Sample records for immunological molecular markers

  1. Cell markers and determinants in fish immunology.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Elisa; Buonocore, Francesco; Scapigliati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    Despite the impressive increase in the cloning and expression of genes encoding fish immunoregulatory molecules, the knowledge on "in vivo" and "in vitro" functional immunology of the corresponding peptide products is still at an initial stage. This is partly due to the lacking of specific markers for immunoregulatory peptides, that represent an indispensible tool to dissect immune reactions and to trace the fate of cellular events downstream of the activation. In this review we summarise the available information on functional immune activities of some teleost species and discuss the obtained data in an evolutionary and applied context. PMID:18722788

  2. Department and function: Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology; Clinical

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Department and function: Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology; Clinical Immunology in Immunology, Hannover Medical School Positions: 1994-1996: Research Associate, Dept. of Clinical Immunology, Hannover Medical School 1994: Visiting Scientist, Dept. of Immunology, University of Utrecht

  3. Potential immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Ferreira, Antonio Walter

    2011-01-01

    In human toxocariasis, there are few approaches using immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. An immunoblot (IB) assay using excretory-secretory Toxocara canis antigen was standardized for monitoring IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies in 27 children with toxocariasis (23 visceral, three mixed visceral and ocular, and one ocular form) for 22-116 months after chemotherapy. IB sensitivity was 100% for IgG antibodies to bands of molecular weight 29-38, 48-54, 95-116, 121-162, >205 kDa, 80.8% for IgE to 29-38, 48-54, 95-121, > 205 kDa, and 65.4% for IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa. Candidates for diagnostic markers should be IgG antibodies to bands of low molecular weight (29-38 and 48-54 kDa). One group of patients presented the same antibody reactivity to all bands throughout the follow-up study; in the other group, antibodies decayed partially or completely to some or all bands, but these changes were not correlated with time after chemotherapy. Candidates for monitoring patients after chemotherapy may be IgG antibodies to > 205 kDa fractions, IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa and IgE to 95-121 kDa. Further identification of antigen epitopes related to these markers will allow the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays for the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis. PMID:21537750

  4. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a)...

  5. Mathematical Immunology at the molecular, cellular and population scales

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Mathematical Immunology at the molecular, cellular and population scales Carmen Molina of Manchester 18th of December 2012 carmen@maths.leeds.ac.uk #12;Physics Biology MathBio Immunology UK Math: populations 4 Theoretical Immunology 5 Mathematical Biology in the UK 6 Acknowledgements 2 / 50 #12;Physics

  6. Postdoctoral Research Positions in Mucosal Immunology and Molecular Microbiology

    E-print Network

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    Postdoctoral Research Positions in Mucosal Immunology and Molecular Microbiology Two post-doctoral research positions are available at the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University, New the challenge of working at the interface between Immunology and Microbiology. The selected candidates will work

  7. Biochemical and Immunological Markers of Over-Training

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Athletes fail to perform to the best of their ability if they become infected, stale, sore or malnourished. Excessive training with insufficient recovery can lead to a debilitating syndrome in which performance and well being can be affected for months. Eliminating or minimizing these problems by providing advice and guidelines on training loads, recovery times, nutrition or pharmacological intervention and regular monitoring of athletes using an appropriate battery of markers can help prevent the development of an overtraining syndrome in athletes. The potential usefulness of objective physiological, biochemical and immunological markers of overtraining has received much attention in recent years. Practical markers would be ones that could be measured routinely in the laboratory and offered to athletes as part of their sports science and medical support. The identification of common factors among overtrained athletes in comparison with well-trained athletes not suffering from underperformance could permit appropriate intervention to prevent athletes from progressing to a more serious stage of the overtraining syndrome. To date, no single reliable objective marker of impending overtraining has been identified. Some lines of research do, however, show promise and are based on findings that overtrained athletes appear to exhibit an altered hormonal response to stress. For example, in response to a standardized bout (or repeated bouts) of high intensity exercise, overtrained athletes show a lower heart rate, blood lactate and plasma cortisol response. Several immune measures that can be obtained from a resting blood sample (e.g. the expression of specific cell surface proteins such as CD45RO+ on T-lymphocytes) also seem to offer some hope of identifying impending overtraining. If an athlete is suspected of suffering from overtraining syndrome, other measures will also required, if only to exclude other possible causes of underperformance including post-viral fatigue, glandular fever, clinical depression, poor diet, anaemia, asthma, allergies, thyroid disorders, myocarditis and other medical problems interfering with recovery. PMID:24688268

  8. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Selected Genital Tract Immunological Markers and Molecular Vaginal Microbiota in Sub-Saharan African Women, with Relevance to HIV Risk and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kyongo, Jordan K; Crucitti, Tania; Menten, Joris; Hardy, Liselotte; Cools, Piet; Michiels, Johan; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Joseph, Sarah; Fichorova, Raina; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vanham, Guido; Ariën, Kevin K; Jespers, Vicky

    2015-05-01

    Data on immune mediators in the genital tract and the factors that modulate them in sub-Saharan women are limited. Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) samples from 430 sexually active women from Kenya, South Africa, and Rwanda were analyzed for 12 soluble immune mediators using Bio-Plex and Meso Scale Discovery multiplex platforms, as well as single enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Ten bacterial species were quantified in vaginal swab samples. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was defined by Nugent scoring. CVL samples from HIV-infected women showed a clear-cut proinflammatory profile. Pregnant women, adolescents, and women engaging in traditional vaginal practices differed in specific soluble markers compared to reference groups of adult HIV-negative women. Cervical mucus, cervical ectopy, abnormal vaginal discharge, and having multiple sex partners were each associated with an increase in inflammatory mediators. The levels of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-1?, IL-6, IL-12(p70), and IL-8 were elevated, whereas the IL-1RA/IL-1(?+?) ratio decreased in women with BV. The level of gamma interferon-induced protein 10 was lower in BV-positive than in BV-negative women, suggesting its suppression as a potential immune evasion mechanism by BV-associated bacteria. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus vaginalis were associated with decreased proinflammatory cytokines and each BV-associated species with increased proinflammatory cytokines. Remarkably, the in vitro anti-HIV activity of CVL samples from BV-positive women was stronger than that of BV-negative women. In conclusion, we found significant associations of factors, including vaginal microbiota, which can influence immune mediators in the vaginal environment in sexually active women. These factors need to be considered when establishing normative levels or pathogenic cutoffs of biomarkers of inflammation and associated risks in African women. PMID:25761460

  9. An immunological marker of tolerance to infection in wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joseph A; Hall, Amy J; Friberg, Ida M; Ralli, Catriona; Lowe, Ann; Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Turner, Andrew K; Stewart, Alexander; Birtles, Richard J; Paterson, Steve; Bradley, Janette E; Begon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Hosts are likely to respond to parasitic infections by a combination of resistance (expulsion of pathogens) and tolerance (active mitigation of pathology). Of these strategies, the basis of tolerance in animal hosts is relatively poorly understood, with especially little known about how tolerance is manifested in natural populations. We monitored a natural population of field voles using longitudinal and cross-sectional sampling modes and taking measurements on body condition, infection, immune gene expression, and survival. Using analyses stratified by life history stage, we demonstrate a pattern of tolerance to macroparasites in mature compared to immature males. In comparison to immature males, mature males resisted infection less and instead increased investment in body condition in response to accumulating burdens, but at the expense of reduced reproductive effort. We identified expression of the transcription factor Gata3 (a mediator of Th2 immunity) as an immunological biomarker of this tolerance response. Time series data for individual animals suggested that macroparasite infections gave rise to increased expression of Gata3, which gave rise to improved body condition and enhanced survival as hosts aged. These findings provide a clear and unexpected insight into tolerance responses (and their life history sequelae) in a natural vertebrate population. The demonstration that such responses (potentially promoting parasite transmission) can move from resistance to tolerance through the course of an individual's lifetime emphasises the need to incorporate them into our understanding of the dynamics and risk of infection in the natural environment. Moreover, the identification of Gata3 as a marker of tolerance to macroparasites raises important new questions regarding the role of Th2 immunity and the mechanistic nature of the tolerance response itself. A more manipulative, experimental approach is likely to be valuable in elaborating this further. PMID:25004450

  10. An Immunological Marker of Tolerance to Infection in Wild Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joseph A.; Hall, Amy J.; Friberg, Ida M.; Ralli, Catriona; Lowe, Ann; Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Turner, Andrew K.; Stewart, Alexander; Birtles, Richard J.; Paterson, Steve; Bradley, Janette E.; Begon, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Hosts are likely to respond to parasitic infections by a combination of resistance (expulsion of pathogens) and tolerance (active mitigation of pathology). Of these strategies, the basis of tolerance in animal hosts is relatively poorly understood, with especially little known about how tolerance is manifested in natural populations. We monitored a natural population of field voles using longitudinal and cross-sectional sampling modes and taking measurements on body condition, infection, immune gene expression, and survival. Using analyses stratified by life history stage, we demonstrate a pattern of tolerance to macroparasites in mature compared to immature males. In comparison to immature males, mature males resisted infection less and instead increased investment in body condition in response to accumulating burdens, but at the expense of reduced reproductive effort. We identified expression of the transcription factor Gata3 (a mediator of Th2 immunity) as an immunological biomarker of this tolerance response. Time series data for individual animals suggested that macroparasite infections gave rise to increased expression of Gata3, which gave rise to improved body condition and enhanced survival as hosts aged. These findings provide a clear and unexpected insight into tolerance responses (and their life history sequelae) in a natural vertebrate population. The demonstration that such responses (potentially promoting parasite transmission) can move from resistance to tolerance through the course of an individual's lifetime emphasises the need to incorporate them into our understanding of the dynamics and risk of infection in the natural environment. Moreover, the identification of Gata3 as a marker of tolerance to macroparasites raises important new questions regarding the role of Th2 immunity and the mechanistic nature of the tolerance response itself. A more manipulative, experimental approach is likely to be valuable in elaborating this further. PMID:25004450

  11. Postdoctoral Research Position in Molecular Immunology A post-doctoral research position in Molecular Immunology is available in the Liu lab at

    E-print Network

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    Postdoctoral Research Position in Molecular Immunology A post-doctoral research position in Molecular Immunology is available in the Liu lab at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to study and solid background in molecular biology and immunology. Expertise in retroviral vector or experience

  12. OAT MOLECULAR MARKERS: STATUS AND OPPORTUNITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in genomic analysis and application of marker-assisted selection to oat genetic improvement is currently limited by a lack of genomic information and molecular genetic tools, particularly user-friendly molecular markers adapted to high-throughput technology. Identification of such markers i...

  13. Value of Immunological Markers in Predicting Responsiveness to Influenza Vaccination in Elderly Individuals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JORG J. GORONZY; JAMES W. FULBRIGHT; CYNTHIA S. CROWSON; GREGORY A. POLAND; WILLIAM M. O'FALLON; CORNELIA M. WEYAND

    2001-01-01

    Elderly individuals are at high risk for morbidity and mortality when infected with influenza virus. Vacci- nations with inactivated virus are less effective in the elderly due to the declining competency of the aging immune system. We have explored whether immunological parameters predict poor anti-influenza virus vaccine responses and can be used as biological markers of immunosenescence. One hundred fifty-three

  14. AIDS. Author manuscript Comparison of viro-immunological marker changes between HIV-1 and

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    AIDS. Author manuscript Page /1 11 Comparison of viro-immunological marker changes between HIV-1 and HIV-2-infected patients in France Drylewicz Julia 1 2 , Matheron Sophie 3 , Lazaro Estibaliz 4 Background HIV-2 is known to be less pathogenic than HIV-1, although the underlying mechanisms are still

  15. Immunological markers predict the prognosis of patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long; Zhao, Zerui; Jiang, Shanshan; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Han; Xie, Zehua; Lin, Yaobin; Long, Hao

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer has become the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. However, treatment failures still represent enormous challenges, and it is doubtful whether standard treatment modalities could continuously achieve substantial improvements. As one of the novel therapy strategies, PD-L1 has been shown the function of down-regulating T cell activation through receptor PD-1. Moreover, prognosis of cancer patients is based not only on tumor-related factors but also on host-related factors, particularly systemic inflammatory response. Significantly, squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) revealed to be divergent clinical and molecular phenotypes compared with non-squamous NSCLC. Monocyte ratio, neutrophils to lymphocytes ratio, PD-L1 immunostaining score and PD-1-positive stained tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were assessed by Fisher's linear discriminant analysis to discriminate whether overall survival (OS) would exceeding 5 years. Finally, a prediction model was established for OS based on these immunological markers. Furthermore, this prediction model was validated in a second set of squamous NSCLC patients. The model offers a novel tool for survival prediction and could have important clinical implications for patients with squamous NSCLC, thus providing a framework for future individualized therapy. PMID:25999209

  16. 03-390 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (9 units) 2009 Instructors (Office hours by appointment)

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Robert F.

    03-390 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (9 units) ­ 2009 Instructors (Office hours by appointment: kvasilev@cmu.edu Text: Immunology: A Short Course. 6e. Richard Coico and Geoffrey Sunshine. 2009. Wiley Description: This course offers the student a comprehensive view of modern immunology at the molecular

  17. Immunological Markers for PML Prediction in MS Patients Treated with Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Antoniol, Caroline; Stankoff, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (NTZ), a monoclonal antibody recognizing the alpha4 integrin chain, has been approved for the treatment of active multiple sclerosis, but expose to the onset of a rare side effect, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Estimating the individual risk of PML in NTZ-treated patients is a major challenge, and therapeutic strategies are mainly guided by the overall PML risk assessed by identified risk factors: JC virus (JCV) seropositivity, treatment duration (with peak incidence after 24?months), and the previous use of immunosuppressive therapies. Given that this stratification does not yet allow a precise individual prediction of PML, other predictive markers are needed, and several immunological biomarkers have been described. Quantification of anti-JCV antibody levels may improve individual predictive value, with higher baseline titers indicating increased risk. Other immunological biomarkers such as leukocyte cell membrane markers (CD49d, CD11a, and CD62L), detection of circulating JCV-specific activated T effector memory cells (TEM) or genetic screening have been proposed. In this review, we discuss how recent progress in immunology has paved the way for «new combined monitoring», which will include immunological screening, in NTZ-treated patients. PMID:25601865

  18. Molecular and immunological diagnosis of echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gottstein, B

    1992-01-01

    Echinococcosis is an infectious disease of humans caused by the larval (metacestode) stage of the cestode species Echinococcus granulosus (cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease) or Echinococcus multilocularis (alveolar echinococcosis or alveolar hydatid disease). Clinical manifestations depend primarily on localization and size of hepatic lesions and may include hepatomegaly, obstructive jaundice, or cholangitis. Prognostically, alveolar echinococcosis is considered similar to liver malignancies, including a lethality rate of 90% for untreated cases. Diagnosis is based on imaging techniques coupled with immunodiagnostic procedures. Antibody detection tests for E. multilocularis have markedly improved with the use of affinity-purified Em2 antigen and recombinant antigen II/3-10 in enzyme immunoassays. Antigens of corresponding quality for E. granulosus are still unavailable. The detection of circulating antigens and immune complexes in the sera of patients with cystic echinococcosis, the demonstration of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to stimulation with Echinococcus antigens, and the discrimination of serum immunoglobulin isotype activity to various Echinococcus antigens in both cystic and alveolar echinococcosis have been suggested for diagnostic purposes as well as for monitoring patients after treatment. New diagnostic molecular tools include DNA probes for Southern hybridization tests and polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus species-specific DNA fragments. Images PMID:1498767

  19. CHARACTERIZING SAFFLOWER GERMPLASM WITH AFLP MOLECULAR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers are useful to improve germplasm collection management and for identifying genes for future enhancement and breeding. Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. After DNA e...

  20. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) germplasm with molecular markers is needed to enhance germplasm management and utilization. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was completed in safflower using two selective primer pairs resulting in 102 unambiguous polymor...

  1. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  2. Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 13741383 Genome-wide survey of the gene expression response

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 1374­1383 Genome-wide survey of the gene expression response as the interest for compara- tive and evolutionary immunology has motivated the edification of a substantial body of knowledge in fish immunology (Iwama and Nakanishi, 1996). Hence, the activity of non-specific immu- nity

  3. Molecular markers in pediatric neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric molecular neuro-oncology is a fast developing field. A multitude of molecular profiling studies in recent years has unveiled a number of genetic abnormalities unique to pediatric brain tumors. It has now become clear that brain tumors that arise in children have distinct pathogenesis and biology, compared with their adult counterparts, even for those with indistinguishable histopathology. Some of the molecular features are so specific to a particular type of tumors, such as the presence of the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene for pilocytic astrocytomas or SMARCB1 mutations for atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, that they could practically serve as a diagnostic marker on their own. Expression profiling has resolved the existence of 4 molecular subgroups in medulloblastomas, which positively translated into improved prognostication for the patients. The currently available molecular markers, however, do not cover all tumors even within a single tumor entity. The molecular pathogenesis of a large number of pediatric brain tumors is still unaccounted for, and the hierarchy of tumors is likely to be more complex and intricate than currently acknowledged. One of the main tasks of future molecular analyses in pediatric neuro-oncology, including the ongoing genome sequencing efforts, is to elucidate the biological basis of those orphan tumors. The ultimate goal of molecular diagnostics is to accurately predict the clinical and biological behavior of any tumor by means of their molecular characteristics, which is hoped to eventually pave the way for individualized treatment. PMID:23095836

  4. Typing Mycobacterium bovis isolates from Texas and Mexico using molecular markers

    E-print Network

    Perumaalla, Veera Shankar

    1995-01-01

    Microbiology ABSTRACT Typing Mycobacterium bovis Isolates from Texas and Mexico Using Molecular Markers. (December 1995) Veera Shankar Perumaalla, B. V. Sc. & A. H. , APAU, Hyderabad, India. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas A. Ficht. With the rise...Murray, Dept. of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Texas A&M University, were included in the study as controls. All isolates were grown in 20 ml of 7H9 Middlebrook broth (Difco Laboratories) supplemented with OADC enrichment media (Difco) at 37'C on a...

  5. Changes in immunologic cell surface markers during cocaine withdrawal in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T R; Knisely, J S; Christmas, J T; Schnoll, S H; Ruddy, S

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of acute cocaine withdrawal on the immune system of pregnant women, we analyzed changes in a panel of cell surface markers and plasma proteins that have immunological importance. The cell surface markers included complement receptors [CR1 (CD35), CR2 (CD21), CR3 (CD11b, CD18)], immunoglobulin Fc receptors [FcgammaRII (CD32), FcgammaRIII (CD16)], proteins important for lymphocyte function [CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD25, CD45RA], and the framework antigen HLA-ABC. We also measured levels of the plasma proteins C3, C4, IgG, IgM, and IgA, along with the cytokine interleukin-2, soluble lymphocyte markers sCD25, sCD4, sCD8, IL-2, and soluble immune complexes. While no significant changes were seen in the levels of plasma proteins, changes paralleling the course of acute withdrawal were seen in complement receptors and immunoglobulin Fc receptors on leukocyte subpopulations. By contrast, proteins important for lymphocyte function were relatively unperturbed. There was an increase in receptor expression at the onset of withdrawal that peaked 3-5 days after last cocaine use, followed by a decrease in expression to initial (pre-withdrawal) levels. These changes in cell surface receptors may reflect altered immune function in the women who were withdrawing from cocaine. PMID:9045748

  6. Molecular Genetic Markers: Discovery, Applications, Data Storage and Visualisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Duran; Nikki Appleby; David Edwards; Jacqueline Batley

    2009-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers represent one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of genomes and enable the association of heritable traits with underlying genomic variation. Molecular marker technology has developed rapidly over the last decade and two forms of sequence based marker, Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) now predominate applications in

  7. Immunologic biomarkers in relation to exposure markers of PCBs and dioxins in Flemish adolescents (Belgium).

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Rosette L; Koppen, Gudrun; Staessen, Jan A; Hond, Elly Den; Verheyen, Geert; Nawrot, Tim S; Roels, Harry A; Vlietinck, Robert; Schoeters, Greet E R

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we investigated 17- to 18-year-old boys and girls to determine whether changes in humoral or cellular immunity or respiratory complaints were related to blood serum levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxin-like compounds after lifetime exposure in Flanders (Belgium). We obtained blood samples from and administered questionnaires to 200 adolescents recruited from a rural area and two urban suburbs. Physicians recorded medical history and respiratory diseases. We measured immunologic biomarkers such as differential blood cell counts, lymphocyte phenotypes, and serum immunoglobulins. As biomarkers of exposure, we determined the serum concentrations of PCBs (PCB 138, PCB 153, and PCB 180) and dioxin-like compounds [chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) bioassay]. The percentages of eosinophils and natural killer cells in blood were negatively correlated with CALUX toxic equivalents (TEQs) in serum (p = 0.009 and p = 0.05, respectively). Increased serum CALUX TEQs resulted in an increase in serum IgA levels (p = 0.05). Furthermore, levels of specific IgEs (measured by radioallergosorbent tests) of cat dander, house dust mite, and grass pollen were also significantly and negatively associated with the CALUX TEQ, with odds ratios (ORs) equal to 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42-0.96], 0.68 (0.5-0.93), and 0.70 (0.52-0.95), respectively. In addition, reported allergies of the upper airways and past use of antiallergic drugs were negatively associated with CALUX TEQs, with ORs equal to 0.66 (0.47-0.93) and 0.58 (0.39-0.85), respectively. We found a negative association between IgGs and marker PCBs in serum (p = 0.009). This study shows that immunologic measurements and respiratory complaints in adolescents were associated with environmental exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs). The negative correlation between PHAHs and allergic responses in adolescents suggested that exposure may entail alterations in the immune status. PMID:12055051

  8. Ancient metalloenzymes as possible markers in molecular archaeology.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Y; Weser, U

    2000-04-01

    The successful preparation of an active remnant of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase from mummified brain tissue stimulated the isolation of both biochemically and immunologically active alkaline Zn2Mg-phosphatase from antique bone samples of different archaeological sites and age. In particular, specimens from pharaonic Egypt being up to 4000 years of age were used. Gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatographies were employed to optimise the preparation of the ancient enzyme. Compared to the specific activity of alkaline phosphatase from modern autopsy some 50% for a Ptolemaic and 10% for the Old Kingdom enzyme was detectable. The possibility of microbial contamination was checked by employing specific monoclonal antibodies directed against the human bone enzyme. Fortunately, ubiquitously present specified microorganisms on the respective ancient bones did not cross-react with these antibodies while the ancient metalloenzyme reacted with high specificity. Alkaline phosphatase mimicks could be excluded as in the presence of the inhibitors 1,10-phenanthroline and L-homoarginine the enzyme activity was diminished. The presence of ortho-vanadate as a substrate analogon abolished the catalytic function of the enzyme. Likewise, heating to 100 degrees C and replacement of zinc(II) by cadmium(II) resulted in a dramatic loss of activity. In conclusion, alkaline phosphatase appears to be a useful marker enzyme in molecular archaeology. PMID:10830839

  9. Identifying commercially relevant Echinacea species by AFLP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Russi, Luigi; Moretti, Chiaraluce; Raggi, Lorenzo; Albertini, Emidio; Falistocco, Egizia

    2009-11-01

    The rising interest in medicinal plants has brought several species of the genus Echinacea to the attention of many scientists. Echinacea angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. purpurea are the most important for their immunological properties, well known and widely used by the native Americans. The three species are easily distinguishable on the basis of their morphological characteristics, but it would be difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish them in commercial preparations of ground, dry plant parts of E. purpurea (the most valuable species for chemotherapeutic properties) mixed with the other two species. Species-specific molecular markers could be useful to address this issue. In the present work, using fresh material collected from cultivated Echinacea spp., AFLP analysis was used to discriminate the three species and to detect species-specific DNA fragments. By using 14 primer combinations it was possible to detect a total of 994 fragments, of which 565 were polymorphic. Overall, 89 fragments were unique to E. purpurea, 32 to E. angustifolia, and 26 to E. pallida. E+CAC/M+AAT or E+CAC/M+AGC alone provided 13, 9, and 4 or 7, 5, and 5 specific fragments for E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, and E. pallida, respectively. A validation trial to confirm the results was carried out on bulked samples of 23 accessions covering most of the genetic diversity of the three species. The results are discussed in terms of practical applications in the field of popular medicine, detecting frauds, and implications for the genus Echinacea. PMID:19935915

  10. Leishmaniases diagnosis: an update on the use of immunological and molecular tools.

    PubMed

    de Paiva-Cavalcanti, Milena; de Morais, Rayana Carla Silva; Pessoa-E-Silva, Rômulo; Trajano-Silva, Lays Adrianne Mendonça; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Suênia da Cunha; Tavares, Diego de Hollanda Cavalcanti; Brelaz-de-Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly; Silva, Rafael de Freitas E; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniases are caused by obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. They cause a spectrum of diseases, most notably visceral (VL), cutaneous (CL), and mucosal (ML) leishmaniasis, which affect millions of people around the world, each year. Despite scientific advances, leishmaniases cases are expanding, constituting an important public health problem. Immunological and molecular diagnostic tools have been increasingly applied for the early detection of these parasitic infections, since the existence of limitations in clinical and parasitological examinations may provide false results, thus interfering in epidemiological research and diseases control. Although there is a great diversity of available immunological assays, important common deficiencies persist, which explains the current exploration of the molecular biology in research fields, especially the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and its variants, such as real-time quantitative PCR. However, in the last years, significant results have also been reached inside of immunological context (especially by Flow Cytometry), for humans and dogs, demonstrated by research works of the New and Old worlds. In spite of their potential to clarify and minimize the present global situation of the diseases, the implementation of molecular or immunological innovative reference assays for VL and CL at health services is still a challenge due to several reasons, including lack of standardization among laboratories and structural concerns. In this article we bring classical and current information about technological advances for the immunological and molecular leishmaniases diagnosis, their features, and applications. PMID:26097678

  11. Keratin Classes as Molecular Markers Epithelia: Cell Culture Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM G. NELSON; TUNG-TIEN SUN

    1983-01-01

    The keratins are a highly heterogeneous group of proteins that form intermediate filaments in a wide variety of epithelial cells. These proteins can be divided into at least seven major classes according to their molecular weight and their immunological reactivity with monoclonal antibodies. Tissue-distribution studies have revealed a correlation between the expression of specific keratin classes and different morphological features

  12. Molecular detection and immunological localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias)

    E-print Network

    Evans, David H.

    Molecular detection and immunological localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias). Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol dogfish (Squalus acanthias) can make rapid adjustments to gill acid-base transfers to compensate

  13. APPLICATION OF MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR CUCUMBER IMPROVEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The historicity of marker development, map construction, and the utility of marker-assisted selection is presented. Experimental results indicate that the identification of marker-trait associations will continue to be extremely expensive and time consuming, but will likely pay large dividends for ...

  14. Serum Polyfluoroalkyl Concentrations, Asthma Outcomes, and Immunological Markers in a Case–Control Study of Taiwanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Tung, Kuan-Yen; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yi-He; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Background: Per?uorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous pollutants. Experimental data suggest that they may be associated with adverse health outcomes, including asthma. However, there is little supporting epidemiological evidence. Methods: A total of 231 asthmatic children and 225 nonasthmatic controls, all from northern Taiwan, were recruited in the Genetic and Biomarkers study for Childhood Asthma. Structure questionnaires were administered by face-to-face interview. Serum concentrations of 11 PFCs and levels of immunological markers were also measured. Associations of PFC quartiles with concentrations of immunological markers and asthma outcomes were estimated using multivariable regression models. Results: Nine PFCs were detectable in most children (? 84.4%), of which perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the most abundant (median serum concentrations of 33.9 ng/mL in asthmatics and 28.9 ng/mL in controls). Adjusted odds ratios for asthma among those with the highest versus lowest quartile of PFC exposure ranged from 1.81 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.23) for the perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) to 4.05 (95% CI: 2.21, 7.42) for perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA). PFOS, PFOA, and subsets of the other PFCs were positively associated with serum IgE concentrations, absolute eosinophil counts (AEC), eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) concentrations, and asthma severity scores among asthmatics. Conclusions: This study suggests an association between PFC exposure and juvenile asthma. Because of widespread exposure to these chemicals, these findings may be of potential public health concern. PMID:23309686

  15. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. Separation and scoring of 392 markers was completed using the Beckman CEQ8000 capillary electrophoresis system. Twelve plants from each of eight...

  16. [Prognostic and predictive molecular markers for urologic cancers].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Schlomm, T; Bertz, S; Heinzelmann, J; Hölters, S; Simon, R; Stoehr, R; Junker, K

    2014-04-01

    Molecular prognostic factors and genetic alterations as predictive markers for cancer-specific targeted therapies are used today in the clinic for many malignancies. In recent years, many molecular markers for urogenital cancers have also been identified. However, these markers are not clinically used yet. In prostate cancer, novel next-generation sequencing methods revealed a detailed picture of the molecular changes. There is growing evidence that a combination of classical histopathological and validated molecular markers could lead to a more precise estimation of prognosis, thus, resulting in an increasing number of patients with active surveillance as a possible treatment option. In patients with urothelial carcinoma, histopathological factors but also the proliferation of the tumor, mutations in oncogenes leading to an increasing proliferation rate and changes in genes responsible for invasion and metastasis are important. In addition, gene expression profiles which could distinguish aggressive tumors with high risk of metastasis from nonmetastasizing tumors have been recently identified. In the future, this could potentially allow better selection of patients needing systemic perioperative treatment. In renal cell carcinoma, many molecular markers that are associated with metastasis and survival have been identified. Some of these markers were also validated as independent prognostic markers. Selection of patients with primarily organ-confined tumors and increased risk of metastasis for adjuvant systemic therapy could be clinically relevant in the future. PMID:24700189

  17. Technology evaluation: nimotuzumab, the Center of Molecular Immunology/YM BioSciences/Oncoscience.

    PubMed

    Spicer, James

    2005-04-01

    A joint venture between YM BioSciences (formerly York Medical) and The Center of Molecular Immunology is collaborating with Oncoscience in Europe for the development of a humanized monoclonal antibody, nimotuzumab, for the potential treatment (TheraCIM and RadioTheraCIM) and diagnosis (DiaCIM) of cancers of epithelial origin, such as breast, lung, head and neck, and pancreatic cancer. The antibody is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials. PMID:15844627

  18. Molecular biology and immunology of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Califano, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, our knowledge and understanding of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has expanded dramatically. New high-throughput sequencing technologies have accelerated these discoveries since the first reports of whole-exome sequencing of HNSCC tumors in 2011. In addition, the discovery of human papillomavirus in relationship with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has shifted our molecular understanding of the disease. New investigation into the role of immune evasion in HNSCC has also led to potential novel therapies based on immune-specific systemic therapies. PMID:25979390

  19. Conformational flexibility in designing peptides for immunology: the molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2010-09-01

    Computational modeling techniques and computer simulations have become a routine in biological sciences and have gained great attention from researchers. Molecular dynamics simulation is a valuable tool towards an understanding of the complex structure of biological systems, especially in the study of the flexibility of the biological molecules such as peptides or proteins. Peptides play a very important role in human physiology and control many of the processes involved in the immune system response. Designing new and optimal peptide vaccines is one of the hottest challenges of the 21(st) century science and it brings together researchers from different fields. Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be a helpful tool assisting laboratory work, saving financial sources and opening possibilities for exploring properties of the molecular systems that are hardly accessible by conventional experimental methods. Present review is dedicated to the recent contributions in applications of molecular dynamics simulations in peptide design for immunological purposes, such as B or T cell epitopes. PMID:20412039

  20. Drosophila hematopoiesis: markers and methods for molecular genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Cory J.; Liu, Ting; Banerjee, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the Drosophila hematopoietic system are becoming more and more prevalent as developmental and functional parallels with vertebrate blood cells become more evident. Investigative work on the fly blood system has, out of necessity, led to the identification of new molecular markers for blood cell types and lineages and to the refinement of useful molecular genetic tools and analytical methods. This review briefly describes the Drosophila hematopoietic system at different developmental stages, summarizes the major useful cell markers and tools for each stage, and provides basic protocols for practical analysis of circulating blood cells and of the lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ. PMID:24613936

  1. Mosaic down syndrome with a marker: molecular cytogenetic characterization of the marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Goud, Venkatesh; Dalal, Ashwin B

    2012-03-10

    Down syndrome is a complex disorder characterized by well defined and distinctive phenotypic features. Approximately 2-3% of all live-born Down individuals are mosaics. Here we report a boy with suspected Down syndrome showing mosaicism for two different cell lines where one cell line is unexpected. The cytogenetic analysis by G-banding revealed a karyotype of 47 XY+21 [20]/46,X+marker [30]. Further, molecular cytogenetic analysis with spectral karyotyping identified the marker as a derivative of Y chromosome. The delineation of Y chromosomal DNA was done by quantitative real-time PCR and aneuploidy detection by quantitative fluorescence PCR. The Y-short tandem repeats typing was performed to estimate the variation in quantity as well as to find out the extent of deletion on Y chromosome using STR markers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using Y centromeric probe was also performed to confirm the origin of the Y marker. Further fine mapping of the marker was carried out with three bacterial artificial chromosome clones RP11-20H21, RP11-375P13, RP11-71M14, which defined the hypothetical position of the deletion. In our study we defined the extent of deletion of the marker chromosome and also discussed it in relation with mosaicism. This is the first report of mosaic Down syndrome combined with a second de novo mosaic marker derived from the Y chromosome. PMID:22245181

  2. Systems Immunology Reveals Markers of Susceptibility to West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Goel, Gautam; Meng, Hailong; Wang, Xiaomei; You, Fuping; Devine, Lesley; Raddassi, Khadir; Garcia, Melissa N.; Murray, Kristy O.; Bolen, Christopher R.; Gaujoux, Renaud; Shen-Orr, Shai S.; Hafler, David; Fikrig, Erol; Xavier, Ramnik; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection is usually asymptomatic but can cause severe neurological disease and death, particularly in older patients, and how individual variations in immunity contribute to disease severity is not yet defined. Animal studies identified a role for several immunity-related genes that determine the severity of infection. We have integrated systems-level transcriptional and functional data sets from stratified cohorts of subjects with a history of WNV infection to define whether these markers can distinguish susceptibility in a human population. Transcriptional profiles combined with immunophenotyping of primary cells identified a predictive signature of susceptibility that was detectable years after acute infection (67% accuracy), with the most prominent alteration being decreased IL1B induction following ex vivo infection of macrophages with WNV. Deconvolution analysis also determined a significant role for CXCL10 expression in myeloid dendritic cells. This systems analysis identified markers of pathogenic mechanisms and offers insights into potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:25355795

  3. Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

  4. Molecular markers for sex determination in papaya ( Carica papaya L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Deputy; R. Ming; H. Ma; Z. Liu; M. M. M. Fitch; M. Wang; R. Manshardt; J. I. Stiles

    2002-01-01

    We have developed molecular markers tightly linked to Sex1, the gene that determines plant sex in papaya (Carica papaya L.). Three RAPD products have been cloned and a portion of their DNA sequenced. Based on these sequences SCAR primers were synthesized. SCAR T12 and SCAR W11 produce products in hermaphrodite and male plants and only rarely in females. SCAR T1

  5. Tracking different Northern Wheatear populations during migration with molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Delingat

    Stopover decisions of long distance migrating birds, like the Northern Wheatear, Oenanthe oenanthe, depend very much on already covered distances as well as on the ongoing migration route. To test optimality models all available information about the migration route of the in- vestigated individuals is important. Morphometric data and Molecular markers for different breeding populations offer information about the breeding

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers

    E-print Network

    Beissinger, Steven R.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers: origins Black Rail lives under dense marsh vegetation, is rarely observed, flies weakly and has a highly disjunct distribution. The largest population of rails is found in 8­10 large wetlands in San Francisco Bay

  7. Predictive markers in bladder cancer: do we have molecular markers ready for clinical use?

    PubMed

    Sanguedolce, Francesca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Cormio, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease. Approximately 75% of patients present with non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC), which has a high recurrence rate and a low but unpredictable progression rate. Conversely, patients with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) are at high risk for progression and cancer-specific mortality, but, again, disease behavior is unpredictable. To date, risk assessment for tumor recurrence and progression is based on clinico-pathological factors only. A risk assessment calculator that is based on several such parameters is available for NMIBC, but it has been reported to have potential flaws. In the last two decades, great effort has been made to evaluate the prognostic and predictive role of several molecular markers in MIBC and, even more so, in NMIBC, where the need for more precise risk stratification is urgently needed. This review addresses current evidence for the role of several molecular markers easily assessable by immunohistochemical techniques in prognosticating/predicting the outcome of NMIBC and MIBC. To date, because of divergent results among the many studies, no molecular marker has yet entered routine clinical practice; however, some of them (e.g., p53, pRb, p21, and survivin) have proved their predictive value in studies that included a homogeneous patient population on standardized treatment, and, therefore, are probably ready for clinical validation on a larger scale. Even more interesting is the possibility of constructing multimarker panels that could be used in routine clinical practice, as all these markers can easily be evaluated by immunohistochemistry on routine surgical pathology specimens. The molecular markers described herein hold promise for becoming widely available and cost-effective tools for reliable risk assessment, which would represent a great advancement in counseling patients, in selecting them for neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and in determining their eligibility for clinical trials. PMID:25036341

  8. Reviewing and Updating the Major Molecular Markers for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calloni, Raquel; Cordero, Elvira Alicia Aparicio; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells (SC) are able to self-renew and to differentiate into many types of committed cells, making SCs interesting for cellular therapy. However, the pool of SCs in vivo and in vitro consists of a mix of cells at several stages of differentiation, making it difficult to obtain a homogeneous population of SCs for research. Therefore, it is important to isolate and characterize unambiguous molecular markers that can be applied to SCs. Here, we review classical and new candidate molecular markers that have been established to show a molecular profile for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The commonly cited markers for embryonic ESCs are Nanog, Oct-4, Sox-2, Rex-1, Dnmt3b, Lin-28, Tdgf1, FoxD3, Tert, Utf-1, Gal, Cx43, Gdf3, Gtcm1, Terf1, Terf2, Lefty A, and Lefty B. MSCs are primarily identified by the expression of CD13, CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD54, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD106, CD166, and HLA-ABC and lack CD14, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD62E, CD62L, CD62P, and HLA-DR expression. HSCs are mainly isolated based on the expression of CD34, but the combination of this marker with CD133 and CD90, together with a lack of CD38 and other lineage markers, provides the most homogeneous pool of SCs. Here, we present new and alternative markers for SCs, along with microRNA profiles, for these cells. PMID:23336433

  9. Simultaneous analysis of five molecular markers provides a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the living

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, Carl D.

    Simultaneous analysis of five molecular markers provides a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis hypothesis for this group, based on the analysis of more than 4000 characters from five molecular markers parsimony analysis of combined and equally weighted characters from the five molecular markers and Bayesian

  10. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  11. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  12. Molecular markers and sentinel organisms for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Conn, D B

    2008-09-01

    Molecular methods are useful for both to monitor anthropogenic viral, bacterial, and protozoan enteropathogens, and to track pathogen specific markers in a complex environment in order to reveal sources of these pathogens. Molecular genetic markers for fecal viruses, bacteria, and protozoans hold promise for monitoring environmental pollution and water quality. The demand for microbiologically safe waters grows exponentially due to the global demographic rise of the human population. Economically important shellfish, such as oysters, which are harvested commercially and preferentially consumed raw can be of public health importance if contaminated with human waterborne pathogens. However, feral molluscan shellfish which do not have an apparent economic value serve as indicators in monitoring aquatic environments for pollution with human waterborne pathogens and for sanitary assessment of water quality. Current technology allows for multiplexed species-specific identification, genotyping, enumeration, viability assessment, and source-tracking of human enteropathogens which considerably enhances the pathogen source-tracking efforts. PMID:18814723

  13. Molecular markers for wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr41

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaochun Sun; Guihua Bai; Brett F. Carver

    2009-01-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is an important foliar disease of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Pyramiding several major rust-resistance genes into one adapted cultivar is one strategy for obtaining more\\u000a durable resistance. Molecular markers linked to these genes are essential tools for gene pyramiding. The rust-resistance gene\\u000a Lr41 from T.\\u000a tauschii has been introgressed into chromosome

  14. Molecular Markers, Natural History, and Conservation of Marine Animals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ronald Burton (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego; Marine Biology Research Division)

    2009-11-01

    Molecular genetic techniques have found broad utility in modern marine ecology, and applications continue to grow. Databases of DNA sequences now permit nonexperts to identify eggs and larval stages of many marine animals that were previously mysteries. Molecular identifications of field-collected organisms and tissues are used to help assess population connectivity, investigate marine food webs, and identify marketed commodities. Advances in technology already include prototype development of in situ robotic instrumentation for sampling and molecular identification of animal larvae. Studies of population connectivity, once limited to a few gene loci, are slowly giving way to new genomic arrays of markers and high-throughput methodologies for scoring genotypes. Population genetic theory is providing new computational techniques to assess patterns of population structure, estimate effective population sizes, and infer aspects of demographic history. In this article I review a subset of recent work in this growing area of molecular marine ecology.

  15. Are molecular markers useful predictors of adaptive potential?

    PubMed

    Mittell, Elizabeth A; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-08-01

    Estimates of molecular genetic variation are often used as a cheap and simple surrogate for a population's adaptive potential, yet empirical evidence suggests they are unlikely to be a valid proxy. However, this evidence is based on molecular genetic variation poorly predicting estimates of adaptive potential rather than how well it predicts true values. As a consequence, the relationship has been systematically underestimated and the precision with which it could be measured severely overstated. By collating a large database, and using suitable statistical methods, we obtain a 95% upper bound of 0.26 for the proportion of variance in quantitative genetic variation explained by molecular diversity. The relationship is probably too weak to be useful, but this conclusion must be taken as provisional: less noisy estimates of quantitative genetic variation are required. In contrast, and perhaps surprisingly, current sampling strategies appear sufficient for characterising a population's molecular genetic variation at comparable markers. PMID:25989024

  16. The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

  17. Molecular and immunological responses of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, to the organophosphorus insecticide, trichlorfon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Rahmawaty, Atiek; Chang, Zhong-Wen

    2013-04-15

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is used as an agriculture pesticide to destroy insects, a human medicine to combat internal parasites, and an ectoparasiticide in the livestock and aquaculture industries, but which has caused aquatic toxicity in the prawn industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of trichlorfon on molecular and enzymatic processes of the immunological response of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, at 0, 0.2, and 0.4mgL(-1) with 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24h of exposure. The total hemocyte count (THC), respiratory bursts (RBs), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined to evaluate immunological responses and oxidative stress. Results showed that THCs of the prawn exposed to trichlorfon at both concentrations (0.2 and 0.4mgL(-1)) had increased after 12 and 24h; SOD and PO activities had significantly increased at 3h, whereas production of RBs had dramatically increased as oxidative stress at each sampling time after exposure to trichlorfon compared to the control. A potential biomarker of OPs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) revealed a significant decrease after exposure for 6h, and showed a time-dependent tendency. Immune gene expressions, including prophenoloxidase (proPO), the lipopolysaccharide- and ?-1,3-glucan-binding protein (LGBP), peroxinectin (PE), ?2-macroglubulin (?2M), transglutaminase (TG), and copper, zinc (Cu,Zn)-SOD, of prawns exposed to trichlorfon at 0, 0.2, and 0.4mgL(-1) for 0, 6, and 24h were further evaluated. Expressions of all of the immune genes significantly decreased when prawns were exposed to 0.4mgL(-1) trichlorfon for 24h, and among them, an increase in SOD expression was seen after exposure to 0.4mgL(-1) for 6h. Prawns exposed to trichlorfon within 24h exhibited the decrease of circulating hemocytes, and also the induction of oxidative stress, which caused subsequent damage to DNA formation of immune genes. From these results, we concluded that immunological responses and immune gene expressions of prawn exposed to trichlorfon at 0.4mgL(-1) for 24h were perturbed, thus causing a deficiency in immunity and subsequent increased susceptibility to pathogen infections. PMID:23340335

  18. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  19. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain ('K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

  20. Sublethal toxicity of Roundup to immunological and molecular aspects of Biomphalaria alexandrina to Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azza H

    2011-05-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the cellular mechanisms of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails hemocytes against sublethal concentration (10 mg/L) of herbicide Roundup (48% Glyphosate) and/or Schistosoma mansoni infection during 7 days of exposure. Obtained results indicated that herbicide treatment and/or infection led to significant increase (P<0.05) in total hemocytes count during exposure period. Examination of hemocytes monolayers resulted in observation of 3 morphologically different cell types, round small, hyalinocytes and spreading hemocytes. Spreading hemocytes are the dominant, more responsive and highly phagocytic cell type in all experimental groups. Moreover, the exposure to herbicide, infection or both together led to a significant increase (P<0.05) of in vitro phagocytic activity against yeast cells during 7 days of exposure. In addition, flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and comet assay, resulted in DNA damage in B. alexandrina hemocytes exposed to herbicide and/or S. mansoni infection when compared to control group. The immunological responses as well as molecular aspects in B. alexandrina snails have been proposed as biomarkers of exposure to environmental pollutants. PMID:21126764

  1. Immunological and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from a bovine foetus.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Ridieri, Karine Forster; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Hartwig, Daiane Drawanz; Amaral, Marta Gonçalves; Hartleben, Cláudia Pinho; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Cattle are commonly infected with pathogenic leptospires, and similarly to rodents, they excrete the bacteria in their urine and can transmit the pathogen from animal to animal or animal to human. Thus, surveillance and monitoring systems for detection of new Leptospira serovars are important for the control of leptospirosis. Here, we report the isolation of a spirochete from a stillborn bovine foetus and its characterization by immunological and molecular techniques. A variable number tandem repeat profile using seven discriminatory primers identified the spirochete as belonging to species Leptospira interrogans serogroup Australis serovar Muenchen. A phenotypic analysis using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against leptospiral membrane-associated proteins confirmed the expression of important virulence and pathogenicity factors (LipL32 and LigBrep). Out of 120 reference sera tested, 22 positive (36.66%) and 9 negative (15%) also reacted with the new isolate. Furthermore, the serovar Muenchen isolate was virulent in hamster model. The animal inoculated developed acute lethal infection characterized by hepatic, pulmonary and renal lesions. Local isolates exhibited unique characteristics that differed from those of reference strains; therefore, isolation of leptospires is useful in the surveillance of local pathogenic serovars. In conclusion, the data obtained from this study can contribute to the epidemiological understanding and control of leptospirosis in southern Brazil. PMID:25976319

  2. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele [National Product Control Agency for Welfare and Health, Chemicals Department, STTV c/o National Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  3. Immune Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Identification of Molecular Markers of Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero; Luke C. Kingry; Diane J. Ordway; Marcela Henao-Tamayo; Marisa Harton; Randall J. Basaraba; William H. Hanneman; Ian M. Orme; Richard A. Slayden

    The complex molecular events that occur within the host during the establishment of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are poorly defined, thus preventing identification of predictive markers of disease progression and state. To identify such molecular markers during M. tuberculosis infection, global changes in transcriptional response in the host were assessed using mouse whole genome arrays. Bacterial load in the lungs,

  4. Novel male-specific molecular markers (MADC5, MADC6) in hemp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ottó Törjék; Nándor Bucherna; Erzsébet Kiss; Hajnalka Homoki; Zsuzsanna Finta-Korpelová; Iván Bócsa; István Nagy; László E. Heszky

    2002-01-01

    Decamer RAPD primers were tested on dioecious and monoecious hemp cultivars to identify sex-specific molecular markers. Two\\u000a primers (OPD05 and UBC354) generated specific bands in male plants. These two DNA fragments were isolated, cloned and sequenced.\\u000a Both markers proved to be unique, since no sequence with significant homology to OPD05961 and UBC354151 markers were found in databases. These markers were

  5. Molecular Immunology 63 (2015) 513520 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Immunology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/molimm Generation of a chickenized catalytic anti for human diseases (Kim et al., 2005). In most antibodies conventionally Abbreviations: CDR, complementarity

  6. Molecular markers and their use in animal breeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. D. BEUZEN; M. J. STEAR; K. C. CHANG

    2000-01-01

    The use of DNA markers to define the genetic makeup (genotype) and predict the performance of an animal is a powerful aid to animal breeding. One strategy is known as marker-assisted selection (MAS). MAS facilitates the exploitation of existing genetic diversity in breeding populations and can be used to improve a whole range of desirable traits. DNA markers are, by

  7. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    E-print Network

    2009-01-01

    15213, USA, 23 Medical Oncology and Immunotherapy,Unit, Department of Medical Oncology, Centro di RiferimentoMedical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan, 32 Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology,

  8. Prevalence of Anemia and Immunological Markers in HIV-Infected Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Northeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Denue, Ballah Akawu; Kida, Ibrahim Musa; Hammagabdo, Ahmed; Dayar, Ayuba; Sahabi, Mohammed Abubakar

    2013-01-01

    Background There are conflicting reports on the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resolving hematological complications. Whereas some studies have reported improvements in hemoglobin and other hematological parameters resulting in reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV patients, others have reported no improvement in hematocrit values of HAART-treated HIV patients compared with HAART-naïve patients. Objective This current study was designed to assess the impact of HAART in resolving immunological and hematological complications in HIV patients by comparatively analyzing the results (immunological and hematological) of HAART-naive patients and those on HAART in our environment. Methods A total of 500 patients participated, consisting of 315 HAART-naive (119 males and 196 females) patients and 185 HAART-experienced (67 males and 118 females) patients. Hemoglobin (Hb), CD4+ T-cell count, total white blood count (WBC), lymphocyte percentage, plateletes, and plasma HIV RNA were determined. Results HAART-experienced patients were older than their HAART-naive counterparts. In HAART-naive patients, the incidence of anemia (packed cell volume [PCV] <30%) was 57.5%, leukopenia (WBC < 2.5), 6.1%, and thrombocytopenia < 150, 9.6%; it was, significantly higher compared with their counterparts on HAART (24.3%, 1.7%, and 1.2%, respectively). The use of HAART was not associated with severe anemia. Of HAART-naive patients, 57.5% had a CD4 count < 200 cells/?L in comparison with 20.4% of HAART-experienced patients (P < 0.001). The mean viral load log10 was significantly higher in HAART-naive than in HAART-experienced patients (P < 0.001). Total lymphocyte count < 1.0 was a significant predictor of immunological parameters associated with disease progression, and death in HIV-infected patients. Total lymphocyte count fails to predict CD4 count < 200 cells/?L in our cohort; thus, its use in the management and monitoring of HIV-infected patients in our settings is not reliable. PMID:24847174

  9. Identification of leaf rust resistance genes in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars using molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Yu. Urbanovich; S. V. Malyshev; T. V. Dolmatovich; N. A. Kartel

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 68 cultivars of common wheat has been screened for leaf rust resistance genes with the use of molecular markers.\\u000a Markers of genes Lr1, Lr9, Lr10, Lr19, Lr20, Lr21, Lr24, and Lr26 have been used. It has been suggested that allele Xgwm295 be used as a marker for identifying the Lr34 gene. The genes originating from Triticum aestivum

  10. Molecular markers linked to the fin gene controlling determinate growth habit in common bean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Astrid Pañeda; Cristina Rodríguez-Suárez; Ana Campa; Juan José Ferreira; Ramón Giraldez

    2008-01-01

    Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) was used to identify molecular markers linked to determinate growth habit (fin gene) in a F2 population derived from the cross Andecha (FinFin) × BRB130 (finfin). Fourteen RAPD markers and one microsatellite (BMd45-AIA) were linked to the fin gene when tested on the entire population. The SCAR, SI19b, designed from the RAPD marker OI19385 (linked to the fin

  11. Molecular analysis of silver crucian carp ( Carassius auratus gibelio Bloch) clones by SCAR markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Zhou; Yang Wang; Jian-Fang Gui

    2001-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers specific for one, two or three clones have been identified from five gynogenetic clones of silver crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio Bloch) using RAPD markers developed earlier. In this study, three RAPD markers (RA1-PA, RA2-EF and RA4-D) produced by Opj-1, and two RAPD DNA fragments (RA3-PAD and RA5-D) produced by Opj-7, were selected

  12. Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology 20 Pathology and Diagnostic Pathology and adenocarcinoma ·Application of molecular pathology to pathological diagnosis · Discovery of cancer therapy target and acceleration of pathological diagnostic processes Investigation of the development of EB virus

  13. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

  14. Association between molecular markers for beef tenderness and growth traits in Argentinian angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Pintos, D; Corva, P M

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers for beef tenderness are classic examples of the contribution of genome technology to animal breeding through marker-assisted selection (MAS). Markers on the ?-calpain (CAPN1) and calpastatin (CAST) genes have been extensively evaluated for their association with tenderness. However, little is known about their potential effect on other economically important traits. In this work, the association of molecular markers for beef tenderness with growth traits was evaluated in Angus cattle of Argentina. Expected progeny differences were extracted from the 2008 Angus Sire Summary of Argentina. Information corresponding to 268 influential bulls that had been genotyped for two markers in CAPN1 and two markers in CAST was provided by the Argentine Angus Association. Genotype probabilities were assigned, by segregation analysis, to those bulls in the Sire Summary that had no marker information. Expected progeny differences of 1365 sires were regressed on the number of alleles favouring tenderness at each locus. There was a significant effect of markers on expected progeny differences of birth weight, weaning weight (direct), weight at 18 months and rib eye area. In general, there was a negative effect of alleles favouring tenderness on growth traits. These correlated responses should be taken into account when molecular markers are used in selection schemes that aim to improve beef tenderness. PMID:21554351

  15. A review on SNP and other types of molecular markers and their use in animal genetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Vignal; Denis Milan; Magali SanCristobal; André Eggen

    2002-01-01

    During the last ten years, the use of molecular markers, revealing polymorphism at the DNA level, has been playing an increasing part in animal genetics studies. Amongst others, the microsatellite DNA marker has been the most widely used, due to its easy use by simple PCR, followed by a denaturing gel electrophoresis for allele size determination, and to the high

  16. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  17. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundances of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10...

  18. The use of molecular markers in apple breeding for disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Marta; Pitera, Emilian; Gawro?ski, Stanis?aw W

    2002-01-01

    Molecular markers have become a useful tool simplifying and speeding up breeding work. They are also helpful in the genetic analysis of complex agronomic traits. The investigations concern the use of already available SCAR markers for molecular analysis of breeding materials. The markers are the apple powdery mildew resistance gene Pl2, originating from Malus zumi, and the apple scab resistance gene Vf, from M. floribunda 821. The clone U 211 was found to be highly resistant to mildew under field conditions and transmitted a high level of resistance to the majority of its progeny. The presence of the Vf gene conferring resistance to scab was confirmed by molecular analysis. As the molecular markers for the Pl2 gene are not present in the DNA of U 211, it is probable that the clone U 211 is a new source of mildew resistance. PMID:12378248

  19. ZIP4 is a novel molecular marker for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Yongzhi; Yang, Jingxuan; Zhu, Vivian F.; Liu, Yulun; Cui, Xiaobo; Chen, Leon; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Hergenroeder, Georgene W.; Fletcher, Stephen A.; Levine, Jonathan M.; Kim, Dong H.; Tandon, Nitin; Zhu, Jay-Jiguang; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated zinc transport has been observed in many cancers. However, the status of zinc homeostasis and the expression profile of zinc transporters in brain and brain tumors have not been reported. Methods The gene profiles of 14 zinc importers (ZIPs) and 10 zinc exporters (ZnTs) in patients with glioma were studied by investigating the association between the zinc transporters and brain tumor characteristics (tumor grade and overall survival time). Three independent cohorts were analyzed to cross-validate the findings: the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGCA) cohort (n = 186), the US National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) cohort (n = 335), and The University of Texas (UT) cohort (n = 34). Results The expression of ZIP3, 4, 8, 14, ZnT5, 6, and 7 were increased, and the expression of ZnT10 was decreased in grade IV gliomas, compared with grade II gliomas. Among all 24 zinc transporters, ZIP4 is most significantly associated with tumor grade and overall survival; this finding is consistent across 2 independent cohorts (CGCA and REMBRANDT) and is partially validated by the third cohort (UT). High ZIP4 expression was significantly associated with higher grade of gliomas and shorter overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.53, P = .040 in CGCA cohort; hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 1.08–1.61, P = .007 in REMBRANDT cohort). Conclusions Dysregulated expression of zinc transporters is involved in the progression of gliomas. Our results suggest that ZIP4 may serve as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for gliomas. PMID:23595627

  20. Fingerprinting and Genetic Stability of Rubus Using Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA markers were used to identify raspberries and blackberries and to evaluate genetic stability of four cryopreserved Rubus accessions following 12 years of storage in liquid nitrogen. In the first study, 12 genomic Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers and one Expressed Sequence Tag- (EST)-SSR wer...

  1. Molecular Markers of Radiation-related Normal Tissue Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Okunieff, Paul; Chen, Yuhchyau; Maguire, David J.; Huser, Amy K.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past five decades, those interested in markers of radiation effect have focused primarily on tumor response. More recently, however, the view has broadened to include irradiated normal tissues—markers that predict unusual risk of side-effects, prognosticate during the prodromal and therapeutic phases, diagnose a particular toxicity as radiation-related, and, in the case of bioterror, allow for tissue-specific biodosimetry. Currently, there are few clinically useful radiation-related biomarkers. Notably, levels of some hormones such as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) have been used successfully as markers of dysfunction, indicative of the need for replacement therapy, and for prevention of cancers. The most promising macromolecular markers are cytokines: TGF?, IL-1, IL-6, and TNF? being lead molecules in this class as both markers and targets for therapy. Genomics and proteomics are still in nascent stages and are actively being studied and developed. PMID:18506399

  2. Molecular Markers for Genetic Diversity and Bayoud Disease Resistance in Date Palm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    My H. Sedra

    \\u000a The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L) is a monocotyledoneus woody perennial and dioecious plant with a long generation life time. Traditional and ­modern genetic\\u000a improvement in date palm need long time and considerable funds. The molecular markers can assist the selection and give better\\u000a and efficient research strategies. Several researches cited in this overview paper showed the use molecular markers

  3. Molecular markers for population genetic analyses in the family Psittacidae (Psittaciformes, Aves)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrícia J. Faria; Cristina Y. Miyaki

    2006-01-01

    The selection of molecular markers for population studies is an important tool for biodiversity conservation. The fam- ily Psittacidae contains many endangered and vulnerable species and we tested three kinds of molecular markers for their potential use in population studies of five psitacid species: 43 hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus), 42 blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna), 23 red-and-green macaws (Ara chloroptera), 19

  4. New sequence-tagged site molecular markers for identification of sex in Distichlis spicata.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Sarah M; O'Quinn, Robin; Brown, Anna L

    2009-09-01

    Sex-linked molecular markers have become valuable tools for understanding sex ratio evolution and sex-specific physiology in pre-reproductive plants. To develop new accurate methods for sexing Distichlis spicata juveniles and nonflowering individuals, we converted a random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction marker that co-segregated with the female phenotype into a set of sequence-tagged site markers. We tested the marker pair on known males and females from populations in Oregon and California. A single band was obtained for all female samples but never for males. PMID:21564910

  5. Comparative study of the high molecular mass fraction and low molecular mass fraction of Sho-saiko-to in a murine immunologically induced liver injury model.

    PubMed

    Nose, Mitsuhiko; Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Iwahashi, Naomi; Oguri, Kanayo; Ogihara, Yukio

    2002-01-01

    We compared the pharmacological actions of the high and low molecular mass fractions of Sho-saiko-to using a murine immunologically induced liver injury model to estimate the roles of these fractions in the expression of the pharmacological action. In a Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury model, Sho-saiko-to and both of its fractions significantly reduced the increases in the aminotranseferase levels in serum. They also reduced the increase in the nitric oxide (NOx) level in serum. On the other hand, Sho-saiko-to and its high molecular mass fraction suppressed the increase in plasma NOx level in an LPS-induced endotoxin shock model but its low molecular mass fraction did not. These results suggest the possibility that both fractions act hepatoprotectively in a different manner. We believe that these results can help to elucidate the mechanism of action of ingredients in Sho-saiko-to. PMID:11824559

  6. The Effects of Water Matrix on Decay of Human Fecal Molecular Markers and Campylobacter spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although molecular source tracking for human fecal contamination is used on a wide range of sample types, little is known about comparative decay of proposed molecular markers under different conditions, or correlation with pathogen decay. Our purpose was to measure correlations ...

  7. Molecular markers from the transcribed/expressed region of the genome in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Rustgi, S

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, molecular marker technology in higher plants has witnessed a shift from the so-called random DNA markers (RDMs), developed in the past arbitrarily from genomic DNA and cDNA, to the molecular markers representing the transcriptome and the other coding sequences. These markers have been described as gene targeted markers (GTMs). Another specific class of markers includes the so-called functional markers (FMs), which are supposed to have a cause and effect relationship with the traits of interest. In this review, we first describe the development of these markers representing the transcriptome or genes per se; we then discuss the uses of these markers in some detail and finally add a note on the future directions of research and the implications of the wider application of these markers in crop improvement programmes. Using suitable examples, we describe markers of different classes derived from cDNA clones, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), gene sequences and the unique (coding) sequences obtained through methyl filtration or genome normalization (high C(0) t fraction) from gDNA libraries. While we briefly describe RFLPs, SSRs, AFLPs and SNPs developed from the transcriptome (cDNA clones and EST databases), we have discussed in more detail some of the novel markers developed from the transcriptome and specific genes. These novel markers include expressed sequence tag polymorphisms (ESTPs), conserved orthologue set (COS) markers, amplified consensus genetic markers (ACGMs), gene specific tags (GSTs), resistance gene analogues (RGAs) and exon-retrotransposon amplification polymorphism (ERAP). Uses of these markers have been discussed in some detail under the following headings: development of transcript and functional maps, estimations of genetic diversity, marker-assisted selection (MAS), candidate-gene (CG) approach and map-based cloning, genetical genomics and identification of eQTLs, study of genome organization and taxonomic and phylogenetic studies. At the end, we also append a list of websites relevant to further studies on the transcriptome. For want of space, considerable information including voluminous data in the form of 12 tables, and a long list of references cited in these tables, has been placed on the Internet as electronic supplementary material (ESM), which the readers may find useful. PMID:15095058

  8. A Comparison of Three Molecular Markers for the Identification of Populations of Globodera pallida.

    PubMed

    Hoolahan, Angelique H; Blok, Vivian C; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Potato cyst nematodes cost the potato industry substantial financial losses annually. Through the use of molecular markers, the distribution and infestation routes of these nematodes can be better elucidated, permitting the development of more effective preventative methods. Here we assess the ability of three molecular markers to resolve multiple representatives of five Globodera pallida populations as monophyletic groups. Molecular markers included a region of the rbp-1 gene (an effector), a non-coding nuclear DNA region (the ITS region), and a novel marker for G. pallida, a ?3.4 kb non-coding mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) region. Multiple phylogenetic analysis methods were performed on the three DNA regions separately, and on a data set of these three regions combined. The analyses of the combined data set were similar to that of the sole mtDNA marker; resolving more populations as monophyletic groups, relative to that of the ITS region and rbp-1 gene region. This suggests that individual markers may be inadequate for distinguishing populations of G. pallida. The use of this new non-coding mtDNA marker may provide further insights into the historical distribution of G. pallida, as well as enable the development of more sensitive diagnostic methods. PMID:23482966

  9. Immunological markers for tolerance to avian malaria in Hawai`i `Amakihi: new tools for restoring native Hawaiian forest birds?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated three assays for non-specific or innate immune capacity to see if measurements were independent of malarial infection and capable of distinguishing malaria-tolerant, low-elevation Hawai?i ?Amakihi from malaria-susceptible, high-elevation ?Amakihi. ?Amakihi were captured at Malama Ki Forest Reserve (20 m), Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (1800 m), and Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve (1700 m), bled for collection of plasma and packed erythrocytes for malarial diagnostics, and either transported to K?lauea Field Station Aviary and held in captivity for 48 hours for inoculation of wing webs with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) or released immediately in the field after collection of a blood sample. All birds were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microscopy to determine infection status. We found no significant association between malarial infection status and degree of wing web swelling after inoculation with PHA (T = -0.174, df = 13, P = 0.864) and no association between origin of birds from low- and high-elevation populations and degree of wing web swelling (T = 0.113, df = 52, P = 0.911). Infected ?Amakihi from low elevation had significantly higher small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity than uninfected individuals from the same population (T = -2.675, df = 21, P = 0.014), so we limited comparisons to uninfected birds. Uninfected ?Amakihi from low elevations did not differ in small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity from uninfected ?Amakihi from high elevation (T = -0.260, df = 46, P = 0.796). Compared to high-elevation birds, low-elevation ?Amakihi had significantly higher titers of natural antibodies (NAb) as measured by complement-mediated lysis of rabbit erythrocytes (Mann-Whitney U = 27, X2= 32.332, df = 1, P < 0.0001). This innate immunological difference may be related to ability to survive malarial infection and may prove to be important for understanding possible mechanisms for the evolution of disease tolerance in Hawai?i’s native bird species.

  10. Applications and Implications of Neutral versus Non-neutral Markers in Molecular Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R.

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection. PMID:21747718

  11. Comprehensive genetic discrimination of Leonurus cardiaca populations by AFLP, ISSR, RAPD and IRAP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Soorni, Aboozar

    2014-06-01

    Leonurus cardiaca is well known for its medicinal importance. In this investigation, genotypic characterization of this species from six eco-geographical regions of Iran was evaluated by four molecular techniques (AFLP, RAPD, ISSR and IRAP). A total of 899 polymorphic fragments were detected by used molecular markers (AFLP = 356, RAPD = 325, ISSR = 113 and IRAP = 105) with an overall average polymorphism of 81.24%. Genetic variation calculated using Shannon's Information index (I) and Nei's gene diversity index (H) showed high genetic diversity in studied germplasm. Also, analysis of molecular variance showed high genetic variation among (55%) and within populations (45%). UPGMA dendrogram constructed from combined data of molecular markers distinguished studied populations in accordance with the results obtained by each marker which all individuals were clearly differentiated into two major clusters. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant for all marker systems with the highest correlation between similarity matrixes of RAPD and ISSR markers (r = 0.82). The present results have an important implication for L. cardiaca germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation. Furthermore, the characterized individuals exhibited a great deal of molecular variation and they seem to have a rich gene pool for breeding programs. PMID:24562682

  12. MOLECULAR MARKER ASSISTED BREEDING FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE IN COMMON BEAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been 40 sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers (http://www.usda.prosser.wsu.edu/miklas/Scartable3.pdf) generated across laboratories that are available for indirect selection of 27 qualitatively and 8 quantitatively expressed genes conditioning resistance to bacterial, fun...

  13. Vaxfectin-adjuvanted seasonal influenza protein vaccine: correlation of systemic and local immunological markers with formulation parameters.

    PubMed

    Shlapobersky, Mark; Wei, Qun; Sullivan, Sean; Vilalta, Adrian

    2009-10-30

    Vaxfectin, a cationic lipid-based adjuvant, when combined with a seasonal influenza protein vaccine has been reported to enhance predominantly either antibody or cellular responses depending upon the ratio of adjuvant to antigen. Preliminary physical characterization showed that particle size was dependent on the antigen to Vaxfectin ratio. In an effort to identify potential predictive markers helpful in formulation development, a panel of biomarkers was assayed both at the site of administration and in the serum. Local upregulation of IFN-gamma, IL-6, Cxcl9, CCL2, TNF-alpha, CD274 as well as Toll-like receptor pathway transcripts MyD88, TLR2, TLR3 and TLR9 was observed. Also, systemic levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha and CCL2 were elevated in response to Vaxfectin formulation in a ratio-dependent manner. These results have identified biomarkers that may be useful in testing Vaxfectin-protein formulations to produce balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:19607952

  14. Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii.

    PubMed

    Gygax, M; Gianfranceschi, L; Liebhard, R; Kellerhals, M; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2004-11-01

    Breeding for scab-resistant apple cultivars by pyramiding several resistance genes in the same genetic background is a promising way to control apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. To achieve this goal, DNA markers linked to the genes of interest are required in order to select seedlings with the desired resistance allele combinations. For several apple scab resistance genes, molecular markers are already available; but until now, none existed for the apple scab resistance gene Vbj originating from the crab apple Malus baccata jackii. Using bulk segregant analysis, three RAPD markers linked to Vbj were first identified. These markers were transformed into more reliable sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers that proved to be co-dominant. In addition, three SSR markers and one SCAR were identified by comparing homologous linkage groups of existing genetic maps. Discarding plants showing genotype-phenotype incongruence (GPI plants) plants, a linkage map was calculated. Vbj mapped between the markers CH05e03 (SSR) and T6-SCAR, at 0.6 cM from CH05e03 and at 3.9 cM from T6-SCAR. Without the removal of the GPI plants, Vbj was placed 15 cM away from the closest markers. Problems and pitfalls due to GPI plants and the consequences for mapping the resistance gene accurately are discussed. Finally, the usefulness of co-dominant markers for pedigree analysis is also demonstrated. PMID:15365630

  15. Targeting the Molecular and Cellular Interactions of the Bone Marrow Niche in Immunologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brozowski, Jaime M.; Billard, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have expanded our knowledge of the regulatory bone marrow (BM) niche, which is critical in maintaining and directing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells are niche components in close association with HSCs and have been more clearly defined in immune cell function and homeostasis. Importantly, cellular inhabitants of the BM niche signal through G protein-coupled surface receptors (GPCRs) for various appropriate immune functions. In this article, recent literature on BM niche inhabitants (HSCs, osteoblasts, MSCs, CAR cells) and their GPCR mechanistic interactions are reviewed for better understanding of the BM cells involved in immune development, immunologic disease, and current immune reconstitution therapies. PMID:24408534

  16. IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

  17. Immunology & Pharmacology

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    postgraduate courses e.g. M.Sc. courses in Clinical Pharmacology, Immunology, Toxicology, Medicinal ChemistryBSc (Hons) Immunology & Pharmacology DEGREE PROGRAMME GUIDE 2013-2014 #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology & Pharmacology Introduction Degree Aims and Outcomes General Enquiries General Requirements Industrial

  18. Identification of specific molecular markers linked to the rust resistance gene M4 in flax

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Y. Bo; J. J. Ma; J. X. Chen; T. Y. Miao; W. X. Zhai

    2008-01-01

    To identify molecular markers linked to the flax rust-resistance gene M4, RAPD analysis of NM4 (a near-isogenic line containing the M4 gene) and the recurrent parent Bison was performed using 540 decamer primers. The primer OPA18 amplified a specific fragment,\\u000a OPA18432, in the NM4 line. The OPA18432 marker was found to be closely linked to the M4 gene, with a

  19. Identification of sex chromosome molecular markers using RAPDs and fluorescent in situ hybridization in rainbow trout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Iturra; J. F. Medrano; M. Bagley; N. Lam; N. Vergara; J. C. Marin

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode\\u000a of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified\\u000a that generated polymorphic bands amplifying preferentially in males of the Mount Lassen and Scottish strains of rainbow trout.\\u000a Chromosomal

  20. Molecular markers to study competition and diversity of Rhizobium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Sessitsch

    1997-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was directed to the development of molecular identification and detection techniques for studying the ecology of Rhizobium, a nitrogen- fixing bacterium of agricultural importance. Competition of inoculant strains with indigenous microbes is a serious problem in agricultural practice and was therefore addressed in this work using the developed tools. Furthermore, various molecular techniques have

  1. DNA markers in molecular diagnostics for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying-Hsiu; Lin, Selena Y; Song, Wei; Jain, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, mainly due to the difficulty of early detection and limited therapeutic options. The implementation of HCC surveillance programs in well-defined, high-risk populations were only able to detect about 40–50% of HCC at curative stages (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stages 0 & 1) due to the low sensitivities of the current screening methods. The advance of sequencing technologies has identified numerous modifications as potential candidate DNA markers for diagnosis/surveillance. Here we aim to provide an overview of the DNA alterations that result in activation of cancer pathways known to potentially drive HCC carcinogenesis and to summarize performance characteristics of each DNA marker in the periphery (blood or urine) for HCC screening. PMID:25098554

  2. Genetic analysis of Indian mulberry varieties through molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, K; Awasthi, A K; Srivastava, P P; Saratchandra, B

    2004-01-01

    India is one of the countries where sericulture is being practiced traditionally. Due to the higher economic return and the greater employment potential, attempts are being made to increase the productivity by developing high yielding mulberry varieties. At the present, Mysore local, Bomaypiasbari, Kanva-2, Bilidevalaya, Kajli, S1, BC(2)59, C776, RFS-175, S-36 and Victory-1 are being cultivated extensively in different parts of India for rearing the silkworm Bombyx mori L. Using 17 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and 11 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers the genetic relationships among these varieties were analyzed. The RAPD and ISSR primers revealed more than 75% polymorphism among the varieties. The genetic similarity estimated from RAPD markers varied from 0.645, between Kajli and Victory-1 to 0.887, between Kanva-2 and Bilidevalaya. Similarly, the genetic similarity estimated from the ISSR markers ranged from 0.600, between Kajli and Victory-1, to 0.873 between Kanva-2 and BC(2)59. The dendrogram constructed from these markers grouped the varieties into three major groups comprising the low yielding, medium yielding and high yielding. The low genetic similarity between the group of varieties originating from the eastern regions with that of the southern region encourages formation of extensive breeding programs between these groups as to transfer the high yield potential of the southern varieties to the low yielding but highly adaptive eastern varieties. PMID:15383066

  3. Parasite Immunology, 2001: 23: 327344 Immunological genomics of Brugia malayi: filarial genes implicated

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    Parasite Immunology, 2001: 23: 327±344 Immunological genomics of Brugia malayi: filarial genes of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University biochemical and immunological data on prominent filarial proteins with the exciting new information provided

  4. Construction of a genetic linkage map in tetraploid species using molecular markers.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Z W; Hackett, C A; Bradshaw, J E; McNicol, J W; Milbourne, D

    2001-01-01

    This article presents methodology for the construction of a linkage map in an autotetraploid species, using either codominant or dominant molecular markers scored on two parents and their full-sib progeny. The steps of the analysis are as follows: identification of parental genotypes from the parental and offspring phenotypes; testing for independent segregation of markers; partition of markers into linkage groups using cluster analysis; maximum-likelihood estimation of the phase, recombination frequency, and LOD score for all pairs of markers in the same linkage group using the EM algorithm; ordering the markers and estimating distances between them; and reconstructing their linkage phases. The information from different marker configurations about the recombination frequency is examined and found to vary considerably, depending on the number of different alleles, the number of alleles shared by the parents, and the phase of the markers. The methods are applied to a simulated data set and to a small set of SSR and AFLP markers scored in a full-sib population of tetraploid potato. PMID:11238421

  5. Understanding the Molecular Determinants Driving the Immunological Specificity of the Protective Pilus 2a Backbone Protein of Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Brogioni, Barbara; Cozzi, Roberta; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Yero, Daniel; Telford, John L.; Grandi, Guido; Daura, Xavier; Zacharias, Martin; Maione, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The pilus 2a backbone protein (BP-2a) is one of the most structurally and functionally characterized components of a potential vaccine formulation against Group B Streptococcus. It is characterized by six main immunologically distinct allelic variants, each inducing variant-specific protection. To investigate the molecular determinants driving the variant immunogenic specificity of BP-2a, in terms of single residue contributions, we generated six monoclonal antibodies against a specific protein variant based on their capability to recognize the polymerized pili structure on the bacterial surface. Three mAbs were also able to induce complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis killing of live GBS and target the same linear epitope present in the structurally defined and immunodominant domain D3 of the protein. Molecular docking between the modelled scFv antibody sequences and the BP-2a crystal structure revealed the potential role at the binding interface of some non-conserved antigen residues. Mutagenesis analysis confirmed the necessity of a perfect balance between charges, size and polarity at the binding interface to obtain specific binding of mAbs to the protein antigen for a neutralizing response. PMID:23825940

  6. Molecular and cellular markers of toxicity in the Japanese Medaka @

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; D'Surney, S.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hull, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been recommended for use as a model organism to detect carcinogenic, teratogenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic compounds in aquatic systems. Because a long latent period often occurs between initial contact with deleterious chemicals and subsequent expression of the pathology, we are investigating early biologically-relevant responses that can be used as genotoxicity markers of exposure and effect. This project focuses on the development of genotoxic bioassays and experimental protocols for exposing Japanese Medaka to genotoxic compounds. 21 refs., 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. Volatility of organic molecular markers used for source apportionment analysis: measurements and implications for atmospheric lifetime.

    PubMed

    May, Andrew A; Saleh, Rawad; Hennigan, Christopher J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-11-20

    Molecular markers are organic species used to define fingerprints for source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter. Traditionally, these markers have been assumed to be stable in the atmosphere. This work investigates the gas-particle partitioning of eight organic species used as molecular markers in receptor models for biomass burning (levoglucosan), motor vehicles (5?-cholestane, n-hexacosane, n-triacontane, 1,2-benz[a]anthracene, coronene), and meat cooking (cholesterol, oleic acid). Experiments were conducted using a thermodenuder to measure the evaporation of single component particles. The data were analyzed using the integrated volume method to determine saturation concentrations and enthalpies of vaporization for each compound. The results indicate that appreciable quantities (>10%) of most of these markers exist in the gas phase under typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, these species should be considered semivolatile. Predictions from a chemical kinetics model indicate that gas-particle partitioning has important effects on the atmospheric lifetime of these species. The atmospheric decay of semivolatile compounds proceeds much more rapidly than nonvolatile compounds because gas-phase oxidation induces evaporation of particle-phase material. Therefore, both gas-particle partitioning and chemical reactions need to be accounted for when semivolatile molecular markers are used for source apportionment studies. PMID:23013599

  8. Molecular markers of dental pulp tissue during orthodontic tooth movement: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, Rohaya Megat; Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Yeen, Wong Woan; Ahmad, Nurul Atikah; Senafi, Sahidan

    2012-01-01

    Three specific orthodontic tooth movement genes, that is, FCRL1, HSPG2, and LAMB2 were detected at upper first premolar (with appliance) dental pulp tissue by using GeneFishing technique as compared to lower first premolar (without appliance). These three differentially expressed genes have the potential as molecular markers during orthodontic tooth movement by looking at molecular changes of pulp tissue. PMID:22629122

  9. Molecular and immunological characterization of group V allergen isoforms from velvet grass pollen (Holcus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Schramm, G; Bufe, A; Petersen, A; Schlaak, M; Becker, W M

    1998-03-01

    Group V grass pollen allergens belong to the major grass pollen allergens causing reactions of type I allergy. cDNAs coding for two isoforms of the group V allergen of velvet grass pollen (Holcus lanatus), a widespread grass species, were isolated from a cDNA library by hybridization with a 5'-terminal reverse-transcribed PCR-derived cDNA probe. Amino acid sequences of the two isoforms, designated rHol l 5.01 and rHol l 5.02, revealed high similarity between them (78% identity) and to group V allergens and their isoforms found in other grass species. Recombinant Hol l 5 isoforms were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as fusion proteins. To compare their immunological reactivities with group-V-specific monoclonal antibodies and patients' IgE, immunoblotting, ELISA and histamine release assay were performed. Interestingly, monoclonal antibody Bo9, specific for group Vb isoforms of timothy grass, bound only to isoform rHol l 5.01, not to rHol l 5.02. On the other side, IgE reactivities of patients' sera revealed no differences between the two isoforms when investigated by immunoblotting and only slight differences when investigated by ELISA. In histamine release assay both isoforms released comparable amounts of histamine from basophils of four individual patients. Thus, the two group V isoforms of velvet grass pollen exhibit differential binding when tested with monoclonal antibodies, i.e. different structure of single epitopes, but negligible differences concerning overall IgE-binding capacity and histamine-releasing capacity. PMID:9523689

  10. Molecular Characterization of Entomopathogenic Fungi Using Microsatellite Markers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of entomopathogenic fungi isolated from their arthropod hosts or other sources can be cumbersome when certain morphological features are not clear or time consuming when the organism needs to reach a certain growth stage for proper identification. Molecular tools can be handy and offe...

  11. Use of Molecular Markers for Catfish Production and Product Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish are a diploid species native to North America and the primary product of U.S. aquaculture, and molecular genetic research supports selective breeding of catfish for commercial production. To date, short tandem repeat loci have been used to characterize DNA sequence variation within ...

  12. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, ?V?3 integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein. PMID:25099015

  13. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  14. Proceedings of the second international symposium on molecular markers in horticulture Acta Horticulturae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Molecular Markers in Horticulture was held at the CH2M Hill Alumni Center at Oregon State University (OSU), Corvallis (Oregon, US), from July 29 to August 1st, 2009. This symposium was convened by a scientist at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) of...

  15. Molecular markers to study population structure and dynamics in beneficial insects (predators and parasitoids)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine MacDonald; Hugh Loxdale

    2004-01-01

    For beneficial insects--predators and parasitoids--to be used effectively within pest control scenarios, it is often necessary to have fundamental as well as more applied information about them, including data on population dynamics, host switching and breeding systems. In recent years, such information has been gained by the use of molecular DNA markers. In this article, we briefly discuss the range

  16. POPULATION BIOLOGY/GENETICS Molecular Markers Reveal Infestation Dynamics of the Bed Bug

    E-print Network

    Vargo, Ed

    POPULATION BIOLOGY/GENETICS Molecular Markers Reveal Infestation Dynamics of the Bed Bug (Hemiptera://dx.doi.org/10.1603/ME11256 ABSTRACT The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, and molecular markers in soils of Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas D. Bucheli; Franziska Blum; André Desaules; Örjan Gustafsson

    2004-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were analysed in 23 soil samples (0–10 cm layer) from the Swiss soil monitoring network (NABO) together with total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) concentration, as well as some PAH source diagnostic ratios and molecular markers. The concentrations of the sum of 16 EPA priority PAHs ranged from 50 to 619 ?g\\/kg dw. Concentrations

  18. Correlation between molecular markers and adaptively significant genetic variation in Bromus tectorum (Poaceae), an inbreedingannual grass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Ramakrishnan; SUSAN E. MEYER; JENNIFER WATERS; MIKEL R. STEVENS; CRAIG E. COLEMAN; DANIEL J. FAIRBANKS

    2004-01-01

    Single sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphic (AFLP) molecular marker genotypes in cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum) were compared to published data on phenotypic variation in seed dormancy, vernalization requirement, and resistance to the pathogen Ustilago bullata. Several features of cheatgrass facilitated this study: it is a recent invader in the western United States, has considerable phenotypic polymorphism, and

  19. Correlation between molecular markers and adaptively significant genetic variation in Bromus tectorum (Poaceae), an inbreedingannual grass.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Alisa P; Meyer, Susan E; Waters, Jennifer; Stevens, Mikel R; Coleman, Craig E; Fairbanks, Daniel J

    2004-06-01

    Single sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphic (AFLP) molecular marker genotypes in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) were compared to published data on phenotypic variation in seed dormancy, vernalization requirement, and resistance to the pathogen Ustilago bullata. Several features of cheatgrass facilitated this study: it is a recent invader in the western United States, has considerable phenotypic polymorphism, and is an obligate self-pollinator. Forty self-pollinating lines from four populations common to the three phenotypic data sets were analyzed for molecular genetic variation using seven SSR loci and 31 AFLP loci. We examined correlations between distance matrices using the Mantel test for each pair of studies. The two molecular data sets were significantly correlated (r = 0.636). The AFLP markers often distinguished among several lines with identical SSR genotypes. The AFLP data were also significantly correlated with the phenotypic data (r values from 0.4640 to 0.5658), but the SSR data were much more highly correlated (r values from 0.677 to 0.844). The difference between molecular marker systems was especially notable when an outlier population from Potosi Pass, Nevada, was excluded from the analysis. These results suggest that SSR markers may be good surrogates for phenotypic traits in population genetic studies of strongly inbreeding species such as cheatgrass. PMID:21653434

  20. RiceCAP: Development of molecular markers associated with long grain milling yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. rice breeders are focused on developing new cultivars that have high yield and high milling quality. Using traditional breeding methods, it takes approximately ten years to develop a new cultivar. Development of molecular markers that are closely linked to traits of economic value will increase...

  1. Molecular markers highlight variation within and among Kentucky bluegrass varieties and accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing relationships among germplasm and cultivars of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is limited to field evaluations or a small set of molecular markers. To improve the efficiency of characterizing Kentucky bluegrass cultivars and germplasm, this study was designed to develop a larger set...

  2. QUANTITATION, DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT PRECISION OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work focuses on analysis of organic molecular markers in airborne particulate matter (PM) by Gas Chromatography/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (GC/IT MS). The particulate samples used in the method development were collected as PM10 in metropolitan Philadelphia during...

  3. Molecular markers and allelic relationships of anthracnose resistance gene cluster B4 in common bean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Belén Méndez-Vigo; Cristina Rodríguez-Suárez; Astrid Pañeda; Juan José Ferreira; Ramón Giraldez

    2005-01-01

    Allelism tests and molecular marker analyses were combined to characterize the genes that, proceeding from the germplasm lines ‘A493’ and ‘A321’, confer resistance to bean anthracnose in the new breeding lines ‘A1220’ and ‘A1231’, respectively, developed through backcross breeding, using the dry bean landrace ‘Andecha’ as the recurrent parent. Allelism tests indicate that resistance to race 38 of anthracnose in

  4. Cloning and characterization of resistance gene candidate sequences and molecular marker development in gerbera (Gerbera hybrida)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving disease resistance has become an important breeding objective in gerbera, one of the most important floricultural crops in the world. Development and application of molecular markers are expected to assist selection of gerberas with improved disease resistance. The availability of resistan...

  5. A molecular marker-based linkage map of diploid bananas ( Musa acuminata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Fauré; J. L. Noyer; J. P. Horry; F. Bakry; C. Lanaud; D. Go?zalez de León

    1993-01-01

    A partial molecular linkage map of the Musa acuminata diploid genome is presented. This map is based on 58 RFLP, four isozyme and 28 RAPD markers segregating in an F2 population of 92 individuals. A total of 90 loci was detected, 77 of which were placed on 15 linkage groups while 13 segregated independently. Segregation distortions were shown by 36%

  6. Prognostic molecular markers in non-small cell lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacek Nikli?ski; Wies?awa Nikli?ska; Jerzy Laudanski; El?bieta Chyczewska; Lech Chyczewski

    2001-01-01

    Although TNM stage is the most significant prognostic parameter in lung cancer, additional parameters are required for explaining variability of survival. Hence molecular alterations in lung cancer have been extensively studied. Most prominent among them are alterations in the p53–p21 pathway, controlling the G1\\/S transition. They are the most commonly observed aberrations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results

  7. [Molecular Genetic Markers of Economically Important Traits in Dairy Cattle].

    PubMed

    Yudin, N S; Voevoda, M I

    2015-05-01

    The selection efficiency of complex quantitative economically important traits in dairy cattle depends on the identification of candidate genes responsible for these traits, as well as the determination of causative DNA polymorphism in these genes. Here, we review examples of DNA polymorphisms in coding and noncoding parts of genes that are associated with milk yield, milk fat and protein contents, milk fat and protein percentages, the biochemical composition of milk, and other milk production traits. Together with data with of foreign authors, which were obtained predominantly for Holstein animals, much attention in the review is paid to domestic studies on Russian cattle breeds. Particular attention is dedicated to DNA polymorphisms in the genes encoding transcription factors, which can potentially affect a large number of traits. The results of association analyses are summarized in a table, and they present the progress of research in this area in recent years. Our analysis indicates that the majority of SNPs, which are associated with significant effects on milk production traits, are in fact in a linkage disequilibrium with yet unknown mutations. The identification of functionally significant DNA polymorphisms and other genetic factors (epimutations, VNTR) is necessary for effective marker-assisted selection and genomic selection of diary cattle breeds. PMID:26137639

  8. Cytogenetic and molecular markers for detecting Aegilops uniaristata chromosomes in a wheat background.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Li, Guangrong; Zhou, Jianping; Li, Genying; Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chengyan; Zhao, Zhendong; Yang, Zujun

    2014-09-01

    Aegilops uniaristata has many agronomically useful traits that can be used for wheat breeding. So far, a Triticum turgidum - Ae. uniaristata amphiploid and one set of Chinese Spring (CS) - Ae. uniaristata addition lines have been produced. To guide Ae. uniaristata chromatin transformation from these lines into cultivated wheat through chromosome engineering, reliable cytogenetic and molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes need to be developed. Standard C-banding shows that C-bands mainly exist in the centromeric regions of Ae. uniaristata but rarely at the distal ends. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using (GAA)8 as a probe showed that the hybridization signal of chromosomes 1N-7N are different, thus (GAA)8 can be used to identify all Ae. uniaristata chromosomes in wheat background simultaneously. Moreover, a total of 42 molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes were developed by screening expressed sequence tag - sequence tagged site (EST-STS), expressed sequence tag - simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR), and PCR-based landmark unique gene (PLUG) primers. The markers were subsequently localized using the CS - Ae. uniaristata addition lines and different wheat cultivars as controls. The cytogenetic and molecular markers developed herein will be helpful for screening and identifying wheat - Ae. uniaristata progeny. PMID:25486537

  9. Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, V.; Peckmann, J.; Seifert, R.; Wehrung, P.; Reitner, J.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-12-01

    The authors propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C{sub 20} isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C{sub 25} homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely {sup 13}C-depleted isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}108 to {minus}115.6% PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. The authors postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}88%) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H{sub 2}. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as cold seep microbialites rather than mere antigenic carbonates.

  10. Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

  11. Molecular markers of influenza B lineages and clades.

    PubMed

    Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Pierucci, Federica; Azzi, Alberta

    2014-11-01

    Co-circulation of two influenza B virus lineages, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, has been recognized since the late 1980s. The assessment of the prevalent lineage and the group of viruses in circulation is of importance in order to decide on the vaccine composition and evaluate its efficacy. The molecular characterization of influenza B viruses in circulation has been the aim of this study; this was approached by identifying and locating nucleotide substitutions in the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), specific for the lineage and/or clade. By the alignment of 3456 sequences from the influenza GISAID EpiFlu database, a high number of lineage- and group-specific nucleotide positions have been observed in the HA gene, but not in the NA gene. Additionally, an RT-PCR method has been developed, applicable directly to clinical specimens, which amplifies a short HA region that includes a group of unique molecular signatures. Twenty eight influenza B virus-positive respiratory specimens, collected in Tuscany in the seasons 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, were analyzed. The results revealed two clearly distinguishable patterns: one, more frequent, was characterized by all of the nucleotide changes associated with the B/Yamagata lineage (in most cases of Group 2), whereas the other exhibited all of the changes associated with the B/Victoria lineage. It can be concluded that the analysis of this short HA sequence can permit a rapid, highly sensitive determination of influenza B virus lineages and clades. PMID:25412364

  12. Molecular Markers of Influenza B Lineages and Clades

    PubMed Central

    Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Pierucci, Federica; Azzi, Alberta

    2014-01-01

    Co-circulation of two influenza B virus lineages, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, has been recognized since the late 1980s. The assessment of the prevalent lineage and the group of viruses in circulation is of importance in order to decide on the vaccine composition and evaluate its efficacy. The molecular characterization of influenza B viruses in circulation has been the aim of this study; this was approached by identifying and locating nucleotide substitutions in the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), specific for the lineage and/or clade. By the alignment of 3456 sequences from the influenza GISAID EpiFlu database, a high number of lineage- and group-specific nucleotide positions have been observed in the HA gene, but not in the NA gene. Additionally, an RT-PCR method has been developed, applicable directly to clinical specimens, which amplifies a short HA region that includes a group of unique molecular signatures. Twenty eight influenza B virus-positive respiratory specimens, collected in Tuscany in the seasons 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, were analyzed. The results revealed two clearly distinguishable patterns: one, more frequent, was characterized by all of the nucleotide changes associated with the B/Yamagata lineage (in most cases of Group 2), whereas the other exhibited all of the changes associated with the B/Victoria lineage. It can be concluded that the analysis of this short HA sequence can permit a rapid, highly sensitive determination of influenza B virus lineages and clades. PMID:25412364

  13. Identification and validation of molecular markers linked to the leaf rust resistance gene Lr19 in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Charpe, Ashwini; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Haque, Qazi Mohammad Rizwanul

    2006-10-01

    A leaf rust resistance gene Lr19 on the chromosome 7DL of wheat derived from Agropyron elongatum was tagged with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite markers. The F(2) population of 340 plants derived from a cross between the leaf rust resistant near-isogenic line (NIL) of Thatcher (Tc + Lr19) and leaf rust susceptible line Agra Local that segregated for dominant monogenic leaf rust resistance was utilized for generating the mapping population. The molecular markers were mapped in the F(2) derived F(3) homozygous population of 140 seedlings. Sixteen RAPD markers were identified as linked to the alien gene Lr19 among which eight were in a coupling phase linkage. Twelve RAPD markers co-segregated with Lr19 locus. Nine microsatellite markers located on the long arm of chromosome 7D were also mapped as linked to the gene Lr19, including 7 markers which co-segregated with Lr19 locus, thus generating a saturated region carrying 25 molecular markers linked to the gene Lr19 within 10.2 +/- 0.062 cM on either side of the locus. Two RAPD markers S265(512) and S253(737) which flanked the locus Lr19 were converted to sequence characterized amplified region markers SCS265(512) and SCS253(736), respectively. The marker SCS265(512) was linked with Lr19 in a coupling phase and the marker SCS253(736) was linked in a repulsion phase, which when used together mimicked one co-dominant marker capable of distinguishing the heterozygous resistant seedlings from the homozygous resistant. The molecular markers were validated on NILs mostly in Thatcher background isogenic for 44 different Lr genes belonging to both native and alien origin. The validation for polymorphism in common leaf rust susceptible cultivars also confirmed the utility of these tightly linked markers to the gene Lr19 in marker-assisted selection. PMID:16896713

  14. Molecular nature of RAPD markers from Haemophilus influenzae Rd genome.

    PubMed

    Mori, E; Liò, P; Daly, S; Damiani, G; Perito, B; Fani, R

    1999-03-01

    Despite the widespread application of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, there is no experimental evidence of the molecular mechanism of random amplification starting from a complex template. To investigate this mechanism, we cloned and sequenced 23 selected RAPD bands amplified from Haemophilus influenzae Rd genomic DNA using eight decamer primers different in GC content and/or nucleotide sequence. As the whole genome sequence of H. influenzae Rd has been reported, the exact nucleotide sequence of each primer-template annealing site was identified. Results showed that, on an average, a homology of eight base pairs was involved in priming events and that the number of nonhomologous base pairings declined exponentially from the 5' end of the primer to its 3' end. The interaction between the primer and the template DNA was stabilized by the formation of secondary structures, and a perfect match of the 3' terminal region of the primer was not necessary for successful amplification. The complexity of the annealing process suggested that, in the studied reaction conditions, many primer-template annealing sites were extended in the first cycles and that differences in the efficiency of priming and replication processes led to amplification of RAPD fragments. Moreover, the distribution of the amplified regions on the H. influenzae chromosome was analyzed. PMID:10209764

  15. Molecular markers for the characterization of Brazilian Cercospora caricis isolates.

    PubMed

    Inglis, P W; Teixeira, E A; Ribeiro, D M; Valadares-Inglis, M C; Tigano, M S; Mello, S C

    2001-03-01

    Cercospora caricis is of interest as a potential mycoherbicide for control of purple nutsedge, Cyperus rotundus, which is considered to be the world's worst weed. The genetic variation of a collection of Brazilian Ce. caricis isolated from Cy. rotundus was analyzed by using RAPD, RFLP with a telomeric probe, [TTAGGG]18 and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of the ribosomal RNA gene. The Brazilian isolates were also compared with a Ce. caricis isolate from Florida, USA and with some other Cercospora species. A cluster of isolates from the Brazilian cerrado region was identified showing high genetic similarity. In contrast, isolates originating in other geographic regions of Brazil were less than 50% and 25% related to the former group according to similarity estimates produced from RAPD and telomeric RFLP analyses respectively. ITS sequence analysis did not support taxonomic division of the Brazilian strains, but did confirm the distant relatedness of these strains to the Ce. caricis isolate from Florida. The data indicate a need for an extensive molecular survey of Cercospora species associated with the Cyperaceae. PMID:11270654

  16. The natural profilin from Russian thistle (Salsola kali) contains a low IgE-binding ability isoform--molecular and immunological characterization.

    PubMed

    Mas, Salvador; Barderas, Rodrigo; Colás, Carlos; Quiralte, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Villalba, Mayte

    2012-12-01

    Chenopodiaceae pollens such as those from Salsola kali and Chenopodium album are important causes of allergy in Mediterranean areas because of the progress of desertification in European countries. Among the various allergenic protein families, profilins constitute a group of pan-allergens that are involved in polysensitization and pollen-food allergy syndrome. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis of S. kali profilin highlighted a polymorphic pattern, with several isoforms that have different molecular features (isoelectric point and molecular mass) and immunological features. Two isoforms have been cloned and sequenced. Sal k 4.02 and Sal k 4.03 displayed non-conservative amino acid changes in critical positions of the IgE epitopes. Both isoforms were produced in Escherichia coli and structurally and spectroscopically characterized. Changes in the electrophoretic mobility and in their IgG and IgE immunological behavior were observed in comparison with Che a 2, their counterpart from C. album. The IgE-binding ability of Sal k 4.03 is similar to that of Che a 2, whereas Sal k 4.02 showed a 35% reduction in IgE binding in 86% of patients, suggesting a hypoallergenic character. Three-dimensional modeling allowed us to propose which amino acid residues are involved in those immunological changes based on epitope mapping studies previously performed in other profilins. These profilin isoforms constitute suitable candidates for specific immunotherapy with recombinant allergens. PMID:23043287

  17. Discovery of Molecular Markers to Discriminate Corneal Endothelial Cells in the Human Body

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Masahito; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Hara, Susumu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs) on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant number of CECs results in corneal edema called bullous keratopathy which can lead to severe visual loss. Corneal transplantation is the most effective method to treat corneal endothelial dysfunction, where it suffers from donor shortage. Therefore, regeneration of CECs from other cell types attracts increasing interests, and specific markers of CECs are crucial to identify actual CECs. However, the currently used markers are far from satisfactory because of their non-specific expression in other cell types. Here, we explored molecular markers to discriminate CECs from other cell types in the human body by integrating the published RNA-seq data of CECs and the FANTOM5 atlas representing diverse range of cell types based on expression patterns. We identified five genes, CLRN1, MRGPRX3, HTR1D, GRIP1 and ZP4 as novel markers of CECs, and the specificities of these genes were successfully confirmed by independent experiments at both the RNA and protein levels. Notably none of them have been documented in the context of CEC function. These markers could be useful for the purification of actual CECs, and also available for the evaluation of the products derived from other cell types. Our results demonstrate an effective approach to identify molecular markers for CECs and open the door for the regeneration of CECs in vitro. PMID:25807145

  18. Molecular markers based identification of diversity for drought tolerance in bread wheat varieties and synthetic hexaploids.

    PubMed

    Shah, Zahid Hussain; Munir, Muhammad; Kazi, Abdul Mujeeb; Mujtaba, Tahir; Ahmed, Zaheer

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of the wheat genome has delayed the development and application of molecular markers to this species and wheat now lies behind barley, maize and rice in marker development. However, improvements in marker detection systems and in the techniques used to identify markers linked to useful traits has allowed considerable advances to be made in recent years. To evaluate the genetic diversity 53 genotypes of Richard's selection, were studied at National Agriculture Reseach Center (NARC) Islamabad. The present study found that RAPD analysis is a valuable diagnostic tool. Different sets of RAPD primers were used to study the polymorphism at molecular level. Highest number of amplifications was shown by primer OpG-2 in Richard's material. Coefficient of similarity as well as genetic distances among these three sets of materials was calculated by using Unweighted Pair Group of Arithamatic Means (UPGMA) function (Nei and Li, 1979). The SHs derived genotypes of Richard's selection were highly polymorphic with a polymorphism percentage of 69.70 as compared to NUYT (rainfed) and elite Pakistani bread wheat varieties with a polymorphism of 44.44% and 61.11% respectively. Cluster analysis was done in which grouping of genotypes was done on the basis of genetic distances. Cluster analysis revealed that genotypes of Richard's genotypes are showing high level of among cultivar variation as compared to NUYT (Rainfed) and elite Pakistani drought tolerant bread wheat varieties. These genotypes were also phenotypically evaluated. PMID:19430030

  19. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR).

    PubMed

    Hasnaoui, Nejib; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Mars, Messaoud; Zhang, Dapeng; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2012-02-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In the present study, we report the development of 4 new polymorphic SSR markers. They have been used in addition to 11 SSRs previously published to investigate molecular diversity of 33 P. granatum ecotypes. Based on the multi-locus profiles, twenty-two distinctive genotypes were identified. Globally, quite low genetic diversity has been revealed, as measured by allele richness (2.83 per locus) and heterozygosity (He=0.245; Ho=0.243), reflecting the narrow genetic background of the plant material. Four synonymous groups could be detected involving 15 accessions. Results of ordination and cluster analysis suggested that almost all the Tunisian cultivars share similar genetic background, and are likely derived from a small number of introductions in ancient times. Results issued from this study provide essential information to project a pomegranate core-collection without plant material duplication and for sustainable management of pomegranate landraces at national and international level. Furthermore, these SSR markers are powerful tool for marker assisted selection (MAS) program and for QTL studies. PMID:22123180

  20. Characterization of molecular markers in smoke from residential coal combustion in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xinhui Bi; Bernd R. T. Simoneit; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu

    2008-01-01

    The organic constituents and distributions of molecular markers emitted from a residential coal-stove burning honeycomb coal briquettes were determined in this study. The major organic components emitted directly in smoke particles were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with abundant hydroxy-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs), i.e., thermally altered derivative compounds from coal combustion, UCM (unresolved complex mixture of branched and cyclic compounds), n-alkanes

  1. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case. PMID:23933412

  2. Functionally associated molecular genetic marker map construction in perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Faville; A. C. Vecchies; M. Schreiber; M. C. Drayton; L. J. Hughes; E. S. Jones; K. M. Guthridge; K. F. Smith; T. Sawbridge; G. C. Spangenberg; G. T. Bryan; J. W. Forster

    2004-01-01

    A molecular marker-based map of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) has been constructed through the use of polymorphisms associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A pair-cross between genotypes from a North African ecotype and the cultivar Aurora was used to generate a two-way pseudo-testcross population. A selection of 157 cDNAs assigned to eight different functional categories associated with agronomically important

  3. Genetic analysis of apomixis in Citrus and Poncirus by molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. García; M. J. Asíns; J. Forner; E. A. Carbonell

    1999-01-01

    Propagation of citrus rootstocks depends upon the production of clonal plants from nucellar seedlings. This makes apomixis\\u000a one of the host important traits in breeding programs for citrus rootstocks. The genetic control of apomixis was studied in\\u000a a 50-tree progeny derived from the cross C. volkameriana?P. trifoliata using 69 molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis. The proportion of nucellar seedlings

  4. Quantification of the effects of molecular marker oxidation on source apportionment estimates for motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anirban A.; Wagstrom, Kristina M.; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers are individual organic compounds used in receptor models to apportion fine particulate matter to sources. These models currently assume that molecular markers are chemically stable; however, recent laboratory experiments suggest they may be significantly oxidized on atmospherically relevant time scales. To investigate the effects of photo-oxidation, we extended a 3-D chemical transport model (PMCAMx) to simulate norhopane concentrations over the eastern United States during July 2001. Norhopane is an important molecular marker for motor vehicle exhaust. We examined eight different simulation scenarios, using different combinations of reaction rates and source profiles. The simulations including norhopane oxidation better reproduced the observed spatial patterns of norhopane concentrations than the non-reactive cases. Chemical mass balance (CMB) analysis was performed using the PMCAMx-predicted motor vehicle norhopane and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations to quantify the bias caused by oxidation on source apportionment estimates. Norhopane oxidation caused CMB to underestimate total vehicle OC by 10-50%, with larger biases in rural areas. This underestimation was largely due to changes in the amount of OC apportioned to gasoline vehicles which was reduced by as much as 100%. The OC apportioned to diesel vehicle emissions was relatively insensitive to norhopane reaction. Therefore, oxidation can substantially alter CMB estimates regarding the relative importance of gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions.

  5. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  6. Molecular marker-based characterization in candidate plus trees of Pongamia pinnata, a potential biodiesel legume

    PubMed Central

    Kesari, Vigya; Madurai Sathyanarayana, Vinod; Parida, Ajay; Rangan, Latha

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Pongamia pinnata, a legume tree, has many traditional uses and is a potential biodiesel plant. Despite its importance and the availability of appropriate molecular genetic tools, the full potential of Pongamia is yet to be realized. The objective of this study was to assess genetic diversity among 10 systematically characterized candidate plus trees (CPTs) of P. pinnata from North Guwahati. Methodology The application and informativeness of polymerase chain reaction-based molecular markers [random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)] to assess the genetic variability and relatedness among 10 CPTs of P. pinnata were investigated. Principal results Polymorphism rates of 10.48, 10.08 and 100 % were achieved using 18 RAPD, 12 ISSR and 4 AFLP primer combinations, respectively. Polymorphic information content (PIC) varied in the range 0.33–0.49, 0.18–0.49 and 0.26–0.34 for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers, respectively, whereas the corresponding average marker index (MI) values for the above markers were 7.48, 6.69 and 30.75. Based on Nei's gene diversity and Shannon's information index, inter-population diversity (hsp) was highest when compared with intra-population diversity (hpop) and the gene flow (Nm) ranged from a moderate value of 0.607 to a high value of 6.287 for the three DNA markers. Clustering of individuals was not similar when RAPD- and ISSR-derived dendrogram analyses were compared with that of AFLP. The Mantel test cophenetic correlation coefficient was higher for AFLP (r = 0.98) than for ISSR (r = 0.73) and RAPD (r = 0.84). Molecular markers discriminated the individuals efficiently and generated a high similarity in dendrogram topologies derived using unweighted pair-group arithmetic average, although some differences were observed. The three-dimensional scaling by principal coordinate analysis supported the result of clustering. Conclusions Comparing the results obtained with the three DNA markers, AFLP indicated higher efficiency for estimating the levels of genetic diversity and proved to be reliable for fingerprinting, mapping and diversity studies in Pongamia in view of their suitability for energy production purposes. PMID:22476075

  7. Development of a molecular linkage map of pearl millet integrating DArT and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Supriya, A; Senthilvel, S; Nepolean, T; Eshwar, K; Rajaram, V; Shaw, R; Hash, C T; Kilian, A; Yadav, R C; Narasu, M L

    2011-07-01

    Pearl millet is an important component of food security in the semi-arid tropics and is assuming greater importance in the context of changing climate and increasing demand for highly nutritious food and feed. Molecular tools have been developed and applied for pearl millet on a limited scale. However, the existing tool kit needs to be strengthened further for its routine use in applied breeding programs. Here, we report enrichment of the pearl millet molecular linkage map by exploiting low-cost and high-throughput Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. Genomic representation from 95 diverse genotypes was used to develop a DArT array with circa 7,000 clones following PstI/BanII complexity reduction. This array was used to genotype a set of 24 diverse pearl millet inbreds and 574 polymorphic DArT markers were identified. The genetic relationships among the inbred lines as revealed by DArT genotyping were in complete agreement with the available pedigree data. Further, a mapping population of 140 F(7) Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs) from cross H 77/833-2 × PRLT 2/89-33 was genotyped and an improved linkage map was constructed by integrating DArT and SSR marker data. This map contains 321 loci (258 DArTs and 63 SSRs) and spans 1148 cM with an average adjacent-marker interval length of 3.7 cM. The length of individual linkage groups (LGs) ranged from 78 cM (LG 3) to 370 cM (LG 2). This better-saturated map provides improved genome coverage and will be useful for genetic analyses of important quantitative traits. This DArT platform will also permit cost-effective background selection in marker-assisted backcrossing programs as well as facilitate comparative genomics and genome organization studies once DNA sequences of polymorphic DArT clones are available. PMID:21476042

  8. For More Information: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/divprograms/immunology/

    E-print Network

    Stormo, Gary

    For More Information: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/divprograms/immunology/ To request information: dbbs-info@wustl.edu what is immunology? Immunology is the study of the immune system in health and disease, including. Immunology has a strong foundation in biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Washington University

  9. Isolation, purification, and immunological activities of a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide from the Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lina; Luo, Xi; Tang, Qingjiu; Liu, Yanfang; Zhou, Shuai; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Jingsong

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immuno-enhancing activity, hot water extract of Ganoderma lucidum fruit bodies was separated by membrane ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography, and the immunological activities of fractions were assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. A novel polysaccharide (TB3-2-2) was successfully isolated and purified. TB3-2-2 is a homogeneous polysaccharide, with a relative molecular weight of 5.11 × 103 Da, identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and was composed of galactose and glucose in a molar ratio of 2:3 determined by high-performance anion exchange chromatography. TB3-2-2 had a carbohydrate content of 99%, as measured using the phenol-sulfuric acid method. Proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes and the expression level of interleukin-6 was significantly increased by TB3-2-2. Results indicate that the low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immunological activity in G. lucidum is worthy of further research and development. PMID:23796222

  10. Isolation of molecular markers from specific chromosomal intervals using DNA pools from existing mapping populations.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, J J; Wing, R A; Ganal, M W; Tanksley, S D

    1991-01-01

    We present a general method for isolating molecular markers specific to any region of a chromosome using existing mapping populations. Two pools of DNA from individuals homozygous for opposing alleles for a targeted chromosomal interval, defined by two or more linked RFLP markers, are constructed from members of an existing mapping population. The DNA pools are then screened for polymorphism using random oligonucleotide primers and PCR (1). Polymorphic DNA bands should represent DNA sequences within or adjacent to the selected interval. We tested this method in tomato using two genomic intervals containing genes responsible for regulating pedicle abscission (jointless) and fruit ripening (non-ripening). DNA pools containing 7 to 14 F2 individuals for each interval were screened with 200 random primers. Three polymorphic markers were thus identified, two of which were subsequently shown to be tightly linked to the selected intervals. The third marker mapped to the same chromosome (11) but 45 cM away from the selected interval. A particularly attractive attribute of this method is that a single mapping population can be used to target any interval in the genome. Although this method has been demonstrated in tomato, it should be applicable to any sexually reproducing organism for which segregating populations are being used to construct genetic linkage maps. Images PMID:1684420

  11. Screening of rice landraces for salinity tolerance at seedling stage through morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Nasim; Yeasmin, Lucina; Gantait, Saikat; Goswami, Rupak; Chakraborty, Somsubhra

    2014-10-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate 33 rice landrace genotypes for assessment of their salt tolerance at seedling stage. Growth parameters like root length, shoot length and plant biomass were measured after 12 days of exposure to six different levels of saline solution (with electrical conductivity of 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 or 14 dS m (-1)). Genotypes showing significant interaction and differential response towards salinity were assessed at molecular level using 11 simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers, linked with salt tolerance quantitative trait loci. Shoot length, root length and plant biomass at seedling stage decreased with increasing salinity. However, relative salt tolerance in terms of these three parameters varied among genotypes. Out of the 11 SSR markers RM8094, RM336 and RM8046, the most competent descriptors to screen the salt tolerant genotypes with higher polymorphic information content coupled with higher marker index value, significantly distinguished the salt tolerant genotypes. Combining morphological and molecular assessment, four lanraces viz. Gheus, Ghunsi, Kuthiahara and Sholerpona were considered as true salt tolerant genotypes which may contribute in greater way in the development of salt tolerant genotypes in rice. PMID:25320465

  12. Immunological detection of small organic molecules in the presence of perchlorates: relevance to the life marker chip and life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Rix, Catherine S; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2011-11-01

    The proposed ExoMars mission, due to launch in 2018, aims to look for evidence of extant and extinct life in martian rocks and regolith. Previous attempts to detect organic molecules of biological or abiotic origin on Mars have been unsuccessful, which may be attributable to destruction of these molecules by perchlorate salts during pyrolysis sample extraction techniques. Organic molecules can also be extracted and measured with solvent-based systems. The ExoMars payload includes the Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument, capable of detecting biomarker molecules of extant and extinct Earth-like life in liquid extracts of martian samples with an antibody microarray assay. The aim of the work reported here was to investigate whether the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those at the NASA Phoenix landing site, would compromise the LMC extraction and detection method. To test this, we implemented an LMC-representative sample extraction process with an LMC-representative antibody assay and used these to extract and analyze a model sample that consisted of a Mars analog sample matrix (JSC Mars-1) spiked with a representative organic molecular target (pyrene, an example of abiotic meteoritic infall targets) in the presence of perchlorate salts. We found no significant change in immunoassay function when using pyrene standards with added perchlorate salts. When model samples spiked with perchlorate salts were subjected to an LMC-representative liquid extraction, immunoassays functioned in a liquid extract and detected extracted pyrene. For the same model sample matrix without perchlorate salts, we observed anomalous assay signals that coincided with yellow coloration of the extracts. This unexpected observation is being studied further. This initial study indicates that the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those detected at the NASA Phoenix landing site, is unlikely to prevent the LMC from extracting and detecting organic molecules from martian samples. PMID:22011057

  13. Correlation of NK Cell Activation and Inhibition Markers with NK Cytoxicity Among Women Experiencing Immunologic Implantation Failure After In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolyn B. Coulam; Roumen G. Roussev

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The pivotal event in determining successful from unsuccessful cycles after in vitro fertilization is implantation. The purpose of this study was to compare the percentage of circulating NK cells expressing activation and inhibition markers between infertile and fertile control women and to determine the correlation between these markers and those of the NK cytotoxicity activation assay. Lastly, we wish

  14. Genetic analysis of apomixis in Citrus and Poncirus by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    García, R; Asíns, M J; Forner, J; Carbonell, E A

    1999-08-01

    Propagation of citrus rootstocks depends upon the production of clonal plants from nucellar seedlings. This makes apomixis one of the host important traits in breeding programs for citrus rootstocks. The genetic control of apomixis was studied in a 50-tree progeny derived from the cross C. volkameriana×P. trifoliata using 69 molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis. The proportion of nucellar seedlings was estimated by isoenzymatic analysis of 25 seedlings per tree for 2 consecutive years. The type of embryony (polyembryonic versus monoembryonic seeds) was also determined for fruit-yielding trees. Separate genetic maps for each parental species were developed. The integration and comparison of these maps could be accomplished using common multiallelic segregant loci. Differences in gene synteny between the two species-specific genetic maps were shown. Important distortions in the segregation of markers at several genomic regions, some of them also involving differences in the C-methylation pattern, have been observed, especially for the pollen parent. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) revealed the presence of six genomic positions (two in P. trifoliata and four in C. volkameriana) contributing individually up to 24% of the total variation for apomixis. Within the same species, QTLs with positive and negative allele effects were present, even in the same linkage group. One of the markers associated to apomixis (Apo2) is also associated to embryony type. Therefore, the genetic control of apomictic reproduction found in citrus (nucellar embryony) is quite complex compared to what has been reported for gametophytic apomixis. Molecular markers linked to QTLs governing apomixis will be useful to assist selection of future apomictic rootstocks for citrus varieties. PMID:22665185

  15. Using Molecular Markers to Characterize Productivity in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Edros, Raihana Z.; McDonnell, Susan; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Selection of high producing cell lines to produce maximum product concentration is a challenging and time consuming task for the biopharmaceutical industry. The identification of early markers to predict high productivity will significantly reduce the time required for new cell line development. This study identifies candidate determinants of high productivity by profiling the molecular and morphological characteristics of a panel of six Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) stable cell lines with varying recombinant monoclonal antibody productivity levels ranging between 2 and 50 pg/cell/day. We examined the correlation between molecular parameters and specific productivity (qp) throughout the growth phase of batch cultures. Results were statistically analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Our study revealed that, overall, heavy chain (HC) mRNA had the strongest association with qp followed by light chain (LC) mRNA, HC intracellular polypeptides, and intracellular antibodies. A significant correlation was also obtained between qp and the following molecular markers: growth rate, biomass, endoplasmic reticulum, and LC polypeptides. However, in these cases, the correlation was not observed at all-time points throughout the growth phase. The repeated sampling throughout culture duration had enabled more accurate predictions of productivity in comparison to performing a single-point measurement. Since the correlation varied from day to day during batch cultivation, single-point measurement was of limited use in making a reliable prediction. PMID:24146795

  16. Determination of specific molecular markers of biomass burning in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgeorg, Torben; Schüpbach, Simon; Kehrwald, Natalie; McWethy, David; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Fire influences regional to global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Molecular markers of biomass burning archived in lake sediments are becoming increasingly important in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and may help determine interactions between climate and fire activity. One group of these molecular markers is the monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan. Several aerosol studies and recent ice core research use these compounds as a marker for biomass burning, but studies from lake sediment cores are rare. Previous sediment methods used gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and required derivatization of samples. Here, we present a high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry method to allow separation and detection of the three monosaccharide anhydrides in lake sediments with implications for reconstructing past biomass burning events. We validated the method by quantifying levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in selected sediment core samples from Lake Kirkpatrick, New Zealand. The freeze-dried, milled and homogenized sediment samples were first extracted with methanol by pressurized solvent extraction, pre-concentrated and finally separated and analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry. We compared these isomers with macroscopic charcoal concentrations, as charcoal is a well-known proxy for biomass burning. In addition, we applied the method to a sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala to prove the suitability of these markers for reconstructing biomass burning history over the entire Holocene. In the Lake Kirkpatrick samples, levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan concentrations significantly correlate with macroscopic charcoal concentrations. The three isomers are present in samples without any macroscopic charcoal, and may reflect the presence of microscopic charcoal. Levoglucosan/mannosan and levoglucosan/(mannosan+galactosan) ratios differ between samples with high macroscopic charcoal concentrations and samples without any charcoal. These ratios may help determine not only when fires occurred, but also past changes in the primary burned vegetation. However, the possibility that these isomer ratios help differentiate changes in burned vegetation needs further evaluation. The preliminary results of the Lake Petén Itzá samples demonstrate the occurrence of all three molecular markers in the entire core, covering the past approximately 10,000 years. The three monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan may be an additional tool for reconstructing past fire events over decadal to millennial time scales in sediment cores.

  17. TMED6-COG8 is a novel molecular marker of TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongcan; Rao, Qiu; Xia, Qiuyuan; Shi, Shanshan; Shi, Qunli; Ma, Henghui; Lu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma is a highly aggressive malignancy which often occurs primarily in children and young adults. The pathognomonic molecular lesion in this subtype is a translocation event involving the TFE3 transcription factor at chromosome Xp11.2. Hence, the pathological diagnosis of an Xp11.2 translocation RCC is based upon morphology, TFE3 immunohistochemistry, or genetic analyses. However, due to the false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 IHC and expensive for TFE3 break-apart FISH assay, additional molecular markers are necessary to help provide early diagnose and individualization treatment. Owing to recent advances in microarray and RNA-Seq, Pflueger et al. have discovered that TMED6-COG8 is dramatically increased in TFE3 translocation RCCs, compared with clear cell RCCs and papillary RCCs, implying that TMED6-COG8 might be a new molecular tumor marker of TFE3 translocation RCCs. To extend this observation, we firstly validated the TMED6-COG8 expression level by qRT-PCR in RCCs including Xp11.2 translocation RCCs (n = 5), clear cell RCCs (n = 7) and papillary RCCs (n = 5). Then, we also examined the expression level of TMED6-COG8 chimera in Xp11.2 translocation alveolar soft part sarcoma. We found that TMED6-COG8 chimera expression level was higher in Xp11.2 translocation RCCs than in ASPS (P < 0.05). What’s more, the expression levels of TMED6-COG8 chimera in esophagus cancers (n = 32), gastric cancers (n = 11), colorectal cancers (n = 12), hepatocellular carcinomas (n = 10) and non-small-cell lung cancers (n = 12) were assessed. Unexpectedly, TMED6-COG8 chimera was decreased in these five human types. Therefore, our observations from this study indicated that TMED6-COG8 chimera might act as a novel diagnostic marker in Xp11.2 translocation RCCs. PMID:26045774

  18. Evaluation of HOXB13 as a molecular marker of recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-O; Oh, Kyung-Jin; Xuan Nguyen, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Young-Rang; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Don; Ryu, Soo Bang; Jung, Chaeyong

    2012-04-01

    Many patients with prostate cancer have disease recurrence following surgical removal of tumors and fail to respond to androgen ablation therapy. Despite the existence of a number of clinical/pathological factors, it is not possible to predict which patients will fall into this category. The results of our previous studies demonstrated that the HOXB13 homeodomain protein plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer and the progression of this malignancy. In addition, HOXB13 has been reported to predict estrogen-resistant breast cancer tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether HOXB13 could be used as a molecular marker to predict prostate cancer recurrence. To examine the role of HOXB13 as a molecular marker with clinical/pathological data, the expression of HOXB13 was compared using immunohistochemistry in 57 organ-confined prostate cancer tumors obtained by radical prostatectomy. There was no significant correlation between the expression of HOXB13 and most clinical/pathological parameters, including tumor margin, invasion, pathological stage and risk level. The HOXB13 expression levels correlated with the Gleason score and there was a positive correlation with the pre-operative prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. Accordingly, the tumor specimens from 4 patients who ultimately had biochemical failure (PSA >0.2 ng/ml), all showed a high expression of HOXB13, while their risk levels were either intermediate or high. This is the first study to report that HOXB13, together with other clinical/pathological factors, can be used as a molecular marker to predict the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:22293681

  19. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Jeong [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koom, Woong Sub [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoguen [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam-Kyu [Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Bae [Department of Medical Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keum, Ki Chang, E-mail: kckeum@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients.

  20. Identification and confirmation of molecular markers and orange flesh color associated with major QTL for high beta-carotene content in muskmelon 

    E-print Network

    Napier, Alexandra Bamberger

    2009-05-15

    -carotene content, flesh color, and flesh color intensity. Bulk segregent analysis was used with RAPD markers to identify molecular markers associated with high beta-carotene content. Flesh color and flesh color intensity both had significant relationships with beta...

  1. Molecular markers as a method to evaluate the movement of Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari).

    PubMed

    Gil, Zulma Nancy; Benavides, Pablo; Souza, Og De; Acevedo, Flor Edith; Lima, Eraldo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a methodology to describe the movement of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the field through: (i) the evaluation of allele variation of a microsatellite marker on polymorphic Colombian H. hampei populations; (ii) the invention of a device for releasing H. hampei adults; (iii) the standardization of a release-recapture technique for H. hampei populations; (iv) the estimation of the flight distance of the insect; and (v) the calculation of a mathematical expression that describes the movement of H. hampei in space over time. The results indicated that: (i) the microsatellite molecular marker HHK.1.6 was exclusively present in a population from Guapotá-Santander, was dominant and allows the evaluation of H. hampei movement for several generations; (ii) a device that released 88.8% of H. hampei adults in 2?s was designed; (iii) this device was used as H. hampei populations containing HHK.1.6 marker release strategy, and coffee seeds as recapture strategy; (iv) it was estimated that H. hampei adults flew as far as 65?m, however, 90% were recovered in a radius of <40?m. Finally, (v) the mathematical expression that described the movement of H. hampei in space over time was [Formula: see text], being [Formula: see text] the average number of borer beetles recaptured per tree, and x the distance in meters. This method will allow to determine the movement of H. hampei from different environmental and ecological scenarios. PMID:26078300

  2. Delimitation of russula subgenus amoenula in Korea using three molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Fong, Jonathan J; Lee, Hyun; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Jung, Paul Eunil; Min, Young Ju; Seok, Soon Ja; Lim, Young Woon

    2013-12-01

    Distinguishing individual Russula species has been difficult due to extensive phenotypic plasticity and obscure morphological and anatomical discontinuities. Due to highly similar macroscopic features, such as the presence of a red-cap, species identification within the Russula subgenus Amoenula is particularly difficult. Three species of the subgenus Amoneula have been reported in Korea. We used a combination of morphology and three molecular markers, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 28S nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU), and RNA polymerase II gene (RPB2), for identification and study of the genetic diversity of Russula subgenus Amoenula in Korea. We identified only two species in Korea (R. mariae and R. violeipes); these two species were indistinguishable according to morphology and LSU, but were found to be reciprocally monophyletic species using ITS and RPB2. The markers, ITS, LSU, and RPB2, have been tested in the past for use as DNA barcoding markers, and findings of our study suggest that ITS and RPB2 had the best performance for the Russula subgenus Amoneula. PMID:24493939

  3. Microevolutionary Patterns and Molecular Markers: The Genetics of Geographic Variation in Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    Molecular markers have been used only rarely to characterize the population genetic structure of nematodes. Published studies have suggested that different taxa may show distinct genetic architectures. Isoenzyme and RAPD markers have been used to investigate geographic variation of Ascaris suum at the level of infrapopulations (nematodes within individual hosts), within localities, and among geographic regions. Independent estimates of genetic differentiation among population samples based on isoenzyme and RAPD data showed similar patterns and substantial correlation. Heterozygote deficiencies within infrapopulations and large values for inbreeding coefficients among infrapopulations suggested that the composition of these populations was not consistent with a model of random recruitment from a large panmictic pool of life-cycle stages. Both isoenzyme and RAPD markers revealed moderate levels of genetic differentiation among samples representing infrapopulations and localities. Of total gene diversity, 9.4% (isoenzyme) and 9.2% (RAPD) was partitioned among infrapopulations. Geographic localities accounted for 7.8% (isoenzyme) and 6.2% (RAPD) of total diversity. Only infrapopulations from the same farm had low levels of differentiation. PMID:19277145

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Capsicum annuum varieties Mandarin and Blackcluster: assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Tripathi, Swati; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Young-Il; Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Do-Sun; Woo, Jong-Gyu; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul

    2014-01-10

    Next generation sequencing technologies have proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to assemble and characterize gene content and identify molecular markers in various organisms. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L., Solanaceae) is a major staple vegetable crop, which is economically important and has worldwide distribution. High-throughput transcriptome profiling of two pepper cultivars, Mandarin and Blackcluster, using 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing yielded 279,221 and 316,357 sequenced reads with a total 120.44 and 142.54Mb of sequence data (average read length of 431 and 450 nucleotides). These reads resulted from 17,525 and 16,341 'isogroups' and were assembled into 19,388 and 18,057 isotigs, and 22,217 and 13,153 singletons for both the cultivars, respectively. Assembled sequences were annotated functionally based on homology to genes in multiple public databases. Detailed sequence variant analysis identified a total of 9701 and 12,741 potential SNPs which eventually resulted in 1025 and 1059 genotype specific SNPs, for both the varieties, respectively, after examining SNP frequency distribution for each mapped unigenes. These markers for pepper will be highly valuable for marker-assisted breeding and other genetic studies. PMID:24125952

  5. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers survey of the cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) genome: towards an SSR-based molecular genetic map of cassava

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Stephenson; K. Edwards; S. Melzer; J. Nkumbira; U. Gullberg; K. Apel; M. Gale; J. Tohme; M. Fregene

    2001-01-01

    The development of PCR-based, easily automated molecular genetic markers, such as SSR markers, are required for realistic\\u000a cost-effective marker-assisted selection schemes. This paper describes the development and characterization of 172 new SSR\\u000a markers for the cassava genome. The placement of 36 of these markers on the existing RFLP framework map of cassava is also\\u000a reported. Two similar enrichment methods were

  6. The Species Mycobacterium africanum in the Light of New Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, S.; Kubica, T.; Bange, F. C.; Adjei, O.; Browne, E. N.; Chinbuah, M. A.; Diel, R.; Gyapong, J.; Horstmann, R. D.; Joloba, M. L.; Meyer, C. G.; Mugerwa, R. D.; Okwera, A.; Osei, I.; Owusu-Darbo, E.; Schwander, S. K.; Rüsch-Gerdes, S.

    2004-01-01

    The findings of recent studies addressing the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates have initiated a discussion on the classification of M. africanum, especially of those isolates originating from East Africa (cluster F, subtype II) and displaying phenotypic and biochemical characteristics more similar to those of M. tuberculosis. To further address this question, we analyzed a representative collection of 63 M. tuberculosis complex strains comprising 30 M. africanum subtype I strains, 20 M. africanum subtype II strains, 10 randomly chosen M. tuberculosis isolates, and type strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and M. africanum for the following biochemical and molecular characteristics: single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gyrB and narGHJI and the presence or absence of RD1, RD9, and RD12. For all molecular markers analyzed, subtype II strains were identical to the M. tuberculosis strains tested. In contrast, the subtype I strains as well as the M. africanum type strain showed unique combinations of SNPs in gyrB and genomic deletions (the absence of RD9 and the presence of RD12), which proves their independence from M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. Accordingly, all subtype I strains displayed main biochemical characteristics included in the original species description of M. africanum. We conclude that the isolates from West Africa were proved to be M. africanum with respect to the phenotypic and genetic markers analyzed, while the isolates from East Africa must be regarded as phenotypic variants of M. tuberculosis (genotype Uganda). We propose the addition of the molecular characteristics defined here to the species description of M. africanum, which will allow clearer species differentiation in the future. PMID:15364975

  7. The species Mycobacterium africanum in the light of new molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Niemann, S; Kubica, T; Bange, F C; Adjei, O; Browne, E N; Chinbuah, M A; Diel, R; Gyapong, J; Horstmann, R D; Joloba, M L; Meyer, C G; Mugerwa, R D; Okwera, A; Osei, I; Owusu-Darbo, E; Schwander, S K; Rüsch-Gerdes, S

    2004-09-01

    The findings of recent studies addressing the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates have initiated a discussion on the classification of M. africanum, especially of those isolates originating from East Africa (cluster F, subtype II) and displaying phenotypic and biochemical characteristics more similar to those of M. tuberculosis. To further address this question, we analyzed a representative collection of 63 M. tuberculosis complex strains comprising 30 M. africanum subtype I strains, 20 M. africanum subtype II strains, 10 randomly chosen M. tuberculosis isolates, and type strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and M. africanum for the following biochemical and molecular characteristics: single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gyrB and narGHJI and the presence or absence of RD1, RD9, and RD12. For all molecular markers analyzed, subtype II strains were identical to the M. tuberculosis strains tested. In contrast, the subtype I strains as well as the M. africanum type strain showed unique combinations of SNPs in gyrB and genomic deletions (the absence of RD9 and the presence of RD12), which proves their independence from M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. Accordingly, all subtype I strains displayed main biochemical characteristics included in the original species description of M. africanum. We conclude that the isolates from West Africa were proved to be M. africanum with respect to the phenotypic and genetic markers analyzed, while the isolates from East Africa must be regarded as phenotypic variants of M. tuberculosis (genotype Uganda). We propose the addition of the molecular characteristics defined here to the species description of M. africanum, which will allow clearer species differentiation in the future. PMID:15364975

  8. Molecular markers in commercial Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) hybrids susceptible to multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, L F C; Zanatta, D B; Bravo, J P; Brancalhão, R M C; Fernandez, M A

    2009-01-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori L. is particularly susceptible to virus diseases, especially B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). Disease resistance, along with high productivity, are important selection criteria for developing commercial hybrids of B. mori. We used bioassays and molecular markers linked to susceptibility/resistance to baculovirus infection to analyze the response of commercial B. mori hybrids from two companies to a geographic isolate of B. mori multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmMNPV) from Paraná state in Brazil. Both of these commercial lines were highly susceptible to BmMNPV, with death rates of 92 and 94%. A polymorphic fragment of approximately ~350 bp, associated with susceptibility, and an ~800-bp fragment, associated with resistance to BmMNPV, were detected in all specimens. An additional fragment of ~480 bp, recently identified by our research team as a BmMNPV genomic sequence, was detected in the infected silkworms and could be used as a molecular marker for the diagnosis of nucleopolyhedrovirus infection. PMID:19283681

  9. Evaluation of genetically modified sugarcane lines carrying Cry 1AC gene using molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Roba M

    2013-01-01

    Five genetically modified insect resistant sugarcane lines harboring the Bt Cry 1AC gene to produce insecticidal proteins were compared with non-transgenic control by using three types of molecular marker techniques namely, RAPD, ISSR and AFLP. These techniques were applied on transgenic and non-transgenic plants to investigate the genetic variations, which may appear in sugarcane clones. This variation might demonstrate the genomic changes associated with the transformation process, which could change important molecular basis of various biological phenomena. Genetic variations were screened using 22 different RAPD primers, 10 ISSR primers and 13 AFLP primer combinations. Analysis of RAPD and ISSR banding patterns gave no exclusive evidence for genetic variations. Meanwhile, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 0.45% in each of RAPD and ISSR, while the polymorphism generated by AFLP analysis was 1.8%. The maximum percentage of polymorphic bands was 1.4%, 1.1% and 5.5% in RAPD, ISSR and AFLP, respectively. These results demonstrate that most transgenic lines showed genomic homogeneity and verified minor genomic changes. Dendrograms revealing the relationships among the transgenic and control plants were developed from the data of each of the three marker types. PMID:23549345

  10. Identification of Leaf Rust Resistance Genes in Selected Egyptian Wheat Cultivars by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Imbaby, I. A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Hassan, M. E. M.; Abd-El-Aziz, A. R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is a common and widespread disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Egypt. Host resistance is the most economical, effective, and ecologically sustainable method of controlling the disease. Molecular markers help to determine leaf rust resistance genes (Lr genes). The objective of this study was to identify Lr genes in fifteen wheat cultivars from Egypt. Ten genes, Lr13, Lr19, Lr24, Lr26, Lr34, Lr35 Lr36, Lr37, Lr39, and Lr46, were detected in fifteen wheat cultivars using various molecular markers. The most frequently occurring genes in fifteen Egyptian wheat cultivars were Lr13, Lr24, Lr34, and Lr36 identified in all the cultivars used, followed by Lr26 and Lr35 (93%), Lr39 (66%), Lr37 (53%), and Lr46 (26.6%) of the cultivars, and finally Lr19 was present in 33.3% of cultivars. It is concluded that there was a good variation in Lr genes carried by wheat cultivars commercially grown in Egypt. Therefore, strategies for deploying resistance genes to prolong effective disease resistance are suggested to control wheat leaf rust disease. PMID:24511291

  11. Molecular Markers for Biomass Traits: Association, Interaction and Genetic Divergence in Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Appukuttannair R; Jingade, Anuradha H; Urs, Raje S

    2007-01-01

    Improvement of high yielding, disease resistant silkworm strains became imminent to increase production of silk, which is a major revenue earner for sericulturists. Since environment interacts with phenotype, conventional breeding did not result in commendable yield improvement in synthetic strains of silkworm, Bombyx mori. Identification of DNA markers associated with different economically important biomass traits and its introgression could assist molecular breeding and expression of stabilized high yielding characters, but genetic basis of most quantitative traits in silkworm is poorly understood due to its polygenic control. Correlation analysis (R = 0.9) revealed significant interrelation among biomass traits viz., larval duration (TLD), larval weight (LWT), cocoon weight (CWT), shell weight (SWT), shell ratio (SR) and floss content. PCR using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers revealed 92% polymorphism among 14 tropical and temperate strains of B. mori, with average diversity index of 0.747. Stepwise multiple regression analysis (MRA) selected 35 ISSR markers positively or negatively correlated with different biomass traits, illustrated polygenic control. ISSR marker 830.8(1050bp) was significantly associated with LWT, CWT, SWT, SR and floss content, indicated its pleiotropic role. Two ISSR markers, 835.5(1950bp) and 825.9(710bp) showed significant association with floss content and TLD. These markers were segregated in F(2) generation and Chi-square test confirmed (chi(2) = ~45; P < 0.05) its genetic contribution to the associated biomass traits. Strains, with both positively and negatively correlated markers, had intermediate mean value for biomass traits (eg. SWT = 0.17 +/- 0.014 g in GNM and Moria) indicated interaction of loci in natural populations. Low yielding Indian strains grouped together by Hierarchical clustering. Chinese and Japanese strains were distributed in the periphery of ALSCAL matrix indicated convergence of genetic characters in Indian strains. Average genetic distance between Chinese strains and Indian strains (0.193) significantly (P < 0.01) varied from that between Chinese and Japanese strains. Interaction of loci and allelic substitutions induced phenotypic plasticity in temperate B. mori populations on tropic adaptation in India. These outcomes show possibility to combine favorable alleles at different QTL to increase larval, cocoon and shell weight. PMID:19662204

  12. Transcriptome survey of Patagonian southern beech Nothofagus nervosa (= N. Alpina): assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nothofagus nervosa is one of the most emblematic native tree species of Patagonian temperate forests. Here, the shotgun RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) of the transcriptome of N. nervosa, including de novo assembly, functional annotation, and in silico discovery of potential molecular markers to support population and associations genetic studies, are described. Results Pyrosequencing of a young leaf cDNA library generated a total of 111,814 high quality reads, with an average length of 447 bp. De novo assembly using Newbler resulted into 3,005 tentative isotigs (including alternative transcripts). The non-assembled sequences (singletons) were clustered with CD-HIT-454 to identify natural and artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads, leading to 21,881 unique singletons. 15,497 out of 24,886 non-redundant sequences or unigenes, were successfully annotated against a plant protein database. A substantial number of simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs) were discovered in the assembled and annotated sequences. More than 40% of the SSR sequences were inside ORF sequences. To confirm the validity of these predicted markers, a subset of 73 SSRs selected through functional annotation evidences were successfully amplified from six seedlings DNA samples, being 14 polymorphic. Conclusions This paper is the first report that shows a highly precise representation of the mRNAs diversity present in young leaves of a native South American tree, N. nervosa, as well as its in silico deduced putative functionality. The reported Nothofagus transcriptome sequences represent a unique resource for genetic studies and provide a tool to discover genes of interest and genetic markers that will greatly aid questions involving evolution, ecology, and conservation using genetic and genomic approaches in the genus. PMID:22747958

  13. Genetic molecular analysis of Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae) hybrids using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Suresh, Narayana; Bhat, Asha M; Suryaprakash, Nayani; Kumar, Saya Satheesh; Kumar, Anil; Jayarama

    2011-06-01

    In Coffea arabica (arabica coffee), the phenotypic as well as genetic variability has been found low because of the narrow genetic basis and self fertile nature of the species. Because of high similarity in phenotypic appearance among the majority of arabica collections, selection of parental lines for inter-varietals hybridization and identification of resultant hybrids at an early stage of plant growth is difficult. DNA markers are known to be reliable in identifying closely related cultivars and hybrids. Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) is a new molecular marker technology developed based on PCR. In this paper, sixty arabica-hybrid progenies belonging to six crosses were analyzed using 31 highly polymorphic SRAP markers. The analysis revealed seven types of SRAP marker profiles which are useful in discriminating the parents and hybrids. The number of bands amplified per primer pair ranges from 6.13 to 8.58 with average number of seven bands. Among six hybrid combinations, percentage of bands shared between hybrids and their parents ranged from 66.29% to 85.71% with polymorphic bands varied from 27.64% to 60.0%. Percentage of hybrid specific fragments obtained in various hybrid combinations ranged from 0.71% to 10.86% and ascribed to the consequence of meiotic recombination. Based on the similarity index calculation, it was observed that F1 hybrids share maximum number of bands with the female parent compared to male parent. The results obtained in the present study revealed the effectiveness of SRAP technique in cultivar identification and hybrid analysis in this coffee species. PMID:21717853

  14. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  15. Status of potential PfATP6 molecular markers for artemisinin resistance in Suriname

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms within the PfATP6 gene have been indicated as potential molecular markers for artemisinin efficacy. Since 2004, the use of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was introduced as first-line treatment of the uncomplicated malaria cases in Suriname. The aim of this research was to determine changes in Suriname in the status of the polymorphic markers in the PfATP6 gene before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen, particularly of the S769N mutation, which was reported to be associated with in vitro Artemether resistance in the neighboring country French Guiana. Methods The PfATP6 gene from Plasmodium falciparum parasites in Suriname was investigated in 28 samples using PCR amplification and restriction enzyme analysis, to assess and determine the prevalence of potentially interesting single nucleotide polymorphisms. The polymorphisms [L263E; A623E; S769N], which may be associated with the artemisinin resistant phenotype were characterized in parasites from three endemic regions before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen. In addition, the status of these molecular markers was compared in paired P. falciparum isolates from patients with recurring malaria after controlled ACT. Results All the investigated samples exhibit the wild-type genotype at all three positions; L263, A623, S769. Conclusion All investigated isolates before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen and independent of endemic region harbored the wild-type genotype for the three investigated polymorphisms. The study revealed that decreased artemisinin susceptibility could occur independent from PfATP6 mutations, challenging the assumption that artemisinin resistance is associated with these mutations in the PfATP6 gene. PMID:22966810

  16. Molecular markers for the detection of the wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr10 in diverse genetic backgrounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Schachermayr; Catherine Feuillet; Beat Keller

    1997-01-01

    We recently showed that the Lr10 wheat leaf rust resistance gene cosegregated with the candidate resistance gene Lrk10 which encodes a putative receptor-like kinase. The aim of this study was to develop Lrk10-derived molecular markers for the detection of the Lr10 gene in breeding material. Different subfragments of Lrk10 were tested as RFLP markers for the Lr10 resistance gene. The

  17. The semidwarf gene, sd-1, of rice ( Oryza sativa L.). II. Molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. G. Cho; M. Y. Eun; S. R. McCouch; Y. A. Chae

    1994-01-01

    To establish the location of the semidwarf gene, sd-1, the anthocyanin activator (A), purple node (Pn), purple auricle (Pau), and the isozyme locus, EstI-2, in relation to DNA markers on the molecular linkage map of rice, 20 RFLP markers, previously mapped to the central region of chromosome 1 (McCouch et al. 1988), were mapped onto an F2 population derived from

  18. Combustion inputs into a terrestrial archive over 265 years as evidenced by BPCA molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2015-04-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) such as char and soot is produced during the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel. It is composed of condensed aromatic structures and can resist degradation processes, maybe over long periods of time. Land-use changes, industrial activity and its transport by wind and water affect the fluxes of PyOM from the source to its sedimentary archive. Investigating environmental PyOM with the molecular marker benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method provides various information about quantity, quality (BPCA distribution pattern) and about its isotopic composition (13C and 14C). Assessing PyOM quality can indicate whether it is mostly combustion condensate (soot) or combustion residue (charcoal) and potentially allow source apportionment. Our study area is the Pettaquamscutt River catchment area (35 km2), Rhode Island, U.S.A. It is located down-wind of industrial areas recording deposition of long-distance atmospheric transport as well as local catchment inputs, both from natural and anthropogenic sources. We investigated 50 samples of a sediment record over a time span of 265 years (1733-1998 AD). Previous investigations provided information on the age of deposition, the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as of the radiocarbon contents of total organic carbon (TOC) and PAH (Lima, 2004). We used the BPCA molecular marker method to quantify and characterize PyOM in the same record. First results show that quantity and quality of PyOM change over 265 years. Our investigation aims at understanding how different sources of PyOM are reflected in terrestrial archives by comparing the results of BPCA with radiocarbon-dated TOC and PAH records. Among other aspects, the PAH record reflects the Great Depression and the 1970s oil embargo in North America. We interpret the BPCA distribution patterns regarding the simultaneous shift of dominant fuels including wood, coal, petroleum and gas. Future work will include compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of BPCA molecular markers to improve our understanding of the sources and residence time of PyOM. References Lima, A.L.C., 2004. Molecular and Isotopic Records of Combustion Inputs to the Environment Over the Last 250 Years, doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MIT/WHOI).

  19. Basic Immunology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Klimov, Vladimir V.

    Some individuals might blanch at the idea of a "basic" immunology overview, but Professor Vladimir V. Klimov provides just such a resource on this site. As the homepage notes, the site is designed to assist undergraduate students learning about the basics of immunology through essays, images, animations, quizzes, case histories, and external links. Visitors can begin by looking over the "Table of Contents" area, which includes seven complete chapters of information. These chapters include "The Immune Responses", "Effector Activity", and "Functional Organization of the Immune System". While some of the materials on the site require a paid subscription, there's enough free material here to get students on their way to learning more about this field of study.

  20. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  1. First-trimester maternal cell microRNA is a superior pregnancy marker to immunological testing for predicting adverse pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Winger, Edward E; Reed, Jane L; Ji, Xuhuai

    2015-08-01

    Patients at risk of immune-mediated pregnancy complications have historically relied on the use of peripheral blood immunological assays for diagnosis and pregnancy monitoring. However, these tests often fail to identify many at-risk patients, achieving moderately predictive receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve AUCs of 0.60-0.70. We previously demonstrated that a microRNA panel comprising 30 microRNAs successfully predicts pregnancy outcome in the first trimester. In our current study we constructed a smaller, more clinically useful seven-microRNA panel from the original panel of 30 microRNAs with equivalent sensitivity and specificity. To select optimal microRNAs for a smaller panel, quantitative RT-PCR on 30 microRNAs was first performed on 48 patients (191 samples) with concurrent immunological testing: TNF?/Il-10 ratio, IFN?/Il-10, CD56+16+%, NK 50:1 cytotoxicity and T regulatory cells. MicroRNAs were separated into clusters associated with: Th1/Th2 response; T regulatory cell percent; pregnancy risk; treatment response. Seven most differentially expressed microRNAs were selected. The seven microRNA scoring system was then applied to 39 patient samples in the first trimester of pregnancy (19 healthy deliveries, 8 miscarriages, 12 preeclampsia [7 late-onset and 5 early-onset]) and 20 samples in the preconception period (2-10 weeks before conception). Predictive value was assessed. ROC curves for the seven-microRNA panel achieved AUC 0.92 for miscarriage and 0.90 for preeclampsia (blood drawn 34.9±19.2 days post-implantation). For samples measured preconception, ROC curve analysis demonstrated AUC 0.81 for adverse pregnancy outcome. Maternal PBMC microRNA can identify high-risk patients likely to benefit from immunotherapy with improved sensitivity and specificity compared with standard immune assays. PMID:25965838

  2. A slippery molecular assembly allows water as a self-erasable security marker

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Rajasekaran; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul Dev; Praveen, Vakayil K.; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-01-01

    Protection of currency and valuable documents from counterfeit continues to be a challenge. While there are many embedded security features available for document safety, they are not immune to forgery. Fluorescence is a sensitive property, which responds to external stimuli such as solvent polarity, temperature or mechanical stress, however practical use in security applications is hampered due to several reasons. Therefore, a simple and specific stimuli responsive security feature that is difficult to duplicate is of great demand. Herein we report the design of a fluorescent molecular assembly on which water behaves as a self-erasable security marker for checking the authenticity of documents at point of care. The underlying principle involves the disciplined self-assembly of a tailor-made fluorescent molecule, which initially form a weak blue fluorescence (?em?=?425?nm, ?f?=?0.13) and changes to cyan emission (?em?=?488?nm,?f?=?0.18) in contact with water due to a reversible molecular slipping motion. This simple chemical tool, based on the principles of molecular self-assembly and fluorescence modulation, allows creation of security labels and optically masked barcodes for multiple documents authentication. PMID:25940779

  3. Molecular profiling for genetic variability in Capsicum species based on ISSR and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Thul, Sanjog T; Darokar, Mahendra P; Shasany, Ajit K; Khanuja, Suman P S

    2012-06-01

    The taxonomic identity of Capsicum species is found to be difficult as it displays variations at morpho-chemical characters. Twenty-two accessions of six Capsicum species, namely, C. annuum, C. baccatum, C. chinense, C. eximium, C. frutescens, and C. luteum were investigated for phenotypic diversity based on flower color and for genetic differences by molecular makers. The genetic cluster analyses of 27 RAPD and eight ISSR primers, respectively, revealed genetic similarities in the ranges of 23-88% and 11-96%. Principal component analysis of the pooled RAPD and ISSR data further supports the genetic similarity and groupings. Different species showed variations in relation to corolla shade of flower. C. annuum accessions formed a single cluster in the molecular analysis as maintaining their flower characteristic. C. chinense accession shared flower features with the accessions of C. frutescens and were found to be closer at genotypic level. C. luteum was found to be rather closer to C. baccatum complex, both phenotypically and genetically. The only accession of C. eximium presenting purple flowers falls apart from the groupings. The floral characteristics and the molecular markers are found to be useful toward the delineation of the species specificity in Capsicum collection and identification of genetic stock. PMID:21861246

  4. A slippery molecular assembly allows water as a self-erasable security marker.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Rajasekaran; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul Dev; Praveen, Vakayil K; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-01-01

    Protection of currency and valuable documents from counterfeit continues to be a challenge. While there are many embedded security features available for document safety, they are not immune to forgery. Fluorescence is a sensitive property, which responds to external stimuli such as solvent polarity, temperature or mechanical stress, however practical use in security applications is hampered due to several reasons. Therefore, a simple and specific stimuli responsive security feature that is difficult to duplicate is of great demand. Herein we report the design of a fluorescent molecular assembly on which water behaves as a self-erasable security marker for checking the authenticity of documents at point of care. The underlying principle involves the disciplined self-assembly of a tailor-made fluorescent molecule, which initially form a weak blue fluorescence (?em?=?425?nm, ?f?=?0.13) and changes to cyan emission (?em?=?488?nm,?f?=?0.18) in contact with water due to a reversible molecular slipping motion. This simple chemical tool, based on the principles of molecular self-assembly and fluorescence modulation, allows creation of security labels and optically masked barcodes for multiple documents authentication. PMID:25940779

  5. IL-32 is a molecular marker of a host defense network in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Dennis; Inkeles, Megan S.; Liu, Phillip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Teles, Rosane M. B.; Vaidya, Poorva; Munoz, Marcos A.; Schenk, Mirjam; Swindell, William R.; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Horvath, Steve; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease–related death worldwide; however, only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop disease. Factors that contribute to protection could prove to be promising targets for M. tuberculosis therapies. Analysis of peripheral blood gene expression profiles of active tuberculosis patients has identified correlates of risk for disease or pathogenesis. We sought to identify potential human candidate markers of host defense by studying gene expression profiles of macrophages, cells that, upon infection by M. tuberculosis, can mount an antimicrobial response. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed an association between the cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) and the vitamin D antimicrobial pathway in a network of interferon-?– and IL-15–induced “defense response” genes. IL-32 induced the vitamin D–dependent antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4 and to generate antimicrobial activity in vitro, dependent on the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In addition, the IL-15–induced defense response macrophage gene network was integrated with ranked pairwise comparisons of gene expression from five different clinical data sets of latent compared with active tuberculosis or healthy controls and a coexpression network derived from gene expression in patients with tuberculosis undergoing chemotherapy. Together, these analyses identified eight common genes, including IL-32, as molecular markers of latent tuberculosis and the IL-15–induced gene network. As maintaining M. tuberculosis in a latent state and preventing transition to active disease may represent a form of host resistance, these results identify IL-32 as one functional marker and potential correlate of protection against active tuberculosis. PMID:25143364

  6. [Abbas et al. 2000] A. K. Abbas, A. H. Lichtman, and J. S. Pober. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. W. B. Saunders Company, 2000.

    E-print Network

    Stepney, Susan

    Immunology. W. B. Saunders Company, 2000. [Abraham & Malaviya 1997] S. Abraham and R. Malaviya. Mast cells: Round 2. Seminars in Immunology, 12(3):277­292, 2000. [Anderson & Matzinger 2000b] C. C. Anderson and P. Matzinger. Danger: the view from the bottom of the cliff. Seminars in Immunology, 12(3):231­238, 2000

  7. Comparison of the utility of barley retrotransposon families for genetic analysis by molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Leigh, F; Kalendar, R; Lea, V; Lee, D; Donini, P; Schulman, A H

    2003-07-01

    The Sequence-Specific Amplification Polymorphism (S-SAP) method, and the related molecular marker techniques IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), are based on retrotransposon activity, and are increasingly widely used. However, there have been no systematic analyses of the parameters of these methods or of the utility of different retrotransposon families in producing polymorphic, scorable fingerprints. We have generated S-SAP, IRAP, and REMAP data for three barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) varieties using primers based on sequences from six retrotransposon families (BARE-1, BAGY-1, BAGY-2, Sabrina, Nikita and Sukkula). The effect of the number of selective bases on the S-SAP profiles has been examined and the profiles obtained with eight MseI+3 selective primers compared for all the elements. Polymorphisms detected in the insertion pattern of all the families show that each can be used for S-SAP. The uniqueness of each transposition event and differences in the historic activity of each family suggest that the use of multiple retrotransposon families for genetic analysis will find applications in mapping, fingerprinting, and marker-assisted selection and evolutionary studies, not only in barley and other Hordeum species and related taxa, but also more generally. PMID:12768410

  8. Identifying molecular markers for the sensitive detection of residual atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vu-Han, Tu-Lan; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasselblatt, Martin; Kerl, Kornelius; Nagel, Inga; Obser, Tobias; Oyen, Florian; Siebert, Reiner; Schneppenheim, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT), a rare and highly malignant tumor entity of the central nervous system that presents in early childhood, has a poor prognosis. AT/RTs are characterized by biallelic inactivating mutations of the gene SMARCB1 in 98% of patients; these mutations may serve as molecular markers for residual tumor cell detection in liquid biopsies. We developed a marker-specific method to detect residual AT/RT cells. Seven of 150 patient samples were selected, each with a histological and genetically ascertained diagnosis of AT/RT. Tumor tissue was either formalin fixed or fresh frozen. DNA was extracted from the patients' peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, DNA sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to characterize the tumors' mutations. Residual tumor cell detection used mutation-specific primers and real-time PCR. The detection limit for the residual tumor cell search was 1-18%, depending on the quality of the template provided. The residual tumor cell search in PBL and CSF was negative for all seven patients. The SMARCB1 region of chromosome 22 is prone to DNA double-strand breaks. The individual breakpoints and breakpoint-specific PCR offer the option to detect minimal residual tumor cells in CSF or blood. Even if we did not detect minimal residual tumor cells in the investigated material, proof of principle for this method was confirmed. PMID:25016934

  9. Identification of the sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools: a molecular marker approach.

    PubMed

    Crilley, Leigh R; Qadir, Raeed M; Ayoko, Godwin A; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-08-01

    Children are particularly susceptible to air pollution and schools are examples of urban microenvironments that can account for a large portion of children's exposure to airborne particles. Thus this paper aimed to determine the sources of primary airborne particles that children are exposed to at school by analyzing selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools in Brisbane, Australia. Positive matrix factorization analysis identified four sources at the schools: vehicle emissions, biomass burning, meat cooking and plant wax emissions accounting for 45%, 29%, 16% and 7%, of the organic carbon respectively. Biomass burning peaked in winter due to prescribed burning of bushland around Brisbane. Overall, the results indicated that both local (traffic) and regional (biomass burning) sources of primary organic aerosols influence the levels of ambient particles that children are exposed at the schools. These results have implications for potential control strategies for mitigating exposure at schools. PMID:24842381

  10. Role of molecular markers in diagnosis and prognosis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Gobbo, Stefano; Remo, Andrea; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Pea, Maurizio; Chilosi, Marco; Menestrina, Fabio; Cheng, Liang

    2007-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that different renal cell neoplasms have characteristic morphologic and genetic features. Histologic subtyping of renal epithelial neoplasms has been shown to be of prognostic value; therefore they must be correctly classified. Although adequate sampling and a good understanding of the morphologic features usually minimize diagnostic errors, the use of immunohistochemical and chromosomal analysis on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues can be necessary. These techniques can facilitate diagnosis on small biopsies, which are increasingly obtained from renal masses. An immunohistochemical panel including CD10, parvalbumin, AMACR, CK7 and S100A1 seems the most promising; fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using centromeric probes to evaluate the gains and losses of the chromosomes can be helpful in selected cases. A wide variety of molecular markers have been examined, but further research is required to prove their value as prognostic tools. PMID:17375873

  11. A multi-marker molecular signature approach for treatment-specific subgroup identification with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Guennel, T; Marshall, S; Cheung, L W-K

    2014-10-01

    Delivering on the promise of personalized medicine has become a focus of the pharmaceutical industry as the era of the blockbuster drug is fading. Central to realizing this promise is the need for improved analytical strategies for effectively integrating information across various biological assays (for example, copy number variation and targeted protein expression) toward identification of a treatment-specific subgroup-identifying the right patients. We propose a novel combination of elastic net followed by a maximal ?(2) and semiparametric bootstrap. The combined approaches are presented in a two-stage strategy that estimates patient-specific multi-marker molecular signatures (MMMS) to identify and directly test for a biomarker-driven subgroup with enhanced treatment effect. This flexible strategy provides for incorporation of business-specific needs, such as confining the search space to a subgroup size that is commercially viable, ultimately resulting in actionable information for use in empirically based decision making. PMID:24637498

  12. Investigation of Molecular Marker Lipids in Alpine Ice Cores Via Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makou, M. C.; Eglinton, T. I.; Thompson, L. G.; Hughen, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Recently developed analytical techniques were employed to identify and quantify organic molecular markers trapped in high-altitude ice. While various compounds represent potentially useful proxies for biomass burning, vegetation type, atmospheric circulation, and anthropogenic activity, prior attempts to measure organic compounds in ice cores have typically required large volumes of sample material that are incompatible with generation of high-resolution paleoclimate records. We employed stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD), coupled with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), to examine the organic content of small quantities (? 30 ml) of ice. To test the utility of the approach, post-industrial ice core samples from the Huascarán and Sajama sites (Andes), the Dasuopu and Puruogangri sites (Tibetan Plateau), and Mt. Kilimanjaro (east Africa) were tested. n-Alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl amides and nitriles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and various diterpenoids were identified in this suite of cores. These marker compounds suggest inputs from biomass burning, fresh vascular plant material, and anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion. Differences in distributions of the alkyl amide and nitrile homologues between the different sites suggest a predominantly local or regional supply of organic matter. Pre-industrial samples from the Sajama and Puruogangri ice cores were also analyzed in order to assess the character of biomarker assemblages in the absence of anthropogenic contributions and investigate changes in inputs over time. PAHs and diterpenoids, which may result from biomass burning and were observed in the modern Sajama samples, occurred in two Holocene Sajama samples, but not in a last glacial sample. Enhanced inputs of terrestrial vegetation combustion biomarkers were consistent with periods of enhanced aridity in both cores. This study demonstrates the utility of SBSE, TD, and GC/TOF-MS for isolating organic compounds from small amounts of alpine ice and paves the way for development of high-resolution molecular stratigraphic records from tropical ice cores.

  13. Molecular markers (RAPD) associated with growth, yield and origin of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. in India.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S N; Pradeep, A R

    2003-12-01

    To identify the molecular markers associated with growth and yield parameters in silkworm, Bombyx mori, RAPD profiles generated with seven UBC primers for fourteen silkworm stocks, originated from China, Japan, India and Russia, were statistically analyzed. Stepwise Multiple Regression Analysis establishes significant association of 45 markers with larval span, growth indices and four cocoon yield parameters relevant for silk production and t-test attest significance of the association of 89.5(1500 bp) and 54.13(300 bp), respectively with longer larval duration and high cocoon weight. The validity of this selection of markers was further supported with Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) done on the basis of Mahalanobis D2 statistics. The two indices of yield/growth were also tested with DFA, which helped in identifying a few markers and thereby opened scope of using such marker (e.g. 91.11(900 bp)) for incorporating molecular markers in the breeding program for crop improvement in silkworm. PMID:14964827

  14. Highly variable microsatellite markers for the fungal and algal symbionts of the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria and challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungal associations.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Ivo; Dal Grande, Francesco; Cornejo, Carolina; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    The availability of highly variable markers for the partners of a fungal symbiosis enables the integrated investigation of ecological and evolutionary processes at the symbiotic level. In this article we analyze the specificity of the first and to date only microsatellite markers that had been developed for an epiphytic lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria). We used DNA extracts from cultures of the fungal and of the green algal symbionts of L. pulmonaria as well as total DNA extracts from related Lobaria species associated with the same algal partner, and got evidence that five of the previously described microsatellite markers, proposed to be fungus-specific, are indeed alga-specific. Hence, highly variable microsatellite primer sets available for both, the algal and the fungal symbionts of L. pulmonaria are now at our hands, which allow us to investigate so far unexplored biological processes of lichen symbionts, such as codispersal and coevolution. In a broader sense, our work evaluates and discusses the challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungi forming close associations with other organisms. PMID:20943165

  15. High throughput genome-specific and gene-specific molecular markers for erucic acid genes in Brassica napus (L.) for marker-assisted selection in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mukhlesur; Sun, Zudong; McVetty, Peter B E; Li, Genyi

    2008-10-01

    A single base change in the Bn-FAE1.1 gene in the A genome and a two-base deletion in the Bn-FAE1.2 gene in the C genome produce the nearly zero content of erucic acid observed in canola. A BAC clone anchoring Bn-FAE1.1 from a B. rapa BAC library and a BAC clone anchoring Bn-FAE1.2 from a B. oleracea BAC library were used in this research. After sequencing the gene flanking regions, it was found that the dissimilarity of the flanking sequences of these two FAE1 homologs facilitated the design of genome-specific primers that could amplify the corresponding genome in allotetraploid B. napus. The two-base deletion in the C genome gene was detected as a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. To increase the throughput, one genome-specific primer was labeled with four fluorescence dyes and combined with 20 different primers to produce PCR products with different fragment sizes. Eventually, a super pool of 80 samples was detected simultaneously. This dramatically reduces the cost of marker detection. The single base change in the Bn-FAE1.1 gene was detected as single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) marker with an ABI SNaPshot kit. A multiplexing primer set was designed by adding a polyT to the 5' primer end to increase SNP detection throughput through sample pooling. Furthermore, the Bn-FAE1.1 and Bn-FAE1.2 were integrated into the N8 and N13 linkage groups of our previously reported high-density sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) map, respectively. There were 124 SRAP markers in a N8 bin in which the Bn-FAE1.1 gene-specific SCAR marker was located and 46 SRAP markers in a N13 bin into which the Bn-FAE1.2 SNP marker was integrated. These three kinds of high throughput molecular markers have been successfully implemented in our canola/rapeseed breeding programs. PMID:18633592

  16. Ribosomal DNA as molecular markers and their applications in the identification of fish parasites (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from India

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Anshu; Verma, Chandni; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2014-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques for taxonomic analysis of monogenean parasites has led to a great increase for proper identification and factualness. These molecular techniques, in particular the use of molecular markers, have been used to identify and validate the monogenean parasites. Although, improvements in marker detection systems particularly of elements of rDNA like 18S, ITS and 28S used in monogeneans parasites have enabled great advances to be made in recent years in India. However, the molecular sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationships among the parasitic helminthes is unconventional in India. Many workers have been always questioned the validity of Indian species of monogeneans and emphasized the need to ascertain the status of species from Indian fish. Here we would like to provide additional resolution for the interpretation of use of molecular markers in study of monogeneans in India. This review provides an overview of current stage of studies in India that have been used in applying molecular techniques to monogenean.

  17. Molecular genetic approach for identifying markers associated with yield traits in the silkworm, Bombyx mori using RFLP-STS primers.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, T P; Sethuraman, B N; Saratchandra, B; Chatterjee, S N

    2004-10-01

    Bombyx mori, the mulberry silkworm, exhibits wide variability in yield and developmental attributes. The genetics of yield expression, shown to be of polygenic nature, is poorly studied in silkworm. To identify markers associated with 10 selected yield traits, multiple regression analysis (MRA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were applied on 64 markers generated with eight RFLP-derived sequence-tagged-site (STS) primers on the genomic DNA of 20 silkworm stocks of different origin and diverse yield potential. The analyses led to the identification of ten markers showing significant association with the different yield traits. The markers could classify the stocks according to yield potential, irrespective of their origin and status of diapause. Trait means were significantly different for stocks with and with out the associated marker. The inheritance of a marker G2(1300bp), selected at the first step of MRA for five yield traits was shown to segregate in 1:1 ratio in the F2 progeny from a cross between two divergent stocks. The relevance of the STS primers is discussed in the context of applying multiple regression model for identifying markers associated with yield expression and suitability for molecular breeding work in B. mori for yield improvement. PMID:15609576

  18. Evaluation of molecular markers for discriminating Gonatocerus morrilli (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae): a biological control agent for Homalodisca vitripennis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the utility of molecular markers for distinguishing between two closely related species, Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) and G. walkerjonesi, S. Triapitsyn, to evaluate whether post-release G. morrilli specimens could be discriminated in the field. Initially, post-release specimens from Cal...

  19. Cytotoxic immunological synapses

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.; Long, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the most fundamental activities of the adaptive immune system is to kill infected cells and tumor cells. Two distinct pathways mediate this process, both of which are facilitated by a cytotoxic immunological synapse. While traditionally thought of as innate immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells are now appreciated to have the capacity for long-term in reactions to chemical and viral insults. These cells integrate multiple positive and negative signals through NK cell cytotoxic or inhibitory synapses. The traditional CD8+?? T-cell receptor-positive cells are among the best models for the concept of an immunological synapse, in which vectoral signaling is linked to directed secretion in a stable interface to induce apoptotic cell death in an infected cell. Large-scale molecular organization in synapses generated a number of hypotheses. Studies in the past five years have started to provide clear answers regarding the validity of these models. In vivo imaging approaches have provided some hints as to the physiological relevance of these processes with great promise for the future. This review provides an overview of work on cytotoxic immunological synapses and suggests pathways forward in applying this information to the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:20536553

  20. The Development of 7E Chromosome-Specific Molecular Markers for Thinopyrum elongatum Based on SLAF-seq Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiqiang; Huang, Zefeng; Dai, Yi; Qin, Shuwen; Gao, Yingying; Zhang, Lulu; Gao, Yong; Chen, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    Thinopyrum elongatum is an important relative of wheat, it is favored by many researchers for the disease resistant genes that exist in its E genome. Some studies have showed that the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum contains resistance genes related to Fusarium head blight and wheat rust. Therefore, developing 7E chromosome-specific molecular markers linked to resistance genes will provide an important tool for exploring and using the resistant genes of Th. elongatum. In addition, it would greatly contribute in the effort to cultivate disease-resistant wheat varieties. Featured in high throughput, high-accuracy and low-cost, SLAF-seq technology has been widely used in molecular breeding, system evolution, and germplasm resource detection. Based on SLAF-seq, 518 specific fragments on the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum were successfully amplified. A total of 135 primers were designed according to 135 randomly selected fragments, and 89 specific molecular markers of Th. elongatum were developed, with efficiencies up to 65.9%. These markers were all detected in a variety of materials, and they are all proved to be specific and stable. These markers can be used not only for detecting the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum but also for providing an important theoretical and practical basis for wheat breeding by marker-assisted selection (MAS). This paper reports the first application of SLAF-seq technology with a high success rate in developing specific molecular markers for Th. elongatum, providing a strong case for the application of this new technology. PMID:23762296

  1. Immunology, Microbiology & Immunology, and Institute for Immunity, Transplantation & Infection

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Immunology, Microbiology & Immunology, and Institute for Immunity, Transplantation & Infection at Barrier Sites: Roles of Commensals and Nutrients Microbiology and Immunology sponsored seminars in black Immunology sponsored seminars in red All are welcome to join us for refreshments before the Immunology

  2. Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks. PMID:17150982

  3. Use of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to study immunological markers resulting from exposure to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract from Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.fuentes@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Rivera, Evasomary [Department of Biology, Rio Piedras Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Gioda, Adriana [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Marques de Sao Vicente street, 225, Gavea, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sanchez-Rivera, Diana; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R. [Department of Chemistry, Mayaguez Campus, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico); Jimenez-Velez, Braulio D., E-mail: braulio.jimenez@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico)

    2010-03-15

    Fine particulate air pollutants, mainly their organic fraction, have been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. Puerto Rico has been reported to have the highest prevalence of pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma) in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the immunological response of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to organic extracts isolated from airborne particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) in Puerto Rico. Organic extracts from PM{sub 2.5} collected throughout an 8-month period (2000-2001) were pooled (composite) in order to perform chemical analysis and biological activity testing. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract to assess cytotoxicity, levels of cytokines and relative gene expression of MHC-II, hPXR and CYP3A5. Our findings show that organic PM{sub 2.5} consist of toxic as well as bioactive components that can regulate the secretion of cytokines in BEAS-2B, which could modulate inflammatory response in the lung. Trace element analyses confirmed the presence of metals in organic extracts highlighting the relative high abundance of Cu and Zn in polar organic extracts. Polar organic extracts exhibited dose-dependant toxicity and were found to significantly induce the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1beta and IL-7 while significantly inhibiting the secretion of IL-8, G-CSF and MCP-1. Moreover, MHC-II transcriptional activity was up-regulated after 24 h of exposure, whereas PXR and CYP3A5 were down-regulated. This research provides a new insight into the effects of PM{sub 2.5} organic fractions on specific effectors and their possible role in the development of respiratory inflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico.

  4. Molecular marker characterization and source appointment of particulate matter and its organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Kyu; Ban, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yong-Pyo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Yi, Seung-Muk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to identify possible sources and to estimate their contribution to total suspended particle (TSP) organic aerosol (OA) contents. A total of 120 TSP and PM2.5 samples were collected simultaneously every third day over a one-year period in urban area of Incheon, Korea. High concentration in particulate matters (PM) and its components (NO3(-), water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), and n-alkanoic acids) were observed during the winter season. Among the organics, n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, levoglucosan, and phthalates were major components. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis identified seven sources of organic aerosols including combustion 1 (low molecular weight (LMW)-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)), combustion 2 (high molecular weight (HMW)-PAHs), biomass burning, vegetative detritus (n-alkane), secondary organic aerosol 1 (SOA1), secondary organic aerosol 2 (SOA2), and motor vehicles. Vegetative detritus increased during the summer season through an increase in biogenic/photochemical activity, while most of the organic sources were prominent in the winter season due to the increases in air pollutant emissions and atmospheric stability. The correlation factors were high among the main components of the organic carbon (OC) in the TSP and PM2.5. The results showed that TSP OAs had very similar characteristics to the PM2.5 OAs. SOA, combustion (PAHs), and motor vehicle were found to be important sources of carbonaceous PM in this region. Our results imply that molecular markers (MMs)-PMF model can provide useful information on the source and characteristics of PM. PMID:26022138

  5. [Markers for non-invasive molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mikha?lenko, D S; Perepechin, D V; Apolikhin, O I; Efremov, G D; Sivkov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is accumulated mass of data on the molecular-genetic disorders in prostate cancer (PCa), bladder cancer (BC) and renal cancer (RC). Tumor cells in these diseases are present in the urine sediment; their number is sufficient for molecular genetic analysis that makes possible the development of noninvasive diagnosis of oncourological diseases. A characteristic feature of PCa includes the overexpression of the PCA3 gene; assay kit Progensa™ to quantify such overexpression has been developed; approximately 50% of tumors express a TMPRSS2-ERG chimeric oncogene. Combined analysis of PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG allows to detect PCa with a diagnostic accuracy of 84%, which is significantly higher than that of prostate specific antigen test. As a potential markers of BC, there are somatic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, TERT genes in urine sediment, which are found in this disease with a frequency of about 60, 30 and 50%, respectively. The basis of the test system for DNA diagnosis of BC in urine sediment may include a definition of a combination of mutations in these genes with microsatellite instability. Aberrant methylation of the 5'-regulatory regions of tumor suppressor genes, integrated in the panel, also is considered as a tool in the diagnosis of RC (VHL, RASSF1, RARB2, CDH1), PCa (GSTP1, PTGS2, LGALS3) and BC (RASSF1, APC, SFRP2) after standardization of panels of loci investigated, sample preparation methods, bisulfite conversion, and the design of primers and probes. Thus, a test systems for molecular genetic diagnosis of oncourological diseases in urine sediment are currently available or may be developed in the near future. PMID:25807773

  6. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n?=?4x?=?28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  7. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ?2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  8. Establishment of a proteome profile and identification of molecular markers for mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Guo, Yueshuai; Zheng, Bo; Shao, Binbin; Jiang, Min; Wang, Gaigai; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are undifferentiated cells that are required to maintain spermatogenesis throughout the reproductive life of mammals. Although SSC transplantation and culture provide a powerful tool to identify the mechanisms regulating SSC function, the precise signalling mechanisms governing SSC self-renewal and specific surface markers for purifying SSCs remain to be clearly determined. In the present study, we established a steady SSC culture according to the method described by Shinohara's lab. Fertile progeny was produced after transplantation of cultured SSCs into infertile mouse testis, and the red fluorescence exhibited by the culture cell membranes was stably and continuously transmitted to the offspring. Next, via advanced mass spectrometry and an optimized proteomics platform, we constructed the proteome profile, with 682 proteins expressed in SSCs. Furthermore bioinformatics analysis showed that the list contained several known molecules that are regulated in SSCs. Several nucleoproteins and membrane proteins were chosen for further exploration using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. The results showed that SALL1, EZH2, and RCOR2 are possibly involved in the self-renewal mechanism of SSCs. Furthermore, the results of tissue-specific expression analysis showed that Gpat2 and Pld6 were uniquely and highly expressed in mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The cellular localization of PLD6 was further explored and the results showed it was primarily expressed in the spermatogonial membrane of mouse testes and cultured SSCs. The proteins identified in this study form the basis for further exploring the molecular mechanism of self-renewal in SSCs and for identifying specific surface markers of SSCs. PMID:25352495

  9. Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF #12;The Department of Microbiology & Immunology on infectious disease and immunology. The Department publishes M&I, its newsletter, once a year. Highlighting & Immunology Columbia University 701 West 168th St., NY, NY 10032 (212) 305-3647 oj2@columbia.edu #12

  10. Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a “modified backcross” involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062?cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID:22936937

  11. Molecular markers for the identification and global tracking of whitefly vector-Begomovirus complexes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J K

    2000-11-01

    Recent unprecedented upsurges in populations of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) have drawn much attention to its worldwide importance as an insect pest and as the vector of emergent begomoviruses (Family: Geminiviridae; Genus: Begomovirus). Several begomoviruses that are considered 'new' and others previously regarded as minor pathogens have been linked to recent epidemics. Recent studies have revealed much variation in begomoviruses, despite the view that DNA-containing viruses do not rapidly accumulate mutations. Also, certain B. tabaci 'variants' are known that more effectively or selectively transmit certain begomoviruses and exhibit biotic differences that may influence their spread. Patterns of distribution and dissemination of begomoviruses transmitted by B. tabaci are poorly understood because standardized molecular-based tracking methods have not been available. Understanding virus/whitefly vector/host plant interrelationships in the context of emerging problems can be achieved only by linking predicted evolutionary histories with epidemiology using molecular phylogenetic approaches. Identification and validation of informative molecular sequences are essential initial steps in this process. Genus-wide degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers have been developed to amplify and sequence the 'core' region of the coat protein open reading frame (ORF) (V1), permitting 'universal' detection and provisional virus identification by comparisons with described viral genotypes. In subsequent studies reported here, several potentially informative viral ORFs and a non-coding region are explored. Of particular use for expanding diversity studies are group- or virus-specific sequences that can be targeted by utilizing newly available core CP sequences, or additional conserved regions around which broad spectrum primers can be designed to target variable sequences in key ORFs or non-coding regions. Prospective markers under exploration were selected with a basis in the most highly conserved viral ORFs, CP (V1) and a portion of replication-associated protein (REP) (L1/C1), and a key non-coding sequence that contain sufficient variability and/or virus-specific sequences, and are consequently of potential epidemiological relevance. Because B. tabaci occurs as a cryptic species, or species complex, that exhibits biotic polymorphism, yet morphological invariance, traditional morphologically based identification is impossible. An overriding complication to establishing molecular markers for identifying whitefly vector variants is that whitefly sequences in general, have not been available. However, recent work has shown that a partial mitochondria cytochrome oxidase I (mt COI) sequence separates vector variants with a basis in geographical origin, suggesting it is useful for further exploring variability and the phylogenetic history of whiteflies on a large scale. Here, the utility of whitefly mt COI nucleotides (nt) sequences is illustrated for inferring relationships between B. tabaci collected from major world regions. Used collectively, these approaches permit investigations of the patterns of distribution and dissemination of begomovirus-whitefly vector complexes for the first time. Ultimately, more immediate recognition of exotic viruses and whitefly vectors and early detection of upsurges in vector populations and of emerging viruses will be possible. PMID:11137175

  12. Mitochondrial DNA damage: molecular marker of vulnerable nigral neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Laurie H; McCoy, Jennifer; Hu, Xiaoping; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J; Chu, Charleen T; Van Houten, Bennett; Greenamyre, J T

    2014-10-01

    DNA damage can cause (and result from) oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment, both of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in human postmortem brain tissue and in in vivo and in vitro models of PD, using a newly adapted histochemical assay for abasic sites and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)-based assay. We identified the molecular identity of mtDNA damage to be apurinic/apyrimidinic (abasic) sites in substantia nigra dopamine neurons, but not in cortical neurons from postmortem PD specimens. To model the systemic mitochondrial impairment of PD, rats were exposed to the pesticide rotenone. After rotenone treatment that does not cause neurodegeneration, abasic sites were visualized in nigral neurons, but not in cortex. Using a QPCR-based assay, a single rotenone dose induced mtDNA damage in midbrain neurons, but not in cortical neurons; similar results were obtained in vitro in cultured neurons. Importantly, these results indicate that mtDNA damage is detectable prior to any signs of degeneration - and is produced selectively in midbrain neurons under conditions of mitochondrial impairment. The selective vulnerability of midbrain neurons to mtDNA damage was not due to differential effects of rotenone on complex I since rotenone suppressed respiration equally in midbrain and cortical neurons. However, in response to complex I inhibition, midbrain neurons produced more mitochondrial H2O2 than cortical neurons. We report selective mtDNA damage as a molecular marker of vulnerable nigral neurons in PD and suggest that this may result from intrinsic differences in how these neurons respond to complex I defects. Further, the persistence of abasic sites suggests an ineffective base excision repair response in PD. PMID:24981012

  13. Molecular cloning, expression and immunological characterisation of Pas n 1, the major allergen of Bahia grass Paspalum notatum pollen.

    PubMed

    Davies, Janet M; Mittag, Diana; Dang, Thanh D; Symons, Karen; Voskamp, Astrid; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2008-12-01

    Bahia grass, Paspalum notatum, is a clinically important subtropical grass with a prolonged pollination season from spring to autumn. We aimed to clone and characterise the major Bahia grass pollen allergen, Pas n 1. Grass pollen-allergic patients presenting to a tertiary hospital allergy clinic were tested for IgE reactivity with Bahia grass pollen extract by skin prick testing, ImmunoCAP, ELISA and immunoblotting. Using primers deduced from the N-terminal peptide sequence of a group 1 allergen of Bahia grass pollen extract separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the complete Pas n 1 cDNA was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and cloned. Biological relevance of recombinant Pas n 1 expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by serum IgE reactivity and basophil activation. Twenty-nine of 34 (85%) consecutive patients presenting with grass pollen allergy were skin prick test positive to Bahia grass pollen. The Pas n 1 cDNA has sequence homology with the beta-expansin 1 glycoprotein family and is more closely related to the maize pollen group 1 allergen (85% identity) than to ryegrass Lol p 1 or Timothy grass Phl p 1 (64 and 66% identity, respectively). rPas n 1 reacted with serum IgE in 47 of 55 (85%) Bahia grass pollen-allergic patients, activated basophils and inhibited serum IgE reactivity with the 29 kDa band of Bahia grass pollen extract. In conclusion the cDNA for the major group 1 allergen of the subtropical Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1, was identified and cloned. rPas n 1 is immunologically active and is a valuable reagent for diagnosis and specific immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy. PMID:18817975

  14. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry. PMID:24755444

  15. Gene Expression Profiles in Cells of Peripheral Blood Identify New Molecular Markers of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bluth, Martin; Lin, Yin-yao; Zhang, Hong; Viterbo, Dominick; Zenilman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Blood leukocytes play a major role in mediating local and systemic inflammation during acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in circulation exhibit unique changes in gene expression, and could provide a “reporter” function that reflects the inflammatory response in pancreas of acute pancreatitis. Methods To determine specific changes in blood leukocytes during acute pancreatitis, we studied gene transcription profile of in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in a rat model of experimental pancreatitis (sodium taurocholate). Normal rats, saline controls and a model of septic shock were used as a controls. cRNA obtained from PBMC of each group (n = 3) were applied to Affymetrix rat genome DNA Gene Chip Arrays. Results From the 8,799 rat genes analyzed, 140 genes showed unique significant changes in their expression in PBMC during the acute phase of pancreatitis, but not in sepsis. Among the 140 genes, 57 were upregulated, while 69 were downregulated. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, prostaglandin E2 receptor and phospholipase D1 are among the top upregulated genes. Others include genes involved in G protein-coupled receptor and TGF-?-mediated signaling pathways, while genes associated with apoptosis, glucocorticoid receptors and even the cholecystokinin receptor are downregulated. Conclusions Microarray analysis in transcriptional profiling of PBMC showed that genes that are uniquely related to molecular and pancreatic function display differential expression in acute pancreatitis. Profiling genes obtained from an easily accessible source during severe pancreatitis may identify surrogate markers for disease severity. PMID:18347268

  16. Molecular markers for identifying a new selected variety of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Li, Fuhua; Huang, Hao; Li, Yijun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during the last decade has produced new varieties exhibiting high growth rates and disease resistance. However, the identification of new varieties of shrimps from their phenotypic characters is difficult. This study introduces a new approach for identifying varieties of shrimps using molecular markers of microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences. The method was employed to identify a new selected variety, Kehai No. 1 (KH-1), from three representative stocks (control group): Zhengda; Tongwei; and a stock collected from Fujian Province, which is now cultured in mainland China. By pooled genotyping of KH-1 and the control group, five microsatellites showing differences between KH-1 and the control group were screened out. Individual genotyping data confirmed the results from pooled genotyping. The genotyping data for the five microsatellites were applied to the assignment analysis of the KH-1 group and the control group using the partial Bayesian assignment method in GENECLASS2. By sequencing the mitochondrial control regions of individuals from the KH-1 and control group, four haplotypes were observed in the KH-1 group, whereas 14 haplotypes were obtained in the control group. By combining the microsatellite assignment analysis with mitochondrial control region analysis, the average accuracy of identification of individuals in the KH-1 group and control group reached 89%. The five selected microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences were highly polymorphic and could be used to distinguish new selected varieties of L. vannamei from other populations cultured in China.

  17. Molecular characterization of sour orange (Citrus aurantium) accessions and their relatives using SSR and SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Polat, I; Kacar, Y A; Yesiloglu, T; Uzun, A; Tuzcu, O; Gulsen, O; Incesu, M; Kafa, G; Turgutoglu, E; Anil, S

    2012-01-01

    Citrus production with its many varieties is of importance since it provides economically important products for Turkish exports. Sour orange is a rootstock commonly used for propagating the different scion varieties. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of the rootstock accessions would be useful in order to improve citrus breeding programs. We studied genetic relationships and diversity of 51 accessions of sour orange (Citrus aurantium) and their relatives using SSR (simple sequence repeat) and SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism) molecular markers. Twenty-one SRAP primer combinations were tested on these accessions and relatives, producing 167 polymorphic fragments, with a mean of 8.0 and a mean polymorphism information content value of 0.47. Seventeen SSR primers also produced 30 polymorphic fragments, with a mean of 1.4 per primer and a mean polymorphism information content value of 0.39. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average analysis using combined SSR and SRAP data showed a similarity range from 0.71 to 1.00 among the accessions. In the cluster analysis, sour orange relatives were indicated as a separate group from sour orange. 'Macrophylla' and 'Mexican lime' were the accessions most distinct (0.71) from the others. We conclude that genetic diversity in these sour orange accessions is lower and some of them were identical. PMID:23079821

  18. Stathmin is a potential molecular marker and target for the treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Liu, Hairong; Liang, Jing; Yin, Beibei; Xiao, Junjuan; Li, Junwei; Feng, Dongfeng; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate the expression levels of stathmin in tissues of gastric cancer, and evaluate the therapeutic effects of stathmin antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) and/or docetaxel in human gastric cancer cells. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression levels of stathmin in gastric cancer and adjacent tissues. Stathmin ASODN was transfected into gastric cancer SGC 7901 cell lines. The cell proliferation was assessed with the MTT assay, and the inhibitory rates were calculated. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of stathmin, respectively. The synergistic effects of stathmin ASODN and docetaxel were evaluated. The efficacy and clinical benefit rates of the treatment of docetaxel combined with stathmin evaluation were investigated and compared. Results: Our results showed that the expression of stathmin was elevated in gastric cancer tissues, indicating a possible association between the stathmin expression and the disease occurrence. The MTT assay and tumor growth experiment revealed that stathmin ASODN significantly inhibited the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, stathmin ASDON enhanced the inhibitory effects of docetaxel on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, indicating a synergistic effect for the combination treatment. Importantly, docetaxel treatment was more effective for stathmin-negative gastric cancer patients, compared with stathmin-positive patients. Conclusion: Stathmin expression provides evidence for the treatment planning for gastric cancers. Stathmin might be a potential molecular marker and target for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, P. K.; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N. K.; Singh, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1–24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  20. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, P K; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N K; Singh, U S

    2015-03-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1-24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  1. Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Don; van Helden, Paul D; Wiid, Ian JF

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA) is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1) is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4) are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria. PMID:19245690

  2. Anthrax molecular epidemiology and forensics: using the appropriate marker for different evolutionary scales.

    PubMed

    Keim, Paul; Van Ert, Matthew N; Pearson, Talima; Vogler, Amy J; Huynh, Lynn Y; Wagner, David M

    2004-09-01

    Precise identification of Bacillus anthracis isolates has aided forensic and epidemiological analyses of natural anthrax cases, bioterrorism acts and industrial scale accidents by state-sponsored bioweapons programs. Because there is little molecular variation among B. anthracis isolates, identifying and using rare variation is crucial for precise strain identification. We think that mutation is the primary diversifying force in a clonal, recently emerged pathogen, such as B. anthracis, since mutation rate is correlated with diversity on a per locus basis. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are rare, their detection is facilitated by whole genome discovery approaches. As highly stable phylogenetic markers, SNPs are useful for identifying long branches or key phylogenetic positions. Selection of single, diagnostic "Canonical SNPs" (canSNPs) for these phylogenetic positions allows for efficient and defining assays. We have taken a nested hierarchal strategy for subtyping B. anthracis, which is consistent with traditional diagnostics and applicable to a wide range of pathogens. Progressive hierarchical resolving assays using nucleic acids (PHRANA) uses a progression of diagnostic genomic loci that are initially highly stable but with low resolution and, ultimately, very unstable but with high resolution. This approach mitigates the need for data weighting and provides both a deeply rooted phylogenetic hypothesis and high resolution discrimination among closely related isolates. PMID:15450200

  3. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Zemtsova, Lyudmila V; Grushetskaya, Zoya E; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Mozgova, Galina V; Pilyuk, Yadviga E; Volovik, Valentina T; Melnikova, Natalia V; Zelenin, Alexandr V; Lemesh, Valentina A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2014-04-01

    The application of DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine allowed us to increase the resolution of chromosome C-banding and DAPI-banding patterns and to investigate chromosomal polymorphism in karyotypes of seven spring and six winter rape varieties. It was shown that the pericentromeric and intercalary C-bands of most of the chromosomes in spring rape were smaller in size and less polymorphic than those of winter rape. More 26S and 5S rDNA sites were found in the winter rape karyotypes than the spring varieties. Separate or colocalized 26S and 5S rDNA sites were revealed on chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16 and 18. Intervarietal and intravarietal polymorphism of the number and chromosomal localization of rDNA sites were detected. The generalized idiogram of chromosomes of 13 Brassica napus varieties with account of all possibilities of C-banding patterns as well as localization of 26S and 5S rDNA sites were constructed. Polymorphism of the examined molecular and cytogenetic markers as well as the heterozygosis level of FAE1.1 gene controlling erucic acid synthesis in rapeseed was higher in the winter varieties than in the spring ones. The obtained data were in a atisfactory agreement with increased tolerance to environmental stress conditions of winter rape. PMID:24840830

  4. Antigen-specific immunoglobulin A antibodies secreted from circulating B cells are an effective marker for recent local immune responses in patients with cholera: comparison to antibody-secreting cell responses and other immunological markers.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T; Faruque, A S G; Ahmed, Firoz; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Islam, M Monirul; Akramuzzaman, Syed M; Sack, David A; Calderwood, Stephen B

    2003-08-01

    Gut-derived lymphocytes transiently migrate through the peripheral circulation before homing back to mucosal sites and can be detected using an ELISPOT-based antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay. Alternatively, transiently circulating lymphocytes may be cultured in vitro, and culture supernatants may be assayed for antigen-specific responses (antibody in lymphocyte supernatant [ALS] assay). The ALS assay has not been validated extensively in natural mucosal infection, nor has the ALS response been compared to the ASC assay and other cholera-specific immunological responses. Accordingly, we examined immune responses in 30 adult patients with acute cholera in Bangladesh, compared with 10 healthy controls, measuring ALS-immunoglobulin A (IgA), ASC-IgA, and serum and fecal IgA responses to two potent Vibrio cholerae immunogens, the nontoxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CtxB) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a weaker V. cholerae immunogen, the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA). We found significant increases of anti-CtxB, anti-LPS, and anti-MSHA IgA in supernatants of lymphocytes cultured 7 days after onset of cholera using the ALS assay. We found that ALS and ASC responses correlated extremely well; both had comparable sensitivities as the vibriocidal responses, and both procedures were more sensitive than fecal IgA measurements. An advantage of the ALS assay for studying mucosal immune responses is the ability to freeze antibodies in supernatants for subsequent evaluation; like the ASC assay, the ALS assay can distinguish recent from remote mucosal infection, a distinction that may be difficult to make in endemic settings using other procedures. PMID:12874365

  5. Molecular markers linked to papaya ring spot virus resistance and Fusarium race 2 resistance in melon.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Yariv; Kovalski, Irina; Dogimont, Catherine; Pitrat, Michel; Portnoy, Vitaly; Katzir, Nurit; Perl-Treves, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    In melon, the Fom-1 gene confers monogenic resistance against the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, races 0 and 2, while the closely linked Prv gene specifies resistance against the papaya ring spot virus. Markers linked to these resistance (R) genes were identified using two recombinant inbred line populations, derived from crosses between Cucumis melo Vedrantais and C. melo PI 161375, and between C. melo Vedrantais and C. melo PI 414723, respectively. Using bulked segregant analysis, as well as systematic scoring of the mapping populations, we developed two amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, two random amplified polymorphic DNA markers and five restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers linked to this locus. Four of the RFLP sequences bear homology to nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat R genes, indicating the presence of a significant R-gene cluster in this locus. Our study provides the most closely linked markers published so far for these important traits. It also improves the resolution of the whole linkage group IX, which was difficult to order in our previous studies. Two of the markers were converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers to facilitate their application in marker-assisted selection. Testing these two markers in several melon lines revealed different marker haplotypes in the melon germplasm and supported multiple, independent origin of the Fusarium races 0 and 2 resistance trait. PMID:15551034

  6. [Construction of AFLP molecular markers linkage map and localization of green cocoon gene in silkworm (Bombyx mori)].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai-Chun; Lu, Cheng; Li, Bin; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Ze-Yang; Xiang, Zhong-Huai

    2004-08-01

    Based on an improved method of AFLP, AFLP markers were employed for construction of a linkage map and localization of Gc gene used a set of 44 backcross lines( BC1) of silkworm ( Bombyx mori) as a mapping population. In this work, all together 3 956 bands were obtained by 28 pairs of primers and 141.3 bands each primer pair on average. Among them 2 836 bands were in good agreement with the segregation pattern. A total of 1 018 (25.7%) polymorphic AFLP markers were detected. The 693 (68.1%) of polymorphic markers with 1:1 segregation ratio ( P < or = 0.05) were obtained. Furthermore,The analytical model was based on the backcross type and the parameters were set as following: LOD = 3.0, maximum recombination value of 0. 20 and use the command ' group', 'compare', 'try', 'map' and 'ripple' to construct the linkage maps. 407 of the 693 loci were chi2 tested in agreement with 1:1 segregation were divided into 33 linkages by Mapmaker/Exp(Version 3.0), with a total map distance of 3 676.7 cM and a mean distance of 9.1 cM between markers. The morphological gene Gc was located between L-P4T6-107 and L-PT6T4-84 on linkage group 22. In addition, 286 markers were not included in the linkage groups. The efficiency of loci mapping was 58.7%. Among the 33 linkage groups, the morphological marker Gc classically localized on linkage group 15 was relocated on linkage group 22 on the map, suggesting that this molecular linkage group corresponds to linkage group 15 on the linkage map based on morphological characters. All these have laid an important base for the marker assisted breeding of the silkworm. PMID:15481532

  7. Temporal trends of molecular markers associated with artemether-lumefantrine tolerance\\/resistance in Bagamoyo district, Tanzania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Malmberg; B. Ngasala; P. E. Ferreira; E. Larsson; I. Jovel; A. Hjalmarsson; M. Petzold; Z. Premji; J. P. Gil; A. Bjorkman; A. Martensson

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) constitutes a major threat to recent global malaria control achievements. Surveillance of molecular markers could act as an early warning system of ACT-resistance before clinical treatment failures are apparent. The aim of this study was to analyse temporal trends of established genotypes associated with artemether-lumefantrine tolerance\\/resistance before

  8. Identification of molecular markers for the detection of the yellow rust resistance gene Yr17 in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Robert; Christine Abelard; Françoise Dedryver

    1999-01-01

    The Yr17 gene, which is present in many European wheat cultivars, displays yellow rust resistance at the seedling stage. The\\u000a gene introduced into chromosome 2A from Aegilops ventricosa was previously found to be closely linked (0.5 cM) to leaf and\\u000a stem rust resistance genes Lr37 and Sr38, respectively. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers linked\\u000a to the

  9. Identification of molecular markers linked to the Agropyron elongatum -derived leaf rust resistance gene Lr24 in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Schachermayr; M. M. Messmer; C. Feuillet; H. Winzeler; M. Winzeler; B. Keller

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers linked to the wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr24 derived from Agropyron elongatum (3DL\\/3Ag translocation). Two near isogenic lines (NILs), ‘Arina’ and Lr24\\/7* “Arina”, were screened for polymorphism at the DNA level with 115 RFLP probes. Twenty-one of these probes map to the homoeologous group 3. In addition, 360 RAPD

  10. Identification and localization of molecular markers linked to the Lr 9 leaf rust resistance gene of wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Schachermayr; H. Siedler; M. D. Gale; H. Winzeler; M. Winzeler; B. Keller

    1994-01-01

    Near-isogenic lines (NILs) for the leaf rust resistance gene Lr9 were screened for polymorphisms at the molecular level. RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers as well as RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) markers were used. Out of 395 RAPD primers tested, three showed polymorphisms between NILs, i.e., an additional band was found in resistant lines. One of these polymorphic bands

  11. Development and evaluation of robust molecular markers linked to disease resistance in tomato for distinctness, uniformity and stability testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Arens; Carmen Mansilla; Daniël Deinum; Laetitia Cavellini; André Moretti; Sophie Rolland; Hanneke van der Schoot; David Calvache; Fernando Ponz; Cécile Collonnier; René Mathis; Diederik Smilde; Carole Caranta; Ben Vosman

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers linked to phenotypically important traits are of great interest especially when traits are difficult and\\/or\\u000a costly to be observed. In tomato where a strong focus on resistance breeding has led to the introgression of several resistance\\u000a genes, resistance traits have become important characteristics in distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS) testing for\\u000a Plant Breeders Rights (PBR) applications. Evaluation of

  12. Genetic dissection of root growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.).II: mapping quantitative trait loci using molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Price; A. D. Tomos

    1997-01-01

    Drought is a major abiotic stress of upland rice, and good root growth has been associated with drought avoidance. We report\\u000a on the genetic mapping of root growth traits in an F2 population derived from two drought-resistant rice varieties, ‘Bala’ and ‘Azucena’. Restriction fragment length polymorphism\\u000a (RFLP) between the parents was 32%, and a molecular map with 71 marker loci

  13. Prediction of hybrid performance in maize using molecular markers and joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbreds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tobias A. Schrag; Jens Möhring; Albrecht E. Melchinger; Barbara Kusterer; Baldev S. Dhillon; Hans-Peter Piepho; Matthias Frisch

    2010-01-01

    The identification of superior hybrids is important for the success of a hybrid breeding program. However, field evaluation\\u000a of all possible crosses among inbred lines requires extremely large resources. Therefore, efforts have been made to predict\\u000a hybrid performance (HP) by using field data of related genotypes and molecular markers. In the present study, the main objective\\u000a was to assess the

  14. A computational procedure for functional characterization of potential marker genes from molecular data: Alzheimer's as a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margherita Squillario; Annalisa Barla

    2011-01-01

    Background  A molecular characterization of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the key to the identification of altered gene sets that lead to\\u000a AD progression. We rely on the assumption that candidate marker genes for a given disease belong to specific pathogenic pathways,\\u000a and we aim at unveiling those pathways stable across tissues, treatments and measurement systems. In this context, we analyzed\\u000a three

  15. Identification and cloning of molecular markers for UV-B tolerant gene in wild sugarcane ( Saccharum spontaneum L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuan Li; Yongmei He; Yanqun Zu; Fangdong Zhan

    2011-01-01

    Previously we have selected wild sugarcane (Saccharum spontaneum L.) sterile lines that are tolerant or susceptible to UV-B radiation based on response index (RI) in a field screening test. The RI was established according to plant height, tiller number, leaf index, total biomass and brix under enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280–310nm) radiation. In this experiment, molecular markers linked to the UV-B

  16. Development of a sex-specific molecular marker for Japanese hop Humulus Japonicus Siebold & Zucc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. S. Aleksandrov; M. G. Divashuk; G. I. Karlov

    2011-01-01

    Japanese hop (Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc.) is a dioecious plant and a suitable model for studying the XX\\/XY1Y2 system of sex chromosomes. To develop a sex-specific marker, 12 RAPD and 36 ISSR markers were analyzed on the basis of pools\\u000a of male and female plants identified after flowering. We were the first to identify ISSR marker K-16, which manifested

  17. DNA markers for sex: Molecular evidence for gender dimorphism in dioecious Mercurialis annua L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. K. Khadka; A. Nejidat; M. Tal; A. Golan-Goldhirsh

    2002-01-01

    Male specific Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, OPB01-1562 and OPC07-303, were identified and sequenced in dioecious Mercurialis annua. Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) primers were designed. Several internal segments of OPB01-1562 were amplified as male specific SCAR markers. These markers were PCR amplified from strong, intermediate and weak male subtypes selected according to their resistance to feminization by cytokinin.

  18. A genetic map of Asparagus officinalis based on integrated RFLP, RAPD and AFLP molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Spada; E. Caporali; G. Marziani; P. Portaluppi; F. M. Restivo; F. Tassi; A. Falavigna

    1998-01-01

    An integrated genetic map of the dioecious species Asparagus officinalis L. has been constructed on the basis of RFLP, RAPD, AFLP and isoenzyme markers. The segregation analysis of the polymorphic\\u000a markers was carried out on the progeny of five different crosses between male and female doubled-haploid clones generated\\u000a by anther culture. A total of 274 markers have been organized to

  19. Sex determination in 58 bird species and evaluation of CHD gene as a universal molecular marker in bird sexing.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Milos; Stevanov-Pavlovic, Marija; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Bosnjak, Jasna; Gajic, Bojan; Aleksic, Nevenka; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to test the CHD gene (Chromo Helicase DNA-binding gene) as a universal molecular marker for sexing birds of relatively distant species. The CHD gene corresponds to the aim because of its high degree of conservation and different lengths in Z and W chromosomes due to different intron sizes. DNA was isolated from feathers and the amplification of the CHD gene was performed with the following sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers: 2550F/2718R and P2/P8. Sex determination was attempted in 284 samples of 58 bird species. It was successful in 50 bird species; in 16 of those (Alopochen aegyptiacus, Ara severus, Aratinga acuticaudata, Bucorvus leadbeateri, Cereopsis novaehollandiae, Columba arquatrix, Corvus corax, C. frugilegus, Cyanoliseus patagonus, Guttera plumifera, Lamprotornis superbus, Milvus milvus, Neophron percnopterus, Ocyphaps lophotes, Podiceps cristatus, and Poicephalus senegalus), it was carried out for the first time using molecular markers and PCR. It is reasonable to assume that extensive research is necessary to define the CHD gene as a universal molecular marker for successful sex determination in all bird species (with exception of ratites). The results of this study may largely contribute to the aim. PMID:22553188

  20. An update of the Courtot × Chinese Spring intervarietal molecular marker linkage map for the QTL detection of agronomic traits in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Sourdille; T. Cadalen; H. Guyomarc'h; J. Snape; M. Perretant; G. Charmet; C. Boeuf; S. Bernard; M. Bernard

    2003-01-01

    We made an update of the intervarietal molecular marker linkage map of the wheat genome developed using a doubled-haploid (DH) population derived from the cross between the cultivars 'Courtot' and 'Chinese Spring'. This map was constructed using 187 DH lines and 659 markers. The genome was well covered (more than 95%) except for chromosomes from homoeologous group 4 and chromosomes

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS FOR GLASSY-WINGED AND SMOKE-TREE SHARPSHOOTERS FOR USE IN PREDATOR GUT CONTENT EXAMINATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To aid in identifying key predators of Proconiini sharpshooter species present in California, we developed and tested molecular diagnostic markers for the glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca coagulata (Say) and smoke-tree sharpshooter Homalodisca liturata (Ball) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae: Proconii...

  2. Molecular markers of trichloroethylene-induced toxicity in human kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)]. E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Hueni, Sarah E. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Horwitz, Beth P. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2005-08-07

    Difficulties in evaluation of trichloroethylene (TRI)-induced toxicity in humans and extrapolation of data from laboratory animals to humans are due to the existence of multiple target organs, multiple metabolic pathways, sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in both metabolism and susceptibility to toxicity, and the lack or minimal amount of human data for many target organs. The use of human tissue for mechanistic studies is thus distinctly advantageous. The kidneys are one target organ for TRI and metabolism by the glutathione (GSH) conjugation pathway is responsible for nephrotoxicity. The GSH conjugate is processed further to produce the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. Confluent, primary cultures of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells were used as the model system. Although cells in log-phase growth, which are undergoing more rapid DNA synthesis, would give lower LD{sub 50} values, confluent cells more closely mimic the in vivo proximal tubule. DCVC caused cellular necrosis only at relatively high doses (>100 {mu}M) and long incubation times (>24 h). In contrast, both apoptosis and enhanced cellular proliferation occurred at relatively low doses (10-100 {mu}M) and early incubation times (2-8 h). These responses were associated with prominent changes in expression of several proteins that regulate apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, Apaf-1, Caspase-9 cleavage, PARP cleavage) and cellular growth, differentiation and stress response (p53, Hsp27, NF-{kappa}B). Effects on p53 and Hsp27 implicate function of protein kinase C, the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and the cytoskeleton. The precise pattern of expression of these and other proteins can thus serve as molecular markers for TRI exposure and effect in human kidney.

  3. Molecular markers of yolk sac fry development in nine families of lake trout.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Kristiina A; Paavilainen, Tiia; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Czesny, Sergiusz; Rinchard, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Salmonids in certain areas of North America and northern Europe suffer from reproductive disturbances manifested through the death of yolk sac fry. These disturbances are referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the Great Lakes region and M74 in the Baltic Sea. Both of these syndromes have been associated with reduced concentrations of thiamine in affected females and their eggs. However, large variations in signs and mortality, both within and between the individual syndromes, have been reported. Yolk sac fry mortality (M74) in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar has been shown to be associated with reduced DNA binding of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 (HIF-1), reduced production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein, decreased capillary density, and down-regulation of adult-type globin gene transcription (which is responsible for the protein part of adult hemoglobin). One of the main effects of all of these changes is reduced oxygen transport to the tissues of affected fry. In this study, the developmental patterns of HIF-1 DNA binding, VEGF protein expression, and adult-type globin gene transcription were analyzed in nine family groups of Lake Michigan lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. The results indicate that HIF-1 DNA binding and globin gene transcription increase from hatch to the end of yolk sac stage. Interindividual and between-family biological variations were detected, especially in VEGF protein expression and globin gene transcription. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using these molecular markers in investigating the etiology of EMS and making comparisons between the mechanisms of different salmonid yolk sac fry mortalities. PMID:20218502

  4. Subtracted diversity array identifies novel molecular markers including retrotransposons for fingerprinting Echinacea species.

    PubMed

    Olarte, Alexandra; Mantri, Nitin; Nugent, Gregory; Pang, Edwin C K

    2013-01-01

    Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult. We report the construction of a novel Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA) for Echinacea species and demonstrate the potential of this array for isolating highly polymorphic sequences. In order to selectively isolate Echinacea-specific sequences, a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was performed between a pool of twenty-four Echinacea genotypes and a pool of other angiosperms and non-angiosperms. A total of 283 subtracted genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments were amplified and arrayed. Twenty-seven Echinacea genotypes including four that were not used in the array construction could be successfully discriminated. Interestingly, unknown samples of E. paradoxa and E. purpurea could be unambiguously identified from the cluster analysis. Furthermore, this Echinacea-specific SDA was also able to isolate highly polymorphic retrotransposon sequences. Five out of the eleven most discriminatory features matched to known retrotransposons. This is the first time retrotransposon sequences have been used to fingerprint Echinacea, highlighting the potential of retrotransposons as based molecular markers useful for fingerprinting and studying diversity patterns in Echinacea. PMID:23940565

  5. Subtracted Diversity Array Identifies Novel Molecular Markers Including Retrotransposons for Fingerprinting Echinacea Species

    PubMed Central

    Olarte, Alexandra; Mantri, Nitin; Nugent, Gregory; Pang, Edwin C. K.

    2013-01-01

    Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult. We report the construction of a novel Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA) for Echinacea species and demonstrate the potential of this array for isolating highly polymorphic sequences. In order to selectively isolate Echinacea-specific sequences, a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was performed between a pool of twenty-four Echinacea genotypes and a pool of other angiosperms and non-angiosperms. A total of 283 subtracted genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments were amplified and arrayed. Twenty-seven Echinacea genotypes including four that were not used in the array construction could be successfully discriminated. Interestingly, unknown samples of E. paradoxa and E. purpurea could be unambiguously identified from the cluster analysis. Furthermore, this Echinacea-specific SDA was also able to isolate highly polymorphic retrotransposon sequences. Five out of the eleven most discriminatory features matched to known retrotransposons. This is the first time retrotransposon sequences have been used to fingerprint Echinacea, highlighting the potential of retrotransposons as based molecular markers useful for fingerprinting and studying diversity patterns in Echinacea. PMID:23940565

  6. Molecular markers indicate different dynamics of leaves and roots during litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Jens; Jansen, Boris; Palviainen, Marjo; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Up to now there is only a poor understanding of the sources contributing to organic carbon in forest soils, especially the contribution of leaves and roots. Studies of the last 2 decades have shown that methods like pyrolysis and CuO oxidation are suitable tools to trace back the main contributors of organic matter in water, sediments and soils. Lignin derived monomers, extractable lipids, cutin and suberin derived compounds have been used frequently for identification of plant material. However, for the selection of suitable biomarker the decomposition patterns and stability of these compounds are of high importance but they are only poorly understood. In this study we focused on following questions: (I) Which compounds are characteristic to identify certain plant parts and plant species? (II) How stable are these compounds during the first 3 years of litter decomposition? We studied the chemical composition of samples from a 3-year litterbag decomposition experiment with roots and leaves of spruce, pine and birch which was done in Finland. Additionally to mass loss, carbon and nitrogen contents, free lipids were extracted; by alkaline hydrolysis non extractable lipids were gained. The extracts were analyzed afterwards by GC-MS, the insoluble residues were analyzed by curie-point Pyrolysis GC-MS. In addition to the identification and quantification of a variety of different compounds and compound ratios we used statistical classification methods to get deeper insights into the patterns of leaf and root-derived biomarkers during litter decomposition. The mass loss was largely different between the litter species and we always observed larger mass loss for leaf-derived litter in comparison to root derived litter. This trend was also observed by molecular analysis. The increase of the ratio of vanillic acid to vanillin was correlated to the mass loss of the samples over time. This shows that the degree of decomposition of plant material was linked with the degree of lignin degradation. Preliminary results show, that we were able to distinguish the different species and plant parts using various approaches, e.g., abundance and patterns of different substances and different ratios of compounds. The polyesters suberin and cutin were particularly useful to differentiate between roots and leaves. We conclude that knowledge of the decomposition patterns of molecular markers will largely improve the identification power of organic matter sources in soils.

  7. Tuning immune responses: diversity and adaptation of the immunological synapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annemieke Th. den Boer; Matthias Gunzer; Peter Friedl

    2005-01-01

    The onset and regulation of a specific immune response results from communication between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which form molecular interactions at the site of cell–cell contact — and this is known as the immunological synapse. Initially, the immunological synapse was viewed as a stereotypical adhesion and signalling device with a defined molecular structure and signalling processes. However,

  8. The potential of hypoxia markers as target for breast molecular imaging – a systematic review and meta-analysis of human marker expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of breast cancer is a promising emerging technology, potentially able to improve clinical care. Valid imaging targets for molecular imaging tracer development are membrane-bound hypoxia-related proteins, expressed when tumor growth outpaces neo-angiogenesis. We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of such hypoxia marker expression rates in human breast cancer to evaluate their potential as clinically relevant molecular imaging targets. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles describing membrane-bound proteins that are related to hypoxia inducible factor 1? (HIF-1?), the key regulator of the hypoxia response. We extracted expression rates of carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), C-X-C chemokine receptor type-4 (CXCR4), or insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in human breast disease, evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We pooled study results using random-effects models and applied meta-regression to identify associations with clinicopathological variables. Results Of 1,705 identified articles, 117 matched our selection criteria, totaling 30,216 immunohistochemistry results. We found substantial between-study variability in expression rates. Invasive cancer showed pooled expression rates of 35% for CAIX (95% confidence interval (CI): 26-46%), 51% for GLUT1 (CI: 40-61%), 46% for CXCR4 (CI: 33-59%), and 46% for IGF1R (CI: 35-70%). Expression rates increased with tumor grade for GLUT1, CAIX, and CXCR4 (all p < 0.001), but decreased for IGF1R (p < 0.001). GLUT1 showed the highest expression rate in grade III cancers with 58% (45-69%). CXCR4 showed the highest expression rate in small T1 tumors with 48% (CI: 28-69%), but associations with size were only significant for CAIX (p < 0.001; positive association) and IGF1R (p = 0.047; negative association). Although based on few studies, CAIX, GLUT1, and CXCR4 showed profound lower expression rates in normal breast tissue and benign breast disease (p < 0.001), and high rates in carcinoma in situ. Invasive lobular carcinoma consistently showed lower expression rates (p < 0.001). Conclusions Our results support the potential of hypoxia-related markers as breast cancer molecular imaging targets. Although specificity is promising, combining targets would be necessary for optimal sensitivity. These data could help guide the choice of imaging targets for tracer development depending on the envisioned clinical application. PMID:24206539

  9. Molecular, Immunological, and Biological Characterization of Tityus serrulatus Venom Hyaluronidase: New Insights into Its Role in Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Mendes, Bárbara Bruna Ribeiro; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Felicori, Liza Figueiredo; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo Andrez; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2014-01-01

    Background Scorpionism is a public health problem in Brazil, and Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is primarily responsible for severe accidents. The main toxic components of Ts venom are low-molecular-weight neurotoxins; however, the venom also contains poorly characterized high-molecular-weight enzymes. Hyaluronidase is one such enzyme that has been poorly characterized. Methods and principal findings We examined clones from a cDNA library of the Ts venom gland and described two novel isoforms of hyaluronidase, TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2. The isoforms are 83% identical, and alignment of their predicted amino acid sequences with other hyaluronidases showed conserved residues between evolutionarily distant organisms. We performed gel filtration followed by reversed-phase chromatography to purify native hyaluronidase from Ts venom. Purified native Ts hyaluronidase was used to produce anti-hyaluronidase serum in rabbits. As little as 0.94 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum neutralized 1 LD50 (13.2 µg) of Ts venom hyaluronidase activity in vitro. In vivo neutralization assays showed that 121.6 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum inhibited mouse death 100%, whereas 60.8 µl and 15.2 µl of serum delayed mouse death. Inhibition of death was also achieved by using the hyaluronidase pharmacological inhibitor aristolochic acid. Addition of native Ts hyaluronidase (0.418 µg) to pre-neutralized Ts venom (13.2 µg venom+0.94 µl anti-hyaluronidase serum) reversed mouse survival. We used the SPOT method to map TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2 epitopes. More peptides were recognized by anti-hyaluronidase serum in TsHyal-1 than in TsHyal-2. Epitopes common to both isoforms included active site residues. Conclusions Hyaluronidase inhibition and immunoneutralization reduced the toxic effects of Ts venom. Our results have implications in scorpionism therapy and challenge the notion that only neurotoxins are important to the envenoming process. PMID:24551256

  10. Biotherapies & Immunology International Master

    E-print Network

    Arleo, Angelo

    Biotherapies & Immunology International Master #12;students the possibility to access to a large knowledge in the field of biotherapies with special focus on immunology. The partners involved in this PIM have a large recognized expertise in Biotherapies and immunology and can offer complementary courses

  11. Microsatellite primed-PCR to select molecular markers for Tuber species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonella Amicucci; Chiara Guidi; Lucia Potenza; Vilberto Stocchi

    2002-01-01

    The direct microsatellite-primed PCR and the RAMPO techniques were applied to detect inter-specific polymorphisms in Tuber species and to select species specific fragments. A T. borchii marker was identified and specific primers were selected.

  12. Screening of tea (Camellia sinensis) for trait-associated molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Mphangwe, Nicholas I K; Vorster, Juan; Steyn, J Martin; Nyirenda, Hastings E; Taylor, Nicolette J; Apostolides, Zeno

    2013-09-01

    This study was done to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers that may associate with seven important traits in tea. Sixty RAPD primers were first screened using 18 cultivars under each of the 7 traits, followed by confirmatory screening of 20 promising primers with 32 tea cultivars. Six RAPD primers generated a total of nine specific bands that associated with six desired traits: black tea quality and tolerance to drought, high temperature, low temperature, Phomopsis theae, and high yield. These markers would allow early identification of plant material with the desired traits that can be advanced to the next stage of selection and enhance targeted choice of breeding stocks with the desirable traits. The nine RAPD markers identified in this study could improve precision and efficiency in tea breeding and selection and are an important contribution towards the establishment of marker-assisted selection in tea breeding programmes. PMID:23852798

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of markers and cytokines for equid myeloid cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Falko Steinbach; Robert Stark; Sherif Ibrahim; Eman Abd-El Gawad; Hanns Ludwig; Jakob Walter; Ulrich Commandeur; Susanne Mauel

    2005-01-01

    The myeloid cell system comprises of monocytes, macrophages (M?), dendritic cells (DC), Kupffer cells, osteoclasts or microglia and is also known as the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS). Essential cytokines to differentiate or activate these cells include GM-CSF or IL-4. Important markers for characterization include CD1, CD14, CD68, CD163 and CD206. All these markers, however, were not cloned or further characterized

  14. A high-density molecular map for ryegrass (Lolium perenne) using AFLP markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. F. Bert; G. Charmet; P. Sourdille; M. D. Hayward; F. Balfourier

    1999-01-01

    AFLP markers have been successfully employed for the development of a high-density linkage map of ryegrass (Lolium\\u000a perenne L.) using a progeny set of 95 plants from a testcross involving a doubled-haploid tester. This genetic map covered 930 cM\\u000a in seven linkage groups and was based on 463 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers using 17 primer pairs,\\u000a three isozymes

  15. Development of ITS sequence based molecular marker to distinguish, Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) from its adulterants.

    PubMed

    Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Murugan, Ramar; Ravikumar, Kaliamoorthy; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2010-09-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) is one of the highly traded raw drugs and also used as a stimulative food additive in Europe and USA. While, Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India recognizes T. terrestris as Goksura, Tribulus lanuginosus and T. subramanyamii are also traded by the same name raising issues of quality control. The nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequence were used to develop species-specific DNA markers. The species-specific markers efficiently amplified 295bp for T. terrestris (TT1F and TT1R), 300bp for T. lanuginosus (TL1F and TL1R) and 214bp for T. subramanyamii (TS1F and TS1R). These DNA markers can be used to distinguish T. terrestris from its adulterants. PMID:20083169

  16. Molecular markers reveal only two mud crab species of genus Scylla (Brachyura: Portunidae) in Indian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Anup; Varkey, Mathews; Sobhanan, Sobha Pindaniyil; Mani, Anjali Kottayil; Gopalakrishnan, Achamveetil; Kumaran, Ganesh; Sethuramalingam, Arulraj; Srinivasan, Pandiarajan; Samraj, Yohannan Chellema Thampi

    2014-08-01

    The taxonomic ambiguity of the Indian mud crab (genus Scylla de Hann 1833) is still a cause of concern as several papers have been published with misleading identification. This is the first attempt to resolve the taxonomic uncertainty of the mud crab commonly available in Indian coastal waters using molecular genetic markers (ITS-1 and sequencing of COI gene) combined with traditional morphometry. Additionally, we developed a PCR method by which Indian mud crab species can be identified rapidly and effectively. The results clearly indicate that the green morph of the Indian mud crab is Scylla serrata and the brown morph is S. olivacea. The S. serrata commonly mentioned in the literature from India is S. olivacea; the S. tranquebarica noted by many Indian researchers should belong to S. serrata. Caution should be taken when interpreting or implementing the biological, molecular, and aquaculture data in the literature. PMID:24699826

  17. Survey of Paramecium duboscqui using three markers and assessment of the molecular variability in the genus Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Boscaro, Vittorio; Fokin, Sergei I; Verni, Franco; Petroni, Giulio

    2012-12-01

    The genus Paramecium (phylum Ciliophora) is one of the best-known among protozoa. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the diversity and distribution of species within this genus was remarkably scarce until recent times. In the last years a constantly growing amount of data has formed, especially on the distribution of species and the characterization of molecular markers. Much effort has been made on detecting clades inside each morphospecies, which could suggest the presence of sibling species complexes as in the famous case of Paramecium aurelia. In this work we present new data on Paramecium duboscqui, one of the morphospecies that have not yet been surveyed employing DNA sequences as markers. We obtained data from nine strains sampled around the world, using the three most commonly employed markers (18S rRNA gene, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and COI gene sequences). Moreover, we compared our results with those already available for other Paramecium species, and performed phylogenetic analyses for the entire genus. We also expanded the knowledge on the ITS2 secondary structure and its usefulness in studies on Paramecium. Our approach, that considers the data of all the species together, highlighted some characteristic patterns as well as some ambiguities that should be further investigated. PMID:22982632

  18. Identification of incompatibility alleles and characterisation of molecular markers genetically linked to the A incompatibility locus in the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Larraya; María M. Peñas; Gumer Pérez; Cruz Santos; Enrique Ritter; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Lucía Ramírez

    1999-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a hetertothallic homobasidiomycete whose mating is controlled by a bifactorial tetrapolar genetic system. Although this\\u000a mechanism is well accepted, there is a lack of knowledge about its molecular basis, as the incompatibility loci have not been\\u000a cloned and sequenced. As a first step towards the elucidation of the molecular structure of the A-type incompatibility locus, molecular markers

  19. Patterns of inheritance with RAPD molecular markers reveal novel types of polymorphism in the honey bee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg J. Hunt; Robert E. Page

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to generate random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) from honey bee DNA samples in order to follow the patterns of inheritance of RAPD markers in a haplodiploid insect. The genomic DNA samples from two parental bees, a haploid drone and a diploid queen, were screened for polymorphism with 68 different tennucleotide primers of random

  20. Use of molecular markers in breeding for soluble solids content in tomato — a re-examination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Tanksley; J. Hewitt

    1988-01-01

    Through earlier breeding efforts, portions of the genome of the wild species Lycopersicon chmielewskii have been introgressed into the cultivated tomato (Rick 1974). These introgressed chromosomal segments have been reported to increase soluble solids in fruit of certain tomato varieties (Rick 1974). Recently, two of the introgressed segments have been identified with RFLP markers and tested for effects on soluble

  1. Genetic Stock Identification of Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin: An Evaluation of Different Molecular Markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary A. Winans; Melanie M. Paquin; Donald M. Van Doornik; Bruce M. Baker; Perry Thornton; Dan Rawding; Anne Marshall; Paul Moran; Steven Kalinowski

    2004-01-01

    Protein genetic markers (allozymes) have been used during the last decade in a genetic stock identification (GSI) program by state and federal management agencies to monitor stocks of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Columbia River basin. In this paper we report new data for five microsatellite and three intron loci from 32 steelhead populations in the three upriver evolutionarily significant

  2. Molecular characterization of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] is an important medicinal fruit with immense health benefits and antioxidant activity. In this study, microsatellite markers were used as DNA fingerprinting tools for the identification and characterization of peach germplasm in the United States. Eleven microsatel...

  3. Molecular markers to determine ecological fate of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (“Bt”) is a ubiquitous soil bacterium with entomopathogenic properties. One strain, Bt subsp. kurstaki (“Btk”), is highly toxic to lepidopteran larvae and used in many commercial products for biological pest control. We designed a set of DNA markers that successfully identifi...

  4. A clinical, cytogenetic, FISH and molecular study of supernumerary marker 15 chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, N.R. [Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Crolla, J.A.; Harvey, J.F. [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    We studied 17 patients with supernumerary marker chromosomes shown by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the 15-centromere specific probe pTRA-25 to be 15-derived. Genetic constitution of the marker chromosomes was investigated using FISH, Southern blot analysis and PCR for proximal and distal loci on 15q as well as conventional cytogenetics. Eight of the 17 patients were mentally retarded. Six of the eight carried a de novo marker 15 containing one or two doses of loci known to be in or near the Prader-Willi/Angelman (PWS/AS) region, whereas none of the nine non-retarded patients had duplications of this region, and only two of the eight whose parents were available had a de novo marker. None of the mentally retarded patients had PWS or AS. In two retarded patients (one de novo, one familial) there was no duplication of the PWS/AS region. Uniparental disomy affecting the normal 15 homologs was excluded in 10 of the patients, including all eight with mental retardation.

  5. Molecular fossils and other organic markers as palaeoenvironmental indicators of the Messinian Calcare di Base

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    biological signatures: algae, bacteria and higher plants. Organic markers together with sedimentary evidence in Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis. This occurred in a complex palaeogeographic environment Salinity Crisis are still intensely debated. An exhaustive and thorough review of the depositional

  6. Identification of molecular markers associated with low chill/heat tolerance in raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New genetic markers were developed which are linked to cold and heat tolerant raspberries. Raspberry is a cool season crop, and as such, cannot tolerate the high temperatures of the South during the normal growing season. Expanding the commercial growth range of raspberry production to the southern...

  7. Molecular detection of clinical colorectal cancer metastasis: how should multiple markers be put to use?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Conzelmann; Ulrich Linnemann; Martin R. Berger

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims Up to 45% of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients will develop local recurrence or metastasis following curative resection. The latter is due to cells shed from the primary carcinoma prior to or during surgery. The aim of this study was to contribute toward a “rational”-approach for detecting these disseminated tumor cells (DTC) using a combination of independent markers

  8. Modelling Immunological Memory

    E-print Network

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  9. Identification and mapping of molecular markers linked to rust resistance genes located on chromosome 1RS of rye using wheat-rye translocation lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Mago; W. Spielmeyer; G. Lawrence; E. Lagudah; J. Ellis; A. Pryor

    2002-01-01

    The short arm of rye (Secale cereale) chromosome 1 has been widely used in breeding programs to incorporate new disease resistance genes into wheat. Using wheat-rye translocation and recombinant lines, molecular markers were isolated and mapped within chromosomal regions of 1RS carrying rust resistance genes Lr26, Sr31, Yr9 from 'Petkus' and SrR from 'Imperial' rye. RFLP markers previously mapped to

  10. Chromosomal regions associated with segregation distortion of molecular markers in F 2 ?, backcross, doubled haploid, and recombinant inbred populations in rice ( Oryza sativa L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Xu; L. Zhu; J. Xiao; N. Huang; S. R. McCouch

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal regions associated with marker segregation distortion in rice were compared based on six molecular linkage maps.\\u000a Mapping populations were derived from one interspecific backcross and five intersubspecific (indica?\\/?japonica) crosses, including two F2 populations, two doubled haploid (DH) populations, and one recombinant inbred (RI) population. Mapping data for each population\\u000a consisted of 129–629 markers. Segregation distortion was determined based on

  11. Molecular Diversity in Ukrainian Melon Collection as Revealed by AFLP and Microsatellite Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-eight melon accessions, which are of primary breeding importance in the Ukraine, were analyzed for diversity. These collections represent a major non-US and non-west Europe source of melon germplasm that have not yet been subjected to molecular characterization. Molecular diversity was esti...

  12. Applications of molecular markers and DNA sequences in identifying fungal pathogens of cool season grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular techniques have now been widely applied in many disciplines of biological sciences including fungal identification in microbial ecology and plant pathology. In plant pathology, it is now common to use molecular techniques to identify and study plant pathogens of many agronomic and horticul...

  13. RGA-ILP, a new type of functional molecular markers in bread wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronghua Zhou; Jizeng Jia; Lifeng Gao

    2010-01-01

    Markers targeting intron length polymorphism of resistance gene analogues (RGA-ILP) are not only expected to be more polymorphic\\u000a than those designed from conserved exons, but also have potential resistance gene function. Based on known domains of resistance\\u000a genes, more than 900 wheat RGAs were mined from public databases. Two hundred and seventy-eight intron-containing RGA candidates\\u000a were predicted based on rice

  14. Molecular Characterization of Tree Peony Germplasm Using Sequence-Related Amplified Polymorphism Markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao Yan Han; Liang Sheng Wang; Qing Yan Shu; Zheng An Liu; Su Xia Xu; Takuya Tetsumura

    2008-01-01

    This study examined 63 tree peony specimens, consisting of 3 wild species and 63 cultivars, using sequence-related amplified\\u000a polymorphism (SRAP) markers for the purpose of detecting genomic polymorphisms. Bulk DNA samples from each specimen were evaluated\\u000a with 23 SRAP primer pairs. Among the 296 different amplicons, 262 were polymorphic. The maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining,\\u000a and unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic average

  15. Molecular markers linked to white rust resistance in mustard Brassica juncea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. V. Prabhu; D. J. Somers; G. Rakow; R. K. Gugel

    1998-01-01

    White rust, caused by Albugo candida (Pers.) Kuntze, is an economically important disease of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. and Coss mustard, particularly in India. The most efficient and cost-effective way of protecting mustard plants\\u000a from white rust disease is through genetic resistance. The objective of this study was to identify RAPD markers for white\\u000a rust resistance in an F1-derived doubled-haploid

  16. Protein based molecular markers provide reliable means to understand prokaryotic phylogeny and support Darwinian mode of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz S.; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2012-01-01

    The analyses of genome sequences have led to the proposal that lateral gene transfers (LGTs) among prokaryotes are so widespread that they disguise the interrelationships among these organisms. This has led to questioning of whether the Darwinian model of evolution is applicable to prokaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of taxon-specific molecular markers such as conserved signature indels (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) for understanding the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes and to assess the influence of LGTs on prokaryotic evolution. The analyses of genomic sequences have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are unique properties of different groups of prokaryotes ranging from phylum to genus levels. The species distribution patterns of these molecular signatures strongly support a tree-like vertical inheritance of the genes containing these molecular signatures that is consistent with phylogenetic trees. Recent detailed studies in this regard on the Thermotogae and Archaea, which are reviewed here, have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are specific for the species from these two taxa and a number of their major clades. The genetic changes responsible for these CSIs (and CSPs) initially likely occurred in the common ancestors of these taxa and then vertically transferred to various descendants. Although some CSIs and CSPs in unrelated groups of prokaryotes were identified, their small numbers and random occurrence has no apparent influence on the consistent tree-like branching pattern emerging from other markers. These results provide evidence that although LGT is an important evolutionary force, it does not mask the tree-like branching pattern of prokaryotes or understanding of their evolutionary relationships. The identified CSIs and CSPs also provide novel and highly specific means for identification of different groups of microbes and for taxonomical and biochemical studies. PMID:22919687

  17. Selective DNA Pooling for Determination of Linkage between a Molecular Marker and a Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-01-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: ``selective DNA pooling'') takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F(2) and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect, can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. PMID:7896115

  18. Distinct immunologic effects of different intravenous iron preparations on monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Lisa H.; Zawada, Adam M.; Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Seiler, Sarah; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency contributes to anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. I.v. iron is therefore widely used for anaemia treatment, although it may induce oxidative stress and activate monocytes. Different i.v. iron preparations are available, but interestingly their substance-specific immunologic effects are poorly studied. Methods We analysed the effect of iron sucrose, ferric carboxymaltose, iron isomaltoside 1000, low-molecular-weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol on classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocyte biology. We therefore stimulated in vitro mature monocytes and haematopoietic CD34+ stem cells during their differentiation into monocytes with different concentrations (0.133, 0.266, 0.533 mg/mL) of i.v. iron preparations. Alterations of monocyte subset distribution, expression of surface markers (CD86, CCR5, CX3CR1), as well as production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-1?) and reactive oxygen species were measured using flow cytometry. Additionally, we analysed phagocytosis and antigen presentation capacity. Results We found specific immunologic effects after stimulation with iron sucrose which were not induced by the other iron preparations. Iron sucrose activated monocyte subsets leading to significantly increased CD86 expression. Simultaneously CD16 and CX3CR1 expression and monocytic phagocytosis capacity were decreased. Additionally, differentiation of monocytes from haematopoietic CD34+ stem cells was almost completely abolished after stimulation with iron sucrose. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that specific immunologic effects of distinct i.v. iron preparations exist. The clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation. PMID:24523357

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL COMPUTATION: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    IMMUNOLOGICAL COMPUTATION: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS AUTHORS/AFFILIATIONS: Dipankar Dasgupta Reviews fundamental immunology concepts Presents computational models based on the negative selection From CRC Press About the Book Over the last decade, the field of immunological computation has

  20. [Organization of cooperative oncologic immunological research in the RSFSR].

    PubMed

    Gorodilova, V V; Starinski?, V V; Kovalev, B N; Popova, A A; Nevskaia, E A

    1982-01-01

    A number of medical establishments are conducting a joint study on Immunology of Tumors sponsored by CMEA. The study is carried out under the auspices of the P. A. Herzen Research Institute in the following directions: (1) Investigations in the diagnostic and prognostic value of immunologic tests in oncological clinic; (2) Establishment of basal immunological status of patients and its changes in relation to stages of cancer development; (3) Identification of immunological markers for tumors of different sites. This research is channeled into several programs. The success of the whole venture depends on active participation of all concerned. The results of the study will contribute to the clinical experience of application of immunological tests in examination of considerable groups of patients with tumors at different sites. PMID:6211831

  1. Highly variable microsatellite markers for the fungal and algal symbionts of the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria and challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungal associations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivo Widmer; Francesco Dal Grande; Carolina Cornejo; Christoph Scheidegger

    2010-01-01

    The availability of highly variable markers for the partners of a fungal symbiosis enables the integrated investigation of ecological and evolutionary processes at the symbiotic level. In this article we analyze the specificity of the first and to date only microsatellite markers that had been developed for an epiphytic lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria). We used DNA extracts from cultures of the

  2. Immunology as Information Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Forrest; Steven A. Hofmeyr

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes the behavior of the immune system from an informationprocessing perspective. It reviews a series of projects conducted at the University of New Mexico and the Santa Fe Institute, which have developed and explored the theme "immunology as information processing." The projects cover the spectrum from serious modeling of real immunological phenomena, such as crossreactive responses in animals

  3. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  4. Immunology of the tonsils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marta Perry; Anthony Whyte

    1998-01-01

    The tonsils are lymphoepithelial structures that provide a protective immunological ring at the openings of both digestive and respiratory tracts. Here, as discussed by Marta Perry and Anthony Whyte, the unique nature of the various human tonsils reveals that they are capable of a variety of complex immunological functions.

  5. Invertebrate Ecological Immunology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rolff; M. T. Siva-Jothy

    2003-01-01

    Ecological immunology is a rapidly expanding field that examines the causes and consequences of variation in immune function in the context of evolution and of ecology. Millions of invertebrate species rely solely on innate immunity, compared with only 45,000 vertebrate species that rely additionally on an acquired immune system. Despite this difference in diversity, most studies of ecological immunology focus

  6. Molecular Phylogeny of a tick, Ixodes granulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) based on cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana Che; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; George, Ernna; Nor, Shukor Md

    2014-09-01

    Identification of a local species of tick, Ixodes granulatus from the family Ixodidae is essential because it has potential to be vector for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia and tick thypus. The aim of this study is to portray the relationships among several populations of I. granulatus collected from different species of animal hosts and localities in Peninsular Malaysia. Polymerase Chain Reaction was conducted by amplifying mitochondrial DNA marker, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from 15 individual ticks that attached to five different hosts caught from three different localities. Confirmation of the species identity was accomplished using BLAST program. Neighbor-joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) tree based on COI sequences were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 to identify the relationship among species. The result of this study showed a high genetic heterogeneity between I. granulatus and other species of the same genus (7.2-23.7%). Furthermore, a low intraspecific variation was observed among the species of I. granulatus collected from different localities (0-3.7%). This study produced the first establishment of molecular marker for clarifying genetic species variation and diversity of local I. granulatus tick which contribute to the control of tick-borne infections.

  7. Molecular identification and phylogenetic relationship of green algae, Spirogyra ellipsospora (Chlorophyta) using ISSR and rbcL markers.

    PubMed

    Wongsawad, Pheravut; Peerapornpisal, Yuwadee

    2014-11-01

    Spirogyra is found in a wide range of habitats, including small stagnant water bodies, rivers, and streams. Spirogyra ellipsospora is common in northern Thailand. Species identification of the Spirogyra species based only on morphological characteristics can be difficult. A reliable and accurate method is required to evaluate genetic variations. This study aims to apply molecular approaches for the identification of S. ellipsospora using microsatellites and rbcL markers. Based on DNA sequencing, the rbcL gene was sequenced and the data was analyzed using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) program in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database. The sequence of S. ellipsospora from this study revealed definitive identity matches in the range of 99% for the consensus sequences of S. ellipsospora. The 10 primers of ISSR could be amplified by 92 amplification fragments. The DNA fragments and the rbcL sequence data grouped the Spirogyra specimens into two distinct clusters. PMID:25313288

  8. The genotypes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China revealed by sequence analysis of multiple molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Pan, Song; Wang, Guo-Ping; Tang, Min; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2013-01-01

    The genotypes of ten citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from central China were determined by examining multiple molecular markers (MMMs) using 11 primer pairs. The results revealed that one isolate contained a single T30 genotype, two isolates contained a single VT genotype, and the other seven isolates were mixtures of two or more genotypes. Sequence analysis of amplified MMMs showed a high genetic diversity in Chinese CTV populations. The genotypes resembling T36, RB and B165 were identified from Chinese CTV isolates for the first time. Our results suggest that genotype assignment of CTV cannot be based solely on the amplification profiles of MMMs, and sequencing of MMMs is required. PMID:22987316

  9. Molecular Characterization of Cultivated Bromeliad Accessions with Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Yaying; Wang, Weiyong; Yu, Xinying; Shen, Xiaolan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaojing; Tian, Danqing; Shen, Fuquan; Yu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Bromeliads are of great economic importance in flower production; however little information is available with respect to genetic characterization of cultivated bromeliads thus far. In the present study, a selection of cultivated bromeliads was characterized via inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers with an emphasis on genetic diversity and population structure. Twelve ISSR primers produced 342 bands, of which 287 (~84%) were polymorphic, with polymorphic bands per primer ranging from 17 to 34. The Jaccard’s similarity ranged from 0.08 to 0.89 and averaged ~0.30 for the investigated bromeliads. The Bayesian-based approach, together with the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based clustering and the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), distinctly grouped the bromeliads from Neoregelia, Guzmania, and Vriesea into three separately clusters, well corresponding with their botanical classifications; whereas the bromeliads of Aechmea other than the recently selected hybrids were not well assigned to a cluster. Additionally, ISSR marker was proven efficient for the identification of hybrids and bud sports of cultivated bromeliads. The findings achieved herein will further our knowledge about the genetic variability within cultivated bromeliads and therefore facilitate breeding for new varieties of cultivated bromeliads in future as well. PMID:22754348

  10. Molecular characterization of cultivated bromeliad accessions with Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Yaying; Wang, Weiyong; Yu, Xinying; Shen, Xiaolan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaojing; Tian, Danqing; Shen, Fuquan; Yu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Bromeliads are of great economic importance in flower production; however little information is available with respect to genetic characterization of cultivated bromeliads thus far. In the present study, a selection of cultivated bromeliads was characterized via inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers with an emphasis on genetic diversity and population structure. Twelve ISSR primers produced 342 bands, of which 287 (~84%) were polymorphic, with polymorphic bands per primer ranging from 17 to 34. The Jaccard's similarity ranged from 0.08 to 0.89 and averaged ~0.30 for the investigated bromeliads. The Bayesian-based approach, together with the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based clustering and the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), distinctly grouped the bromeliads from Neoregelia, Guzmania, and Vriesea into three separately clusters, well corresponding with their botanical classifications; whereas the bromeliads of Aechmea other than the recently selected hybrids were not well assigned to a cluster. Additionally, ISSR marker was proven efficient for the identification of hybrids and bud sports of cultivated bromeliads. The findings achieved herein will further our knowledge about the genetic variability within cultivated bromeliads and therefore facilitate breeding for new varieties of cultivated bromeliads in future as well. PMID:22754348

  11. Identification of two novel waxy alleles and development of their molecular markers in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuangen; Zhao, Ganlin; Li, Yan; Fan, Jing; Ding, Guoxiang; Zhao, Jiqun; Ni, Xianlin; Xu, Yongju; Wang, Wenming

    2013-05-01

    High amylopectin grains of waxy sorghum have a high economic value in the food and bioenergy industries because of their increased starch digestibility and higher ethanol conversion rate compared with wild-type sorghum grains. Mutation in the granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) gene contributes to the waxy phenotype. Two classes of waxy alleles, wx(a) and wx(b), have been characterized previously. In the present work, we identified two novel types of waxy mutations in the sorghum GBSS gene, designated as wx(c) and wx(d). The wx(c) allele has a G deletion at the 5' splicing site of the ninth intron, causing a shift of the 5' cleavage site; in turn, a reading frame shift occurred and resulted in an early translation termination. The wx(d) allele contained a mutation at the 3' splicing site of the 10th intron, which led to a splicing site shift and resulted in the deletion of five amino acids (GTGKK) in the predicted translation product. Furthermore, cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers were developed to detect the wx(c) and wx(d) alleles. With these markers, classification of waxy alleles was performed in nearly 100 sorghum accessions from our breeding program. Most waxy sorghum cultivars in China were either wx(a) or wx(c), implying that these two mutations are preferentially maintained during domestic selection in glutinous sorghum production. PMID:23789996

  12. Prediction of body mass index in mice using dense molecular markers and a regularized neural network.

    PubMed

    Okut, Hayrettin; Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Weigel, Kent A

    2011-06-01

    Bayesian regularization of artificial neural networks (BRANNs) were used to predict body mass index (BMI) in mice using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Data from 1896 animals with both phenotypic and genotypic (12 320 loci) information were used for the analysis. Missing genotypes were imputed based on estimated allelic frequencies, with no attempt to reconstruct haplotypes based on family information or linkage disequilibrium between markers. A feed-forward multilayer perceptron network consisting of a single output layer and one hidden layer was used. Training of the neural network was done using the Bayesian regularized backpropagation algorithm. When the number of neurons in the hidden layer was increased, the number of effective parameters, ?, increased up to a point and stabilized thereafter. A model with five neurons in the hidden layer produced a value of ? that saturated the data. In terms of predictive ability, a network with five neurons in the hidden layer attained the smallest error and highest correlation in the test data although differences among networks were negligible. Using inherent weight information of BRANN with different number of neurons in the hidden layer, it was observed that 17 SNPs had a larger impact on the network, indicating their possible relevance in prediction of BMI. It is concluded that BRANN may be at least as useful as other methods for high-dimensional genome-enabled prediction, with the advantage of its potential ability of capturing non-linear relationships, which may be useful in the study of quantitative traits under complex gene action. PMID:21481292

  13. Screening of molecular markers linked to dwarf trait in crape myrtle by bulked segregant analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Y J; Liu, Y; Cai, M; He, D; Shen, J S; Ju, Y Q; Bian, X M; Pan, H T; Zhang, Q X

    2015-01-01

    Plant height is one of the most important traits of plant architecture as it modulates both economic and ornamental values. Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica L.) is a popular ornamental woody plant because of its long-lasting mid-summer bloom, rich colors, and diversified plant architecture. These traits also make it an ideal model of woody species for genetic analysis of many ornamental traits. To understand the inheritance of plant height and screen for genes modulating plant height in Lagerstroemia, segregation of the plant height trait was analyzed using the F1 population of L. fauriei (standard) x L. indica 'Pocomoke' (dwarf) with 96 seedlings, while dwarf genes were screened using the bulked segregant analysis method, combined with 28 amplified fragment length polymorphism primers and 41 simple sequence repeat primers. The results showed that the dwarf trait of crape myrtle was controlled by a major gene and modified by minor genes. An amplified fragment length polymorphism marker, M53E39-92, which was 23.33 cM from the loci controlling the dwarf trait, was screened. These results provide basic information for marker-assisted selection in Lagerstromia and cloning of dwarf genes in future studies. PMID:25966210

  14. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  15. Identification and cloning of molecular markers for UV-B tolerant gene in wild sugarcane (Saccharum spontaneum L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; He, Yongmei; Zu, Yanqun; Zhan, Fangdong

    2011-11-01

    Previously we have selected wild sugarcane (Saccharum spontaneum L.) sterile lines that are tolerant or susceptible to UV-B radiation based on response index (RI) in a field screening test. The RI was established according to plant height, tiller number, leaf index, total biomass and brix under enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-310 nm) radiation. In this experiment, molecular markers linked to the UV-B tolerant and susceptible genes were identified and cloned. RAPD (Randomly amplified polymorphic DNAs) assay using 100 arbitrary primers followed by clustering analysis separated the tolerant and susceptible lines into two groups at the genetic distance of 0.380. The UV-B tolerant and susceptible gene pools were constructed and compared using the Bulked Segregate Analysis (BSA) approach. Of the 100 arbitrary RAPD primers, primer OPR16 produced polymorphic DNA banding patterns from both gene pools. The OPR16-1200 bp DNA fragment was only amplified from the tolerant lines and the OPR16-800 bp from the susceptible ones. These two PCR fragments were cloned onto T-vector. DNA sequence alignment analysis determined that 42% homology existed between the reverse and forward sequences of the OPR16-1200 bp clone, and 36% homology between the forward sequences of the OPR16-800 bp and OPR16-1200 bp clones. The two DNA clones were determined to be linked to the UV-B tolerant and susceptible genes, and they can be used to develop molecular markers for the associated traits. PMID:21925894

  16. Molecular hierarchy of mammary differentiation yields refined markers of mammary stem cells

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Camila O.; Rebbeck, Clare; Rozhkova, Elena; Valentine, Amy; Samuels, Abigail; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Osten, Pavel; Harris, Elena Y.; Uren, Philip J.; Smith, Andrew D.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The partial purification of mouse mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) using combinatorial cell surface markers (Lin?CD24+CD29hCD49fh) has improved our understanding of their role in normal development and breast tumorigenesis. Despite the significant improvement in MaSC enrichment, there is presently no methodology that adequately isolates pure MaSCs. Seeking new markers of MaSCs, we characterized the stem-like properties and expression signature of label-retaining cells from the mammary gland of mice expressing a controllable H2b-GFP transgene. In this system, the transgene expression can be repressed in a doxycycline-dependent fashion, allowing isolation of slowly dividing cells with retained nuclear GFP signal. Here, we show that H2b-GFPh cells reside within the predicted MaSC compartment and display greater mammary reconstitution unit frequency compared with H2b-GFPneg MaSCs. According to their transcriptome profile, H2b-GFPh MaSCs are enriched for pathways thought to play important roles in adult stem cells. We found Cd1d, a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, to be highly expressed by H2b-GFPh MaSCs, and isolation of Cd1d+ MaSCs further improved the mammary reconstitution unit enrichment frequency to nearly a single-cell level. Additionally, we functionally characterized a set of MaSC-enriched genes, discovering factors controlling MaSC survival. Collectively, our data provide tools for isolating a more precisely defined population of MaSCs and point to potentially critical factors for MaSC maintenance. PMID:23580620

  17. Designing a SCAR molecular marker for monitoring Trichoderma cf. harzianum in experimental communities* #

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Gabriel; Verdejo, Valentina; Gondim-Porto, Clarissa; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Several species of the fungal genus Trichoderma establish biological interactions with various micro- and macro-organisms. Some of these interactions are relevant in ecological terms and in biotechnological applications, such as biocontrol, where Trichoderma could be considered as an invasive species that colonizes a recipient community. The success of this invasion depends on multiple factors, which can be assayed using experimental communities as study models. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to monitor the colonization and growth of T. cf. harzianum when it invades experimental communities. For this study, 16 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers of 10-mer were used to generate polymorphic patterns, one of which generated a band present only in strains of T. cf. harzianum. This band was cloned, sequenced, and five primers of 20–23 mer were designed. Primer pairs 2F2/2R2 and 2F2/2R3 successfully and specifically amplified fragments of 278 and 448 bp from the T. cf. harzianum BpT10a strain DNA, respectively. Both primer pairs were also tested against the DNA from 14 strains of T. cf. harzianum and several strains of different fungal genera as specificity controls. Only the DNA from the strains of T. cf. harzianum was successfully amplified. Moreover, primer pair 2F2/2R2 was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fungal DNA mixtures and DNA extracted from fungal experimental communities as templates. T. cf. harzianum was detectable even when as few as 100 copies of the SCAR marker were available or even when its population represented only 0.1% of the whole community. PMID:25367789

  18. Molecular characterization of Buffalograss germplasm using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Budak, H; Shearman, R C; Parmaksiz, I; Gaussoin, R E; Riordan, T P; Dweikat, I

    2004-01-01

    Buffalograss [ Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Englem] germplasm has a broad resource of genetic diversity that can be used for turfgrass, forage and conservation. Buffalograss is the only native grass that is presently used as a turfgrass in the Great Plains region of North America. Its low growth habit, drought tolerance and reduced requirement for fertilizer and pesticides contribute to interest in its use. The objectives of this study were to use sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers in the evaluation of genetic diversity and phenetic relationships in a diverse collection of 53 buffalograss germplasms, and to identify buffalograss ploidy levels using flow cytometry. Based on their DNA contents, buffalograss genotypes were grouped into four sets, corresponding to their ploidy levels. Thirty-four SRAP primer combinations were used. This is the first report of the detection of differentiating diploid, tetraploid, pentaploid and hexaploid buffalograss genotypes, representing diverse locations of origin, using SRAP markers. Cluster analysis by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages based on genetic similarity matrices indicated that there were eight clusters. The coefficients of genetic distance among the genotypes ranged from 0.33 up to 0.99 and averaged D=0.66. The genetic diversity estimate, He, averaged 0.35. These results demonstrated that genotypes with potential traits for turfgrass improvement could readily be distinguished, based on SRAP. The use of PCR-based technologies such as SRAP is an effective tool for estimating genetic diversity, identifying unique genotypes as new sources of alleles for enhancing turf characteristics, and for analyzing the evolutionary and historical development of cultivars at the genomic level in a buffalograss breeding program. PMID:13679978

  19. Designing a SCAR molecular marker for monitoring Trichoderma cf. harzianum in experimental communities.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Gabriel; Verdejo, Valentina; Gondim-Porto, Clarissa; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    Several species of the fungal genus Trichoderma establish biological interactions with various micro- and macro-organisms. Some of these interactions are relevant in ecological terms and in biotechnological applications, such as biocontrol, where Trichoderma could be considered as an invasive species that colonizes a recipient community. The success of this invasion depends on multiple factors, which can be assayed using experimental communities as study models. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to monitor the colonization and growth of T. cf. harzianum when it invades experimental communities. For this study, 16 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers of 10-mer were used to generate polymorphic patterns, one of which generated a band present only in strains of T. cf. harzianum. This band was cloned, sequenced, and five primers of 20-23 mer were designed. Primer pairs 2F2/2R2 and 2F2/2R3 successfully and specifically amplified fragments of 278 and 448 bp from the T. cf. harzianum BpT10a strain DNA, respectively. Both primer pairs were also tested against the DNA from 14 strains of T. cf. harzianum and several strains of different fungal genera as specificity controls. Only the DNA from the strains of T. cf. harzianum was successfully amplified. Moreover, primer pair 2F2/2R2 was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fungal DNA mixtures and DNA extracted from fungal experimental communities as templates. T. cf. harzianum was detectable even when as few as 100 copies of the SCAR marker were available or even when its population represented only 0.1% of the whole community. PMID:25367789

  20. Diagnostic value of molecular markers for Lr genes and characterization of leaf rust resistance of German winter wheat cultivars with regard to the stability of vertical resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albrecht Serfling; Ilona Krämer; Volker Lind; Edgar Schliephake; Frank Ordon

    Breeding for resistance is an efficient strategy to manage wheat leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina f. sp. tritici. However, a prerequisite for the directed use of Lr genes in breeding and the detection of new races virulent to these Lr genes is a detailed knowledge on Lr genes present in wheat cultivars. Therefore, respective molecular markers for 18 Lr

  1. Evaluation of molecular markers for discriminating Gonaterocerus morrilli: A biological control agent imported from the origin of the glassy-winged sharpshooter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the utility of molecular markers for discriminating between two very closely related species, Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) (imported from Texas) and G. walkerjonesi S. Triapitsyn (native to California), to determine whether post-release G. morrilli specimens could be detected and discri...

  2. Stanford Immunology Graduate Program Handbook

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    1 Stanford Immunology Graduate Program Handbook 2013-2014 #12;PhD Program in Immunology 2013-2014 PhD Handbook 2 The PhD Program in Immunology is one of thirteen Stanford Biosciences programs. The goal of the PhD Program in Immunology is to provide outstanding training and education for obtaining

  3. DEGREE PROGRAMME BSc (Hons) Immunology

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    BSc (Hons) Immunology DEGREE PROGRAMME GUIDE 2013-2014 #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology Introduction - Year 4 Introduction Immunology developed as the study of how the body defends itself against pathogens health and regulating disease have become apparent. As a result, immunology incorporates a wide variety

  4. Molecular characterization and population structure of the macaw palm, Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae), ex situ germplasm collection using microsatellites markers.

    PubMed

    Lanes, Éder C M; Motoike, Sérgio Y; Kuki, Kacilda N; Nick, Carlos; Freitas, Renata D

    2015-01-01

    The Acrocomia aculeata is one of the most promising plants for sustainable production of renewable energy. In order to understand patterns of the distribution of the allelic diversity of A. aculeata ex situ germplasm collection, the present study investigated the hypothesis that the genetic variability of the accessions may match their geographical origin. A genotypic analysis of 77 A. aculeata accessions was conducted with 6 simple sequence repeat markers. A high degree of molecular diversity among the accessions was found, with an average of 9 alleles per locus and a polymorphic information content with a mean of 0.76. A total of 4 clusters was identified by the Bayesian analysis of population structure. The highest subpopulation diversity was identified in Pop1, mainly formed by accessions from State of Mato Grosso do Sul. The populations Pop2A, Pop2B, and Pop2C, all from the State of Minas Gerais, showed high genetic variability as determined by a higher F st, and a wide genetic variance, which were identified within and among the population by analysis of molecular variance. Based on our results and on Vavilov's theory on crop origins, one possible diversity center for A. aculeata is proposed to be in a region in southeast Brazil. PMID:25425677

  5. Morphological and molecular profiling of Spirogyra from northeastern and northern Thailand using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    Wongsawad, Pheravut; Peerapornpisal, Yuwadee

    2014-01-01

    Green algae, Spirogyra (Chlorophyta), are found in a wide range of habitats including small stagnant water bodies, rivers, and streams. Species identification of Spirogyra based on morphological characteristics has proven to be a difficult process. An accurate identification method is required to evaluate genetic variations. This study is aimed at investigating the molecular profiling of 19 samples of Spirogyra from northern and northeastern Thailand. The morphological characteristics of each sample were recorded, viz. cell dimensions (width and length), along with the number and arrangement of chloroplast spirals/pyrenoids. With regard to a correlation of the biological and ecological parameters, conductivity was clearly significantly related to the number of pyrenoids. While DO is negatively related to the number of chloroplast spirals. Molecular studies with 10 ISSR primers were amplified to examine the DNA fingerprints. Morphological characters were determined to be significantly different by revealing 5 traits (P < 0.05) for all specimens. In addition, the DNA markers of all specimens were investigated using 10 ISSR primers. The results show that the PCR technique amplified 108 fragments. An analysis of the DNA fragments grouped all samples by ISRR-PCR, which were then separated into two groups according to their distribution. PMID:26150742

  6. Expanding Character Sampling for Ciliate Phylogenetic Inference Using Mitochondrial SSU-rDNA as a Molecular Marker

    PubMed Central

    Dunthorn, Micah; Foissner, Wilhelm; Katz, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular systematics of ciliates, particularly at deep nodes, has largely focused on increasing taxon sampling using the nuclear small subunit rDNA (nSSU-rDNA) locus. These previous analyses have generally been congruent with morphologically-based classifications, although there is extensive non-monophyly at many levels. However, caution is needed in interpreting these results as nSSU-rDNA is just a single molecular marker. Here the mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU-rDNA) is evaluated for deep ciliate nodes using the Colpodea as an example. Overall, well-supported nodes in the mtSSU-rDNA and concatenated topologies are well supported in the nSSU-rDNA topology; e.g., the non-monophyly of the Cyrtolophosidida. The two moderately-to well-supported incongruences between the loci are the placement of the Sorogenida and Colpoda aspera. Our analyses of mtSSU-rDNA support the conclusion, originally derived from nSSU-rDNA, that the morphological characters used in taxonomic circumscriptions of the Colpodea represent a mixture of ancestral and derived states. This demonstration of the efficacy of the mtSSU-rDNA will enable phylogenetic reconstructions of deep nodes in the ciliate tree of life to move from a single-locus to a multi-locus approach. PMID:20708960

  7. Uses of molecular markers for understanding modern and historical ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, V. L.

    2010-12-01

    Information on current and historical population sizes and movements is important for understanding many aspects of ecosystem ecology such as responses to climate change. Such information can be surprisingly difficult to acquire, but can be estimated from clues contained in an organism’s DNA. Recent revolutions in molecular genetics, including direct sequencing and efficient mutation-detection methods, enable extraction of sequence information from even very small or ancient specimens. Furthermore, theoretical advances such as coalescent theory and molecular assignments are providing powerful tools to unlock secrets about changes in numbers, distributions and movements. Combination of these approaches with other types of data promises to provide especially useful insights into modern and paleoecosystems. I will provide examples of these applications from recent studies in ornithology.

  8. Cytokines and other immunological biomarkers in children's environmental health studies

    PubMed Central

    Duramad, Paurene; Tager, Ira B.; Holland, Nina T.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental exposures (e.g. pesticides, air pollution, and environmental tobacco smoke) during prenatal and early postnatal development have been linked to a growing number of childhood diseases including allergic disorders and leukemia. Because the immune response plays a critical role in each of these diseases, it is important to study the effects of toxicants on the developing immune system. Children's unique susceptibility to environmental toxicants has become an important focus of the field of immunotoxicology and the use of immune biomarkers in molecular epidemiology of children's environmental health is a rapidly expanding field of research. In this review, we discuss how markers of immune status and immunotoxicity are being applied to pediatric studies, with a specific focus on the various methods used to analyze T-helper-1/2 (Th1/Th2) cytokine profiles. Furthermore, we review recent data on the effects of children's environmental exposures to volatile organic compounds, metals, and pesticides on Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and the associations of Th1/Th2 profiles with adverse health outcomes such as pediatric respiratory diseases, allergies, cancer and diabetes. Although cytokine profiles are increasingly used in children's studies, there is still a need to acquire distribution data for different ages and ethnic groups of healthy children. These data will contribute to the validation and standardization of cytokine biomarkers for future studies. Application of immunological markers in epidemiological studies will improve the understanding of mechanisms that underlie associations between environmental exposures and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:17624696

  9. Temporal trends of molecular markers associated with artemether-lumefantrine tolerance/resistance in Bagamoyo district, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) constitutes a major threat to recent global malaria control achievements. Surveillance of molecular markers could act as an early warning system of ACT-resistance before clinical treatment failures are apparent. The aim of this study was to analyse temporal trends of established genotypes associated with artemether-lumefantrine tolerance/resistance before and after its deployment as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Tanzania 2006. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1) N86Y, Y184F, D1246Y and P. falciparum chloroquine transporter gene (pfcrt) K76T were analysed from dried blood spots collected during six consecutive studies from children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Fukayosi village, Bagamoyo District, Tanzania, between 2004–2011. Results There was a statistically significant yearly increase of pfmdr1 N86, 184F, D1246 and pfcrt K76 between 2006–2011 from 14% to 61% (yearly OR = 1.38 [95% CI 1.25-1.52] p < 0.0001), 14% to 35% (OR = 1.17 [95% CI 1.07-1.30] p = 0.001), 54% to 85% (OR = 1.21 [95% CI 1.03-1.42] p = 0.016) and 49% to 85% (OR = 1.33 [95% CI 1.17-1.51] p < 0.0001), respectively. Unlike for the pfmdr1 SNP, a significant increase of pfcrt K76 was observed already between 2004–2006, from 26% to 49% (OR = 1.68 [95% CI 1.17-2.40] p = 0.005). From 2006 to 2011 the pfmdr1 NFD haplotype increased from 10% to 37% (OR = 1.25 [95% CI 1.12-1.39] p < 0.0001), whereas the YYY haplotype decreased from 31% to 6% (OR = 0.73 [95% CI 0.56-0.98] p = 0.018). All 390 successfully analysed samples had one copy of the pfmdr1 gene. Conclusion The temporal selection of molecular markers associated with artemether-lumefantrine tolerance/resistance may represent an early warning sign of impaired future drug efficacy. This calls for stringent surveillance of artemether-lumefantrine efficacy in Tanzania and emphasizes the importance of molecular surveillance as a complement to standard in vivo trials. PMID:23506218

  10. Cotton Marker Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of available molecular markers for cotton, Cotton Incorporated has spearheaded an initiative to create the Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD), and several groups are actively involved in projects to generate, screen and map cotton molecular markers. CMD is a centralized databas...

  11. Immunology taught by human genetics.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic studies are rarely conducted for immunological purposes. Instead, they are typically driven by medical and evolutionary goals, such as understanding the predisposition or resistance to infectious or inflammatory diseases, the pathogenesis of such diseases, and human evolution in the context of the long-standing relationships between humans and their commensal and environmental microbes. However, the dissection of these experiments of Nature has also led to major immunological advances. In this review, we draw on some of the immunological lessons learned in the three branches of human molecular genetics most relevant to immunology: clinical genetics, epidemiological genetics, and evolutionary genetics. We argue that human genetics has become a new frontier not only for timely studies of specific features of human immunity, but also for defining general principles of immunity. These studies teach us about immunity as it occurs under "natural" conditions, through the transition from the almost complete wilderness that existed worldwide until about a century ago to the current unevenly distributed medically shaped environment. Hygiene, vaccines, antibiotics, and surgery have considerably decreased the burden of infection, but these interventions have been available only recently, so have yet to have a major impact on patterns of genomic diversity, making it possible to carry out unbiased evolutionary studies at the population level. Clinical genetic studies of childhood phenotypes have not been blurred by modern medicine either. Instead, medical advances have actually facilitated such studies, by making it possible for children with life-threatening infections to survive. In addition, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases have increased life expectancy at birth from ?20 yr to ?80 yr, providing unique opportunities to study the genetic basis of immunological phenomena against which there is no natural counterselection, such as reactivation and secondary infectious diseases and breakdown of self-tolerance manifesting as autoimmunity, in populations of adult and aging patients. Recently developed deep sequencing and stem cell technologies are of unprecedented power, and their application to human genetics is opening up exciting and timely possibilities for young immunologists seeking uncharted waters to explore. PMID:24092470

  12. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham; Moseley, Pope; Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy. PMID:25654553

  13. Immunological findings in autism.

    PubMed

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    The immunopathogenesis of autism is presented schematically in Fig. 1. Two main immune dysfunctions in autism are immune regulation involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity. Mercury and an infectious agent like the measles virus are currently two main candidate environmental triggers for immune dysfunction in autism. Genetically immune dysfunction in autism involves the MHC region, as this is an immunologic gene cluster whose gene products are Class I, II, and III molecules. Class I and II molecules are associated with antigen presentation. The antigen in virus infection initiated by the virus particle itself while the cytokine production and inflammatory mediators are due to the response to the putative antigen in question. The cell-mediated immunity is impaired as evidenced by low numbers of CD4 cells and a concomitant T-cell polarity with an imbalance of Th1/Th2 subsets toward Th2. Impaired humoral immunity on the other hand is evidenced by decreased IgA causing poor gut protection. Studies showing elevated brain specific antibodies in autism support an autoimmune mechanism. Viruses may initiate the process but the subsequent activation of cytokines is the damaging factor associated with autism. Virus specific antibodies associated with measles virus have been demonstrated in autistic subjects. Environmental exposure to mercury is believed to harm human health possibly through modulation of immune homeostasis. A mercury link with the immune system has been postulated due to the involvement of postnatal exposure to thimerosal, a preservative added in the MMR vaccines. The occupational hazard exposure to mercury causes edema in astrocytes and, at the molecular level, the CD95/Fas apoptotic signaling pathway is disrupted by Hg2+. Inflammatory mediators in autism usually involve activation of astrocytes and microglial cells. Proinflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and TARC), and an anti-inflammatory and modulatory cytokine, TGF-beta1, are consistently elevated in autistic brains. In measles virus infection, it has been postulated that there is immune suppression by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and maturation and downregulation MHC class II expression. Cytokine alteration of TNF-alpha is increased in autistic populations. Toll-like-receptors are also involved in autistic development. High NO levels are associated with autism. Maternal antibodies may trigger autism as a mechanism of autoimmunity. MMR vaccination may increase risk for autism via an autoimmune mechanism in autism. MMR antibodies are significantly higher in autistic children as compared to normal children, supporting a role of MMR in autism. Autoantibodies (IgG isotype) to neuron-axon filament protein (NAFP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are significantly increased in autistic patients (Singh et al., 1997). Increase in Th2 may explain the increased autoimmunity, such as the findings of antibodies to MBP and neuronal axonal filaments in the brain. There is further evidence that there are other participants in the autoimmune phenomenon. (Kozlovskaia et al., 2000). The possibility of its involvement in autism cannot be ruled out. Further investigations at immunological, cellular, molecular, and genetic levels will allow researchers to continue to unravel the immunopathogenic mechanisms' associated with autistic processes in the developing brain. This may open up new avenues for prevention and/or cure of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:16512356

  14. Molecular characterization of Syrian date palm cultivars using plasmid-like DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Haider, N; Nabulsi, I

    2012-02-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the most important domesticated fruit trees in the Near East and North African countries. This tree has been, for several decades, in serious threat of being completely destroyed by the "Bayoud" disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. In this study, 18 Syrian date palm cultivars and four male trees were analyzed according to the identity of mitochondrial plasmid-like DNAs. A PCR strategy that employs plasmid-like DNAs-specific primer pair was used. These primers amplify a product of either 373-bp or 265-bp that corresponds to the S-(Bayoud-susceptible) or the R-plasmid (Bayoud-resistant), respectively. Generated data revealed that only six cultivars ('Medjool', 'Ashrasi', 'Gish Rabi', 'Khineze', and yellow- and red-'Kabkab') have the S-plasmid, suggesting their susceptibility to the fusariosis, while the remaining 12 cultivars and the four male trees contain the R-plasmid, suggesting their resistance to the fusariosis. The PCR process applied here has been proved efficient for the rapid screening for the presence of the S and R DNAs in Syrian date palm. PCR markers developed in this study could be useful for the screening of date palm lines growing in the field. The availability of such diagnostic tool for plasmid characterization in date palm would also be of great importance in establishing propagation and breeding programs of date palm in Syria. PMID:22568006

  15. Molecular characterization and differentiation of five horse breeds raised in Algeria using polymorphic microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Berber, N; Gaouar, S; Leroy, G; Kdidi, S; Tabet Aouel, N; Saïdi Mehtar, N

    2014-10-01

    In this study, genetic analyses of diversity and differentiation were performed on five horse breeds raised in Algeria (Barb, Arab-Barb, Arabian, Thoroughbred and French Trotter). All microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic in all the breeds. A total of 123 alleles from 14 microsatellite loci were detected in 201 horses. The average number of alleles per locus was the highest in the Arab-Barb horses (7.86) and lowest in the thoroughbred breed (5.71), whereas the observed and expected heterozygosities per breed ranged from 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.752 (Barb) and 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.77 (Arab-Barb), respectively. The genetic differentiation between the breeds was significant (p < 0.01) based on the infinitesimal model (FST ). Three different approaches for evaluating the genetic relationships were applied. Genetic distances, the factorial correspondence analysis and structure analysis showed that a significant amount of genetic variation is maintained in the native horse populations and the other breeds. The Barb and Arab-Barb breeds seem to be the most genetically related and support the decision to consider the breeds as same population. PMID:24834806

  16. Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2012-05-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors. PMID:22679860

  17. Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijewski, T.; ?mietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2011-02-01

    The genetic constitution of mussels ( Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction between the Black Sea and Mediterranean populations and a higher incidence of M. trossulus than reported so far in northern European populations. The frequency of M. galloprovincialis nuclear alleles was high along the Iberian Peninsula and decreased abruptly along the French coasts with a high frequency of M. edulis alleles in the Bay of Biscay, The Netherlands, Germany, Iceland, Barents and White Seas, and with little evidence of introgression between the two taxa. M. trossulus alleles were observed in the Baltic Sea and Danish Straits as expected. In addition, occurrence of M. trossulus alleles in cold waters of Iceland, Barents Sea and White Sea is reported for the first time.

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for molecular genetic diversity in Siganus fuscescens.

    PubMed

    Ning, Y F; Li, Z B; Li, Q H; Dai, G; Shangguan, J B; Yuan, Y; Huang, Y S

    2015-01-01

    The rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens is an economically valuable species that is widely distributed throughout the estuaries, intertidal, and offshore coasts of the Indo-Pacific and eastern Mediterranean. Ten novel microsatellite loci from the genome of S. fuscescens were developed using the fast isolation protocol with amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats. Polymorphisms in these 10 microsatellite markers were determined from 32 wild individuals. The number of alleles per locus and the polymorphism information content ranged from 2 to 5 and from 0.059 to 0.668, respectively. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.063 to 0.781 and from 0.062 to 0.731, respectively. Although 1 locus (LZY-X7, P < 0.005) showed significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no deviations were detected in the other 9 loci. These microsatellite loci may be useful for further population genetic studies, conservation studies, population structure assessment, and linkage map construction of S. fuscescens. PMID:25729939

  19. Fasciola hepatica: identification of molecular markers for resistant and susceptible Pseudosuccinea columella snail hosts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alfredo; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Fraga, Jorge; Jobet, Edouard; Modat, Sylvain; Pérez, R T; Yong, Mary; Sanchez, J; Loker, Eric S; Théron, André

    2003-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis, RAPD-PCR and nuclear rDNA ITS sequencing were performed to search for genetic differences between Pseudosuccinea columella snails susceptible and resistant to Fasciola hepatica infection. Of the 21 enzymatic loci analyzed in both populations, none of them exhibited neither within- or between-group variation. Such an absence of enzyme polymorphism support the hypothesis of selfing as the "prevalent" mating system for this hermaphroditic species. Conversely, the RAPD profiles displayed clear differences between susceptible and resistant isolates for 17 of the 26 primers tested while no within-group variation was detected. rDNA ITS sequence analysis from snails of each isolates showed only two bases that differed between groups accounting for a 0.17% of variation confirming that susceptible and resistant snails belong to the same species. This is the first time that a genetic variation using RAPD markers is demonstrated between susceptible and resistant lymnaeid snails vis-a-vis of F. hepatica infection in absence of experimental selection. PMID:14990314

  20. Retrotransposon-based molecular markers for analysis of genetic diversity within the Genus Linum.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Nataliya V; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Zelenin, Alexander V; Lakunina, Valentina A; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Speranskaya, Anna S; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Uroshlev, Leonid A; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V; Sadritdinova, Asiya F; Koroban, Nadezda V; Amosova, Alexandra V; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Guzenko, Elena V; Lemesh, Valentina A; Savilova, Anastasya M; Rachinskaia, Olga A; Kishlyan, Natalya V; Rozhmina, Tatiana A; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Muravenko, Olga V

    2014-01-01

    SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

  1. Detection of self-incompatible oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus L.) based on molecular markers for identification of the class I S haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Havlícková, Lenka; Jozová, Eva; Klíma, Miroslav; Kucera, Vratislav; Curn, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    The selection of desirable genotypes with recessive characteristics, such as self-incompatible plants, is often difficult or even impossible and represents a crucial barrier in accelerating the breeding process. Molecular approaches and selection based on molecular markers can allow breeders to overcome this limitation. The use of self-incompatibility is an alternative in hybrid breeding of oilseed rape. Unfortunately, stable self-incompatibility is recessive and phenotype-based selection is very difficult and time-consuming. The development of reliable molecular markers for detecting desirable plants with functional self-incompatible genes is of great importance for breeders and allows selection at early stages of plant growth. Because most of these reliable molecular markers are based on discrimination of class I S-locus genes that are present in self-compatible plants, there is a need to use an internal control in order to detect possible PCR inhibition that gives false results during genotyping. In this study, 269 double haploid F2 oilseed rape plants obtained by microspore embryogenesis were used to verify the applicability of an improved PCR assay based on the detection of the class I SLG gene along with an internal control. Comparative analysis of the PCR genotyping results vs. S phenotype analysis confirmed the applicability of this molecular approach in hybrid breeding programs. This approach allows accurate detection of self-incompatible plants via a different amplification profile. PMID:25249779

  2. Detection of self-incompatible oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus L.) based on molecular markers for identification of the class I S haplotype.

    PubMed

    Havlícková, Lenka; Jozová, Eva; Klíma, Miroslav; Kucera, Vratislav; Curn, Vladislav

    2014-09-01

    The selection of desirable genotypes with recessive characteristics, such as self-incompatible plants, is often difficult or even impossible and represents a crucial barrier in accelerating the breeding process. Molecular approaches and selection based on molecular markers can allow breeders to overcome this limitation. The use of self-incompatibility is an alternative in hybrid breeding of oilseed rape. Unfortunately, stable self-incompatibility is recessive and phenotype-based selection is very difficult and time-consuming. The development of reliable molecular markers for detecting desirable plants with functional self-incompatible genes is of great importance for breeders and allows selection at early stages of plant growth. Because most of these reliable molecular markers are based on discrimination of class I S-locus genes that are present in self-compatible plants, there is a need to use an internal control in order to detect possible PCR inhibition that gives false results during genotyping. In this study, 269 double haploid F2 oilseed rape plants obtained by microspore embryogenesis were used to verify the applicability of an improved PCR assay based on the detection of the class I SLG gene along with an internal control. Comparative analysis of the PCR genotyping results vs. S phenotype analysis confirmed the applicability of this molecular approach in hybrid breeding programs. This approach allows accurate detection of self-incompatible plants via a different amplification profile. PMID:25249779

  3. A mitochondrial molecular marker, ori-rep-tra, for differentiation of yeast species.

    PubMed Central

    Piskur, J; Mozina, S S; Stenderup, J; Pedersen, M B

    1995-01-01

    Yeasts exhibit various mechanisms for the inheritance of their mitochondrial genomes. Differences among these mechanisms are based on variations within nuclear as well as mitochondrial genetic elements. Here we report diagnostic differences in the presence of biologically active mitochondrial intergenic sequences, ori-reptra, among related yeasts in the genera Saccharomyces, Arxiozyma, Debaryomyces, Kluyveromyces, Pachytichospora, Torulaspora, and Zygosaccharomyces. A molecular probe containing ori-rep-tra can be employed specifically for the differentiation and identification of isolates belonging to the species complex Saccharomyces sensu stricto. PMID:7618892

  4. Molecular phylogeography of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) and genetic relationships with congeners using cytochrome b gene marker.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Song, Sze-Looi; Prasartvit, Anchana; Lim, Phaik-Eem

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an important emerging zoonotic parasite causing human eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in many parts of the world. To-date there is only a single study using mitochondrial cytochrome b (CYTB) gene to determine its genetic structure in eight geographical localities in Thailand. The present study examined the molecular phylogeography of this rat lungworm and its phylogenetic relationship with congeners using CYTB gene marker. A total of 15 CYTB haplotypes was found in 37 sequences from 14 geographical localities (covering north, west, east, central and south regions) in Thailand. These CYTB haplotypes were distinct from those of A. cantonensis for China and Hawaii. In Thailand, some CYTB haplotypes appeared to be confined to specific geographical localities. The partial CYTB DNA nucleotide sequences separated unequivocally the A. cantonensis isolates of Thailand, China and Hawaii as well as the congeners Angiostrongylus malaysiensis, A. costaricensis and Angiostrongylus vasorum, with A. malaysiensis grouped with A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis grouped with A. vasorum. Likewise the congeners of Metastrongylus and Onchocerca genera could also be clearly differentiated. The present study added two new definitive hosts (Bandicota savilei and Rattus losea) and three new localities (Mae Hong Son in the north, Tak in the west, and Phang Nga in the south) for A. malaysiensis in Thailand, indicating its wide occurrence in the country. Three CYTB haplotypes were found in the Thailand samples of A. malaysiensis. In addition to differentiation of congeners, CYTB gene marker could be used for determining the genetic diversity of a given population/taxon. PMID:25930187

  5. Advances in molecular biomarkers for gastric cancer: miRNAs as emerging novel cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua-Hsi; Lin, Wen-chang; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the stomach is one of the most prevalent cancer types in the world. Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining, the outcomes of gastric cancer patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early gastric cancer. Modern biomedical research has explored many potential gastric cancer biomarker genes by utilising serum protein antigens, oncogenic genes or gene families through improving molecular biological technologies, such as microarray, RNA-Seq and the like. Recently, the small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be critical regulators in the oncogenesis pathways and to serve as useful clinical biomarkers. This new class of biomarkers is emerging as a novel molecule for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, including gastric cancer. By translational suppression of target genes, miRNAs play a significant role in the gastric cancer cell physiology and tumour progression. There are potential implications of previously discovered gastric cancer molecular biomarkers and their expression modulations by respective miRNAs. Therefore, many miRNAs are found to play oncogenic roles or tumour-suppressing functions in human cancers. With the surprising stability of miRNAs in tissues, serum or other body fluids, miRNAs have emerged as a new type of cancer biomarker with immeasurable clinical potential. PMID:24456939

  6. Comparative protein profiles: potential molecular markers from spermatozoa of Acipenseriformes (Chondrostei, Pisces).

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Hulak, Martin; Rodina, Marek; Sulc, Miroslav; Li, Zhi-Hua; Linhart, Otomar

    2010-12-01

    Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseriformes), the source of roe consumed as caviar, are a unique and commercially valuable group of ancient fishes. In this study, comparative proteomics was used to analyze protein profiles of spermatozoa from five sturgeon species and one paddlefish: Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii), sterlet (A. ruthenus), Russian sturgeon (A. gueldenstaedtii), starry sturgeon (A. stellatus), beluga (Huso huso), and Mississippi paddlefish (Polyodon spathula). Protein profiles of spermatozoa were determined by isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) high-resolution gels. The peptides, previously selected by 2-DE analysis as potentially species-specific, were obtained by "in-gel" tryptic digestion, followed by matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Among the 23 protein spots selected, 14 were identified as isoforms of enolase B present in all species, but with different isoelectric points or molecular mass. Exceptions were A. ruthenus and H. huso, species with a close phylogenetic relationship. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was detected exclusively in P. spathula. Phosphoglycerate kinase was detected only in A. ruthenus and H. huso, and 3 additional proteins (fructose bisphosphate aldolase A-2, glycogen phosphorylase type IV and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) were found exclusively in A. gueldenstaedtii and H. huso. This study points to the application of proteomics for differential characterization and comparative studies of acipenseriform species at the molecular level. PMID:20869341

  7. Molecular and Contextual Markers of Hepatitis C Virus and Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Drumright, Lydia N.; Frost, Simon D.W.; Commins, Deborah; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Scott, William K.; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde; Page, J. Bryan; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Francisco; Singer, Elyse; Levine, Andrew; Minagar, Alireza; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Kotila, Taiwo; Chiappelli, Francesco; Sinnott, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves a complex interplay of social risks, and molecular factors of both virus and host. Injection drug abuse is the most powerful risk factor for HCV infection, followed by sexual transmission and additional non-injection drug abuse factors such as co-infection with other viruses and barriers to treatment. It is clearly important to understand the wider context in which the factors related to HCV infection occur. This understanding is required for a comprehensive approach leading to the successful prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV. An additional consideration is that current treatments and advanced molecular methods are generally unavailable to socially disadvantaged patients. Thus, the recognition of behavioral/social, viral, and host factors as components of an integrated approach to HCV is important to help this vulnerable group. Equally important, this approach is key to the development of personalized patient treatment – a significant goal in global healthcare. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the impact of drug abuse, epidemiology, social behavior, virology, immunopathology, and genetics on HCV infection and the course of disease. PMID:19650670

  8. Validity of the bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae) based on morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Muto, Maki; Yamada, Minoru; Arizono, Naoki; Rausch, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    The bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi is described based upon the morphology of adult tapeworms recovered from the brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi) and larval plerocercoids found in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from Kodiak Island in Alaska in 1952. However, in 1987 D. ursi was synonymized with Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, and the taxonomic relationship between both species has not subsequently been revised. In this study mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) sequences of holotype and paratype D. ursi specimens that had been preserved in a formalin-acetic acid-alcohol solution since the time the species was initially described approximately 60 yr ago were analyzed. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 sequences revealed that D. ursi is more closely related to D. dendriticum than it is to Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense and Diphyllobothrium latum. In addition to molecular evidence, differences in the life cycle and ecology of the larval plerocercoids between D. ursi and D. dendriticum also suggest that D. ursi is a distinct species, separate from D. dendriticum and D. nihonkaiense, and also possibly from D. latum . PMID:22663179

  9. Population typing of the causal agent of cassava bacterial blight in the Eastern Plains of Colombia using two types of molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular typing of pathogen populations is an important tool for the development of effective strategies for disease control. Diverse molecular markers have been used to characterize populations of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), the main bacterial pathogen of cassava. Recently, diversity and population dynamics of Xam in the Colombian Caribbean coast were estimated using AFLPs, where populations were found to be dynamic, diverse and with haplotypes unstable across time. Aiming to examine the current state of pathogen populations located in the Colombian Eastern Plains, we also used AFLP markers and we evaluated the usefulness of Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) as new molecular markers for the study of Xam populations. Results The population analyses showed that AFLP and VNTR provide a detailed and congruent description of Xam populations from the Colombian Eastern Plains. These two typing strategies clearly separated strains from the Colombian Eastern Plains into distinct populations probably because of geographical distance. Although the majority of analyses were congruent between typing markers, fewer VNTRs were needed to detect a higher number of genetic populations of the pathogen as well as a higher genetic flow among sampled locations than those detected by AFLPs. Conclusions This study shows the advantages of VNTRs over AFLPs in the surveillance of pathogen populations and suggests the implementation of VNTRs in studies that involve large numbers of Xam isolates in order to obtain a more detailed overview of the pathogen to improve the strategies for disease control. PMID:24946775

  10. New insights into family relationships within the avian superfamily Sylvioidea (Passeriformes) based on seven molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The circumscription of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea is a matter of long ongoing debate. While the overall inclusiveness has now been mostly agreed on and 20 families recognised, the phylogenetic relationships among the families are largely unknown. We here present a phylogenetic hypothesis for Sylvioidea based on one mitochondrial and six nuclear markers, in total ~6.3 kbp, for 79 ingroup species representing all currently recognised families and some species with uncertain affinities, making this the most comprehensive analysis of this taxon. Results The resolution, especially of the deeper nodes, is much improved compared to previous studies. However, many relationships among families remain uncertain and are in need of verification. Most families themselves are very well supported based on the total data set and also by indels. Our data do not support the inclusion of Hylia in Cettiidae, but do not strongly reject a close relationship with Cettiidae either. The genera Scotocerca and Erythrocercus are closely related to Cettiidae, but separated by relatively long internodes. The families Paridae, Remizidae and Stenostiridae clustered among the outgroup taxa and not within Sylvioidea. Conclusions Although the phylogenetic position of Hylia is uncertain, we tentatively support the recognition of the family Hyliidae Bannerman, 1923 for this genus and Pholidornis. We propose new family names for the genera Scotocerca and Erythrocercus, Scotocercidae and Erythrocercidae, respectively, rather than including these in Cettiidae, and we formally propose the name Macrosphenidae, which has been in informal use for some time. We recommend that Paridae, Remizidae and Stenostiridae are not included in Sylvioidea. We also briefly discuss the problems of providing a morphological diagnosis when proposing a new family-group name (or genus-group name) based on a clade. PMID:22920688

  11. Identification of Barramundi (Lates calcarifer) DC-SCRIPT, a Specific Molecular Marker for Dendritic Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Zoccola, Emmanuelle; Delamare-Deboutteville, Jérôme; Barnes, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is a critical step bridging innate immune recognition and specific immune memory. In mammals, the process is orchestrated by dendritic cells (DCs) in the lymphatic system, which initiate clonal proliferation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, fish lack a classical lymphatic system and there are currently no cellular markers for DCs in fish, thus antigen-presentation in fish is poorly understood. Recently, antigen-presenting cells similar in structure and function to mammalian DCs were identified in various fish, including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). The present study aimed to identify a potential molecular marker for DCs in fish and therefore targeted DC-SCRIPT, a well-conserved zinc finger protein that is preferentially expressed in all sub-types of human DCs. Putative dendritic cells were obtained in culture by maturation of spleen and pronephros-derived monocytes. DC-SCRIPT was identified in barramundi by homology using RACE PCR and genome walking. Specific expression of DC-SCRIPT was detected in barramundi cells by Stellaris mRNA FISH, in combination with MHCII expression when exposed to bacterial derived peptidoglycan, suggesting the presence of DCs in L. calcarifer. Moreover, morphological identification was achieved by light microscopy of cytospins prepared from these cultures. The cultured cells were morphologically similar to mammalian and trout DCs. Migration assays determined that these cells have the ability to move towards pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns, with a preference for peptidoglycans over lipopolysaccharides. The cells were also strongly phagocytic, engulfing bacteria and rapidly breaking them down. Barramundi DCs induced significant proliferation of responder populations of T-lymphocytes, supporting their role as antigen presenting cells. DC-SCRIPT expression in head kidney was higher 6 and 24 h following intraperitoneal challenge with peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide and declined after 3 days relative to PBS-injected controls. Relative expression was also lower in the spleen at 3 days post challenge but increased again at 7 days. As DC-SCRIPT is a constitutively expressed nuclear receptor, independent of immune activation, this may indicate initial migration of immature DCs from head kidney and spleen to the injection site, followed by return to the spleen for maturation and antigen presentation. DC-SCRIPT may be a valuable tool in the investigation of antigen presentation in fish and facilitate optimisation of vaccines and adjuvants for aquaculture. PMID:26173015

  12. Molecular diversity of Enteromorpha from the coast of Yantai: a dual-marker assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Zhengyi; Wang, Yinchu; Zhao, Yushan; Qin, Song

    2013-11-01

    We collected nine Enteromorpha specimens from the coast of Yantai and evaluated their diversity based on analyses of their ITS (internal transcribed spacer) and 5S rDNA NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sequences. The ITS sequences showed slight nucleotide divergences between Enteromorpha linza and Enteromorpha prolifera. In contrast, multiple highly variable regions were found in the ITS region of Enteromorpha flexuosa. In general, there were more variable sites in the NTS region than in the ITS region in the three species. The variations in 5S rDNA NTS sequences indicated that the molecular diversity of Enteromorpha from the coast of Yantai is very high. However, a phylogenetic tree constructed using 5S rDNA NTS sequence data indicated that genetic differences were not directly related to geographical distribution.

  13. Origins of the amphiploid species Brassica napus L. investigated by chloroplast and nuclear molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amphiploid species Brassica napus (oilseed rape, Canola) is a globally important oil crop yielding food, biofuels and industrial compounds such as lubricants and surfactants. Identification of the likely ancestors of each of the two genomes (designated A and C) found in B. napus would facilitate incorporation of novel alleles from the wider Brassica genepool in oilseed rape crop genetic improvement programmes. Knowledge of the closest extant relatives of the genotypes involved in the initial formation of B. napus would also allow further investigation of the genetic factors required for the formation of a stable amphiploid and permit the more efficient creation of fully fertile re-synthesised B. napus. We have used a combination of chloroplast and nuclear genetic markers to investigate the closest extant relatives of the original maternal progenitors of B. napus. This was based on a comprehensive sampling of the relevant genepools, including 83 accessions of A genome B. rapa L. (both wild and cultivated types), 94 accessions of B. napus and 181 accessions of C genome wild and cultivated B. oleracea L. and related species. Results Three chloroplast haplotypes occurred in B. napus. The most prevalent haplotype (found in 79% of accessions) was not present within the C genome accessions but was found at low frequencies in B. rapa. Chloroplast haplotypes characteristic of B. napus were found in a small number of wild and weedy B. rapa populations, and also in two accessions of cultivated B. rapa 'brocoletto'. Whilst introgression of the B. napus chloroplast type in the wild and weedy B. rapa populations has been proposed by other studies, the presence of this haplotype within the two brocoletto accessions is unexplained. Conclusions The distribution of chloroplast haplotypes eliminate any of the C genome species as being the maternal ancestor of the majority of the B. napus accessions. The presence of multiple chloroplast haplotypes in B. napus and B. rapa accessions was not correlated with nuclear genetic diversity as determined by AFLPs, indicating that such accessions do not represent recent hybrids. Whilst some chloroplast diversity observed within B. napus can be explained by introgression from inter-specific crosses made during crop improvement programmes, there is evidence that the original hybridisation event resulting in to B. napus occurred on more than one occasion, and involved different maternal genotypes. PMID:20350303

  14. Molecular markers to assess short-term disease local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    XU, TAO; SU, BOJIN; WANG, CHUNHUA; WANG, SUMEI; HUANG, HECHENG; PAN, YUNBAO; WANG, DONGHUI; WEI, WEIHONG; CLARET, FRANÇOIS X.; YANG, HUILING

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) research is to develop effective predictors of tumor recurrence following treatment to determine whether immediate adjuvant therapy is necessary. We retrospectively analyzed archived specimens collected from 45 patients with paired samples of primary NPC (pNPC) and recurrent NPC (rNPC). Clinical samples were collected from the Cancer Center Databases of the First People’s Hospital of Foshan and Shantou Central Hospital (affiliates of Sun Yat-Sen University) between 2001 and 2012. Expression levels of phosphor-Stat3 (p-Stat3), signalosome complex subunit 5 (Jab1/Csn5), Akt1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Ki-67, and apoptosis were determined by immunohistochemistry in pNPC and rNPC samples from the same patients. Differences in these markers between the short-term interval to recurrence (ITR) group (ITR <18 months) and long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months) were further analyzed. In Cox’s regression analysis, the ITR was significantly associated as an independent-negative prognostic factor for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.211; 95% confidence interval, 0.053–0.841; P=0.027). p-Stat3 was increased in the short-term ITR group (ITR <18 months) and tended to be lower in the long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months). In the short-term ITR group, nuclear Akt expression was significantly increased in paired rNPC (P=0.028). In the long-term ITR group, the expression of nuclear Jab1/Csn5 (P=0.047) and assessment of apoptosis measured with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) (P=0.003) was significantly increased in paired rNPC. The results suggest that differences between short- and long-term ITR may predict outcome in rNPC. Furthermore, the overexpression of Jab1/Csn5 and Akt may contribute to the carcinogenesis of rNPC, and Akt seems to promote the progression of short-term ITR. Intra-individual changes of Jab1/Csn5, Akt, and TUNEL may help to identify short-term ITR. PMID:25607111

  15. Sequestration of organic nitrogen in a paddy soil chronosequence as assessed by amino sugars molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Philipp; Lehndorff, E.; Cao, Z.; Amelung, W.

    2010-05-01

    Available nitrogen is a limiting factor in paddy rice systems due to ammonia volatilization, denitrification and stabilization in organic complexes. Soil organic nitrogen (SON) might therefore constitute a critical component of the nitrogen cycle in rice systems. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of microorganisms for the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms. For this purpose we analyzed amino sugars as markers for the residues of bacteria and fungi in a chronosequence of soils that were used for paddy rice production for a period of 0 to 2000 years in the Hangzhou bay area in Southeast China. Within the soil profile, amino sugar concentrations were generally highest in the puddled Ap horizon and decreased with increasing depth along with organic carbon concentrations regardless of the time of rice cultivation. Nevertheless, a sharp increase of total amino sugar concentration from 0.1 g kg-1 to 0.3 g kg-1 was observed in the Ah horizon when comparing tidal wetland to salt marsh that had been impoldered 30 years ago, indicating an increasing importance of microbial residues in SON stabilization following the conversion of the semiaquatic marsh to a terrestrial system. With increased time of paddy rice cropping, amino sugar concentrations continued to increase up to a maximum of 2.1 g kg-1 after 300 years of paddy cultivation but declined again to 1 g kg-1 in soils with 700-2000 years history of cultivation despite increasing organic matter accumulation. Changes in the composition of the amino sugars were also most pronounced at initial stages of paddy rice management. The proportions of glucosamine (abundant in fungal chitin) decreased during the first 50 years of cultivation relative to mainly galactosamine (abundant in bacterial gums) and muramic acid (abundant in bacterial peptidoglycan), that remained at constantly low levels. At later stages of paddy rice cultivation, the ratios of glucosamine to galactosamine and to muramic acid re-increased. We conclude that microorganisms significantly contribute to the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms during the first 300 years of cropping, within an increasing contribution of bacteria as cropping time proceeds. At even longer periods of paddy rice cultivation, there appears to be a backshift to lower concentrations of microbial residues with higher proportions of fungal N remaining.

  16. Molecular mapping of the Pl(16) downy mildew resistance gene from HA-R4 to facilitate marker-assisted selection in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Gulya, Thomas J; Seiler, Gerald J; Vick, Brady A; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2012-06-01

    The major genes controlling sunflower downy mildew resistance have been designated as Pl genes. Ten of the more than 20 Pl genes reported have been mapped. In this study, we report the molecular mapping of gene Pl(16) in a sunflower downy mildew differential line, HA-R4. It was mapped on the lower end of linkage group (LG) 1 of the sunflower reference map, with 12 markers covering a distance of 78.9 cM. One dominant simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, ORS1008, co-segregated with Pl(16), and another co-dominant expressed sequence tag (EST)-SSR marker, HT636, was located 0.3 cM proximal to the Pl(16) gene. The HT636 marker was also closely linked to the Pl(13) gene in another sunflower differential line, HA-R5. Thus the Pl(16) and Pl(13) genes were mapped to a similar position on LG 1 that is different from the previously reported Pl(14) gene. When the co-segregating and tightly linked markers for the Pl(16) gene were applied to other germplasms or hybrids, a unique band pattern for the ORS1008 marker was detected in HA-R4 and HA-R5 and their F(1) hybrids. This is the first report to provide two tightly linked markers for both the Pl(16) and Pl(13) genes, which will facilitate marker-assisted selection in sunflower resistance breeding, and provide a basis for the cloning of these genes. PMID:22350177

  17. Processes Underpinning Development and Maintenance of Diversity in Rice in West Africa: Evidence from Combining Morphological and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Maat, Harro; Richards, Paul; Struik, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the interplay of artificial and natural selection in rice adaptation in low-input farming systems in West Africa. Using 20 morphological traits and 176 molecular markers, 182 farmer varieties of rice (Oryza spp.) from 6 West African countries were characterized. Principal component analysis showed that the four botanical groups (Oryza sativa ssp. indica, O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. glaberrima, and interspecific farmer hybrids) exhibited different patterns of morphological diversity. Regarding O. glaberrima, morphological and molecular data were in greater conformity than for the other botanical groups. A clear difference in morphological features was observed between O. glaberrima rices from the Togo hills and those from the Upper Guinea Coast, and among O. glaberrima rices from the Upper Guinea Coast. For the other three groups such clear patterns were not observed. We argue that this is because genetic diversity is shaped by different environmental and socio-cultural selection pressures. For O. glaberrima, recent socio-cultural selection pressures seemed to restrict genetic diversity while this was not observed for the other botanical groups. We also show that O. glaberrima still plays an important role in the selection practices of farmers and resulting variety development pathways. This is particularly apparent in the case of interspecific farmer hybrids where a relationship was found between pericarp colour, panicle attitude and genetic diversity. Farmer varieties are the product of long and complex trajectories of selection governed by local human agency. In effect, rice varieties have emerged that are adapted to West African farming conditions through genotype × environment × society interactions. The diversity farmers maintain in their rice varieties is understood to be part of a risk-spreading strategy that also facilitates successful and often serendipitous variety innovations. We advocate, therefore, that farmers and farmer varieties should be more effectively involved in crop development. PMID:24465809

  18. Molecular classification of prostate cancer progression: foundation for marker-driven treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Logothetis, Christopher J; Gallick, Gary E; Maity, Sankar N; Kim, Jeri; Aparicio, Ana; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2013-08-01

    Recently, many therapeutic agents for prostate cancer have been approved that target the androgen receptor and/or the prostate tumor microenvironment. Each of these therapies has modestly increased patient survival. A better understanding of when in the course of prostate cancer progression specific therapies should be applied, and of what biomarkers would indicate when resistance arises, would almost certainly improve survival due to these therapies. Thus, applying the armamentarium of therapeutic agents in the right sequences in the right combination at the right time is a major goal in prostate cancer treatment. For this to occur, an understanding of prostate cancer evolution during progression is required. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of prostate cancer progression, but challenge the prevailing view by proposing a new model of prostate cancer progression, with the goal of improving biologic classification and treatment strategies. We use this model to discuss how integrating clinical and basic understanding of prostate cancer will lead to better implementation of molecularly targeted therapeutics and improve patient survival. PMID:23811619

  19. Molecular Classification of Prostate Cancer Progression: Foundation for Marker driven-Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Christopher J; Gallick, Gary E.; Maity, Sankar N.; Kim, Jeri; Aparicio, Ana; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many therapeutic agents for prostate cancer (PCa) have been approved that target the androgen receptor and/or the prostate tumor microenvironment. Each of these therapies has modestly increased patient survival. However, if a better understanding as to when in the course of PCa progression specific therapies should be applied, and what biomarkers would indicate when resistance arises, survival due to these therapies would almost certainly improve. Thus, applying the armamentarium of therapeutic agents in the right sequences in the right combination at the right time is a major goal in prostate cancer treatment. For this to occur, an understanding of prostate cancer evolution during progression is required. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of PCa progression, but challenge the prevailing view by proposing a new model of PCa progression, with the goal of improving biologic classification and treatment strategies. We use this model to discuss how integrating clinical and basic understanding of PCa will lead to better implementation of molecularly-targeted therapeutics and improve patient survival. PMID:23811619

  20. Molecular characterization of Platonia insignis Mart. ("bacurizeiro") using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Souza, I G B; Souza, V A B; Lima, P S C

    2013-05-01

    Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae) is widespread throughout the Amazon and adjacent areas. The fruits (known locally as "bacuri") have significant commercial potential, but the species is under threat from agro-industrial expansion. The genetic variability within 72 genotypes of P. insignis belonging to ten populations collected in the Brazilian states of Maranhão and Piauí, and maintained in the germplasm collection of Embrapa Meio-Norte, has been determined, and the organization of genetic diversity within populations, between populations and among geographic groups verified. Eighteen selected inter simple sequence repeat primers allowed amplification of 236 loci of which 221 (93.64%) were polymorphic, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. At the population level, the Shannon and Nei diversity indices ranged from 0.082 to 0.323 and from 0.120 to 0.480, respectively. The global coefficient of genetic differentiation (G(ST)) was 0.4730 indicating that differentiation between populations was significant, a finding that was confirmed by analysis of molecular variance (?(ST) = 0.28). UPGMA cluster analysis revealed that the genotypes could be stratified into groups that were well defined and consistent with those identified in the dendrogram constructed using pair wise ?(ST) values. The high genetic diversity established in this study may facilitate the management and conservation of the germplasm of P. insignis. PMID:23275206

  1. Postallogeneic monitoring with molecular markers detected by pretransplant next-generation or Sanger sequencing predicts clinical relapse in patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuewen; Schroeder, Thomas; Zabelina, Tatjana; Badbaran, Anita; Bacher, Ulrike; Kobbe, Guido; Ayuk, Francis; Wolschke, Christine; Schnittger, Susanne; Kohlmann, Alexander; Haferlach, Torsten; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-03-01

    Relapse is the major cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative syndrome neoplasms (MDS/MPN). We evaluated the impact of molecular mutations on outcome and the value of molecular monitoring post-transplantation. We screened 45 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 39 patients, including seven with transformed-acute myeloid leukemia), MDS/MPN unclassifiable (n = 5), and atypical BCR-ABL1-negative CML (n = 1) for mutations in ASXL1, CBL, NRAS, and TET2 genes by molecular genetics including a sensitive next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique. In 36 patients, sufficient DNA was available for molecular analyses. In particular, TET2 and CBL mutations were screened applying amplicon deep sequencing. In 89% of cases, at least one mutation could be detected: ASXL1: n = 18 (50%); CBL: n = 7 (19%); TET2: n = 15 (42%); and NRAS: n = 11 (32%). Survival after AHSCT at 5 yr was 46% (95% CI 28-64%) and was not influenced by any mutation. After a median of 6 months after AHSCT in 33% of the patients, one of the molecular markers was still detectable, resulting in a higher incidence of relapse than in patients with undetectable mutations (50% vs. 15%, P = 0.04). In conclusion, pretransplant molecular mutation analysis can help to detect biomarkers in patients with MPN/MDS, which may be subsequently used as minimal residual disease markers after AHSCT. PMID:24164563

  2. Molecular Markers in Sex Hormone Pathway Genes Associated with the Efficacy of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lee, Yung-Chin; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Liu, Chia-Chu; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Huang, Chun-Nung; You, Bang-Jau; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Although most advanced prostate cancer patients respond to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), the efficacy is widely variable. We investigated whether the host genetic variations in sex hormone pathway genes are associated with the efficacy of ADT. A cohort of 645 patients with advanced prostate cancer treated with ADT was genotyped for 18 polymorphisms across 12 key genes involved in androgen and estrogen metabolism. We found that after adjusting for known risk factors in multivariate Cox regression models, AKR1C3 rs12529 and AR-CAG repeat length remained significantly associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after ADT (P?0.041). Furthermore, individuals carrying two unfavorable genotypes at these loci presented a 13.7-fold increased risk of PCSM compared with individuals carrying zero (P<0.001). Our results identify two candidate molecular markers in key genes of androgen and estrogen pathways associated with PCSM after ADT, establishing the role of pharmacogenomics in this therapy. PMID:23359804

  3. Identification of Ty1-copia retrotransposons in three ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes: evolutionary relationships and use as molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Díez, Jesús; Béguiristain, Thierry; Le Tacon, François; Casacuberta, Josep M; Tagu, Denis

    2003-04-01

    We amplified by PCR and sequenced 46 partial Ty1- copia reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes Pisolithus and Laccaria bicolor and the host tree Eucalyptus globulus. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these sequences represent a new class of Ty1- copia RT, characteristic of basidiomycetes but related to plant Ty1- copia retrotransposons. To generate fingerprints of L. bicolor strains, outward facing PCR primers annealing to RTs were designed. This method, which is a modification of the inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) analysis, enables the detection of polymorphisms or changes within the insertion sites of Ty1- copia elements in the genome. Using this method, we investigated whether the transposition of Ty1- copia elements was related to the somaclonal variation observed in L. bicolor S238, an inoculant strain used in French Douglas-fir plantations. Data indicated that no differences in the IRAP fingerprints were detected in phenotypic variants of L. bicolor S238. We reported here for the first time the presence of Ty1- copia retrotransposon sequences in basidiomycetes, which resulted in suitable targets for developing new molecular markers. PMID:12684843

  4. Predictive molecular markers of response to epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) family-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Barton, Sarah; Starling, Naureen; Swanton, Charles

    2010-12-01

    Constitutive activation of the EGFR/RAS/PI3K cell-signaling pathway that may occur through molecular aberrations in core pathway components occurs in many solid tumours, including colorectal cancer(CRC), non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC) and breast cancer. Predictive biomarkers of response to therapeutics targeting this pathway are necessary to select patients more likely to respond, and importantly, to avoid treating patients likely to suffer a worse outcome with therapy compared to standard of care. Determination of EGFR by immunohistochemistry(IHC) is not strongly predictive of response to EGFR-targeted therapy in CRC and NSCLC. EGFR gene mutations in the tyrosine kinase(TK) binding domain are predictive of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors(TKIs) in NSCLC, and the acquisition of a point mutation in a gene encoding an amino acid in an adjacent area, T790M, is predictive of resistance. However, novel irreversible EGFR inhibitors such as BIBW-2992 and HKI-272 may retain activity in tumours with T790M mutations. It is well established in CRC that mutations in KRAS are predictive of resistance to EGFR pathway inhibition, and may predict for a poorer outcome with therapy. Other potentially useful biomarkers of resistance to EGFR-targeted therapy in the process of clinical validation include mutations in BRAF, PTEN loss and PI3KCA mutations, nuclear factor-kappa beta(NF-??) pathway activity, and expression of alternative EGFR ligands. Functional genomics elucidation of drug resistance pathways using RNA interference (RNAi) techniques may provide novel therapeutic approaches in disease resistant to EGFR pathway targeting and accelerate predictive biomarker development. PMID:20718710

  5. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  6. Occurrence and suitability of pharmaceuticals and personal care products as molecular markers for raw wastewater contamination in surface water and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Han; Li, Jinhua; Hu, Jiangyong; Ong, Say Leong

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to provide the first and comprehensive data on the occurrence of 17 target pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in urban water environment in Singapore. Meanwhile, this study also verified the suitability of these PPCPs as specific markers of raw wastewater contamination in receiving water bodies in highly urbanized areas where both surface water and groundwater are not impacted by the discharge of treated wastewater effluents. Analytical results of wastewater showed that among 17 target PPCPs examined, only 5 PPCPs were detected in 100 % of raw wastewater samples, including acetaminophen (ACT), carbamazepine (CBZ), caffeine (CF), diethyltoluamide (DEET), and salicylic acid (SA). Similarly, these PPCPs were found in most surface water and groundwater. Interestingly, the three PPCPs (ACT, CBZ, and SA) were only detected in surface water and groundwater in the sampling sites close to relatively older sewer systems, while they were absent in background samples that were collected from the catchment with no known wastewater sources. This suggests that ACT, CBZ, and SA can be used as specific molecular markers of raw wastewater in surface water and groundwater. This study also confirmed that CF and DEET were not really associated with wastewater sources, thus cannot serve well as specific molecular markers of wastewater contamination in receiving water bodies. To the best knowledge of the authors, the use of ACT and SA as specific molecular markers of raw wastewater contamination in urban surface waters and groundwater was first reported. Further studies on the use of ACT, CBZ, and SA along with other chemical/microbial markers are recommended to identify and differentiate contamination sources of surface waters/groundwater. PMID:24352549

  7. Functional markers based molecular characterization and cloning of resistance gene analogs encoding NBS-LRR disease resistance proteins in finger millet (Eleusine coracana).

    PubMed

    Panwar, Preety; Jha, Anand Kumar; Pandey, P K; Gupta, Arun K; Kumar, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Magnaporthe grisea, the blast fungus is one of the main pathological threats to finger millet crop worldwide. A systematic search for the blast resistance gene analogs was carried out, using functional molecular markers. Three-fourths of the recognition-dependent disease resistance genes (R-genes) identified in plants encodes nucleotide binding site (NBS) leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. NBS-LRR homologs have only been isolated on a limited scale from Eleusine coracana. Genomic DNA sequences sharing homology with NBS region of resistance gene analogs were isolated and characterized from resistant genotypes of finger millet using PCR based approach with primers designed from conserved regions of NBS domain. Attempts were made to identify molecular markers linked to the resistance gene and to differentiate the resistant bulk from the susceptible bulk. A total of 9 NBS-LRR and 11 EST-SSR markers generated 75.6 and 73.5% polymorphism respectively amongst 73 finger millet genotypes. NBS-5, NBS-9, NBS-3 and EST-SSR-04 markers showed a clear polymorphism which differentiated resistant genotypes from susceptible genotypes. By comparing the banding pattern of different resistant and susceptible genotypes, five DNA amplifications of NBS and EST-SSR primers (NBS-05(504,) NBS-09(711), NBS-07(688), NBS-03(509) and EST-SSR-04(241)) were identified as markers for the blast resistance in resistant genotypes. Principal coordinate plot and UPGMA analysis formed similar groups of the genotypes and placed most of the resistant genotypes together showing a high level of genetic relatedness and the susceptible genotypes were placed in different groups on the basis of differential disease score. Our results provided a clue for the cloning of finger millet blast resistance gene analogs which not only facilitate the process of plant breeding but also molecular characterization of blast resistance gene analogs from Eleusine coracana. PMID:21116864

  8. Combining charcoal sediment and molecular markers to infer a Holocene fire history in the Maya lowlands of Petén, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgeorg, Torben; Schüpbach, Simon; Colombaroli, Daniele; Beffa, Giorgia; Radaelli, Marta; Kehrwald, Natalie; Barbante, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Holocene vegetation changes in the Maya Lowlands during the Holocene are a result of changing climate conditions, solely anthropogenic activities, or interactions of both factors. As a consequence, it is difficult to assess how tropical ecosystems will cope with projected changes in precipitation and land-use intensification over the next decades. We investigated the role of fire during the Holocene by combining different proxies. We distinguished between three different morphotypes (grass, wood and leaves) in macroscopic charcoal. We also determined the molecular fire proxies levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan. Combining these different fire proxies allows a more robust understanding of the complex history of fire regimes at different spatial scales during the Holocene. Comparing the two biomass burning proxies may help increase our understanding about advantages and limitations of molecular markers as proxies for past fire reconstruction in lake sediments. In order to infer changes in past biomass burning, we analysed a lake sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala (17°00'N, 89°50'W, 110 m above sea level), and compared our results with millennial-scale vegetation and climate change data available in this area. Some differences were observed between the two records and we assumed that while macroscopic charcoal represents a local fire signal, the molecular fire proxies records seem to be influenced by regional to supra-regional fire or low temperature fires. During the Holocene we detected three periods of high fire activity: 9500-6000 cal yr BP, 3800 cal yr BP and 2700 cal yr BP. We attributed the first maximum (9500-6000 cal yr BP) to only climate conditions, which corresponds with observations from previous studies in this region. The fast decrease in the relative abundance of woody charcoal to grass charcoal at the 3800 cal yr BP fire maximum may result from human activity, but we cannot exclude that this shift was related to climate conditions during this period. The last maximum (2700 cal yr BP) we attribute to the agricultural activity of the Maya at Lake Petén Itzá.

  9. Immunologic lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references.

  10. tostandoutfromthecrowd? NextGen Immunology

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Ehud

    to Immunology research Microbiome and host interactions in health and disease Immune cell development (thymus widely used therapeutics for diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Bone Marrow and medicine, including immunogenomics, microbiome study, host pathogen interactions, cancer immunology

  11. Identification and sequence characterisation of molecular markers polymorphic between male kiwifruit ( Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa (A. Chev.) A. Chev.) accessions exhibiting different flowering time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina Novo; Silvia Romo; Manuel Rey; María Jesús Prado; María Victoria González

    2010-01-01

    Fruit set in kiwifruit is strongly dependent on pollination, which is limited by the lack of efficient male pollen donors,\\u000a among other factors. We searched for molecular markers that could be polymorphic in relation to flowering time in order to\\u000a classify male kiwifruit plants to discard those that are not likely to perform as efficient pollen donors. Random amplified\\u000a polymorphic

  12. Identification and confirmation of molecular markers and orange flesh color associated with major QTL for high beta-carotene content in muskmelon

    E-print Network

    Napier, Alexandra Bamberger

    2009-05-15

    IDENTIFICATION AND CONFIRMATION OF MOLECULAR MARKERS AND ORANGE FLESH COLOR ASSOCIATED WITH MAJOR QTL FOR HIGH BETA-CAROTENE CONTENT IN MUSKMELON A Thesis by ALEXANDRA BAMBERGER NAPIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate... COLOR ASSOCIATED WITH MAJOR QTL FOR HIGH BETA-CAROTENE CONTENT IN MUSKMELON A Thesis by ALEXANDRA BAMBERGER NAPIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  13. Molecular Characterization of c-Abl\\/c-Src Kinase Inhibitors Targeted against Murine Tumour Progenitor Cells that Express Stem Cell Markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kruewel; Silvia Schenone; Marco Radi; Giovanni Maga; Astrid Rohrbeck; Maurizio Botta; Juergen Borlak; Maria A. Deli

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundThe non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Abl and c-Src are overexpressed in various solid human tumours. Inhibition of their hyperactivity represents a molecular rationale in the combat of cancerous diseases. Here we examined the effects of a new family of pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidines on a panel of 11 different murine lung tumour progenitor cell lines, that express stem cell markers, as well

  14. Purification and characterization of high- and low-molecular-mass isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Kinetic, structural and immunological evidence that the green algal enzyme is distinct from the prokaryotic and higher plant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Rivoal, J; Plaxton, W C; Turpin, D H

    1998-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme in the supply of carbon skeletons for the assimilation of nitrogen by green algae. Two PEPC isoforms with respective native molecular masses of 400 (PEPC1) and 650 (PEPC2) kDa have been purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 cc1883 (Chlorophyceae). SDS/PAGE, immunoblot and CNBr peptide-mapping analyses indicate the presence of the same 100 kDa PEPC catalytic subunit in both isoforms. PEPC1 is a homotetramer, whereas PEPC2 seems to be a complex between the PEPC catalytic subunit and other immunologically unrelated polypeptides of 50-70 kDa. Kinetic analyses indicate that these PEPC isoforms are (1) differentially regulated by pH, (2) activated by glutamine and dihydroxyacetone phosphate and (3) inhibited by glutamate, aspartate, 2-oxoglutarate and malate. These results are consistent with the current model for the regulation of anaplerotic carbon fixation in green algae, and demonstrate that green algal PEPCs are uniquely regulated by glutamine. Several techniques were used to assess the structural relationships between C. reinhardtii PEPC and the higher plant or prokaryotic enzyme. Immunoblot studies using anti-(green algal or higher plant PEPC) IgGs suggested that green algal (C. reinhardtii, Selenastrum minutum), higher plant (maize, banana fruit, tobacco) and prokaryotic (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Escherichia coli) PEPCs have little or no immunological relatedness. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the C. reinhardtii PEPC subunit did not have significant similarity to the highly conserved corresponding region in enzymes from higher plants, and CNBr cleavage patterns of green algal PEPCs were distinct from those of higher plant and cyanobacterial PEPCs. These results point to significant evolutionary divergence between green algal, higher plant and prokaryotic PEPCs. PMID:9512480

  15. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  16. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  17. Immunology Taught by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    After a half-century of mouse-dominated research, human immunology is making a comeback. Informed by mouse studies and powered by new techniques, human immune research is both advancing disease treatment and providing new insights into basic biology. PMID:22261029

  18. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  19. Immunology Infectious disease

    E-print Network

    Schüler, Axel

    asthma we hope to enlighten the exact mecha- nisms of induction of pathogenicity. Infection with A yeastKeywords Immunology Infectious disease Asthma risk factor » Dr. Uwe Müller The yeast-like organism Cryptococ- cus neoformans is an opportunistic pathogen for immunocompromised patients. Infection

  20. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Hypoxia in Human Xenografts: Comparing Hypoxia-Induced Gene Expression with Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers

    PubMed Central

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer 18F-FMISO and the reporter substrate 124I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: 124I-FIAU, 18F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. PMID:18922936

  1. Characterization of Extractable Organic Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere of Houston and Source Apportionment Calculations Using Organic Molecular Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M. P.; Yue, Z. W.; Buzco, B.

    2002-12-01

    Samples of atmospheric PM2.5 were collected in Houston, TX every second day during the summer of 2000 as part of the EPA sponsored Houston Fine Particle Matter Supersite program. Sampling occurred at three sites, including one industrial location (HRM-3), one suburban location (Aldine) and one coastal location (La Porte). Twenty samples collected over a 24 hour period have been analyzed to quantify the concentration of 95 individual organic compounds, including: n-alkanes (C20 to C36), aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanoic acids (C5 to C34), n-alkenoic acids (C18:1 and C18:2), carboxylic diacids (C3 to C10), petroleum biomarkers and others. As a whole, the extractable compounds were dominated by acids, especially by octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid. The measured concentration of n-alkanes exhibited a peak at C29, with carbon preference index (CPI) values in the range of 0.97 to 2.0. Using organic molecular markers, including seven alkanes, four petroleum biomarkers, seven PAH, one alkanoic acid, one alkenoic acid, levoglucosan, and three chemical components (Al, Si and Elemental Carbon), Chemical Mass Balancing (CMB) calculations have been performed on the ambient speciation data. These calculations are used to determine the contribution of seven different primary emission sources including: diesel powered vehicles, gasoline vehicles, wood combustion, fuel oil combustion, road dusts, meat cooking and vegetation waxes. The contribution of diesel powered vehicles and gasoline powered vehicles are the most important primary sources at all three sampling locations, with road dusts important at the industrial location. Meat cooking emissions were significant at all three locations. Wood combustion is an important contribution during a four-day period when uncontrolled wildfires in eastern Texas and Louisiana brought biomass combustion aerosols into the sampling region.

  2. Cross sectional and longitudinal surveys of canine enteric coronavirus infection in kennelled dogs: a molecular marker for biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Stavisky, Jenny; Pinchbeck, Gina; Gaskell, Rosalind M; Dawson, Susan; German, Alexander J; Radford, Alan D

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that kennelled dogs are more likely to test positive for CECoV than household pets. Here we describe both cross sectional and longitudinal studies in two rescue kennels and two boarding kennels, together with molecular diagnostics, to provide a new insight into the epidemiology of CECoV. Prevalence of CECoV in the cross sectional studies tended to be higher in the rescue kennels (13.8% and 33.3%) than the boarding kennels (5.3% and 13.5%). In each kennel, type I CECoV was more prevalent than type 2 CECoV. The mean quantity of type I detected was equivalent to 6.3 × 10(8)gc/gm (range=5 × 10(6), 8.5 × 10(11)), compared to 1.3 × 10(8)gc/gm (range = 3 × 10(6), 2.4 × 10(10)) for type II. In one rescue shelter where dogs were followed longitudinally, infection was significantly associated with accommodation block as well as the length of stay (increased risk of CECoV per week in residence of × 1.9). Of those animals sampled on two or more occasions, none tested positive on arrival, and 54.5% later shed CECoV, suggesting that infection may have been acquired within the kennel. Shedding patterns and sequence analysis suggested both types I and II CECoV were maintained in this population by a combination of introductions into the shelter and within-shelter transmission. The findings suggest that some kennel environments may be important in maintaining CECoV infection in the population. We also propose that the diversity of viruses like CECoV in these populations may provide a novel surrogate marker for the success of biosecurity. PMID:22543007

  3. Spread of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Myanmar: a cross-sectional survey of the K13 molecular marker

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Kyaw M; Imwong, Mallika; Lwin, Khin M; Win, Aye A; Hlaing, Tin M; Hlaing, Thaung; Lin, Khin; Kyaw, Myat P; Plewes, Katherine; Faiz, M Abul; Dhorda, Mehul; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Tim J C; Nair, Shalini; McDew-White, Marina; Flegg, Jennifer A; Grist, Eric P M; Guerin, Philippe; Maude, Richard J; Smithuis, Frank; Dondorp, Arjen M; Day, Nicholas P J; Nosten, François; White, Nicholas J; Woodrow, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Emergence of artemisinin resistance in southeast Asia poses a serious threat to the global control of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Discovery of the K13 marker has transformed approaches to the monitoring of artemisinin resistance, allowing introduction of molecular surveillance in remote areas through analysis of DNA. We aimed to assess the spread of artemisinin-resistant P falciparum in Myanmar by determining the relative prevalence of P falciparum parasites carrying K13-propeller mutations. Methods We did this cross-sectional survey at malaria treatment centres at 55 sites in ten administrative regions in Myanmar, and in relevant border regions in Thailand and Bangladesh, between January, 2013, and September, 2014. K13 sequences from P falciparum infections were obtained mainly by passive case detection. We entered data into two geostatistical models to produce predictive maps of the estimated prevalence of mutations of the K13 propeller region across Myanmar. Findings Overall, 371 (39%) of 940 samples carried a K13-propeller mutation. We recorded 26 different mutations, including nine mutations not described previously in southeast Asia. In seven (70%) of the ten administrative regions of Myanmar, the combined K13-mutation prevalence was more than 20%. Geospatial mapping showed that the overall prevalence of K13 mutations exceeded 10% in much of the east and north of the country. In Homalin, Sagaing Region, 25 km from the Indian border, 21 (47%) of 45 parasite samples carried K13-propeller mutations. Interpretation Artemisinin resistance extends across much of Myanmar. We recorded P falciparum parasites carrying K13-propeller mutations at high prevalence next to the northwestern border with India. Appropriate therapeutic regimens should be tested urgently and implemented comprehensively if spread of artemisinin resistance to other regions is to be avoided. Funding Wellcome Trust–Mahidol University–Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. PMID:25704894

  4. Genomic exploration and molecular marker development in a large and complex conifer genome using RADseq and mRNAseq.

    PubMed

    Karam, M-J; Lefèvre, F; Dagher-Kharrat, M Bou; Pinosio, S; Vendramin, G G

    2015-05-01

    We combined restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) using a hypomethylation-sensitive enzyme and messenger RNA sequencing (mRNAseq) to develop molecular markers for the 16 gigabase genome of Cedrus atlantica, a conifer tree species. With each method, Illumina(®) reads from one individual were used to generate de novo assemblies. SNPs from the RADseq data set were detected in a panel of one single individual and three pools of three individuals each. We developed a flexible script to estimate the ascertainment bias in SNP detection considering the pooling and sampling effects on the probability of not detecting an existing polymorphism. Gene Ontology (GO) and transposable element (TE) search analyses were applied to both data sets. The RADseq and the mRNAseq assemblies represented 0.1% and 0.6% of the genome, respectively. Genome complexity reduction resulted in 17% of the RADseq contigs potentially coding for proteins. This rate was doubled in the mRNAseq data set, suggesting that RADseq also explores noncoding low-repeat regions. The two methods gave very similar GO-slim profiles. As expected, the two assemblies were poor in TE-like sequences (<4% of contigs length). We identified 17,348 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RADseq data set and 5,714 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the transcriptome. A subset of 282 SNPs was validated using the Fluidigm genotyping technology, giving a conversion rate of 50.4%, falling within the expected range for conifers. Increasing sample size had the greatest effect for ascertainment bias reduction. These results validated the utility of the RADseq approach for highly complex genomes such as conifers. PMID:25224750

  5. Tracking larvae with molecular markers reveals high relatedness and early seasonal recruitment success in a partially spawning marine bivalve.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Philippe; Tremblay, Réjean; Sévigny, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-01

    The partial synchronized spawning strategy adopted by some marine invertebrate broadcast-spawners can lead to the production of many distinct pools of larvae within a single reproductive cycle. Following the fate of these larval groups from birth to settlement with molecular markers might shed light on mechanisms regulating their population recruitment. Larvae and recruits of Mya arenaria, a partially spawning marine bivalve, were monitored and collected over 13 consecutive weeks during an entire reproductive cycle. Each sampled individual (n = 218) was sorted according to size (early veligers, late veligers, post-larval recruits) and genotyped at seven microsatellite loci for comparisons among samples and with adult reference samples (n = 270). While traditional differentiation statistics (e.g., pairwise ? ST, allelic richness) suggested the absence of sweepstakes reproductive success, the level of relatedness found within and among larvae and recruit samples suggested otherwise. Four samples out of ten were observed to have higher within-sample relatedness values than randomly expected, including the very first group of early veligers produced in the season (E1) and the last group of post-larvae who survived recruitment (P10). E1 individuals were also found to be more related than randomly expected to individuals of more than 80 % of all other samples including the last surviving recruits (P8 and P10). These results suggest that the first larvae produced in the season were the most successful to survive recruitment. Results also show direct evidence for larval retention and demonstrate for the first time larval and post-larval kin aggregation in a marine bivalve. PMID:25715923

  6. Analysis of the MdMYB1 gene sequence and development of new molecular markers related to apple skin color and fruit-bearing traits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kejun; Wang, Changjun; Wang, Jianghui; Xin, Li; Zhou, Guangfang; Li, Linguang; Shen, Guangning

    2014-12-01

    MdMYB1, a key transcription factor determining apple skin color, coordinately regulates genes in the anthocyanin pathway. In this study, we analyzed the MdMYB1 gene and its relationship to apple skin color and fruit-bearing traits to better understand this gene and its application to apple breeding. A previously reported MdMYB1 dCAPS marker failed to identify alleles of the MdMYB1 gene in 'Fuji', a very important apple cultivar. In this study, we revealed that the polymorphic site related to the MdMYB1 dCAPS marker is heterozygous in 'Fuji'. In addition, two new polymorphic sites related to apple skin color were identified in the MdMYB1 gene, with two new molecular markers accordingly developed. Testing of these markers in 'Fuji' and its progeny revealed that they could predict apple skin color and identify alleles of the MdMYB1 gene in this cultivar. Most interestingly, the allele MdMYB1-2 in 'Gala' apple and its hybrid plants was found to be related to the fruit-bearing trait, and the molecular marker Mb2 was able to identify the MdMYB1-2 allele. Our study is apparently the first to report a relationship between the MdMYB1 allele and the fruit-bearing trait in apple. More work is needed to determine whether and how the MdMYB1 gene or a gene linked to the MdMYB1-2 allele influences the flowering trait in perennial apple trees, and whether flowering in other plants is influenced by related genes. PMID:25106952

  7. PM2.5 Characterization for Time Series Studies: Organic Molecular Marker Speciation Methods and Observations from Daily Measurements in Denver

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Steven J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Garcia, Jessica K.; Vedal, Sverre; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) has been shown to have a wide range of adverse health effects and consequently is regulated in accordance with the US-EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards. PM2.5 originates from multiple primary sources and is also formed through secondary processes in the atmosphere. It is plausible that some sources form PM2.5 that is more toxic than PM2.5 from other sources. Identifying the responsible sources could provide insight into the biological mechanisms causing the observed health effects and provide a more efficient approach to regulation. This is the goal of the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study, a multi-year PM2.5 source apportionment and health study. The first step in apportioning the PM2.5 to different sources is to determine the chemical make-up of the PM2.5. This paper presents the methodology used during the DASH study for organic speciation of PM2.5. Specifically, methods are covered for solvent extraction of non-polar and semi-polar organic molecular markers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Vast reductions in detection limits were obtained through the use of a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet along with other method improvements. Results are presented for the first 1.5 years of the DASH study revealing seasonal and source-related patterns in the molecular markers and their long-term correlation structure. Preliminary analysis suggests that point sources are not a significant contributor to the organic molecular markers measured at our receptor site. Several motor vehicle emission markers help identify a gasoline/diesel split in the ambient data. Findings show both similarities and differences when compared with other cities where similar measurements and assessments have been made. PMID:20161318

  8. PM 2.5 characterization for time series studies: Organic molecular marker speciation methods and observations from daily measurements in Denver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Steven J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Garcia, Jessica K.; Vedal, Sverre; Hannigan, Michael P.

    Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM 2.5) has been shown to have a wide range of adverse health effects and consequently is regulated in accordance with the US-EPA's National Ambient Air Quality Standards. PM 2.5 originates from multiple primary sources and is also formed through secondary processes in the atmosphere. It is plausible that some sources form PM 2.5 that is more toxic than PM 2.5 from other sources. Identifying the responsible sources could provide insight into the biological mechanisms causing the observed health effects and provide a more efficient approach to regulation. This is the goal of the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study, a multi-year PM 2.5 source apportionment and health study. The first step in apportioning the PM 2.5 to different sources is to determine the chemical make-up of the PM 2.5. This paper presents the methodology used during the DASH study for organic speciation of PM 2.5. Specifically, methods are covered for solvent extraction of non-polar and semi-polar organic molecular markers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Vast reductions in detection limits were obtained through the use of a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet along with other method improvements. Results are presented for the first 1.5 years of the DASH study revealing seasonal and source-related patterns in the molecular markers and their long-term correlation structure. Preliminary analysis suggests that point sources are not a significant contributor to the organic molecular markers measured at our receptor site. Several motor vehicle emission markers help identify a gasoline/diesel split in the ambient data. Findings show both similarities and differences when compared with other cities where similar measurements and assessments have been made.

  9. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Medhi, K.; Sarmah, D.K.; Deka, M.; Bhau, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

  10. Transmission ratio distortion of molecular markers in a doubled haploid population originated from a natural hybrid between Osmunda japonica and O. lancea.

    PubMed

    Yatabe-Kakugawa, Yoko; Tsutsumi, Chie; Hirayama, Yumiko; Tsuneki, Shizuka; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    In ferns, intra-gametophytic selfing occurs as a mode of reproduction where two gametes from the same gametophyte form a completely homozygous sporophyte. Intra-gametophytic selfing is considered to be prevented by lethal or deleterious recessive genes in several diploid species. In order to investigate the modes and tempo of selection acting different developmental stages, doubled haploids obtained from intra-gametophytic selfing within isolated gametophytes of a putative F1 hybrid between Osmunda japonica and O. lancea were analyzed with EST_derived molecular markers, and the distribution pattern of transmission ratio distortion (TRD) along linkage map was clarified. As the results, the markers with skewness were clustered in two linkage groups. For the two highly distorted regions, gametophytes and F2 population were also examined. The markers skewed towards O. japonica on a linkage group (LG_2) showed skewness also in gametophytes, and the TRD was generated in the process of spore formation or growth of gametophytes. Also, selection appeared to be operating in the gametophytic stage. The markers on other linkage group (LG_11) showed highest skewness towards O. lancea in doubled haploids, and it was suggested that the segregation of LG_11 were influenced by zygotic lethality or genotypic evaluation and that some deleterious recessive genes exist in LG_11 and reduce the viability of homozygotes with O. japonica alleles. It is very likely that a region of LG_11were responsible for the low frequencies of intra-gametophytic selfing in O. japonica. PMID:23224293

  11. Evaluation of IS200-PCR and Comparison with Other Molecular Markers To Trace Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Typhimurium Bovine Isolates from Farm to Meat

    PubMed Central

    Millemann, Yves; Gaubert, Stéphane; Remy, Dominique; Colmin, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that uses an original molecular marker (IS200-PCR) and that is based on the amplification of DNA with outward-facing primers complementary to each end of IS200 has been evaluated with a collection of 85 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates. These strains were isolated from a group of 10 cows at different stages: during transportation between the farm and the slaughterhouse, on the slaughter line, from the environment, and from the final product (ground beef). The 85 isolates were characterized by their antibiotic resistance patterns and were compared by IS200-PCR and by use of four other genotypic markers. Those markers included restriction profiles for 16S and 23S rRNA (ribotypes) and amplification profiles obtained by different approaches: random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, and PCR ribotyping. The results of the IS200-PCR were in accordance with those of other molecular typing methods for this collection of isolates. Five different genotypes were found, which made it possible to refine the hypotheses on transmission obtained from phenotypic results. The genotyping results indicated the massive contamination of the whole group of animals and of the environment by one clonal strain originally recovered from one cow that excreted the strain. On the other hand, a few animals and their environment appeared to be simultaneously contaminated with genetically different strains. PMID:10834977

  12. Molecular markers associated with the immature fiber (im) gene affecting the degree of fiber cell wall thickening in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Moon, Hong S; Delhom, Christopher D; Zeng, Linghe; Fang, David D

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber fineness and maturity measured indirectly as micronaire (MIC) are important properties of determining fiber grades in the textile market. To understand the genetic control and molecular mechanisms of fiber fineness and maturity, we studied two near isogenic lines, Gossypium hirsutum, Texas Marker-1 wild type (TM-1) and immature fiber (im) mutant showing a significant difference in MIC values. The fibers from im mutant plants were finer and less mature with lower MIC values than those from the recurrent parent, TM-1. A comprehensive fiber property analysis of TM-1 and im mutant showed that the lower MIC of fibers in im mutant was due to the lower degree of fiber cell wall thickening as compared to the TM-1 fibers. Using an F(2) population comprising 366 progenies derived from a cross between TM-1 and im mutant, we confirmed that the immature fiber phenotype present in a mutant plant was controlled by one single recessive gene im. Furthermore, we identified 13 simple sequence repeat markers that were closely linked to the im gene located on chromosome 3. Molecular markers associated with the im gene will lay the foundation to further investigate genetic information required for improving cotton fiber fineness and maturity. PMID:22890806

  13. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  14. Immunological Profiling of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C.; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that chronic inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Researchers have recently discovered that increased inflammatory cytokines and the infiltration and activation of macrophage cells in the adipose tissue are related to chronic obesity. This immunologic dysregulation has led to the development of the classical pro-inflammatory paradigm. However, since chronic inflammation associated with obesity is more than just the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, precise dissection requires beyond the classical pro-inflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this review is to summarize the immunological profiling of obesity for theragnostic convenience, focusing on the cytokine and adipokine network in obesity and the significance of the balance of Th1/Th2 immunity.

  15. Immunology of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Beineke, Andreas; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-02-15

    The increasing disease susceptibility in different whale and dolphin populations has led to speculation about a possible negative influence of environmental contaminants on the immune system and therefore on the health status of marine mammals. Despite current efforts in the immunology of marine mammals several aspects of immune functions in aquatic mammals remain unknown. However, assays for evaluating cellular immune responses, such as lymphocyte proliferation, respiratory burst as well as phagocytic and cytotoxic activity of leukocytes and humoral immune responses have been established for different cetacean species. Additionally, immunological and molecular techniques enable the detection and quantification of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in lymphoid cells during inflammation or immune responses, respectively. Different T and B cell subsets as well as antigen-presenting cells can be detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Despite great homologies between marine and terrestrial mammal lymphoid organs, some unique anatomical structures, particularly the complex lymphoepithelial laryngeal glands in cetaceans represent an adaptation to the marine environment. Additionally, physiological changes, such as age-related thymic atrophy and cystic degeneration of the "anal tonsil" of whales have to be taken into account when investigating these lymphoid structures. Systemic morbillivirus infections lead to fatalities in cetaceans associated with generalized lymphoid depletion. Similarly, chronic diseases and starvation are associated with a loss of functional lymphoid cells and decreased resistance against opportunistic infections. There is growing evidence for an immunotoxic effect of different environmental contaminants in whales and dolphins, as demonstrated in field studies. Furthermore, immunomodulatory properties of different persistent xenobiotics have been confirmed in cetacean lymphoid cells in vitro as well as in animal models in vivo. However, species-specific differences of the immune system and detoxification of xenobiotics between cetaceans and laboratory rodents have to be considered when interpreting these toxicological data for risk assessment in whales and dolphins. PMID:19700205

  16. Immunology in Pittsburgh.

    PubMed

    Finn, Olivera J; Salter, Russell D

    2006-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has a long tradition of excellence in immunology research and training. Faculty, students, and postdoctoral fellows walk through hallways that are pictorial reminders of the days when Dr. Jonas Salk worked here to develop the polio vaccine, or when Dr. Niels Jerne chaired the Microbiology Department and worked on perfecting the Jerne Plaque Assay for antibody-producing cells. Colleagues and postdoctoral fellows of Professor Salk are still on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh Medical School as are graduate students of Professor Jerne. A modern research building, the 17 story high Biomedical Science Tower, is a vivid reminder of the day when Dr. Thomas Starzl arrived in Pittsburgh and started building the most prominent solid-organ-transplant program in the world. The immunology research that developed around the problem of graft rejection and tolerance induction trained numerous outstanding students and fellows. Almost 20 yr ago, the University of Pittsburgh founded the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) with the renowned immunologist Dr. Ronald Herberman at its helm. This started a number of new research initiatives in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. A large number of outstanding young investigators, as well as several well-established tumor immunologists, were recruited to Pittsburgh at that time. PMID:17337760

  17. Validation and identification of molecular markers linked to the leaf rust resistance gene Lr 28 in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annapurnalilly Bipinraj; Balgounda Honrao; Mohinder Prashar; Subhash Bhardwaj; Suryaprakasa Rao; Shubhada Tamhankar

    2011-01-01

    Leaf rust resistance gene Lr28 controls one of the important resistances in the Indian subcontinent against the most prevalent Puccinia triticina pathotype 77-5. Pyramid- ing Lr28 with other resistance genes would therefore, provide durable resistance against rust, a process that can be facilitated by DNA markers. A microsatellite marker wmc313 linked to Lr28 at a distance of 5.0 cM was

  18. Analysis of black carbon molecular markers by two chromatographic methods (GC-FID and HPLC-DAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Maximilian P. W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCA) as a quantitative measure for black carbon (BC) in soil and sediment samples is a well-established method [1, 2]. Briefly, the oxidation of polycondensated BC molecules forms seven molecular markers, which can be assigned to BC, and which subsequently can be quantified by GC-FID (gas chromatography with flame ionization detector). Recently this method has been refined for BC quantification in seawater samples measuring BPCA on HPLC-DAD (High performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector) [3]. However, a systematic comparison of BC as determined by both analytical techniques would be essential to the calculation of global BC budgets, but is lacking. Here we present data for the systematic comparison of the two BPCA methods, both for quantity and quality. We prepared chars under well-defined laboratory conditions. Chestnut hardwood chips and rice straw were pyrolysed at temperatures between 200 and 1000°C under constant N2 stream. The BC contents of the chars have been analysed using the BPCA extraction method followed by either GC-FID or HPLC-DAD quantification [4]. It appears that the GC-FID method yields systematically lower concentrations of BPCA in the chars compared to the HPLC-DAD method. Possible reasons for the observed difference are i) higher losses of sample material during preparation for GC-FID; ii) different quality of the linear regression used for quantification; iii) incomplete derivatisation of B5CA and B6CA, which is needed for GC-FID analysis. In a next step, we will test different derivatisation procedures (methylation with dimethyl sulfate or diazomethane, and silylation) for their influence on the GC-FID results. The aim of this study is to test if black carbon can be quantified in soil, sediment and water samples using one single method - a crucial step when attempting a global BC budget. References: [1] Brodowski, S., Rodionov, A., Haumeier L., Glaser, B., Amelung, W. (2005) Org. Geochem. 36, 1299-1310. [2] Glaser, B., Haumeier, L., Guggenberger, G., Zech, W. (1998) Org. Geochem. 29, 811-819. [3] Dittmar, T. (2008) Org. Geochem. 39. 396-407. [4] Schneider, M.P.W., Hilf, M., Vogt, U.F., Schmidt, M.W.I., Org. Geochem. (submitted)

  19. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L.) Using High-Resolution Melting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiejun; Yu, Long-Xi; McCord, Per; Miller, David; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Johnson, David; Monteros, Maria J.; Ho, Julie; Reisen, Peter; Samac, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt, a bulk segregant analysis was conducted in susceptible or resistant pools constructed from 13 synthetic alfalfa populations, followed by association mapping in two F1 populations consisted of 352 individuals. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used for genotyping. Phenotyping was done by manual inoculation of the pathogen to replicated cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Marker-trait association was analyzed by TASSEL. Seventeen SNP markers significantly associated with Verticillium wilt resistance were identified and they were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7 and 8. SNP markers identified on chromosomes 2, 4 and 7 co-locate with regions of Verticillium wilt resistance loci reported in M. truncatula. Additional markers identified on chromosomes 1 and 8 located the regions where no Verticillium resistance locus has been reported. This study highlights the value of SNP genotyping by high resolution melting to identify the disease resistance loci in tetraploid alfalfa. With further validation, the markers identified in this study could be used for improving resistance to Verticillium wilt in alfalfa breeding programs. PMID:25536106

  20. Laboratory markers in ulcerative colitis: Current insights and future advances

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Michele; Rosa, Antonella De; Serao, Rosalba; Picone, Ilaria; Vietri, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in man. Despite some common features, these forms can be distinguished by different genetic predisposition, risk factors and clinical, endoscopic and histological characteristics. The aetiology of both CD and UC remains unknown, but several evidences suggest that CD and perhaps UC are due to an excessive immune response directed against normal constituents of the intestinal bacterial flora. Tests sometimes invasive are routine for the diagnosis and care of patients with IBD. Diagnosis of UC is based on clinical symptoms combined with radiological and endoscopic investigations. The employment of non-invasive biomarkers is needed. These biomarkers have the potential to avoid invasive diagnostic tests that may result in discomfort and potential complications. The ability to determine the type, severity, prognosis and response to therapy of UC, using biomarkers has long been a goal of clinical researchers. We describe the biomarkers assessed in UC, with special reference to acute-phase proteins and serologic markers and thereafter, we describe the new biological markers and the biological markers could be developed in the future: (1) serum markers of acute phase response: The laboratory tests most used to measure the acute-phase proteins in clinical practice are the serum concentration of C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Other biomarkers of inflammation in UC include platelet count, leukocyte count, and serum albumin and serum orosomucoid concentrations; (2) serologic markers/antibodies: In the last decades serological and immunologic biomarkers have been studied extensively in immunology and have been used in clinical practice to detect specific pathologies. In UC, the presence of these antibodies can aid as surrogate markers for the aberrant host immune response; and (3) future biomarkers: The development of biomarkers in UC will be very important in the future. The progress of molecular biology tools (microarrays, proteomics and nanotechnology) have revolutionised the field of the biomarker discovery. The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve, characterize and analyse large amounts of data generated by the technological advances. The techniques available for biomarkers development are genomics (single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, pharmacogenetics and gene expression analyses) and proteomics. In the future, the addition of new serological markers will add significant benefit. Correlating serologic markers with genotypes and clinical phenotypes should enhance our understanding of pathophysiology of UC. PMID:25685607

  1. Immunology and Infectious Disease: recommended sequence of required courses www.immunology.psu.edu Immunology and Infectious Disease

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Immunology and Infectious Disease: recommended sequence of required courses www.immunology.psu.edu Immunology and Infectious Disease Dr. James Endres Howell (814) 867­0194 immunology@psu.edu Year 1 VB SC 050S Microbiology Laboratory MICRB 410(3) Principles of Immunology* B M B 402(3) General Biochemistry Choose

  2. Characterization of Haemaphysalis flava (Acari: Ixodidae) from Qingling subspecies of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) in Qinling Mountains (Central China) by morphology and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-yu; Zhao, Guang-hui; Jia, Yan-qing; Bian, Qing-qing; Du, Shuai-zhi; Fang, Yan-qing; Qi, Mao-zhen; Yu, San-ke

    2013-01-01

    Tick is one of important ectoparasites capable of causing direct damage to their hosts and also acts as vectors of relevant infectious agents. In the present study, the taxa of 10 ticks, collected from Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) in Qinling Mountains of China in April 2010, were determined using morphology and molecular markers (nucleotide ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S). Microscopic observation demonstrated that the morphological features of these ticks were similar to Haemaphysalis flava. Compared with other Haemaphysalis species, genetic variations between Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis and H. flava were the lowest in ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S, with sequence differences of 2.06%-2.40% and 1.30%-4.70%, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships showed that all the Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis were grouped with H. flava, further confirmed that the Haemaphysalis sp. is H. flava. This is the first report of ticks in giant panda by combining with morphology and molecular markers. This study also provided evidence that combining morphology and molecular tools provide a valuable and efficient tool for tick identification. PMID:23894541

  3. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic drift or selection during breeding processes. Comparative analysis of allele distribution revealed genetic divergence between improved cultivars and landraces, as well as between cultivars released in different years. These results will be useful for assessing cultivars and for marker-assisted breeding in sesame. PMID:24641723

  4. Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Modelling T cell immunology

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Modelling T cell immunology;Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Mathematics is a special science! #12;Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Classical mechanics (Newton) Figure

  5. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5590 Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5210 Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. (a)...

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILITY OF A ‘ONE-STEP’ SPECIES-SPECIFIC MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC MARKER FOR GONATOCERUS MORRILLI DESIGNED TOWARD THE INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER REGION 2 (ITS2) TO MONITOR ESTABLISHMENT IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to the ‘one-step’ species-specific molecular diagnostic ISSR-PCR DNA fingerprinting method, we developed an additional ‘one-step’ molecular diagnostic marker ‘gmtx’ toward Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) designed toward the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) to aid in mo...

  8. Classification of a new member of the TBE flavivirus subgroup by its immunological, pathogenetic and molecular characteristics: identification of subgroup-specific pentapeptides.

    PubMed

    Gao, G F; Hussain, M H; Reid, H W; Gould, E A

    1993-11-01

    The antigenic, pathogenic and molecular characteristics of Turkish sheep encephalitis (TSE) virus, strain TTE80, were compared with other members of the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus complex. Monoclonal antibodies with defined specificity for the flavivirus envelope glycoprotein distinguished TSE virus from louping ill (LI), western or far eastern TBE, Langat and Powassan virus in indirect immunofluorescence, haemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests. On the other hand, TSE virus, which produces an LI-like disease in sheep, resembled LI virus in mouse neurovirulence tests. Molecular homology data of all the structural genes of TSE virus compared with other tick-borne flaviviruses demonstrated that TSE virus is a distinct member in the TBE virus subgroup. The data are consistent with the conclusion that TSE virus has evolved by a separate evolutionary pathway as compared with the close antigenic relatives, western European, far eastern TBE viruses and LI virus. By aligning the encoded amino acids in the viral envelope glycoprotein of mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses, we have also identified subgroup-specific pentapeptide motifs for the tick-borne encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis and dengue subgroup viruses of the genus Flavivirus. These pentapeptides have important implications for the evolution, classification and diagnosis of flaviviruses. PMID:8249442

  9. A dense genetic map of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, covering all chromosomes based on 1018 molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Yasukochi, Y

    1998-12-01

    A dense linkage map was constructed for the silkworm, Bombyx mori, containing 1018 genetic markers on all 27 autosomes and the Z chromosome. Most of the markers, covering approximately 2000 cM, were randomly amplified polymorphic DNAs amplified with primer-pairs in combinations of 140 commercially available decanucleotides. In addition, eight known genes and five visible mutations were mapped. Bombyx homologues of engrailed and invected genes were found to be closely linked, as in Drosophila melanogaster. The average interval between markers was approximately 2 cM, equal to approximately 500 kb. The correspondence of seven linkage groups to counterparts of the conventional linkage map was determined. This map is the first linkage map in insects having a large number of chromosomes (n = 28) that covers all chromosomes without any gaps. PMID:9832528

  10. 21 CFR 866.5220 - Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY...Systems § 866.5220 Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system...Identification. A Cohn fraction II immunological test...

  11. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  12. Characterization of high-copy-number retrotransposons from the large genomes of the louisiana iris species and their use as molecular markers.

    PubMed Central

    Kentner, Edward K; Arnold, Michael L; Wessler, Susan R

    2003-01-01

    The Louisiana iris species Iris brevicaulis and I. fulva are morphologically and karyotypically distinct yet frequently hybridize in nature. A group of high-copy-number TY3/gypsy-like retrotransposons was characterized from these species and used to develop molecular markers that take advantage of the abundance and distribution of these elements in the large iris genome. The copy number of these IRRE elements (for iris retroelement), is approximately 1 x 10(5), accounting for approximately 6-10% of the approximately 10,000-Mb haploid Louisiana iris genome. IRRE elements are transcriptionally active in I. brevicaulis and I. fulva and their F(1) and backcross hybrids. The LTRs of the elements are more variable than the coding domains and can be used to define several distinct IRRE subfamilies. Transposon display or S-SAP markers specific to two of these subfamilies have been developed and are highly polymorphic among wild-collected individuals of each species. As IRRE elements are present in each of 11 iris species tested, the marker system has the potential to provide valuable comparative data on the dynamics of retrotransposition in large plant genomes. PMID:12807789

  13. Comparative Assessment of Lymph Node Micrometastasis in Cervical, Endometrial and Vulvar Cancer: Insights on the Real Time qRT-PCR Approach versus Immunohistochemistry, Employing Dual Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Kalliopi I.; Rodolakis, Alexandros; Christodoulou, Ioanna; Gazouli, Maria; Markaki, Sofia; Antsaklis, Aris; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    To address the value of qRT-PCR and IHC in accurately detecting lymph node micrometastasis in gynecological cancer, we performed a systematic approach, using a set of dual molecular tumor-specific markers such as cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), in a series of 46 patients (19 with cervical cancer, 18 with endometrial cancer, and 9 with vulvar cancer). A total of 1281 lymph nodes were analyzed and 28 were found positive by histopathology. Following this documentation, 82 lymph nodes, 11 positive and 71 negative, were randomly selected and further analyzed both by IHC and qRT-PCR for CK19 and CA9 expression. All 11 (100%) expressed CK19 by IHC, while only 6 (54.5%) expressed CA9. On the contrary, all the histologically negative for micrometastases lymph nodes were also negative by IHC analysis for both markers. The comparative diagnostic efficacy of the two markers using qRT-PCR, however, disclosed that the analysis of the same aliquots of the 82 lymph nodes led to 100% specificity for the CK19 biomarker, while, in contrast, CA9 failed to recapitulate a similar pattern. These data suggest that qRT-PCR exhibits a better diagnostic accuracy compared to IHC, while CK19 displays a consistent pattern of detection compared to CA9. PMID:24527437

  14. IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT Student: Program: Immunology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: PLEASE RETURN TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Immunology Program Administrator Modell Center Harvard Medical

  15. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921 Public...Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer...

  16. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921 Public...Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer...

  17. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921 Public...Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer...

  18. Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbnde

    E-print Network

    Fiebig, Peter

    Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbünde: Sonderforschungsbereich 643;Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbünde: Sonderforschungsbereich 643 Sprecher Klinische Mikrobiologie, Immunologie und Hygiene, Wasserturmstraße 3-5, 1. Stock #12;Medical Immunology

  19. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921 Public...Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer...

  20. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921 Public...Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer...

  1. CELL BIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS Identification of Expressed Sequence Markers for a Major Gene-Rich Region of Wheat

    E-print Network

    Gill, Kulvinder

    -Rich Region of Wheat Chromosome Group 1 Using RNA Fingerprinting­Differential Display Devinder Sandhu, Deepak in identifying expressed se- quence markers for a small targeted region of the wheat (Triticum chromosome 1B, where it maps to the mid-satellite re- aestivum L.) genome. Wheat genes are present in clusters spanning

  2. Hierarchical Analysis of Genetic Structure in Native Fire Ant Populations: Results from Three Classes of Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, K. G.; Krieger, MJB.; Shoemaker, D. D.; Vargo, E. L.; Keller, L.

    1997-01-01

    We describe genetic structure at various scales in native populations of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta using two classes of nuclear markers, allozymes and microsatellites, and markers of the mitochondrial genome. Strong structure was found at the nest level in both the monogyne (single queen) and polygyne (multiple queen) social forms using allozymes. Weak but significant microgeographic structure was detected above the nest level in polygyne populations but not in monogyne populations using both classes of nuclear markers. Pronounced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) differentiation was evident also at this level in the polygyne form only. These microgeographic patterns are expected because polygyny in ants is associated with restricted local gene flow due mainly to limited vagility of queens. Weak but significant nuclear differentiation was detected between sympatric social forms, and strong mtDNA differentiation also was found at this level. Thus, queens of each form seem unable to establish themselves in nests of the alternate type, and some degree of assortative mating by form may exist as well. Strong differentiation was found between the two study regions using all three sets of markers. Phylogeographic analyses of the mtDNA suggest that recent limitations on gene flow rather than longstanding barriers to dispersal are responsible for this large-scale structure. PMID:9335601

  3. Molecular characterization of diverse CIMMYT maize inbred lines from eastern and southern Africa using single nucleotide polymorphic markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of germplasm diversity and relationships among elite breeding materials is fundamentally important in crop improvement. We genotyped 450 maize lines developed and/or widely used by CIMMYT breeding programs both in Kenya and Zimbabwe using 1065 SNP markers to (i) investigate population stru...

  4. MOLECULAR MAPPING OF A NUCLEAR MALE-STERILITY GENE IN SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) USING TRAP AND SSR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nuclear male-sterile mutant, NMS 360, possesses a single recessive gene, ms9, controlling male sterility. The present study identified DNA markers linked to the ms9 gene in an F2 population derived from the cross of NMS 360 x RHA 271 and maps the ms9 gene to an existing sunflower SSR linkage map. ...

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

    2012-01-01

    The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data provide valuable molecular evidence for the effects of the space environment on R. pseudoacacia and may contribute to future space-breeding programs involving forest trees. PMID:23315806

  6. Can tissue-based immune markers be used for studying the natural history of cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Koshiol, Jill; Lin, Shih-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered immunity and chronic inflammation play a key role in the etiology of many malignancies, but the underlying biological mechanisms involved remain unclear. Systemic markers of immunity may not represent the clinically relevant, site-specific immune response, whereas tissue-based markers may more accurately reflect the local immunologic mechanisms by which precursor lesions develop into cancer. Tissues are often only available in individuals with disease. Previous studies have measured tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes to predict prognosis and survival, but it can be challenging to use tissue-based markers to study the natural history of cancer due to limitations with regard to temporality, the availability of appropriate comparison groups, and other epidemiologic issues. In this commentary, we discuss several epidemiologic study design and study population considerations to address these issues, including the strengths and limitations of using tissue-based markers to study immune response and cancer development. We also discuss how the use of tissue-based immune markers fits into the greater context of molecular epidemiology, which encompasses multiple technologies and techniques, and how implementation of tissue-based immune markers will provide an increased understanding of site-specific biological mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:22481034

  7. Hepatic Proliferation and Angiogenesis Markers Are Increased after Portal Deprivation in Rats: A Study of Molecular, Histological and Radiological Changes

    PubMed Central

    Liné, Antoine; Zappa, Magaly; Fasseu, Magali; Paradis, Valérie; Vilgrain, Valérie; Van Beers, Bernard E.; Legagneux, Josette; Moreau, Richard; Lettéron, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims To determine the pathogenesis of liver nodules, and lesions similar to obliterative portal venopathy, observed after portosystemic shunts or portal vein thrombosis in humans. Methods We conducted an experimental study comparing portacaval shunt (PCS), total portal vein ligation (PVL), and sham (S) operated rats. Each group were either sacrificed at 6 weeks (early) or 6 months (late). Arterial liver perfusion was studied in vivo using CT, and histopathological changes were noted. Liver mRNA levels were quantified by RT-QPCR for markers of inflammation (Il10, Tnfa), proliferation (Il6st, Mki67, Hgf, Hnf4a), angiogenesis: (Vegfa, Vegfr 1, 2 and 3; Pgf), oxidative stress (Nos2, and 3, Hif1a), and fibrosis (Tgfb). PCS and PVL were compared to the S group. Results Periportal fibrosis and arterial proliferation was observed in late PCS and PVL groups. CT imaging demonstrated increased arterial liver perfusion in the PCS group. RT-QPCR showed increased inflammatory markers in PCS and PVL early groups. Tnfa and Il10 were increased in PCS and PVL late groups respectively. All proliferative markers increased in the PCS, and Hnf4a in the PVL early groups. Mki67 and Hnf4a were increased in the PCS late group. Nos3 was increased in the early and late PCS groups, and Hif1a was decreased in the PVL groups. Markers of angiogenesis were all increased in the early PCS group, and Vegfr3 and Pgf in the late PCS group. Only Vegfr3 was increased in the PVL groups. Tgf was increased in the PCS groups. Conclusions Portal deprivation in rats induces a sustained increase in intrahepatic markers of inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and fibrosis. PMID:26020934

  8. Chemokines: immunology's high impact factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Mackay

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines facilitate leukocyte migration and positioning as well as other processes such as angiogenesis and leukocyte degranulation. The burgeoning knowledge on chemokines and their receptors has influenced many aspects of immunology, in part because cell migration is intimately related to leukocyte function. This overview assesses the impact that chemokines have had on our understanding of immunology and infectious diseases. These

  9. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Filho, Nelson A; Jacob, Cristina M; Sole, Dirceu; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Arruda, Luisa K; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Cocco, Renata R; Camelo-Nunes, Inês; Chong-Neto, Herberto J; Wandalsen, Gustavo F; Castro, Ana P M; Yang, Ariana C; Pastorino, Antonio C; Sarinho, Emanuel S

    2013-06-01

    The subspecialty of pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil is in its early years and progressing steadily. This review highlights the research developed in the past years aiming to show the characteristics of allergic and immunologic diseases in this vast country. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated the high prevalence of asthma in infants, children, and adolescents. Mortality rates and average annual variation of asthma hospitalization have reduced in all pediatric age groups. Indoor aeroallergen exposure is excessively high and contributes to the high rates of allergy sensitization. Prevalence of food allergy has increased to epidemic levels. Foods (35%), insect stings (30%), and drugs (23%) are the main etiological agents of anaphylaxis in children and adolescents. Molecular diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) showed a high incidence of fungal infections including paracoccidioidomycosis in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and the occurrence of BCG adverse reactions or other mycobacterial infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Education in pediatric allergy and immunology is deficient for medical students, but residency programs are effective in training internists and pediatricians for the practice of allergy. The field of PID requires further training. Last, this review is a tribute to Prof. Dr. Charles Naspitz, one of the pioneers of our specialty in Brazil. PMID:23578336

  10. Markers of chemically induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, G.; Milman, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This book is a concise review and evaluation of available data for recognizing and measuring markers of cancer or oncogenesis provoked in vivo by chemicals using relatively short-term experiments in animals. This review focuses on biochemical and immunological changes that correlate with carcinogenicity. Such ''markers,'' if occurring early enough, may be used to predict the onset of cancer in experimental animals exposed to potential chemical carcinogens long before morphological changes are seen. It is by examining all the information available about the potential carcinogenicity of chemicals that proper decisions can be made towards limiting the risk of cancer due to exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  11. Factors Influencing Changes in the Clinical Immunology Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Nakamura; David J. Bylund

    1994-01-01

    anisms. In the future, the immunology laboratory will pro- vide test services on a disease-oriented basis and will utilize assays of humoral and cellular immunity, as well as other assays based on molecular techniques. The labo- ratory scientist will work closely with clinicians and provide interactive consultation. The major factors that will influ- ence future laboratory tests are: (a) governmental

  12. BIOCHEMICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF RAPIDLY PURIFIED 10-nm FILAMENTS

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Robert D.

    .4. The solubilized components assemble into distinct 10-nm filaments upon the addition of 0.171 M sodium chloride-buffered saline. Purified FC are birefringent and retain the pattern of distribution of 10-rim filaments,000 molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels. The protein is immunologically

  13. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fevzi BARDAKCI

    Due to advances in molecular biology techniques, large numbers of highly informative DNA markers have been developed for the identification of genetic polymorphism. In the last decade, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been one of the most commonly used molecular techniques to develop DNA markers. RAPD markers are amplification products

  14. Molecular marker analysis of Helianthus annuus L. 2. Construction of an RFLP linkage map for cultivated sunflower

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Berry; A. J. Leon; C. C. Hanfrey; P. Challis; A. Burkholz; S. R. Barnes; G. K. Rufener; M. Lee; P. D. S. Caligari

    1995-01-01

    A detailed linkage map of Helianthus annuus was constructed based on segregation at 234 RFLP loci, detected by 213 probes, in an F2 population of 289 individuals (derived from a cross between the inbred lines HA89 and ZENB8). The genetic markers covered 1380 centiMorgans (cM) of the sunflower genome and were aranged in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid

  15. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  16. Identification and validation of molecular markers linked to the leaf rust resistance gene Lr19 in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sudhir Kumar Gupta; Ashwini Charpe; Kumble Vinod Prabhu; Qazi Mohammad Rizwanul Haque

    2006-01-01

    A leaf rust resistance gene Lr19 on the chromosome 7DL of wheat derived from Agropyron elongatum was tagged with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite markers. The F2 population of 340 plants derived from a cross between the leaf rust resistant near-isogenic line (NIL) of Thatcher (Tc + Lr19) and leaf rust susceptible line Agra Local that segregated for dominant monogenic

  17. Identification of microspore-derived plants in anther culture of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) using molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Chen; G. Hausner; E. Kenaschuk; D. Procunier; P. Dribnenki; G. Penner

    1998-01-01

    The microspore origin of anther-culture-derived plants of flax was determined using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and\\u000a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Polymorphic fragments between the two parents of the F1 donor plants were identified and their segregation patterns in anther-culture-derived plants were used to elucidate the origin\\u000a of those plants and to determine the degree of independence of plants

  18. Measurements of organic molecular markers in California using comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatograph High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Schilling, K. A.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Hersey, S. P.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the sources and transformation processes of organic aerosol requires detailed speciation of organic compounds. Molecular markers specific to individual sources help determine the contribution of each source to organic aerosol emissions. In previous work using one-dimensional gas-chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC/MS), less than 10-20% of the organic fraction has been identified, with a large contribution of unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Two-dimensional gas-chromatograph is a novel technique which provides excellent resolution to separate compounds buried in this complex mixture. In addition to a volatility-based chromatographic separation, compounds are further separated on a second column based on their polarities. Here we report measurements of more than 200 resolved compounds observed on filters collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Pasadena, and during a large biomass burning event in the Los Angeles area (Station Fire). High volume filter samples are thermally desorbed in a Gerstel Thermal Desorption System (TDS2) and preconcentrated on a cooled inlet (CIS). The compounds are then analyzed by comprehensive 2-dimensional GC using a Zoex modulator, followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (Tofwerks). Compound identification is carried out by comparison of retention times with known standards, mass spectral library match, and identification of molecular fragments by exact mass. A wide range of compounds are observed: n-alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as acids, esters and ketones. While levoglucosan was observed in organic aerosol produced during the Station Fire, many other compounds revealed by two-dimensional GC (such as resin acids, lignin pyrolysis products) show elevated signals, suggesting that other molecular markers can provide additional information about aerosol formation processes during biomass burning events.

  19. Immunology for physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan S.; Weisbuch, Gérard

    1997-10-01

    The immune system is a complex system of cells and molecules that can provide us with a basic defense against pathogenic organisms. Like the nervous system, the immune system performs pattern recognition tasks, learns, and retains a memory of the antigens that it has fought. The immune system contains more than 107 different clones of cells that communicate via cell-cell contact and the secretion of molecules. Performing complex tasks such as learning and memory involves cooperation among large numbers of components of the immune system and hence there is interest in using methods and concepts from statistical physics. Furthermore, the immune response develops in time and the description of its time evolution is an interesting problem in dynamical systems. In this paper, the authors provide a brief introduction to the biology of the immune system and discuss a number of immunological problems in which the use of physical concepts and mathematical methods has increased our understanding.

  20. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  1. Molecular subtyping of Blastocystis spp. using a new rDNA marker from the mitochondria-like organelle genome.

    PubMed

    Poirier, P; Meloni, D; Nourrisson, C; Wawrzyniak, I; Viscogliosi, E; Livrelli, V; Delbac, F

    2014-04-01

    Blastocystis spp. are common anaerobic intestinal protozoa found in both human and animals. They are characterized by a high genetic diversity with at least 17 subtypes (STs) that have been described on the basis of a 600 bp 'barcoding region' from the 18S rDNA gene. However, analysis of the recently sequenced genome of a Blastocystis ST7 isolate (strain B) revealed the presence of multiple variable copies of the 18S rDNA gene, with 17 completely assembled copies. Comparison of the barcoding region from these 17 copies allowed us to classify the 18S rDNA sequences into 6 clusters, each cluster containing identical sequences. Surprisingly, 4 of these clusters had the highest homology with 18S rDNA sequences from 2 other Blastocystis ST7 isolates referred as QQ98-4 and H. These results suggest that the 18S rDNA gene is not the marker of choice to discriminate between strains within STs. In the present study, we identified a single-copy subtyping rDNA marker in the genome of the mitochondria-like organelles (MLOs). Using a partial sequence of the MLO rDNA, we successfully subtyped 66 isolates from both human and animals belonging to Blastocystis ST1 to ST10. Our results also indicate that this mitochondrial marker could be useful to detect co-infections by different isolates of a same ST. PMID:24467909

  2. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC) was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC). Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525). The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I) and Nei genetic diversity index (h) were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490) when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218). A mini-core collection (MC) containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%), low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%), large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%), and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%). For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC) for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and large VR% and CR% suggested that the MC provides a good representation of the genetic diversity of the original CC. The MC was more genetically diverse with higher diversity indices and a higher PIC value than the CC. A MC may aid in reasonably and efficiently selecting materials for sesame breeding and for genotypic biological studies, and may also be used as a population for association mapping in sesame. PMID:23153260

  3. Characterization of CIMMYT bread wheats for high- and low-molecular weight glutenin subunits and other quality-related genes with SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan LiangJianwei; Jianwei Tang; Roberto Javier Peña; Ravi Singh; Xinyao He; Xiaoyong Shen; Danian Yao; Xianchun Xia; Zhonghu He

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred and seventy-three CIMMYT bread wheat cultivars and advanced lines grown under irrigated conditions in Mexico during\\u000a the 2005-06 Yaqui crop cycle were characterized for quality-related genetic traits using gene-specific markers for some high-\\u000a and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS and LMW-GS) genes, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phytoene synthase (PSY), and\\u000a waxy genes. Of them, 142 were analyzed for quality parameters

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Gimbovskaya; V. N. Kalinin; T. E. Ivashchenko; V. S. Baranov

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations ÎF508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation ÎF508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%)

  5. Analytic Immunologic Techniques Joseph G. Kunkel

    E-print Network

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    Chapter 1 Analytic Immunologic Techniques Joseph G. Kunkel I. Introduction Analytic immunologic that are present in a complex mixture and measure their relative or absolute titers at the same time. Immunology may or may not be replaced by mABs. Before investigators embark on using a particular immunologic

  6. M&ISummer 2011 Microbiology & Immunology

    E-print Network

    Biasutti, Michela

    M&ISummer 2011 Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF #12;04 Message Letter from the Chair 08 AID newsletter from the Department of Mi- crobiology & Immunology. In this inaugural issue, I would like Immunology (CCTI), a cross-departmental initiative that will emphasize transla- tion of basic immunological

  7. Molecular Method for Sex Identification of Half-Smooth Tongue Sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) Using a Novel Sex-Linked Microsatellite Marker

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaolin; Xu, Genbo; Chen, Song-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is one of the most important flatfish species for aquaculture in China. To produce a monosex population, we attempted to develop a marker-assisted sex control technique in this sexually size dimorphic fish. In this study, we identified a co-dominant sex-linked marker (i.e., CyseSLM) by screening genomic microsatellites and further developed a novel molecular method for sex identification in the tongue sole. CyseSLM has a sequence similarity of 73%–75% with stickleback, medaka, Fugu and Tetraodon. At this locus, two alleles (i.e., A244 and A234) were amplified from 119 tongue sole individuals with primer pairs CyseSLM-F1 and CyseSLM-R. Allele A244 was present in all individuals, while allele A234 (female-associated allele, FAA) was mostly present in females with exceptions in four male individuals. Compared with the sequence of A244, A234 has a 10-bp deletion and 28 SNPs. A specific primer (CyseSLM-F2) was then designed based on the A234 sequence, which amplified a 204 bp fragment in all females and four males with primer CyseSLM-R. A time-efficient multiplex PCR program was developed using primers CyseSLM-F2, CyseSLM-R and the newly designed primer CyseSLM-F3. The multiplex PCR products with co-dominant pattern could be detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, which accurately identified the genetic sex of the tongue sole. Therefore, we have developed a rapid and reliable method for sex identification in tongue sole with a newly identified sex-linked microsatellite marker. PMID:25054319

  8. Evaluation of Molecular- and Culture-Dependent MST Markers To Detect Fecal Contamination and Indicate Viral Presence in Good Quality Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Diston, D; Sinreich, M; Zimmermann, S; Baumgartner, A; Felleisen, R

    2015-06-16

    Microbial contamination of groundwater represents a significant health risk to resource users. Culture-dependent Bacteroides phage and molecular-dependent Bacteroidales 16S rRNA assays are employed in microbial source tracking (MST) studies globally, however little is known regarding how these important groups relate to each other in the environment and which is more suitable to indicate the presence of waterborne fecal pollution and human enteric viruses. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining 64 groundwater samples from sites with varying hydrogeological properties using a MST toolbox containing two bacteriophage groups (phage infecting GB-124 and ARABA-84), and two Bacteroidales 16S rRNA markers (Hf183 and BacR); those were compared to fecal indicator bacteria, somatic coliphage, Bacteroidales 16S rRNA marker AllBac, four human enteric viruses (norovirus GI and II, enterovirus and group A rotavirus) and supplementary hydrogeological/chemical data. Bacteroidales 16S rRNA indicators offered a more sensitive assessment of both human-specific and general fecal contamination than phage indicators, but may overestimate the risk from enteric viral pathogens. Comparison with hydrogeological and land use site characteristics as well as auxiliary microbiological and chemical data proved the plausibility of the MST findings. Sites representing karst aquifers were of significantly worse microbial quality than those with unconsolidated or fissured aquifers, highlighting the vulnerability of these hydrogeological settings. PMID:25871525

  9. Immunological memory to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Slifka, Mark K

    2004-08-01

    Immunological memory is defined by the ability of a host to remember a past encounter with a specific pathogen and to respond to it in an effective manner upon re-exposure. How long immunological memory can be maintained in the absence of re-infection continues to be a subject of great controversy. Recent studies on immunity following smallpox vaccination demonstrate that T-cell memory declines steadily with a half-life of 8-15 years, whereas antiviral antibody responses are maintained for up to 75 years without appreciable decline. By combining recent advances in quantitative immunology with historical accounts of protection against smallpox dating back to the time of Edward Jenner, we are gaining a better understanding of the duration and magnitude of immunological memory and how it relates to protective immunity. PMID:15245737

  10. Efficiency of Double Layered Microencapsulated Probiotic to Modulate ProInflammatory Molecular Markers for the Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-related disorders are one of the challenging current health problems with medical, social, and economic consequences. Endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and release of a variety of inflammatory molecules are established mediators in alcoholic liver injury (ALD). Probiotics like L. plantarum though were reported to attenuate ALD, their in vivo health benefits are limited by their survival and sustenance in the adverse gut conditions. Therefore, to enhance their in vivo performance, chitosan coated alginate beads entrapping L. plantarum were prepared, characterized, and evaluated for their efficacy against ALD in rats. Following chronic alcohol exposure, rats developed endotoxemia, showed enhanced levels of liver enzyme markers, NF-?B levels, and increased cytokines such as TNF-? and IL12/p40 subunit, and reflected significant histological changes in the intestine and liver. However, cosupplementation with double layered microencapsulated probiotic significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the levels of endotoxemia, serum transaminases, NF-?B, and cytokines complemented with restoration of normal histoarchitecture of the intestine and liver. It is being documented here for the first time that the probiotics have the potential to inhibit IL-12/p40 subunit which is a recently explored potential marker for developing novel therapeutic agents. This study reveals that microencapsulation of probiotics may offer a biopharmacological basis for effective management of ALD. PMID:24966470

  11. PftetQ and pfmdt copy numbers as predictive molecular markers of decreased ex vivo doxycycline susceptibility in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of a series of independent doxycycline inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) values to validate the trimodal distribution previously described and to validate the use of the pftetQ and pfmdt genes as molecular markers of decreased in vitro doxycycline susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods Doxycycline IC50 values, from 484 isolates obtained at the French National Reference Centre for Imported Malaria (Paris) between January 2006 and December 2010, were analysed for the first time by a Bayesian mixture modelling approach to distinguish the different in vitro phenotypic groups by their IC50 values. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the pftetQ and pfmdt copy numbers of 89 African P. falciparum isolates that were randomly chosen from the phenotypic groups. Results The existence of at least three doxycycline phenotypes was demonstrated. The mean doxycycline IC50 was significantly higher in the group with a pftetQ copy number >1 compared to the group with a pftetQ copy number?=?1 (33.17 ?M versus 17.23 ?M) and the group with a pfmdt copy number >1 (28.28 ?M versus 16.11 ?M). There was a significant difference between the combined low and medium doxycycline IC50 group and the high IC50 group in terms of the per cent of isolates with one or more copy numbers of the pftetQ gene (0% versus 20.69%) or pfmdt gene (8.33% versus 37.93%). In the logistic regression model, the pfmdt and pftetQ copy numbers >1 (odds ratio?=?4.65 and 11.47) were independently associated with the high IC50 group. Conclusions Copy numbers of pftetQ and pfmdt are potential predictive molecular markers of decreased susceptibility to doxycycline. PMID:24225377

  12. Source apportionments of PM2.5 organic carbon using molecular marker Positive Matrix Factorization and comparison of results from different receptor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jongbae; Dulger, Muaz; Olson, Michael R.; McGinnis, Jerome E.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Matsunaga, Aiko; Sioutas, Constantinos; Schauer, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Four hundred fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples collected over a 1-year period at two sites in the Los Angeles Basin were analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and organic molecular markers. The results were used in a Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model to obtain daily, monthly and annual average source contributions to PM2.5 OC. Results of the PMF model showed similar source categories with comparable year-long contributions to PM2.5 OC across the sites. Five source categories providing reasonably stable profiles were identified: mobile, wood smoke, primary biogenic, and two types of secondary organic carbon (SOC) (i.e., anthropogenic and biogenic emissions). Total primary emission factors and total SOC factors contributed approximately 60% and 40%, respectively, to the annual-average OC concentrations. Primary sources showed strong seasonal patterns with high winter peaks and low summer peaks, while SOC showed a reverse pattern with highs in the spring and summer in the region. Interestingly, smoke from forest fires which occurred episodically in California during the summer and fall of 2009 was identified and combined with the primary biogenic source as one distinct factor to the OC budget. The PMF resolved factors were further investigated and compared to a chemical mass balance (CMB) model and a second multi-variant receptor model (UNMIX) using molecular markers considered in the PMF. Good agreement between the source contribution from mobile sources and biomass burning for three models were obtained, providing additional weight of evidence that these source apportionment techniques are sufficiently accurate for policy development. However, the CMB model did not quantify primary biogenic emissions, which were included in other sources with the SOC. Both multivariate receptor models, the PMF and the UNMIX, were unable to separate source contributions from diesel and gasoline engines.

  13. Nutrition, immunological mechanisms and dietary immunomodulation in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Verlaet, Annelies A J; Noriega, Daniela Briceno; Hermans, Nina; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2014-07-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) etiology is not completely understood, but common comorbid dysfunction of the gastrointestinal and immune system suggests that these systems may be affected by a common genetic background and molecular mechanisms. For example, increased levels of specific cytokines were observed in ADHD. Moreover, ADHD has a high comorbidity with both Th1- and Th2-mediated disorders like ear infections, eczema and asthma. A common pathophysiological mechanism was suggested to underlie both asthma and ADHD, while several genes that are linked to ADHD have immune functions. Furthermore, immunological recognition of food provoking ADHD-like behavior was suggested. An immune imbalance, probably requiring a predisposing genetic background, is therefore suggested to contribute to ADHD etiology, with immune dysregulation being more likely than a single subcellular defect. However, next to allergic mechanisms, also pharmacological mechanisms (especially in case of food additives) might be involved. In addition, though cellular (cytokine-related) rather than antibody-mediated immune mechanisms seem involved, specific immune-inflammatory markers other than antibodies have not been systematically studied in ADHD. Substantial alterations implicated in ADHD apparently occur in the immune system and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. As a result, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress could develop, which can lead to ADHD symptoms, for example by chronic T-cell-mediated neuroinflammation. If immune pathways contribute to ADHD, both its diagnosis and treatment should be reconsidered. Modulation of immune system activity might have potential in ADHD treatment, for example by nutritional approaches providing safe and low-cost ADHD therapy, but further research in these fields is implicated. PMID:24493267

  14. Bone Markers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  15. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal, E-mail: rafals@io.gliwice.p [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara [Department of Pathology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Grzegorz, Wozniak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Center of Oncology, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Dariusz, Lange [Department of Pathology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  16. Molecular virology and immunology of HIV infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Chinen; William T. Shearer

    2002-01-01

    Great progress has been made with respect to our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of AIDS and the infectious agent, HIV, that causes the disease. HIV, a human retrovirus with tropism for CD4+ T cells and monocytes, induces a decrease of T-cell counts, T-cell dysfunction, and, ultimately, immunodeficiency. HIV also causes B-cell dysfunction characterized by polyclonal activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and lack of

  17. Narcolepsy: immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Overeem, Sebastiaan; Black, John Logan; Lammers, Gert Jan

    2008-04-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a debilitating sleep disorder with an estimated prevalence of about 0.05%. Narcolepsy is caused by a selective loss of hypocretin (orexin) producing neurons in the perifornical hypothalamus. Based on the very strong association with the HLA subtype DQB1*0602, it is currently hypothesized narcolepsy is caused by an autoimmune-mediated process directed at the hypocretin neurons. So far however, studies focusing on general markers of (auto)immune activation, as well as humoral immunity against the hypocretin system have not yielded consistent results supporting this hypothesis. PMID:18291691

  18. The diagnosis of BCR/ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative diseases (CMPD): a comprehensive approach based on morphology, cytogenetics, and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Haferlach, Torsten; Bacher, Ulrike; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Recent years showed significant progress in the molecular characterization of the chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) which are classified according to the WHO classification of 2001 as polycythemia vera (PV), chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF), essential thrombocythemia (ET), CMPD/unclassifiable (CMPD-U), chronic neutrophilic leukemia, and chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)/hypereosinophilic syndrome, all to be delineated from BCR/ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). After 2001, the detection of the high frequency of the JAK2V617F mutation in PV, CIMF, and ET, and of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene in CEL further added important information in the diagnosis of CMPD. These findings also enhanced the importance of tyrosine kinase mutations in CMPD and paved the way to a more detailed classification and to an improved definition of prognosis using also novel minimal residual disease (MRD) markers. Simultaneously, the broadening of therapeutic strategies in the CMPD, e.g., due to reduced intensity conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in CML, in CEL, and in other ABL and PDGRFB rearrangements, increased the demands to diagnostics. Therefore, today, a multimodal diagnostic approach combining cytomorphology, cytogenetics, and individual molecular methods is needed in BCR/ABL-negative CMPD. A stringent diagnostic algorithm for characterization, choice of treatment, and monitoring of MRD will be proposed in this review. PMID:17938925

  19. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5490 Hemopexin immunological test system. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5340 Ferritin immunological test system. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5880 Transferrin immunological test system. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5570 - Lactoferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5570 Lactoferrin immunological test system. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5230 Colostrum immunological test system. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5340 Ferritin immunological test system. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5490 Hemopexin immunological test system. (a)...

  6. Biomarkers: The Useful and the Not So Useful— An Assessment of Molecular Prognostic Markers for Cutaneous Melanoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie E Gould Rothberg; David L Rimm

    2010-01-01

    Among individuals with localized (Stage I–II) melanoma, stratifying patients by a number of phenotypic variables (e.g., depth of invasion, ulceration) yields a wide range of 10-year melanoma-specific survival rates. With the possible exception of Ki-67, no molecular assessment is routinely used. However, there have been a tremendous number of studies assessing protein expression by immunohistochemistry toward the goal of better

  7. The Efficacy of Molecular Markers Analysis with Integration of Sensory Methods in Detection of Aroma in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, H. Y.; Faruq, G.; Zakaria, H. P.; Harikrishna, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Allele Specific Amplification with four primers (External Antisense Primer, External Sense Primer, Internal Nonfragrant Sense Primer, and Internal Fragrant Antisense Primer) and sensory evaluation with leaves and grains were executed to identify aromatic rice genotypes and their F1 individuals derived from different crosses of 2 Malaysian varieties with 4 popular land races and 3 advance lines. Homozygous aromatic (fgr/fgr) F1 individuals demonstrated better aroma scores compared to both heterozygous nonaromatic (FGR/fgr) and homozygous nonaromatic (FGR/FGR) individuals, while, some F1 individuals expressed aroma in both leaf and grain aromatic tests without possessing the fgr allele. Genotypic analysis of F1 individuals for the fgr gene represented homozygous aromatic, heterozygous nonaromatic and homozygous nonaromatic genotypes in the ratio 20?:?19?:?3. Genotypic and phenotypic analysis revealed that aroma in F1 individuals was successfully inherited from the parents, but either molecular analysis or sensory evaluation alone could not determine aromatic condition completely. The integration of molecular analysis with sensory methods was observed as rapid and reliable for the screening of aromatic genotypes because molecular analysis could distinguish aromatic homozygous, nonaromatic homozygous and nonaromatic heterozygous individuals, whilst the sensory method facilitated the evaluation of aroma emitted from leaf and grain during flowering to maturity stages. PMID:24222741

  8. TGF-?1/Smad signaling, MMP-14, and MSC markers in arterial injury: discovery of the molecular basis of restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Lijuan; Wei, Cuilei; Duan, Juncang; Zou, Hong; Cao, Weiwei; Qi, Yan; Jia, Wei; Hu, Jianming; Zhao, Wei; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1 has been suggested to be involved in the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) following arterial injury, but the role of downstream signaling and the contribution of the recruited MSCs are still unknown. The release of latent TGF-?1 from latent TGF-binding protein (LTBP) by matrix metallopeptidase-14 (MMP-14) proteolysis was demonstrated, which contributed to neointima formation, but the relationship between MMP-14 and activated TGF-?1 in the process of restenosis has yet to be explored. In this study, we observed the change in expression and distribution of TGF-?1/Smad signaling pathway proteins, MMP-14, and MSC markers in the process of neointima formation using a rat model for balloon-induced carotid artery injury. We found that the increase in downstream Smad signaling was consistent with the elevation of TGF-?1 levels and MSCs accumulated at the lumen side of neointima. Furthermore, the activation of MMP-14 in the injured artery was preceded by the increase in TGF-?1 levels. Herein, we conclude that MMP-14 induces an elevation in the levels of TGF-?1/Smad signaling proteins in injured arteries, and that MSCs are recruited by TGF-?1/Smad signaling and MMP-14, possibly differentiating into vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-like cells and VSMC via modulation of TGF-?1/Smads signaling and MMP-14. PMID:25031710

  9. Molecular characterization of three common olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivars in Palestine, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    Obaid, Ramiz; Abu-Qaoud, Hassan; Arafeh, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Eight accessions of olive trees from three common varieties in Palestine, Nabali Baladi, Nabali Mohassan and Surri, were genetically evaluated using five simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 17 alleles from 5 loci were observed in which 15 (88.2%) were polymorphic and 2 (11.8%) were monomorphic. An average of 3.4 alleles per locus was found ranging from 2.0 alleles with the primers GAPU-103 and DCA-9 to 5.0 alleles with U9932 and DCA-16. The smallest amplicon size observed was 50 bp with the primer DCA-16, whereas the largest one (450 bp) with the primer U9932. Cluster analysis with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) showed three clusters: a cluster with four accessions from the ‘Nabali Baladi’ cultivar, another cluster with three accessions that represents the ‘Nabali Mohassen’ cultivar and finally the ‘Surri’ cultivar. The similarity coefficient for the eight olive tree samples ranged from a maximum of 100% between two accessions from Nabali Baladi and also in two other samples from Nabali Mohassan, to a minimum similarity coefficient (0.315) between the Surri and two Nabali Baladi accessions. The results in this investigation clearly highlight the genetic dissimilarity between the three main olive cultivars that have been misidentified and mixed up in the past, based on conventional morphological characters. PMID:26019564

  10. Molecular markers reveal spatially segregated cryptic species in a critically endangered fish, the common skate (Dipturus batis)

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Andrew M.; Sims, David W.; Cotterell, Stephen P.; El Nagar, Aliya; Ellis, Jim R.; Lynghammar, Arve; McHugh, Matthew; Neat, Francis C.; Pade, Nicolas G.; Queiroz, Nuno; Serra-Pereira, Bárbara; Rapp, Toby; Wearmouth, Victoria J.; Genner, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Many sharks and skates are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because of their large size, slow growth, late maturity and low fecundity. In Europe dramatic population declines have taken place in common skate (Dipturus batis L.), one of the largest demersal fish in regional shelf seas, leading to extirpations from substantial parts of its former range. Here we report the discovery of cryptic species in common skate collected from the northeast Atlantic continental shelf. Data from nuclear microsatellite markers indicated two clearly distinct clades and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences demonstrated monophyly of each one of them. Capture locations showed evidence of strong spatial segregation, with one taxon occurring mainly in waters off the southern British Isles and around Rockall, while the other was restricted to more northerly shelf waters. These apparently cryptic species showed overlapping substrate and depth preferences, but distributional limits were closely related to temperature gradients, potentially indicating thermal limits to their distributions. This discovery of hidden diversity within a large, critically endangered marine vertebrate demonstrates how marine biodiversity can be underestimated, even in such a relatively well-studied and heavily exploited region. PMID:20106849

  11. Molecular markers reveal spatially segregated cryptic species in a critically endangered fish, the common skate (Dipturus batis).

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Andrew M; Sims, David W; Cotterell, Stephen P; El Nagar, Aliya; Ellis, Jim R; Lynghammar, Arve; McHugh, Matthew; Neat, Francis C; Pade, Nicolas G; Queiroz, Nuno; Serra-Pereira, Bárbara; Rapp, Toby; Wearmouth, Victoria J; Genner, Martin J

    2010-05-22

    Many sharks and skates are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because of their large size, slow growth, late maturity and low fecundity. In Europe dramatic population declines have taken place in common skate (Dipturus batis L.), one of the largest demersal fish in regional shelf seas, leading to extirpations from substantial parts of its former range. Here we report the discovery of cryptic species in common skate collected from the northeast Atlantic continental shelf. Data from nuclear microsatellite markers indicated two clearly distinct clades and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences demonstrated monophyly of each one of them. Capture locations showed evidence of strong spatial segregation, with one taxon occurring mainly in waters off the southern British Isles and around Rockall, while the other was restricted to more northerly shelf waters. These apparently cryptic species showed overlapping substrate and depth preferences, but distributional limits were closely related to temperature gradients, potentially indicating thermal limits to their distributions. This discovery of hidden diversity within a large, critically endangered marine vertebrate demonstrates how marine biodiversity can be underestimated, even in such a relatively well-studied and heavily exploited region. PMID:20106849

  12. Analysis of genetic stability through intersimple sequence repeats molecular markers in micropropagated plantlets of Anoectochilus formosanus Hayata, a medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fusheng; Lv, Yali; Dong, Hailing; Guo, Shunxing

    2010-01-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus HAYATA, commonly known as "Jewel Orchids," which has been used as Chinese folk medicines, is being subjected to a huge crisis, whose wild resources have gradually become more and more scarce. Hence, micropropagation protocol by axillary branching established for A. formosanus was employed for large-scale commercial production. In this study, due to the somaclonal variation and on the basis of some virtue of intersimple sequence repeats (ISSR) analysis, we firstly utilized the ISSR primers to investigate the genetic stability of A. formosanus propagated in vitro for a period of more than 5 years. Among the total 100 bands amplified by 17 ISSR markers, 77 bands were distributed in size from 500 bp to 1.5 kbp, while only 5 bands were beyond 1.8 kbp in size. Meanwhile, according to the cluster analysis, genetic similarity was more than 94% and the polymorphism rate was only 2.76% among the total 1810 scorable bands. All results demonstrate A. formosanus, multiplied by axillary branching, maintained high genetic fidelity even after a period of more than 5 years under in vitro propagation with only a low risk of genetic instability. The results from this study provide an important basis for giving evidence of genetic stability of A. formosanus before micropropagation for large-scale commercial production. PMID:20190397

  13. Gene Expression Levels of Cytokine Profile and Cytotoxic Markers in Non-Immediate Reactions to Drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sinforiano J. Posadas; Mar??a J Torres; Cristobalina Mayorga; Carlos Juarez; Miguel Blanca

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACTDrugs can induce IgE mediated or T cell dependent immunological reactions. T cell dependent reactions are poorly understood, although T lymphocytes have been proposed as a protagonist in a number of non-immediate immunological reactions (NIR). The objective was to study in vivo different regulatory and proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic markers in patients with NIR to drugs. Twenty patients with NIR

  14. Modular Design of Immunological Synapses and Kinapses

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of an immunological synapse goes back to the early 1980s with the discovery of the relationship between T-cell antigen receptor mediated Ca2+ signaling, adhesion, and directed secretion. However, this concept did not gain traction until images were published starting in 1998 that revealed a specific molecular pattern in the interface between T cells and model antigen-presenting cells or supported planar bilayers. The dominant pattern, a ring of adhesion molecules surrounding a central cluster of antigen receptors, was observed in both model systems. Analysis of the origins of this pattern over the past 10 years has presented a solution for a difficult problem in lymphocyte biology—how a highly motile cell can suddenly stop when it encounters a signal delivered by just a few antigenic ligands on the surface of another cell without disabling the sensory machinery of the motile cell. The T lymphocyte actively assembles the immunological synapse pattern following a modular design with roots in actin–myosin?based motility. PMID:20066081

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in adults: Immunological subtypes and clinical features at presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. van't Veer; W. L. J. van Putten; L. F. Verdonck; G. J. Ossenkoppele; B. Löwenberg; J. C. Kluin-Nelemans; P. W. Wijermans; H. C. Schouten; W. Sizoo; A. W. Dekker

    1993-01-01

    Summary In 91 of 106 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) enrolled in the treatment protocol ALL HOVON-5 between May 1988 and October 1991, the immunophenotype of the leukemia was determined and correlated with clinical characteristics at presentation. The immunological marker analysis was performed in ten laboratories, all members of the Dutch Study Group on Immunophenotyping of Leukemias and

  16. Genetic Dissection of Sympatric Populations of Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), Using DALP-PCR Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Latif, M. A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Mazid, M. S.; Ali, M. E.; Ahmed, F.; Omar, M. Y.; Tan, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Direct amplified length polymorphism (DALP) combines the advantages of a high-resolution fingerprint method and also characterizing the genetic polymorphisms. This molecular method was also found to be useful in brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens species complex for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms. A total of 11 populations of Nilaparvata spp. were collected from 6 locations from Malaysia. Two sympatric populations of brown planthopper, N. lugens, one from rice and the other from a weed grass (Leersia hexandra), were collected from each of five locations. N. bakeri was used as an out group. Three oligonucleotide primer pairs, DALP231/DALPR?5, DALP234/DALPR?5, and DALP235/DALPR?5 were applied in this study. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram based on genetic distances for the 11 populations of Nilaparvata spp. revealed that populations belonging to the same species and the same host type clustered together irrespective of their geographical localities of capture. The populations of N. lugens formed into two distinct clusters, one was insects with high esterase activities usually captured from rice and the other was with low esterase activities usually captured from L. hexandra. N. bakeri, an out group, was the most isolated group. Analyses of principal components, molecular variance, and robustness also supported greatly to the findings of cluster analysis. PMID:22593700

  17. Sexual genetic and simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis for molecular marker development on the all hermaphrodite papaya.

    PubMed

    Chiu, C T; Wang, C W; Chen, F C; Chin, S W; Liu, C C; Lee, M J; Chung, W C; Chien, Y W; Chang, H J; Lee, C Y

    2015-01-01

    The papaya (Carica papaya L.) is one of the most important economic tropical fruits in the world, and the hermaphrodite is the preferred type in field cultures. We analyzed the sexual ratio of offspring from the cultivar 'Taiwan Seed Station No. 7' (T7) by a self-cross and its cross with Taichung Sunrise (TS). Female progeny from the T7 self-crossing were not observed. This finding may be caused by a lethal gene that is linked to females. In this study, we selected 192 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) to analyze the polymorphism between T7 and TS. A total of 37 SSRs were identified for T7 and TS. In addition, 14 SSRs served as the molecular makers for identification of T7, TS and their hybrid offsprings. Thus, the results show that the genetic similarity between T7 and TS is rather high. This suggests that T7 may be a mutant of TS. Phylogenetic analysis from the SSR polymorphisms of the above parent strains and 15 F1 offspring revealed the genetic distance of the F1 offspring located between T7 and TS. The results of this study may provide an opportunity for elucidating the genetic characteristics of all hermaphrodites via identification of molecular makers. PMID:25867396

  18. Diagnostic molecular markers for phosphine resistance in U.S. populations of Tribolium castaneum and Rhyzopertha dominica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaorigetu; Schlipalius, David; Opit, George; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju; Phillips, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Stored product beetles that are resistant to the fumigant pesticide phosphine (hydrogen phosphide) gas have been reported for more than 40 years in many places worldwide. Traditionally, determination of phosphine resistance in stored product beetles is based on a discriminating dose bioassay that can take up to two weeks to evaluate. We developed a diagnostic cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence method, CAPS, to detect individuals with alleles for strong resistance to phosphine in populations of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, according to a single nucleotide mutation in the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) gene. We initially isolated and sequenced the DLD genes from susceptible and strongly resistant populations of both species. The corresponding amino acid sequences were then deduced. A single amino acid mutation in DLD in populations of T. castaneum and R. dominica with strong resistance was identified as P45S in T. castaneum and P49S in R. dominica, both collected from northern Oklahoma, USA. PCR products containing these mutations were digested by the restriction enzymes MboI and BstNI, which revealed presence or absence, respectively of the resistant (R) allele and allowed inference of genotypes with that allele. Seven populations of T. castaneum from Kansas were subjected to discriminating dose bioassays for the weak and strong resistance phenotypes. Application of CAPS to these seven populations confirmed the R allele was in high frequency in the strongly resistant populations, and was absent or at a lower frequency in populations with weak resistance, which suggests that these populations with a low frequency of the R allele have the potential for selection of the strong resistance phenotype. CAPS markers for strong phosphine resistance will help to detect and confirm resistant beetles and can facilitate resistance management actions against a given pest population. PMID:25826251

  19. The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Christina S. [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Narasimhan, Balasubramanian [Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Cao Hongbin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Kwok, Shirley [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Erickson, Julianna P. [Biochemistry-Genome Center, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Koong, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Pourmand, Nader [Biochemistry-Genome Center, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)], E-mail: qle@stanford.edu

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16{sup INK4a} staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO{sub 2} and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16{sup INK4a} staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16{sup INK4a} staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO{sub 2} or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

  20. Alcohol and immunology: Summary of the 2012 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Jill A; Curtis, Brenda J; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-12-01

    On October 27, 2012, the 17th annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting was held at the Grand Wailea Hotel in Maui, Hawaii as a satellite meeting to the 2012 Society of Leukocyte Biology conference. This year's meeting focused on the influence of alcohol on signal transduction pathways in various disease and injury models. Three plenary sessions were held where invited speakers shared their research on alcohol-mediated alterations of cell signaling components, immune cell subsets, and inflammation. These studies suggested alcohol has a negative effect on cell signaling machinery and immune cell homeostasis, resulting in disease, disease progression, and increased mortality. Researchers also identified tissue-specific alcohol-linked elevations in markers of inflammation, including cold-shock proteins and microRNAs. Additionally, one study revealed the effects of alcohol on immune cell subsets in a model of allergic asthma. PMID:24169087

  1. Cross-generational trans fat intake facilitates mania-like behavior: oxidative and molecular markers in brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Trevizol, F; Roversi, Kr; Dias, V T; Roversi, K; Barcelos, R C S; Kuhn, F T; Pase, C S; Golombieski, R; Veit, J C; Piccolo, J; Pochmann, D; Porciúncula, L O; Emanuelli, T; Rocha, J B T; Bürger, M E

    2015-02-12

    Since that fast food consumption have raised concerns about people's health, we evaluated the influence of trans fat consumption on behavioral, biochemical and molecular changes in the brain-cortex of second generation rats exposed to a model of mania. Two successive generations of female rats were supplemented with soybean oil (SO, rich in n-6 FA, control group), fish oil (FO, rich in n-3 FA) and hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF, rich in trans FA) from pregnancy, lactation to adulthood, when male rats from 2nd generation received amphetamine (AMPH-4 mg/kg-i.p., once a day, for 14 days) treatment. AMPH increased locomotor index in all animals, which was higher in the HVF group. While the FO group showed increased n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) incorporation and reduced n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio, HVF allowed trans fatty acid (TFA) incorporation and increased n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in the brain-cortex. In fact, the FO group showed minor AMPH-induced hyperactivity, decreased reactive species (RS) generation per se, causing no changes in protein carbonyl (PC) levels and dopamine transporter (DAT). FO supplementation showed molecular changes, since proBDNF was increased per se and reduced by AMPH, decreasing the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level following drug treatment. Conversely, HVF was related to increased hyperactivity, higher PC level per se and higher AMPH-induced PC level, reflecting on DAT, whose levels were decreased per se as well as in AMPH-treated groups. In addition, while HVF increased BDNF-mRNA per se, AMPH reduced this value, acting on BDNF, whose level was lower in the same AMPH-treated experimental group. ProBDNF level was influenced by HVF supplementation, but it was not sufficient to modify BDNF level. These findings reinforce that prolonged consumption of trans fat allows TFA incorporation in the cortex, facilitating hyperactive behavior, oxidative damages and molecular changes. Our study is a warning about cross-generational consumption of processed food, since high trans fat may facilitate the development of neuropsychiatric conditions, including bipolar disorder (BD). PMID:25499313

  2. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in! PMID:26139599

  3. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system...Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components immunological...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system...Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components immunological...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system...Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components immunological...

  6. Molecular mapping and construction of SCAR markers of the strawberry Rpf1 resistance gene to Phytophthora fragariae and their use in breeding programmes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Haymes; Weg van de W. E; P. Arens; B. Vosman; A. P. M. den Nijs

    1998-01-01

    The commercial strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) resistance gene Rpfl conferring resistance to various isolates of Phytophthora fragariae, was mapped using 7 RAPD markers. A DNA fragment representing a RAPD marker linked to susceptibility was cloned, sequenced and converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Next, SCAR primers to the resistant allele (SCAR-R) were developed based upon a deletion

  7. Molecular mapping and construction of SCAR markers of the strawberry Rpf 1 resistance gene to Phytophthora fragariae and their use in breeding programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Haymes; Weg van de W. E; P. Arens; B. Vosman; Nijs den A. P. M

    1997-01-01

    The commercial strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) resistance gene Rpfl conferring resistance to various isolates of Phytophthora fragariae, was mapped using 7 RAPD markers. A DNA fragment representing a RAPD marker linked to susceptibility was cloned, sequenced and converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Next, SCAR primers to the resistant allele (SCAR-R) were developed based upon a deletion

  8. Molecular Profiles of HCV Cirrhotic Tissues Derived in a Panel of Markers with Clinical Utility for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; Archer, Kellie J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detection is difficult because low accuracy of surveillance tests. Genome-wide analyses were performed using HCV-cirrhosis with HCC to identify predictive signatures. Methodology/Principal Findings Cirrhotic liver tissue was collected from 107 HCV-infected patients with diagnosis of HCC at pre-transplantation and confirmed in explanted livers. Study groups included: 1) microarray hybridization set (n?=?80) including patients without (woHCC?=?45) and with (wHCC?=?24) HCC, and with incidental HCC (iHCC?=?11); 2) independent validation set (n?=?27; woHCC?=?16, wHCC?=?11). Pairwise comparisons were performed using moderated t-test. FDR<1% was considered significant. L1-penalized logistic regression model was fit for woHCC and wHCC microarrays, and tested against iHCC. Prediction model genes were validated in independent set by qPCR. The genomic profile was associated with genetic disorders and cancer focused on gene expression, cell cycle and cell death. Molecular profile analysis revealed cell cycle progression and arrest at G2/M, but progressing to mitosis; unregulated DNA damage check-points, and apoptosis. The prediction model included 17 molecules demonstrated 98.6% of accuracy and correctly classified 6 out of 11 undiagnosed iHCC cases. The best model performed even better in the additional independent set. Conclusions/Significances The molecular analysis of HCV-cirrhotic tissue conducted to a prediction model with good performance and high potential for HCC surveillance. PMID:22792259

  9. Sex-biased gene flow in spectacled eiders (Anatidae): Inferences from molecular markers with contrasting modes of inheritance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, K.T.; Petersen, M.R.; Fields, R.L.; Talbot, S.L.; Pearce, J.M.; Chesser, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Genetic markers that differ in mode of inheritance and rate of evolution (a sex-linked Z-specific microsatellite locus, five biparentally inherited microsatellite loci, and maternally inherited mitochondrial [mtDNA] sequences) were used to evaluate the degree of spatial genetic structuring at macro- and microgeographic scales, among breeding regions and local nesting populations within each region, respectively, for a migratory sea duck species, the spectacled eider (Somateria fisheri). Disjunct and declining breeding populations coupled with sex-specific differences in seasonal migratory patterns and life history provide a series of hypotheses regarding rates and directionality of gene flow among breeding populations from the Indigirka River Delta, Russia, and the North Slope and Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. The degree of differentiation in mtDNA haplotype frequency among breeding regions and populations within regions was high (??CT = 0.189, P 0.05; biparentally inherited microsatellites: mean ?? = 0.001, P > 0.05) than was observed for mtDNA. Using models explicitly designed for uniparental and biparentally inherited genes, estimates of spatial divergence based on nuclear and mtDNA data together with elements of the species' breeding ecology were used to estimate effective population size and degree of male and female gene flow. Differences in the magnitude and spatial patterns of gene correlations for maternally inherited and nuclear genes revealed that females exhibit greater natal philopatry than do males. Estimates of generational female and male rates of gene flow among breeding regions differed markedly (3.67 ?? 10-4 and 1.28 ?? 10-2, respectively). Effective population size for mtDNA was estimated to be at least three times lower than that for biparental genes (30,671 and 101,528, respectively). Large disparities in population sizes among breeding areas greatly reduces the proportion of total genetic variance captured by dispersal, which may accelerate rates of inbreeding (i.e., promote higher coancestries) within populations due to nonrandom pairing of males with females from the same breeding population.

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N. [Scientific Center of Medical Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obsterics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  11. Stanford Immunology Charter 3/5/12 Charter for Stanford Immunology

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Stanford Immunology Charter 3/5/12 1 Charter for Stanford Immunology Preamble Stanford has been one of the leading institutions in the world in basic and clinical immunology since the 1960's. Because of the relevance of immunology to many areas of the basic and clinical sciences, faculty engaged in research

  12. Adaptive population divergence: markers, QTL and traits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John K. McKay; Robert G. Latta

    2002-01-01

    Molecular markers appear to be poor indicators of heritable variation in adaptive traits. Direct comparison of population structure in markers with that in traits is made possible by the measure Qst, which partitions quantitative genetic variation in a manner analogous to Fst for single gene markers. A survey of the literature reveals that mean Qst is typically larger than and

  13. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma cells. These experiments were further validated using primary human neurons and confirmed that adaptogens activate the release of both NPY and Hsp70, while tested non adaptogens were inactive in NPY assay and inhibit the release of Hsp70. Taken together, our data demonstrates for the first time that neuropeptide Y and heat shock protein Hsp70 can be used as molecular biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. PMID:23920279

  14. Individual neural cell types express immunologically distinct N-CAM forms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD K. WILLIAMS; CHRISTO GORIDIS; RICHARD AKESON

    1985-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecules, or N-CAMs, are a group of structurally and immunologically related glycoproteins found in vertebrate neural tissues. Adult brain N-CAMs have apparent molecular weights of 180,000, 140,000, and 120,000. In this article we identify, using monoclonal antibody (Mab) 3G6.41, an immunologically distinct adult rat N-CAM form and show that this form is selectively expressed by some

  15. Intensive induction is effective in selected octogenarian acute myeloid leukemia patients: prognostic significance of karyotype and selected molecular markers used in the European LeukemiaNet classification.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Meir; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Dombret, Hervé; Döhner, Hartmut; Pilorge, Sylvain; Krug, Utz; Carroll, Andrew J; Larson, Richard A; Marcucci, Guido; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Büchner, Thomas; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2014-02-01

    We investigated whether octogenarian patients with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled onto Cooperative Group clinical trials and treated with intensive induction therapy could be cured, and whether karyotype and selected molecular markers had any prognostic significance in these patients. Among 138 patients with cytogenetic information, normal karyotype was the most common (47.1%) followed by complex karyotype (14.5%) and sole +8 (9.4%). Among these patients, the relapse-free survival rate at 1 year was 37% and 13% at 3 years, and the respective overall survival rates were 24% and 8%. Whereas the 90 patients who survived beyond 30 days had the same relapse-free survival rates, their 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 36% and 11%, respectively. Of the 66 patients surviving beyond 30 days who could be classified into European LeukemiaNet genetic groups, those in the intermediate-I group had better overall survival than patients in the adverse group (P=0.01). Among patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia who were tested for the European LeukemiaNet-associated molecular alterations, FLT3-internal tandem duplication and NPM1 mutations, it was found that FLT3-internal tandem duplication (detected in 29% of patients) did not associate with overall survival (P=0.31), whereas NPM1 mutations (30%) were associated with a significantly longer overall survival (P=0.002). We conclude that intensive induction is effective and indicated in selected octogenarians with acute myeloid leukemia, that their overall survival varies among the European LeukemiaNet genetic groups and that NPM1 mutations may be of prognostic significance among octogenarian patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24097631

  16. Intensive induction is effective in selected octogenarian acute myeloid leukemia patients: prognostic significance of karyotype and selected molecular markers used in the European LeukemiaNet classification

    PubMed Central

    Wetzler, Meir; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Dombret, Hervé; Döhner, Hartmut; Pilorge, Sylvain; Krug, Utz; Carroll, Andrew J.; Larson, Richard A.; Marcucci, Guido; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Büchner, Thomas; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether octogenarian patients with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled onto Cooperative Group clinical trials and treated with intensive induction therapy could be cured, and whether karyotype and selected molecular markers had any prognostic significance in these patients. Among 138 patients with cytogenetic information, normal karyotype was the most common (47.1%) followed by complex karyotype (14.5%) and sole +8 (9.4%). Among these patients, the relapse-free survival rate at 1 year was 37% and 13% at 3 years, and the respective overall survival rates were 24% and 8%. Whereas the 90 patients who survived beyond 30 days had the same relapse-free survival rates, their 1-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 36% and 11%, respectively. Of the 66 patients surviving beyond 30 days who could be classified into European LeukemiaNet genetic groups, those in the intermediate-I group had better overall survival than patients in the adverse group (P=0.01). Among patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia who were tested for the European LeukemiaNet-associated molecular alterations, FLT3-internal tandem duplication and NPM1 mutations, it was found that FLT3-internal tandem duplication (detected in 29% of patients) did not associate with overall survival (P=0.31), whereas NPM1 mutations (30%) were associated with a significantly longer overall survival (P=0.002). We conclude that intensive induction is effective and indicated in selected octogenarians with acute myeloid leukemia, that their overall survival varies among the European LeukemiaNet genetic groups and that NPM1 mutations may be of prognostic significance among octogenarian patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24097631

  17. Immunological Memory is Associative Derek J. Smith

    E-print Network

    Somayaji, Anil

    Immunological Memory is Associative Derek J. Smith Department of Computer Science University of New Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA asp@t10.lanl.gov Abstract This paper argues that immunological memory population in the immune system). Keywords: Immunological Memory, Associative Memory, Cross-Reactive Memory

  18. Immunology Taught by Bacteria Russell E. Vance

    E-print Network

    Vance,. Russell

    Immunology Taught by Bacteria Russell E. Vance Received: 11 March 2010 /Accepted: 12 March 2010 multiple pathogenic bacteria. Conclusion Thus, immunology taught by L. pneumophila may lead to a more "Immunology Taught by Viruses" [1]. Zinkerna- gel's message was targeted to a generation of immunolo- gists

  19. MICB 411 IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY Autumn Semester, 2008

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    MICB 411 IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY Autumn Semester, 2008 Dr. Scott Wetzel (SC216; Phone 243-2168) Lab as set forth by the Journal of Immunology (American Association of Immunologists) and includes: Title- Not required for the report GRADING OF THE PAPER IS AS FOLLOWS: Journal of Immunology format and 10 page limit

  20. Administration and Management National Institute of Immunology

    E-print Network

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    1 #12;Bye-Laws for Administration and Management of the National Institute of Immunology Framed under Rule 32 (VIII) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF IMMUNOLOGY New Delhi 2 #12;CONTENTS 1. Short title 2 and Management of the National Institute of Immunology Framed under Rule 32 (VIII) 1. SHORT TITLE These Bye

  1. Department and function: Group Leader, Clinical Immunology

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Department and function: Group Leader, Clinical Immunology Education: 1981-1986 Biology in Hannover Positions: 1987-recent Scientist in the Division of Clinical Immunology, MHH 1992 PhD in Biology, MHH 2003 Habilitation in Immunology, MHH Major research interests: Analysis of Natural Killer (NK) cell subpopulations

  2. SchoolofMedicalSciences BSc (Hons) Immunology

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    BSc (Hons) Immunology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology · Introduction · Degree Aims and Outcomes · General Enquiries · General Requirements · Industrial Requirements Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Immunology developed as the study of how the body

  3. IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Immunology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL ON IMMUNOLOGY, MODELL CENTER, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL Grades and credit for rotations will not be assigned unless

  4. Immunology for physicists Alan S. Perelson

    E-print Network

    Weisbuch, Gerard

    Immunology for physicists Alan S. Perelson Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory of immunological problems in which the use of physical concepts and mathematical methods has increased our properties 1219 B. Basic facts of immunology 1221 1. Clonal selection 1223 2. Learning and memory 1223 3

  5. A taste of mathematical biology: theoretical immunology

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    A taste of mathematical biology: theoretical immunology Carmen Molina-París Department of Applied carmen@maths.leeds.ac.uk #12;Physics Biology Modelling Motivation Immunology UK MathBio Thanks Outline 1 modelling and why stochastic? 5 Theoretical Immunology 6 Mathematical Biology in the UK 7 Acknowledgements 2

  6. Modelling Immunological Memory Simon Garrett1

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    5 Modelling Immunological Memory Simon Garrett1 , Martin Robbins1 , Joanne Walker1 , William Wilson2 , and Uwe Aickelin2 1 Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors

  7. Ex situ conservation of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster and evaluation of genetic fidelity in regenerates using DNA-based molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Richa; Kashyap, Sarvesh Pratap; Singh, Chandra Shekhar; Tiwari, Kavindra Nath; Singh, Karuna; Singh, Major

    2014-11-01

    Germplasm storage of Phyllanthus fraternus by using synseed technology has been optimized. Synseeds were prepared from nodal segments taken from in vitro-grown plantlets. An encapsulation matrix of 3 % sodium alginate and 100 mM calcium chloride with polymerization duration up to 15 min was found most suitable for synseed formation. Maximum plantlet conversion (92.5?±?2.5 %) was obtained on a growth regulator-free ½-strength solid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. Multiple shoot proliferation was optimum on a ½ MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Shoots were subjected to rooting on MS media containing 1 mg/l ?-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and acclimatized successfully. Encapsulated nodal segments can be stored for up to 90 days with a survival frequency of 47.33 %. The clonal fidelity of synseed-derived plantlets was also assessed and compared with that of the mother plant using rapid amplified polymorphic DNA and inter-simple sequence repeat analysis. No changes in molecular profiles were observed among the synseed-derived plantlets and mother plant, which confirms the genetic stability of regenerates. This synseed production protocol could be useful for in vitro multiplication, short-term storage, and exchange of germplasm of this important antiviral and hepatoprotective plant. PMID:25172059

  8. Obtaining polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration ratios and molecular markers for residential wood combustion: Temuco, a case study.

    PubMed

    Cereceda-Balic, Francisco; Fadic, Ximena; Llanos, Ana L; Dominguez, Ana María; Guevara, Juan L; Vidal, Víctor; Díaz-Robles, Luis A; Schiappacasse, L Nicolás; Etcharren, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    It is known that residential wood combustion (RWC) is an important source of fine particle emissions. The purpose of this work was to characterize the chemical composition of the particulate matter present in the Temuco urban atmosphere during winter, specifically the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) profile, because PAHs are considered to be among the key compounds in particulate matter toxicity. During the 2008 winter monitoring campaign, samples of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters of < or = 10 (PM10) and < or = 2.5 (PM2.5) microm were taken on days with contamination episodes. Sixteen U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PAH compounds were extracted with toluene and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results show that phenantrene was the predominant compound associated with particulate matter at a concentration range between 300 and 600 ng m(-3), 18 times higher than the second most abundant PAH compound. High-molecular-mass compounds such as dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3,c,d]pyrene were also found, but they were minorities in the set. It was recognized from the PAH concentration ratios of the Temuco atmospheric aerosol that the main contamination source was in fact residential wood combustion; although not all the concentration ratios evaluated match the reported reference values, probably due to the kind of biomass used, the characteristics of Chilean heating appliances and climate. PMID:22393809

  9. The double helix and immunology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Gustav J. V.

    2003-01-01

    The immune system can recognize and produce antibodies to virtually any molecule in the Universe. This enormous diversity arises from the ingenious reshuffling of DNA sequences encoding components of the immune system. Immunology is an example of a field completely transformed during the past 50 years by the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of DNA technologies that followed.

  10. Immunology of Silicone Breast Implants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nir Kossovsky; Charles J. Freiman

    1994-01-01

    Understanding the immunology of silicone breast implants, at present, consists of reconciling an increasingly large body of data with an older, established, but otherwise unsubstantiated theory. Despite the variety of silicone breast implants, there are nevertheless certain phenomena that occur with all silicone gel-filled devices. Recent clinical findings suggest that in some patients, silicone will act as an adjuvant on

  11. Testing mitochondrial sequences and anonymous nuclear markers for phylogeny reconstruction in a rapidly radiating group: molecular systematics of the Delphininae (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Delphinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Sarah E; Adams, Lara D; Rosel, Patricia E

    2009-01-01

    Background Many molecular phylogenetic analyses rely on DNA sequence data obtained from single or multiple loci, particularly mitochondrial DNA loci. However, phylogenies for taxa that have undergone recent, rapid radiation events often remain unresolved. Alternative methodologies for discerning evolutionary relationships under these conditions are desirable. The dolphin subfamily Delphininae is a group that has likely resulted from a recent and rapid radiation. Despite several efforts, the evolutionary relationships among the species in the subfamily remain unclear. Results Here, we compare a phylogeny estimated using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences to a multi-locus phylogeny inferred from 418 polymorphic genomic markers obtained from amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The two sets of phylogenies are largely incongruent, primarily because the mtDNA tree provides very poor resolving power; very few species' nodes in the tree are supported by bootstrap resampling. The AFLP phylogeny is considerably better resolved and more congruent with relationships inferred from morphological data. Both phylogenies support paraphyly for the genera Stenella and Tursiops. The AFLP data indicate a close relationship between the two spotted dolphin species and recent ancestry between Stenella clymene and S. longirostris. The placement of the Lagenodelphis hosei lineage is ambiguous: phenetic analysis of the AFLP data is consistent with morphological expectations but the phylogenetic analysis is not. Conclusion For closely related, recently diverged taxa, a multi-locus genome-wide survey is likely the most comprehensive approach currently available for phylogenetic inference. PMID:19811651

  12. A centennial record of anthropogenic impacts and extreme weather events in southwestern Taiwan: evidence from sedimentary molecular markers in coastal margin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Lee, Chon-Lin; Louchouarn, Patrick; Huh, Chih-An; Liu, James T; Chen, Jian-Cheng; Lee, Kun-Je

    2014-09-15

    A 100-year history of human and natural disturbances in southwestern Taiwan was reconstructed using a suite of molecular markers in four dated sediment cores from the upper slope region off the Gaoping River mouth. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) tracked Taiwan's industrialization/urbanization starting in the 1970s, and the enactment of environmental regulatory policies thereafter. The predominant pyrogenic sources include vehicular, smelter, and coal combustion but spatial differences are observed among sub-regions of the shelf. Profiles of lignin oxidation products (LOPs) point to a significant increase in terrestrial organic matter inputs driven by land development after the 1970s. Low lignin diagenetic signature ratios [(Ad/Al)v] in all sediments suggest quick transport of fresh plant material from land to sea via mountainous rivers. Shifts in PAHs, LOPs, and radionuclides in recent sediments reveal the deposition of turbidites resulting from typhoon-induced floods. Multiproxy analysis illustrates the interplay between anthropogenic activities and natural processes. PMID:25066458

  13. Effect of Walking Exercise on Changes in Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Metabolic Syndrome Markers, and High-molecular-weight Adiponectin in Obese Middle-aged Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Young; Seo, Byoung-Do; Kim, Dong-Je

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 24-week exercise intervention on cardiorespiratory fitness, metabolic syndrome markers, and high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin among obese middle-aged women. [Subjects] The subjects were 14 obese middle-aged women. [Methods] The exercise program involved walking at 50–60% of the maximum oxygen consumption, 3 times a week, for 24 weeks. Body composition analysis, blood pressure measurements, and blood analysis were performed before the exercise program and at weeks 6, 12, 18, and 24. [Results] The results showed that after 24 weeks in the exercise program, the obesity indices and metabolic risk factors, namely, weight, body fat, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides decreased significantly, whereas HDLC, a metabolic improvement factor, increased significantly. Additionally, VO2max increased significantly, together with the level of total and HMW adiponectins. Correlation analysis of the changes in measured variables (? score) during resulting from the 24-week exercise program showed that body fat had a significant negative correlation and VO2max had a significant positive correlation with HMW adiponectin. [Conclusion] Among obese middle-aged women, regular exercise increases cardiorespiratory fitness and HMW adiponectin expression and therefore can be effective in the prevention and treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25435686

  14. Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

    PubMed

    Xincheng, Zhang; Kunci, Chen; Xinping, Zhu; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong; Wei, Li; Fengfang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ? × C. maculata ? and C. maculata ? × C. argus ?), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ? × C. argus ?), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ? × C. maculata ?). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids. PMID:24438305

  15. Use of AFLP and RAPD molecular genetic markers and cytogenetic analysis to explore relationships among taxa of the Patagonian Bromus setifolius complex

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Bromus setifolius var. pictus (Hook) Skottsb., B. setifolius var. setifolius Presl. and B.setifolius var. brevifolius Ness are three native Patagonian taxa in the section Pnigma Dumort of the genus Bromus L. AFLP and RAPD analysis, in conjunction with genetic distance measurements and statistical techniques, revealed variation within this group and indicated that B. setifolius var. brevifolius was closely related to B. setifolius var. pictus, with both taxa being more distantly related to B. setifolius var. setifolius. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed the chromosomal number of B. setifolius var. pictus (2n = 70) and B. setifolius var. setifolius (2n = 28) and showed for the first time that B. setifolius var. brevifolius had 2n = 70. The combination of molecular genetic and cytogenetic evidence supported a species status for two of the three taxa and suggested hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of these complex taxa. Species status was also indicated for B. setifolius var. setifolius. Based on these findings, we suggest that B. setifolius var. pictus be referred to as B. pictus Hook var. pictus, and B. setifolius var brevifolius as B. pictus Hook var brevifolius. The correlation between AFLP diversity and variation in ecological parameters suggested that this marker system could be used to assess breeding progress and to monitor the domestication of Patagonian Bromus species for agronomic use. PMID:21637686

  16. SERS molecular sentinel for the RNA genetic marker of PB1-F2 protein in highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Junfeng; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2014-11-15

    We have developed a simple and sensitive assay for the detection of the RNA genetic marker associated with high pathogenicity influenza (HPAI) virus. The assay constituted of an array of Raman label tagged hairpin-DNA immobilized on a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate as the molecular sentinel (MS) reporter. Upon incubation of the assay with the target RNA, the structure of the hairpin-DNA probe changed from stem-loop configuration (closed state) to DNA/RNA hybridization configuration (open state) so that the Raman label tag will be physically separated from the SERS substrate and induce a decrease of Raman scattering intensity. A metal film over nanosphere (MFON) substrate was developed with a SERS enhancement of about 1.7 × 10(5). Based on this MS-modified substrate, the SERS signal showed a linear relationship to the target RNA in the range of 0-60 attomoles and the limit of detect is 2.67 attomoles. The non-complementary RNA sequences control was also detected and no spectral response was observed. The sensing process only required a single hybridization step and post-hybridization washing could also be omitted. Given that this ultrasensitive biosensor assay is free of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, it would be a potential diagnostic tool for point-of-care HPAI virus detection. PMID:24934747

  17. Molecular cytogenetic and agronomic characterization of advanced generations of wheat x triticale hybrids resistant to Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko): application of GISH and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Nkongolo, K K; Haley, S D; Kim, N S; Michael, P; Fedak, G; Quick, J S; Peairs, F B

    2009-04-01

    The PI 386148 triticale from Russia is among the highest resistant line to the Russian wheat aphid (RWA) (Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko)). This triticale line was used as the male parent in crosses with Lamar wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The F1 plants were backcrossed to Lamar wheat. The progenies were tested for RWA biotype 1 reaction for at least eight backcross and selfing generations. Five lines from these selections were identified for their resistance to the RWA and their seeds were increased for agronomic and other characterizations. Molecular and cytological analyses of these lines were performed using genomic in situ hybridization and rye chromosome-specific microsatellites markers. Three lines were cytologically stable and carried a pair of rye (Secale strictum (C. Presl) C. Presl) chromosomes as disomic addition lines of 1R. One line was unstable and showed a moderate level of mixoploidy with monosomic additions of 1R. Duplication of rye chromosome 1R was also identified. No wheat-rye chromosome interchange was detected, suggesting little homology between S. strictum and T. aestivum chromosomes. Specific microsatellite primers were used to identify the rye chromosomes present in each line. One rye chromosome, 1R, from the donor species contains genes for RWA resistance. Grain yield and test weight of three of the lines were similar to some adapted released wheat varieties under stress conditions. PMID:19370091

  18. Molecular characterization of circumventricular organs and third ventricle ependyma in the rat: potential markers for periventricular tumors.

    PubMed

    Szathmari, Alexandru; Champier, Jacques; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François; Jouvet, Anne; Watrin, Chantal; Wierinckx, Anne; Fèvre Montange, Michelle

    2013-02-01

    Circumventricular organs (CVOs) are specialized ventricular structures around the third and fourth ventricles of the brain. In humans, these structures are present during the fetal period and some become vestigial after birth. Some of these organs, such as the pineal gland (PG), subcommissural organ (SCO), and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, might be the sites of origin of periventricular tumors, notably pineal parenchymal tumors, papillary tumor of the pineal region and chordoid glioma. In contrast to the situation in humans, CVOs are present in the adult rat and can be dissected by laser capture microdissection (LCM). In this study, we used LCM and microarrays to analyze the transcriptomes of three CVOs, the SCO, the subfornical organ (SFO), and the PG and the third ventricle ependyma in the adult rat, in order to better characterize these organs at the molecular level. Several genes were expressed only, or mainly, in one of these structures, for example, Erbb2 and Col11a1 in the ependyma, Epcam and Claudin-3 (CLDN3) in the SCO, Ren1 and Slc22a3 in the SFO and Tph, Aanat and Asmt in the PG. The expression of these genes in periventricular tumors should be examined as evidence for a possible origin from the CVOs. Furthermore, we performed an immunohistochemical study of CLDN3, a membrane protein involved in forming cellular tight junctions and found that CLDN3 expression was restricted to the apical pole of ependymocytes in the SCO. This microarray study provides new evidence regarding the possible origin of some rare periventricular tumors. PMID:22537279

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Eastern and Central Sudan using pvcsp and pvmsp-3? genes as molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Talha, Albadawi Abdelbagi; Pirahmadi, Sekineh; Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Djadid, Navid Dinparast; Nour, Bakri Y M; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2015-06-01

    In Sudan, Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 5-10% of malaria cases. This study was carried out to determine the genetic diversity of P. vivax population from Sudan by analyzing the polymorphism of P. vivax csp (pvcsp) and pvmsp-3? genes. Blood samples (n=76) were taken from suspected malaria cases from 2012-2013 in three health centers of Eastern and Central Sudan. Parasite detection was performed by microscopy and molecular techniques, and genotyping of both genes was performed by PCR-RFLP followed by DNA sequence for only pvcsp gene (n=30). Based on microscopy analysis, 76 (%100) patients were infected with P. vivax, whereas nested-PCR results showed that 86.8% (n=66), 3.9% (n=3), and 3.9% (n=3) of tested samples had P. vivax as well as Plasmodium falciparum mono- and mixed infections, respectively. Four out of 76 samples had no results in molecular diagnosis. All sequenced samples were found to be of VK210 (100%) genotype with six distinct amino acid haplotypes, and 210A (66.7%) was the most prevalent haplotype. The Sudanese isolates displayed variations in the peptide repeat motifs (PRMs) ranging from 17 to 19 with GDRADGQPA (PRM1), GDRAAGQPA (PRM2) and DDRAAGQPA (PRM3). Also, 54 polymorphic sites with 56 mutations were found in repeat and post-repeat regions of the pvcsp and the overall nucleotide diversity (?) was 0.02149±0.00539. A negative value of dN-dS (-0.0344) was found that suggested a significant purifying selection of Sudanese pvcsp, (Z test, P<0.05). Regarding pvmsp-3?, three types were detected: types A (94.6%, 52/55), type C (3.6%, 2/55), and type B (1.8%, 1/55). No multiclonal infections were detected, and RFLP analysis identified 13 (Hha I, A1-A11, B1, and C1) and 16 (Alu I, A1-A14, B1, and C1) distinct allelic forms. In conclusion, genetic investigation among Sudanese P. vivax isolates indicated that this antigen showed limited antigenic diversity. PMID:25721363

  20. Evolution of the polymorphism at molecular markers in QTL and non-QTL regions in selected chicken lines (Open Access publication)

    PubMed Central

    Loywyck, Valérie; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Pitel, Frédérique; Verrier, Étienne; Bijma, Piter

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the joint evolution of neutral and selected genomic regions in three chicken lines selected for immune response and in one control line. We compared the evolution of polymorphism of 21 supposedly neutral microsatellite markers versus 30 microsatellite markers located in seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions. Divergence of lines was observed by factor analysis. Five supposedly neutral markers and 12 markers in theQTL regions showed Fst values greater than 0.15. However, the non-significant difference (P > 0.05) between matrices of genetic distances based on genotypes at supposedly neutral markers on the one hand, and at markers in QTL regions, on the other hand, showed that none of the markers in the QTL regions were influenced by selection. A supposedly neutral marker and a marker located in the QTL region on chromosome 14 showed temporal variations in allele frequencies that could not be explained by drift only. Finally, to confirm thatmarkers located inQTL regions on chromosomes 1, 7 and 14were under the influence of selection, simulations were performed using haplotype dropping along the existing pedigree. In the zone located on chromosome 14, the simulation results confirmed that selection had an effect on the evolution of polymorphism of markers within the zone. PMID:18990356