy region 1.75 GeVLambda}*(1520) on the neutron is reported, and we will extend the results on the proton to higher energies than in previous studies.

  16. Bacteriophage Lambda: a Paradigm Revisited ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; Allison, Heather E.; Saunders, Jon R.; McCarthy, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has an archetypal immunity system, which prevents the superinfection of its Escherichia coli lysogens. It is now known that superinfection can occur with toxigenic lambda-like phages at a high frequency, and here we demonstrate that the superinfection of a lambda lysogen can lead to the acquisition of additional lambda genomes, which was confirmed by Southern hybridization and quantitative PCR. As many as eight integration events were observed but at a very low frequency (6.4 × 10−4) and always as multiple insertions at the established primary integration site in E. coli. Sequence analysis of the complete immunity region demonstrated that these multiply infected lysogens were not immunity mutants. In conclusion, although lambda superinfection immunity can be confounded, it is a rare event. PMID:20375161

  17. Further observations of the lambda 10830 He line in stars and their significance as a measure of stellar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the lambda 1030 He line in 198 stars are given along with data on other features in that spectral range. Nearly 80% of all G and K stars show some lambda 10830; of these, half are variable and 1/4 show emission. It was confirmed that lambda 10830 is not found in M stars, is weak in F stars, and is particularly strong in close binaries. The line is found in emission in extremely late M and S stars, along with P gamma, but P gamma is not in emission in G and K stars with lambda 10830 emissions. Variable He emission and Ti I emission are found in the RV Tauri variables R Scuti and U Mon. In R Aqr the Fe XIII coronal line lambda 10747 and a line at lambda 11012 which may be singlet He or La II are found, as well as lambda 10830 and P gamma. The nature of coronas or hot chromospheres in the various stars is discussed. It was concluded that the lambda 10830 intensity must be more or less proportional to the energy deposited in the chromosphere corona by non-thermal processes.

  18. Aggregates, Crystals, Gels, and Amyloids: Intracellular and Extracellular Phenotypes at the Crossroads of Immunoglobulin Physicochemical Property and Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant immunoglobulins comprise an important class of human therapeutics. Although specific immunoglobulins can be purposefully raised against desired antigen targets by various methods, identifying an immunoglobulin clone that simultaneously possesses potent therapeutic activities and desirable manufacturing-related attributes often turns out to be challenging. The variable domains of individual immunoglobulins primarily define the unique antigen specificities and binding affinities inherent to each clone. The primary sequence of the variable domains also specifies the unique physicochemical properties that modulate various aspects of individual immunoglobulin life cycle, starting from the biosynthetic steps in the endoplasmic reticulum, secretory pathway trafficking, secretion, and the fate in the extracellular space and in the endosome-lysosome system. Because of the diverse repertoire of immunoglobulin physicochemical properties, some immunoglobulin clones' intrinsic properties may manifest as intriguing cellular phenotypes, unusual solution behaviors, and serious pathologic outcomes that are of scientific and clinical importance. To gain renewed insights into identifying manufacturable therapeutic antibodies, this paper catalogs important intracellular and extracellular phenotypes induced by various subsets of immunoglobulin clones occupying different niches of diverse physicochemical repertoire space. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that make certain immunoglobulin clones desirable or undesirable for large-scale manufacturing and therapeutic use are summarized. PMID:23533417

  19. Variable region expression in the antibody responses of infants vaccinated with Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide-protein conjugates. Description of a new lambda light chain-associated idiotype and the relation between idiotype expression, avidity, and vaccine formulation. The Collaborative Vaccine Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, D M; Shackelford, P G; Holmes, S J; Lucas, A H

    1993-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae b polysaccharide (Hib PS)-protein conjugate vaccines differ chemically and immunologically. To determine whether anti-Hib PS variable region expression might differ according to vaccine formulation, infants were vaccinated at 2, 4, and 6 mo of age with Hib PS coupled to either meningococcal outer membrane protein complex (Hib PS-OMPC) or tetanus toxoid (Hib PS-T), or Hib PS oligomers coupled to a mutant diphtheria toxin (Oligo-CRM). Two anti-Hib PS idiotypes were measured in sera obtained after the third injection: HibId-1, expressed by anti-Hib PS antibodies having the kappa II-A2 variable region, and HibId-2, a newly defined cross-reactive idiotype associated with a subset of anti-Hib PS antibodies having lambda VII variable regions. HibId-1 was present in 33, 68, and 64% of infants given either Hib PS-OMPC, Oligo-CRM, or Hib PS-T, respectively (P < 0.001). The respective values for HibId-2 were 47, 18, and 10% (P = 0.001). Subjects who were vaccinated with Hib PS-OMPC or Hib PS-T and who produced detectable HibId-1-positive antibody, had significantly higher mean antibody avidity than subjects who did not produce HibId-1 positive antibodies. In contrast, Oligo-CRM evoked high avidity anti-Hib PS antibodies, irrespective of the idiotypic profile. These findings indicate fundamental differences in both variable region content and antibody quality elicited by different Hib PS conjugate vaccines. PMID:8450060

  20. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  1. Bacteriophage lambda: Early pioneer and still relevant.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid-1950s to mid-1980s was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives has continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  2. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  3. Inducible mutagenesis in TEPC 2372, a mouse plasmacytoma cell line that harbors the transgenic shuttle vector lambdaLIZ.

    PubMed

    Felix, K; Kovalchuk, A L; Park, S S; Coleman, A E; Ramsay, E S; Qian, M; Kelliher, K A; Jones, G M; Ried, T; Bornkamm, G W; Janz, S

    2001-01-25

    The plasmacytoma cell line, TEPC 2372, was derived from a malignant plasma cell tumor that developed in the peritoneal cavity of a BALB/c mouse that harbored the transgenic shuttle vector for the assessment of mutagenesis in vivo, lambdaLIZ. TEPC 2372 was found to display the typical features of a BALB/c plasmacytoma. It consisted of pleomorphic plasma cells that secreted a monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG2b/lambda), was initially dependent on the presence of IL-6 to grow in cell culture, contained a hyperdiploid chromosome complement with a tendency to undergo tetraploidization, and harbored a constitutively active c-myc gene by virtue of a T(6;15) chromosomal translocation. TEPC 2372 was further characterized by the ability to respond to in vitro exposure with 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide), an oxidative model mutagen, with a vigorous dose-dependent increase in mutagenesis that peaked at a 7.85-fold elevation of mutant rates in lambdaLIZ when compared to background mutant rates in untreated controls. Cotreatment with 4-NQO and BSO (buthionine sulfoximine), a glutathione-depleting compound that causes endogenous oxidative stress, resulted in a 9.03-fold increase in the mutant frequency in lambdaLIZ. These results demonstrated that TEPC 2372, the malignant plasma cell counterpart of the lambdaLIZ-based in vivo mutagenesis assay, may be useful as an in vitro reference point for the further elucidation of oxidative mutagenesis in lymphoid tissues. PMID:11166031

  4. Molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in goose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Wu, Kun; Yuan, Xiaoli; Shao, Shuai; Wang, WenYuan; Wei, Si; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in adaptive immune system as defense molecules against pathogens. However, our knowledge on avian immunoglobulin genes has been limited to a few species. In this study, we analyzed goose (Anser cygnoides orientalis) immunoglobulin genes. Three IgH classes including IgM, IgA, IgY and λ light chain were identified. The IgM and IgA heavy chain constant regions are characteristically similar to their counterparts described in other vertebrates. In addition to the classic Ig isotypes, we also detected a transcript that encoded a truncated form of IgY (IgY(ΔFc)) in goose. Similar to duck, the IgY(ΔFc) in goose was generated by using different transcriptional termination signal of the same υ gene. Limited variability and only one leader peptide were observed in VH and VL domains, which suggested that gene conversion was the primary mechanism involved in goose antibody diversity. Our study provides more insights into the immunoglobulin genes in goose that had not been fully explored before. PMID:26921669

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  6. Graft-versus-leukemia activity may overcome therapeutic resistance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia with unmutated immunoglobulin variable heavy-chain gene status: implications of minimal residual disease measurement with quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ritgen, Matthias; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; von Neuhoff, Nils; Humpe, Andreas; Brüggemann, Monika; Pott, Christiane; Raff, Thorsten; Kröber, Alexander; Bunjes, Donald; Schlenk, Richard; Schmitz, Norbert; Döhner, Hartmut; Kneba, Michael; Dreger, Peter

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate if graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity conferred by allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is effective in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with unmutated V(H) gene status. The kinetics of residual disease (MRD) were measured by quantitative allele-specific immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 9 patients after nonmyeloablative allo-SCT for unmutated CLL. Despite an only modest decrease in the early posttransplantation phase, MRD became undetectable in 7 of 9 patients (78%) from day +100 onwards subsequent to chronic graft-versus-host disease or donor lymphocyte infusions. With a median follow-up of 25 months (range, 14-37 months), these 7 patients remain in continuous clinical and molecular remission. In contrast, PCR negativity was achieved in only 6 of 26 control patients (23%) after autologous SCT for unmutated CLL and it was not durable. Taken together, this study shows for the first time that GVL-mediated immunotherapy might be effective in CLL with unmutated V(H). PMID:15205268

  7. Biphenotypic plasma cell myeloma: two cases of plasma cell neoplasm with a coexpression of kappa and lambda light chains

    PubMed Central

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Bornhost, Joshua; Alapat, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell neoplasm (PCM) is a medullary and extra medullary proliferation of clonal plasma cells that occurs due to accidental translocation of proto-oncogenes into immunoglobulin (Ig) gene loci. While the majority of plasma cell neoplasms are monoclonal, up to 2% of the PCMs [1] considered being biclonal based on electrophoretic analysis, characterized by secretion of paraprotein with two distinct heavy chains or light chains are possible and present unique diagnostic challenges. Methods: Traditionally protein electrophoresis has been used to diagnose, characterize, and monitor progression of plasma cell neoplasm. To characterize neoplastic plasma cells, in our institution, other ancillary studies, including in situ hybridization, flow cytometric analyses of plasma cell surface markers and cytoplasmic immunoglobulins with DNA ploidy, are also utilized routinely. Results: We present two cases of plasma cell myeloma in which the neoplastic plasma cells shows production of cytoplasmic kappa and lambda light chain, with secretion of free lambda light chain only. Co-expression of kappa and lambda light chain by the same neoplastic plasma cells is a rare but reported phenomenon. Conclusions: Our study indicates that serum electrophoresis alone could mischaracterize biphenotypic myeloma as monotypic plasma cell myelomas in the absence of additional testing methods. PMID:26339430

  8. Study ofe+e- to Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma^0,Sigma^0 anti-Sigma^0 using Initial State Radiation with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-09-14

    We study the e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda gamma, Lambda anti-Sigma0 gamma, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 gamma processes using 230 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the BaBar detector at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. From the analysis of the baryon-antibaryon mass spectra the cross sections for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma0, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 are measured in the dibaryon mass range from threshold up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, and limits on the relative phase between Lambda form factors are obtained. We also measure the J/psi --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 and psi(2S) --> Lambda anti-Lambda branching fractions.

  9. The Heavy Mass Expansion lambda(sub)b -> lambda(sub)c Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mannel, Thomas; Roberts, Winston

    1992-11-01

    We point out that in the decays of the lambda(sub)b to lambda(sub)c one can find predictions which - in the framework of the 1/m(sub)c expansion - do not receive corrections in any order of 1/m(sub)c. We discuss QCD corrections to these predictions and examine some of the consequences for nonleptonic decays.

  10. Binding energy of (Lambda)He-7 and test of charge symmetry breaking in the Lambda N interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, O; Honda, D; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kawama, D; Maruyama, N; Matsumura, A; Nakamura, S N; Nomura, H; Nonaka, K; Ohtani, A; Okayasu, Y; Osaka, M; Oyamada, M; Sumihama, M; Tamura, H; Baker, O K; Cole, L; Christy, M; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Tang, L; Yuan, L; Acha, A; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Kramer, L; Markowitz, P; Pamela, P; Perez, N; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Rivera, R; Kato, S; Sato, Y; Takahashi, T; Daniel, A; Hungerford, Ed V; Ispiryan, M; Kalantarians, N; Lan, K J; Li, Y; Miyoshi, T; Randeniya, S; Rodriguez, V M; Bosted, P; Carlini, R; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gaskell, D; Jones, M; Mack, D; Roche, J; Smith, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Egiyan, K; Mkrtchyan, H; Margaryan, A; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Zamkochian, S; Hu, B; Song, Y; Luo, W; Androic, D; Furic, M; Petkovic, T; Seva, T; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Gasparian, A; Halkyard, R; Johnson, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Gan, L; Benmokhtar, F; Horn, T; Elassar, M; Gibson, E F

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7LambdaHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7LambdaHe, 7LambdaLi*and 7LambdaBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the LambdaN potential is discussed. For 7LambdaHe and 7LambdaBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4LambdaH and 4LambdaHe, is due to the CSB of the LambdaN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  11. Measurement of the Production Fraction Times Branching Fraction f(b -> \\Lambda_b) x B(\\Lambda_b -> J/\\psi \\Lambda)

    SciTech Connect

    Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; /CINVESTAV, IPN

    2011-09-01

    A new measurement of the b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} production fraction multiplied by the {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} branching fraction was performed by the D0 experiment using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The result of this measurement, f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = [6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)] x 10{sup -5}, represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average. We give an estimate of {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}), which takes into account correlations among the different b-hadron production fractions and other weakly decaying baryons.

  12. Nonlinear stability control and lambda-bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Erneux, T.; Reiss, E.L.; Magnan, J.F.; Jayakumar, P.K.

    1987-12-01

    Passive techniques for nonlinear stability control are presented for a model of fluidelastic instability. They employ the phenomena of lambda-bifurcation and a generalization of it. lambda-bifurcation occurs when a branch of flutter solutions bifurcates supercritically from a basic solution and terminates with an infinite period orbit at a branch of divergence solutions which bifurcates subcritically from the basic solution. The shape of the bifurcation diagram then resembles the greek letter lambda. When the system parameters are in the range where flutter occurs by lambda-bifurcation, then as the flow velocity increase the flutter amplitude also increases, but the frequencies of the oscillations decrease to zero. This diminishes the damaging effects of structural fatigue by flutter, and permits the flow speed to exceed the critical flutter speed. If generalized lambda-bifurcation occurs, then there is a jump transition from the flutter states to a divergence state with a substantially smaller amplitude, when the flow speed is sufficiently larger than the critical flutter speed.

  13. [Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Thon, Vojtěch

    2013-07-01

    Patients with agammaglobulinaemia and hypogammaglobulinaemia require immunoglobulin G (IgG) replacement therapy to prevent serious infections. Since the 1950s, therapy with human immune globulin products has been the standard of treatment. Currently, the most common routes of administration of IgG replacement therapy are intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG). The home therapy may improve the quality of life in patients who require lifelong IgG replacement. The -anti-IgA antibody test identifies the patients with the risk of anaphylactoid reactions in IVIG replacement. The SCIG delivery may be used in patients with anti-IgA antibodies and previous systemic reactions to IVIG. PMID:23964967

  14. Does lambda sub 2,2 vary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to find a secular drift in lambda sub 2,2, or the phase of the low order and degree portion of the geogravity field. This portion may be associated with mass anomalies near the core-mantle boundary. From the geomagnetic evidence, such anomalies might have westward drifts on the order of 0.5 degrees/year. Tracking data on 8 synchronous satellite over a period of 6 years were examined for residual accelerations which might be explained by a drift of the lambda sub 2,2 gravity phase angle. No conclusive movement of lambda sub 2,2 was detected. But a measured upper bound on the drift of less than 0.05 degrees/year is still compatible with possible slow moving irregularities in the region of the core-mantle boundary.

  15. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin: opportunities and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Misbah, S; Sturzenegger, M H; Borte, M; Shapiro, R S; Wasserman, R L; Berger, M; Ochs, H D

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) administration via the subcutaneous (s.c.) route has become increasingly popular in recent years. The method does not require venous access, is associated with few systemic side effects and has been reported to improve patients' quality of life. One current limitation to its use is the large volumes which need to be administered. Due to the inability of tissue to accept such large volumes, frequent administration at multiple sites is necessary. Most studies conducted to date have investigated the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) in patients treated previously with the intravenous (i.v.) formulation. New data now support the use of s.c. administration in previously untreated patients with primary immunodeficiencies. SCIg treatment may further be beneficial in the treatment of autoimmune neurological conditions, such as multi-focal motor neuropathy; however, controlled trials directly comparing the s.c. and i.v. routes are still to be performed for this indication. New developments may further improve and facilitate the s.c. administration route. For example, hyaluronidase-facilitated administration increases the bioavailability of SCIg, and may allow for the administration of larger volumes at a single site. Alternatively, more concentrated formulations may reduce the volume required for administration, and a rapid-push technique may allow for shorter administration times. As these developments translate into clinical practice, more physicians and patients may choose the s.c. administration route in the future. PMID:19883424

  16. {lambda}(1405)-induced nonmesonic decay in kaonic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sekihara, T.; Jido, D.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.

    2009-06-15

    Nonmesonic decay of kaonic nuclei is investigated under a {lambda}(1405) doorway picture in which the K absorptions in nuclei take place through the {lambda}(1405) resonance. Calculating {lambda}(1405)N{yields}YN transitions with one-meson exchange, we find that the nonmesonic decay ratio {gamma}{sub {lambda}}{sub N}/{gamma}{sub {sigma}{sup 0}}{sub N} depends strongly on the ratio of the couplings {lambda}(1405)-KN and {lambda}(1405)-{pi}{sigma}. Especially, a larger {lambda}(1405)-KN coupling leads to enhancement of the decay to {lambda}N. Using the chiral unitary approach for description of the KN amplitudes, we obtain {gamma}{sub {lambda}}{sub N}/{gamma}{sub {sigma}{sup 0}}{sub N}{approx_equal}1.2 almost independently of the nucleon density and find the total nonmesonic decay width calculated in uniform nuclear matter to be 22 MeV at the normal density.

  17. Associated {Lambda} production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, G.; Baker, O.K. |; Avery, S.; E93018 Collaboration

    1997-12-31

    The {sup 1}H(e, e{prime}K{sup +}){Lambda} and {sup 1}H(e, e{prime}K{sup +}){Sigma}{sup 0} reactions were studied as a function of the squared four-momentum-transfer, Q{sup 2}, and the virtual photon polarization, {var_epsilon}, thus enabling the separation of the longitudinal and transverse parts of the cross section. The existence of a sensibly large longitudinal component for the {sup 1}H(e, e{prime}K{sup +}){Lambda} reaction seems to be sustained by these data.

  18. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R.S.; Koretsky, A.P.; Moreland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and narrower distribution of rates and a higher frequency of pausing was observed. PMID:19562332

  19. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy: ensuring success.

    PubMed

    Younger, M Elizabeth M; Blouin, William; Duff, Carla; Epland, Kristin Buehler; Murphy, Elyse; Sedlak, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) infusions are an option for patients requiring immunoglobulin therapy. Nurses are uniquely positioned to advocate for patients and to teach them how to successfully manage their infusions. The purpose of this review is to describe SCIg therapy and to provide teaching instructions as well as creative tips to ensure treatment success. PMID:25545976

  20. Pharmacoeconomics of immunoglobulins in primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2009-08-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders are associated with increased patient susceptibility to recurrent infections. Since the 1950s, intramuscular, intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin products have been used to replace functionally deficient or absent immunoglobulins, reduce the incidence of infections and prevent organ damage caused by infections. This article aims to review the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency by focusing on costs, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, supply and off-label use. To date, the economic burden of primary immunodeficiency is unknown. Past studies have supported minimal differences in effectiveness between intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins. Subcutaneous therapy may be considered for patients who prefer treatment at home. The small number of economic evaluations and their methodological limitations precludes the recommendation of a specific product for use in primary immunodeficiency on pharmacoeconomic grounds. Demand for immunoglobulins has increased over time, leading to periodic shortages and emphasizing the importance of its appropriate use. PMID:19670998

  1. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component. PMID:26124916

  2. The Lambda Point Experiment in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Swanson, D. R.; Nissen, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1993-01-01

    In October 1992 a low temperature experiment was flown on the Space Shuttle in low earth orbit, using the JPL low temperature research facility. The objective of the mission was to measure the heat capacity and thermal relaxation of helium very close to the lambda point with the smearing effect of gravity removed.

  3. The Lambda Orionis association. [star cluster anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdin, P.; Penston, M. V.

    1977-01-01

    The Lambda Orionis association has the photometric properties of a typical young cluster with an age of about 4 million yr. Its distance is 400 + or - 40 pc. Attention is drawn to the lack of a dense molecular cloud and associated infrared sources in this young grouping

  4. Induction of polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    James, S P

    2001-05-01

    This unit is designed to examine the effects of T cells or lymphokines on B cell differentiation in situations where the antigen specificity of the B cells is not of interest. In these cases, antibody production induced by polyclonal stimuli (e.g., mitogens, antibodies, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), or lymphokines) can be measured instead of antigen-specific immunoglobulin production. Because B cells in the circulation and tissues are pleomorphic (containing subpopulations of cells that may be resting, cells that may have had prior antigenic exposure, and cells that may have undergone prior isotype commitment), the antibody responses of these subpopulations to various growth and differentiation factors differ. Therefore, the choice of which lymphocyte subpopulation to culture and which activation signal to use is determined by the particular experimental question. PMID:18432825

  5. Multiple myeloma with monoclonal IgG and IgD of lambda type exhibiting, under treatment, a shift from mainly IgG to mainly IgD.

    PubMed Central

    Gallart, T; Bladé, J; Martínez-Quesada, J; Sierra, J; Rozman, C; Vives, J

    1985-01-01

    A patient with multiple myeloma (MM), who initially presented with a predominant IgG lambda and a minor IgD lambda paraprotein pattern, is described. After chemotherapy, levels of the IgD lambda protein increased and the IgG lambda levels decreased. The following results were obtained when serum IgD was predominant. In the bone marrow, there were three plasma cell populations: a major one containing only delta chains, a minor one containing only gamma chains, and another minor one containing both delta and gamma chains. All these plasma cell populations contained lambda chains. Stimulation of circulating mononuclear cells with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) achieved differentiation of circulating B lymphocytes into plasma cells: 30% with only cytoplasmic delta lambda chains and 10% with only cytoplasmic gamma lambda chains. These IgG-containing plasma cells showed cytoplasmic reactivity with rabbit antiserum raised against monoclonal IgD which was shown to contain specificities recognizing both delta chains and idiotypic determinants present in both serum IgD lambda and IgG lambda. Circulating B lymphocytes were 'monoclonal': almost all expressed surface delta lambda chains, and a small proportion of them expressed both delta gamma and lambda chains. High levels of IgD were detected in the supernatants of all cultures, but high concentrations of IgG were only detected in those from PWM-stimulated cultures with very low levels of IgM and IgA. These findings suggest that plasma cells producing either IgD or IgG were derived from a common B-cell clone. Double paraproteinaemia exhibiting a shift in immunoglobulin production from IgG to IgD has not been previously described. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3922877

  6. Destabilizing loop swaps in the CDRs of an immunoglobulin VL domain.

    PubMed Central

    Helms, L. R.; Wetzel, R.

    1995-01-01

    It is generally believed that loop regions in globular proteins, and particularly hypervariable loops in immunoglobulins, can accommodate a wide variety of sequence changes without jeopardizing protein structure or stability. We show here, however, that novel sequences introduced within complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3 of the immunoglobulin variable domain REI VL can significantly diminish the stability of the native state of this protein. Besides their implications for the general role of loops in the stability of globular proteins, these results suggest previously unrecognized stability constraints on the variability of CDRs that may impact efforts to engineer new and improved activities into antibodies. PMID:8535243

  7. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  8. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  9. {lambda}{sub b}{yields}p, {lambda} transition form factors from QCD light-cone sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuming; Lue Caidian; Shen Yuelong

    2009-10-01

    Light-cone sum rules for the {lambda}{sub b}{yields}p, {lambda} transition form factors are derived from the correlation functions expanded by the twist of the distribution amplitudes of the {lambda}{sub b} baryon. In terms of the {lambda}{sub b} three-quark distribution amplitude models constrained by the QCD theory, we calculate the form factors at small momentum transfers and compare the results with those estimated in the conventional light-cone sum rules (LCSR) and perturbative QCD approaches. Our results indicate that the two different versions of sum rules can lead to the consistent numbers of form factors responsible for {lambda}{sub b}{yields}p transition. The {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda} transition form factors from LCSR with the asymptotic {lambda} baryon distribution amplitudes are found to be almost 1 order larger than those obtained in the {lambda}{sub b}-baryon LCSR, implying that the preasymptotic corrections to the baryonic distribution amplitudes are of great importance. Moreover, the SU(3) symmetry breaking effects between the form factors f{sub 1}{sup {lambda}{sub b}}{sup {yields}}{sup p} and f{sub 1}{sup {lambda}{sub b}}{sup {yields}}{sup {lambda}} are computed as 28{sub -8}{sup +14}% in the framework of {lambda}{sub b}-baryon LCSR.

  10. Influence of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Treatment on Thrombopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Winter, Oliver; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-06-01

    AIM: The mechanisms by which intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) result in an increase in platelet counts in most patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have not yet been fully explained. One of these mechanisms may be related to stimulation of thrombopoiesis. METHODS: A total of 13 adult patients who received IVIg were studied: 11 patients with primary ITP, 1 patient with ITP related to common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and 1 patient with uncharacterized thrombocytopenia. IVIg (0.5-1.5 g/kg body weight) was administered on consecutive days (days 1-3). Endogenous thrombopoietin (eTPO) was measured prior to and at least 1 day following treatment. In addition, IL-6 was measured in 5 of the treated patients. RESULTS: In 10 of 13 patients, IVIg treatment resulted in an increase in platelet counts. eTPO remained unchanged or elevated in almost all cases where the platelet count remained low (<100 × 10(3)/μ0. In all cases with normal or increased platelet counts (>100 × 10(3)/μ0, the eTPO concentration decreased. Furthermore, IVIg induced IL-6 synthesis in all 5 examined patients. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that the induction of eTPO synthesis by IL-6 may be a potential mechanism in which IVIg may stimulate thrombopoiesis. Further studies are required to characterize this mechanism. PMID:22851938

  11. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R E; Ochs, H D

    2014-12-01

    Most primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are the result of single gene defects. Based on this fact, more than 240 different entities have been identified. Those PIDs with predominant antibody deficiency are treated with immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy. This review focuses on the diagnosis, clinical characteristics and treatment of patients suffering from PID, or secondary immunodeficiency disorders (SID) caused, for instance, by irradiation, immunosuppressive drugs or thymectomy. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most commonly diagnosed and least understood form of PID, with a heterogeneous range of symptoms and genotypes, requiring individualized treatment plans. This includes adjusting the dose and treatment interval, administrating Ig by intravenous or subcutaneous injection by either pump or push, and finally deciding which treatment options are best for a given patient. Ig therapy can also be used to treat immunodeficiencies resulting from lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases or immunosuppression following organ transplantation; however, there is an urgent need for research in this field. Accurate and early diagnosis of PID is important to ensure that optimal treatment is started early to maintain the patient's health. Detailed patient registries have been established to increase awareness of PID, as well as provide a valuable resource for further research. PMID:25546741

  12. General mechanism for modulating immunoglobulin effector function

    PubMed Central

    Sondermann, Peter; Pincetic, Andrew; Maamary, Jad; Lammens, Katja; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins recognize and clear microbial pathogens and toxins through the coupling of variable region specificity to Fc-triggered cellular activation. These proinflammatory activities are regulated, thus avoiding the pathogenic sequelae of uncontrolled inflammation by modulating the composition of the Fc-linked glycan. Upon sialylation, the affinities for Fcγ receptors are reduced, whereas those for alternative cellular receptors, such as dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)/CD23, are increased. We demonstrate that sialylation induces significant structural alterations in the Cγ2 domain and propose a model that explains the observed changes in ligand specificity and biological activity. By analogy to related complexes formed by IgE and its evolutionarily related Fc receptors, we conclude that this mechanism is general for the modulation of antibody-triggered immune responses, characterized by a shift between an “open” activating conformation and a “closed” anti-inflammatory state of antibody Fc fragments. This common mechanism has been targeted by pathogens to avoid host defense and offers targets for therapeutic intervention in allergic and autoimmune disorders. PMID:23697368

  13. Dynamic processes in Be star atmospheres. 2: He I 2P-nD line formation in lambda Eridani (outburst)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Meylan, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The He I lambda 6678 line of early Be stars generally shows violet (V) and red (R) emission whenever hydrogen alpha emission is present, but its use as a diagnostic has been handicapped by a poor understanding of the processes that drive it into emission. In an attempt to address this problem we obtained three series of eschelle spectra of the first two members of the singlet and triplet 2P-nD series of lambda Eri (B2e) during 1992 November 3-5 at Kitt Peak. During these observations lambda 6678 showed substantial emission variability in both the wings and central profile, providing an opportunity to compare its behavior with that of the lambda 4922, lambda 5876, and lambda 4471 lines. We found that the responses of the lines were different in several respects. Whereas the emissions in the V wings of all four lines scaled together, the R wing of the lambda 4922 line invariably responded with increased absorption whenever the R wing of lambda 6678 line showed increased emission. These same trends occurred within the central photospheric profiles. The R-wing behavior shows that much, but not all of the emission in lambda 6678 is caused by matter projected against the stellar disk. The excitation temperatures of the neighboring 2(sup 1) P transitions, lambda 6678 and lambda 4922 must be greater than and less than the photospheric continuum temperature, respectively. We have investigated departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the He I spectrum in a variety of ad hoc, perturbed model atmospheres. We have found only one way to cause the source function of lambda 6678 to increase so strongly, namely, by increasing the atmospheric temperature in the line formation region to 30,000 - 40,000 K. This effect was discovered by Auer and Mihalas for O3-O4 atmospheric models, but it has not been applied to active B stars. Our models suggest that lambda 6678 emission in Be stars can be used as a sensitive monitor of localized hot spots on these stars' surfaces

  14. Dynamic processes in Be star atmospheres. 2: He I 2P-nD line formation in lambda Eridani (outburst)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Meylan, Thomas

    1994-09-01

    The He I lambda 6678 line of early Be stars generally shows violet (V) and red (R) emission whenever hydrogen alpha emission is present, but its use as a diagnostic has been handicapped by a poor understanding of the processes that drive it into emission. In an attempt to address this problem we obtained three series of eschelle spectra of the first two members of the singlet and triplet 2P-nD series of lambda Eri (B2e) during 1992 November 3-5 at Kitt Peak. During these observations lambda 6678 showed substantial emission variability in both the wings and central profile, providing an opportunity to compare its behavior with that of the lambda 4922, lambda 5876, and lambda 4471 lines. We found that the responses of the lines were different in several respects. Whereas the emissions in the V wings of all four lines scaled together, the R wing of the lambda 4922 line invariably responded with increased absorption whenever the R wing of lambda 6678 line showed increased emission. These same trends occurred within the central photospheric profiles. The R-wing behavior shows that much, but not all of the emission in lambda 6678 is caused by matter projected against the stellar disk. The excitation temperatures of the neighboring 21 P transitions, lambda 6678 and lambda 4922 must be greater than and less than the photospheric continuum temperature, respectively. We have investigated departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the He I spectrum in a variety of ad hoc, perturbed model atmospheres. We have found only one way to cause the source function of lambda 6678 to increase so strongly, namely, by increasing the atmospheric temperature in the line formation region to 30,000 - 40,000 K. This effect was discovered by Auer and Mihalas for O3-O4 atmospheric models, but it has not been applied to active B stars. Our models suggest that lambda 6678 emission in Be stars can be used as a sensitive monitor of localized hot spots on these stars' surfaces. The

  15. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Zhao, Y; Sinkora, M; Wertz, N; Kacskovics, I

    2009-03-01

    Swine share with most placental mammals the same five antibody isotypes and same two light chain types. Loci encoding lambda, kappa and Ig heavy chains appear to be organized as they are in other mammals. Swine differ from rodents and primates, but are similar to rabbits in using a single VH family (VH3) to encode their variable heavy chain domain, but not the family used by cattle, another artiodactyl. Distinct from other hoofed mammals and rodents, Ckappa:Clambda usage resembles the 1:1 ratio seen in primates. Since IgG subclasses diversified after speciation, same name subclass homologs do not exist among swine and other mammals unless very closely related. Swine possess six putative IgG subclasses that appear to have diversified by gene duplication and exon shuffle while retaining motifs that can bind to FcgammaRs, FcRn, C1q, protein A and protein G. The epithelial chorial placenta of swine and the precosial nature of their offspring have made piglets excellent models for studies on fetal antibody repertoire development and on the postnatal role of gut colonization, maternal colostrum and neonatal infection on the development of adaptive immunity during the "critical window" of immunological development. This chapter traces the study of the humoral immune system of this species through its various eras of discovery and compiles the results in tables and figures that should be a useful reference for educators and investigators. PMID:18804488

  16. Excited states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be in an {alpha} cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad

    2006-12-15

    The energies of the degenerate spin-flip doublet (3{sup +}/2,5{sup +}/2) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be and of the 2{sup +} state of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be are analyzed in the {alpha} cluster model using a phenomenological dispersive three-body {lambda}{alpha}{alpha} force that reproduces the ground state energy of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be. Two types of phenomenological {lambda}{alpha} and {alpha}{alpha} potentials and a few s-state {lambda}{lambda} potentials are taken as input. The energies of the excited states of the hypernuclei, treated as three- and four-body systems, calculated using the Variational Monte Carlo method, are in good agreement with the experimental values. Our results demonstrate that the existing data are insensitive to whether one employs a dispersive {lambda}{alpha}{alpha} force along with potentials in the relative angular momentum state l=0 and 2 as in the present work or whether one uses nonlocal {lambda}{alpha} potential as in earlier analyses.

  17. The Hyperon {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2011-10-21

    We present an analysis of the hyperon {Lambda}(1405) for p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). A {Lambda}(1405) signal could be reconstructed in both charged decay channels ({Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}).

  18. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Lambda-bar Polarization in B0 -> Lambda-par p pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-08-03

    We present a measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -} branching fraction performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Based on a sample of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs we measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -}) [3.07 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. The measured differential spectrum as a function of the dibaryon invariant mass m({bar {Lambda}}p) shows a near-threshold enhancement similar to that observed in other baryonic B decays. We study the {bar {Lambda}} polarization as a function of {bar {Lambda}} energy in the B{sup 0} rest frame (E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}) and compare it with theoretical expectations of fully longitudinally right-polarized {bar {Lambda}} at large E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}.

  19. Study of the decay asymmetry parameter and CP violation parameter in the Lambda(c)+ ---> Lambda pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-09-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a new measurement of the weak decay-asymmetry parameter a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +} decay. Comparing particle with antiparticle decays, we obtain the first measurement of the CP violation parameter {Alpha} {triple_bond} a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} + a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}/a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} - a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}. We obtain a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.13 and {Alpha} = -0.07 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.12 where errors are statistical and systematic.

  20. Random yet deterministic: convergent immunoglobulin responses to influenza

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andrew; Tsang, John S.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell clonal expansion is a hallmark of host-defense and vaccination responses. Given the vast immunoglobulin repertoire, individuals may expand B cells carrying largely distinct immunoglobulin genes following antigenic challenge. Using immunoglobulin-repertoire sequencing to dynamically track responses to influenza vaccination, Jackson et al. find evidence of convergent immunoglobulin responses across individuals. PMID:25179798

  1. Reevaluation of the reported observation of the {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, S. D.; Hungerford, E. V.

    2007-12-15

    The results of experiment E906, undertaken at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL-AGS), were reanalyzed to clarify the signature of the decays of the double- and single-{lambda} hypernuclei that could have been produced in this experiment. This reanalysis indicates that instead of the reported decay of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H through a proposed resonance in {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}He, it is more probable that the decay of the {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 7}He hypernucleus was observed. This decay was accompanied by a background of coincident decays of pairs of the single hypernuclear fragments {sub {lambda}}{sup 3}H with {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {lambda}}{sup 3}H with {sub {lambda}}{sup 3}H, and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H with {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H. An attempt was also made to determine if any other double or coincident single hypernuclear species could be observed in the data.

  2. Recognition of additional roles for immunoglobulin domains in immune function

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John P.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Haire, Robert N.; Litman, Ronda T.; Ostrov, David A.; Litman, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of immune receptors found in phylogenetically disparate species at the genetic, structural and functional levels has provided unique insight into the evolutionary acquisition of immune function. The roles of variable- and intermediate-type immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in direct recognition of ligands and other functions are far wider than previously anticipated. Common mechanisms of multigene family diversification and expansion as well as unique adaptations that relate to function continue to provide unique insight into the numerous patterns, processes and complex interactions that regulate the host response to infectious challenge. PMID:20004115

  3. {lambda}-{sigma} coupling effect in the neutron-rich {lambda} hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Li in a microscopic shell-model calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Umeya, A.; Harada, T.

    2009-02-15

    We investigate the structure of the neutron-rich {lambda}-hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Li by using microscopic shell-model calculations considering a {lambda}-{sigma} coupling effect. The calculated {sigma}-mixing probability in the {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Li ground state is found to be about 0.34% that is coherently enhanced by the {lambda}-{sigma} coupling configurations, leading to the energy shift 0.28 MeV that is about 3 times larger than that in {sub {lambda}}{sup 7}Li. The importance of the {sigma} configuration obtained by the {sigma}N interaction and the potentiality of the neutron-rich environment are discussed.

  4. The lambda point experiment in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation and potential for performing very high resolution measurements of the heat capacity singularity at the lambda point of helium in microgravity conditions was briefly discussed. It is clear that tests extending deep into the asymptotic region can be performed, where the theoretical predictions take on their simplest form. This advantageous situation should lead to a major improvement in the understanding of the range of applicability of current theoretical ideas in this field. The lambda transition holds out the prospect of giving the maximum advance of any system, and with the application of cryogenic techniques, the potential of this system can be realized. The technology for the initial experiments is already developed, and results could be obtained in 1990.

  5. The {Lambda}(1405) in Full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Menadue, Benjamin J.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. Selim

    2011-12-14

    At 1405.1 MeV, the lowest-lying negative-parity state of the {Lambda} baryon lies surprising low. Indeed, this is lower than the lowest negative-parity state of the nucleon, even though the {Lambda}(1405) possesses a valence strange quark. However, previous Lattice QCD studies have been unable to identify such a low-lying state. Using the PACS-CS (2+1)-flavour full-QCD ensembles, available through the ILDG, we utilise a variational analysis with source and sink smearing to isolate this elusive state. We find three low-lying odd-parity states, and for the first time reproduce the correct level ordering with respect to the nearby scattering thresholds.

  6. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin in Refractory Juvenile Dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    de Inocencio, Jaime; Enríquez-Merayo, Eugenia; Casado, Rocío; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common form of juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. We report a child with steroid-dependent JDM refractory to hydroxychloroquine and subcutaneous methotrexate who experienced systemic reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin and was successfully treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin. This form of therapy has been shown to be safe, has a very low rate of adverse effects, does not require hospital admission, reduces the number of missed school days, and decreases the costs associated with treatment. PMID:26966131

  7. Detecting selection in immunoglobulin sequences.

    PubMed

    Uduman, Mohamed; Yaari, Gur; Hershberg, Uri; Stern, Jacob A; Shlomchik, Mark J; Kleinstein, Steven H

    2011-07-01

    The ability to detect selection by analyzing mutation patterns in experimentally derived immunoglobulin (Ig) sequences is a critical part of many studies. Such techniques are useful not only for understanding the response to pathogens, but also to determine the role of antigen-driven selection in autoimmunity, B cell cancers and the diversification of pre-immune repertoires in certain species. Despite its importance, quantifying selection in experimentally derived sequences is fraught with difficulties. The necessary parameters for statistical tests (such as the expected frequency of replacement mutations in the absence of selection) are non-trivial to calculate, and results are not easily interpretable when analyzing more than a handful of sequences. We have developed a web server that implements our previously proposed Focused binomial test for detecting selection. Several features are integrated into the web site in order to facilitate analysis, including V(D)J germline segment identification with IMGT alignment, batch submission of sequences and integration of additional test statistics proposed by other groups. We also implement a Z-score-based statistic that increases the power of detecting selection while maintaining specificity, and further allows for the combined analysis of sequences from different germlines. The tool is freely available at http://clip.med.yale.edu/selection. PMID:21665923

  8. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  9. Fully correlated study of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He hypernucleus including {lambda}N space-exchange correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A. A.; Hasan, Z.

    2006-09-15

    We present a fully correlated study of the six-body {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He hypernucleus. The wave function involves all relevant dynamic correlations as well as the space-exchange correlation (SEC). Calculations for energy breakdown, {lambda}{lambda}-separation energy, nuclear core polarization, and point proton radius have been performed. The baryon density profiles have also been calculated. Effect of SEC on all these physical observables is found to be significant. The findings suggest that a study ignoring SEC would be deficient.

  10. Trivalent iron induced gelation in lambda-carrageenan

    SciTech Connect

    Running, Cordelia A.; Falshaw, Ruth; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2012-05-24

    This communication reports gelation of lambda-carrageenan, for the first time, in the presence of trivalent iron ions. Kappa-, iota- and lambda-carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides used extensively in food, pharmaceutical and medical applications. Kappa- and iota-carrageenans show gelation in the presence of mono- and di-valent ions, but lambda-carrageenan yields only viscous solutions. Our results show that gelation in lambda-carrageenan indeed is possible, but with trivalent ions. X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of iron (III)-lambda-carrageenan are characteristic of highly oriented and polycrystalline fibers containing well resolved Bragg reflections. The elastic modulus (G*) of the product is far greater than the loss modulus (G*) indicating the thermal stability of lambda-carrageenan in the presence of iron (III) ions. This novel finding has potential to expand lambda-carrageenan's current utility beyond a viscosifying agent.

  11. MASS FUNCTION PREDICTIONS BEYOND {Lambda}CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Lukic, Zarija; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian

    2011-05-10

    The statistics of dark matter halos is an essential component of precision cosmology. The mass distribution of halos, as specified by the halo mass function, is a key input for several cosmological probes. The sizes of N-body simulations are now such that, for the most part, results need no longer be statistics-limited, but are still subject to various systematic uncertainties. Discrepancies in the results of simulation campaigns for the halo mass function remain in excess of statistical uncertainties and of roughly the same size as the error limits set by near-future observations; we investigate and discuss some of the reasons for these differences. Quantifying error sources and compensating for them as appropriate, we carry out a high-statistics study of dark matter halos from 67 N-body simulations to investigate the mass function and its evolution for a reference {Lambda}CDM cosmology and for a set of wCDM cosmologies. For the reference {Lambda}CDM cosmology (close to WMAP5), we quantify the breaking of universality in the form of the mass function as a function of redshift, finding an evolution of as much as 10% away from the universal form between redshifts z = 0 and z = 2. For cosmologies very close to this reference we provide a fitting formula to our results for the (evolving) {Lambda}CDM mass function over a mass range of 6 x 10{sup 11}-3 x 10{sup 15} M{sub sun} to an estimated accuracy of about 2%. The set of wCDM cosmologies is taken from the Coyote Universe simulation suite. The mass functions from this suite (which includes a {Lambda}CDM cosmology and others with w {approx_equal} -1) are described by the fitting formula for the reference {Lambda}CDM case at an accuracy level of 10%, but with clear systematic deviations. We argue that, as a consequence, fitting formulae based on a universal form for the mass function may have limited utility in high-precision cosmological applications.

  12. Discovery of new Mycoplasma pneumoniae antigens by use of a whole-genome lambda display library.

    PubMed

    Beghetto, Elisa; De Paolis, Francesca; Montagnani, Francesca; Cellesi, Carla; Gargano, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the leading cause of atypical pneumonia in children and young adults. Bacterial colonization can occur in both the upper and the lower respiratory tracts and take place both endemically and epidemically worldwide. Characteristically, the infection is chronic in onset and recovery and both humoral and cell-mediated mechanisms are involved in the response to bacterial colonization. To identify bacterial proteins recognized by host antibody responses, a whole-genome M. pneumoniae library was created and displayed on lambda bacteriophage. The challenge of such a library with sera from individuals hospitalized for mycoplasmal pneumonia allowed the identification of a panel of recombinant bacteriophages carrying B-cell epitopes. Among the already known M. pneumoniae B-cell antigens, our results confirmed the immunogenicity of P1 and P30 adhesins. Also, the data presented in this study localized, within their sequences, the immunodominant epitopes recognized by human immunoglobulins. Furthermore, library screening allowed the identification of four novel immunogenic polypeptides, respectively, encoded by fragments of the MPN152, MPN426, MPN456 and MPN-500 open reading frames, highlighting and further confirming the potential of lambda display technology in antigen and epitope discovery. PMID:18992837

  13. Differential Photoproduction Cross Sections of the Sigma0(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the exclusive photoproduction cross sections for the Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520) in the reactions gamma + p -> K+ + Y* using the CLAS detector for energies from near the respective production thresholds up to a center-of-mass energy W of 2.85 GeV. The differential cross sections are integrated to give the total exclusive cross sections for each hyperon. Comparisons are made to current theoretical models based on the effective Lagrangian approach and fitted to previous data. The accuracy of these models is seen to vary widely. The cross sections for the Lambda(1405) region are strikingly different for the Sigma+pi-, Sigma0 pi0, and Sigma- pi+ decay channels, indicating the effect of isospin interference, especially at W values close to the threshold.

  14. Analyses of chicken immunoglobulin light chain cDNA clones indicate a few germline V lambda genes and allotypes of the C lambda locus.

    PubMed Central

    Parvari, R; Ziv, E; Lentner, F; Tel-Or, S; Burstein, Y; Schechter, I

    1987-01-01

    cDNA libraries of chicken spleen and Harder gland (a gland enriched with immunocytes) constructed in pBR322 were screened by differential hybridization and by mRNA hybrid-selected translation. Eleven L-chain cDNA clones were identified from which VL probes were prepared and each was annealed with kidney DNA restriction digests. All VL probes revealed the same set of bands, corresponding to about 15 germline VL genes of one subgroup. The nucleotide sequences of six VL clones showed greater than or equal to 85% homology, and the predicted amino acid sequences were identical or nearly identical to the major N-terminal sequence of L-chains in chicken serum. These findings, and the fact that the VL clones were randomly selected from normal lymphoid tissues, strongly indicate that the bulk of chicken L-chains is encoded by a few germline VL genes, probably much less than 15 since many of the VL genes are known to be pseudogenes. Therefore, it is likely that somatic mechanisms operating prior to specific triggering by antigen play a major role in the generation of antibody diversity in chicken. Analysis of the constant region locus (sequencing of CL gene and cDNAs) demonstrate a single CL isotype and suggest the presence of CL allotypes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3107981

  15. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  16. Measurement of transverse {lambda} and {lambda}-bar polarization at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrero, A.

    2007-06-13

    New data on hyperon polarization in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering have been collected by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN during the years 2002-2004, using a beam of longitudinally polarized muons of 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target that can be polarized both longitudinally and transversely. The various combinations of beam and target polarizations allow for the study of a wide variety of hyperon polarization effects. Here we present preliminary results on the transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar produced both with unpolarized and transversely polarized deuteron targets.

  17. T(sub lambda) Depression by a Heat Current Along the lambda-Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Larson, Melora; Iraelsson, Ulf E.

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of the depression of the superfluid transition temperature by a heat current (1 less than or = Q less than or = 100 microW/sq cm) along the lambda-line (SVP less than or = P less than or = 21.6 bar). At P = 21.6 bar, measurements were also performed in a reduced gravity (0.2g). Experimental results show that the pressure dependence of the depression and the gravity effect on the measurements are small, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. Keywords: superfluid helium; Lambda transition; heat current

  18. Mapping of Heavy Chain Genes for Mouse Immunoglobulins M and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Ping; Tucker, Philip W.; Mushinski, J. Frederic; Blattner, Frederick R.

    1980-09-01

    A single DNA fragment containing both μ and δ immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been cloned from normal BALB/c mouse liver DNA with a new λ phage vector Charon 28. The physical distance between the membrane terminal exon of μ and the first domain of δ is 2466 base pairs, with δ on the 3' side of μ . A single transcript could contain a variable region and both μ and δ constant regions. The dual expression of immunoglobulins M and D on spleen B cells may be due to alternate splicing of this transcript.

  19. X-linked Agammaglobulinemia With Normal Immunoglobulin and Near-Normal Vaccine Seroconversion.

    PubMed

    Preece, Kahn; Lear, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    We present a 22-month-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia masked by normal immunoglobulin levels and vaccine seroconversion. Diagnosis was made after strong clinical suspicion of immune deficiency led to identification of markedly reduced B-cell numbers and confirmation with identification of a novel Bruton tyrosine kinase gene mutation. He was commenced on replacement immunoglobulin therapy with excellent clinical improvement. This case highlights the variability of phenotypic presentation and apparent disunity between routine immunologic investigations and severe disease in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, necessitating clinical acumen to make the diagnosis. PMID:26527549

  20. Design of broadly tuned FIR FEL based on a variable-period microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Qing-Xiang Liu |; Yong Xu

    1995-12-31

    A varible-period microwiggler is proposed and investigated. The fundamental period of the microwiggler is designed as {lambda}o=2mm, and the period of the microwiggler can be turned from {lambda}o to n{lambda}o (n=1,2,3,{hor_ellipsis}) The wiggler fields with the period 3{lambda}o, 4{lambda}o, and 5{lambda}o are measured and compared with the theoretical results. Finally, a broadly tuned FIR FEL is designed based on the performance of the variable-period microwiggler.

  1. Lambda Baryon a Production in 91 GEV Positron - Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routenburg, Paul

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of Lambda + | Lambda production in the data collected with the OPAL detector during 1990 is presented. A total inclusive rate is determined and checked through detailed systematic studies. This rate is found to be 0.356 +/- 0.011 (stat.) +/- 0.028 (syst.) per multihadron event. The inclusive cross sections as a function of the fractional Lambda energy (x _{E}) and xi (xi = ln(1/x_{p }), where x_{p} is the fractional Lambda momentum) are determined and compared to the predictions of the HERWIG 5.0 and JETSET 7.2 Monte Carlos as tuned to agree with global event shapes at an average centre-of-mass energy of 91 GeV. The overall Lambda rate is in agreement with the JETSET prediction but less than that predicted by HERWIG. The fragmentation function observed is softer than predicted by either Monte Carlo. Scaling violations are observed in the x_{E } distribution compared to the observations between 29 and 35 GeV. This is attributed to increased gluon radiation. A study is then made of the Lambda decay length distribution, and of the production and decay angles. Reasonable agreement is found between the data and the expectations. There is some indication that the Lambda rate increases faster with event sphericity than does the charged multiplicity. This effect is thought to be due to increased baryon production in gluon fragmentation. Finally, an investigation into Lambda - | Lambda, Lambda - Lambda and | Lambda - | Lambda production in the same event is presented. The results support local baryon number conservation and agree with the JETSET prediction. It is also shown that an additional meson is produced between the baryon and the antibaryon a significant fraction of the time.

  2. Measurement of the Lambda0b lifetime in the decay lambda0b--> J/psiLambda0 with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the Lambda(0)(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay channel Lambda(0)(b)--> J/psiLambda(0), with J/psi--> mu(+)mu(-) and Lambda(0)--> ppi(-), the B0 lifetime in the decay B0-->J/psiK(0)(S) with J/psi--> mu(+)mu(-) and K(0)(S)-->pi(+)pi(-), and the ratio of these lifetimes. The analysis is based on approximately 250 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV. The Lambda(0)(b) lifetime is determined to be tau(Lambda(0)(b)) = 1.22(+0.22)(-0.18)(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) ps, the B0 lifetime tau(B0) = 1.40(+0.11)(-0.10)(stat) +/- 0.03(syst) ps, and the ratio tau(Lambda(0)(b))/tau(B0) = 0.87(+0.17)(-0.14)(stat) +/- 0.03(syst). In contrast with previous measurements using semileptonic decays, this is the first determination of the Lambda(0)(b) lifetime based on a fully reconstructed decay channel. PMID:15783476

  3. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T

    2016-05-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen-D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  4. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J.; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen–D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  5. Spectroscopy of 28Al(Lambda), 12B(Lambda), 7He(Lambda) by the (e,e'K+) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Akihiko Matsumura

    2010-06-30

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction is one of the powerful tools to investigate precise structures of hypernuclei and to study $\\Lambda$N interaction. The second generation hypernuclear experiment at JLab Hall C(E01-011) was successfully performed in 2005, introducing the two novel experimental configurations, High resolution and large acceptance Kaon Spectrometer(HKS) and Tilt method. Thanks to these new configurations, various hypernuclei such as $^{28}_{\\Lambda}$Al, $^{12}_{\\Lambda}$B and $^{7}_{\\Lambda}$He were measured with precise energy resolution of 500 keV (FWHM). Obtained absolute binding energies and cross sections were compared with other experimental data and recent theoretical calculations based on shell model and cluster model. The results of this study provided new information on $\\Lambda$N interaction.

  6. Rabi resonances in the {lambda} excitation scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2002-12-01

    We consider the interaction of a three-level system with phase-modulated resonant fields in the {lambda} excitation scheme. We treat theoretically the case of a sinusoidal phase modulation, a phase step perturbation, and a stochastic phase modulation. The appearance of a Rabi resonance both in the spectrum of the optical transmitted signal (electromagnetically induced transparency) and in the spectrum of the microwave emission (coherent population trapping maser) is considered in detail. All the theoretical results are compared with the analogous ones reported for the two-level system and with our experimental observations obtained for the case of rubidium in a buffer gas.

  7. {Lambda}(1520) photoproduction with Regge contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seung-il; Yu, Byung-Geel; Kao, Chung-Wen

    2011-10-21

    In this talk, we report our recent progresses on the {Lambda}(1520) photoproduction using the effective Lagrangian approach. In addition to the tree-level Born diagrams, we take into account the Regge-trajectories for the possible strange-meson exchanges in the t channel. We compute the angular and energy dependences of the production process, including polarization observables, such as the photon-beam asymmetry and the polarization-transfer coefficients, resulting in good qualitative agreement with current experimental data. We also compute the K{sup -} angle distribution function in the Gottfried-Jackson frame, using the polarization-transfer coefficients in the z direction.

  8. Aetherizing Lambda: Barotropic fluids as dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2009-07-15

    We examine the class of barotropic fluid models of dark energy, in which the pressure is an explicit function of the density, p=f({rho}). Through general physical considerations we constrain the asymptotic past and future behaviors and show that this class is equivalent to the sum of a cosmological constant and a decelerating perfect fluid, or 'aether', with w{sub AE}{>=}0. Barotropic models give substantially disjoint predictions from quintessence, except in the limit of {lambda}CDM. They are also interesting in that they simultaneously can ameliorate the coincidence problem and yet 'predict' a value of w{approx_equal}-1.

  9. Using bioinformatics tools for the sequence analysis of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2006-03-01

    The huge potential repertoire of 10(12) immunoglobulins and 10(12) T cell receptors per individual results from complex mechanisms of combinatorial diversity between the variable (V), diversity (D), and junction (J) genes, nucleotide deletions and insertions (N-diversity) at the junctions and, for the immunoglobulins, somatic hypermutations. The accurate analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T cell receptor sequences, and the annotation of the junctions, therefore represent a huge challenge. The IMGT Scientific chart rules, based on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts, were the prerequisites for the implementation of the IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis tools. IMGT/V-QUEST analyzes germline V and rearranged V-J or V-D-J nucleotide sequences. IMGT/JunctionAnalysis is the first tool that automatically analyzes the complex junctions in detail. These interactive tools are easy to use and freely available on the Web (http://imgt.cines.fr), either separately or integrated. PMID:18432961

  10. Measurement of the Lambda/b lifetime in Lambda/b to Lambda/c pi decays at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, Jonathan Reid; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2008-10-01

    The lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon (consisting of u, d and b quarks) is the theoretically most interesting of all b-hadron lifetimes. The lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} probes our understanding of how baryons with one heavy quark are put together and how they decay. Experimentally however, measurements of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime have either lacked precision or have been inconsistent with one another. This thesis describes the measurement of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in proton-antiproton collisions with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Using 1070 {+-} 60pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), a clean sample of about 3,000 fully-reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (with {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} subsequently decaying via {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) is used to extract the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, which is found to be c{tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 422.8 {+-} 13.8(stat) {+-} 8.8(syst){micro}m. This is the most precise measurement of its kind, and is even better than the current world average. It also settles the recent controversy regarding the apparent inconsistency between CDF's other measurement and the rest of the world.

  11. A Study of Bbar to Xi_c Lambda_c^- and Bbar to Lambda_c^+ Lambda_c^- Kbar Decays at \\babar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-11-07

    We report measurements of B-meson decays into two- and three-body final states containing two charmed baryons using a sample of 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays. We find significant signals in two modes, measuring branching fractions {beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K{sup -}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.60) x 10{sup -3} and {beta}(B{sup -}{yields} {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c}{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}) x {beta}({Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (2.08 {+-} 0.65 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.54) x 10{sup -5}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and from the branching fraction {beta}({Lambda}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), respectively. We also set upper limits at the 90% confidence level on two other modes: {beta}({bar {beta}}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sup +}{sub c}{bar {Lambda}}{sup -}{sub c}) x {beta}({Xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -5} and {beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{bar {Lambda}}{sup -}{sub c}{bar K}{sup 0}) < 1.5 x 10{sup -3}. We observe structure centered at an invariant mass of 2.93 GeV/c{sup 2} in the {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -} mass distribution of the decay B{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{bar {Lambda}}{sup -}{sub c}K{sup -}.

  12. On the local behaviour of the multidimensional {Lambda}-variation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhvalov, Alexandr N

    2011-01-14

    Let two classes ({Lambda}{sup 1},...,{Lambda}{sup m})BV and (M{sup 1},...,M{sup m})BV on an interval {Delta} be given. In the paper, we find necessary and sufficient conditions for the {Lambda}-variation of any function in the M-class, over a neighbourhood of every regular point, to tend to zero as the neighbourhood decreases. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  13. First measurement of the ratio of branching fractions BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) mu nu)/BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) pi) at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shin-shan

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation, we measure the properties of the lowest-mass beauty baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}. Baryons are the bound states of three quarks. Protons and neutrons, constituents of atomic nuclei, are the most common baryons. Other types of baryons can be produced and studied in the high-energy collider environment. Three-body dynamics makes baryons composed of low mass quarks difficult to study. On the other hand, baryons with one heavy quark simplify the theoretical treatment of baryon structure, since the heavy quark can be treated the same way as the nucleus in the atom. The {Lambda}{sub b} is composed of u, d, and b quarks, where the b quark is much heavier than the other two. Although, it is accessible, little is known about {Lambda}{sub b}. In 1991, UA1 [1] reconstructed 9 {+-} 1 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} candidates. In 1996, ALEPH and DELPHI reconstructed the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and found only 3-4 candidates [2, 3]. ALEPH measured a {Lambda}{sub b} mass of 5614 {+-} 21 MeV/c{sup 2}, while DELPHI measured 5668 {+-} 18 MeV/c{sup 2}, about 2 {sigma} higher. Subsequently, CDF-I observed 20 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} events [4], confirmed the existence of {Lambda}{sub b} unambiguously and made a more precise measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} mass, 5621 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2}. A recent CDF-II measurement by Korn [5] yields 5619.7 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which will significantly improve the current world average, 5624 {+-} 9 MeV/c{sup 2}, and resolve the discrepancy of ALEPH and DELPHI.

  14. The fluxonium as a lambda system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vool, U.; Kou, A.; Smith, W. C.; Serniak, K.; Shankar, S.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    A lambda system is a 3-level system in which two low-energy states can transition to a third higher-energy state by a coherent drive but not to each other. Lambda systems are commonly implemented in systems relying on atomic transitions. In the field of superconducting quantum circuits, the fluxonium qubit, an artificial atom consisting of a Josephson junction shunted by a super-inductance, is a unique artificial atom with highly non-linear energy levels. At half-flux quantum it has two low-energy states with a long energy lifetime, but it is difficult to perform fast quantum gates in this manifold. Employing the higher 2nd excited state as an intermediate level would be much more efficient. However, selection rules in the fluxonium qubit prohibit transitions between low-energy states and higher-energy states of the same parity. In this talk, we will introduce a way to create formerly forbidden transitions between levels of the fluxonium qubit - thus creating a more interesting artificial atom and a useful tool for future superconducting quantum circuits. Work supported by ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  15. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Lange, S.; Smoljanin, S.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.; Epple, M.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M.-O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Medipix3 photon-counting detector chip has a number of novel features that are attractive for synchrotron experiments, such as a high frame rate with zero dead time and high spatial resolution. DESY are developing a large-area Medipix3-based detector array (LAMBDA). A single LAMBDA module consists of 2 by 6 Medipix3 chips on a ceramic carrier board, bonded to either a single large silicon sensor or two smaller high-Z sensors. The readout system fits behind the carrier board to allow module tiling, and uses a large on-board RAM and multiple 10 Gigabit Ethernet links to permit high-speed readout. Currently, the first large silicon modules have been constructed and read out at low speed, and the firmware for highspeed readout is being developed. In addition to these silicon sensors, we are developing a germanium hybrid pixel detector in collaboration with Canberra for higher-energy beamlines. Canberra have produced a set of 256-by-256-pixel planar germanium sensors with 55μm pitch, and these are currently being bonded to Medipix3 readout chips by Fraunhofer IZM (Berlin).

  16. Enhancement of Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transcytosis by Biparatopic VHH

    PubMed Central

    Emmerson, Chris D.; van der Vlist, Els J.; Braam, Myrthe R.; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Merchiers, Pascal; de Haard, Hans J. W.; Verrips, C. Theo; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.; Dolk, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) ensures the transport of dimeric immunoglobulin A (dIgA) and pentameric immunoglobulin M (pIgM) across epithelia to the mucosal layer of for example the intestines and the lungs via transcytosis. Per day the human pIgR mediates the excretion of 2 to 5 grams of dIgA into the mucosa of luminal organs. This system could prove useful for therapies aiming at excretion of compounds into the mucosa. Here we investigated the use of the variable domain of camelid derived heavy chain only antibodies, also known as VHHs or Nanobodies®, targeting the human pIgR, as a transport system across epithelial cells. We show that VHHs directed against the human pIgR are able to bind the receptor with high affinity (∼1 nM) and that they compete with the natural ligand, dIgA. In a transcytosis assay both native and phage-bound VHH were only able to get across polarized MDCK cells that express the human pIgR gene in a basolateral to apical fashion. Indicating that the VHHs are able to translocate across epithelia and to take along large particles of cargo. Furthermore, by making multivalent VHHs we were able to enhance the transport of the compounds both in a MDCK-hpIgR and Caco-2 cell system, probably by inducing receptor clustering. These results show that VHHs can be used as a carrier system to exploit the human pIgR transcytotic system and that multivalent compounds are able to significantly enhance the transport across epithelial monolayers. PMID:22022593

  17. ON THE BINDING ENERGY PARAMETER {lambda} OF COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaojie; Li Xiangdong

    2010-06-10

    The binding energy parameter {lambda} plays an important role in common envelope evolution. Previous works have already pointed out that {lambda} varies throughout the stellar evolution, though it has been adopted as a constant in most of the population synthesis calculations. We have systematically calculated the binding energy parameter {lambda} for both Population I and Population II stars of masses 1-20 M {sub sun}, taking into account the contribution from the internal energy of stellar matter. We present fitting formulae for {lambda} that can be incorporated into future population synthesis investigations. We also briefly discuss the possible applications of the results in binary evolutions.

  18. Rare {Lambda}{sub b} decays in a quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, L.; Roberts, W.

    2010-08-05

    Hadronic form factors for the rare weak transitions {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)} are calculated using a nonrelativistic quark model. The form factors obtained in this way are found to satisfy the relationships expecetd from the heavy quark effective theory. Differential decay rates and branching ratios are calculated for the dileptonic decays {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, for both ground state and excited daughter baryons. Inclusion of the long distance contributions from charmonium resonances significantly enhances the decay rates. Future work is outlined.

  19. Charge-symmetry breaking {Lambda}-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Murali, M.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    Some time ago we showed that the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction, as obtained from the mass four hypernuclei ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He), was spin-independent; a result which cannot be understood with the conventional meson-exchange models. The calculations of ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He) are currently being extended to include noncentral nuclear and hypernuclear forces which could modify this result. At a more fundamental level we intend to study quark-structure contributions to the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction.

  20. Remarks on the generalized Tukey's lambda family of distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, H.; Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    The family of curves generated by the mapping of the uniform density F/sup -1/(lambda) = ..cap alpha.. + ..beta..(lambda/sup ..gamma..delta/ - (1-lambda)/sup ..gamma../)/..gamma.., 0 < lambda < 1, is considered. Primary interest is the application of the above density to approximating theoretical distribution functions of test statistics such as S.D., skewness, and kurtosis under non-normality. Moments are straight forward to evaluate in terms of gamma functions, or polygamma functions in special cases. 1 figure, 8 tables. (RWR)

  1. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  2. Analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Taking into account the {Lambda} baryon distribution amplitudes and the most general form of the interpolating current of the {Lambda}{sub b}, the semileptonic {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} transition is investigated in the framework of the light cone QCD sum rules. Sum rules for all 12 form factors responsible for the {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay are constructed. The obtained results for the form factors are used to compute the branching fraction. A comparison of the obtained results with the existing predictions of the heavy quark effective theory is presented. The results of the branching ratio shows the detectability of this channel at the Large Hadron Collider beauty in the near future is quite high.

  3. Rapid separation of immunoglobulin M from immunoglobulin G antibodies for reliable diagnosis of recent rubella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Frisch-Niggemeyer, W

    1975-01-01

    Chromatography on controlled pore glass was adapted for the separation of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) rubella antibodies from 0.3-ml samples of human serum. An extremely sharp separation of IgM from IgG antibodies could be obtained within 40 min. Nonspecific inhibitors were removed before chromatography by precipitation with high-molecular-weight dextran sulfate, and the titer of rubella antibodies in the different classes of immunoglobulins were assayed with a modified hemagglutination inhibition technique. The combination of these methods is recommended for routine tests. It permits an accurate diagnosis of recent rubella infection within a few hours. PMID:1194404

  4. Phylogen of immunoglobulin structure and function. 3. Immunoglobulins of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Leslie, G A; Clem, L W

    1969-12-01

    Chicken 7.1S immunoglobulin was purified from whole chicken serum by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The macroglobulin was purified by a combination of salt precipitation and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Both immunoglobulin molecules yielded 75% heavy (H) chains and 25% light (L) chains when subjected to extensive reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. Antigenically reactive H and L chains were obtained by partial reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. The 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulin H chains were antigenically unrelated to each other, whereas the L chains were antigenically indistinguishable from one another. The 16.7S H chains were found to have a mass of approximately 70,000, and the 7.1S H chains had a mass of 67,500. The mass of the L chains was approximately 22,000. Sedimentation equilibrium studies of the 7.1S immunoglobulin molecule gave a mol wt of approximately 170,000 which is in good agreement with the 179,000 predicted on the basis of 2 H and 2 L polypeptide chains. The 16.7S molecule was shown to have a mol wt of approximately 890,000. A reductive subunit that has a mol wt of approximately 174,000 has been isolated from the 16.7S molecule. These values are consistent with the chicken macroglobulin having five subunits, each of which has 2 H and 2 L chains. The hexose contents of the chicken 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulins are 2.2% and 2.6%, respectively. The extinction coefficients of the 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulins were 13.18 +/- 0.04 and 12.72 +/- 0.77, respectively, when measured in 0.3 M KCl. Based upon physical-chemical and antigenic characteristics, the 16.7S immunoglobulin most closely resembles IgM of mammals. The 7.1S immunoglobulin definitely belongs to a different class than the 16,7S immunoglobulin, but it does not align itself very well with any of the mammalian immunoglobulins. We propose that this molecule be designated as Ig

  5. {lambda}N space-exchange correlation effects in the {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.

    2006-01-15

    A complete realistic study of the {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He hypernucleus is presented using a realistic Hamiltonian and a fully correlated wave function that takes into account all relevant dynamical correlations and {lambda}N space-exchange correlation (SEC). Results are sensitive to SEC, which significantly affects energy breakdown, {lambda}-separation energy, nuclear core polarization, point proton radius, and density profiles.

  6. QCD factorization for {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhenhua; Guo Xinheng; Lue Gang

    2011-02-01

    We prove that in the limit m{sub b},m{sub c}{yields}{infinity}, with m{sub c}/m{sub b} fixed, factorization holds at order {alpha}{sub s} for the decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. This proof is done in the infinite-momentum frame in which the momenta of {pi}, {Lambda}{sub c}, and {Lambda}{sub b} go to infinity. Our result is renormalization-scale- and scheme-independent at O({alpha}{sub s}). This is the same as the QCD factorization for B{yields}D{pi}.

  7. Environmental chemistry, ecotoxicity, and fate of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Ming; Troiano, John; Wang, Albert; Goh, Kean

    2008-01-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used for controlling pest insects in agriculture, public health, and in construction and households. Lambda-cyhalothrin is characterized by low vapor pressure and a low Henry's law constant but by a high octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and high water-solid-organic carbon partition coefficient (K(oc)) values. Lambda-cyhalothrin is quite stable in water at pH < 8, whereas it hydrolyzes to form HCN and aldehyde under alkaline conditions. Although lambda-cyhalothrin is relatively photostable under natural irradiation, with a half-life > 3 wk, its photolysis process is fast under UV irradiation, with a half-life < 10 min. The fate of lambda-cyhalothrin in aquatic ecosystems depends on the nature of system components such as suspended solids (mineral and organic particulates) and aquatic organisms (algae, macrophytes, or aquatic animals). Lambda-cyhalothrin residues dissolved in water decrease rapidly if suspended solids and/or aquatic organisms are present because lambda-cyhalothrin molecules are strongly adsorbed by particulates and plants. Adsorbed lambda-cyhalothrin molecules show decreased degradation rates because they are less accessible to breakdown than free molecules in the water column. On the other hand, lambda-cyhalothrin adsorbed to suspended solids or bottom sediments may provide a mechanism to mitigate its acute toxicity to aquatic organisms by reducing their short-term bioavailability in the water column. The widespread use of lambda-cyhalothrin has resulted in residues in sediment, which have been found to be toxic to aquatic organisms including fish and amphipods. Mitigation measures have been used to reduce the adverse impact of lambda-cyhalothrin contributed from agricultural or urban runoff. Mitigation may be achieved by reducing the quantity of runoff and suspended solid content in runoff through wetlands, detention ponds, or vegetated ditches. PMID:18418954

  8. Accuracy and coverage assessment of Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit) Genes Encoding Immunoglobulins in the Whole Genome Sequence Assembly (OryCun2.0) and Localization of the IGH Locus to Chromosome 20

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Agarwala, Richa; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Hayes, Hélène; Mage, Rose G.

    2013-01-01

    We report analyses of genes encoding immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the rabbit 6.51x whole genome assembly. This OryCun2.0 assembly confirms previous mapping of the duplicated IGK1 and IGK2 loci to chromosome 2 and the IGL lambda light chain locus to chromosome 21. The most frequently rearranged and expressed IGHV1 that is closest to IG DH and IGHJ genes encodes rabbit VHa allotypes. The partially inbred Thorbecke strain rabbit used for whole-genome sequencing was homozygous at the IGK but heterozygous with the IGHV1a1 allele in one of 79 IGHV-containing unplaced scaffolds and IGHV1a2, IGHM, IGHG and IGHE sequences in another. Some IGKV, IGLV and IGHA genes are also in other unplaced scaffolds. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we assigned the previously unmapped IGH locus to the q-telomeric region of rabbit chromosome 20. An approximately 3 Mb segment of human chromosome 14 including IGH genes predicted to map to this telomeric region based on synteny analysis could not be located on assembled chromosome 20. Unplaced scaffold chrUn0053 contains some of the genes that comparative mapping predicts to be missing. We identified discrepancies between previous targeted studies and the OryCun2.0 assembly and some new BAC clones with IGH sequences that can guide other studies to further sequence and improve the OryCun2.0 assembly. Complete knowledge of gene sequences encoding variable regions of rabbit heavy, kappa and lambda chains will lead to better understanding of how and why rabbits produce antibodies of high specificity and affinity through gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. PMID:23925440

  9. The disulphide bridges of a mouse immunoglobulin G1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Svasti, J.; Milstein, C.

    1972-01-01

    [35S]Cystine-labelled immunoglobulin MOPC21 (IgG1) was prepared from myeloma cells in tissue culture. Carrier myeloma protein was added and the protein was digested with pepsin. The digest was fractionated on Sephadex G-50 into two fractions, further digested with trypsin and again fractionated on Sephadex. Disulphide-bridge peptides were purified by electrophoresis and chromatography and identified by radioautography. A peptide of 96 residues was isolated, which contains both the heavy–light interchain disulphide bridge and all the inter-heavy-chain disulphide bridges. Other peptides were isolated, accounting for all the intrachain disulphide bridges (which could be placed by homology with proteins of other species), except for the variable section of the light chain. Sequences describing this missing disulphide bridge were obtained from totally reduced and alkylated light chains. Peptides related to the interchain disulphide-bridge peptide were isolated from partially reduced and alkylated myeloma protein and from totally reduced heavy chain. The interchain disulphide-bridge peptide was placed at the C-terminal position of the F(ab′)2 fragment, prepared by digestion of the protein with pepsin at pH4.0. Sequences from the heavy-chain intrachain disulphide bridges of MOPC 21 immunoglobulin are compared with homologous sequences from mouse myeloma proteins of other subclasses and proteins of other species. PMID:5073237

  10. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  11. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of molecular nanotechnology.'' The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based construction''. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of ``molecular nanotechnology.`` The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based ``construction``. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Lambda/2 fringe-spacing interferometer.

    PubMed

    de Chatellus, H Guillet; Pique, J-P

    2009-03-15

    The precision of interferometry is directly linked to the fringe spacing of the recorded interferogram. Whereas all interferometric devices show a fringe spacing equal to a wavelength of the laser light we present a novel scheme of a two-beam interferometer exhibiting a fringe spacing reduced by a factor of 2; the direct detection of the beat signal is replaced with the monitoring of the fluorescence of a twofold degenerate atomic system resonant with the laser. The lambda/2 fringe spacing in the fluorescence signal is demonstrated with a hot sodium vapor excited by a broadband laser tuned to the D1 line. In the saturation regime, the dark fringes are expected to be extremely narrow, leading to the possibility of nanoscale displacement measurements or atom localization. PMID:19282922

  14. Bactericidal properties of Campylobacter jejuni-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in commercial immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Autenrieth, I B; Schwarzkopf, A; Ewald, J H; Karch, H; Lissner, R

    1995-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common enterocolitis-causing microorganisms worldwide. It is of particular importance in immunodeficient patients, who frequently are prone to develop extraintestinal manifestations. Since these cases respond poorly to antibiotic treatment, a supportive immunomodulating therapy including the administration of C. jejuni-specific immunoglobulins would be desirable. In the present study, nine commercial immunoglobulin preparations for intravenous use were tested for the presence of C. jejuni lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and outer membrane protein (OMP)-specific antibodies by using immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody reactivities against these antigens were comparable in eight of nine tested immunoglobulin preparations. Only in one preparation were C. jejuni OMP- and LPS-specific IgM antibodies found. In this preparation the immunoblot test revealed a strong reactivity against both flagellin and a major OMP. Moreover, all immunoglobulin preparations recognized OMPs of C. jejuni serotypes Lior 4, 9, 11, and 29 equally strongly, while the reactivity to an anti-Lior 36 isolate was less marked. Furthermore, the bactericidal properties of three immunoglobulin preparations were tested by means of chemiluminescence signaling in and bacterial killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). The results show that the IgM preparation enhanced Campylobacter-triggered chemiluminescence signaling in PMNL as well as killing of C. jejuni by PMNL, while the other immunoglobulin preparations did not do so. These results suggest that the administration of immunoglobulin preparations containing C. jejuni-specific IgM antibodies would be beneficial for patients with severe C. jejuni infections. PMID:8540699

  15. Moderate-resolution spectral standards from lambda 5600 to lambda 9000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Lori E.; Strom, Karen M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a grid of stellar classification spectra of moderate resolution (R approximately 1500) in the range lambda lambda 5600-9000 A, compiled from high signal-to noise spectra of 275 stars, most in the open clusters Praesepe and M67. The grid covers dwarfs from types B8 through M5, giants from G8 through M7, and subgiants from F5 through K0. We catalog atomic and molecular absorption features useful for stellar classification, and demonstrate the use of luminosity-sensitive features to distinguish between late-type dwarf and giant stars. The entire database is made available in digital format on anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web.

  16. Properties of the Lambda(1405) Measured at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Moriya, Reinhard Schumacher

    2012-04-01

    The nature of the {Lambda}(1405), and its place in the baryon spectrum has remained uncertain for decades. Theoretical studies have shown that it may possess strong dynamical components which are not seen in other well-known baryons. Using the CLAS detector system in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, we have measured the photoproduction reaction {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1405) with high statistics and over different {Sigma}{pi} decay channels. The reconstructed invariant mass distribution (lineshape) has been measured, as well as the differential cross sections for the {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520). Our analysis method is discussed and our near-final results for the {Lambda}(1405) lineshape and differential cross section are presented.

  17. Lineshape of the Lambda(1405) measured at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Moriya, Reinhard Schumacher, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The {Lambda}(1405) has been a subject of controversy for decades, and its nature as a hyperon resonance has yet to be established firmly. Its peculiar lineshape, i.e., its {Sigma}{pi} invariant mass spectrum has lead to various theoretical studies, and some of these show that it may possess strong dynamical components which are not seen in other well-known baryons. With the CLAS detector system in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, we have measured the photoproduction reaction {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1405) with high statistics over different {Sigma}{pi} decay channels. The reconstructed invariant mass distribution has been measured, as well as the differential cross sections for the nearby {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520). Our analysis method is discussed and our near-final results for the {Lambda}(1405) lineshape is presented.

  18. Simple model for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple geometric model is presented to account for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions A + BC - AB + C. It applies to reactions in which AB is formed in a pi state, and in which the unpaired molecular orbital responsible for lambda-doubling arises from breaking the B-C bond. The lambda-doublet population ratio is predicted to be 2:1 provided that: (1) the motion of A in the transition state determines the plane of rotation of AB; (2) the unpaired pi orbital lying initially along the B-C bond may be resolved into a projection onto the AB plane of rotation and a projection perpendicular to this plane; (3) there is no preferred geometry for dissociation of ABC. The 2:1 lambda-doublet ratio is the 'unconstrained dynamics prior' lambda-doublet distribution for such reactions.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 16N_Lambda by Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, Francesco; Urciuoli, Guido; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Aniol, Konrad; Baturin, Pavlo; Bertin, Pierre; Benaoum, Hachemi; Blomqvist, Ingvar; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Brindza, Paul; Bydzovsky, Petr; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Colilli, Stefano; Coman, Luminita; Craver, Brandon; de Cataldo, Giacinto; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; Ferdi, Catherine; Feuerbach, Robert; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gayou, Olivier; Giuliani, Fausto; Gomez, Javier; Gricia, Massimo; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hayes, David; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kino, Kouichi; Kross, Brian; Lagamba, Luigi; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lucentini, Maurizio; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; McCormick, Kathy; Michaels, Robert; Millener, D.; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Nappi, E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Okasyasu, Y.; Paschke, Kent; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Raue, Brian; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Rikki; Rodriguez, Victor; Saha, Arunava; Santavenere, Fabio; Sarty, Adam; Segal, John; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Snyder, Ryan; Solvignon, Patricia; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Veneroni, P.P.; Voutier, Eric; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zeng, X.; Zorn, Carl

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the 16O(e, e'K+)16N_Lambda reaction has been performed at Jefferson Lab. A thin film of falling water was used as a target. This permitted a simultaneous measurement of the p(e, e'K+)Lambda,Sigma_0 exclusive reactions and a precise calibration of the energy scale. A ground-state binding energy of 13.76 ± 0.16 MeV was obtained for 16N_Lambda with better precision than previous measurements on the mirror hypernucleus 16O_Lambda. Precise energies have been determined for peaks arising from a Lambda in s and p orbits coupled to the p1/2 and p3/2 hole states of the 15N core nucleus.

  20. Is there a {pi}{lambda}N bound state?

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, A.; Garcilazo, H.

    2008-07-01

    We have searched for bound states in the {pi}{lambda}N system by solving the nonrelativistic Faddeev equations, as well as a relativistic version, with input separable {pi}N, {pi}{lambda}, and {lambda}N interactions. A bound-state solution, driven by the {delta}(1232) and the {sigma}(1385) p-wave meson-baryon resonances, was found in the channel (I,J{sup P})=((3/2),2{sup +}), provided the {lambda} laboratory momentum at which the {lambda}N {sup 3}S{sub 1} phase shift becomes negative is larger than p{sub lab}{approx}750-800 MeV/c. Other strange and charmed {pi}BB{sup '} systems that might have bound states of a similar nature are listed.

  1. Comments on \\Lambda and other repelling equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hartmut

    DeSitter's (1917) cosmology of a universe devoid of matter but expanding due to a positive cosmological constant \\Lambda is commonly considered as a valid counterexample against a Machian interpretation of General Relativity. This view is conceptually questionable because of the mathematical equivalence of \\Lambda with a constant (`vacuum') energy density \\rho_{\\Lambda} (as e.g.\\ inflationists use it) implying an equation of state P=-\\rho_{\\Lambda} that leads to a `repelling force' in a standard universe. We discuss the reasons for this apparent antigravity extracted from the structure of the theory. Antigravitational effects can be produced by other equations of state as well, notably by proposed dark matter constituents. Such components plus matter and radiation lead to world models (we show examples) beyond the classical classification schemes for which we propose extensions in terms of `critical equations of state' rather than `critical \\Lambda'.

  2. Phillips' Lambda function: Data summary and physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisov, V.; Plant, W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of Phillips' Lambda function describing the average length of breakers on the ocean per unit area at speed cb are summarized. An expression is developed that fits these data within reasonable bounds. A physical model for the Lambda function is derived based on the assumption that breaking occurs when the surface steepness exceeds a threshold value. The energy contained in the breaking region is related to the fifth power of the breaker speed, as Phillips showed, and from this the probability of finding a breaker with a speed cb may be determined from a simulation of the long-wave surface based on a linear superposition of Fourier components. This probability is directly related to the Lambda function so that a form for this function can be determined. The Lambda function so determined agrees in both shape and intensity with the fit to the measured Lambda functions.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of Lambda16N by electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Cusanno, F; Urciuoli, G M; Acha, A; Ambrozewicz, P; Aniol, K A; Baturin, P; Bertin, P Y; Benaoum, H; Blomqvist, K I; Boeglin, W U; Breuer, H; Brindza, P; Bydzovský, P; Camsonne, A; Chang, C C; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E A; Cisbani, E; Colilli, S; Coman, L; Craver, B J; De Cataldo, G; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A P; Ferdi, C; Feuerbach, R J; Folts, E; Fratoni, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Giuliani, F; Gomez, J; Gricia, M; Hansen, J O; Hayes, D; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T K; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kino, K; Kross, B; Lagamba, L; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R A; Lucentini, M; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Meziani, Z E; McCormick, K; Michaels, R W; Millener, D J; Miyoshi, T; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P A; Moteabbed, M; Muñoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Nappi, E; Nelyubin, V V; Norum, B E; Okasyasu, Y; Paschke, K D; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Punjabi, V A; Qiang, Y; Raue, B; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Reitz, B; Roche, R E; Rodriguez, V M; Saha, A; Santavenere, F; Sarty, A J; Segal, J; Shahinyan, A; Singh, J; Sirca, S; Snyder, R; Solvignon, P H; Sotona, M; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V A; Suzuki, T; Ueno, H; Ulmer, P E; Veneroni, P; Voutier, E; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Zheng, X; Zorn, C

    2009-11-13

    An experimental study of the (16)O(e,e'K(+))(Lambda)(16)N reaction has been performed at Jefferson Lab. A thin film of falling water was used as a target. This permitted a simultaneous measurement of the p(e,e'K(+))Lambda, Sigma(0) exclusive reactions and a precise calibration of the energy scale. A ground-state binding energy of 13.76+/-0.16 MeV was obtained for (Lambda)(16)N with better precision than previous measurements on the mirror hypernucleus (Lambda)(16)O. Precise energies have been determined for peaks arising from a Lambda in s and p orbits coupled to the p(1/2) and p(3/2) hole states of the (15)N core nucleus. PMID:20365979

  4. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  5. Doublet-spacing enhancement caused by {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling in {sub {Lambda}L}i hypernuclear isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Umeya, Atsushi; Harada, Toru

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically investigate energy spacings of doublets in {sub {Lambda}L}i hypernuclear isotopes with A=7-10 in shell-model calculations with a {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling effect. The calculated results show that the energy shifts are {Delta}{epsilon}=0.09-0.28 MeV and the {Sigma}-mixing probabilities are P{sub {Sigma}}=0.10%-0.34% in {Lambda} ground states for the isotopes because of the {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling in the first-order perturbation. It is found that the energy spacing of the doublet is enhanced as a neutron number N increases; the contribution of the {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling interaction is comparable to that of the {Lambda}N interaction in the neutron-rich {Lambda} hypernuclei. The coherent mechanism of this doublet-spacing enhancement is also discussed in terms of Fermi-type and Gamow-Teller-type {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N couplings.

  6. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rabadi, Laith; Francis, Jean M.; Henderson, Joel; Ghai, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulopathy due to dysproteinemia can have a wide spectrum of pathologic and clinical features based on specific characteristics of the abnormal protein and the response induced within the parenchymal tissue. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition can manifest as a different glomerular disease. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a unique entity mimicking immune complex GN that does not conform to any of those subtypes. IgG monoclonal granular deposition in the glomeruli with a pattern similar to immune complex disease suggested by C3 and C1q deposition should prompt consideration of PGNMID. Literature is scarce in terms of recurrence of disease in renal allografts. In this article we present the clinical–pathologic features of three cases of PGNMID in the renal allograft showing the variable course and manifestation of the disease. PMID:26613031

  7. Explanatory style and Immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    PubMed

    Brennan, F X; Charnetski, C J

    2000-01-01

    The construct of explanatory style has been related to numerous aspects of human psychology, including health. Our research has focused on the effects of various psychological variables on the immune system, in particular Immunoglobulin A (IgA). We had participants fill out the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the predominant measure of explanatory style, and assayed saliva samples for secretory IgA. No relationship was observed between overall ASQ score and IgA, or composite optimism score and IgA. However, we observed significant negative correlations between both the composite pessimism score and IgA, as well as the hopelessness score and IgA. Pessimistic explanatory style may therefore be related to immune system deficits and poor health. PMID:11330488

  8. On the affinities of lambda 5778 and other broad diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Alan; Webster, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    The authors examined the broad band 5778 A because of the quantity and quality of data that exists in literature. To investigate the affinity of that band with the bands of Family 1, the ratio W(sub lambda)(4430)/W(sub lambda)(5797) was formed. If the two band belong to the same family then the ratio should be a constant from star to star and it should not be possible to find an independent variable with which the ratio is correlated. If, however, a variable is found which does produce a statistically significant correlation with the ratio of equivalent widths then the bands cannot be in the same family. To test the affinity of the band at 5778 A with the other families the procedure was repeated using the bands at 5780 and 5787 A as being representative of Families 2 and 3 respectively. The measurement results of this test are shown using 21 stars taken from Herbig. Statistically significant correlations resulted when the band at 5778 A was tested against the bands of Families 1 and 2 but there was no correlation with Family 3. It is concluded that lambda 5778 is unlikely a member of Family 1 and so all the broad bands do not have their origin in a single carrier. Also, lambda 5778 does not appear to be a member of Family 2 either, but may be a member of Family 3. It appears that either a single carrier can be the origin of both broad and narrow bands or that the bands are produced by different carriers which exist in similar interstellar habitats. This latter possibility would require the introduction of a fourth family of bands.

  9. Hepatopancreatic intoxication of lambda cyhalothrin insecticide on albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Elhalwagy, Manal EA; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Nahas, AA; Ziada, Reem M; Mohamady, Aziza H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the known adverse effects of lambda cyhalothrin insecticide, little is known about its hepatopancreatic intoxication effects. The present study was carried out to elucidate sub-chronic effect of Karat 2.5% EC formulation of lambda cyhalothrin on male albino rats. Methods: To explore the effects of exposure to lambda cyhalothrin on rats and its mechanism, low (1/40 of LD50, 5 mg/kg/day) and high dose (1/4 of LD50, 50 mg/kg/day) lambda cyhalothrin were applied to rats via drinking water for 3 months. Blood samples were collected monthly, and the animals were dissected for liver and pancreas’s examination at the end of the experiment. Lambda cyhalothrin administration was associated with the elevation in lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduction in SH-protein a major marker for antioxidant, as well as basel paraoxonase (PON) in both treated groups throughout the experimental periods. Results: In addition, significant elevations in liver enzymes alanin amino transferase, (ALT), and aspartate amino transferase (AST), as well as plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glucose level. While, significant reduction in insulin level through the experimental periods. Results of histopathological and histochemical studies showed that lambda cyhalothrin exposure induces liver and pancreatic tissues damage and depletion in glycogen content was pronounced in liver of both treated groups. Conclusions: In conclusion subchronic intoxication with lambda cyhalothrin formulation induced remarkable changes in the examined parameters. PMID:26221269

  10. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546