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1

HIV Molecular Immunology Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The HIV Molecular Immunology Database, associated with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of California, and the US Department of Energy, "is an annotated, searchable collection of HIV-1 cytotoxic and helper T-cell epitopes and antibody binding sites." Links are provided to a number of other tools, as well as the associated HIV Immunology Database Compendia, which is downloadable in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. The search functions are fairly easy to use with several drop down boxes to select the fields of interest.

2

Department and function: Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology; Clinical  

E-print Network

Department and function: Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology; Clinical Immunology in Immunology, Hannover Medical School Positions: 1994-1996: Research Associate, Dept. of Clinical Immunology, Hannover Medical School 1994: Visiting Scientist, Dept. of Immunology, University of Utrecht

Manstein, Dietmar J.

3

21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.  

...marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic marker immunological test system is a device that consists...techniques the inherited human protein allotypic markers...allotypes) in serum and other body fluids. The...

2014-04-01

4

21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic marker immunological test system is a device that consists...techniques the inherited human protein allotypic markers...allotypes) in serum and other body fluids. The...

2013-04-01

5

21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic marker immunological test system is a device that consists...techniques the inherited human protein allotypic markers...allotypes) in serum and other body fluids. The...

2012-04-01

6

21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic marker immunological test system is a device that consists...techniques the inherited human protein allotypic markers...allotypes) in serum and other body fluids. The...

2011-04-01

7

Oral lupus erythematosus: markers of immunologic injury.  

PubMed

Tissue speciments were taken from three regions in a patient with oral progressive lupus erythematosus (LE): the tongue, the buccal mucosa and clinically uninvolved cutaneous tissue. They were subjected to immunocytochemical studies by use of markers. HLA-DR antigen expression on mucosal epithelial cells was found in association with a predominance of activated helper T-Cells in the lesional tissue. Langerhans cells (OKT-6) and B-cells (Leu-IO, B1 and B2) were nearly absent in the mucosal lesions. The presence of populations of macrophages (MY-4) in the lesional epithelium might suggest an important role for these cells, rather than for Langerhans cells, in the afferent limb of cellular immunity in this case of LE. PMID:3908518

Van Joost, T; Stolz, E; Van der Sluis, J J; Vuzevski, V D; Van der Kwast, T H

1985-12-01

8

IMMUNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Microsatellite Markers Linked to Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Vaccine Response in Young F1 Broiler-Cross Chicks1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reduction in Salmonella enteritidis (SE) con- tamination is of importance for poultry production as well as for food safety. The objectives of this study were to identify potential genetic markers of antibody response to SE vaccine in young broiler chicks and then to confirm this linkage in broiler-cross offspring, as well as to explore interactions of marker alleles with dam

M. G. Kaiser; N. Deeb; S. J. Lamont

9

Postdoctoral Research Positions in Mucosal Immunology and Molecular Microbiology  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Research Positions in Mucosal Immunology and Molecular Microbiology Two post-doctoral research positions are available at the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University, New and microbiologists that have broad interests in mucosal immunology and host-commensal interactions and enjoy

Symington, Lorraine S.

10

Mathematical Immunology at the molecular, cellular and population scales  

E-print Network

Mathematical Immunology at the molecular, cellular and population scales Carmen Molina of Manchester 18th of December 2012 carmen@maths.leeds.ac.uk #12;Physics Biology MathBio Immunology UK Math: populations 4 Theoretical Immunology 5 Mathematical Biology in the UK 6 Acknowledgements 2 / 50 #12;Physics

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

11

Postdoctoral Research Position in Molecular Immunology A post-doctoral research position in Molecular Immunology is available in the Liu lab at  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Research Position in Molecular Immunology A post-doctoral research position in Molecular Immunology is available in the Liu lab at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to study and solid background in molecular biology and immunology. Expertise in retroviral vector or experience

Symington, Lorraine S.

12

Value of Immunological Markers in Predicting Responsiveness to Influenza Vaccination in Elderly Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elderly individuals are at high risk for morbidity and mortality when infected with influenza virus. Vacci- nations with inactivated virus are less effective in the elderly due to the declining competency of the aging immune system. We have explored whether immunological parameters predict poor anti-influenza virus vaccine responses and can be used as biological markers of immunosenescence. One hundred fifty-three

JORG J. GORONZY; JAMES W. FULBRIGHT; CYNTHIA S. CROWSON; GREGORY A. POLAND; WILLIAM M. O'FALLON; CORNELIA M. WEYAND

2001-01-01

13

03-390 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (9 units) 2009 Instructors (Office hours by appointment)  

E-print Network

03-390 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (9 units) ­ 2009 Instructors (Office hours by appointment: kvasilev@cmu.edu Text: Immunology: A Short Course. 6e. Richard Coico and Geoffrey Sunshine. 2009. Wiley Description: This course offers the student a comprehensive view of modern immunology at the molecular

Murphy, Robert F.

14

Molecular biology and immunology of fungal allergens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungi are non-chlorophyllus microorganisms, which constitutes the main source of outdoor and indoor allergens. The antigens\\u000a present in the spores and fragments of hyphae induce allergic responses in sensitized patients. The frequently recognized\\u000a fungi associated with asthma include Alternaria, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, and Penicillium. With the advent of molecular\\u000a biology techniques a number of fungal genes encoding relevant allergens have been

Viswanath P. Kurup; Banani Banerjee; Kevin J. Kelly; Jordan N. Fink

2000-01-01

15

Immunological Markers for PML Prediction in MS Patients Treated with Natalizumab  

PubMed Central

Natalizumab (NTZ), a monoclonal antibody recognizing the alpha4 integrin chain, has been approved for the treatment of active multiple sclerosis, but expose to the onset of a rare side effect, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Estimating the individual risk of PML in NTZ-treated patients is a major challenge, and therapeutic strategies are mainly guided by the overall PML risk assessed by identified risk factors: JC virus (JCV) seropositivity, treatment duration (with peak incidence after 24?months), and the previous use of immunosuppressive therapies. Given that this stratification does not yet allow a precise individual prediction of PML, other predictive markers are needed, and several immunological biomarkers have been described. Quantification of anti-JCV antibody levels may improve individual predictive value, with higher baseline titers indicating increased risk. Other immunological biomarkers such as leukocyte cell membrane markers (CD49d, CD11a, and CD62L), detection of circulating JCV-specific activated T effector memory cells (TEM) or genetic screening have been proposed. In this review, we discuss how recent progress in immunology has paved the way for «new combined monitoring», which will include immunological screening, in NTZ-treated patients. PMID:25601865

Antoniol, Caroline; Stankoff, Bruno

2015-01-01

16

Molecular biology and immunology of cytomegalovirus.  

PubMed Central

The application of modern biochemical techniques has led to a rapid improvement in our knowledge of the molecular biology of CMV. Several coding regions of the DNA genome have been identified with certainty and major virus-coded proteins have been given provisional names. The cascade expression of the CMV genome has been shown to be controlled by mechanisms similar to those found in other herpes viruses, together with novel post-transcriptional controls which remain to be defined. The control of CMV replication by the host involves both non-specific and specific defence mechanisms. The induction of natural killer cells and interferon early after CMV infection appears to be the most important aspects of the non-specific host defence against the virus. The cell-mediated immune response, in particular the generation of Tc cells against CMV early antigens, is probably the most important facet of the specific immune defence against CMV. When intact these defence mechanisms appear to be efficient in restricting viral replication; however, when such immunity is compromised, the balance rapidly swings in favour of the virus. As our understanding of the interaction between the host and the virus increases, it may be possible to redress the balance in such cases in favour of the host. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3036059

Griffiths, P D; Grundy, J E

1987-01-01

17

(ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

18

MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

19

Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 13741383 Genome-wide survey of the gene expression response  

E-print Network

Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 1374­1383 Genome-wide survey of the gene expression response as the interest for compara- tive and evolutionary immunology has motivated the edification of a substantial body of knowledge in fish immunology (Iwama and Nakanishi, 1996). Hence, the activity of non-specific immu- nity

Bernatchez, Louis

20

Prenatal immunologic predictors of postpartum depressive symptoms: a prospective study for potential diagnostic markers.  

PubMed

In postpartum depression (PPD), immunologic changes have been proposed to be involved in the disease pathology. The study evaluates the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response over the course of late pregnancy and postpartum period and their association with the development of postpartum depressive symptoms. Furthermore, prenatal immunologic markers for a PPD were investigated. Hundred pregnant women were included. At 34th and 38th week of pregnancy as well as 2 days, 7 weeks and 6 months postpartum, immune parameters (neopterin, regulatory T cells, CXCR1, CCR2, MNP1 and CD11a) were measured by flow cytometry/ELISA, and the psychopathology was evaluated. We found that regulatory T cells were significantly increased prenatal (p=0.011) and postnatal (p=0.01) in mothers with postnatal depressive symptoms. The decrease in CXCR 1 after delivery was significantly higher in mother with postnatal depressive symptoms (p=0.032). Mothers with postnatal depressive symptoms showed already prenatal significantly elevated neopterin levels (p=0.049). Finally, regulatory T cells in pregnancy strongly predict postnatal depressive symptoms (p=0.004). The present study revealed that prenatal and postnatal immunologic parameters are associated with postpartum depressive symptoms in mothers. In addition, we found immune markers that could eventually be the base for a biomarker set that predicts postnatal depressive symptoms already during pregnancy. PMID:24595743

Krause, Daniela; Jobst, Andrea; Kirchberg, Franka; Kieper, Susann; Härtl, Kristin; Kästner, Ralph; Myint, Aye-Mu; Müller, Norbert; Schwarz, Markus J

2014-10-01

21

Current Issues on Molecular and Immunological Diagnosis of Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) traditionally relies on smear microscopy and culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical samples. With recent advances in technology, there have been numerous efforts to develop new diagnostic tests for TB that overcome the low sensitivity and specificity and long turnover time associated with current diagnostic tests. Molecular biological tests based on nucleic acid amplification have brought an unprecedented opportunity for the rapid and specific detection of M. tuberculosis from clinical specimens. With automated sequencing analysis, species identification of mycobacteria is now easier and more accurate than with conventional methods, and rapid detection of mutations in the genes associated with resistance to TB drugs provides early information on the potential drug resistance for each clinical isolate or for clinical samples. In addition, immunological tests for the detection of M. tuberculosis antigens and antibodies to the antigens have been explored to identify individuals at risk of developing TB or with latent TB infection (LTBI). The recent introduction of commercial IFN-? assay kits for the detection of LTBI provides a new approach for TB control even in areas with a high incidence of TB. However, these molecular and immunological tools still require further evaluation using large scale cohort studies before implementation in TB control programs. PMID:17594141

2007-01-01

22

Update on immunologic and molecular diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.  

PubMed

Human strongyloidiasis is an intestinal parasitosis that may affect 100 million individuals. However, the prevalence rates of this infection may represent smaller values than the actual data, mainly due to difficulties in its diagnosis. The aim of this study was to update the immunological and molecular methods applied to the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. There is a great diversity of techniques used in the diagnosis of this parasitosis, such as immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting, luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS), dispstick and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), all with advantages and disadvantages, and with unique features for specific purposes. Considering the magnitude of strongyloidiasis and the importance of early diagnosis, due to the possibility of chronicity and hyperinfection, this study analyzes the different methods currently employed, and demonstrates the necessity of developing innovative methodologies, which also maintain diagnostic accuracy, particularly for regions with limited technological resources. PMID:24686097

Levenhagen, Marcelo A; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

2014-07-01

23

Glioma biology and molecular markers.  

PubMed

The tumors classified as gliomas include a wide variety of histologies including the more common (astrocytoma, glioblastoma), as well as the less common histologies (oligodendroglioma, mixed oligoastrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma). Recent efforts at comprehensive genetic characterization of various primary brain tumor types have identified a number of common alterations and pathways common to multiple tumor types. Common pathways in glioma biology include growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling via the MAP kinase cascade or PI3K signaling, loss of apoptosis through p53, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis via VEGF signaling, and invasion. However, in addition to these common general pathway alterations, a number of specific alterations have been identified in particular tumor types, and a number of these have direct therapeutic implications. These include mutations or fusions in the BRAF gene seen in pilocytic astrocytomas (and gangliogliomas). In oligodendrogliomas, mutations in IDH1 and codeletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q are associated with improved survival with upfront use of combined chemotherapy and radiation, and these tumors also have unique mutations of CIC and FUBP1 genes. Low grade gliomas are increasingly seen to be divided into two groups based on IDH mutation status, with astrocytomas developing through IDH mutation followed by p53 mutation, while poor prognosis low grade gliomas and primary glioblastomas (GBMs) are characterized by EGFR amplification, loss of PTEN, and loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. GBMs can be further characterized based on gene expression and gene methylation patterns into three or four distinct subgroups. Prognostic markers in diffuse gliomas include IDH mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT methylation, and MGMT is also a predictive marker in elderly patients with glioblastoma treated with temozolomide monotherapy. PMID:25468223

Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard

2015-01-01

24

Molecular markers in pediatric neuro-oncology  

PubMed Central

Pediatric molecular neuro-oncology is a fast developing field. A multitude of molecular profiling studies in recent years has unveiled a number of genetic abnormalities unique to pediatric brain tumors. It has now become clear that brain tumors that arise in children have distinct pathogenesis and biology, compared with their adult counterparts, even for those with indistinguishable histopathology. Some of the molecular features are so specific to a particular type of tumors, such as the presence of the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene for pilocytic astrocytomas or SMARCB1 mutations for atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, that they could practically serve as a diagnostic marker on their own. Expression profiling has resolved the existence of 4 molecular subgroups in medulloblastomas, which positively translated into improved prognostication for the patients. The currently available molecular markers, however, do not cover all tumors even within a single tumor entity. The molecular pathogenesis of a large number of pediatric brain tumors is still unaccounted for, and the hierarchy of tumors is likely to be more complex and intricate than currently acknowledged. One of the main tasks of future molecular analyses in pediatric neuro-oncology, including the ongoing genome sequencing efforts, is to elucidate the biological basis of those orphan tumors. The ultimate goal of molecular diagnostics is to accurately predict the clinical and biological behavior of any tumor by means of their molecular characteristics, which is hoped to eventually pave the way for individualized treatment. PMID:23095836

Ichimura, Koichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao

2012-01-01

25

Immunological and Biochemical Markers in Oral Carcinogenesis: The Public Health Perspective  

PubMed Central

Oral health is an integral component of general health and well being and a basic human right. Dental public health is probably the most challenging specialty of dentistry. Because of the lack of adequate resources among other factors, many people are likely to suffer from dental diseases. Despite great improvements in the oral health status of populations across the world, the burden and impact of dental diseases are still high. This is particularly true among underprivileged groups in both developed and developing communities. Oral diseases and conditions, including oral cancer, oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS, dental trauma, craniofacial anomalies, and noma, all have broad impacts on health and well-being. Oral cancer, the sixth most common cancer worldwide continues to be most prevalent cancer related to the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other carcinogenic products. Nevertheless, significant reduction in mortality can be achieved by advances in early diagnosis and implementation of multidisciplinary treatment programs leading to improvement of survivorship and better quality of life. The present study was designed to evaluate the immunologic and biochemical markers in oral carcinogenesis using circulating immune complexes (CIC), copper, iron, and selenium concentrations as assessment endpoints. Study results indicated an increase in CIC and copper levels, and a decrease in iron and selenium concentrations in oral cancer patients compared to controls. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed. PMID:19151437

Khanna, Sunali

2008-01-01

26

Histological, immunological and molecular features of a nasal mucosa primary melanoma associated with nasal melanosis.  

PubMed

Nasal mucosa melanoma is a rare entity that may occur together with nasal melanosis. The histological and immunological features and loss of heterozygosity analysis of such lesions have not been reported to date. In the study presented here short-term cell cultures were established from the patient's melanoma and subsequent relapses. Histology, immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, human leukocyte antigen analysis, microdissection with subsequent polymerase chain reaction for analysis of loss of heterozygosity were used to characterize the tumour and other cells. Melanoma of the nasal cavity was found, with a surrounding proliferation of atypical melanocytes corresponding to nasal melanosis. Immunoreactivity was found for S-100, gp100, tyrosinase and MelanA protein. Loss of heterozygosity for a p16-flanking marker was found in the tumour and the melanotic cells. Short-term cell cultures expressed tyrosinase and MUC18 at the mRNA level and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-12 receptor at the protein level. This is the first time short-term cell cultures have been established and analysed from such a tumour. Melanoma-associated antigens were identified within the tumour. The melanoma and the melanotic cells showed loss of heterozygosity for the p16 gene, which is implicated in melanoma development. This points to a common origin in tumorigenesis. Pathways of tumour escape, such as expression of CD54 and interleukin-10, were observed. The clinical, immunological and molecular features suggest that nasal melanosis should be followed closely. PMID:11828261

Hofbauer, G F L; Böni, R; Simmen, D; Mihic, D; Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Dummer, R

2002-02-01

27

Molecular Marker Systems for Oenothera Genetics  

PubMed Central

The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome–genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9·8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed. PMID:18791241

Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Greiner, Stephan

2008-01-01

28

Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

Shugart, L.R.; D'Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

1991-12-15

29

Molecular detection and immunological localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias)  

E-print Network

Molecular detection and immunological localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus localization of gill Na /H exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias). Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol dogfish (Squalus acanthias) can make rapid adjustments to gill acid-base transfers to compensate

Evans, David H.

30

Cross-sectional study of cytomegalovirus shedding and immunological markers among seropositive children and their mothers.  

PubMed

BackgroundCongenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading infectious cause of birth defects in the United States. To better understand factors that may influence CMV transmission risk, we compared viral and immunological factors in healthy children and their mothers.MethodsWe screened for CMV IgG antibodies in a convenience sample of 161 children aged 0¿47 months from the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area, along with 32 mothers of children who screened CMV-seropositive. We assessed CMV shedding via PCR using saliva collected with oral swabs (children and mothers) and urine collected from diapers using filter paper inserts (children only).ResultsCMV IgG was present in 31% (50/161) of the children. Half (25/50) of seropositive children were shedding in at least one fluid. The proportion of seropositive children who shed in saliva was 100% (8/8) among the 4¿12 month-olds, 64% (9/14) among 13¿24 month-olds, and 40% (6/15) among 25¿47 month-olds (P for trend¿=¿0.003). Seropositive mothers had a lower proportion of saliva shedding (21% [6/29]) than children (P¿<¿0.001). Among children who were shedding CMV, viral loads in saliva were significantly higher in younger children (P <0.001); on average, the saliva viral load of infants (i.e., <12 months) was approximately 300 times that of two year-olds (i.e., 24¿35 months). Median CMV viral loads were similar in children¿s saliva and urine but were 10¿50 times higher (P¿<¿0.001) than the median viral load of the mothers¿ saliva. However, very high viral loads (> one million copies/mL) were only found in children¿s saliva (31% of those shedding); children¿s urine and mothers¿ saliva specimens all had fewer than 100,000 copies/mL. Low IgG avidity, a marker of primary infection, was associated with younger age (p¿=¿0.03), higher viral loads in saliva (p¿=¿0.02), and lower antibody titers (p¿=¿0.005).ConclusionsYoung CMV seropositive children, especially those less than one year-old may present high-risk CMV exposures to pregnant women, especially via saliva, though further research is needed to see if this finding can be generalized across racial or other demographic strata. PMID:25388365

Stowell, Jennifer D; Mask, Karen; Amin, Minal; Clark, Rebekah; Levis, Denise; Hendley, Will; Lanzieri, Tatiana M; Dollard, Sheila C; Cannon, Michael J

2014-11-12

31

Immune Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Identification of Molecular Markers of Disease  

PubMed Central

The complex molecular events that occur within the host during the establishment of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are poorly defined, thus preventing identification of predictive markers of disease progression and state. To identify such molecular markers during M. tuberculosis infection, global changes in transcriptional response in the host were assessed using mouse whole genome arrays. Bacterial load in the lungs, the lesions associated with infection, and gene expression profiling was performed by comparing normal lung tissue to lungs from mice collected at 20, 40, and 100 days after aerosol infection with the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis. Quantitative, whole lung gene expression identified signature profiles defining different signaling pathways and immunological responses characteristic of disease progression. This includes genes representing members of the interferon-associated gene families, chemokines and cytokines, MHC, and NOS2, as well as an array of cell surface markers associated with the activation of T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells that participate in immunity to M. tuberculosis infection. More importantly, several gene transcripts encoding proteins that were not previously associated with the host response to M. tuberculosis infection, and unique molecular markers associated with disease progression and state, were identified. PMID:18787176

Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Kingry, Luke C.; Ordway, Diane J.; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Harton, Marisa; Basaraba, Randall J.; Hanneman, William H.; Orme, Ian M.; Slayden, Richard A.

2009-01-01

32

HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Fall 2002  

E-print Network

Covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation including molecular structure and assembly of ...

Pillai, Shiv

33

Predicting quantitative variation within rice germplasm using molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diverse Asian rice (Oryza sativa) germplasm has been used to identify associations between various quantitative traits and RAPD molecular markers using multiple regression analysis. This has allowed us to predict for other samples of germplasm their performance for traits such as culm length and number, days to flowering, grain width, and panicle and leaf length using only RAPD marker data.

Parminder S Virk; Brian V Ford-Lloyd; Michael T Jackson; Harpal S Pooni; Tomas P Clemeno; H John Newbury

1996-01-01

34

Comparative Genome Analysis of Molecular Markers Pierre Peterlongo1  

E-print Network

c-GAMMA: Comparative Genome Analysis of Molecular Markers Pierre Peterlongo1 , Jacques Nicolas1 be observed in details with low cost genomic sequences produced by new generation of sequencers. A method power of candidate markers. First results are presented on a set of microbial genomes. The importance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Hypocomplementaemia as an immunological marker of morbidity and mortality in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To analyse the prevalence and clinical significance of hypocomplementaemia in a large series of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS), focusing on the association of low complement levels with clinical manifestations, immunological features, lymphoproliferative disorders and mortality. Methods. Complement determinations (C3 and C4 levels, CH50 activity) were made in 336 consecutive patients with primary SS (313 women and 23

M. Ramos-Casals; P. Brito-Zeron; J. Yague; M. Akasbi; R. Bautista; M. Ruano; G. Claver; V. Gil

2004-01-01

36

Seafood allergy: lessons from clinical symptoms, immunological mechanisms and molecular biology.  

PubMed

Food allergy consists of a wide range of disorders that result from adverse immune responses to dietary antigens. Manifestations of allergic response includes acute, potentially fatal anaphylactic reactions and a variety of chronic diseases that mainly affect the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and respiratory tract. Tools for clinical diagnosis and management, which have not changed much in the past two decades, include the clinical history, tests for specific IgE antibody to suspected foods, elimination diets, oral food challenges, and provision of medications such as epinephrine for emergency treatment. On the other hand, recent immunological and molecular biological research have enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms of these disorders and revealed the identities of many food allergens. Here, we will discuss seafood allergies with respect to the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, immunological mechanisms, and molecular biology of seafood allergens. Furthermore, potential applications and future directions in the clinical management of seafood allergies are discussed. PMID:16261809

Chu, Ka Hou; Tang, Chi Yan; Wu, Adrian; Leung, Patrick S C

2005-01-01

37

Construction of phoE-caa, a novel PCR- and immunologically detectable marker gene for Pseudomonas putida.  

PubMed Central

In this paper we describe the construction and use in Pseudomonas putida WCS358 of phoE-caa, a novel hybrid marker gene, which allows monitoring both at the protein level by immunological methods and at the DNA level by PCR. The marker is based on the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein gene phoE and 75 bp of E. coli caa, which encode a nonbacteriocinic fragment of colicin A. This fragment contains an epitope which is recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1C11. As the epitope is contained in one of the cell surface-exposed loops of PhoE, whole cells of bacteria expressing the protein can be detected by using the MAb. The marker gene contains only E. coli sequences not coding for toxins and therefore can be considered environmentally safe. The hybrid PhoE-ColA protein was expressed in E. coli under conditions of phosphate starvation, and single cells could be detected by immunofluorescence microscopy with MAb 1C11. Using a wide-host-range vector the phoE-caa gene was introduced into P. putida WCS358. The gene appeared to be expressed under phosphate limitation in this species, and the gene product was present in the membrane fraction and reacted with MAb 1C11. The hybrid PhoE-ColA protein could be detected on whole cells of WCS358 mutant strains lacking (part of) the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide but not on wild-type WCS358 cells, unless these cells had previously been washed with 10 mM EDTA. In addition to immunodetection, the phoE-caa marker gene could be specifically detected by PCR with one primer directed to a part of the phoE sequence and a second primer that annealed to the caa insert. Images PMID:7993086

Zaat, S A; Slegtenhorst-Eegdeman, K; Tommassen, J; Geli, V; Wijffelman, C A; Lugtenberg, B J

1994-01-01

38

Analyzing Pathogen Populations Using Molecular Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA probes are useful markers for studying pathogen population genetics. Repetitive probes may produce characteristic “fingerprints”\\u000a that identify strains or lineages of asexually-reproducing pathogens. Relatedness among strains can be inferred, giving insight\\u000a into the processes of race evolution, gene flow, and other aspects of pathogen population biology. Information about pathogen\\u000a population dynamics may be useful in designing improved strategies for

Rebecca J. Nelson

39

Development and use of molecular markers: past and present.  

PubMed

Abstract Molecular markers, due to their stability, cost-effectiveness and ease of use provide an immensely popular tool for a variety of applications including genome mapping, gene tagging, genetic diversity diversity, phylogenetic analysis and forensic investigations. In the last three decades, a number of molecular marker techniques have been developed and exploited worldwide in different systems. However, only a handful of these techniques, namely RFLPs, RAPDs, AFLPs, ISSRs, SSRs and SNPs have received global acceptance. A recent revolution in DNA sequencing techniques has taken the discovery and application of molecular markers to high-throughput and ultrahigh-throughput levels. Although, the choice of marker will obviously depend on the targeted use, microsatellites, SNPs and genotyping by sequencing (GBS) largely fulfill most of the user requirements. Further, modern transcriptomic and functional markers will lead the ventures onto high-density genetic map construction, identification of QTLs, breeding and conservation strategies in times to come in combination with other high throughput techniques. This review presents an overview of different marker technologies and their variants with a comparative account of their characteristic features and applications. PMID:25430893

Grover, Atul; Sharma, P C

2014-11-28

40

Cognitive impairment induced by permanent bilateral common carotid occlusion exacerbates depression-related behavioral, biochemical, immunological and neuronal markers.  

PubMed

There is a strong link between cognitive impairment and depression, but up to date it is not clear whether cognitive impairment is 'cause' or 'consequence' of depression. Therefore, we here examined the effect of cognitive impairment induced by permanent occlusion of common carotid arteries, a model known as two-vessel occlusion (2VO), on chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depression-related markers in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2VO or sham surgery. Sixty days after the surgery, the cognitive function of the rats was tested using the radial arm maze task measuring working and reference memory. Subsequently, the animals were randomly assigned to undergo 21 days of CUS or to stay non-stressed. One week after the last stressor, psychomotor retardation, a feature of depression-like behavior, was assessed using the forced swim test (FST) by measuring time spent on immobility. Plasma amino acid (glutamine, glutamate and glycine) and serum pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin 6) levels, and hippocampus CA1 neuronal damage were measured 24h after FST exposure. Results show that 2VO increased immobility in the FST only when rats had been exposed to CUS. In addition, 2VO surgery intensified the effect of CUS on IL-6, glutamate and glycine levels and increased CA1 hippocampal damage. In conclusion, our findings show that cognitive impairment may predispose to depression by intensifying the effect of stress on depression-related behavioral, biochemical, immunological and neuronal markers. PMID:25446000

Khojasteh, Fatemeh; Nahavandi, Arezo; Mehrpouya, Sara; Homberg, Judith R; Mirzamohammadi, Solmaz; Raufi, Safoora; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Barati, Mahmood

2015-01-30

41

Systems immunology reveals markers of susceptibility to west nile virus infection.  

PubMed

West Nile virus (WNV) infection is usually asymptomatic but can cause severe neurological disease and death, particularly in older patients, and how individual variations in immunity contribute to disease severity is not yet defined. Animal studies identified a role for several immunity-related genes that determine the severity of infection. We have integrated systems-level transcriptional and functional data sets from stratified cohorts of subjects with a history of WNV infection to define whether these markers can distinguish susceptibility in a human population. Transcriptional profiles combined with immunophenotyping of primary cells identified a predictive signature of susceptibility that was detectable years after acute infection (67% accuracy), with the most prominent alteration being decreased IL1B induction following ex vivo infection of macrophages with WNV. Deconvolution analysis also determined a significant role for CXCL10 expression in myeloid dendritic cells. This systems analysis identified markers of pathogenic mechanisms and offers insights into potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:25355795

Qian, Feng; Goel, Gautam; Meng, Hailong; Wang, Xiaomei; You, Fuping; Devine, Lesley; Raddassi, Khadir; Garcia, Melissa N; Murray, Kristy O; Bolen, Christopher R; Gaujoux, Renaud; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Hafler, David; Fikrig, Erol; Xavier, Ramnik; Kleinstein, Steven H; Montgomery, Ruth R

2015-01-01

42

P53 and Expression of Immunological Markers May Identify Early Stage Thyroid Tumors  

PubMed Central

Background. Besides its major role in cell proliferation, DNA repair, and apoptosis, functional p53 protein is involved in the induction of antitumor cytotoxic-T-cell activity against carcinoma cells. We aimed to investigate p53 and immune cell markers utility as diagnostic and prognostic markers of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Methods. ACIS-III system was used to evaluate p53 and immune cell markers including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM); CD68 and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) subsets such as CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD20 in 206 thyroid carcinomas, 105 benign nodules, and 18 normal tissues. Also, TP53 was sequenced in 78 out of 164 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Results. P53 expression was observed more frequently in malignant than in benign lesions (P < 0.0001) and helped discriminate follicular patterned lesions. In addition, p53 was more frequent in smaller (P = 0.0015), unique tumors (P = 0.0286), with thyroiditis (P = 0.0486) and without metastasis at diagnosis (P = 0.0201). TAM was more frequent in P53 negative tumors (P = 0.002). Infiltration of CD8+ TIL was found in 61.7% of P53 positive and 25.6% of P53 negative DTC (P < 0.001). Conclusions. We suggest that p53 and CD8+ TIL immune profile analysis might be useful in DTC. PMID:24171036

Marcello, Marjory Alana; Morari, Elaine Cristina; Cunha, Lucas Leite; De Nadai Silva, Aline Carolina; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Carvalho, André Lopes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Vassallo, José; Ward, Laura Sterian

2013-01-01

43

Estimation of coancestry in Iberian pigs using molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic markers provide a useful tool toestimate pairwise coancestry betweenindividuals in the absence of a known pedigree. Inthe present work 62 pigs from two relatedstrains of Iberian breed, Guadyerbas andTorbiscal, belonging to a conservationprogramme with completely known pedigrees since1945, have been genotyped for 49microsatellites. Four coefficients thatsummarise molecular resemblance betweenindividuals together with eightestimators of coancestry have been calculatedfrom this information.

Miguel Toro; Carmen Barragán; Cristina Óvilo; Jaime Rodrigañez; Carmen Rodriguez; Luis Silió

2002-01-01

44

Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

45

Phylogenetic study of some Aporrectodea species based on molecular markers  

E-print Network

in "Advances in Earthworm Taxonomy V (Annelida: Oligochaeta), T. Pavlicek, P. Cardet, C. Csuzdi, R.C. Le Bayon earthworms play as key organisms in terrestrial ecosystems functioning, the lack of knowledge in phylogenetic earthworm taxonomy has only recently started. Molecular markers, mitochondrial and nucle- ar, are thus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Molecular markers for sex determination in papaya ( Carica papaya L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed molecular markers tightly linked to Sex1, the gene that determines plant sex in papaya (Carica papaya L.). Three RAPD products have been cloned and a portion of their DNA sequenced. Based on these sequences SCAR primers were synthesized. SCAR T12 and SCAR W11 produce products in hermaphrodite and male plants and only rarely in females. SCAR T1

J. C. Deputy; R. Ming; H. Ma; Z. Liu; M. M. M. Fitch; M. Wang; R. Manshardt; J. I. Stiles

2002-01-01

47

RESEARCH Open Access Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium  

E-print Network

RESEARCH Open Access Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods: The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes

Boyer, Edmond

48

RESEARCH ARTICLE Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers: origins Black Rail lives under dense marsh vegetation, is rarely observed, flies weakly and has a highly disjunct distribution. The largest population of rails is found in 8­10 large wetlands in San Francisco Bay

Beissinger, Steven R.

49

Modeling the Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits With Molecular Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the genetic control of quantitatively inherited traits is fundamental to agricultural, evolutionary and biomedical genetic research. A detailed picture of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits can be elucidated with a well-saturated genetic map of molecular markers. The parameters that quantify the genetic architecture of a trait include the number of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL), their genomic positions,

Rongling Wu; Wei Hou; Yuehua Cui; Hongying Li; Tian Liu; Song Wu; Chang-Xing Ma; Yanru Zeng

2007-01-01

50

MOLECULAR MARKERS OF EARLY CERVICAL NEOPLASIA  

PubMed Central

Pure morphological distinction of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) from their mimics can be challenging. Diagnosis can be difficult with nonconventional HSILs associated with a metaplastic phenotype, squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) that defy precise classification such as “eosinophilic dysplasias”, and those that overlap with columnar neoplasms, including stratified variants of adenocarcinoma in situ (“SMILE”). Gene expression and protein profiling have identified biomarkers with the potential to decrease diagnostic variability and increase specificity of histological and cytological analysis. Among the ones clinically useful for HSIL detection are p16INK4A and MIB-1 which complement each other, differentiating SIL from normal/atrophic (MIB-1 low) or reactive/immature metaplastic (p16INK4A scattered) epithelium. Additional markers, including ProExTM C, have been proposed but their added value is yet to be established. In the final analysis, biomarkers are most helpful for distinguishing benign immature or atrophic proliferations from HSIL. The distinction of LSIL from HSIL must be made on the hematoxylin and eosin-stained section and should be made with care, given the potential consequences of a diagnosis of CIN2 or CIN3. PMID:21076641

Pinto, Alvaro P.; Crum, Christopher P.; Hirsch, Michelle S.

2010-01-01

51

Molecular pathology in adult gliomas: diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers.  

PubMed

Over the past 10 years, there has been an increasing use of molecular markers in the assessment and management of adult malignant gliomas. Some molecular signatures are used diagnostically to help pathologists classify tumours, whereas others are used to estimate prognosis for patients. Most crucial, however, are those markers that are used to predict response to certain therapies, thereby directing clinicians to a particular treatment while avoiding other potentially deleterious therapies. Recently, large-scale genome-wide surveys have been used to identify new biomarkers that have been rapidly developed as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Given these developments, the pace of discovery of new molecular assays will quicken to facilitate personalised medicine in the setting of malignant glioma. PMID:20610347

Jansen, Michael; Yip, Stephen; Louis, David N

2010-07-01

52

Predictive markers in bladder cancer: do we have molecular markers ready for clinical use?  

PubMed

Bladder cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease. Approximately 75% of patients present with non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC), which has a high recurrence rate and a low but unpredictable progression rate. Conversely, patients with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) are at high risk for progression and cancer-specific mortality, but, again, disease behavior is unpredictable. To date, risk assessment for tumor recurrence and progression is based on clinico-pathological factors only. A risk assessment calculator that is based on several such parameters is available for NMIBC, but it has been reported to have potential flaws. In the last two decades, great effort has been made to evaluate the prognostic and predictive role of several molecular markers in MIBC and, even more so, in NMIBC, where the need for more precise risk stratification is urgently needed. This review addresses current evidence for the role of several molecular markers easily assessable by immunohistochemical techniques in prognosticating/predicting the outcome of NMIBC and MIBC. To date, because of divergent results among the many studies, no molecular marker has yet entered routine clinical practice; however, some of them (e.g., p53, pRb, p21, and survivin) have proved their predictive value in studies that included a homogeneous patient population on standardized treatment, and, therefore, are probably ready for clinical validation on a larger scale. Even more interesting is the possibility of constructing multimarker panels that could be used in routine clinical practice, as all these markers can easily be evaluated by immunohistochemistry on routine surgical pathology specimens. The molecular markers described herein hold promise for becoming widely available and cost-effective tools for reliable risk assessment, which would represent a great advancement in counseling patients, in selecting them for neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and in determining their eligibility for clinical trials. PMID:25036341

Sanguedolce, Francesca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Cormio, Luigi

2014-10-01

53

Clinical and Immunological Markers of Dengue Progression in a Study Cohort from a Hyperendemic Area in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Background With its elusive pathogenesis, dengue imposes serious healthcare, economic and social burden on endemic countries. This study describes the clinical and immunological parameters of a dengue cohort in a Malaysian city, the first according to the WHO 2009 dengue classification. Methodology and Findings This longitudinal descriptive study was conducted in two Malaysian hospitals where patients aged 14 and above with clinical symptoms suggestive of dengue were recruited with informed consent. Among the 504 participants, 9.3% were classified as non-dengue, 12.7% without warning signs, 77.0% with warning signs and 1.0% with severe dengue based on clinical diagnosis. Of these, 37% were misdiagnosed as non-dengue, highlighting the importance of both clinical diagnosis and laboratory findings. Thrombocytopenia, prolonged clotting time, liver enzymes, ALT and AST served as good markers for dengue progression but could not distinguish between patients with and without warning signs. HLA-A*24 and -B*57 were positively associated with Chinese and Indians patients with warning signs, respectively, whereas A*03 may be protective in the Malays. HLA-A*33 was also positively associated in patients with warning signs when compared to those without. Dengue NS1, NS2A, NS4A and NS4B were found to be important T cell epitopes; however with no apparent difference between with and without warning signs patients. Distinction between the 2 groups of patients was also not observed in any of the cytokines analyzed; nevertheless, 12 were significantly differentially expressed at the different phases of illness. Conclusion The new dengue classification system has allowed more specific detection of dengue patients, however, none of the clinical parameters allowed distinction of patients with and without warning signs. While the HLA-A*33 may be predictive marker for development of warning signs; larger studies will be needed to support this findings. PMID:24647042

Rathakrishnan, Anusyah; Klekamp, Benjamin; Wang, Seok Mui; Komarasamy, Thamil Vaani; Natkunam, Santha Kumari; Sathar, Jameela; Azizan, Azliyati; Sanchez-Anguiano, Aurora; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

2014-01-01

54

DNA marker applications to molecular genetics and genomics in tomato  

PubMed Central

Tomato is an important crop and regarded as an experimental model of the Solanaceae family and of fruiting plants in general. To enhance breeding efficiency and advance the field of genetics, tomato has been subjected to DNA marker studies as one of the earliest targets in plants. The developed DNA markers have been applied to the construction of genetic linkage maps and the resultant maps have contributed to quantitative trait locus (QTL) and gene mappings for agronomically important traits, as well as to comparative genomics of Solanaceae. The recently released whole genome sequences of tomato enable us to develop large numbers of DNA markers comparatively easily, and even promote new genotyping methods without DNA markers. In addition, databases for genomes, DNA markers, genetic linkage maps and other omics data, e.g., transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and phenome information, will provide useful information for molecular breeding in tomatoes. The use of DNA marker technologies in conjunction with new breeding techniques will promise to advance tomato breeding. PMID:23641178

Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki

2013-01-01

55

Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

Shugart, L.R.

1990-10-01

56

Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

2014-01-01

57

Prognostication in MF: from CBC to cytogenetics to molecular markers.  

PubMed

Myelofibrosis (MF) is a clonal stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and extramedullary hematopoiesis leading to progressive bone marrow failure, severe anemia, constitutional symptoms, hepatosplenomegaly, and thrombosis. MF can arise following a history of polycythemia vera (PV) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), or can present de novo as primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The disease course is variable with median survival ranging from months to years. Clinical and biological features such as advanced age, leukocytosis, anemia, transfusion dependence, and elevated inflammatory markers can impact prognosis in patients with PMF. Cytogenetic abnormalities and molecular markers such as JAK2 V617F, ASXL1, and CALR mutations have also been identified as prognostic variables. Several different scoring systems have been developed based on these prognostic factors. In this review, we will discuss the clinical, biological, molecular, and cytogenetic prognostic factors that have been identified in PMF, and the current prognostic models that have been developed to guide treatment decisions. PMID:25189726

Zhou, Amy; Oh, Stephen T

2014-06-01

58

Diagnostic procedures in tularaemia with special focus on molecular and immunological techniques.  

PubMed

Tularaemia is a severe bacterial zoonosis caused by the highly infectious agent Francisella tularensis. It is endemic in countries of the northern hemisphere ranging from North America to Europe, Asia and Japan. Very recently, Francisella-like strains causing disease in humans were described from tropical northern Australia. In the last decade, efforts have been made to develop sensitive and specific immunological and molecular techniques for the laboratory diagnosis of tularaemia and also for the definite identification of members of the species F. tularensis and its four subspecies. Screening for the keyword 'Francisella' a Medline search over the last decade was performed and articles describing diagnostic methods for tularaemia and its causative agent were selected. Besides classical microbiological techniques (cultivation, biochemical profiling, susceptibility testing) several new immunological and molecular approaches to identify F. tularensis have been introduced employing highly specific antibodies and various polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Whereas direct antigen detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or immunofluorescence might allow early presumptive diagnosis of tularaemia, these methods--like all PCR techniques--still await further evaluation. Therefore, diagnosis of tularaemia still relies mainly on the demonstration of specific antibodies in the host. ELISA and immunoblot methods started to replace the standard tube or micro-agglutination assays. However, the diagnostic value of antibody detection in the very early clinical phase of tularaemia is limited. Francisella tularensis is regarded as a 'highest priority' biological agent (category 'A' according to the CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA), thus rapid and reliable diagnosis of tularaemia is required not only for a timely onset of therapy, the handling of outbreak investigations but also for the surveillance of endemic foci. Only very recently, evaluated test kits for serological diagnosis of human tularaemia became available, while the introduction of standardized molecular techniques for detection and typing is still missing. PMID:16219088

Splettstoesser, W D; Tomaso, H; Al Dahouk, S; Neubauer, H; Schuff-Werner, P

2005-08-01

59

Identification of early molecular markers for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the mammary gland represents an early, pre-invasive stage in the development of invasive breast carcinoma. Since DCIS is a curable disease, it would be highly desirable to identify molecular markers that allow early detection. Mice transgenic for the WAP-SV40 early genome region were used as a model for DCIS development. Gene expression

Céline Kretschmer; Anja Sterner-Kock; Friederike Siedentopf; Winfried Schoenegg; Peter M Schlag; Wolfgang Kemmner

2011-01-01

60

[Immunochemical and molecular-genetic markers in gastric cancer diagnostics].  

PubMed

Studies of molecular mechanisms of neoplastic transfromation are being under the thorough investigation, reveal the new genes involved into the tumor development. These genes and their products are potential tumor markers and levels of their expression can be detected using modem assays characterized by high specificity and sensitivity. The review highlights the current status of the molecular diagnostics of gastric cancer, including protein and nucleic acids biomarkers. The genetic and epigenetic changes, which are detected in the malignant and nonmalignant tumor tissue DNA and in the blood plasma DNA from tumor bearing patients, are summarized. PMID:19351030

Elistratova, E P; Laktionov, P P; Shelestiuk, P I; Tuzikov, S A; Vlasov, V V; Rykova, E Iu

2009-01-01

61

Comparison of parasitological, immunological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis in dogs with different clinical signs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aiming to improve the diagnosis of canine leishmaniasis (CanL) in an endemic area of the Northwest region of São Paulo State, Brazil, the efficacy of parasitological, immunological and molecular diagnostic methods were studied. Dogs with and without clinical signs of the disease and positive for Leishmania, by direct parasite identification on lymph node smears and\\/or specific antibody detection by ELISA,

M. A. B. Moreira; M. C. R. Luvizotto; J. F. Garcia; C. E. P. Corbett; M. D. Laurenti

2007-01-01

62

Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 30853091 Epi-allelic Erk1 and Erk2 knockdown series for quantitative analysis  

E-print Network

Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 3085­3091 Epi-allelic Erk1 and Erk2 knockdown series for quantitative analysis of T cell Erk regulation and IL-2 production Lucia Willea,1, Melissa L. Kempb,1, Peter 2006; received in revised form 21 January 2007; accepted 7 February 2007 Abstract Erk activation

63

The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer  

PubMed Central

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

2014-01-01

64

Pyrogenic molecular markers: Linking PAH with BPCA analysis.  

PubMed

Molecular characterization of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is of great interest to understand the formation and behavior of these increasingly abundant materials in the environment. Two molecular marker methods have often been used to characterize and trace PyOM: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) analysis. Since both methods target pyrogenic polycyclic compounds, we investigated the linkages between the two approaches using chars that were produced under controlled conditions. Rye and maize straws and their analogues charred at 300, 400 and 500°C, respectively, were thus analyzed with both methods. Moreover, we also measured BPCAs directly on the lipid extracts, on which PAHs were analyzed, and on the respective extraction residues, too. Both methods revealed important features of the chars, in particular the increasing degree of aromatic condensation with increasing highest heating temperature (HTT). The overlap between the two methods was identified in the lipid fraction, where the proportion of benzenetricarboxylic acids (B3CAs) correlated with PAH abundance. The results confirmed the validity and complementarity of the two molecular marker methods, which will likely continue to play a crucial role in PyOM research due to the recent developments of compound-specific PAH and BPCA stable carbon (?(13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotope methods. PMID:25084061

Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Brodowski, Sonja; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

2015-01-01

65

Molecular markers of endometrial carcinoma detected in uterine aspirates.  

PubMed

Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most frequent of the invasive tumors of the female genital tract. Although usually detected in its initial stages, a 20% of the patients present with advanced disease. To date, no characterized molecular marker has been validated for the diagnosis of EC. In addition, new methods for prognosis and classification of EC are needed to combat this deadly disease. We thus aimed to identify new molecular markers of EC and to evaluate their validity on endometrial aspirates. Gene expression screening on 52 carcinoma samples and series of real-time quantitative PCR validation on 19 paired carcinomas and normal tissue samples and on 50 carcinoma and noncarcinoma uterine aspirates were performed to identify and validate potential biomarkers of EC. Candidate markers were further confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. We identified ACAA1, AP1M2, CGN, DDR1, EPS8L2, FASTKD1, GMIP, IKBKE, P2RX4, P4HB, PHKG2, PPFIBP2, PPP1R16A, RASSF7, RNF183, SIRT6, TJP3, EFEMP2, SOCS2 and DCN as differentially expressed in ECs. Furthermore, the differential expression of these biomarkers in primary endometrial tumors is correlated to their expression level in corresponding uterine fluid samples. Finally, these biomarkers significantly identified EC with area under the receiver-operating-characteristic values ranging from 0.74 to 0.95 in uterine aspirates. Interestingly, analogous values were found among initial stages. We present the discovery of molecular biomarkers of EC and describe their utility in uterine aspirates. These findings represent the basis for the development of a highly sensitive and specific minimally invasive method for screening ECs. PMID:21207424

Colas, Eva; Perez, Cristina; Cabrera, Silvia; Pedrola, Nuria; Monge, Marta; Castellvi, Josep; Eyzaguirre, Fernando; Gregorio, Jesus; Ruiz, Anna; Llaurado, Marta; Rigau, Marina; Garcia, Marta; Ertekin, Tugçe; Montes, Melania; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Carreras, Ramon; Xercavins, Jordi; Ortega, Alicia; Maes, Tamara; Rosell, Elisabet; Doll, Andreas; Abal, Miguel; Reventos, Jaume; Gil-Moreno, Antonio

2011-11-15

66

Molecular marker from pancreatic 'juices' helps identify pancreatic cancer  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed a promising method to distinguish between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis — two disorders that are difficult to tell apart. A molecular marker obtained from pancreatic "juices" can identify almost all cases of pancreatic cancer, their study shows. The findings were being presented at Digestive Disease Week 2013 in Orlando, Fla. Pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis both produce the same signs of disease in the pancreas, such as inflammation, but cancer in the organ is a life-threatening disorder that must be treated immediately and aggressively.

67

An analysis of 14 molecular markers for monitoring osteoarthritis: segregation of the markers into clusters and distinguishing osteoarthritis at baseline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate the relationships between serum and urinary molecular markers (MM) used to monitor osteoarthritis.Design Forty osteoarthritis patients had blood and urine collected at baseline and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months later. Specimens from 20 controls were obtained twice at a one month interval. The concentration of 14 different markers was determined at each time point and the

I. G Otterness; A. C Swindell; R. O Zimmerer; A. R Poole; M Ionescu; E Weiner

2000-01-01

68

A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

2014-01-01

69

A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.  

PubMed

Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain ('K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

2014-01-01

70

Molecular Marker Applications in Oat (Avena Sativa L.) Breeding and Germplasm Diagnostics .  

E-print Network

??The ability to identify germplasm and select traits accurately is fundamental to successful plant breeding. Pedigrees and molecular markers facilitate these processes; however misleading experimental… (more)

Benazir Katarina, Marquez

2014-01-01

71

Comparison of two assays in the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis: immunological and molecular.  

PubMed

Serological tests for Toxoplasma gondii are inadequate because antibody production either fails or is significantly delayed. This study in eastern Iraq investigated the IgG-avidity ELISA test for detecting recent T. gondii infections among pregnant women and compared immunological methods and PCR as molecular assays in the diagnosis of T. gondii. Serums samples were taken from 130 pregnant women at risk of toxoplasmosis and a control group of 25 women with normal pregnancy. Of 50 IgM- and/or IgG-positive samples, only 15 showed low IgG-avidity antibodies. PCR was performed on 25 selected samples. Toxoplasma DNA was detected in 15/15 IgM-positive with low IgG-avidity and 1/3 IgM-positive with high IgG-avidity. None of the IgM-negative with high IgG-avidity showed any Toxoplasma DNA. ELISA IgG-avidity when used in combination with ELISA IgG/IgM is a valuable assay for the exclusion of ongoing or recently acquired T. gondii infection in pregnant women. PMID:24932933

Hashoosh, D A; Majeed, I A

2014-01-01

72

Is interferon-gamma the right marker for bacille Calmette-Guérin-induced immune protection? The missing link in our understanding of tuberculosis immunology.  

PubMed

Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), developed a century ago, is the only licensed tuberculosis (TB) vaccine in use to date. The protective efficacy of BCG against TB varies with no apparent protection in some population, and mechanisms of its immune protection is poorly known, and yet BCG is the most widely used vaccine, with more than 4 billion BCG-vaccinated children globally. BCG is probably the only licensed vaccine currently in use believed to mediate immune protection through the production of interferon (IFN)-? by CD4 T cells, which in turn activates macrophages to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Currently, a number of new TB candidate vaccines are in different phases of clinical trial. The majority of these new vaccines are either recombinant forms of BCG or prime boosters of BCG (rBCG) and their immunogenicity is tested using BCG as a benchmark by measuring specific IFN-? produced by CD4(+) T cells as a protective immune marker. However, some recent studies that examined mechanisms of immune protection of BCG in animals and humans have reported a lack of correlation between IFN-? production by CD4 cells and BCG-induced immune protection. These studies point to the fact that there is a missing link in our understanding of TB immunology. Conversely, there is emerging evidence that other T cell subsets (gammadelta, ??), CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells may play a vital role in immune protection against Mtb infection and BCG-induced immune protection. ?? T cells and NK cells, which were considered to be part of the innate immunity in the past, have been shown to develop immunological memory upon re-encounter with the same pathogen. In this paper, the controversy over the role of IFN-? as a marker for protective immunity against TB, and emerging data on the role of ?? T cells, CD8(+) and NK cells in TB immunology, will be presented. PMID:22861360

Abebe, F

2012-09-01

73

[Multilocus sequence typing: the molecular marker of the Internet era].  

PubMed

Global or longer term epidemiology track the spread of clonal lineages, associated with hipervirulence or resistance or multi-resistance to antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the application of a molecular typing system for this purpose should produce data easily shared by different and geographically distant laboratories, as well as distinguish those clonal lineages even with low levels of variability accumulated in the genome.A marker based on the DNA sequence will produce objective results easily organized in data bases accessible by Internet. The application of a similar strategy that was used in the analysis of isoenzymes, by sequencing variable fragments of selected housekeeping genes, will allow obtaining a general view of the distribution of the clonal lineages and tracking their spread. PMID:14756994

Vázquez, Julio A; Berrón, Sonsoles

2004-02-01

74

New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

Huuskonen, Hannele [National Product Control Agency for Welfare and Health, Chemicals Department, STTV c/o National Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

2005-09-01

75

Molecular markers for identifying municipal, domestic and agricultural sources of organic matter in natural waters.  

PubMed

Molecular markers can be used to determine the sources of organic pollution in water. This review summarizes progress made during the last two decades in identifying reliable molecular markers to distinguish pollution from sewage, animal production, and other sources. Two artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame-K, are sufficiently stable to be molecular markers and easily associated with domestic wastewater. Waste from different animal species may be distinguished by profiling fecal sterols and bile acids. Other markers which have been evaluated, including caffeine, detergent components, and compounds commonly leached from landfills are discussed. PMID:24200048

Harwood, John J

2014-01-01

76

Molecular Evolution and Diversity inBacillus anthracisas Detected by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus anthraciscauses anthrax and represents one of the most molecularly monomorphic bacteria known. We have used AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) DNA markers to analyze 78 B. anthracis isolates and six relatedBacillusspecies for molecular variation. AFLP markers are extremely sensitive to even small sequence variation, using PCR and high-resolution electrophoresis to examine restriction fragments. Using this approach, we examined ca.

PAUL KEIM; ABDULAHI KALIF; JAMES SCHUPP; KAREN HILL; STEVEN E. TRAVIS; KARA RICHMOND; DEBRA M. ADAIR; MARTIN HUGH-JONES; CHERYL R. KUSKE; ANDPAUL JACKSON

1997-01-01

77

Molecular, immunological, enzymatic and biochemical studies of coproporphyrinogen oxidase deficiency in a family with hereditary coproporphyria.  

PubMed

A 27-year-old woman who had recurrent pain in renal bed since 1998 with increasing character, was stationary admitted. The patient showed dark urine, complained of hair loss and took since 1994 a hormonal oral contraceptive. No photosensitivity was observed. Determinations of urinary porphyrin metabolites in 1998 revealed a porphyria cutanea tarda like excretion pattern with elevations of uro- (1767 nmol/24 hr, normal <29 nmol/24 hr) and heptacarboxyporphyrin (568 nmol/24 hr; normal <4 nmol/24 hr). Follow-up studies in feces showed the characteristics of a hereditary coproporphyria with dominance of coproporphyrin isomer III (total= 1470 nmol/g, isomer III= 93%), (normal: <37 nmol/g, isomer III = 25-35%). The excretion of porphyrin precursors (delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen) was increased by taking an ethinylestradiol-cyproteronacetate-preparation, but acute and/or chronic manifestations were not observed. Coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was decreased to 35% in the patient (normal=138+/-21 pkat/g protein; x+/-s), whereas the activity of red cell uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase was normal. Her mother and both sisters could be verified as heterozygous gene carriers of hereditary coproporphyria by their urinary and fecal excretion parameters and because of reduced coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity up to 50%. The father was normal with respect to his genotype. Molecular analysis revealed a hitherto unknown mutation with the transversion of a cytosine to thymine at nucleotide position 854 in exon 4 of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene. The gene defect was confirmed by DGGE in the mother and her three daughters. The investigation of the immunological nature of the defective coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene from the whole family revealed decreased concentrations of coproporphyrinogen oxidase protein in the patient, her mother and her two sisters. PMID:11929047

Gross, U; Puy, H; Kühnel, A; Meissauer, U; Deybach, J C; Jacob, K; Martasek, P; Nordmann, Y; Doss, M O

2002-02-01

78

Genetic Diversity Among Wheat Cultivars Using Molecular Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to compare amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) marker systems for estimating genetic diversity among 13 Iranian wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars through average expected heterozygosity (Hav), sum of effective number of alleles (SENA), and marker index (MI). The AFLP markers had the highest values

Babak Abdollahi Mandoulakani; Ali-Akbar Shahnejat-Bushehri; Badredin Ebrahim Sayed Tabatabaei; Sepideh Torabi; Alireza Mohammadi Hajiabad

2010-01-01

79

Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers  

PubMed Central

A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

2011-01-01

80

Evaluation of molecular markers for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) comprises a group of bacteria that have a high degree of genetic similarity. Two species in this group, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, are the main cause of human and bovine tuberculosis, respectively. M. bovis has a broader host range that includes humans; thus, the differentiation of mycobacterium is of great importance for epidemiological and public health considerations and to optimize treatment. The current study aimed to evaluate primers and molecular markers described in the literature to differentiate M. bovis and M. tuberculosis by PCR. Primers JB21/22, frequently cited in scientific literature, presented in our study the highest number of errors to identify M. bovis or M. tuberculosis (73%) and primers Mb.400, designed to flank region of difference 4 (RD4), were considered the most efficient (detected all M. bovis tested and did not detect any M. tuberculosis tested). Although also designed to flank RD4, primers Mb.115 misidentified eight samples due to primer design problems. The results showed that RD4 is the ideal region to differentiate M. bovis from other bacteria classified in MTC, but primer design should be considered carefully. PMID:24744007

Sales, Mariana Lázaro; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Sales, Erica Bravo; Cottorello, Ana Cláudia Pinto; Issa, Marina Azevedo; Hodon, Mikael Arrais; Soares Filho, Paulo Martins; Ramalho, Alberto Knust; Silva, Marcio Roberto; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

2014-09-01

81

Estimating ancestry and heterozygosity of hybrids using molecular markers  

PubMed Central

Background Hybridization, genetic mixture of distinct populations, gives rise to myriad recombinant genotypes. Characterizing the genomic composition of hybrids is critical for studies of hybrid zone dynamics, inheritance of traits, and consequences of hybridization for evolution and conservation. Hybrid genomes are often summarized either by an estimate of the proportion of alleles coming from each ancestral population or classification into discrete categories like F1, F2, backcross, or merely “hybrid” vs. “pure”. In most cases, it is not realistic to classify individuals into the restricted set of classes produced in the first two generations of admixture. However, the continuous ancestry index misses an important dimension of the genotype. Joint consideration of ancestry together with interclass heterozygosity (proportion of loci with alleles from both ancestral populations) captures all of the information in the discrete classification without the unrealistic assumption that only two generations of admixture have transpired. Methods I describe a maximum likelihood method for joint estimation of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity. I present two worked examples illustrating the value of the approach for describing variation among hybrid populations and evaluating the validity of the assumption underlying discrete classification. Results Naively classifying natural hybrids into the standard six line cross categories can be misleading, and false classification can be a serious problem for datasets with few molecular markers. My analysis underscores previous work showing that many (50 or more) ancestry informative markers are needed to avoid erroneous classification. Conclusion Although classification of hybrids might often be misleading, valuable inferences can be obtained by focusing directly on distributions of ancestry and heterozygosity. Estimating and visualizing the joint distribution of ancestry and interclass heterozygosity is an effective way to compare the genetic structure of hybrid populations and these estimates can be used in classic quantitative genetic methods for assessing additive, dominant, and epistatic genetic effects on hybrid phenotypes and fitness. The methods are implemented in a freely available package “HIest” for the R statistical software ( http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/HIest/index.html). PMID:22849298

2012-01-01

82

Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers  

SciTech Connect

The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

2007-02-15

83

Isotopic and molecular fractionation in combustion; three routes to molecular marker validation, including direct molecular 'dating' (GC/AMS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The identification of unique isotopic, elemental, and molecular markers for sources of combustion aerosol has growing practical importance because of the potential effects of fine particle aerosol on health, visibility and global climate. It is urgent, therefore, that substantial efforts be directed toward the validation of assumptions involving the use of such tracers for source apportionment. We describe here three independent routes toward carbonaceous aerosol molecular marker identification and validation: (1) tracer regression and multivariate statistical techniques applied to field measurements of mixed source, carbonaceous aerosols; (2) a new development in aerosol 14C metrology: direct, pure compound accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) by off-line GC/AMS ('molecular dating'); and (3) direct observation of isotopic and molecular source emissions during controlled laboratory combustion of specific fuels. Findings from the combined studies include: independent support for benzo( ghi)perylene as a motor vehicle tracer from the first (statistical) and second (direct 'dating') studies; a new indication, from the third (controlled combustion) study, of a relation between 13C isotopic fractionation and PAH molecular fractionation, also linked with fuel and stage of combustion; and quantitative data showing the influence of both fuel type and combustion conditions on the yields of such species as elemental carbon and PAH, reinforcing the importance of exercising caution when applying presumed conservative elemental or organic tracers to fossil or biomass burning field data as in the first study.

Currie, L. A.; Klouda, G. A.; Benner, B. A.; Garrity, K.; Eglinton, T. I.

84

Molecular Markers of Radiation-related Normal Tissue Toxicity  

PubMed Central

Over the past five decades, those interested in markers of radiation effect have focused primarily on tumor response. More recently, however, the view has broadened to include irradiated normal tissues—markers that predict unusual risk of side-effects, prognosticate during the prodromal and therapeutic phases, diagnose a particular toxicity as radiation-related, and, in the case of bioterror, allow for tissue-specific biodosimetry. Currently, there are few clinically useful radiation-related biomarkers. Notably, levels of some hormones such as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) have been used successfully as markers of dysfunction, indicative of the need for replacement therapy, and for prevention of cancers. The most promising macromolecular markers are cytokines: TGF?, IL-1, IL-6, and TNF? being lead molecules in this class as both markers and targets for therapy. Genomics and proteomics are still in nascent stages and are actively being studied and developed. PMID:18506399

Okunieff, Paul; Chen, Yuhchyau; Maguire, David J.; Huser, Amy K.

2009-01-01

85

Molecular markers of spermatogonial stem cells in the domestic cat.  

PubMed

Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) represent an exciting new avenue for assisted reproduction in endangered and genetically valuable species. Before this technology can be applied to wildlife, species-specific markers are required to evaluate SSC enrichment strategies and monitor subsequent in vitro culture. This study was designed to evaluate six conserved SSC markers (THY1, GPR125, GFRalpha1, PLZF, UCHL1 and OCT4) in the cat. Testes from three juveniles and three adults were obtained following routine castrations and processed for mRNA extraction. RT-PCR of whole testis and cell suspensions enriched for SSCs by differential plating confirmed that all six SSC markers are expressed in both the whole testis and SSC-enriched cell fractions. The expression of all six putative SSC marker genes in the cat testis suggests conservation of SSC markers, and perhaps self-renewal mechanisms, in felids. PMID:23279513

Vansandt, L M; Pukazhenthi, B S; Keefer, C L

2012-12-01

86

Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology  

E-print Network

Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology 20 Pathology and Diagnostic Pathology and adenocarcinoma ·Application of molecular pathology to pathological diagnosis · Discovery of cancer therapy target and acceleration of pathological diagnostic processes Investigation of the development of EB virus

Miyashita, Yasushi

87

Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

88

IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

89

Rules of evidence for cancer molecular-marker discovery and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to some claims, molecular markers are set to revolutionize the process of evaluating prognosis and diagnosis for cancer. Research about cancer markers has, however, been characterized by inflated expectations, followed by disappointment when original results can not be reproduced. Even now, disappointment might be expected, in part because rules of evidence to assess the validity of studies about diagnosis

David F. Ransohoff

2004-01-01

90

Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants  

PubMed Central

In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

2014-01-01

91

Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.  

PubMed

In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

2014-09-01

92

Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A  

PubMed Central

Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was similar genotypic distribution in both acute and fulminant category, with predominance of genotype IIIA (70%) compared to IA (30%). Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity. PMID:21605420

2011-01-01

93

Immunology & Pharmacology  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Immunology & Pharmacology DEGREE PROGRAMME GUIDE 2013-2014 #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology illnesses and chronic inflammatory diseases. Immunology with pharmacology is therefore concerned primarily with scientific aspects of the two disciplines and how they combine in the application of immunological techniques

Levi, Ran

94

Cellular and molecular functions of hepatic stellate cells in inflammatory responses and liver immunology  

PubMed Central

The liver is a central immunological organ. Liver resident macrophages, Kupffer cells (KC), but also sinusoidal endothelial cells, dendritic cells (DC) and other immune cells are involved in balancing immunity and tolerance against pathogens, commensals or food antigens. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have been primarily characterized as the main effector cells in liver fibrosis, due to their capacity to transdifferentiate into collagen-producing myofibroblasts (MFB). More recent studies elucidated the fundamental role of HSC in liver immunology. HSC are not only the major storage site for dietary vitamin A (Vit A) (retinol, retinoic acid), which is essential for proper function of the immune system. This pericyte further represents a versatile source of many soluble immunological active factors including cytokines [e.g., interleukin 17 (IL-17)] and chemokines [C-C motif chemokine (ligand) 2 (CCL2)], may act as an antigen presenting cell (APC), and has autophagy activity. Additionally, it responds to many immunological triggers via toll-like receptors (TLR) (e.g., TLR4, TLR9) and transduces signals through pathways and mediators traditionally found in immune cells, including the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway or inflammasome activation. Overall, HSC promote rather immune-suppressive responses in homeostasis, like induction of regulatory T cells (Treg), T cell apoptosis (via B7-H1, PDL-1) or inhibition of cytotoxic CD8 T cells. In conditions of liver injury, HSC are important sensors of altered tissue integrity and initiators of innate immune cell activation. Vice versa, several immune cell subtypes interact directly or via soluble mediators with HSC. Such interactions include the mutual activation of HSC (towards MFB) and macrophages or pro-apoptotic signals from natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and gamma-delta T cells (?? T-cells) on activated HSC. Current directions of research investigate the immune-modulating functions of HSC in the environment of liver tumors, cellular heterogeneity or interactions promoting HSC deactivation during resolution of liver fibrosis. Understanding the role of HSC as central regulators of liver immunology may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for chronic liver diseases. PMID:25568859

2014-01-01

95

MOLECULAR MARKERS Our lab started to develop molecular markers linked to economic traits in beans in 1990 when Dr.  

E-print Network

tag a gene in the absence of a saturated genetic map. Other approaches such as segregant bulk analysis greatly limited the use of MAS in bean breeding except for major gene traits. Most mapping studies at that time was RAPD marker(s) and we were able to `tag' the first gene for rust resistance in common bean

96

Molecular tools for marker-assisted breeding of buffelgrass  

E-print Network

11 grass species and covers approximately 80-85% of the buffelgrass genome. Two RFLPs from the buffelgrass genome map were converted to PCR-based markers for both the identification of hybrids and quantification of sexual versus apomictic reproduction...

Jessup, Russell William

2005-11-01

97

[Molecular-genetic markers in lung cancer diagnostics].  

PubMed

The major approaches to different lung cancer marker development are outlined in the review, including genetic, epigenetic, protein, transcryptomic, proteomic, metabolic, and miRNA markers. As far as epigenetic changes are among the earliest events in malignant transformation, methylated markers are thoroughly discussed. Special attention is given to minimally invasive tumor markers, which could be detected in easily accessible biological fluids, because they can be useful for screening and early diagnostics of cancer (before its clinical manifestation) as well as for verification of standard methods of diagnostics. Extracellular nucleic acids, circulating in blood (cirNA), are highlighted as the potential source of material for the early lung cancer diagnostics, prediction of antitumor treatment efficiency, post-treatment monitoring and disease prognosis. PMID:21634110

Ponomareva, A A; Rykova, E Iu; Cherdyntseva, N V; Cho?nzonov, E L; Laktionov, P P; Vlasov, V V

2011-01-01

98

Immunological and molecular polymorphisms of OspC, an immunodominant major outer surface protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.  

PubMed Central

The gene of the immunodominant major protein pC of Borrelia burgdorferi was previously cloned and sequenced (R. Fuchs, S. Jauris, F. Lottspeich, V. Preac-Mursic, B. Wilske, and E. Soutschek, Mol. Microbiol. 6:503-509, 1992). pC is abundantly expressed on the outer surface of B. burgdorferi, as demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibody L22 1F8. Accordingly, pC is renamed OspC, by analogy to the outer surface proteins OspA and OspB. Western immunoblot analysis of 45 B. burgdorferi isolates with monoclonal antibodies revealed that OspC is immunologically heterogeneous. Partial sequence analysis of the ospC gene confirmed the protein heterogeneity at the genetic level. We found that the degree of identity between the ospC partial sequences of five strains representing different OspA serotypes was only 63.3 to 85.4%. Immunological heterogeneity was also observed among representatives of the three newly designated genospecies of B. burgdorferi sensu lato, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and group VS461. Heterogeneity was confirmed for B. garinii at the genetic level. The ospC gene was also cloned from strains that did not express OspC, and antibody-reactive OspC was expressed in Escherichia coli. In addition, OspC-expressing variants were obtained from a nonexpressing strain by plating single colonies on solid medium. These findings confirm that the ospC gene is also present in nonexpressing strains. Because OspC is an immunodominant protein for the early immune response in Lyme borreliosis and was effective as a vaccine in an animal model, the immunological and molecular polymorphisms of ospC and OspC have important implications for the development of diagnostic reagents and vaccines. Images PMID:8478108

Wilske, B; Preac-Mursic, V; Jauris, S; Hofmann, A; Pradel, I; Soutschek, E; Schwab, E; Will, G; Wanner, G

1993-01-01

99

Comparative study of the high molecular mass fraction and low molecular mass fraction of Sho-saiko-to in a murine immunologically induced liver injury model.  

PubMed

We compared the pharmacological actions of the high and low molecular mass fractions of Sho-saiko-to using a murine immunologically induced liver injury model to estimate the roles of these fractions in the expression of the pharmacological action. In a Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury model, Sho-saiko-to and both of its fractions significantly reduced the increases in the aminotranseferase levels in serum. They also reduced the increase in the nitric oxide (NOx) level in serum. On the other hand, Sho-saiko-to and its high molecular mass fraction suppressed the increase in plasma NOx level in an LPS-induced endotoxin shock model but its low molecular mass fraction did not. These results suggest the possibility that both fractions act hepatoprotectively in a different manner. We believe that these results can help to elucidate the mechanism of action of ingredients in Sho-saiko-to. PMID:11824559

Nose, Mitsuhiko; Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Iwahashi, Naomi; Oguri, Kanayo; Ogihara, Yukio

2002-01-01

100

Markers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

2011-01-01

101

[Non-small cell lung cancer. Subtyping and predictive molecular marker investigations in cytology].  

PubMed

The diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been revolutionized over the last few years. Requirements for cytopathologists in lung cancer diagnosis have therefore changed. The general diagnostic category of NSLC is no longer sufficient. In addition cytological specimens need to be evaluated for adequacy regarding predictive marker analyses. Accurate NSCLC subtyping with a distinction of adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma is crucial for treatment decisions as the subtype will decide on the chemotherapy regimen and the choice of predictive marker analyses for targeted treatment. In the majority of cases, the subtype can be diagnosed by morphology alone. Cytology is equally well suited as biopsy specimens for the assessment of molecular predictive markers. The best results are achieved when both cytology and biopsy specimens are compared to choose the most appropriate specimen for morphological subtyping and molecular testing. In this paper, we discuss special issues of NSCLC subtyping and currently recommended predictive molecular marker analyses. PMID:22711372

Savic, S; Bihl, M P; Bubendorf, L

2012-07-01

102

Predictive molecular markers: has the time come for routine use in lung cancer?  

PubMed

Although some evidence exists to support the use of clinical factors such as performance status and weight loss to predict response and toxicity to therapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, researchers have shown little prospective data on the use of molecular markers to facilitate selection of specific chemotherapy or new molecularly targeted agents in this patient population. Breast cancer exemplifies the growing role that molecular markers are playing, not only as prognostic factors, but also in predicting response to targeted treatments such as hormonal therapy, and more recently, trastuzumab (Herceptin). Although several studies have examined molecular markers in lung cancer and have shown promising potential value, these studies were retrospective and require prospective validation. To identify molecular markers that reliably predict response and to be able to individualize cytotoxic and targeted therapy for NSCLC patients are the ultimate goals of future trials. This article focuses on a selected number of promising markers under study in lung cancer, including those thought to play roles in response to DNA damaging chemotherapy (excision repair cross-complementing [ERCC1], xeroderma pigmentosum group D [XPD]), taxane resistance (beta-tubulin III), antimetabolite therapy (RRM1), irinotecan metabolism (UGT1A1) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway inhibition. To date, none of these markers can be recommended for routine use in clinical practice. PMID:19777702

Davies, Angela M; Mack, Philip C; Lara, Primo N; Lau, Derick H; Danenberg, Kathleen; Gumerlock, Paul H; Gandara, David R

2004-03-01

103

Molecular mechanisms and functional implications of polarized actin remodeling at the T cell immunological synapse.  

PubMed

Transient,specialized cell-cell interactions play a central role in leukocyte function by enabling specific intercellular communication in the context of a highly dynamic systems level response. The dramatic structural changes required for the formation of these contacts are driven by rapid and precise cytoskeletal remodeling events. In recent years, the immunological synapse that forms between a T lymphocyte and its antigen-presenting target cell has emerged as an important model system for understanding immune cell interactions. In this review, we discuss how regulators of the cortical actin cytoskeleton control synaptic architecture and in this way specify T cell function. PMID:25355055

Le Floc'h, Audrey; Huse, Morgan

2015-02-01

104

The Effects of Water Matrix on Decay of Human Fecal Molecular Markers and Campylobacter spp.  

EPA Science Inventory

Although molecular source tracking for human fecal contamination is used on a wide range of sample types, little is known about comparative decay of proposed molecular markers under different conditions, or correlation with pathogen decay. Our purpose was to measure correlations ...

105

Immunological markers for tolerance to avian malaria in Hawai`i `Amakihi: new tools for restoring native Hawaiian forest birds?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We evaluated three assays for non-specific or innate immune capacity to see if measurements were independent of malarial infection and capable of distinguishing malaria-tolerant, low-elevation Hawai?i ?Amakihi from malaria-susceptible, high-elevation ?Amakihi. ?Amakihi were captured at Malama Ki Forest Reserve (20 m), Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (1800 m), and Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve (1700 m), bled for collection of plasma and packed erythrocytes for malarial diagnostics, and either transported to K?lauea Field Station Aviary and held in captivity for 48 hours for inoculation of wing webs with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) or released immediately in the field after collection of a blood sample. All birds were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microscopy to determine infection status. We found no significant association between malarial infection status and degree of wing web swelling after inoculation with PHA (T = -0.174, df = 13, P = 0.864) and no association between origin of birds from low- and high-elevation populations and degree of wing web swelling (T = 0.113, df = 52, P = 0.911). Infected ?Amakihi from low elevation had significantly higher small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity than uninfected individuals from the same population (T = -2.675, df = 21, P = 0.014), so we limited comparisons to uninfected birds. Uninfected ?Amakihi from low elevations did not differ in small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity from uninfected ?Amakihi from high elevation (T = -0.260, df = 46, P = 0.796). Compared to high-elevation birds, low-elevation ?Amakihi had significantly higher titers of natural antibodies (NAb) as measured by complement-mediated lysis of rabbit erythrocytes (Mann-Whitney U = 27, X2= 32.332, df = 1, P < 0.0001). This innate immunological difference may be related to ability to survive malarial infection and may prove to be important for understanding possible mechanisms for the evolution of disease tolerance in Hawai?i’s native bird species.

Atkinson, Carter T.; Paxton, Eben H.

2013-01-01

106

Immunosignaturing can detect products from molecular markers in brain cancer.  

PubMed

Immunosignaturing shows promise as a general approach to diagnosis. It has been shown to detect immunological signs of infection early during the course of disease and to distinguish Alzheimer's disease from healthy controls. Here we test whether immunosignatures correspond to clinical classifications of disease using samples from people with brain tumors. Blood samples from patients undergoing craniotomies for therapeutically naïve brain tumors with diagnoses of astrocytoma (23 samples), Glioblastoma multiforme (22 samples), mixed oligodendroglioma/astrocytoma (16 samples), oligodendroglioma (18 samples), and 34 otherwise healthy controls were tested by immunosignature. Because samples were taken prior to adjuvant therapy, they are unlikely to be perturbed by non-cancer related affects. The immunosignaturing platform distinguished not only brain cancer from controls, but also pathologically important features about the tumor including type, grade, and the presence or absence of O(6)-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation promoter (MGMT), an important biomarker that predicts response to temozolomide in Glioblastoma multiformae patients. PMID:22815729

Hughes, Alexa K; Cichacz, Zbigniew; Scheck, Adrienne; Coons, Stephen W; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

2012-01-01

107

Immunosignaturing Can Detect Products from Molecular Markers in Brain Cancer  

PubMed Central

Immunosignaturing shows promise as a general approach to diagnosis. It has been shown to detect immunological signs of infection early during the course of disease and to distinguish Alzheimer’s disease from healthy controls. Here we test whether immunosignatures correspond to clinical classifications of disease using samples from people with brain tumors. Blood samples from patients undergoing craniotomies for therapeutically naïve brain tumors with diagnoses of astrocytoma (23 samples), Glioblastoma multiforme (22 samples), mixed oligodendroglioma/astrocytoma (16 samples), oligodendroglioma (18 samples), and 34 otherwise healthy controls were tested by immunosignature. Because samples were taken prior to adjuvant therapy, they are unlikely to be perturbed by non-cancer related affects. The immunosignaturing platform distinguished not only brain cancer from controls, but also pathologically important features about the tumor including type, grade, and the presence or absence of O6-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation promoter (MGMT), an important biomarker that predicts response to temozolomide in Glioblastoma multiformae patients. PMID:22815729

Hughes, Alexa K.; Cichacz, Zbigniew; Scheck, Adrienne; Coons, Stephen W.; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

2012-01-01

108

MOLECULAR MARKER ASSISTED BREEDING FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE IN COMMON BEAN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

There have been 40 sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers (http://www.usda.prosser.wsu.edu/miklas/Scartable3.pdf) generated across laboratories that are available for indirect selection of 27 qualitatively and 8 quantitatively expressed genes conditioning resistance to bacterial, fun...

109

Applications and Implications of Neutral versus Non-neutral Markers in Molecular Ecology  

PubMed Central

The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection. PMID:21747718

Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R.

2011-01-01

110

Targeting the Molecular and Cellular Interactions of the Bone Marrow Niche in Immunologic Disease  

PubMed Central

Recent investigations have expanded our knowledge of the regulatory bone marrow (BM) niche, which is critical in maintaining and directing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells are niche components in close association with HSCs and have been more clearly defined in immune cell function and homeostasis. Importantly, cellular inhabitants of the BM niche signal through G protein-coupled surface receptors (GPCRs) for various appropriate immune functions. In this article, recent literature on BM niche inhabitants (HSCs, osteoblasts, MSCs, CAR cells) and their GPCR mechanistic interactions are reviewed for better understanding of the BM cells involved in immune development, immunologic disease, and current immune reconstitution therapies. PMID:24408534

Brozowski, Jaime M.; Billard, Matthew J.

2014-01-01

111

IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

112

Maintaining genetic diversity using molecular coancestry: the effect of marker density and effective population size  

PubMed Central

Background The most efficient method to maintain genetic diversity in populations under conservation programmes is to optimize, for each potential parent, the number of offspring left to the next generation by minimizing the global coancestry. Coancestry is usually calculated from genealogical data but molecular markers can be used to replace genealogical coancestry with molecular coancestry. Recent studies showed that optimizing contributions based on coancestry calculated from a large number of SNP markers can maintain higher levels of diversity than optimizing contributions based on genealogical data. In this study, we investigated how SNP density and effective population size impact the use of molecular coancestry to maintain diversity. Results At low SNP densities, the genetic diversity maintained using genealogical coancestry for optimization was higher than that maintained using molecular coancestry. The performance of molecular coancestry improved with increasing marker density, and, for the scenarios evaluated, it was as efficient as genealogical coancestry if SNP density reached at least 3 times the effective population size. However, increasing SNP density resulted in reduced returns in terms of maintained diversity. While a benefit of 12% was achieved when marker density increased from 10 to 100 SNP/Morgan, the benefit was only 2% when it increased from 100 to 500 SNP/Morgan. Conclusions The marker density of most SNP chips already available for farm animals is sufficient for molecular coancestry to outperform genealogical coancestry in conservation programmes aimed at maintaining genetic diversity. For the purpose of effectively maintaining genetic diversity, a marker density of around 500 SNPs/Morgan can be considered as the most cost effective density when developing SNP chips for new species. Since the costs to develop SNP chips are decreasing, chips with 500 SNPs/Morgan should become available in a short-term horizon for non domestic species. PMID:24088414

2013-01-01

113

Molecular and cellular markers of toxicity in the Japanese Medaka @  

SciTech Connect

The Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been recommended for use as a model organism to detect carcinogenic, teratogenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic compounds in aquatic systems. Because a long latent period often occurs between initial contact with deleterious chemicals and subsequent expression of the pathology, we are investigating early biologically-relevant responses that can be used as genotoxicity markers of exposure and effect. This project focuses on the development of genotoxic bioassays and experimental protocols for exposing Japanese Medaka to genotoxic compounds. 21 refs., 8 figs, 2 tabs.

Shugart, L.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; D'Surney, S.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hull, C.G.

1990-01-01

114

Parasite Immunology, 2001: 23: 327344 Immunological genomics of Brugia malayi: filarial genes implicated  

E-print Network

Parasite Immunology, 2001: 23: 327±344 Immunological genomics of Brugia malayi: filarial genes of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University biochemical and immunological data on prominent filarial proteins with the exciting new information provided

Maizels, Rick

115

Understanding the Molecular Determinants Driving the Immunological Specificity of the Protective Pilus 2a Backbone Protein of Group B Streptococcus  

PubMed Central

The pilus 2a backbone protein (BP-2a) is one of the most structurally and functionally characterized components of a potential vaccine formulation against Group B Streptococcus. It is characterized by six main immunologically distinct allelic variants, each inducing variant-specific protection. To investigate the molecular determinants driving the variant immunogenic specificity of BP-2a, in terms of single residue contributions, we generated six monoclonal antibodies against a specific protein variant based on their capability to recognize the polymerized pili structure on the bacterial surface. Three mAbs were also able to induce complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis killing of live GBS and target the same linear epitope present in the structurally defined and immunodominant domain D3 of the protein. Molecular docking between the modelled scFv antibody sequences and the BP-2a crystal structure revealed the potential role at the binding interface of some non-conserved antigen residues. Mutagenesis analysis confirmed the necessity of a perfect balance between charges, size and polarity at the binding interface to obtain specific binding of mAbs to the protein antigen for a neutralizing response. PMID:23825940

Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Brogioni, Barbara; Cozzi, Roberta; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Yero, Daniel; Telford, John L.; Grandi, Guido; Daura, Xavier; Zacharias, Martin; Maione, Domenico

2013-01-01

116

Molecular cloning, recombinant expression, and immunological characterization of a novel allergen from tartary buckwheat.  

PubMed

Buckwheat is generally regarded as a nutritionally rich food source. However, earlier studies prove that it also causes allergies to subjects. Allergenic proteins with a strong IgE-binding activity have been identified in common buckwheat (CB) and a 24 kDa allergen (rTBa) in tartary buckwheat (TB). The objective of this research was to clone and express a novel allergen in tartary buckwheat and to evaluate its structure and immunological activity. The 1773 bp full-length cDNA was amplified and cloned from the total RNA of TB by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods. Its nucleotide sequence had high similarity with legume-like 13S storage protein mRNA in CB. The deduced amino acid sequence included a putative signal peptide and 18 fragments as its epitope sites. The predicted full-length TB allergen sequence was found to have two domains, and the recombinant protein reacted with sera from patients with positive IgE binding to buckwheat and had a lower binding ability than the recombinant TBa and recombinant TBb (C- and N-terminal amino acid sequence of TBt codes for protein). This fact suggests that full-length TB allergen may hydrolyze to two domains in vivo, decreasing the IgE-binding ability. PMID:18980324

Zhang, Xin; Yuan, Jing Ming; Cui, Xiao Dong; Wang, Zhuan Hua

2008-11-26

117

Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques  

PubMed Central

Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, ?V?3 integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein. PMID:25099015

2014-01-01

118

Volatility of organic molecular markers used for source apportionment analysis: measurements and implications for atmospheric lifetime.  

PubMed

Molecular markers are organic species used to define fingerprints for source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter. Traditionally, these markers have been assumed to be stable in the atmosphere. This work investigates the gas-particle partitioning of eight organic species used as molecular markers in receptor models for biomass burning (levoglucosan), motor vehicles (5?-cholestane, n-hexacosane, n-triacontane, 1,2-benz[a]anthracene, coronene), and meat cooking (cholesterol, oleic acid). Experiments were conducted using a thermodenuder to measure the evaporation of single component particles. The data were analyzed using the integrated volume method to determine saturation concentrations and enthalpies of vaporization for each compound. The results indicate that appreciable quantities (>10%) of most of these markers exist in the gas phase under typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, these species should be considered semivolatile. Predictions from a chemical kinetics model indicate that gas-particle partitioning has important effects on the atmospheric lifetime of these species. The atmospheric decay of semivolatile compounds proceeds much more rapidly than nonvolatile compounds because gas-phase oxidation induces evaporation of particle-phase material. Therefore, both gas-particle partitioning and chemical reactions need to be accounted for when semivolatile molecular markers are used for source apportionment studies. PMID:23013599

May, Andrew A; Saleh, Rawad; Hennigan, Christopher J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

2012-11-20

119

[Immunological safety of transfusion].  

PubMed

Transfusion safety lies on the strict application of measures aimed: at avoiding the occurrence of acute hazards, as far as they can be prevented by e.g. the ABO compatibility for red blood cell concentrates and therapeutic plasma; at reducing the frequency of other acute accidents such as TRALI or post-transfusion GVH (based on the implementation of measures which prove to be largely efficacious though not completely); and at reducing delayed incidents and hazards. The implementation of such immunological safety measures also aim at favoring the transfusion efficacy, in avoiding the lysis of transfused red cells or platelets. Perfect immunological compatibility (match) is impossible because transfused cells expose several hundreds of molecular variants with antigenic properties. Adaptive immunity is largely based upon antigen/antibody conflicts and it predominates in transfusion immunological hazards, but inflammation (as well as other components of innate immunity) is now acknowledged as a major actor of transfusion immunological linked hazards. PMID:25578545

Muller, Jean-Yves; Chiaroni, Jacques; Garraud, Olivier

2015-02-01

120

Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects  

PubMed Central

Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

Malik, Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Ali Khan, Asif; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Qadir Ahmad, Muhammad; Hasan Abbasi, Ghulam

2014-01-01

121

Abstract--Molecular markers have A Bayesian method for identification ofbeen demonstrated to be useful for  

E-print Network

to be useful for the estimation of stock mixture pro- stock mixtures from molecular marker data portions where han- Stock mixture analysis using multi- propriate estimates. First, in the dling data where only are suc- number of stock sources to represent cessively simulated from the corre- a particular data set

122

An Educational Software for Simulating the Sample Size of Molecular Marker Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed educational software to show graduate students how to plan molecular marker experiments. These computer simulations give the students feedback on the precision of their experiments. The objective of the software was to show students using a hands-on approach how: (1) environmental variation influences the range of the estimates of the…

Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

2007-01-01

123

Study of genetic diversity in Chamomile ( Matricaria chamomilla) based on morphological traits and molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chamomile is one of the most important medicinal plants in the world trade that has many applications in drug and sanitary industrials. In order to evaluate the genetic diversity of different chamomile landraces based on morphological and molecular markers, 20 landraces were collected from different area of Iran. In addition to that, five populations imported from European were examined. The

M. Solouki; H. Mehdikhani; H. Zeinali; A. A. Emamjomeh

2008-01-01

124

Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

125

Effectiveness of SSR molecular markers in evaluating the phylogenetic relationships among eight Actinidia species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study is to evaluate a set of microsatellites and their effectiveness in determining the phylogenetic relationships among Actinidia species. A set of 14 genotypes belonging to eight Actinidia species were subjected to PCR using SSRs as molecular markers. The PCR products were analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The discriminating ability of SSRs was based on

A. E. Korkovelos; A. G. Mavromatis; W. G. Huang; M. Hagidimitriou; A. Giakoundis; C. K. Goulas

2008-01-01

126

MOLECULAR DNA MARKERS UTILIZED TO DISCERN ALFALFA FALL DORMANCY CHECK CULTIVARS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Alfalfa cultivars are difficult to distinguish based upon morphological traits. Only a few morphological traits have been used to describe alfalfa. Molecular markers especially simple sequence repeats (SSR) have not been utilized in alfalfa to characterize alfalfa cultivars. This study was conduct...

127

Analysis of genetic diversity in Ganoderma population with a novel molecular marker SRAP  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic marker technology designed to detect naturally occurring polymorphisms at the DNA level had become an invaluable and revolutionizing tool for both applied and basic studies of fungi. To eliminate the confusion on the taxonomy of Ganoderma strains, in this study, a collection of 31 accessions representative of morphotypes and some unclassified types was used for analyzing molecular diversity using

Shu-Jing Sun; Wei Gao; Shu-Qian Lin; Jian Zhu; Bao-Gui Xie; Zhi-Bin Lin

2006-01-01

128

Progression of Hair Cell Ejection and Molecular Markers of Apoptosis in the  

E-print Network

Progression of Hair Cell Ejection and Molecular Markers of Apoptosis in the Avian Cochlea following-dependent apoptotic death in inner ear sensory hair cells. The timing of apoptotic signaling in sensory hair cells- nocytochemical techniques to document the following responses in affected hair cells: T-cell restricted

129

Predicting the sites of metastases from lung cancer using molecular biologic markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The use of molecular markers in staging non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been supported in retrospective prognostic models but has not been evaluated in predicting sites of metastases.Methods. Pathologic specimens were collected from 202 patients after complete resection for stage I NSCLC, who were subsequently found to have no metastases at 5 years (n = 108), isolated brain

Thomas A D’Amico; Thomas A Aloia; Mary-Beth H Moore; Debbi H Conlon; James E Herndon; Michael S Kinch; David H Harpole

2001-01-01

130

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, and molecular markers in soils of Switzerland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were analysed in 23 soil samples (0–10 cm layer) from the Swiss soil monitoring network (NABO) together with total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) concentration, as well as some PAH source diagnostic ratios and molecular markers. The concentrations of the sum of 16 EPA priority PAHs ranged from 50 to 619 ?g\\/kg dw. Concentrations

Thomas D. Bucheli; Franziska Blum; André Desaules; Örjan Gustafsson

2004-01-01

131

DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR MARKERS OF RESPONSE TO ASSESS THE SENSITIVITY OF CHILDREN TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Development of Molecular Markers of Response to Assess the Sensitivity of Children to Environmental Chemicals J.Allen, C. Blackman, M. Blaze, D. Delker, D. DeMarini, C. Doerr, R. Grindstaff, S. Hester, C. Jones, A. Kligerman, G. Knapp, M. Kohan, C. Nelson, R. Owen, J. P...

132

Assessing Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) genetic diversity and population structure using RAPD and microsatellite molecular markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Two molecular marker systems, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellites, were used to evaluate population diversity and differentiation in four northern Nevada Bromus tectorum populations. We found 16 RAPD primers that yielded 165 strong repeatable bands. Of those bands, 60 (35.8%...

133

Correlation between molecular markers and adaptively significant genetic variation in Bromus tectorum (Poaceae), an inbreedingannual grass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphic (AFLP) molecular marker genotypes in cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum) were compared to published data on phenotypic variation in seed dormancy, vernalization requirement, and resistance to the pathogen Ustilago bullata. Several features of cheatgrass facilitated this study: it is a recent invader in the western United States, has considerable phenotypic polymorphism, and

A. P. Ramakrishnan; SUSAN E. MEYER; JENNIFER WATERS; MIKEL R. STEVENS; CRAIG E. COLEMAN; DANIEL J. FAIRBANKS

2004-01-01

134

Detecting Molecular Signatures of Life on Mars: the Life Marker Chip (lmc) Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the rise of interest in planetary exploration and the emergence of Astrobiology as a promising field of research have lead to a number of programmes aiming to develop sensitive instruments for the detection of the molecular signatures of life in extreme environments. An antibody assay-based life detection instrument, the Life Marker Chip (LMC), is currently under development

Mariliza Derveni

2010-01-01

135

A molecular marker-based linkage map of diploid bananas ( Musa acuminata )  

Microsoft Academic Search

A partial molecular linkage map of the Musa acuminata diploid genome is presented. This map is based on 58 RFLP, four isozyme and 28 RAPD markers segregating in an F2 population of 92 individuals. A total of 90 loci was detected, 77 of which were placed on 15 linkage groups while 13 segregated independently. Segregation distortions were shown by 36%

S. Fauré; J. L. Noyer; J. P. Horry; F. Bakry; C. Lanaud; D. Go?zalez de León

1993-01-01

136

Development of molecular genetic markers from a cDNA subtraction library of Frosty Pod inoculated cacao  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We have been employing a candidate gene approach to identify molecular markers associated with disease resistance in Theobroma cacao. Candidate genes can be turned into molecular markers using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. As a novel approach to identifying genes associa...

137

Novel molecular, cytotoxical, and immunological study on promising and selective anticancer activity of Mung bean sprouts  

PubMed Central

Background The anticancer and immunomodulatory activity of mung bean sprouts (MBS) and the underlying mechanisms against human cervical and hepatocarcinoma cancer cells were explored. Methods MBS cytotoxicity and MBS-induced anticancer cytokines, TNF-? and IFN-? from cancer cells, and immunological cytokines, IL-4, IFN-?, and IL-10 from peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) were assessed by MTS and ELISA assays. Apoptotic cells were investigated by flow cytometry. The expression level of apoptotic genes (Bax, BCL-2, Capsases 7–9) and cell cycle regulatory genes (cyclin D, E, and A) and tumor suppressor proteins (p27, p21, and p53) was assessed by real-time qPCR in the cancer cells treated with extract IC50. Results The cytotoxicity on normal human cells was significantly different from HeLa and HepG2 cells, 163.97 ± 5.73, 13.3 ± 0.89, and 14.04 ± 1.5 mg/ml, respectively. The selectivity index (SI) was 12.44 ± 0.83 for HeLa and 11.94 ± 1.2 for HepG2 cells. Increased levels of TNF-? and IFN-? were observed in the treated HeLa and HepG2 culture supernatants when compared with untreated cells. MBS extract was shown to be an immunopolarizing agent by inducing IFN? and inhibiting IL-4 production by PBMC; this leads to triggering of CMI and cellular cytotoxicity. The extract induced apoptosis, in a dose and time dependent manner, in treated HeLa and HepG2, but not in untreated, cells (P < 0.05). The treatment significantly induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 in HeLa cells. The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase of the treated HeLa cells increased from 62.87 ± 2.1%, in untreated cells, to 80.48 ± 2.97%. Interestingly, MBS IC50 induced the expression of apoptosis and tumor suppressor related genes in both HeLa and HepG2 cells. MBS extract succeeded in inducing cdk-inhibitors, p21, p53, and p27 in HeLa cells while it induced only p53 in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). This is a clue for the cell type- specific interaction of the studied extract. These proteins inhibit the cyclin-cdk complexes apart from the presence of some other components that might stimulate some cyclins such as cyclin E, A, and D. Conclusion MBS extract was shown to be a potent anticancer agent granting new prospects of anticancer therapy using natural products. PMID:23122182

2012-01-01

138

Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting  

SciTech Connect

The authors propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C{sub 20} isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C{sub 25} homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely {sup 13}C-depleted isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}108 to {minus}115.6% PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. The authors postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}88%) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H{sub 2}. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as cold seep microbialites rather than mere antigenic carbonates.

Thiel, V.; Peckmann, J.; Seifert, R.; Wehrung, P.; Reitner, J.; Michaelis, W.

1999-12-01

139

Transposable elements and two other molecular markers as typing tools for the genus Paracoccidioides.  

PubMed

Studies comparing Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii have shown that these fungi have significant genomic differences that may have implications in the clinical manifestation, diagnosis, and treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis caused by them. Thus, molecular typing methods are required that can distinguish between various species of Paracoccidioides. The aim of this study was to explore the potential use as molecular markers of the transposable elements Trem A-H recently identified and characterized in the genus Paracoccidioides as a means of differentiating the species. We take advantage of the abundance and distribution of these transposons in the Paracoccidioides genomes to develop a simple and highly reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique. Furthermore we compare the performance of this test with two other molecular markers already in use to identify these fungi. PMID:25541559

Alves, Fernanda Lourenço; Ribeiro, Mariceli Araújo; Hahn, Rosane Christine; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva; Marini, Marjorie Mendes

2015-02-01

140

Molecular markers of influenza B lineages and clades.  

PubMed

Co-circulation of two influenza B virus lineages, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, has been recognized since the late 1980s. The assessment of the prevalent lineage and the group of viruses in circulation is of importance in order to decide on the vaccine composition and evaluate its efficacy. The molecular characterization of influenza B viruses in circulation has been the aim of this study; this was approached by identifying and locating nucleotide substitutions in the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), specific for the lineage and/or clade. By the alignment of 3456 sequences from the influenza GISAID EpiFlu database, a high number of lineage- and group-specific nucleotide positions have been observed in the HA gene, but not in the NA gene. Additionally, an RT-PCR method has been developed, applicable directly to clinical specimens, which amplifies a short HA region that includes a group of unique molecular signatures. Twenty eight influenza B virus-positive respiratory specimens, collected in Tuscany in the seasons 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, were analyzed. The results revealed two clearly distinguishable patterns: one, more frequent, was characterized by all of the nucleotide changes associated with the B/Yamagata lineage (in most cases of Group 2), whereas the other exhibited all of the changes associated with the B/Victoria lineage. It can be concluded that the analysis of this short HA sequence can permit a rapid, highly sensitive determination of influenza B virus lineages and clades. PMID:25412364

Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Pierucci, Federica; Azzi, Alberta

2014-11-01

141

Molecular Markers of Influenza B Lineages and Clades  

PubMed Central

Co-circulation of two influenza B virus lineages, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, has been recognized since the late 1980s. The assessment of the prevalent lineage and the group of viruses in circulation is of importance in order to decide on the vaccine composition and evaluate its efficacy. The molecular characterization of influenza B viruses in circulation has been the aim of this study; this was approached by identifying and locating nucleotide substitutions in the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), specific for the lineage and/or clade. By the alignment of 3456 sequences from the influenza GISAID EpiFlu database, a high number of lineage- and group-specific nucleotide positions have been observed in the HA gene, but not in the NA gene. Additionally, an RT-PCR method has been developed, applicable directly to clinical specimens, which amplifies a short HA region that includes a group of unique molecular signatures. Twenty eight influenza B virus-positive respiratory specimens, collected in Tuscany in the seasons 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, were analyzed. The results revealed two clearly distinguishable patterns: one, more frequent, was characterized by all of the nucleotide changes associated with the B/Yamagata lineage (in most cases of Group 2), whereas the other exhibited all of the changes associated with the B/Victoria lineage. It can be concluded that the analysis of this short HA sequence can permit a rapid, highly sensitive determination of influenza B virus lineages and clades. PMID:25412364

Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Pierucci, Federica; Azzi, Alberta

2014-01-01

142

Identification of molecular markers associated with mite resistance in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).  

PubMed

Coconut mite (Aceria guerreronis 'Keifer') has become a major threat to Indian coconut (Coçcos nucifera L.) cultivators and the processing industry. Chemical and biological control measures have proved to be costly, ineffective, and ecologically undesirable. Planting mite-resistant coconut cultivars is the most effective method of preventing yield loss and should form a major component of any integrated pest management stratagem. Coconut genotypes, and mite-resistant and -susceptible accessions were collected from different parts of South India. Thirty-two simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 7 RAPD primers were used for molecular analyses. In single-marker analysis, 9 SSR and 4 RAPD markers associated with mite resistance were identified. In stepwise multiple regression analysis of SSRs, a combination of 6 markers showed 100% association with mite infestation. Stepwise multiple regression analysis for RAPD data revealed that a combination of 3 markers accounted for 83.86% of mite resistance in the selected materials. Combined stepwise multiple regression analysis of RAPD and SSR data showed that a combination of 5 markers explained 100% of the association with mite resistance in coconut. Markers associated with mite resistance are important in coconut breeding programs and will facilitate the selection of mite-resistant plants at an early stage as well as mother plants for breeding programs. PMID:17546069

Shalini, K V; Manjunatha, S; Lebrun, P; Berger, A; Baudouin, L; Pirany, N; Ranganath, R M; Prasad, D Theertha

2007-01-01

143

Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

1997-01-01

144

Prognostic Histopathological and Molecular Markers on Prostate Cancer Needle-Biopsies: A Review  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer is diverse in clinical presentation, histopathological tumor growth patterns, and survival. Therefore, individual assessment of a tumor's aggressive potential is crucial for clinical decision-making in men with prostate cancer. To date a large number of prognostic markers for prostate cancer have been described, most of them based on radical prostatectomy specimens. However, in order to affect clinical decision-making, validation of respective markers in pretreatment diagnostic needle-biopsies is essential. Here, we discuss established and promising histopathological and molecular parameters in diagnostic needle-biopsies. PMID:25243131

Hoogland, A. Marije; Kweldam, Charlotte F.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.

2014-01-01

145

Molecular phylogeny of elasmobranchs inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear markers.  

PubMed

The elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) being the extant survivors of one of the earliest offshoots of the vertebrate evolutionary tree are good model organisms to study the primitive vertebrate conditions. They play a significant role in maintaining the ecological balance and have high economic value. Due to over-exploitation and illegal fishing worldwide, the elasmobranch stocks are being decimated at an alarming rate. Appropriate management measures are necessary for restoring depleted elasmobranch stocks. One approach for restoring stocks is implementation of conservation measures and these measures can be formulated effectively by knowing the evolutionary relationship among the elasmobranchs. In this study, a total of 30 species were chosen for molecular phylogeny studies using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 12S ribosomal RNA gene and nuclear Internal Transcribed Spacer 2. Among different genes, the combined dataset of COI and 12S rRNA resulted in a well resolved tree topology with significant bootstrap/posterior probabilities values. The results supported the reciprocal monophyly of sharks and batoids. Within Galeomorphii, Heterodontiformes (bullhead sharks) formed as a sister group to Lamniformes (mackerel sharks): Orectolobiformes (carpet sharks) and to Carcharhiniformes (ground sharks). Within batoids, the Myliobatiformes formed a monophyly group while Pristiformes (sawfishes) and Rhinobatiformes (guitar fishes) formed a sister group to all other batoids. PMID:24293104

Pavan-Kumar, A; Gireesh-Babu, P; Babu, P P Suresh; Jaiswar, A K; Hari Krishna, V; Prasasd, K Pani; Chaudhari, Aparna; Raje, S G; Chakraborty, S K; Krishna, Gopal; Lakra, W S

2014-01-01

146

Candidate markers for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in low-molecular weight fraction of serum  

PubMed Central

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents an important public health problem in Egypt where up to 90% of HCC cases are attributable to hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection. Serum alpha-fetoprotein is elevated in only ~60% of HCC patients. The development of effective markers for the detection of HCC could have an impact on cancer mortality and significant public health implications worldwide. The objective of our study was to assess six candidate markers for detection of HCC identified by mass spectrometric analysis of enriched serum. The study examined 78 HCC cases and 72 age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls recruited from the Egyptian population. Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of enriched low-molecular weight fraction of serum was used for identification of the candidate markers. Our analyses show that all six candidate markers are associated with HCC after adjustment for important covariates including HCV and hepatitis B viral infections. The marker candidates are independently predictive of HCC with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (AuROC) curve ranging from 63–93%. A combination of the six markers improves prediction accuracy to 100% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 98% AuROC curve in an independent test set of 50 patients. Two of the candidate markers were identified by sequencing as fragments of complement C3 and C4. In conclusion, a set of six peptides distinguished with high prediction accuracy HCC from controls in an Egyptian population with a high rate of chronic HCV infection. Further evaluation of these marker candidates for the diagnosis of HCC is needed. PMID:17724376

Goldman, Radoslav; Ressom, Habtom W.; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Goldman, Lenka; Wang, Antai; Varghese, Rency S.; An, Yanming; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Drake, Steven K.; Eissa, Sohair A.; Gouda, Iman; Ezzat, Sameera; Moiseiwitsch, Francoise Seillier

2008-01-01

147

NCI-CCI Immunology Branch: Cell & Molecular Biology Section - Yonghzi Karen Cui MD, Ph.D, Biologist  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content CCR Home | About CCR | CCR Intranet Main Navigation Referrals For Patients For Physicians For Prospective Trainees For Scientists News Quick Links Home Referring a Patient Patients and Families Scientific Programs - Immunology Section

148

Transferability of molecular markers from major legumes to Lathyrus spp. for their application in mapping and diversity studies.  

PubMed

Lathyrus cicera L. (chickling pea) and L. sativus L. (grass pea) have great potential among grain legumes due to their adaptability to inauspicious environments, high protein content and resistance to serious diseases. Nevertheless, due to its past underused, further activities are required to exploit this potential and to capitalise on the advances in molecular biology that enable improved Lathyrus spp. breeding programmes. In this study we evaluated the transferability of molecular markers developed for closely related legume species to Lathyrus spp. (Medicago truncatula, pea, lentil, faba bean and lupin) and tested the application of those new molecular tools on Lathyrus mapping and diversity studies. Genomic and expressed sequence tag microsatellite, intron-targeted amplified polymorphic, resistance gene analogue and defence-related gene markers were tested. In total 128 (27.7 %) and 132 (28.6 %) molecular markers were successfully cross-amplified, respectively in L. cicera and L. sativus. In total, the efficiency of transferability from genomic microsatellites was 5 %, and from gene-based markers, 55 %. For L. cicera, three cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers and one derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence marker based on the cross-amplified markers were also developed. Nine of those molecular markers were suitable for mapping in a L. cicera recombinant inbred line population. From the 17 molecular markers tested for diversity analysis, six (35 %) in L. cicera and seven (41 %) in L. sativus were polymorphic and discriminate well all the L. sativus accessions. Additionally, L. cicera accessions were clearly distinguished from L. sativus accessions. This work revealed a high number of transferable molecular markers to be used in current genomic studies in Lathyrus spp. Although their usefulness was higher on diversity studies, they represent the first steps for future comparative mapping involving these species. PMID:24203465

Almeida, Nuno Felipe; Trindade Leitão, Susana; Caminero, Constantino; Torres, Ana Maria; Rubiales, Diego; Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota

2014-01-01

149

Extracellular space determination in rat small intestine by using markers of different molecular weights.  

PubMed

The apparent extracellular space (ECS) of rat jejunum, everted and cannulated "in vitro", has been measured by using extracellular markers of different molecular weights. The markers used were two polyethyleneglycols, 14C and 3H labelled (14C-PEG MW 4000 and 3H-PEG MW 900) and 3H-sucrose. The ECSs for the mucosal and serosal sides have been separately determined throughout the time course, and it has been found that the two spaces are identical when PEG 4000 was used but the serosal ECS is almost the double when using PEG 900. The serosal ECS determined with sucrose is four times as big as the mucosal ECS. It seems reasonable to conclude that the best marker for the measure of total apparent ECS is sucrose, placed in the serosal compartment, taking into account that the mucosal ECS is four times smaller than the serosal one. All the markers used reach equilibrium with ECS, more rapidly in the mucosal than in the serosal ECS. Finally, by comparing cell water and cell Na concentrations, one observes that there is a statistical difference between the results obtained by using PEG 4000 as an extracellular marker and those obtained with sucrose. PMID:574940

Esposito, G; Faelli, A; Tosco, M; Burlini, N; Capraro, V

1979-10-01

150

Forensic soil DNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing: a comparison of four molecular markers.  

PubMed

Soil analysis, such as mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour, are commonly used in forensic casework to link a suspect to a crime scene. However, DNA analysis can also be applied to characterise the vast diversity of organisms present in soils. DNA metabarcoding and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) now offer a means to improve discrimination between forensic soil samples by identifying individual taxa and exploring non-culturable microbial species. Here, we compare the small-scale reproducibility and resolution of four molecular markers targeting different taxa (bacterial 16S rRNA, eukaryotic18S rRNA, plant trnL intron and fungal internal transcribed spacer I (ITS1) rDNA) to distinguish two sample sites. We also assess the background DNA level associated with each marker and examine the effects of filtering Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) detected in extraction blank controls. From this study, we show that non-bacterial taxa in soil, particularly fungi, can provide the greatest resolution between the sites, whereas plant markers may be problematic for forensic discrimination. ITS and 18S markers exhibit reliable amplification, and both show high discriminatory power with low background DNA levels. The 16S rRNA marker showed comparable discriminatory power post filtering; however, presented the highest level of background DNA. The discriminatory power of all markers was increased by applying OTU filtering steps, with the greatest improvement observed by the removal of any sequences detected in extraction blanks. This study demonstrates the potential use of multiple DNA markers for forensic soil analysis using HTS, and identifies some of the standardisation and evaluation steps necessary before this technique can be applied in casework. PMID:25151602

Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

2014-11-01

151

Multilocus microsatellite signature and identification of specific molecular markers for Leishmania aethiopica  

PubMed Central

Background Leishmaniasis is a clinically and epidemiologically diverse zoonotic disease caused by obligatory, intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is the most widely distributed form of the disease characterized by skin lesions. Leishmania aethiopica is considered the predominant etiological agent in Ethiopia. The current study was aimed at developing multilocus microsatellite markers for L. aethiopica isolated from human cutaneous leishmaniasis patients in Ethiopia. Results L. aethiopica parasites for the study were obtained from Ethiopia and laboratory analysis was conducted at The Ohio State University. DNA was extracted from cultured parasites and an internal transcribed spacer located at the ribosomal region of L. aethiopica genomic DNA was PCR amplified for species identification. Microsatellite markers were identified using multilocus microsatellite typing. We generated an enriched genomic library, and using Primer3 software, designed PCR primers to amplify sequences flanking the detected microsatellites. Subsequent screening of the amplified markers for length variations was performed by gel electrophoresis. Using a variety of molecular methods, 22 different microsatellite markers were identified and tested for typing L. aethiopica strains using a number of clinical isolates. Of the 22 markers tested, 5 were polymorphic and showed distinctive multilocus genotypes, classifying them into four clusters. One marker was found to be specific for L. aethiopica, discriminating it from other species of Leishmania. Conclusion Multilocus microsatellite typing using the markers developed in this study could be useful for epidemiological and population genetic studies of strains of L. aethiopica in order to investigate the structure and dynamics of the corresponding natural foci. It could also help to answer specific clinical questions, such as the occurrence of local and diffuse lesions, strain correlates of parasite persistence after subclinical infection and lesion comparisons from patients suffering from L. aethiopica infections. PMID:23734874

2013-01-01

152

Gemcitabine chemoresistance and molecular markers associated with gemcitabine transport and metabolism in human pancreatic cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify predictive molecular markers for gemcitabine resistance, we investigated changes in the expression of four genes associated with gemcitabine transport and metabolism during the development of acquired gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The expression levels of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), RRM1, and RRM2 mRNA were analysed by real-time light cycler-PCR in various subclones

Y Nakano; S Tanno; K Koizumi; T Nishikawa; K Nakamura; M Minoguchi; T Izawa; Y Mizukami; T Okumura; Y Kohgo

2007-01-01

153

Genetic analysis of apomixis in Citrus and Poncirus by molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Propagation of citrus rootstocks depends upon the production of clonal plants from nucellar seedlings. This makes apomixis\\u000a one of the host important traits in breeding programs for citrus rootstocks. The genetic control of apomixis was studied in\\u000a a 50-tree progeny derived from the cross C. volkameriana?P. trifoliata using 69 molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis. The proportion of nucellar seedlings

R. García; M. J. Asíns; J. Forner; E. A. Carbonell

1999-01-01

154

Analysis of molecular marker expression reveals neuronal homology in distantly related arthropods.  

PubMed

Morphological studies suggest that insects and crustaceans of the Class Malacostraca (such as crayfish) share a set of homologous neurons. However, expression of molecular markers in these neurons has not been investigated, and the homology of insect and malacostracan neuroblasts, the neural stem cells that produce these neurons, has been questioned. Furthermore, it is not known whether crustaceans of the Class Branchiopoda (such as brine shrimp) or arthropods of the Order Collembola (springtails) possess neurons that are homologous to those of other arthropods. Assaying expression of molecular markers in the developing nervous systems of various arthropods could resolve some of these issues. Here, we examine expression of Even-skipped and Engrailed, two transcription factors that serve as insect embryonic CNS markers, across a number of arthropod species. This molecular analysis allows us to verify the homology of previously identified malacostracan neurons and to identify additional homologous neurons in malacostracans, collembolans and branchiopods. Engrailed expression in the neural stem cells of a number of crustaceans was also found to be conserved. We conclude that despite their distant phylogenetic relationships and divergent mechanisms of neurogenesis, insects, malacostracans, branchiopods and collembolans share many common CNS components. PMID:10225992

Duman-Scheel, M; Patel, N H

1999-06-01

155

Molecular markers in ambient aerosol in the Mahanadi Riverside Basin of eastern central India during winter.  

PubMed

Organic molecular markers are important atmospheric constituents. Their formation and sources are important aspects of the study of urban and rural air quality. We collected PM10 aerosol samples from the Mahanadi Riverside Basin (MRB), a rural part of eastern central India, during the winter of 2011. PM10 aerosols were characterized for molecular markers using ion chromatography. The concentration of PM10 ranged from 208.8 to 588.3 ?g m(-3) with a mean concentration of 388.9 ?g m(-3). Total concentration of anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, primary sugars, and oxalate were found to be 3.25, 5.60, 10.52, and 0.37 ?g m(-3), respectively, during the study period. Glucose was the most abundant species followed by levoglucosan and mannitol. Significant positive correlation between the molecular markers, anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, primary sugars, and oxalic acid confirmed that biomass burning, biogenic activity, and re-suspension of soil particles were the main sources of aerosol in the eastern central India study area. PMID:25131681

Nirmalkar, Jayant; Deb, Manas K; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Tsai, Ying I; Verma, Santosh K

2015-01-01

156

Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update  

PubMed Central

Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

2014-01-01

157

Molecular marker-based characterization in candidate plus trees of Pongamia pinnata, a potential biodiesel legume  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Pongamia pinnata, a legume tree, has many traditional uses and is a potential biodiesel plant. Despite its importance and the availability of appropriate molecular genetic tools, the full potential of Pongamia is yet to be realized. The objective of this study was to assess genetic diversity among 10 systematically characterized candidate plus trees (CPTs) of P. pinnata from North Guwahati. Methodology The application and informativeness of polymerase chain reaction-based molecular markers [random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)] to assess the genetic variability and relatedness among 10 CPTs of P. pinnata were investigated. Principal results Polymorphism rates of 10.48, 10.08 and 100 % were achieved using 18 RAPD, 12 ISSR and 4 AFLP primer combinations, respectively. Polymorphic information content (PIC) varied in the range 0.33–0.49, 0.18–0.49 and 0.26–0.34 for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers, respectively, whereas the corresponding average marker index (MI) values for the above markers were 7.48, 6.69 and 30.75. Based on Nei's gene diversity and Shannon's information index, inter-population diversity (hsp) was highest when compared with intra-population diversity (hpop) and the gene flow (Nm) ranged from a moderate value of 0.607 to a high value of 6.287 for the three DNA markers. Clustering of individuals was not similar when RAPD- and ISSR-derived dendrogram analyses were compared with that of AFLP. The Mantel test cophenetic correlation coefficient was higher for AFLP (r = 0.98) than for ISSR (r = 0.73) and RAPD (r = 0.84). Molecular markers discriminated the individuals efficiently and generated a high similarity in dendrogram topologies derived using unweighted pair-group arithmetic average, although some differences were observed. The three-dimensional scaling by principal coordinate analysis supported the result of clustering. Conclusions Comparing the results obtained with the three DNA markers, AFLP indicated higher efficiency for estimating the levels of genetic diversity and proved to be reliable for fingerprinting, mapping and diversity studies in Pongamia in view of their suitability for energy production purposes. PMID:22476075

Kesari, Vigya; Madurai Sathyanarayana, Vinod; Parida, Ajay; Rangan, Latha

2010-01-01

158

Molecular markers linked to the blast resistance gene pi-z in oryza sativa for use in marker assisted selection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We have identified DNA markers that cosegregate with the blast resistance gene Pi-z using microsatellite markers found in public databases and degenerate primer pairs based on the P-loop, nucleotide binding site and kinase domain motifs of previously cloned resistance genes. These markers are ploym...

159

Evaluation of Pakistan wheat germplasms for stripe rust resistance using molecular markers.  

PubMed

Wheat production in Pakistan is seriously constrained due to rust diseases and stripe rust (yellow) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, which could limit yields. Thus development and cultivation of genetically diverse and resistant varieties is the most sustainable solution to overcome these diseases. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars that have been grown over the past 60 years. These cultivars were inoculated at the seedling stage with two virulent stripe rust isolates from the United States and two from Pakistan. None of the wheat cultivars were resistant to all tested stripe rust isolates, and 16% of cultivars were susceptible to the four isolates at the seedling stage. The data indicated that none of the Pakistan wheat cultivars contained either Yr5 or Yr15 genes that were considered to be effective against most P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from around the world. Several Pakistan wheat cultivars may have gene Yr10, which is effective against isolate PST-127 but ineffective against PST-116. It is also possible that these cultivars may have other previously unidentified genes or gene combinations. The second objective was to evaluate the 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars for stripe rust resistance during natural epidemics in Pakistan and Washington State, USA. It was found that a higher frequency of resistance was present under field conditions compared with greenhouse conditions. Thirty genotypes (30% of germplasms) were found to have a potentially high temperature adult plant (HTAP) resistance. The third objective was to determine the genetic diversity in Pakistan wheat germplasms using molecular markers. This study was based on DNA fingerprinting using resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) marker analysis. The highest polymorphism detected with RGAP primer pairs was 40%, 50% and 57% with a mean polymorphism of 36%. A total of 22 RGAP markers were obtained in this study. RGAP, simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers were used to determine the presence and absence of some important stripe rust resistance genes, such as Yr5, Yr8, Yr9, Yr15 and Yr18. Of the 60 cultivars analyzed, 17% of cultivars showed a RGAP marker band for Yr9 and 12% of cultivars exhibited the Yr18 marker band. No marker band was detected for Yr5, Yr8 and Yr15, indicating a likely absence of these genes in the tested Pakistan wheat cultivars. Cluster analysis based on molecular and stripe rust reaction data is useful in identifying considerable genetic diversity among Pakistan wheat cultivars. The resistant germplasms identified with 22 RGAP markers and from the resistance evaluations should be useful in developing new wheat cultivars with stripe rust resistance. PMID:21104373

Sobia, Tabassum; Muhammad, Ashraf; Chen, XianMing

2010-09-01

160

Molecular markers, genetic maps, and QTLs for peanut molecular breeding in peanut  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Integration of plant breeding, genetics and genomics promises to foster genetic enhancement leading to increased productivity, oil quality and resistance/tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances have resulted in the development of genomic resources such as SSR markers, and genetic m...

161

TRACKING FECAL CONTAMINATION WITH BACTEROIDALES MOLECULAR MARKERS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF FECAL CONTAMINATION IN THE TILLAMOOK BASIN, OREGON  

EPA Science Inventory

Although amplification of source-specific molecular markers from Bacteroidales fecal bacteria can identify several different kinds of fecal contamination in water, it remains unclear how this technique relates to fecal indicator measurements in natural waters. The objectives of t...

162

Trend of different molecular markers in the last decades for studying human migrations.  

PubMed

Anatomically modern humans are known to have widely migrated throughout history. Different scientific evidences suggest that the entire human population descended from just several thousand African migrants. About 85,000 years ago, the first wave of human migration was out of Africa, that followed the coasts through the Middle East, into Southern Asia via Sri Lanka, and in due course around Indonesia and into Australia. Another wave of migration between 40,000 and 12,000 years ago brought humans northward into Europe. However, the frozen north limited human expansion in Europe, and created a land bridge, "Bering land bridge", connecting Asia with North America about 25,000 years ago. Although fossil data give the most direct information about our past, it has certain anomalies. So, molecular archeologists are now using different molecular markers to trace the "most recent common ancestor" and also the migration pattern of modern humans. In this study, we have studied the trend of molecular markers and also the methodologies implemented in the last decades (2003-2014). From our observation, we can say that D-loop region of mtDNA and Y chromosome based markers are predominant. Nevertheless, mtDNA, especially the D-loop region, has some unique features, which makes it a more effective marker for tracing prehistoric footprints of modern human populations. Although, natural selection should also be taken into account in studying mtDNA based human migration. As per technology is concerned, Sanger sequencing is the major technique that is being used in almost all studies. But, the emergence of different cost-effective-and-easy-to-handle NGS platforms has increased its popularity over Sanger sequencing in studying human migration. PMID:25510397

Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

2015-02-10

163

Predictive Gene Signatures: Molecular Markers Distinguishing Colon Adenomatous Polyp and Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2), proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12), differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2), apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1), fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1), structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES), gene transcription (HDAC1), stem cell (LGR5), endothelial (VWF) and mucin production (MUC2). Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material. PMID:25423035

Drew, Janice E.; Farquharson, Andrew J.; Mayer, Claus Dieter; Vase, Hollie F.; Coates, Philip J.; Steele, Robert J.; Carey, Francis A.

2014-01-01

164

For More Information: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/divprograms/immunology/  

E-print Network

For More Information: http://dbbs.wustl.edu/divprograms/immunology/ To request information: dbbs-info@wustl.edu what is immunology? Immunology is the study of the immune system in health and disease, including. Immunology has a strong foundation in biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Washington University

Stormo, Gary

165

Isolation, purification, and immunological activities of a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide from the Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes).  

PubMed

To obtain a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immuno-enhancing activity, hot water extract of Ganoderma lucidum fruit bodies was separated by membrane ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography, and the immunological activities of fractions were assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. A novel polysaccharide (TB3-2-2) was successfully isolated and purified. TB3-2-2 is a homogeneous polysaccharide, with a relative molecular weight of 5.11 × 103 Da, identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and was composed of galactose and glucose in a molar ratio of 2:3 determined by high-performance anion exchange chromatography. TB3-2-2 had a carbohydrate content of 99%, as measured using the phenol-sulfuric acid method. Proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes and the expression level of interleukin-6 was significantly increased by TB3-2-2. Results indicate that the low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immunological activity in G. lucidum is worthy of further research and development. PMID:23796222

Zhu, Lina; Luo, Xi; Tang, Qingjiu; Liu, Yanfang; Zhou, Shuai; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Jingsong

2013-01-01

166

Immunological detection of small organic molecules in the presence of perchlorates: relevance to the life marker chip and life detection on Mars.  

PubMed

The proposed ExoMars mission, due to launch in 2018, aims to look for evidence of extant and extinct life in martian rocks and regolith. Previous attempts to detect organic molecules of biological or abiotic origin on Mars have been unsuccessful, which may be attributable to destruction of these molecules by perchlorate salts during pyrolysis sample extraction techniques. Organic molecules can also be extracted and measured with solvent-based systems. The ExoMars payload includes the Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument, capable of detecting biomarker molecules of extant and extinct Earth-like life in liquid extracts of martian samples with an antibody microarray assay. The aim of the work reported here was to investigate whether the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those at the NASA Phoenix landing site, would compromise the LMC extraction and detection method. To test this, we implemented an LMC-representative sample extraction process with an LMC-representative antibody assay and used these to extract and analyze a model sample that consisted of a Mars analog sample matrix (JSC Mars-1) spiked with a representative organic molecular target (pyrene, an example of abiotic meteoritic infall targets) in the presence of perchlorate salts. We found no significant change in immunoassay function when using pyrene standards with added perchlorate salts. When model samples spiked with perchlorate salts were subjected to an LMC-representative liquid extraction, immunoassays functioned in a liquid extract and detected extracted pyrene. For the same model sample matrix without perchlorate salts, we observed anomalous assay signals that coincided with yellow coloration of the extracts. This unexpected observation is being studied further. This initial study indicates that the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those detected at the NASA Phoenix landing site, is unlikely to prevent the LMC from extracting and detecting organic molecules from martian samples. PMID:22011057

Rix, Catherine S; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

2011-11-01

167

Evaluation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products as water-soluble molecular markers of sewage.  

PubMed

We examined the utility of 13 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as molecular markers of sewage contamination in riverine, groundwater, and coastal environments. The PPCPs were crotamiton, ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, fenoprofen, mefenamic acid, thymol, triclosan, propyphenazone, carbamazepine, diethyltoluamide, ethenzamide, and caffeine. Measurements in 37 Japanese rivers showed positive correlations of riverine flux of crotamiton (r2 = 0.85), carbamazepine (r2 = 0.84), ibuprofen (r2 = 0.73), and mefenamic acid (r2 = 0.67) with the population in the catchments. In three surveys in the Tamagawa estuary, crotamiton, carbamazepine, and mefenamic acid behaved conservatively across seasons within a salinity range of 0.4-29 per thousand, suggesting their utility as molecular markers in coastal environments. Removal of ketoprofen and naproxen in the estuary was ascribed to photodegradation. Ibuprofen and thymol were removed from estuarine waters in summer by microbial degradation. Triclosan was removed by a combination of microbial degradation, photodegradation, and adsorption. These results were consistent with those of river water incubated for 8 d at 25 degrees C in the dark in order to examine the effects of biodegradation and photodegradation. Crotamiton was detected in groundwater from the Tokyo metropolitan area (12 out of 14 samples), suggesting wastewater leakage from decrepit sewers. Carbamazepine, ketoprofen, and ibuprofen (5/14), caffeine (4/14), and diethyltoluamide (3/14) were also detected in the groundwater, whereas the other carboxylic and phenolic PPCPs were not detected and were thought to be removed during their passage through soil. All the data demonstrated the utility of crotamiton and carbamazepine as conservative markers in freshwater and coastal environments. We recommend combining these conservative markers with labile PPCPs to detect inputs of poorly treated sewage. PMID:18800500

Nakada, Norihide; Kiri, Kentaro; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Harada, Arata; Kuroda, Keisuke; Takizawa, Satoshi; Takada, Hideshige

2008-09-01

168

Determination of specific molecular markers of biomass burning in lake sediments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fire influences regional to global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Molecular markers of biomass burning archived in lake sediments are becoming increasingly important in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and may help determine interactions between climate and fire activity. One group of these molecular markers is the monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan. Several aerosol studies and recent ice core research use these compounds as a marker for biomass burning, but studies from lake sediment cores are rare. Previous sediment methods used gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and required derivatization of samples. Here, we present a high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry method to allow separation and detection of the three monosaccharide anhydrides in lake sediments with implications for reconstructing past biomass burning events. We validated the method by quantifying levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in selected sediment core samples from Lake Kirkpatrick, New Zealand. The freeze-dried, milled and homogenized sediment samples were first extracted with methanol by pressurized solvent extraction, pre-concentrated and finally separated and analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry. We compared these isomers with macroscopic charcoal concentrations, as charcoal is a well-known proxy for biomass burning. In addition, we applied the method to a sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala to prove the suitability of these markers for reconstructing biomass burning history over the entire Holocene. In the Lake Kirkpatrick samples, levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan concentrations significantly correlate with macroscopic charcoal concentrations. The three isomers are present in samples without any macroscopic charcoal, and may reflect the presence of microscopic charcoal. Levoglucosan/mannosan and levoglucosan/(mannosan+galactosan) ratios differ between samples with high macroscopic charcoal concentrations and samples without any charcoal. These ratios may help determine not only when fires occurred, but also past changes in the primary burned vegetation. However, the possibility that these isomer ratios help differentiate changes in burned vegetation needs further evaluation. The preliminary results of the Lake Petén Itzá samples demonstrate the occurrence of all three molecular markers in the entire core, covering the past approximately 10,000 years. The three monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan may be an additional tool for reconstructing past fire events over decadal to millennial time scales in sediment cores.

Kirchgeorg, Torben; Schüpbach, Simon; Kehrwald, Natalie; McWethy, David; Barbante, Carlo

2014-05-01

169

Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients.

Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Jeong [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koom, Woong Sub [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoguen [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam-Kyu [Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Bae [Department of Medical Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keum, Ki Chang, E-mail: kckeum@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-01

170

Mitochondrial Telomeres as Molecular Markers for Identification of the Opportunistic Yeast Pathogen Candida parapsilosis  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have demonstrated that a large number of organisms carry linear mitochondrial DNA molecules possessing specialized telomeric structures at their ends. Based on this specific structural feature of linear mitochondrial genomes, we have developed an approach for identification of the opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida parapsilosis. The strategy for identification of C. parapsilosis strains is based on PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial telomere region. This assay is complemented by immunodetection of a protein component of mitochondrial telomeres. The results demonstrate that mitochondrial telomeres represent specific molecular markers with potential applications in yeast diagnostics and taxonomy. PMID:11923346

Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír; Ry?ovská, Adriana; Fukuhara, Hiroshi

2002-01-01

171

Molecular markers to predict clinical outcome and radiation induced toxicity in lung cancer  

PubMed Central

The elucidation of driver mutations involved in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has led to a surge in the application of novel targeted therapeutics in lung cancer. Novel oncologic research continues to lead investigators towards targeting personalized tumor characteristics rather than applying targeted therapy to broad patient populations. Several driver genes, in particular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ALK fusions, are the earliest to have made their way into clinical trials. The avant-garde role of genomic profiling has led to important clinical challenges when adapting current standard treatments to personalized oncologic care. This new frontier of medicine requires newer biomarkers for toxicity that will identify patients at risk, as well as, new molecular markers to predict and assess clinical outcomes. Thus far, several signature genes have been developed to predict outcome as well as genetic factors related to inflammation to predict toxicity. PMID:24688783

Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Witek, Matthew; Lu, Bo

2014-01-01

172

Molecular Markers for Prostate Cancer in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer in developed countries. The decisive method of diagnosis is based on the results of biopsies, morphologically evaluated to determine the presence or absence of cancer. Although this approach leads to a confident diagnosis in most cases, it can be improved by using the molecular markers present in the tissue. Both miRNAs and proteins are considered excellent candidates for biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, due to their stability over long periods of time. In the last few years, a concerted effort has been made to develop the necessary tools for their reliable measurement in these types of samples. Furthermore, the use of these kinds of markers may also help in establishing tumor grade and aggressiveness, as well as predicting the possible outcomes in each particular case for the different treatments available. This would aid clinicians in the decision-making process. In this review, we attempt to summarize and discuss the potential use of microRNA and protein profiles in FFPE tissue samples as markers to better predict PCa diagnosis, progression, and response to therapy. PMID:24371818

García, Marta; Montes, Melania; Oliván, Mireia; Rigau, Marina; Colás, Eva; de Torres, Inés; Morote, Juan; Reventós, Jaume

2013-01-01

173

Molecular characterization of Anthurium genotypes by using DNA fingerprinting and SPAR markers.  

PubMed

We characterized single primer amplification reaction (SPAR) molecular markers from 20 genotypes of Anthurium andraeanum Lind., including 3 from commercial varieties and 17 from 2 communities in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Twenty-four SPAR, consisting of 7 random amplified polymorphic DNA and 17 inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to estimate the genetic diversity of 20 Anthurium accessions. The set of SPAR markers generated 288 bands and showed an average polymorphism percentage of 93.39%, ranging from 71.43 to 100%. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of the random amplified polymorphic DNA primers averaged 0.364 and ranged from 0.258 to 0.490. Primer OPF 06 showed the lowest PIC, while OPAM 14 was the highest. The average PIC of the inter-simple sequence repeat primers was 0.299, with values ranging from 0.196 to 0.401. Primer UBC 845 had the lowest PIC (0.196), while primer UCB 810 had the highest (0.401). By using the complement of Jaccard's similarity index and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering, 5 clusters were formed with a cophenetic correlation coefficient of 0.8093, indicating an acceptable clustering consistency. However, no genotype clustering patterns agreed with the morphological data. The Anthurium genotypes investigated in this study are a germplasm source for conservational research and may be used in improvement programs for this species. PMID:25062412

Souza Neto, J D; Soares, T C B; Motta, L B; Cabral, P D S; Silva, J A

2014-01-01

174

Fruit plant germplasm characterisation using molecular markers generated in RAPD and ISSR-PCR.  

PubMed

The genotypes of the strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa), apple (Malus domestica) and Ribes species (R. nigrum, R. rubrum and R. glossularia), maintained in our Institute's collection and used in breeding programs, were screened for DNA markers. Twenty primers for RAPD (among 60 tested) and seven for ISSR (among 10 tested) were chosen as creating polymorphic DNA bands differentiating the investigated genotypes. Based on those identity markers, the genetic distance between genotypes was determined, and their relatedness was estimated. In many cases, both RAPD- and ISSR-based genetic similarity confirmed relatedness connected with biological origin and with the place where the cultivar was developed. However, some diversity connected with the technique used for molecular marker generation was observed. Generally, the similarity values based on ISSR data were higher than those based on RAPD. Parallel study using two data sets seems to enable a reduction in the number of potential mistakes connected with each method's, technical limitations and ensures more precise relatedness determination. PMID:12378239

Korbin, Ma?gorzata; Kuras, Anita; Zurawicz, Edward

2002-01-01

175

Delimitation of Russula Subgenus Amoenula in Korea Using Three Molecular Markers  

PubMed Central

Distinguishing individual Russula species has been difficult due to extensive phenotypic plasticity and obscure morphological and anatomical discontinuities. Due to highly similar macroscopic features, such as the presence of a red-cap, species identification within the Russula subgenus Amoenula is particularly difficult. Three species of the subgenus Amoneula have been reported in Korea. We used a combination of morphology and three molecular markers, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 28S nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU), and RNA polymerase II gene (RPB2), for identification and study of the genetic diversity of Russula subgenus Amoenula in Korea. We identified only two species in Korea (R. mariae and R. violeipes); these two species were indistinguishable according to morphology and LSU, but were found to be reciprocally monophyletic species using ITS and RPB2. The markers, ITS, LSU, and RPB2, have been tested in the past for use as DNA barcoding markers, and findings of our study suggest that ITS and RPB2 had the best performance for the Russula subgenus Amoneula. PMID:24493939

Park, Myung Soo; Fong, Jonathan J.; Lee, Hyun; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Jung, Paul Eunil; Min, Young Ju; Seok, Soon Ja

2013-01-01

176

Molecular markers in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: towards an integrated clinicobiological approach.  

PubMed

Of the most frequent malignancies in the United States, cancers of the larynx and of the uterine corpus are the only ones not to show an increase in 5-year survival rates over the last 30 years. The increasing use of chemo- and radiotherapy and conservative surgery to preserve organs and their functions has probably led to a better quality of life in patients with laryngeal cancer, but has definitely failed to improve survival, which remains the primary aim. In our opinion, to reduce laryngeal cancer-related mortality, a change in clinical approach is required. We have reviewed the literature on the potential role of molecular markers in the clinical management of laryngeal cancer. We believe that some of the most significant biological markers might be integrated with the evaluation of behavioural risk factors, clinical TNM staging and histopathological grading for a novel clinicomolecular approach to laryngeal cancer. We foresee the use of the most promising biological markers in the phases of prevention, diagnosis, prognostic assessment and drug design. PMID:15763643

Almadori, Giovanni; Bussu, Francesco; Cadoni, Gabriella; Galli, Jacopo; Paludetti, Gaetano; Maurizi, Maurizio

2005-03-01

177

New strategies in personalized medicine for solid tumors: molecular markers and clinical trial designs.  

PubMed

The delineation of signaling pathways to understand tumor biology combined with the rapid development of technologies that allow broad molecular profiling and data analysis has led to a new era of personalized medicine in oncology. Many academic institutions now routinely profile patients and discuss their cases in meetings of personalized medicine tumor boards before making treatment recommendations. Clinical trials initiated by pharmaceutical companies often require specific markers for enrollment or at least explore multiple options for future markers. In addition to the still small number of targeted agents that are approved for the therapy of patients with histological and molecularly defined tumors, a broad range of novel targeted agents in development are undergoing clinical studies with companion profiling to determine the best-responding patient population. Although the present focus of profiling lies in genetic analyses, additional tests of RNA, protein, and immune parameters are being developed and incorporated in clinical research, and these methods are likely to contribute significantly to future patient selection and treatment approaches. As the advances in tumor biology and human genetics have identified promising tumor targets, the ongoing clinical evaluation of novel agents will now need to show if the promise can be translated into benefit for patients. PMID:25183480

Jürgensmeier, Juliane M; Eder, Joseph P; Herbst, Roy S

2014-09-01

178

Noninvasive detection and imaging of molecular markers in live cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells.  

PubMed

Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) was used to detect and image molecular markers specific to cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This technique is noninvasive and thus can be used to discriminate individual live CMs within highly heterogeneous cell populations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the Raman spectra was used to build a classification model for identification of individual CMs. Retrospective immunostaining imaging was used as the gold standard for phenotypic identification of each cell. We were able to discriminate CMs from other phenotypes with >97% specificity and >96% sensitivity, as calculated with the use of cross-validation algorithms (target 100% specificity). A comparison between Raman spectral images corresponding to selected Raman bands identified by the PCA model and immunostaining of the same cells allowed assignment of the Raman spectral markers. We conclude that glycogen is responsible for the discrimination of CMs, whereas myofibril proteins have a lesser contribution. This study demonstrates the potential of RMS for allowing the noninvasive phenotypic identification of hESC progeny. With further development, such label-free optical techniques may enable the separation of high-purity cell populations with mature phenotypes, and provide repeated measurements to monitor time-dependent molecular changes in live hESCs during differentiation in vitro. PMID:21190678

Pascut, Flavius C; Goh, Huey T; Welch, Nathan; Buttery, Lee D; Denning, Chris; Notingher, Ioan

2011-01-01

179

Management of endocrine disease: clinicopathological classification and molecular markers of pituitary tumours for personalized therapeutic strategies.  

PubMed

Pituitary tumours, the most frequent intracranial tumour, are historically considered benign. However, various pieces of clinical evidence and recent advances in pathological and molecular analyses suggest the need to consider these tumours as more than an endocrinological disease, despite the low incidence of metastasis. Recently, we proposed a new prognostic clinicopathological classification of these pituitary tumours, according to the tumour size (micro, macro and giant), type (prolactin, GH, FSH/LH, ACTH and TSH) and grade (grade 1a, non-invasive; 1b, non-invasive and proliferative; 2a, invasive; 2b, invasive and proliferative and 3, metastatic). In addition to this classification, numerous molecular prognostic markers have been identified, allowing a better characterisation of tumour behaviour and prognosis. Moreover, clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that pituitary tumours could be treated by some chemotherapeutic drugs or new targeted therapies. Our improved classification of these tumours should now allow the identification of prognosis markers and help the clinician to propose personalised therapies to selected patients presenting tumours with a high risk of recurrence. PMID:24431196

Raverot, Gerald; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Trouillas, Jacqueline

2014-04-01

180

Molecular phylogenetics of New Caledonian Diospyros (Ebenaceae) using plastid and nuclear markers?  

PubMed Central

To clarify phylogenetic relationships among New Caledonian species of Diospyros, sequences of four plastid markers (atpB, rbcL, trnK–matK and trnS–trnG) and two low-copy nuclear markers (ncpGS and PHYA) were analysed. New Caledonian Diospyros species fall into three clades, two of which have only a few members (1 or 5 species); the third has 21 closely related species for which relationships among species have been mostly unresolved in a previous study. Although species of the third group (NC clade III) are morphologically distinct and largely occupy different habitats, they exhibit little molecular variability. Diospyros vieillardii is sister to the rest of the NC clade III, followed by D. umbrosa and D. flavocarpa, which are sister to the rest of this clade. Species from coastal habitats of western Grande Terre (D. cherrieri and D. veillonii) and some found on coralline substrates (D. calciphila and D. inexplorata) form two well-supported subgroups. The species of NC clade III have significantly larger genomes than found in diploid species of Diospyros from other parts of the world, but they all appear to be diploids. By applying a molecular clock, we infer that the ancestor of the NC clade III arrived in New Caledonia around 9 million years ago. The oldest species are around 7 million years old and the youngest ones probably much less than 1 million years. PMID:23850609

Turner, Barbara; Munzinger, Jérôme; Duangjai, Sutee; Temsch, Eva M.; Stockenhuber, Reinhold; Barfuss, Michael H.J.; Chase, Mark W.; Samuel, Rosabelle

2013-01-01

181

Molecular phylogenetics of New Caledonian Diospyros (Ebenaceae) using plastid and nuclear markers.  

PubMed

To clarify phylogenetic relationships among New Caledonian species of Diospyros, sequences of four plastid markers (atpB, rbcL, trnK-matK and trnS-trnG) and two low-copy nuclear markers (ncpGS and PHYA) were analysed. New Caledonian Diospyros species fall into three clades, two of which have only a few members (1 or 5 species); the third has 21 closely related species for which relationships among species have been mostly unresolved in a previous study. Although species of the third group (NC clade III) are morphologically distinct and largely occupy different habitats, they exhibit little molecular variability. Diospyros vieillardii is sister to the rest of the NC clade III, followed by D. umbrosa and D. flavocarpa, which are sister to the rest of this clade. Species from coastal habitats of western Grande Terre (D. cherrieri and D. veillonii) and some found on coralline substrates (D. calciphila and D. inexplorata) form two well-supported subgroups. The species of NC clade III have significantly larger genomes than found in diploid species of Diospyros from other parts of the world, but they all appear to be diploids. By applying a molecular clock, we infer that the ancestor of the NC clade III arrived in New Caledonia around 9 million years ago. The oldest species are around 7 million years old and the youngest ones probably much less than 1 million years. PMID:23850609

Turner, Barbara; Munzinger, Jérôme; Duangjai, Sutee; Temsch, Eva M; Stockenhuber, Reinhold; Barfuss, Michael H J; Chase, Mark W; Samuel, Rosabelle

2013-12-01

182

At3g08030 transcript: a molecular marker of seed ageing  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Prolonged storage generally reduces seed viability and vigour, although the rate of deterioration varies among species and environmental conditions. Here, we suggest a possible ageing molecular marker: At3g08030 mRNA. At3g08030 is a member of the DUF642 highly conserved family of cell-wall-associated proteins that is specific for spermatophytes. Methods At3g08030 expression was performed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analysis in seed samples differing in their rate of germination and final germination following a matrix priming and/or controlled deterioration (rapid ageing) treatment. Key Results The At3g08030 gene transcript was present during the entire Arabidopsis thaliana plant life cycle and in seeds, during maturation, the ripening period and after germination. Matrix priming treatment increased the rate of germination of control seeds and seeds aged by controlled deterioration. Priming treatments also increased At3g08030 expression. To determine whether the orthologues of this gene are also age markers in other plant species, At3g08030 was cloned in two wild species, Ceiba aesculifolia and Wigandia urens. As in A. thaliana, the At3g08030 transcript was not present in aged seeds of the tested species but was present in recently shed seeds. A reduction in germination performance of the aged seeds under salt stress was determined by germination assays. Conclusions At3g08030 mRNA detection in a dry seed lot has potential for use as a molecular marker for germination performance in a variety of plant species. PMID:22975286

Garza-Caligaris, Luz Elena; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida Odette; Alvarado-López, Sandra; Zúñiga-Sánchez, Esther; Orozco-Segovia, Alma; Pérez-Ruíz, Rigoberto V.; Gamboa-deBuen, Alicia

2012-01-01

183

Status of potential PfATP6 molecular markers for artemisinin resistance in Suriname  

PubMed Central

Background Polymorphisms within the PfATP6 gene have been indicated as potential molecular markers for artemisinin efficacy. Since 2004, the use of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was introduced as first-line treatment of the uncomplicated malaria cases in Suriname. The aim of this research was to determine changes in Suriname in the status of the polymorphic markers in the PfATP6 gene before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen, particularly of the S769N mutation, which was reported to be associated with in vitro Artemether resistance in the neighboring country French Guiana. Methods The PfATP6 gene from Plasmodium falciparum parasites in Suriname was investigated in 28 samples using PCR amplification and restriction enzyme analysis, to assess and determine the prevalence of potentially interesting single nucleotide polymorphisms. The polymorphisms [L263E; A623E; S769N], which may be associated with the artemisinin resistant phenotype were characterized in parasites from three endemic regions before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen. In addition, the status of these molecular markers was compared in paired P. falciparum isolates from patients with recurring malaria after controlled ACT. Results All the investigated samples exhibit the wild-type genotype at all three positions; L263, A623, S769. Conclusion All investigated isolates before and after the adoption of the ACT-regimen and independent of endemic region harbored the wild-type genotype for the three investigated polymorphisms. The study revealed that decreased artemisinin susceptibility could occur independent from PfATP6 mutations, challenging the assumption that artemisinin resistance is associated with these mutations in the PfATP6 gene. PMID:22966810

2012-01-01

184

Isolation of Ty1-copia retrotransposon in myrtle genome and development of S-SAP molecular marker.  

PubMed

Long terminal repeat (LTR)-retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that are ubiquitous in plants and constitute a major portion of their nuclear genomes. LTR- retrotransposons possess unique properties that make them appropriate for investigating relationships between populations, varieties and closely related species. Myrtus communis L. is an evergreen shrub growing spontaneously throughout the Mediterranean area. Accessions show significant variations for agriculturally important traits, so the development of specific molecular markers for conservation and characterization of myrtle germplasm is desirable to conserve biodiversity. In this study, we isolated the first retrotransposon Ty1-copia-like element (Tmc1) in Myrtus communis L. genome and used this as a molecular marker. We successfully employed the S-SAP marker system to specifically characterize four myrtle accessions belonging to different areas in the province of Caserta (Italy). The high level of polymorphism detected in isolated LTRs, make Tmc1 a good molecular marker for this species. Our findings confirm that retrotransposon-based molecular markers are particularly valuable tools for plant molecular characterization studies. PMID:21725640

Woodrow, Pasqualina; Pontecorvo, Giovanni; Ciarmiello, Loredana F

2012-04-01

185

Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1  

PubMed Central

In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

2014-01-01

186

Basic Immunology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some individuals might blanch at the idea of a "basic" immunology overview, but Professor Vladimir V. Klimov provides just such a resource on this site. As the homepage notes, the site is designed to assist undergraduate students learning about the basics of immunology through essays, images, animations, quizzes, case histories, and external links. Visitors can begin by looking over the "Table of Contents" area, which includes seven complete chapters of information. These chapters include "The Immune Responses", "Effector Activity", and "Functional Organization of the Immune System". While some of the materials on the site require a paid subscription, there's enough free material here to get students on their way to learning more about this field of study.

Klimov, Vladimir V.

187

Prostate cancer molecular markers GSTP1 and hTERT in expressed prostatic secretions as predictors of biopsy results  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo develop noninvasive diagnostic tools for the early detection of prostate cancer (PCa). Current screening for PCa lacks sensitivity and specificity. Two molecular markers, telomerase activity and aberrant methylation of the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) promoter, are found in more than 90% of PCa specimens. Additionally, these markers can be detected in bodily fluids such as urine and postprostatic massage

Laura E. Crocitto; Darlynn Korns; Leo Kretzner; Taras Shevchuk; Sarah L. Blair; Timothy G. Wilson; Soroush A. Ramin; Mark H. Kawachi; Steven S. Smith

2004-01-01

188

Targeted pathways in breast cancer: molecular and protein markers guiding therapeutic decisions.  

PubMed

Breast carcinoma is currently considered as a group of diseases, differing not only in histopathologic phenotype, as indicated by histologic type and grade, but also in their protein, genetic and epigenetic molecular profile. The standard of care indicates that the core information for patient management includes data on Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PgR) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), while there is an emerging role for the proliferation marker Ki67. These indices can be provided even in low resource settings and are indispensable for prognostication and therapeutic patient management. With the progress in molecular and translational research, there is a growing body of information on the molecular subtypes of breast carcinoma and their significance, and multigene signature assays are used to dictate prognosis and guide therapeutics in high resource settings. In addition, several cellular pathways involved in tumor growth and spread are dissected and targeted in clinical trials. Among these are the p53, RB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/MAPK pathways, alterations associated with genetic instability and epigenetic alterations including histone methylation and acetylation, DNA methylation and microRNAs expression. The tumor immune microenvironment, including the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is attracting significant research interest. This review summarizes the mechanisms of function of the above factors in breast tumorigenesis with emphasis on their prognostic and predictive value and their use as therapeutic targets. PMID:25563853

Kourea, Helen P; Zolota, Vassiliki; Scopa, Chrisoula D

2015-01-01

189

Improving the reliability of molecular sexing of birds using a W-specific marker.  

PubMed

Molecular techniques for identifying sex of birds utilize length differences between CHD-Z and CHD-W introns, but in some cases these methods can lead to sexing errors. Here we show that an additional W-specific primer can be used in conjunction with a pre-existing sexing primer pair to dramatically improve the reliability of molecular sexing methods. We illustrate the approach with American coots (Fulica americana), a species with CHD-Z polymorphism that could not be accurately sexed using traditional methods. We developed a reverse primer GWR2 designed to sit within the intron of the W chromosome and amplify a distinctively small DNA fragment that serves as a W-specific marker. Analysis of known-sex individuals indicates that this W-specific primer provides an efficient and reliable protocol to identify the sex of F. americana. The development of such sex-specific primers will likely increase the reliability of molecular sexing methods in other birds as well. Comparisons between CHD-Z alleles of coots and common moorhens (Gallinula chloropus) revealed that CHD-Z polymorphism evolved separately in these two closely related species. We discuss the implications of repeated evolution of CHD-Z polymorphisms among birds. PMID:21586012

Shizuka, Daizaburo; Lyon, Bruce E

2008-11-01

190

Identification and characterization of high-molecular-weight glutenin genes in Polish triticale cultivars by PCR-based DNA markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular markers were used to identify the allele\\/gene composition of complex lociGlu-A1 andGlu-B1 of high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin subunits in triticale cultivars. Forty-six Polish cultivars of both winter and spring\\u000a triticale were analysed with 7 PCR-based markers. Amplified DNA fragments of HMW gluteninGlu-1 genes were separated by agarose slab-gel electrophoresis. Differences between all 3 alleles at the locusGlu-A1 [Glu-A1a (encoding Ax1),1b

Boles?aw P. Salmanowicz; Monika Dylewicz

2007-01-01

191

[Abbas et al. 2000] A. K. Abbas, A. H. Lichtman, and J. S. Pober. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. W. B. Saunders Company, 2000.  

E-print Network

Immunology. W. B. Saunders Company, 2000. [Abraham & Malaviya 1997] S. Abraham and R. Malaviya. Mast cells: Round 2. Seminars in Immunology, 12(3):277­292, 2000. [Anderson & Matzinger 2000b] C. C. Anderson and P. Matzinger. Danger: the view from the bottom of the cliff. Seminars in Immunology, 12(3):231­238, 2000

Stepney, Susan

192

Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The molecular composition of fine particulate (D[sub p] [ge] 2 [mu]m) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available.

Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States)); Hildemann, L.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Simoneit, B.R.T. (College of Oceanography, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States) Environmental Geochemistry Group)

1992-07-01

193

Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The molecular composition of fine particulate (D{sub p} {ge} 2 {mu}m) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available.

Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Simoneit, B.R.T. [College of Oceanography, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States) Environmental Geochemistry Group

1992-07-01

194

Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

Shugart, L.R.; D`Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

1991-12-15

195

A multi-marker molecular signature approach for treatment-specific subgroup identification with survival outcomes.  

PubMed

Delivering on the promise of personalized medicine has become a focus of the pharmaceutical industry as the era of the blockbuster drug is fading. Central to realizing this promise is the need for improved analytical strategies for effectively integrating information across various biological assays (for example, copy number variation and targeted protein expression) toward identification of a treatment-specific subgroup-identifying the right patients. We propose a novel combination of elastic net followed by a maximal ?(2) and semiparametric bootstrap. The combined approaches are presented in a two-stage strategy that estimates patient-specific multi-marker molecular signatures (MMMS) to identify and directly test for a biomarker-driven subgroup with enhanced treatment effect. This flexible strategy provides for incorporation of business-specific needs, such as confining the search space to a subgroup size that is commercially viable, ultimately resulting in actionable information for use in empirically based decision making. PMID:24637498

Li, L; Guennel, T; Marshall, S; Cheung, L W-K

2014-10-01

196

Triazole-based Zn²?-specific molecular marker for fluorescence bioimaging.  

PubMed

Fluorescence bioimaging potential, both in vitro and in vivo, of a yellow emissive triazole-based molecular marker has been investigated and demonstrated. Three different kinds of cells, viz Bacillus thuringiensis, Candida albicans, and Techoma stans pollen grains were used to investigate the intracellular zinc imaging potential of 1 (in vitro studies). Fluorescence imaging of translocation of zinc through the stem of small herb, Peperomia pellucida, having transparent stem proved in vivo bioimaging capability of 1. This approach will enable in screening cell permeability and biostability of a newly developed probe. Similarly, the current method for detection and localization of zinc in Gram seed sprouts could be an easy and potential alternative of the existing analytical methods to investigate the efficiency of various strategies applied for increasing zinc-content in cereal crops. The probe-zinc ensemble has efficiently been applied for detecting phosphate-based biomolecules. PMID:24725748

Sinha, Sougata; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Mathew, Jomon; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra K; Ghosh, Subrata

2014-04-25

197

Identification of the sources of primary organic aerosols at urban schools: a molecular marker approach.  

PubMed

Children are particularly susceptible to air pollution and schools are examples of urban microenvironments that can account for a large portion of children's exposure to airborne particles. Thus this paper aimed to determine the sources of primary airborne particles that children are exposed to at school by analyzing selected organic molecular markers at 11 urban schools in Brisbane, Australia. Positive matrix factorization analysis identified four sources at the schools: vehicle emissions, biomass burning, meat cooking and plant wax emissions accounting for 45%, 29%, 16% and 7%, of the organic carbon respectively. Biomass burning peaked in winter due to prescribed burning of bushland around Brisbane. Overall, the results indicated that both local (traffic) and regional (biomass burning) sources of primary organic aerosols influence the levels of ambient particles that children are exposed at the schools. These results have implications for potential control strategies for mitigating exposure at schools. PMID:24842381

Crilley, Leigh R; Qadir, Raeed M; Ayoko, Godwin A; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Morawska, Lidia

2014-08-01

198

Prediction of hybrid performance in maize using molecular markers and joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbreds.  

PubMed

The identification of superior hybrids is important for the success of a hybrid breeding program. However, field evaluation of all possible crosses among inbred lines requires extremely large resources. Therefore, efforts have been made to predict hybrid performance (HP) by using field data of related genotypes and molecular markers. In the present study, the main objective was to assess the usefulness of pedigree information in combination with the covariance between general combining ability (GCA) and per se performance of parental lines for HP prediction. In addition, we compared the prediction efficiency of AFLP and SSR marker data, estimated marker effects separately for reciprocal allelic configurations (among heterotic groups) of heterozygous marker loci in hybrids, and imputed missing AFLP marker data for marker-based HP prediction. Unbalanced field data of 400 maize dent x flint hybrids from 9 factorials and of 79 inbred parents were subjected to joint analyses with mixed linear models. The inbreds were genotyped with 910 AFLP and 256 SSR markers. Efficiency of prediction (R (2)) was estimated by cross-validation for hybrids having no or one parent evaluated in testcrosses. Best linear unbiased prediction of GCA and specific combining ability resulted in the highest efficiencies for HP prediction for both traits (R (2) = 0.6-0.9), if pedigree and line per se data were used. However, without such data, HP for grain yield was more efficiently predicted using molecular markers. The additional modifications of the marker-based approaches had no clear effect. Our study showed the high potential of joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbred lines for the prediction of performance of untested hybrids. PMID:19916002

Schrag, Tobias A; Möhring, Jens; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Kusterer, Barbara; Dhillon, Baldev S; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Frisch, Matthias

2010-01-01

199

Clinicopathologic factors and molecular markers related to lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer  

PubMed Central

AIM: To analyze predictive factors for lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer. METHODS: We analyzed 1104 patients with early gastric cancer (EGC) who underwent a gastrectomy with lymph-node dissection from May 2003 through July 2011. The clinicopathologic factors and molecular markers were assessed as predictors for lymph node metastasis. Molecular markers such as microsatellite instability, human mutL homolog 1, p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) were included. The ?2 test and logistic regression analysis were used to determine clinicopathologic parameters. RESULTS: Lymph node metastasis was observed in 104 (9.4%) of 1104 patients. Among 104 cases of lymph node positive patients, 24 patients (3.8%) were mucosal cancers and 80 patients (16.7%) were submucosal. According to histologic evaluation, the number of lymph node metastasis found was 4 (1.7%) for well differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, 45 (11.3%) for moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, 36 (14.8%) for poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, and 19 (8.4%) for signet ring cell carcinoma. Of 690 EGC cases, 77 cases (11.2%) showed EGFR overexpression. HER2 overexpression was present in 110 cases (27.1%) of 406 EGC patients. With multivariate analysis, female gender (OR = 2.281, P = 0.009), presence of lymphovascular invasion (OR = 10.950, P < 0.0001), diameter (? 20 mm, OR = 3.173, P = 0.01), and EGFR overexpression (OR = 2.185, P = 0.044) were independent risk factors for lymph node involvement. CONCLUSION: Female gender, tumor size, lymphovascular invasion and EGFR overexpression were predictive risk factors for lymph node metastasis in EGC. PMID:25593477

Jin, Eun Hyo; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Sung-Ae; Shim, Ki-Nam; Seo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Nayoung; Shin, Cheol Min; Yoon, Hyuk; Jung, Hyun Chae

2015-01-01

200

Highly variable microsatellite markers for the fungal and algal symbionts of the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria and challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungal associations.  

PubMed

The availability of highly variable markers for the partners of a fungal symbiosis enables the integrated investigation of ecological and evolutionary processes at the symbiotic level. In this article we analyze the specificity of the first and to date only microsatellite markers that had been developed for an epiphytic lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria). We used DNA extracts from cultures of the fungal and of the green algal symbionts of L. pulmonaria as well as total DNA extracts from related Lobaria species associated with the same algal partner, and got evidence that five of the previously described microsatellite markers, proposed to be fungus-specific, are indeed alga-specific. Hence, highly variable microsatellite primer sets available for both, the algal and the fungal symbionts of L. pulmonaria are now at our hands, which allow us to investigate so far unexplored biological processes of lichen symbionts, such as codispersal and coevolution. In a broader sense, our work evaluates and discusses the challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungi forming close associations with other organisms. PMID:20943165

Widmer, Ivo; Dal Grande, Francesco; Cornejo, Carolina; Scheidegger, Christoph

2010-07-01

201

Molecular analysis of expansion, differentiation, and growth factor treatment of human chondrocytes identifies differentiation markers and growth-related genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is intended to optimise expansion and differentiation of cultured human chondrocytes by growth factor application and to identify molecular markers to monitor their differentiation state. We dissected the molecular consequences of matrix release, monolayer, and 3D-alginate culture, growth factor optimised expansion, and re-differentiation protocols by gene expression analysis. Among 19 common cartilage molecules assessed by cDNA array, six

Karin Benz; Stephen Breit; Martin Lukoschek; Hans Mau; Wiltrud Richter

2002-01-01

202

Transplantation immunology.  

PubMed

The practice of clinical and experimental transplantation continues to evolve at a rapid pace. To appreciate the current transplant practices, it is first necessary to review transplant immunology in its proper context, ie, as a component of the complex series of events that promote the repair of damaged tissues. These processes are generally categorized as inflammation, immunity, and tissue repair/reinforcement. In general, there are 3 forms of graft rejection: hyperacute, acute, and chronic rejection. All 3 forms of graft rejection represent pathologic consequences of one or more of these repair-related processes. The various graft rejection responses also illustrate several complex immunologic principles that need to be considered. These include the definition of an alloantigen, the structure and function of major histocompatibility complex molecules, and the behavior of antigen-presenting cells and alloreactive T cells. This review combines these concepts and principles into a discussion of the 3 forms of graft rejection, each of which is addressed at the level of histopathology, pathobiology, incidence, and clinical strategies. PMID:9396662

VanBuskirk, A M; Pidwell, D J; Adams, P W; Orosz, C G

1997-12-10

203

Molecular Marker For Predicting Treatment Response in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: Does the Promise Fulfill Clinical Need?  

PubMed Central

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is largely diagnosed incidentally on imaging taken for unrelated reasons. The management of localized lesions is primarily extirpative with excellent results. Treatment of advanced RCC has evolved over recent years with the use of targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and antibody-mediated therapies. The treatment response to these targeted therapies is highly variable, with no clear clinical method of identifying patients who will benefit from or not tolerate therapy. The field of molecular markers has evolved significantly in the last decade, with a multitude of markers identified that predict treatment response and drug toxicity. The following review critically evaluates those molecular markers that have been assessed for their utility in predicting treatment response in patients with advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Identifying the ideal treatment for these patients will improve responses to therapy, minimize morbidity, and save significant healthcare dollars. PMID:24337833

Garcia-Roig, Michael; Ortiz, Nicolas; Lokeshwar, Vinata

2014-01-01

204

2.1 MOLECULAR MARKERS AND STOCK STRUCTURE IN FISHES Since the development of allozyme electrophoresis in the 1960's,  

E-print Network

2.1 MOLECULAR MARKERS AND STOCK STRUCTURE IN FISHES Since the development of allozyme genetic stocks of fishes (Utter 1991). Genetic traits useful for detecting stock structure are those the presence and degree of reproductive isolation and hence stock structure. While there are many definitions

Heist, Edward J.

205

Molecular mapping of QTLs for fiber qualities in three diverse lines in Upland cotton using SSR markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The improvement of cotton fiber quality is extremely important because of changes in spinning technology. The identification of the stable QTLs affecting fiber traits across different generations will be greatly helpful to be used effectively in molecular marker-assisted selection to improve fiber quality of cotton cultivars in the future. Using three elite fiber lines of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

Xinlian Shen; Wangzhen Guo; Xiefei Zhu; Youlu Yuan; John Z. Yu; Russell J. Kohel; Tianzhen Zhang

2005-01-01

206

Molecular tagging of a major QTL for fiber strength in Upland cotton and its marker-assisted selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fiber is a basic raw material in the textile industry. The changes in spinning technology have in common the requirement of unique and often greater cotton fiber quality, especially strength, for processing. We used a Gossypium anomalum introgression line, 7235, characterized by good fiber quality properties, to identify molecular markers linked to fiber-strength QTLs. By the use of F2 and

Tianzhen Zhang; Youlu Yuan; John Yu; Wangzhen Guo; Russell J. Kohel

2003-01-01

207

Identification of Genetic Factors Contributing to Heterosis in a Hybrid From Two Elite Maize Inbred Lines Using Molecular Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of molecular markers to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting agriculturally important traits has become a key approach in plant genetics-both for understanding the genetic basis of these traits and to help design novel plant improvement programs. In the study reported here, we mapped QTLs (and evaluated their phenotypic effects) associated with seven major traits (including grain yield)

Charles W. Stuber; Stephen E. Lincoln; David W. Wolff; Tim Helentjarisn; Eric S. Lander

208

Molecular markers of early Parkinson's disease based on gene expression in blood  

PubMed Central

Parkinson's disease (PD) progresses relentlessly and affects five million people worldwide. Laboratory tests for PD are critically needed for developing treatments designed to slow or prevent progression of the disease. We performed a transcriptome-wide scan in 105 individuals to interrogate the molecular processes perturbed in cellular blood of patients with early-stage PD. The molecular multigene marker here identified is associated with risk of PD in 66 samples of the training set comprising healthy and disease controls [third tertile cross-validated odds ratio of 5.7 (P for trend 0.005)]. It is further validated in 39 independent test samples [third tertile odds ratio of 5.1 (P for trend 0.04)]. Insights into disease-linked processes detectable in peripheral blood are offered by 22 unique genes differentially expressed in patients with PD versus healthy individuals. These include the cochaperone ST13, which stabilizes heat-shock protein 70, a modifier of ?-synuclein misfolding and toxicity. ST13 messenger RNA copies are lower in patients with PD (mean ± SE 0.59 ± 0.05) than in controls (0.96 ± 0.09) (P = 0.002) in two independent populations. Thus, gene expression signals measured in blood can facilitate the development of biomarkers for PD. PMID:17215369

Scherzer, Clemens R.; Eklund, Aron C.; Morse, Lee J.; Liao, Zhixiang; Locascio, Joseph J.; Fefer, Daniel; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Schlossmacher, Michael G.; Hauser, Michael A.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Standaert, David G.; Growdon, John H.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Gullans, Steven R.

2007-01-01

209

Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.  

PubMed

Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks. PMID:17150982

Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

2006-01-01

210

Use of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to study immunological markers resulting from exposure to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract from Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

Fine particulate air pollutants, mainly their organic fraction, have been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. Puerto Rico has been reported to have the highest prevalence of pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma) in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the immunological response of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to organic extracts isolated from airborne particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) in Puerto Rico. Organic extracts from PM{sub 2.5} collected throughout an 8-month period (2000-2001) were pooled (composite) in order to perform chemical analysis and biological activity testing. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract to assess cytotoxicity, levels of cytokines and relative gene expression of MHC-II, hPXR and CYP3A5. Our findings show that organic PM{sub 2.5} consist of toxic as well as bioactive components that can regulate the secretion of cytokines in BEAS-2B, which could modulate inflammatory response in the lung. Trace element analyses confirmed the presence of metals in organic extracts highlighting the relative high abundance of Cu and Zn in polar organic extracts. Polar organic extracts exhibited dose-dependant toxicity and were found to significantly induce the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1beta and IL-7 while significantly inhibiting the secretion of IL-8, G-CSF and MCP-1. Moreover, MHC-II transcriptional activity was up-regulated after 24 h of exposure, whereas PXR and CYP3A5 were down-regulated. This research provides a new insight into the effects of PM{sub 2.5} organic fractions on specific effectors and their possible role in the development of respiratory inflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico.

Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.fuentes@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Rivera, Evasomary [Department of Biology, Rio Piedras Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Gioda, Adriana [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Marques de Sao Vicente street, 225, Gavea, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sanchez-Rivera, Diana; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R. [Department of Chemistry, Mayaguez Campus, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico); Jimenez-Velez, Braulio D., E-mail: braulio.jimenez@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico)

2010-03-15

211

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology Akkina Lab Postdoctoral Position  

E-print Network

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology Akkina Lab ­ Postdoctoral Position Job Description: We are looking for post-doctoral scientists with research experience in the areas of immunology, Palmer et al J Immunol. 190:211-219, 2013). Must have an earned PhD in molecular virology, immunology

Stephens, Graeme L.

212

Molecular analysis of East Anatolian traditional plum and cherry accessions using SSR markers.  

PubMed

We conducted SSR analyses of 59 accessions, including 29 traditional plum (Prunus domestica), 24 sweet cherry (Prunus avium), and 1 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) selected from East Anatolian gene sources and 3 plum and 2 cherry reference accessions for molecular characterization and investigation of genetic relationships. Eight SSR loci [1 developed from the apricot (UDAp-404), 4 from the peach (UDP96-010, UDP96-001, UDP96-019, Pchgms1) and 3 from the cherry (UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31) genome] for plum accessions and 9 SSR loci [5 developed from the cherry (PS12A02, UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31, UCD-CH21), 3 from the peach (Pchgms1, UDP96-001, UDP96-005) and 1 from the plum (CPSCT010) genome] for cherry accessions were used for genetic identification. A total of 66 and 65 alleles were obtained in the genetic analyses of 31 plum and 28 cherry accessions, respectively. The number of alleles revealed by SSR analysis ranged from 4 to 14 alleles per locus, with a mean value of 8.25 in plum accessions, and from 5 to 10 alleles per locus with a mean value of 7.2 in cherry accessions. Only one case of synonym was identified among the cherry accessions, while no case of synonym was observed among the plum accessions. Genomic SSR markers used in discrimination of plum and cherry accessions showed high cross-species transferability in the Prunus genus. Because of their appreciable polymorphism and cross species transferability, the SSR markers that we evaluated in this study will be useful for studies involving fingerprinting of cherry and plum cultivars. PMID:24301792

Öz, M H; Vurgun, H; Bakir, M; Büyük, ?; Yüksel, C; Ünlü, H M; Çukadar, K; Karado?an, B; Köse, Ö; Ergül, A

2013-01-01

213

Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers  

PubMed Central

Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n?=?4x?=?28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

2014-01-01

214

Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.  

PubMed

Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n?=?4x?=?28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

2014-01-01

215

Immunology of human schistosomiasis  

PubMed Central

There is a wealth of immunologic studies that have been carried out in experimental and human schistosomiasis that can be classified into three main areas: immunopathogenesis, resistance to reinfection and diagnostics. It is clear that the bulk of, if not all, morbidity due to human schistosomiasis results from immune-response-based inflammation against eggs lodged in the body, either as regulated chronic inflammation or resulting in fibrotic lesions. However, the exact nature of these responses, the antigens to which they are mounted and the mechanisms of the critical regulatory responses are still being sorted out. It is also becoming apparent that protective immunity against schistosomula as they develop into adult worms develops slowly and is hastened by the dying of adult worms, either naturally or when they are killed by praziquantel. However, as with anti-egg responses, the responsible immune mechanisms and inducing antigens are not clearly established, nor are any potential regulatory responses known. Finally, a wide variety of immune markers, both cellular and humoral, can be used to demonstrate exposure to schistosomes, and immunologic measurement of schistosome antigens can be used to detect, and thus diagnose, active infections. All three areas contribute to the public health response to human schistosome infections. PMID:25142505

Colley, D G; Secor, W E

2014-01-01

216

Molecular rotors: what lies behind the high sensitivity of the thioflavin-T fluorescent marker.  

PubMed

Thioflavin-T (ThT) can bind to amyloid fibrils and is frequently used as a fluorescent marker for in vitro biomedical assays of the potency of inhibitors for amyloid-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyloidosis. Upon binding to amyloid fibrils, the steady-state (time-integrated) emission intensity of ThT increases by orders of magnitude. The simplicity of this type of measurement has made ThT a common fluorescent marker in biomedical research over the last 50 years. As a result of the remarkable development in ultrafast spectroscopy measurements, researchers have made substantial progress in understanding the photophysical nature of ThT. Both ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental evidence have shown that the electronically excited-state surface potential of ThT is composed of two regimes: a locally excited (LE) state and a charge-transfer (CT) state. The electronic wave function of the excited state changes from the initial LE state to the CT state as a result of the rotation around a single C-C bond in the middle of the molecule, which connects the benzothiazole moiety to the dimethylanilino ring. This twisted-internal-CT (TICT) is responsible for the molecular rotor behavior of ThT. This Account discusses several factors that can influence the LE-TICT dynamics of the excited state. Solvent, temperature, and hydrostatic pressure play roles in this process. In the context of biomedical assays, the binding to amyloid fibrils inhibits the internal rotation of the molecular segments and as a result, the electron cannot cross into the nonradiative "dark" CT state. The LE state has high oscillator strength that enables radiative excited-state relaxation to the ground state. This process makes the ThT molecule light up in the presence of amyloid fibrils. In the literature, researchers have suggested several models to explain nonradiative processes. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various nonradiative models while focusing on the model that was initially proposed by Glasbeek and co-workers for auramine-O to be the best suited for ThT. We further discuss the computational fitting of the model for the nonradiative process of ThT. PMID:22738376

Amdursky, Nadav; Erez, Yuval; Huppert, Dan

2012-09-18

217

Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF  

E-print Network

Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF #12;The Department of Microbiology & Immunology on infectious disease and immunology. The Department publishes M&I, its newsletter, once a year. Highlighting & Immunology Columbia University 701 West 168th St., NY, NY 10032 (212) 305-3647 oj2@columbia.edu #12

Qian, Ning

218

Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii  

PubMed Central

Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a “modified backcross” involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062?cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID:22936937

Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

2012-01-01

219

Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.  

PubMed

Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry. PMID:24755444

Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

2014-09-01

220

Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections. PMID:21614207

Cotar, Ani-Ioana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Dinu, Sorin; Bucur, Marcela; Iordache, Carmen; Banu, Otilia; Dracea, Olguta; Larion, Cristina; Lazar, Veronica

2010-01-01

221

Molecular markers for identifying a new selected variety of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Selective breeding of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during the last decade has produced new varieties exhibiting high growth rates and disease resistance. However, the identification of new varieties of shrimps from their phenotypic characters is difficult. This study introduces a new approach for identifying varieties of shrimps using molecular markers of microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences. The method was employed to identify a new selected variety, Kehai No. 1 (KH-1), from three representative stocks (control group): Zhengda; Tongwei; and a stock collected from Fujian Province, which is now cultured in mainland China. By pooled genotyping of KH-1 and the control group, five microsatellites showing differences between KH-1 and the control group were screened out. Individual genotyping data confirmed the results from pooled genotyping. The genotyping data for the five microsatellites were applied to the assignment analysis of the KH-1 group and the control group using the partial Bayesian assignment method in GENECLASS2. By sequencing the mitochondrial control regions of individuals from the KH-1 and control group, four haplotypes were observed in the KH-1 group, whereas 14 haplotypes were obtained in the control group. By combining the microsatellite assignment analysis with mitochondrial control region analysis, the average accuracy of identification of individuals in the KH-1 group and control group reached 89%. The five selected microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences were highly polymorphic and could be used to distinguish new selected varieties of L. vannamei from other populations cultured in China.

Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Li, Fuhua; Huang, Hao; Li, Yijun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiang, Jianhai

2014-10-01

222

Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus  

PubMed Central

Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

223

Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation  

PubMed Central

Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA) is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1) is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4) are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria. PMID:19245690

Hayward, Don; van Helden, Paul D; Wiid, Ian JF

2009-01-01

224

Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers.  

PubMed

The application of DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine allowed us to increase the resolution of chromosome C-banding and DAPI-banding patterns and to investigate chromosomal polymorphism in karyotypes of seven spring and six winter rape varieties. It was shown that the pericentromeric and intercalary C-bands of most of the chromosomes in spring rape were smaller in size and less polymorphic than those of winter rape. More 26S and 5S rDNA sites were found in the winter rape karyotypes than the spring varieties. Separate or colocalized 26S and 5S rDNA sites were revealed on chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16 and 18. Intervarietal and intravarietal polymorphism of the number and chromosomal localization of rDNA sites were detected. The generalized idiogram of chromosomes of 13 Brassica napus varieties with account of all possibilities of C-banding patterns as well as localization of 26S and 5S rDNA sites were constructed. Polymorphism of the examined molecular and cytogenetic markers as well as the heterozygosis level of FAE1.1 gene controlling erucic acid synthesis in rapeseed was higher in the winter varieties than in the spring ones. The obtained data were in a atisfactory agreement with increased tolerance to environmental stress conditions of winter rape. PMID:24840830

Amosova, Alexandra V; Zemtsova, Lyudmila V; Grushetskaya, Zoya E; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Mozgova, Galina V; Pilyuk, Yadviga E; Volovik, Valentina T; Melnikova, Natalia V; Zelenin, Alexandr V; Lemesh, Valentina A; Muravenko, Olga V

2014-04-01

225

Molecular markers for identifying a new selected variety of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Selective breeding of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during the last decade has produced new varieties exhibiting high growth rates and disease resistance. However, the identification of new varieties of shrimps from their phenotypic characters is difficult. This study introduces a new approach for identifying varieties of shrimps using molecular markers of microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences. The method was employed to identify a new selected variety, Kehai No. 1 (KH-1), from three representative stocks (control group): Zhengda; Tongwei; and a stock collected from Fujian Province, which is now cultured in mainland China. By pooled genotyping of KH-1 and the control group, five microsatellites showing differences between KH-1 and the control group were screened out. Individual genotyping data confirmed the results from pooled genotyping. The genotyping data for the five microsatellites were applied to the assignment analysis of the KH-1 group and the control group using the partial Bayesian assignment method in GENECLASS2. By sequencing the mitochondrial control regions of individuals from the KH-1 and control group, four haplotypes were observed in the KH-1 group, whereas 14 haplotypes were obtained in the control group. By combining the microsatellite assignment analysis with mitochondrial control region analysis, the average accuracy of identification of individuals in the KH-1 group and control group reached 89%. The five selected microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences were highly polymorphic and could be used to distinguish new selected varieties of L. vannamei from other populations cultured in China.

Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Li, Fuhua; Huang, Hao; Li, Yijun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiang, Jianhai

2015-01-01

226

Conservation of wild animals by assisted reproduction and molecular marker technology.  

PubMed

Wild animals are an integral component of the ecosystem. Their decimation due to abrupt natural calamities or due to gradual human intervention would be disastrous to the ecosystem and would alter the balance in nature between various biotic components. Such an imbalance could have an adverse effect on the ecosystem. Therefore, there is an urgent need to put an end to the ever increasing list of endangered species by undertaking both in situ and ex situ conservation using tools of modern biology, to ascertain the degree of genetic variation and reproductive competence in these animals. This review highlights the development and use of molecular markers such as microsatellites, minisatellites, mitochondrial control region, cytochrome b and MHC loci to assess the genetic variation in various Indian wild animals such as the lion, tiger, leopard and deer. The review also presents data on the semen profile of the big cats of India. Reproductive technologies such as cryopreservation of semen and artificial insemination in big cats are also highlighted. PMID:15255374

Shivaji, S; Kholkute, S D; Verma, S K; Gaur, Ajay; Umapathy, G; Singh, Anju; Sontakke, Sadanand; Shailaja, K; Reddy, Anuradha; Monika, S; Sivaram, V; Jyotsna, B; Bala, Satyare; Ahmed, M Shakeel; Bala, Aruna; Chandrashekar, B V N; Gupta, Sandeep; Prakash, Surya; Singh, Lalji

2003-07-01

227

Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design  

PubMed Central

Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

2012-01-01

228

Comparison of algorithms to infer genetic population structure from unlinked molecular markers.  

PubMed

Identifying population genetic structure (PGS) is crucial for breeding and conservation. Several clustering algorithms are available to identify the underlying PGS to be used with genetic data of maize genotypes. In this work, six methods to identify PGS from unlinked molecular marker data were compared using simulated and experimental data consisting of multilocus-biallelic genotypes. Datasets were delineated under different biological scenarios characterized by three levels of genetic divergence among populations (low, medium, and high FST) and two numbers of sub-populations (K=3 and K=5). The relative performance of hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering, as well as model-based clustering (STRUCTURE) and clustering from neural networks (SOM-RP-Q). We use the clustering error rate of genotypes into discrete sub-populations as comparison criterion. In scenarios with great level of divergence among genotype groups all methods performed well. With moderate level of genetic divergence (FST=0.2), the algorithms SOM-RP-Q and STRUCTURE performed better than hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering. In all simulated scenarios with low genetic divergence and in the experimental SNP maize panel (largely unlinked), SOM-RP-Q achieved the lowest clustering error rate. The SOM algorithm used here is more effective than other evaluated methods for sparse unlinked genetic data. PMID:24964261

Peña-Malavera, Andrea; Bruno, Cecilia; Fernandez, Elmer; Balzarini, Monica

2014-08-01

229

Gene Expression Profiles in Cells of Peripheral Blood Identify New Molecular Markers of Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Blood leukocytes play a major role in mediating local and systemic inflammation during acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in circulation exhibit unique changes in gene expression, and could provide a “reporter” function that reflects the inflammatory response in pancreas of acute pancreatitis. Methods To determine specific changes in blood leukocytes during acute pancreatitis, we studied gene transcription profile of in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in a rat model of experimental pancreatitis (sodium taurocholate). Normal rats, saline controls and a model of septic shock were used as a controls. cRNA obtained from PBMC of each group (n = 3) were applied to Affymetrix rat genome DNA Gene Chip Arrays. Results From the 8,799 rat genes analyzed, 140 genes showed unique significant changes in their expression in PBMC during the acute phase of pancreatitis, but not in sepsis. Among the 140 genes, 57 were upregulated, while 69 were downregulated. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, prostaglandin E2 receptor and phospholipase D1 are among the top upregulated genes. Others include genes involved in G protein-coupled receptor and TGF-?-mediated signaling pathways, while genes associated with apoptosis, glucocorticoid receptors and even the cholecystokinin receptor are downregulated. Conclusions Microarray analysis in transcriptional profiling of PBMC showed that genes that are uniquely related to molecular and pancreatic function display differential expression in acute pancreatitis. Profiling genes obtained from an easily accessible source during severe pancreatitis may identify surrogate markers for disease severity. PMID:18347268

Bluth, Martin; Lin, Yin-yao; Zhang, Hong; Viterbo, Dominick; Zenilman, Michael

2009-01-01

230

Current Status of Molecular Markers for Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal malignancy with near 100% mortality. This is in part due to the fact that most patients present with metastatic or locally advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Significantly, in nearly 95% of PC patients there is neither an associated family history of PC nor of diseases known to be associated with an increased risk of PC. These groups of patients who comprise the bulk of PC cases are termed as “sporadic PC” in contrast to the familial PC cases that comprise only about 5% of all PCs. Given the insidious onset of the malignancy and its extreme resistance to chemo and radiotherapy, an abundance of research in recent years has focused on identifying biomarkers for the early detection of PC, specifically aiming at the sporadic PC cohort. However, while several studies have established that asymptomatic individuals with a positive family history of PC and those with certain heritable syndromes are candidates for PC screening, the role of screening in identifying sporadic PC is still an unsettled question. The present review attempts to assess this critical question by investigating the recent advances made in molecular markers with potential use in the early diagnosis of sporadic PC- the largest cohort of PC cases worldwide. It also outlines a novel yet simple risk-factor based stratification system that could be potentially employed by clinicians to identify those individuals who at an elevated-risk for the development of sporadic PC and therefore candidates for screening. PMID:20888394

Chakraborty, Subhankar; Baine, Michael J.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Batra, Surinder K.

2010-01-01

231

Liver Immunology  

PubMed Central

The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

2014-01-01

232

Microsatellites and RFLP probes from maize are efficient sources of molecular markers for the biomass energy crop Miscanthus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of Gramineae markers was carried out with the aim of developing cost-effective methods for the molecular analysis\\u000a of Miscanthus species. Ten out of twenty Gramineae RFLP probes from ”anchor” sets hybridized well to Miscanthus DNA while all 15 maize probes tested cross-hybridized successfully, showing similar patterns in both species. Cross-taxa\\u000a amplification of maize microsatellite primers was then tested.

P. Hernández; G. Dorado; D. A. Laurie; A. Martín; J. W. Snape

2001-01-01

233

Assessments of Biodiversity Based on Molecular Markers and Morphological Traits among West-Bank, Palestine Fig Genotypes (Ficus carica L.)  

E-print Network

American Journal of Plant Sciences, 2012, 3, 1241-1251 http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ajps.2012.39150 Published Online September 2012 (http://www.SciRP.org/journal/ajps) 1241 Assessments of Biodiversity Based on Molecular Markers and Morphological...- turae, Vol. 107, No. 4, 2006, pp. 347-351. doi:10.1016/j.scienta.2005.11.006 [8] G. R. Rout and A. Mohapatra, “Use of Molecular Mark- ers in Ornamental Plants: A Critical Reappraisal,” Euro- pean Journal of Horticultural Science, Vol. 71, No. 2, 2006...

Basheer-Salimia, Rezq; Awad, Murad; Ward, Joy K.

2012-09-26

234

Subtracted Diversity Array Identifies Novel Molecular Markers Including Retrotransposons for Fingerprinting Echinacea Species  

PubMed Central

Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult. We report the construction of a novel Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA) for Echinacea species and demonstrate the potential of this array for isolating highly polymorphic sequences. In order to selectively isolate Echinacea-specific sequences, a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was performed between a pool of twenty-four Echinacea genotypes and a pool of other angiosperms and non-angiosperms. A total of 283 subtracted genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments were amplified and arrayed. Twenty-seven Echinacea genotypes including four that were not used in the array construction could be successfully discriminated. Interestingly, unknown samples of E. paradoxa and E. purpurea could be unambiguously identified from the cluster analysis. Furthermore, this Echinacea-specific SDA was also able to isolate highly polymorphic retrotransposon sequences. Five out of the eleven most discriminatory features matched to known retrotransposons. This is the first time retrotransposon sequences have been used to fingerprint Echinacea, highlighting the potential of retrotransposons as based molecular markers useful for fingerprinting and studying diversity patterns in Echinacea. PMID:23940565

Olarte, Alexandra; Mantri, Nitin; Nugent, Gregory; Pang, Edwin C. K.

2013-01-01

235

GALNT11 as a new molecular marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Aberrant mucin O-glycosylation often occurs in different cancers and is characterized by immature expression of simple mucin-type carbohydrates. At present, there are some controversial reports about the Tn antigen (GalNAc?-O-Ser/Thr) expression and there is a great lack of information about the [UDP-N-acetyl-?-d-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-Ts)] expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To gain insight in these issues we evaluated the Tn antigen expression in CLL patient samples using two Tn binding proteins with different fine specificity. We also studied the expression from 14 GalNAc-Ts genes in CLL patients by RT-PCR. Our results have provided additional information about the expression level of the Tn antigen, suggesting that a low density of Tn residues is expressed in CLL cells. We also found that GALNT11 was expressed in CLL cells and normal T cell whereas little or no expression was found in normal B cells. Based on these results, GALNT11 expression was assessed by qPCR in a cohort of 50 CLL patients. We found significant over-expression of GALNT11 in 96% of B-CLL cells when compared to normal B cells. Moreover, we confirmed the expression of this enzyme at the protein level. Finally we found that GALNT11 expression was significantly associated with the mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV), [?(2)(1)=18.26; P<0.0001], lipoprotein lipase expression [?(2)(1)=13.72; P=0.0002] and disease prognosis [?(2)(1)=15.49; P<0.0001]. Our evidence suggests that CLL patient samples harbor aberrant O-glycosylation highlighted by Tn antigen expression and that the over-expression of GALNT11 constitutes a new molecular marker for CLL. PMID:24076351

Libisch, M G; Casás, M; Chiribao, Ml; Moreno, P; Cayota, A; Osinaga, E; Oppezzo, P; Robello, C

2014-01-01

236

Molecular markers of yolk sac fry development in nine families of lake trout.  

PubMed

Salmonids in certain areas of North America and northern Europe suffer from reproductive disturbances manifested through the death of yolk sac fry. These disturbances are referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the Great Lakes region and M74 in the Baltic Sea. Both of these syndromes have been associated with reduced concentrations of thiamine in affected females and their eggs. However, large variations in signs and mortality, both within and between the individual syndromes, have been reported. Yolk sac fry mortality (M74) in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar has been shown to be associated with reduced DNA binding of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 (HIF-1), reduced production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein, decreased capillary density, and down-regulation of adult-type globin gene transcription (which is responsible for the protein part of adult hemoglobin). One of the main effects of all of these changes is reduced oxygen transport to the tissues of affected fry. In this study, the developmental patterns of HIF-1 DNA binding, VEGF protein expression, and adult-type globin gene transcription were analyzed in nine family groups of Lake Michigan lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. The results indicate that HIF-1 DNA binding and globin gene transcription increase from hatch to the end of yolk sac stage. Interindividual and between-family biological variations were detected, especially in VEGF protein expression and globin gene transcription. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using these molecular markers in investigating the etiology of EMS and making comparisons between the mechanisms of different salmonid yolk sac fry mortalities. PMID:20218502

Vuori, Kristiina A; Paavilainen, Tiia; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Czesny, Sergiusz; Rinchard, Jacques

2009-12-01

237

A single molecular marker to distinguish between strains of Trichogramma cacoeciae  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single microsatellite marker was used to distinguish between strains of Trichogramma cacoeciae Marchal collected from the carob moth (Ectomyelois ceratoniae) in Tunisia and from the grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) and a hawk moth in France. This marker can be used as an identification and monitoring tool in pest management programs.

J. Pizzol; O. Khoualdia; A. Ferran; P. Chavigny; F. Vanlerberghe-Masutti

2005-01-01

238

Identification and grouping of mycoplasmalike organisms associated with grapevine yellows and clover phyllody diseases based on immunological and molecular analyses.  

PubMed Central

Immunofluorescent staining, dot blot hybridization, PCR, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, and restriction fragment length polymorphism wee used to study the genetic relatedness among mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) associated with several geographically diverse grapevine yellows diseases (CA1, CH1, SA1, and SA2 from Bologna, Italy; GYU from Udine, Italy; GYR from Rome, Italy; and GYG from Germany). The relationship between these and MLOs associated with clover phyllody diseases in Italy (CPhB and CPhC) and Canada (CPhCa) was also examined. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with MLOs of GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected periwinkles. Dot blot hybridization with two cloned GYU DNA fragments, GYD-1 and GYD-2 inserts, showed that both hybridized with DNAs of GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected periwinkles but not with those of GYR and CPhCa. In addition, GYD-1 insert hybridized with DNAs of CA1, CH1, SA1, SA2, and GYG. Three primer pairs were developed in PCR experiments for this study. By using primer set GYD2P1F and GYD2P1R, a 600-bp DNA fragment was amplified only when DNAs from GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected plants were used as templates. With the primer pair GYD2P1F and GYD2P2R, a 550-bp DNA fragment was amplified from GYU, CPhB, CPhC, and GYG. The primer pair GYD1P1F and GYD1P2R, on the other hand, could amplify all isolates, although the patterns of PCR products were not identical for all isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8031086

Chen, K H; Credi, R; Loi, N; Maixner, M; Chen, T A

1994-01-01

239

The genome of the Mediterranean fruitfly ceratitis capitata : Localization of molecular markers by in situ hybridization to salivary gland polytene chromosomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We hybridized cloned DNA segments to salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the medfly,Ceratitis capitata, and thus established molecular markers for 24 sites on 6 out of 10 autosomal arms. An additional marker identified a medfly repetitive element that hybridizes to approximately 100 autosomal sites as well as a granular network that is thought to represent theX chromosome. Some of the

A. Zacharopoulou; M. Frisardi; C. Savakis; A. S. Robinson; P. Tolias; M. Konsolaki; K. Komitopoulou; F. C. Kafatos

1992-01-01

240

Genetic analysis of Spanish melon ( Cucumis melo L.) germplasm using a standardized molecular-marker array and geographically diverse reference accessions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic relationships among 125 Spanish melon ( Cucumis melo L.) accessions from a Spanish germplasm collection were assessed using a standard molecular-marker array consisting of 34 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers bands (19 primers) and 72 reference accessions drawn from previous studies. The reference accession array consisted of a broad range [Japanese (19) Crete (17), African (15), and USA

A. I. López-Sesé; J. E. Staub; M. L. Gómez-Guillamón

2003-01-01

241

DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS FOR GLASSY-WINGED AND SMOKE-TREE SHARPSHOOTERS FOR USE IN PREDATOR GUT CONTENT EXAMINATIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

To aid in identifying key predators of Proconiini sharpshooter species present in California, we developed and tested molecular diagnostic markers for the glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca coagulata (Say) and smoke-tree sharpshooter Homalodisca liturata (Ball) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae: Proconii...

242

Molecular, Immunological, and Biological Characterization of Tityus serrulatus Venom Hyaluronidase: New Insights into Its Role in Envenomation  

PubMed Central

Background Scorpionism is a public health problem in Brazil, and Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is primarily responsible for severe accidents. The main toxic components of Ts venom are low-molecular-weight neurotoxins; however, the venom also contains poorly characterized high-molecular-weight enzymes. Hyaluronidase is one such enzyme that has been poorly characterized. Methods and principal findings We examined clones from a cDNA library of the Ts venom gland and described two novel isoforms of hyaluronidase, TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2. The isoforms are 83% identical, and alignment of their predicted amino acid sequences with other hyaluronidases showed conserved residues between evolutionarily distant organisms. We performed gel filtration followed by reversed-phase chromatography to purify native hyaluronidase from Ts venom. Purified native Ts hyaluronidase was used to produce anti-hyaluronidase serum in rabbits. As little as 0.94 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum neutralized 1 LD50 (13.2 µg) of Ts venom hyaluronidase activity in vitro. In vivo neutralization assays showed that 121.6 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum inhibited mouse death 100%, whereas 60.8 µl and 15.2 µl of serum delayed mouse death. Inhibition of death was also achieved by using the hyaluronidase pharmacological inhibitor aristolochic acid. Addition of native Ts hyaluronidase (0.418 µg) to pre-neutralized Ts venom (13.2 µg venom+0.94 µl anti-hyaluronidase serum) reversed mouse survival. We used the SPOT method to map TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2 epitopes. More peptides were recognized by anti-hyaluronidase serum in TsHyal-1 than in TsHyal-2. Epitopes common to both isoforms included active site residues. Conclusions Hyaluronidase inhibition and immunoneutralization reduced the toxic effects of Ts venom. Our results have implications in scorpionism therapy and challenge the notion that only neurotoxins are important to the envenoming process. PMID:24551256

Oliveira-Mendes, Bárbara Bruna Ribeiro; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Felicori, Liza Figueiredo; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo Andrez; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

2014-01-01

243

Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

2013-01-01

244

Making the most of mitochondrial genomes--markers for phylogeny, molecular ecology and barcodes in Schistosoma (Platyhelminthes: Digenea).  

PubMed

An increasing number of complete sequences of mitochondrial (mt) genomes provides the opportunity to optimise the choice of molecular markers for phylogenetic and ecological studies. This is particularly the case where mt genomes from closely related taxa have been sequenced; e.g., within Schistosoma. These blood flukes include species that are the causative agents of schistosomiasis, where there has been a need to optimise markers for species and strain recognition. For many phylogenetic and population genetic studies, the choice of nucleotide sequences depends primarily on suitable PCR primers. Complete mt genomes allow individual gene or other mt markers to be assessed relative to one another for potential information content, prior to broad-scale sampling. We assess the phylogenetic utility of individual genes and identify regions that contain the greatest interspecific variation for molecular ecological and diagnostic markers. We show that variable characters are not randomly distributed along the genome and there is a positive correlation between polymorphism and divergence. The mt genomes of African and Asian schistosomes were compared with the available intraspecific dataset of Schistosoma mansoni through sliding window analyses, in order to assess whether the observed polymorphism was at a level predicted from interspecific comparisons. We found a positive correlation except for the two genes (cox1 and nad1) adjoining the putative control region in S. mansoni. The genes nad1, nad4, nad5, cox1 and cox3 resolved phylogenies that were consistent with a benchmark phylogeny and in general, longer genes performed better in phylogenetic reconstruction. Considering the information content of entire mt genome sequences, partial cox1 would not be the ideal marker for either species identification (barcoding) or population studies with Schistosoma species. Instead, we suggest the use of cox3 and nad5 for both phylogenetic and population studies. Five primer pairs designed against Schistosoma mekongi and Schistosoma malayensis were tested successfully against Schistosoma japonicum. In combination, these fragments encompass 20-27% of the variation amongst the genomes (average total length approximately 14,000bp), thus providing an efficient means of encapsulating the greatest amount of variation within the shortest sequence. Comparative mitogenomics provides the basis of a rational approach to molecular marker selection and optimisation. PMID:17570370

Zarowiecki, M Z; Huyse, T; Littlewood, D T J

2007-10-01

245

Biotherapies & Immunology International Master  

E-print Network

Biotherapies & Immunology International Master #12;students the possibility to access to a large knowledge in the field of biotherapies with special focus on immunology. The partners involved in this PIM have a large recognized expertise in Biotherapies and immunology and can offer complementary courses

Arleo, Angelo

246

[Influence of pre-analytical storage conditions on four plasma coagulation molecular markers measured using a STACIA automatic coagulation analyzer].  

PubMed

We investigated the effects of specimen storage conditions on the analysis of the coagulation molecular markers, soluble fibrin (SF), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), thrombomodulin (TM) and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex (total PAI-1: tPAI). Marker levels were measured using a STACIA automatic coagulation analyzer. Among these four markers in blood from healthy subjects, only tPAI increased gradually with time, and the differences were especially marked when blood samples were stored at room temperature. Patient blood samples were stored for 4 hours under three different conditions: whole blood storage on ice, storage on ice after centrifugation, and refrigerated storage after centrifugation. Analytical results were compared between the three sets of samples. There were no significant differences in TAT or TM after 4 hours' storage under the different conditions. However, SF was decreased in several samples. In 11 of 14 samples with >20 microg/ml SF, SF levels were reduced by >10 microg/ml when whole blood without centrifugation was stored on ice. tPAI levels increased slightly after storage for 4 hours under all three conditions. These results suggest that centrifugation followed by refrigeration is the optimal storage method for blood samples when all four markers are to be measured simultaneously in the same sample. PMID:23427695

Yae, Masataka; Sueishi, Machiko; Mikami, Yoko; Kinoshita, Misae; Hirano, Sumiko; Nakamura, Kiyoko; Futata, Yuko; Kawashima, Hironobu; Ohkubo, Kumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Akira

2012-12-01

247

Development of user-friendly functional molecular markers for VvDXS gene conferring muscat flavor in grapevine.  

PubMed

High fruit and wine quality combined with good climatic adaptation and disease resistance are essential objectives of grape breeding. While several molecular markers are available for pyramiding resistance to fungal pathogens, molecular tools for predicting fruit composition are still scarce. Muscat flavor, caused by the accumulation of monoterpenoids in the berry, is an important target trait for breeding, sought after in both table grapes and wine. Four missense mutations in the VvDXS gene in grape germplasm have been shown to be tightly linked to muscat flavor. Here we present highly reproducible and breeder-friendly functional markers for each of the targeted polymorphisms developed by using either the multiplexed minisequencing SNaPshot™ method, the high-resolution melting (HRM) assay or the cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence system. A total of 242 grapevine accessions were analyzed to optimize these different genotyping methods and to provide allele-specific markers for accurate selection of muscat flavor at early stages of grape breeding programs. The HRM and the minisequencing SNaPshot multiplex assays allow for high-throughput automated screening and are suitable for large-scale breeding programs and germplasm characterization. PMID:24482604

Emanuelli, F; Sordo, M; Lorenzi, S; Battilana, J; Grando, M S

2014-01-01

248

Characterization of the Miiuy Croaker (Miichthys miiuy) Transcriptome and Development of Immune-Relevant Genes and Molecular Markers  

PubMed Central

Background The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) is an important species of marine fish that supports capture fisheries and aquaculture. At present commercial scale aquaculture of this species is limited due to diseases caused by pathogens and parasites which restrict production and limit commercial value. The lack of transcriptomic and genomic information for the miiuy croaker limits the ability of researchers to study the pathogenesis and immune system of this species. In this study we constructed a cDNA library from liver, spleen and kidney which was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing to enable gene discovery and molecular marker development. Principal Findings In our study, a total of 69,071 unigenes with an average length of 572 bp were obtained. Of these, 45,676 (66.13%) were successfully annotated in public databases. The unigenes were also annotated with Gene Ontology, Clusters of Orthologous Groups and KEGG pathways. Additionally, 498 immune-relevant genes were identified and classified. Furthermore, 14,885 putative simple sequence repeats (cSSRs) and 8,510 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from the 69,071 unigenes. Conclusion The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) transcriptome data provides a large resource to identify new genes involved in many processes including those involved in the response to pathogens and diseases. Furthermore, the thousands of potential cSSR and SNP markers found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of molecular marker assisted breeding programs for the miiuy croaker. PMID:24714210

Che, Rongbo; Sun, Yueyan; Sun, Dianqiao; Xu, Tianjun

2014-01-01

249

Copyright 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Estimation of Pairwise Relatedness With Molecular Markers  

E-print Network

Applications of quantitative genetics and conservation genetics often require measures of pairwise marker-field of conservation genetics. For example, in captive based estimators for wCopyright © 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Estimation of Pairwise Relatedness

Lynch, Michael

250

Application of ISSR Markers to Analyze Molecular Relationships in Iranian Jasmine (Jasminum spp.) Accessions.  

PubMed

There are many species of jasmines in different regions of Iran in natural or cultivated form, and there is no information about their genetic status. Therefore, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis was used to evaluate genetic variations of the 53 accessions representing eight species of Jasminum collected from different regions of Iran. A total of 21 ISSR primers were used which generated 981 bands of different sizes. Mean percentage of polymorphic bands was 90.64 %. Maximum resolving power, polymorphic information content average, and marker index values were 21.55, 0.35, and 14.42 for primers of 3, 4, and 3 respectively. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficients indicated that 53 accessions were divided into two major clusters. The first major cluster was divided into two subclusters; the subcluster A included Jasminum grandiflorum L., J. officinale L., and J. azoricum L. and the subcluster B consisted of three forms of J. sambac L. (single, semi-double, and double flowers). The second major cluster was divided into two subclusters; the first subcluster (C) included J. humile L., J. primulinum Hemsl., J. nudiflorum Lindl. and the second subcluster (D) consisted of J. fruticans L. At the species level, the highest percentage of polymorphism (34.05 %), numbers of effective alleles (1.16), Shannon index (0.151), and Nei's genetic diversity (0.098) were observed in J. officinale. The lowest values of percentage polymorphism (0.011), number of effective alleles (1.009), Shannon index (0.007), and Nei's genetic diversity (0.005) were obtained for J. nudiflorum. Based on pairwise population matrix of Nei's unbiased genetic identity, the highest identity (0.85) was found between J.officinale and J. azoricum and the lowest identity (0.69) was between J. grandiflorum and J. perimulinum. Based on analysis of molecular variance, the amount of genetic variations among the eight populations was 83 %. This study demonstrated that the ISSR is an useful tool in jasmine genomic diversity studies and to detect their relationships. PMID:25189463

Ghasemi Ghehsareh, Masood; Salehi, Hassan; Khosh-Khui, Morteza; Niazi, Ali

2014-09-01

251

Size distribution of particle-phase molecular markers during a severe winter pollution episode.  

PubMed

Airborne particulate matter was collected using filter samplers and cascade impactors in six size fractions below 1.8 microm during a severe winter air pollution event at three sites in the Central Valley of California. The smallest size fraction analyzed was 0.056 < Dp <0.1 microm particle diameter, which accounts for the majority of the mass in the ultrafine (PM0.1) size range. Separate samples were collected during the daytime (10 a.m. to 6 p.m. PST) and nighttime (8 p.m. to 8 a.m. PST) to characterize diurnal patterns. Each sample was extracted with organic solvents and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry for molecular markers that can be used for size-resolved source apportionment calculations. Colocated impactor and filter measurements were highly correlated (R8 > 0.8) for retene, benzo[ghi]flouranthene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, coronene, MW302 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), 17beta(H)-21alpha(H)-30-norhopane, 17alpha(H)-21beta(H)-hopane, alphabetabeta-20R-C29-ethylcholestane, levoglucosan, and cholesterol. Of these compounds, levoglucosan was present in the highest concentration (60-2080 ng m(-3)) followed by cholesterol (6-35 ng m(-3)), PAHs (2-38 ng m(-3)), and hopanes and steranes (0-2 ng m(-3)). Nighttime concentrations were higher than daytime concentrations in all cases. Organic compound size distributions were generally similar to the total carbon size distributions during the nighttime but showed greater variability during the daytime. This may reflect the dominance of fresh emission in the stagnant surface layer during the evening hours and the presence of aged organic aerosol at the surface during the daytime when the atmosphere is better mixed. All of the measured organic compound particle size distributions had a single mode that peaked somewhere between 0.18 and 0.56 microm, but the width of each distribution varied by compound. Cholesterol generally had the broadest particle size distribution, while benzo[ghi]perylene and 17alpha(H)-21beta(H)-29-norhopane generally had sharper peaks. The difference between the size distributions of the various particle-phase organic compounds reflects the fact that these compounds exist in particles emitted from different sources. The results of the current study will prove useful for size-resolved source apportionment exercises. PMID:18800516

Kleeman, Michael J; Riddle, Sarah G; Jakober, Chris A

2008-09-01

252

Identification of Single-Copy Orthologous Genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Physalis Using Molecular Markers  

PubMed Central

The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei’s genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis. PMID:23166835

Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

2012-01-01

253

Molecular mapping of genes for opposite leafing in maize using simple-sequence repeat markers.  

PubMed

Maize with opposite phyllotaxy (OP) and also initiating ears in opposite pairs is an aberrant mutant and also precious material for maize breeding and plant evolution studies. Mapping and identifying the markers closely linked to genes for the OP trait are essential for cloning the gene and marker-assisted selection in breeding. We established H14D, a near-isogenic line of the OP trait with H53 genetic background. We found that the OP trait is regulated by two independent dominant genes with mutually complementary relations, named Opp-1 and Opp-2. Screening of seven simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers among the 105 pairs of SSR primers showed polymorphism between the inbred lines H14D and H53. The polymorphic SSR markers were then used to determine linkage with the trait in an F(2) population with 441 progeny, suggesting that SSR marker umc2094 in the Bin2.01 region is linked with Opp-1 at 6.7 cM, and bnlg1831 in Bin2.06 is linked with Opp-2 at 6.1 cM. Further investigation showed that bnlg1092 and umc1028 are linked to Opp-1 and Opp-2 genes, with genetic distances of 12.2 and 1.9 cM. It was also found that the four SSR markers flank the two OP genes, respectively. These results will be useful for marker-assisted selection breeding of OP maize and will also strengthen the basis for cloning of the opposite leafing gene. PMID:22179993

Tan, Y Q; Xie, C X; Jiang, H Y; Ye, H; Xiang, Y; Zhu, S W; Cheng, B J

2011-01-01

254

Analysis of gene expression profiles in normal and neoplastic ovarian tissue samples identifies candidate molecular markers of epithelial ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer, in part because of the lack of effective early detection methods. Although alterations of several genes, such as c-erb-B2, c-myc, and p53, have been identified in a significant fraction of ovarian cancers, none of these mutations are diagnostic of malignancy or predictive of tumor behavior over time. Here, we used oligonucleotide microarrays with probe sets complementary to >6,000 human genes to identify genes whose expression correlated with epithelial ovarian cancer. We extended current microarray technology by simultaneously hybridizing ovarian RNA samples in a highly parallel manner to a single glass wafer containing 49 individual oligonucleotide arrays separated by gaskets within a custom-built chamber (termed “array-of-arrays”). Hierarchical clustering of the expression data revealed distinct groups of samples. Normal tissues were readily distinguished from tumor tissues, and tumors could be further subdivided into major groupings that correlated both to histological and clinical observations, as well as cell type-specific gene expression. A metric was devised to identify genes whose expression could be considered ideal for molecular determination of epithelial ovarian malignancies. The list of genes generated by this method was highly enriched for known markers of several epithelial malignancies, including ovarian cancer. This study demonstrates the rapidity with which large amounts of expression data can be generated. The results highlight important molecular features of human ovarian cancer and identify new genes as candidate molecular markers. PMID:11158614

Welsh, John B.; Zarrinkar, Patrick P.; Sapinoso, Lisa M.; Kern, Suzanne G.; Behling, Cynthia A.; Monk, Bradley J.; Lockhart, David J.; Burger, Robert A.; Hampton, Garret M.

2001-01-01

255

Insights into the phylogeny of sporadotrichid ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora: Hypotricha) based on genealogical analyses of multiple molecular markers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sporadotrichid ciliates are an especially diverse group. A number of investigators have studied the morphological, morphogenetic, and molecular relationships among members of this group. Despite this, a consistent classification is still lacking and several important questions about the phylogenetic relationships within this group remain unsolved. To improve our understanding of these relationships, we constructed phylogenetic trees using the nucleotide sequences of the small-subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene and amino acid sequences of actin I and ?-tubulin. Analyses of SSrRNA gene sequences indicated that: 1) the Sporadotrichida sensu Lynn (2008) and the Oxytrichidae are polyphyletic; 2) the Uroleptus species, which are classified to urostylids, formed a sister group with the oxytrichids; 3) Halteria grandinella, which is grouped morphologically with oligotrich species, clustered within the oxytrichids. These results are congruent with previous studies based on SSrRNA gene sequences. However, the amino acid sequences of actin I and ?-tubulin yielded different topologies. The main results are: 1) in all phylogenetic trees, the genus Oxytricha was paraphyletic; 2) Uroleptus was sister to a subset of Urostyla and Holosticha, albeit with low supporting values; 3) Halteria grandinella was separated distantly from the Oxytrichidae in trees inferred from actin I amino acid sequences but clustered with oligotrichids in the ?-tubulin analysis. The inconsistency among the trees inferred from these different molecular markers may be caused by rapidly accumulated genetic characterizations of ciliates. Further studies with additional molecular markers and sampling of more taxa are expected to better address the relationships among sporadotrichids.

Hu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaozhong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Al-Farraj, Saleh A.; Song, Weibo

2011-01-01

256

Evaluation of polysucrose 15000 as a marker of intestinal permeability.  

E-print Network

??Evaluation of Polysucrose 15000 as a marker of intestinal permeability Hans Öman, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska Hospital,… (more)

Öman, Hans

1996-01-01

257

Molecular characterization and marker based chemotaxonomic studies of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.  

PubMed

Detailed chemical studies and RAPD analysis were done in different populations of Podophyllum hexandrum collected from high altitude regions of North Western Himalayas. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed a high degree of genetic diversity among the 12 collected accessions, attributed to their geographical and climatic conditions. HPLC analysis also revealed variation in the concentration of two major marker compounds which lead to the identification of a chemotype. The study demonstrated that RAPD and chemical markers are very useful tools to compare the genetic relationship and pattern of variation among such prioritized and endangered medicinal plants. PMID:19788918

Sultan, Phalisteen; Shawl, A S; Rehman, Suriya; Ahmed, S Fayaz; Ramteke, P W

2010-06-01

258

Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breeding for scab-resistant apple cultivars by pyramiding several resistance genes in the same genetic background is a promising way to control apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. To achieve this goal, DNA markers linked to the genes of interest are required in order to select seedlings with the desired resistance allele combinations. For several apple scab resistance genes,

M Gygax; L Gianfranceschi; M Kellerhals; C Gessler; A Patocchi

2004-01-01

259

GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A ROOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

260

Identification of molecular markers associated with low chill/heat tolerance in raspberry  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

New genetic markers were developed which are linked to cold and heat tolerant raspberries. Raspberry is a cool season crop, and as such, cannot tolerate the high temperatures of the South during the normal growing season. Expanding the commercial growth range of raspberry production to the southern...

261

Diversity Analysis of Tomato Cultivars Based on Coefficient of Parentage and RAPD Molecular Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic diversity analysis provides information on the genetic base of the gene pool of released genotypes. The objectives of this study were to assess the diversity of tomato cultivars and breeding lines released from North Carolina State University based on their coefficient of parentage (COP) and RAPD markers, and to estimate the contribution of ancestors to these tomato cultivars and

Bal K. Joshi; Randy G. Gardner; Dilip R. Panthee

2012-01-01

262

Use of molecular markers in breeding for soluble solids content in tomato — a re-examination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through earlier breeding efforts, portions of the genome of the wild species Lycopersicon chmielewskii have been introgressed into the cultivated tomato (Rick 1974). These introgressed chromosomal segments have been reported to increase soluble solids in fruit of certain tomato varieties (Rick 1974). Recently, two of the introgressed segments have been identified with RFLP markers and tested for effects on soluble

S. D. Tanksley; J. Hewitt

1988-01-01

263

A clinical, cytogenetic, FISH and molecular study of supernumerary marker 15 chromosomes  

SciTech Connect

We studied 17 patients with supernumerary marker chromosomes shown by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the 15-centromere specific probe pTRA-25 to be 15-derived. Genetic constitution of the marker chromosomes was investigated using FISH, Southern blot analysis and PCR for proximal and distal loci on 15q as well as conventional cytogenetics. Eight of the 17 patients were mentally retarded. Six of the eight carried a de novo marker 15 containing one or two doses of loci known to be in or near the Prader-Willi/Angelman (PWS/AS) region, whereas none of the nine non-retarded patients had duplications of this region, and only two of the eight whose parents were available had a de novo marker. None of the mentally retarded patients had PWS or AS. In two retarded patients (one de novo, one familial) there was no duplication of the PWS/AS region. Uniparental disomy affecting the normal 15 homologs was excluded in 10 of the patients, including all eight with mental retardation.

Dennis, N.R. [Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Crolla, J.A.; Harvey, J.F. [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom)

1994-09-01

264

Isolation of molecular markers for tomato ( L. esculentum ) using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new DNA polymorphism assay was developed in 1990 that is based on the amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of random DNA segments, using single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. The amplified DNA fragments, referred to as RAPD markers, were shown to be highly useful in the construction of genetic maps (“RAPD mapping”). We have now adapted the

R. M. Klein-Lankhorst; A. Vermunt; R. Weide; T. Liharska; P. Zabel

1991-01-01

265

Molecular genetic characterization of lasquerella new industrial crop using DArTseq markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

DArTseq, a new SNP-based marker platform, was developed and used to analyze the genetic diversity of the US germplasm collection of lesquerella. Lesquerella is a new oilseed crop in the Brassica family found native in the American Southwest. The potential of the species as a domestic source of indu...

266

Patterns of inheritance with RAPD molecular markers reveal novel types of polymorphism in the honey bee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to generate random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) from honey bee DNA samples in order to follow the patterns of inheritance of RAPD markers in a haplodiploid insect. The genomic DNA samples from two parental bees, a haploid drone and a diploid queen, were screened for polymorphism with 68 different tennucleotide primers of random

Greg J. Hunt; Robert E. Page

1992-01-01

267

Molecular markers discriminate closely related species Encarsia diaspidicola and Encarsia berlesei (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae): biocontrol candidate agents for white peach scale in Hawaii.  

PubMed

We genetically characterized Encarsia diapsidicola Silvestri and Encarsia berlesei Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) by two molecular methods: phylogenetic analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI) and intersimple sequence repeat-polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR) DNA fingerprinting. These two closely related endoparasitoids are candidate biological control agents for the white peach scale, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona Targioni-Tozetti (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), in Hawaii. We developed species-specific COI molecular markers that discriminated the two species, and we tested the utility of the E. diaspidicola-specific COI marker to detect parasitism of white peach scale. The COI sequence data uncovered 46-bp differences between the two Encarsia spp. The level of COI genetic divergence between the two species was 9.7%, and the two clustered into their own clade on a parismonious phylogram. ISSR-PCR readily discriminated the two Encarsia spp. because each was observed with fixed species-specific banding patterns. The COI molecular markers were specific for each species because cross-reactivity was not observed with nontarget species. The E. diaspidicola-specific COI markers were successful at detecting parasitism of white peach scale by E. diaspidicola by 24 h. Both molecular marker types successfully discriminated the two Encarsia spp., whereas the COI markers will be useful as tools to assess levels of parasitism in the field and to study competitive interactions between parasitoids. PMID:20568638

De León, Jesse H; Neumann, Gabor; Follett, Peter A; Hollingsworth, Robert G

2010-06-01

268

Modelling Immunological Memory  

E-print Network

Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

2010-01-01

269

Functional markers and a ‘systemic strategy’: convergency between plant breeding, plant nutrition and molecular biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research perspectives towards sustainable plant production through plant breeding on abiotic stress tolerance require interdisciplinary competence. The present paper wants to strengthen awareness of important activities or current insights in plant breeding, plant nutrition and molecular biology to facilitate approximation of the disciplines and to direct efforts in molecular biology early in development towards application. As a consequence of recent

Birgit Arnholdt-Schmitt

2005-01-01

270

Applications of molecular markers and DNA sequences in identifying fungal pathogens of cool season grain legumes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Molecular techniques have now been widely applied in many disciplines of biological sciences including fungal identification in microbial ecology and plant pathology. In plant pathology, it is now common to use molecular techniques to identify and study plant pathogens of many agronomic and horticul...

271

A Life Marker Chip for the Specific Molecular Identification of Life Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Specific Molecular Identification of Life Experiment (SMILE) represents the first in-situ attempt to search for a range of molecules in the Martian environment associated with extinct\\/extant life or potential life processes. SMILE will measure specific molecules using electrical and optical transduction techniques in three science subsystems, one of which a molecular receptor array is the subject of this paper.

M. R. Sims; D. C. Cullen; N. P. Bannister; W. D. Grant; R. Jones

2004-01-01

272

Identification of the IFITM Family as a New Molecular Marker in Human Colorectal Tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the expression profiles of intestinal adenomas from a new murine familial adenomatous polyposis model (Apc#14\\/+) using suppression subtractive hybridization to identify novel diagnostic markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. We identified 18 candidate genes having increased expression levels in the adenoma. Subsequent Northern blotting, real- time reverse transcription-PCR, and in situ hybridization analysis confirmed their induction in B-catenin-activated epithelial cells

Pauline Andreu; Sabine Colnot; Cecile Godard; Pierre Laurent-Puig; Dominique Lamarque; Axel Kahn; Christine Perret; Beatrice Romagnolo

2006-01-01

273

Citrus phylogeny and genetic origin of important species as investigated by molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citrus phylogeny was investigated using RAPD, SCAR and cpDNA markers. The genotypes analyzed included 36 accessions belonging\\u000a to Citrus together with 1 accession from each of the related genera Poncirus, Fortunella, Microcitrus and Eremocitrus. Phylogenetic analysis with 262 RAPDs and 14 SCARs indicated that Fortunella is phylogenetically close to Citrus while the other three related genera are distant from Citrus

E. Nicolosi; Z. N. Deng; A. Gentile; S. La Malfa; G. Continella; E. Tribulato

2000-01-01

274

Molecular phylogeny of the genus Buteo (Aves: Accipitridae) based on mitochondrial marker sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA sequences of the mitochondrial nd6 gene and the non-repetitive part of the pseudo-control region (?CR) were isolated from 101 individuals to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among all buzzards of the genus Buteo and other buteonine genera. Comparisons of the two marker sequences indicate that the ?CR evolved two times faster than the nd6 gene. The ?CR proved to be

Martin J. Riesing; Luise Kruckenhauser; Anita Gamauf; Elisabeth Haring

2003-01-01

275

Protein based molecular markers provide reliable means to understand prokaryotic phylogeny and support Darwinian mode of evolution  

PubMed Central

The analyses of genome sequences have led to the proposal that lateral gene transfers (LGTs) among prokaryotes are so widespread that they disguise the interrelationships among these organisms. This has led to questioning of whether the Darwinian model of evolution is applicable to prokaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of taxon-specific molecular markers such as conserved signature indels (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) for understanding the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes and to assess the influence of LGTs on prokaryotic evolution. The analyses of genomic sequences have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are unique properties of different groups of prokaryotes ranging from phylum to genus levels. The species distribution patterns of these molecular signatures strongly support a tree-like vertical inheritance of the genes containing these molecular signatures that is consistent with phylogenetic trees. Recent detailed studies in this regard on the Thermotogae and Archaea, which are reviewed here, have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are specific for the species from these two taxa and a number of their major clades. The genetic changes responsible for these CSIs (and CSPs) initially likely occurred in the common ancestors of these taxa and then vertically transferred to various descendants. Although some CSIs and CSPs in unrelated groups of prokaryotes were identified, their small numbers and random occurrence has no apparent influence on the consistent tree-like branching pattern emerging from other markers. These results provide evidence that although LGT is an important evolutionary force, it does not mask the tree-like branching pattern of prokaryotes or understanding of their evolutionary relationships. The identified CSIs and CSPs also provide novel and highly specific means for identification of different groups of microbes and for taxonomical and biochemical studies. PMID:22919687

Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz S.; Gupta, Radhey S.

2012-01-01

276

Generation of expressed sequence tags under cadmium stress for gene discovery and development of molecular markers in chickpea.  

PubMed

Chickpea is the world's third most important legume crop and belongs to Fabaceae family but suffered from severe yield loss due to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Development of modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and identification of resistant genes associated with these stresses facilitate improvement in chickpea breeding towards abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, 1597 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from a cDNA library of variety Pusa 1105 root tissue after cadmium (Cd) treatment. Assembly of ESTs resulted in a total of 914 unigenes of which putative homology was obtained for 38.8 % of unigenes after BLASTX search. In terms of species distribution, majority of sequences found similarity with Medicago truncatula followed by Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa and Pisum sativum sequences. Functional annotation was assigned using Blast2Go, and the Gene Ontology (GO) terms were categorized into biological process, molecular function and cellular component. Approximately 10.83 % of unigenes were assigned at least one GO term. Moreover, in the distribution of transcripts into various biological pathways, 20 of the annotated transcripts were assigned to ten pathways in KEGG database. A majority of the genes were found to be involved in sulphur and nitrogen metabolism. In the quantitative real-time PCR analysis, five of the transcription factors and three of the transporter genes were found to be highly expressed after Cd treatment. Besides, the utility of ESTs was demonstrated by exploiting them for the development of 83 genic molecular markers including EST-simple sequence repeats and intron targeted polymorphism that would assist in tagging of genes related to metal stress for future prospects. PMID:24414095

Gaur, Rashmi; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Gupta, Meetu

2014-07-01

277

The Journal of Immunology Computational Approach To Characterize Causative Factors  

E-print Network

The Journal of Immunology Computational Approach To Characterize Causative Factors and Molecular inflammation is necessary for efficacious therapeutic interventions and diagnostic support to clinicians. We, but limited, exper- imental evidence. The Journal of Immunology, 2014, 192: 1824­1834. I nflammation

278

IMMUNOLOGICAL COMPUTATION: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGICAL COMPUTATION: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS AUTHORS/AFFILIATIONS: Dipankar Dasgupta Reviews fundamental immunology concepts Presents computational models based on the negative selection From CRC Press About the Book Over the last decade, the field of immunological computation has

Dasgupta, Dipankar

279

Improving the reliability of molecular sexing of birds using a W-specific marker  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular techniques for identifying sex of birds utilize length differences between CHD-Z and CHD-W introns, but in some cases these methods can lead to sexing errors. Here we show that an additional W-specific primer can be used in conjunction with a pre-existing sexing primer pair to dramatically improve the reliability of molecular sexing methods. We illustrate the approach with American

DAIZABURO SHIZUKA; BRUCE E. LYON

2008-01-01

280

Distinct immunologic effects of different intravenous iron preparations on monocytes  

PubMed Central

Background Iron deficiency contributes to anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. I.v. iron is therefore widely used for anaemia treatment, although it may induce oxidative stress and activate monocytes. Different i.v. iron preparations are available, but interestingly their substance-specific immunologic effects are poorly studied. Methods We analysed the effect of iron sucrose, ferric carboxymaltose, iron isomaltoside 1000, low-molecular-weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol on classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocyte biology. We therefore stimulated in vitro mature monocytes and haematopoietic CD34+ stem cells during their differentiation into monocytes with different concentrations (0.133, 0.266, 0.533 mg/mL) of i.v. iron preparations. Alterations of monocyte subset distribution, expression of surface markers (CD86, CCR5, CX3CR1), as well as production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-1?) and reactive oxygen species were measured using flow cytometry. Additionally, we analysed phagocytosis and antigen presentation capacity. Results We found specific immunologic effects after stimulation with iron sucrose which were not induced by the other iron preparations. Iron sucrose activated monocyte subsets leading to significantly increased CD86 expression. Simultaneously CD16 and CX3CR1 expression and monocytic phagocytosis capacity were decreased. Additionally, differentiation of monocytes from haematopoietic CD34+ stem cells was almost completely abolished after stimulation with iron sucrose. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that specific immunologic effects of distinct i.v. iron preparations exist. The clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation. PMID:24523357

Fell, Lisa H.; Zawada, Adam M.; Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Seiler, Sarah; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.

2014-01-01

281

Highly variable microsatellite markers for the fungal and algal symbionts of the lichen Lobaria pulmonaria and challenges in developing biont-specific molecular markers for fungal associations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The availability of highly variable markers for the partners of a fungal symbiosis enables the integrated investigation of ecological and evolutionary processes at the symbiotic level. In this article we analyze the specificity of the first and to date only microsatellite markers that had been developed for an epiphytic lichen (Lobaria pulmonaria). We used DNA extracts from cultures of the

Ivo Widmer; Francesco Dal Grande; Carolina Cornejo; Christoph Scheidegger

2010-01-01

282

Immunology as Information Processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes the behavior of the immune system from an informationprocessing perspective. It reviews a series of projects conducted at the University of New Mexico and the Santa Fe Institute, which have developed and explored the theme "immunology as information processing." The projects cover the spectrum from serious modeling of real immunological phenomena, such as crossreactive responses in animals

Stephanie Forrest; Steven A. Hofmeyr

2000-01-01

283

Immunology of the tonsils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tonsils are lymphoepithelial structures that provide a protective immunological ring at the openings of both digestive and respiratory tracts. Here, as discussed by Marta Perry and Anthony Whyte, the unique nature of the various human tonsils reveals that they are capable of a variety of complex immunological functions.

Marta Perry; Anthony Whyte

1998-01-01

284

The New Cellular Immunology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

Claman, Henry N.

1973-01-01

285

Invertebrate Ecological Immunology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological immunology is a rapidly expanding field that examines the causes and consequences of variation in immune function in the context of evolution and of ecology. Millions of invertebrate species rely solely on innate immunity, compared with only 45,000 vertebrate species that rely additionally on an acquired immune system. Despite this difference in diversity, most studies of ecological immunology focus

J. Rolff; M. T. Siva-Jothy

2003-01-01

286

Prediction of body mass index in mice using dense molecular markers and a regularized neural network.  

PubMed

Bayesian regularization of artificial neural networks (BRANNs) were used to predict body mass index (BMI) in mice using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Data from 1896 animals with both phenotypic and genotypic (12 320 loci) information were used for the analysis. Missing genotypes were imputed based on estimated allelic frequencies, with no attempt to reconstruct haplotypes based on family information or linkage disequilibrium between markers. A feed-forward multilayer perceptron network consisting of a single output layer and one hidden layer was used. Training of the neural network was done using the Bayesian regularized backpropagation algorithm. When the number of neurons in the hidden layer was increased, the number of effective parameters, ?, increased up to a point and stabilized thereafter. A model with five neurons in the hidden layer produced a value of ? that saturated the data. In terms of predictive ability, a network with five neurons in the hidden layer attained the smallest error and highest correlation in the test data although differences among networks were negligible. Using inherent weight information of BRANN with different number of neurons in the hidden layer, it was observed that 17 SNPs had a larger impact on the network, indicating their possible relevance in prediction of BMI. It is concluded that BRANN may be at least as useful as other methods for high-dimensional genome-enabled prediction, with the advantage of its potential ability of capturing non-linear relationships, which may be useful in the study of quantitative traits under complex gene action. PMID:21481292

Okut, Hayrettin; Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Weigel, Kent A

2011-06-01

287

Molecular markers distinguishing supragranular and infragranular layers in the human prefrontal cortex.  

PubMed

The human neocortex is organized into six layers that are differentiated by the size and packing density of their constituent neurons. The gene products that guide the establishment of this lamination have been studied extensively, but the gene expression gradients present across the layers of the adult human neocortex are mostly unknown. As the supragranular (SG) and infragranular (IG) layers of the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) differ in their connectivity and developmental time course, we hypothesized that the SG and IG layers will show distinct differences in their transcriptomes. To test this prediction, we used laser capture microdissection coupled with DNA microarray transcriptome profiling. Sixty-nine genes exhibited robust and highly consistent expression differences between the SG and IG layers. For six selected markers, in addition to validating the microarray findings, in situ hybridization revealed a complex, subpopulation-specific neuronal distribution. The markers we identified are likely to be related to the functional differences between the SG and IG layers of the human PFC and can be used for assessing alterations in structure and function of this cortical region in human brain disorders. PMID:17432970

Arion, Dominique; Unger, Travis; Lewis, David A; Mirnics, Károly

2007-03-01

288

Diagnostic/prognostic molecular cytogenetic follow-up applied in satellited marker cases  

SciTech Connect

Special caution needs to be exercised in offering a good prognosis in Prader-Willi probe negative 15-derived marker cases, since it is clear that phenotypic effects can still be associated with the apparent presence of proximal sequences. We have had two postnatal cases in this category, one which was inherited from an unaffected paternal (non-mosaic) carrier, possibly demonstrating imprinting effects. Familial studies are continuing in this case. Although the D22/S9 locus appears diagnostic of cateye syndrome (CES), the dual specificity of the 14/22 centromeric probe leaves the possibility of a poor prognosis 14 derivation when the CES probe is negative. Therefore, it is imperative that proximal long arm 13, 14, 21 and more proximal 15 FISH probes be implemented so that a phenotypically correlated database may indicate the proper FISH probes necessary for accurate prognosis. Bisatellited markers is which a bipartite centromeric probe signal was found were considered to be higher risk than those with the single signal in counseling.

Papenhausen, P.R.; Anderson, S.

1994-09-01

289

Molecular Diversity Assessment Using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) Markers in Vicia faba L.  

PubMed Central

Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationship among 58 faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes. Fourteen SRAP primer combinations amplified a total of 1036 differently sized well-resolved peaks (fragments), of which all were polymorphic with a 0.96 PIC value and discriminated all of the 58 faba bean genotypes. An average pairwise similarity of 21% was revealed among the genotypes ranging from 2% to 65%. At a similarity of 28%, UPGMA clustered the genotypes into three main groups comprising 78% of the genotypes. The local landraces and most of the Egyptian genotypes in addition to the Sudan genotypes were grouped in the first main cluster. The advanced breeding lines were scattered in the second and third main clusters with breeding lines from the ICARDA and genotypes introduced from Egypt. At a similarity of 47%, all the genotypes formed separated clusters with the exceptions of Hassawi 1 and Hassawi 2. Group analysis of the genotypes according to their geographic origin and type showed that the landraces were grouped according to their origin, while others were grouped according to their seed type. To our knowledge, this is the first application of SRAP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity in faba bean. Such information will be useful to determine optimal breeding strategies to allow continued progress in faba bean breeding. PMID:23211669

Alghamdi, Salem S.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Ammar, Megahed H.

2012-01-01

290

Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers.  

PubMed

The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexa-nucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system. PMID:20965267

Murat, C; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbé, J; Morin, E; Tisserant, E; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, F

2011-06-01

291

De novo transcriptome analysis of Hevea brasiliensis tissues by RNA-seq and screening for molecular markers  

PubMed Central

Background The rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, is a species native to the Brazilian Amazon region and it supplies almost all the world’s natural rubber, a strategic raw material for a variety of products. One of the major challenges for developing rubber tree plantations is adapting the plant to biotic and abiotic stress. Transcriptome analysis is one of the main approaches for identifying the complete set of active genes in a cell or tissue for a specific developmental stage or physiological condition. Results Here, we report on the sequencing, assembling, annotation and screening for molecular markers from a pool of H. brasiliensis tissues. A total of 17,166 contigs were successfully annotated. Then, 2,191 Single Nucleotide Variation (SNV) and 1.397 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were discriminated from the sequences. From 306 putative, mainly non-synonymous SNVs located in CDS sequences, 191 were checked for their ability to characterize 23 Hevea genotypes by an allele-specific amplification technology. For 172 (90%), the nucleotide variation at the predicted genomic location was confirmed, thus validating the different steps from sequencing to the in silico detection of the SNVs. Conclusions This is the first study of the H. brasiliensis transcriptome, covering a wide range of tissues and organs, leading to the production of the first developed SNP markers. This process could be amplified to a larger set of in silico detected SNVs in expressed genes in order to increase the marker density in available and future genetic maps. The results obtained in this study will contribute to the H. brasiliensis genetic breeding program focused on improving of disease resistance and latex yield. PMID:24670056

2014-01-01

292

Intraocular lymphoma: immunological and cytological analysis.  

PubMed Central

We retrospectively reviewed the cytology and immunohistology of vitreous specimens from nine patients with intraocular lymphoma (ocular reticulum cell sarcoma). A single vitreous biopsy specimen was not always adequate to establish the diagnosis in this condition. Cytological evaluation was more accurate than lymphocyte surface marker analysis to differentiate lymphoma from uveitis. The immunological features of these tumours indicate a heterogeneous group of intraocular lymphomas. Images PMID:3067746

Char, D H; Ljung, B M; Deschênes, J; Miller, T R

1988-01-01

293

Molecular Phylogeny of a tick, Ixodes granulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) based on cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) marker  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identification of a local species of tick, Ixodes granulatus from the family Ixodidae is essential because it has potential to be vector for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia and tick thypus. The aim of this study is to portray the relationships among several populations of I. granulatus collected from different species of animal hosts and localities in Peninsular Malaysia. Polymerase Chain Reaction was conducted by amplifying mitochondrial DNA marker, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from 15 individual ticks that attached to five different hosts caught from three different localities. Confirmation of the species identity was accomplished using BLAST program. Neighbor-joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) tree based on COI sequences were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 to identify the relationship among species. The result of this study showed a high genetic heterogeneity between I. granulatus and other species of the same genus (7.2-23.7%). Furthermore, a low intraspecific variation was observed among the species of I. granulatus collected from different localities (0-3.7%). This study produced the first establishment of molecular marker for clarifying genetic species variation and diversity of local I. granulatus tick which contribute to the control of tick-borne infections.

Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana Che; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; George, Ernna; Nor, Shukor Md

2014-09-01

294

A molecular marker associated with low-temperature induction of dormancy in red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea).  

PubMed

Dormancy induction in temperate deciduous plants is thought to be regulated by short photoperiods, but low temperature has been shown to eliminate the short photoperiod requirement in northern ecotypes. An F2 population (191 plants) red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L.) derived from a polycross of an F1 population produced from reciprocal crosses of the parental clonal ecotypes, Northwest Territories (NWT, 62 degrees N) and Utah (42 degrees N), was examined to identify molecular markers of temperature-induced endodormancy. Dormancy induction curves were generated for each individual in the F2 population and a standard point prior to vegetative maturity (i-VM) was inferred from the change in slope of the dormancy acquisition curve. Under Saskatoon, Saskatchewan field conditions (52 degrees N), the NWT ecotype entered i-VM on average 5-6 weeks before the Utah ecotype. Two sub-populations of the F2 population were distinguishable based on VM acquisition on exposure to low temperature but not to short photoperiods. A sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker was developed that correctly (> 92%) identified individual plants within the F2 subpopulation that were responsive to low-temperature induction of VM. Timing of bud break was strongly associated with the timing of VM in the geographical ecotypes but not in the F2 population, indicating that these are separate traits under genetic control. PMID:17241980

Svendsen, Erl; Wilen, Ron; Stevenson, Robert; Liu, Rensong; Tanino, Karen K

2007-03-01

295

Association of molecular markers in Plasmodium falciparum crt and mdr1 with in vitro chloroquine resistance: a Philippine study.  

PubMed

Specific mutations in the pfcrt and pfmdr1 genes have been reported to be associated with chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria parasites worldwide. These genetic markers are considered to be useful tools for the elucidation of several aspects of the epidemiology of drug resistant malaria. In this study, Plasmodium falciparum isolates from three distinct areas of the Philippines were analyzed for drug-resistance-associated genetic mutations, and their association with the in vitro chloroquine (CQ) response. Two novel pfcrt 72-76 allelic types, CVMDT and SVMDT, were detected. The frequency of the pfcrt K76T mutation in the isolates that were successfully tested for in vitro CQ susceptibility was found to be 100% in Kalinga, 80% in Palawan, and 87% in Mindanao. The frequency of the pfmdr1 N86Y mutation was 39% in Kalinga, 35% in Palawan, and 93% in Mindanao isolates. No mutations were found at positions 1042 and 1246 of pfmdr1. However, there were no significant associations found between polymorphisms in these genes and in vitro CQ susceptibility. The results of this study indicate that mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1 are not predictive of in vitro CQ resistance in Philippine isolates and may therefore not be suitable as molecular markers for surveillance. PMID:19567229

Hatabu, Toshimitsu; Iwagami, Moritoshi; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Taguchi, Nao; Escueta, Aleyla D; Villacorte, Elena A; Rivera, Pilarita T; Kano, Shigeyuki

2009-06-01

296

Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.  

PubMed

Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

2015-01-01

297

Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys  

PubMed Central

Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

2015-01-01

298

Molecular identification and phylogenetic relationship of green algae, Spirogyra ellipsospora (Chlorophyta) using ISSR and rbcL markers  

PubMed Central

Spirogyra is found in a wide range of habitats, including small stagnant water bodies, rivers, and streams. Spirogyra ellipsospora is common in northern Thailand. Species identification of the Spirogyra species based only on morphological characteristics can be difficult. A reliable and accurate method is required to evaluate genetic variations. This study aims to apply molecular approaches for the identification of S. ellipsospora using microsatellites and rbcL markers. Based on DNA sequencing, the rbcL gene was sequenced and the data was analyzed using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) program in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database. The sequence of S. ellipsospora from this study revealed definitive identity matches in the range of 99% for the consensus sequences of S. ellipsospora. The 10 primers of ISSR could be amplified by 92 amplification fragments. The DNA fragments and the rbcL sequence data grouped the Spirogyra specimens into two distinct clusters. PMID:25313288

Wongsawad, Pheravut; Peerapornpisal, Yuwadee

2014-01-01

299

Veterinary Clinical Pathologist Position The Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and  

E-print Network

Veterinary Clinical Pathologist Position The Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, immunology, molecular diagnostics, and cancer. A large combined residency/PhD program in pathology and experience. Environment Overview The Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology (MIP) has more than

Stephens, Graeme L.

300

Molecular epidemiology and virulence markers of Salmonella Infantis isolated over 25 years in São Paulo State, Brazil.  

PubMed

Infection of humans and animals caused by Salmonella is a major public health problem worldwide. Among the more than 2500 serovars, S. Infantis has been one of the 15 most isolated serovars in the world. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the molecular characteristics of S. Infantis strains from Brazil. The aims of this study were to type S. Infantis isolates of this country and to assess their pathogenic potential. The molecular epidemiology of 35 S. Infantis strains, isolated from human sources (25) and food items (10) between 1984 and 2009 in São Paulo State, Brazil, were investigated using ERIC-PCR, PFGE and MLST. Furthermore, the presence of some virulence markers from Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) SPI-1 and SPI-2 and from the virulence plasmid was assessed by PCR. Using ERIC-PCR, 34 S. Infantis strains exhibited a high genetic similarity (? 93.7%) and using PFGE, 32 strains exhibited a similarity ? 80.6%. Additionally, MLST showed a high clonal similarity among strains that all presented the same ST32. Thirty-two isolates under investigation contained the virulence markers invA, sopB, sopD, sipA, sipD, ssaR, sifA, flgK, fljB and flgL. In conclusion, the S. Infantis strains studied were genetically similar, suggesting that a prevalent subtype has been causing disease and food contamination during a 25year period in São Paulo State, an important metropolitan region in Brazil. Furthermore, the contamination between strains from food items and sick humans indicates that better control measures for S. Infantis may be needed in this country. PMID:23860124

Almeida, Fernanda; Pitondo-Silva, André; Oliveira, Maria Aparecida; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

2013-10-01

301

Yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) transcriptome sequencing: molecular marker development and comparative studies  

PubMed Central

Background Yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) is a minor legume crop characterized by its high seed protein content. Although grown in several temperate countries, its orphan condition has limited the generation of genomic tools to aid breeding efforts to improve yield and nutritional quality. In this study, we report the construction of 454-expresed sequence tag (EST) libraries, carried out comparative studies between L. luteus and model legume species, developed a comprehensive set of EST-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and validated their utility on diversity studies and transferability to related species. Results Two runs of 454 pyrosequencing yielded 205?Mb and 530?Mb of sequence data for L1 (young leaves, buds and flowers) and L2 (immature seeds) EST- libraries. A combined assembly (L1L2) yielded 71,655 contigs with an average contig length of 632 nucleotides. L1L2 contigs were clustered into 55,309 isotigs. 38,200 isotigs translated into proteins and 8,741 of them were full length. Around 57% of L. luteus sequences had significant similarity with at least one sequence of Medicago, Lotus, Arabidopsis, or Glycine, and 40.17% showed positive matches with all of these species. L. luteus isotigs were also screened for the presence of SSR sequences. A total of 2,572 isotigs contained at least one EST-SSR, with a frequency of one SSR per 17.75 kbp. Empirical evaluation of the EST-SSR candidate markers resulted in 222 polymorphic EST-SSRs. Two hundred and fifty four (65.7%) and 113 (30%) SSR primer pairs were able to amplify fragments from L. hispanicus and L. mutabilis DNA, respectively. Fifty polymorphic EST-SSRs were used to genotype a sample of 64?L. luteus accessions. Neighbor-joining distance analysis detected the existence of several clusters among L. luteus accessions, strongly suggesting the existence of population subdivisions. However, no clear clustering patterns followed the accession’s origin. Conclusion L. luteus deep transcriptome sequencing will facilitate the further development of genomic tools and lupin germplasm. Massive sequencing of cDNA libraries will continue to produce raw materials for gene discovery, identification of polymorphisms (SNPs, EST-SSRs, INDELs, etc.) for marker development, anchoring sequences for genome comparisons and putative gene candidates for QTL detection. PMID:22920992

2012-01-01

302

Parasitoids, predators and PCR: the use of diagnostic molecular markers in biological control of Arthropods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revolutionized the field of diagnostics, and today it has routine applications in medical, veterinary, forensic and botanical sciences. The fields of biological control and insect pest management have generally been slow to adopt PCR-based diagnostics in comparison with other fields of science. However, there has been increasing interest in the use of molecular diagnostic tools

T. D. Gariepy; U. Kuhlmann; C. Gillott; M. Erlandson

2007-01-01

303

Oranges and lemons: clues to the taxonomy of Citrus from molecular markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Go into any grocery store and one is confronted with an array of Citrus fruit: oranges, grapefruit, mandarins (tangerines), lemons and limes. This is rich bounty for the shopper, but taxonomists are perplexed as to how to classify the various kinds of Citrus that have existed since antiquity. Now, thanks to new genetic and molecular biological techniques, the relationships between

Gloria A. Moore

2001-01-01

304

Molecular subclassification of kidney tumors and the discovery of new diagnostic markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analysed the expression profiles of 70 kidney tumors of different histological subtypes to determine if these subgroups can be distinguished by their gene expression profiles, and to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying each subtype. In all, 39 clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC), seven primary and one metastatic papillary RCC, six granular RCC from old classification, five

Masayuki Takahashi; Ximing J Yang; Jun Sugimura; Jesper Backdahl; Maria Tretiakova; Chao-Nan Qian; Steven G Gray; Robert Knapp; John Anema; Richard Kahnoski; David Nicol; Nicholas J Vogelzang; Kyle A Furge; Hiroomi Kanayama; Susumu Kagawa; Bin Tean Teh

2003-01-01

305

Applicability of molecular markers to determine parasitic infection origins in the animal trade: a case study from Sarcoptes mites in wildebeest.  

PubMed

The development of non-manipulative molecular tools to determine the origin of parasite infections in the animal trade (if infected before their export or import) is of great interest worldwide for both the animal trade industry and for animal welfare. Molecular tools have a wide range of applications, including forensic identification, wildlife preservation and conservation, veterinary public health protection, and food safety. Nonetheless, genetic markers were not reported to detect the source of infection in the animal trade. In this study we tested the applicability of molecular tools to detect the origin of Sarcoptes mite infection of wildebeest imported by the United Arab Emirate (UAE) from Tanzania. Using one multiplex of seven microsatellite markers and control samples from UAE, Kenya and Italy, we demonstrated the usefulness of the multiplex STR-typing as a molecular tool of pivotal interest to help commercialist, authorities, and conservationists, to identify the geographical origin of parasitic infections. PMID:21814832

Alasaad, Samer; Schuster, Rolf K; Gakuya, Francis; Theneyan, Mohamed; Jowers, Michael J; Maione, Sandra; Min, Annarita Molinar; Soriguer, Ramón C; Rossi, Luca

2012-09-01

306

Molecular cloning and characterisation of the RESA gene, a marker of genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum  

PubMed Central

To identity immunodiagnostic antigen genes, a Plasmodium falciparum (Dd2 clone) expression library was screened using human immune sera. The ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA) was isolated: this antigen of the resistant clone presents repeat tandem sequences like the 3D7 clone, albeit in different numbers. RESA has been studied as a marker of genetic diversity, with different sizes being observed in different isolates and clones of Plasmodium falciparum. The native protein was localised in cultures by western-blot and immuno-transmission electron microscopy. The antigenicity of RESA was evaluated by ELISA, using the carboxy-terminal repeat region as antigen. The assay’s sensitivity and specificity were 78.2 and 94% respectively. PMID:19816792

Moyano, Eva M.; González, Luis Miguel; Cuevas, Laureano; Perez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Santa-Maria, Ysmael

2009-01-01

307

Designing a SCAR molecular marker for monitoring Trichoderma cf. harzianum in experimental communities.  

PubMed

Several species of the fungal genus Trichoderma establish biological interactions with various micro- and macro-organisms. Some of these interactions are relevant in ecological terms and in biotechnological applications, such as biocontrol, where Trichoderma could be considered as an invasive species that colonizes a recipient community. The success of this invasion depends on multiple factors, which can be assayed using experimental communities as study models. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to monitor the colonization and growth of T. cf. harzianum when it invades experimental communities. For this study, 16 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers of 10-mer were used to generate polymorphic patterns, one of which generated a band present only in strains of T. cf. harzianum. This band was cloned, sequenced, and five primers of 20-23 mer were designed. Primer pairs 2F2/2R2 and 2F2/2R3 successfully and specifically amplified fragments of 278 and 448 bp from the T. cf. harzianum BpT10a strain DNA, respectively. Both primer pairs were also tested against the DNA from 14 strains of T. cf. harzianum and several strains of different fungal genera as specificity controls. Only the DNA from the strains of T. cf. harzianum was successfully amplified. Moreover, primer pair 2F2/2R2 was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fungal DNA mixtures and DNA extracted from fungal experimental communities as templates. T. cf. harzianum was detectable even when as few as 100 copies of the SCAR marker were available or even when its population represented only 0.1% of the whole community. PMID:25367789

Pérez, Gabriel; Verdejo, Valentina; Gondim-Porto, Clarissa; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

2014-11-01

308

Designing a SCAR molecular marker for monitoring Trichoderma cf. harzianum in experimental communities* #  

PubMed Central

Several species of the fungal genus Trichoderma establish biological interactions with various micro- and macro-organisms. Some of these interactions are relevant in ecological terms and in biotechnological applications, such as biocontrol, where Trichoderma could be considered as an invasive species that colonizes a recipient community. The success of this invasion depends on multiple factors, which can be assayed using experimental communities as study models. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to monitor the colonization and growth of T. cf. harzianum when it invades experimental communities. For this study, 16 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers of 10-mer were used to generate polymorphic patterns, one of which generated a band present only in strains of T. cf. harzianum. This band was cloned, sequenced, and five primers of 20–23 mer were designed. Primer pairs 2F2/2R2 and 2F2/2R3 successfully and specifically amplified fragments of 278 and 448 bp from the T. cf. harzianum BpT10a strain DNA, respectively. Both primer pairs were also tested against the DNA from 14 strains of T. cf. harzianum and several strains of different fungal genera as specificity controls. Only the DNA from the strains of T. cf. harzianum was successfully amplified. Moreover, primer pair 2F2/2R2 was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fungal DNA mixtures and DNA extracted from fungal experimental communities as templates. T. cf. harzianum was detectable even when as few as 100 copies of the SCAR marker were available or even when its population represented only 0.1% of the whole community. PMID:25367789

Pérez, Gabriel; Verdejo, Valentina; Gondim-Porto, Clarissa; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

2014-01-01

309

ADM3, TFF3 and LGALS3 are discriminative molecular markers in fine-needle aspiration biopsies of benign and malignant thyroid tumours  

PubMed Central

Background: Previously, we reported a six-marker gene set, which allowed a molecular discrimination of benign and malignant thyroid tumours. Now, we evaluated these markers in fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) in a prospective, independent series of thyroid tumours with proven histological outcome. Methods: Quantitative RT–PCR was performed (ADM3, HGD1, LGALS3, PLAB, TFF3, TG) in the needle wash-out of 156 FNAB of follicular adenoma (FA), adenomatous nodules, follicular and papillary thyroid cancers (TC) and normal thyroid tissues (NT). Results: Significant expression differences were found for TFF3, HGD1, ADM3 and LGALS3 in FNAB of TC compared with benign thyroid nodules and NT. Using two-marker gene sets, a specific FNAB distinction of benign and malignant tumours was achieved with negative predictive values (NPV) up to 0.78 and positive predictive values (PPV) up to 0.84. Two FNAB marker gene combinations (ADM3/TFF3; ADM3/ACTB) allowed the distinction of FA and malignant follicular neoplasia with NPV up to 0.94 and PPV up to 0.86. Conclusion: We demonstrate that molecular FNAB diagnosis of benign and malignant thyroid tumours including follicular neoplasia is possible with recently identified marker gene combinations. We propose multi-centre FNAB studies on these markers to bring this promising diagnostic tool closer to clinical practice. PMID:22223087

Karger, S; Krause, K; Gutknecht, M; Schierle, K; Graf, D; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Führer, D

2012-01-01

310

Meloidogyne virulence locus molecular marker for characterization of selected mi-virulent populations of Meloidogyne spp. is correlated with several genera of betaproteobacteria.  

PubMed

Resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato is conferred by the Mi resistance gene to the three most important species of Meloidogyne: M. arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica. Nevertheless, the Mi gene is unable to inhibit the reproduction of selected and naturally Mi-virulent populations of root-knot nematodes. As pathogenicity assays are time consuming, molecular markers were developed for the easy identification of Mi-virulent populations of Meloidogyne. The sequence characterized amplified region-Meloidogyne virulence locus (MVC) molecular marker is reported to differentiate Mi-avirulent and naturally Mi-virulent from selected Mi-virulent populations. This marker was used to compare acquired virulence in populations of M. javanica from Spain. The original populations used to develop the MVC marker were included as control for reference. Results showed that this marker did not amplify genomic DNA extracted from single juveniles or females of any of the populations tested either from Spain or Japan. In silico analyses performed with the recently published complete genome of M. incognita, indicated that the MVC marker is not correlated to a MVC or to any eukaryotic organism but to several betaproteobacteria genus from the family Comamonadaceae. PMID:20955082

Cortada, Laura; Sakai, Hiromichi; Verdejo-Lucas, Soledad; Mizukubo, Takayuki

2011-04-01

311

Uses of molecular markers for understanding modern and historical ecosystems (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information on current and historical population sizes and movements is important for understanding many aspects of ecosystem ecology such as responses to climate change. Such information can be surprisingly difficult to acquire, but can be estimated from clues contained in an organism’s DNA. Recent revolutions in molecular genetics, including direct sequencing and efficient mutation-detection methods, enable extraction of sequence information from even very small or ancient specimens. Furthermore, theoretical advances such as coalescent theory and molecular assignments are providing powerful tools to unlock secrets about changes in numbers, distributions and movements. Combination of these approaches with other types of data promises to provide especially useful insights into modern and paleoecosystems. I will provide examples of these applications from recent studies in ornithology.

Friesen, V. L.

2010-12-01

312

Carbohydrate microarrays for the recognition of cross-reactive molecular markers of microbes and host cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe here the development of a carbohydrate-based microarray to extend the scope of biomedical research on carbohydrate-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses. We have demonstrated that microbial polysaccharides can be immobilized on a surface-modified glass slide without chemical conjugation. With this procedure, a large repertoire of microbial antigens (?20,000 spots) can be patterned on a single micro-glass slide, reaching

Shaoyi Liu; Brian J. Trummer; Chao Deng; Aili Wang; Denong Wang

2002-01-01

313

A centennial record of anthropogenic impacts and extreme weather events in southwestern Taiwan: Evidence from sedimentary molecular markers in coastal margin  

SciTech Connect

A 100-year history of human and natural disturbances in southwestern Taiwan was reconstructed using a suite of molecular markers in four dated sediment cores from the upper slope region off the Gaoping River mouth. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) tracked Taiwan's industrialization/urbanization starting in the 1970s, and the enactment of environmental regulatory policies thereafter.

Kuo, Li-Jung; Lee, Chon-Lin; Louchouarn, Patrick; Huh, Chih-An; Liu, James T.; Chen, Jian-Cheng; Lee, Kun-Je

2014-09-15

314

Diagnostic value of molecular markers for Lr genes and characterization of leaf rust resistance of German winter wheat cultivars with regard to the stability of vertical resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breeding for resistance is an efficient strategy to manage wheat leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina f. sp. tritici. However, a prerequisite for the directed use of Lr genes in breeding and the detection of new races virulent to these Lr genes is a detailed knowledge on Lr genes present in wheat cultivars. Therefore, respective molecular markers for 18 Lr

Albrecht Serfling; Ilona Krämer; Volker Lind; Edgar Schliephake; Frank Ordon

315

Molecular Characterization and Population Structure of the Macaw Palm, Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae), Ex Situ Germplasm Collection Using Microsatellites Markers.  

PubMed

The Acrocomia aculeata is one of the most promising plants for sustainable production of renewable energy. In order to understand patterns of the distribution of the allelic diversity of A. aculeata ex situ germplasm collection, the present study investigated the hypothesis that the genetic variability of the accessions may match their geographical origin. A genotypic analysis of 77 A. aculeata accessions was conducted with 6 simple sequence repeat markers. A high degree of molecular diversity among the accessions was found, with an average of 9 alleles per locus and a polymorphic information content with a mean of 0.76. A total of 4 clusters was identified by the Bayesian analysis of population structure. The highest subpopulation diversity was identified in Pop1, mainly formed by accessions from State of Mato Grosso do Sul. The populations Pop2A, Pop2B, and Pop2C, all from the State of Minas Gerais, showed high genetic variability as determined by a higher F st, and a wide genetic variance, which were identified within and among the population by analysis of molecular variance. Based on our results and on Vavilov's theory on crop origins, one possible diversity center for A. aculeata is proposed to be in a region in southeast Brazil. PMID:25425677

Lanes, Eder C M; Motoike, Sérgio Y; Kuki, Kacilda N; Nick, Carlos; Freitas, Renata D

2015-01-01

316

tostandoutfromthecrowd? NextGen Immunology  

E-print Network

tostandoutfromthecrowd? Doyouwant NextGen Immunology: The Michael Sela Student and Postdoc Program for Excellence in Immunology Become a leader of NextGen Immunology! The immune system, in addition to its, state-of-the-art immunology is now reemerging as the most rapidly evolving multi-disciplinary biological

Shapiro, Ehud

317

DEGREE PROGRAMME BSc (Hons) Immunology  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Immunology DEGREE PROGRAMME GUIDE 2013-2014 #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology Introduction - Year 4 Introduction Immunology developed as the study of how the body defends itself against pathogens health and regulating disease have become apparent. As a result, immunology incorporates a wide variety

Levi, Ran

318

Stanford Immunology Graduate Program Handbook  

E-print Network

1 Stanford Immunology Graduate Program Handbook 2013-2014 #12;PhD Program in Immunology 2013-2014 PhD Handbook 2 The PhD Program in Immunology is one of thirteen Stanford Biosciences programs. The goal of the PhD Program in Immunology is to provide outstanding training and education for obtaining

Puglisi, Joseph

319

Associations among cytoplasmic molecular markers, gender, and components of fitness in Silene vulgaris, a gynodioecious plant.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that the dynamics of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic markers used in studies of plant populations could be influenced by natural selection acting elsewhere in the genome. This could be particularly true in gynodioecious plants if cpDNA or mtDNA genetic markers are in gametic disequilibrium with genes responsible for sex expression. In order to investigate this possibility, a natural population of the gynodioecious plant Silene vulgaris was used to study associations among mtDNA haplotype, cpDNA haplotype, sex and some components of fitness through seed. Individuals were sampled for mtDNA and cpDNA haplotype as determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods, sex (female or hermaphrodite), fruit number, fruit set, seeds/fruit and seed germination. The sex of surviving germinating seeds was also noted. All individuals in the population fell into one of two cytoplasmic categories, designated haplotypes f and g by a unique electrophoretic signature in both the mtDNA and cpDNA. The subset of the population carrying haplotype g included a significantly higher proportion of females when compared with the sex ratio of the subset carrying the f haplotype. Haplotype g had a significantly higher fitness when measured by fruit number, fruit set and seeds/fruit, whereas haplotype f had significantly higher fitness when measured by seed germination. Offspring of individuals carrying haplotype g included a significantly greater proportion of females when compared with offspring of individuals carrying the f haplotype. Other studies of gynodioecious plants have shown that females generally have higher fitness through seed than hermaphrodites, but in this study not all fitness differences between haplotypes could be predicted from differences in haplotype-specific sex ratio alone. Rather, some differences in haplotype-specific fitness were due to differences in fitness between individuals of the same sex, but carrying different haplotypes. The results are discussed with regard to the potential for hitchhiking selection to influence the dynamics of the noncoding regions used to designate the cpDNA and mtDNA haplotypes. PMID:12675832

McCauley, D E; Olson, M S

2003-03-01

320

Molecular characterization of Syrian date palm cultivars using plasmid-like DNA markers.  

PubMed

Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the most important domesticated fruit trees in the Near East and North African countries. This tree has been, for several decades, in serious threat of being completely destroyed by the "Bayoud" disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. In this study, 18 Syrian date palm cultivars and four male trees were analyzed according to the identity of mitochondrial plasmid-like DNAs. A PCR strategy that employs plasmid-like DNAs-specific primer pair was used. These primers amplify a product of either 373-bp or 265-bp that corresponds to the S-(Bayoud-susceptible) or the R-plasmid (Bayoud-resistant), respectively. Generated data revealed that only six cultivars ('Medjool', 'Ashrasi', 'Gish Rabi', 'Khineze', and yellow- and red-'Kabkab') have the S-plasmid, suggesting their susceptibility to the fusariosis, while the remaining 12 cultivars and the four male trees contain the R-plasmid, suggesting their resistance to the fusariosis. The PCR process applied here has been proved efficient for the rapid screening for the presence of the S and R DNAs in Syrian date palm. PCR markers developed in this study could be useful for the screening of date palm lines growing in the field. The availability of such diagnostic tool for plasmid characterization in date palm would also be of great importance in establishing propagation and breeding programs of date palm in Syria. PMID:22568006

Haider, N; Nabulsi, I

2012-02-01

321

Identification of the IFITM family as a new molecular marker in human colorectal tumors.  

PubMed

We analyzed the expression profiles of intestinal adenomas from a new murine familial adenomatous polyposis model (Apc(delta14/+)) using suppression subtractive hybridization to identify novel diagnostic markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. We identified 18 candidate genes having increased expression levels in the adenoma. Subsequent Northern blotting, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and in situ hybridization analysis confirmed their induction in beta-catenin-activated epithelial cells of murine adenomas. We showed that most of the genes also have altered expression levels in human colonic adenomas and carcinomas. We focused on the IFITM genes that encode IFN-inducible transmembrane proteins. Serial analyses of gene expression levels revealed high levels of expression in early and late intestinal neoplasm in both mice and humans. Using a conditional mouse model of Apc inactivation and a human colon carcinoma cell line, we showed that IFITM gene expression is rapidly induced after activation of the beta-catenin signaling. Using a large-scale analysis of human tumors, we showed that IFITM gene expression is significantly up-regulated specifically in colorectal tumors and thus may be a useful diagnostic tool in these tumors. PMID:16488993

Andreu, Pauline; Colnot, Sabine; Godard, Cécile; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lamarque, Dominique; Kahn, Axel; Perret, Christine; Romagnolo, Béatrice

2006-02-15

322

Molecular Characterization of Selected Local and Exotic Cattle Using RAPD Marker  

PubMed Central

In order to develop specific genetic markers and determine the genetic diversity of Bangladeshi native cattle (Pabna, Red Chittagong) and exotic breeds (Sahiwal), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed using 12 primers. Genomic DNA was extracted from 20 cattle (local and exotic) blood samples and extracted DNA was observed by gel electrophoresis. Among the random primers three were matched and found to be polymorphic. Genetic relations between cattle’s were determined by RAPD polymorphisms from a total of 66.67%. Statistical analysis of the data, estimating the genetic distances between cattle and sketching the cluster trees were estimated by using MEGA 5.05 software. Comparatively highest genetic distance (0.834) was found between RCC-82 and SL-623. The lowest genetic distance (0.031) was observed between M-1222 and M-5730. The genetic diversity of Red Chittagong and Sahiwal cattle was relatively higher for a prescribed breed. Adequate diversity in performance and adaptability can be exploited from the study results for actual improvement accruing to conservation and development of indigenous cattle resources. PMID:25049622

Khatun, M. Mahfuza; Hossain, Khondoker Moazzem; Mahbubur Rahman, S. M.

2012-01-01

323

Phenotypic screening and molecular analysis of blast resistance in fragrant rice for marker assisted selection.  

PubMed

Experiments were conducted to identify blast-resistant fragrant genotypes for the development of a durable blast-resistant rice variety during years 2012-2013. The results indicate that out of 140 test materials including 114 fragrant germplasms, 25 differential varieties (DVs) harbouring 23 blast-resistant genes, only 16 fragrant rice germplasms showed comparatively better performance against a virulent isolate of blast disease. The reaction pattern of single-spore isolate of Magnaporthe oryzae to differential varieties showed that Pish, Pi9, Pita-2 and Pita are the effective blast-resistant genes against the tested blast isolates in Bangladesh. The DNA markers profiles of selected 16 rice germplasms indicated that genotype Chinigura contained Pish, Pi9 and Pita genes; on the other hand, both BRRI dhan50 and Bawaibhog contained Pish and Pita genes in their genetic background. Genotypes Jirakatari, BR5, and Gopalbhog possessed Pish gene, while Uknimodhu, Deshikatari, Radhunipagol, Kalijira (3), Chinikanai each contained the Pita gene only. There are some materials that did not contain any target gene(s) in their genetic background, but proved resistant in pathogenicity tests. This information provided valuable genetic information for breeders to develop durable blast-resistant fragrant or aromatic rice varieties in Bangladesh. PMID:24841958

Khan, Mohammad Ashik Iqbal; Sen, Partha Pratim; Bhuiyan, Rejwan; Kabir, Enamul; Chowdhury, Abul Kashem; Fukuta, Yoshimichi; Ali, Ansar; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

2014-05-01

324

Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The genetic constitution of mussels ( Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction between the Black Sea and Mediterranean populations and a higher incidence of M. trossulus than reported so far in northern European populations. The frequency of M. galloprovincialis nuclear alleles was high along the Iberian Peninsula and decreased abruptly along the French coasts with a high frequency of M. edulis alleles in the Bay of Biscay, The Netherlands, Germany, Iceland, Barents and White Seas, and with little evidence of introgression between the two taxa. M. trossulus alleles were observed in the Baltic Sea and Danish Straits as expected. In addition, occurrence of M. trossulus alleles in cold waters of Iceland, Barents Sea and White Sea is reported for the first time.

Kijewski, T.; ?mietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

2011-02-01

325

Resistance genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their identification with molecular markers.  

PubMed

Current information on barley resistance genes available from scientific papers and on-line databases is summarised. The recent literature contains information on 107 major resistance genes (R genes) against fungal pathogens (excluding powdery mildew), pathogenic viruses and aphids identified in Hordeum vulgare accessions. The highest number of resistance genes was identified against Puccinia hordei, Rhynchosporium secalis, and the viruses BaYMV and BaMMV, with 17, 14 and 13 genes respectively. There is still a lot of confusion regarding symbols for R genes against powdery mildew. Among the 23 loci described to date, two regions Mla and Mlo comprise approximately 31 and 25 alleles. Over 50 R genes have already been localised and over 30 mapped on 7 barley chromosomes. Four barley R genes have been cloned recently: Mlo, Rpg1, Mla1 and Mla6, and their structures (sequences) are available. The paper presents a catalogue of barley resistance gene symbols, their chromosomalocation and the list of available DNA markers useful in characterising cultivars and breeding accessions. PMID:12923305

Che?kowski, Jerzy; Tyrka, Miros?aw; Sobkiewicz, Andrzej

2003-01-01

326

Retrotransposon-Based Molecular Markers for Analysis of Genetic Diversity within the Genus Linum  

PubMed Central

SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Yurkevich, Olga Yu.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krinitsina, Anastasia A.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Uroshlev, Leonid A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Koroban, Nadezda V.; Amosova, Alexandra V.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Guzenko, Elena V.; Lemesh, Valentina A.; Savilova, Anastasya M.; Rachinskaia, Olga A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Muravenko, Olga V.

2014-01-01

327

Interaction of molecular markers and physical activity on mortality in patients with colon cancer  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Physical activity in colon cancer survivors has been associated with lower cancer recurrences and improved survival. Whether molecular features of the tumor portend more or less likelihood for benefit from exercise is unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Utilizing two large prospective cohort studies with physical activity assessments after colon cancer diagnosis, we examined expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), p53, p21, and p27 and mutational status of K-ras and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase(PI3KCA). We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) of colon cancer-specific mortality, adjusted for tumor and patient characteristics, and tested for molecular interactions with exercise. RESULTS In a cohort of 484 men and women with stage I-III colon cancer, patients who engaged in at least 18 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week after diagnosis had an adjusted HR for colon cancer-specific mortality of 0.64 (95% CI, 0.33-1.23) and for overall mortality of 0.60 (95% CI, 0.41-0.86). A statistically significant interaction was detected based on p27 expression (p=0.03). For tumors with loss of p27 (n=195), physical activity ?18 MET-hours/week led to a HR for colon cancer mortality of 1.40 (95% CI, 0.41-4.72), compared to those with <18 MET-hours/week. However, for tumors with expression of p27 (n=251), the adjusted HR was 0.33 (95% CI, 0.12-0.85). Molecular status of FASN, K-ras, p53, p21, PI3KCA did not influence the association between exercise and colon cancer-specific or overall mortality. CONCLUSION The benefit of physical activity on outcomes in patients with stage I—III colon cancer may be influenced by p27 status. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:19723652

Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Ogino, Shuji; Kirkner, Gregory J.; Chan, Andrew T.; Wolpin, Brian; Ng, Kimmie; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Shima, Kaori; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Fuchs, Charles S.

2009-01-01

328

Book reviews Evolutionary immunology?  

E-print Network

or biomedical value: carp, earthworms, snails, mosquitoes. (As an aide, why is immunology one of the very few branches of basic biology not to have sought initial understanding from organisms simpler than mam- mals

Read, Andrew

329

Validity of the bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae) based on morphological and molecular markers.  

PubMed

The bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi is described based upon the morphology of adult tapeworms recovered from the brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi) and larval plerocercoids found in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from Kodiak Island in Alaska in 1952. However, in 1987 D. ursi was synonymized with Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, and the taxonomic relationship between both species has not subsequently been revised. In this study mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) sequences of holotype and paratype D. ursi specimens that had been preserved in a formalin-acetic acid-alcohol solution since the time the species was initially described approximately 60 yr ago were analyzed. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 sequences revealed that D. ursi is more closely related to D. dendriticum than it is to Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense and Diphyllobothrium latum. In addition to molecular evidence, differences in the life cycle and ecology of the larval plerocercoids between D. ursi and D. dendriticum also suggest that D. ursi is a distinct species, separate from D. dendriticum and D. nihonkaiense, and also possibly from D. latum . PMID:22663179

Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Muto, Maki; Yamada, Minoru; Arizono, Naoki; Rausch, Robert L

2012-12-01

330

Identification of molecular markers to follow up the bioremediation of sites contaminated with chlorinated compounds.  

PubMed

The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (soil and water) represents an ecosustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and sensitive strategies for monitoring and identifying bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics. This chapter provides a description of recently developed molecular-biology-based techniques, such as PCR with degenerate primers set, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), southern blot hybridization, and long-range PCR, used to give a picture of the catabolically relevant microorganisms and of the functional genes present in a polluted system. By using a case study of a groundwater aquifer contaminated with 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), we describe the identification of microorganisms potentially involved in the 1,2-DCA dehalorespiration (Dehalobacter sp. and Desulfitobacterium sp.) and a complete new gene cluster encoding for a 1,2-DCA reductive dehalogenase. The application of these techniques to bioremediation can improve our understanding of the inner mechanisms to evaluate the feasibility of a given treatment and provide us with a method to follow up bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of contaminants during the activities in situ. PMID:20830567

Marzorati, Massimo; Balloi, Annalisa; De Ferra, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele

2010-01-01

331

Molecular study of Trypanosoma caninum isolates based on different genetic markers.  

PubMed

Trypanosoma caninum is a parasite recently described in dogs, whose life cycle is rather unknown. Here, we performed a genetic study with T. caninum samples obtained in different Brazilian regions. The study was based on PCR assays target to small and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) (18S rDNA and 24S? rDNA), cytochrome B (Cyt b), and internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA (ITS1 rDNA) following by the sequence analysis. Additionally, we used primers for the variable regions of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircles and endonucleases restriction in the ITS1 rDNA amplification product. T. caninum samples displayed the same patterns. Tree construction confirmed the close relationship between T. caninum samples, regardless of the molecular target used and endonuclease restriction digestion revealed that all samples have the same restriction profile. Therefore, T. caninum seems to be a genetically homogeneous specie. In the kDNA assay, T. caninum possessed a different molecular size profile with respect to others trypanosomes, 330 and 350 bp. This study provides nucleotide sequences from different regions of the genome of T. caninum that certainly facilitate future studies. PMID:25566771

Barros, Juliana H S; Toma, Helena K; de Fatima Madeira, Maria

2015-02-01

332

Bulinus species on Madagascar: molecular evolution, genetic markers and compatibility with Schistosoma haematobium.  

PubMed

Of the four species of Bulinus found on Madagascar, three species: B. obtusispira, B. liratus and B. bavayi are endemic while the fourth, B. forskalii, is probably a recent introduction from the African mainland. The evolutionary relationships of these species with Bulinus species from Africa were studied by phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial loci: cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and large ribosomal subunit (LSU) or 16S. The observed levels of nucleotide divergence within Bulinus were substantial but may underestimate the true levels as there was evidence of 'saturation' of transitional substitutions at both loci. A putative secondary structure model for the sequenced segment of the 16S was developed. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis using transversional changes only for both loci, showed that there were contrasting levels of divergence within the four species groups. B. obtusispira was consistently placed within the B. africanus group, appearing ancestral to this group and was closest to the basal node within Bulinus. Together with B. bavayi, the two species appear to have been isolated on Madagascar for a long time, contrasting with both B. liratus and B. forskalii that appear more recent colonisers; however, estimate of exact times of divergence is problematic. A PCR-RFLP assay was developed to enable identification and discrimination of B. obtusispira and B. liratus using discriminatory variation within the COI. To enable population genetic analysis within B. obtusispira, microsatellite markers were developed using an enrichment method and 8 primer pairs are reported. Laboratory infection experiments using Madasgacan S. haematobium from the Mahabo area showed that certain populations of B. obtusispira, B. liratus and B. bavayi were compatible. PMID:11769288

Stothard, J R; Brémond, P; Andriamaro, L; Sellin, B; Sellin, E; Rollinson, D

2001-01-01

333

Most frequent molecular and immunohistochemical markers present in selected types of brain tumors.  

PubMed

Tumors of brain tissue and meninges create a heterogeneous group with various biological behavior, therapy management and differing prognosis. Some of these do not require treatment, some can be cured by surgery and some are rapidly fatal despite treatment. Despite huge progress in tumor research, innovations in diagnostic tools and therapy, prognosis remains, in case of malignant tumor types, very serious. There has been an increased understanding of molecular abnormalities occurring in primary brain tumors. Genome-wide analyses of tumors have improved the knowledge in tumor biology. The aim of the research is to explain the oncogenesis features thus leading to the use of new therapeutic modalities in order to prolong survival rate of patients and at the same time providing satisfactory life quality. This article offers a short review of the basic genetic alterations present with some histological types of brain tumors. PMID:24968406

Richterová, Romana; Jure?eková, Jana; Evinová, Andrea; Kolarovszki, Branislav; Ben?o, Martin; De Riggo, Július; Sutovský, Juraj; Mahmood, Silvia; Ra?ay, Peter; Dobrota, Dušan

2014-01-01

334

Sequestration of organic nitrogen in a paddy soil chronosequence as assessed by amino sugars molecular markers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Available nitrogen is a limiting factor in paddy rice systems due to ammonia volatilization, denitrification and stabilization in organic complexes. Soil organic nitrogen (SON) might therefore constitute a critical component of the nitrogen cycle in rice systems. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of microorganisms for the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms. For this purpose we analyzed amino sugars as markers for the residues of bacteria and fungi in a chronosequence of soils that were used for paddy rice production for a period of 0 to 2000 years in the Hangzhou bay area in Southeast China. Within the soil profile, amino sugar concentrations were generally highest in the puddled Ap horizon and decreased with increasing depth along with organic carbon concentrations regardless of the time of rice cultivation. Nevertheless, a sharp increase of total amino sugar concentration from 0.1 g kg-1 to 0.3 g kg-1 was observed in the Ah horizon when comparing tidal wetland to salt marsh that had been impoldered 30 years ago, indicating an increasing importance of microbial residues in SON stabilization following the conversion of the semiaquatic marsh to a terrestrial system. With increased time of paddy rice cropping, amino sugar concentrations continued to increase up to a maximum of 2.1 g kg-1 after 300 years of paddy cultivation but declined again to 1 g kg-1 in soils with 700-2000 years history of cultivation despite increasing organic matter accumulation. Changes in the composition of the amino sugars were also most pronounced at initial stages of paddy rice management. The proportions of glucosamine (abundant in fungal chitin) decreased during the first 50 years of cultivation relative to mainly galactosamine (abundant in bacterial gums) and muramic acid (abundant in bacterial peptidoglycan), that remained at constantly low levels. At later stages of paddy rice cultivation, the ratios of glucosamine to galactosamine and to muramic acid re-increased. We conclude that microorganisms significantly contribute to the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms during the first 300 years of cropping, within an increasing contribution of bacteria as cropping time proceeds. At even longer periods of paddy rice cultivation, there appears to be a backshift to lower concentrations of microbial residues with higher proportions of fungal N remaining.

Roth, Philipp; Lehndorff, E.; Cao, Z.; Amelung, W.

2010-05-01

335

Molecular markers to assess short-term disease local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma  

PubMed Central

An important challenge in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) research is to develop effective predictors of tumor recurrence following treatment to determine whether immediate adjuvant therapy is necessary. We retrospectively analyzed archived specimens collected from 45 patients with paired samples of primary NPC (pNPC) and recurrent NPC (rNPC). Clinical samples were collected from the Cancer Center Databases of the First People’s Hospital of Foshan and Shantou Central Hospital (affiliates of Sun Yat-Sen University) between 2001 and 2012. Expression levels of phosphor-Stat3 (p-Stat3), signalosome complex subunit 5 (Jab1/Csn5), Akt1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Ki-67, and apoptosis were determined by immunohistochemistry in pNPC and rNPC samples from the same patients. Differences in these markers between the short-term interval to recurrence (ITR) group (ITR <18 months) and long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months) were further analyzed. In Cox’s regression analysis, the ITR was significantly associated as an independent-negative prognostic factor for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.211; 95% confidence interval, 0.053–0.841; P=0.027). p-Stat3 was increased in the short-term ITR group (ITR <18 months) and tended to be lower in the long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months). In the short-term ITR group, nuclear Akt expression was significantly increased in paired rNPC (P=0.028). In the long-term ITR group, the expression of nuclear Jab1/Csn5 (P=0.047) and assessment of apoptosis measured with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) (P=0.003) was significantly increased in paired rNPC. The results suggest that differences between short- and long-term ITR may predict outcome in rNPC. Furthermore, the overexpression of Jab1/Csn5 and Akt may contribute to the carcinogenesis of rNPC, and Akt seems to promote the progression of short-term ITR. Intra-individual changes of Jab1/Csn5, Akt, and TUNEL may help to identify short-term ITR. PMID:25607111

XU, TAO; SU, BOJIN; WANG, CHUNHUA; WANG, SUMEI; HUANG, HECHENG; PAN, YUNBAO; WANG, DONGHUI; WEI, WEIHONG; CLARET, FRANÇOIS X.; YANG, HUILING

2015-01-01

336

Molecular markers to assess short-term disease local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.  

PubMed

An important challenge in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) research is to develop effective predictors of tumor recurrence following treatment to determine whether immediate adjuvant therapy is necessary. We retrospectively analyzed archived specimens collected from 45 patients with paired samples of primary NPC (pNPC) and recurrent NPC (rNPC). Clinical samples were collected from the Cancer Center Databases of the First People's Hospital of Foshan and Shantou Central Hospital (affiliates of Sun Yat-Sen University) between 2001 and 2012. Expression levels of phosphor-Stat3 (p-Stat3), signalosome complex subunit 5 (Jab1/Csn5), Akt1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Ki-67, and apoptosis were determined by immunohistochemistry in pNPC and rNPC samples from the same patients. Differences in these markers between the short-term interval to recurrence (ITR) group (ITR <18 months) and long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months) were further analyzed. In Cox's regression analysis, the ITR was significantly associated as an independent?negative prognostic factor for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.211; 95% confidence interval, 0.053-0.841; P=0.027). p-Stat3 was increased in the short-term ITR group (ITR <18 months) and tended to be lower in the long-term ITR group (ITR ?18 months). In the short-term ITR group, nuclear Akt expression was significantly increased in paired rNPC (P=0.028). In the long-term ITR group, the expression of nuclear Jab1/Csn5 (P=0.047) and assessment of apoptosis measured with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end?labeling (TUNEL) (P=0.003) was significantly increased in paired rNPC. The results suggest that differences between short- and long-term ITR may predict outcome in rNPC. Furthermore, the overexpression of Jab1/Csn5 and Akt may contribute to the carcinogenesis of rNPC, and Akt seems to promote the progression of short-term ITR. Intra-individual changes of Jab1/Csn5, Akt, and TUNEL may help to identify short-term ITR. PMID:25607111

Xu, Tao; Su, Bojin; Wang, Chunhua; Wang, Sumei; Huang, Hecheng; Pan, Yunbao; Wang, Donghui; Wei, Weihong; Claret, François X; Yang, Huiling

2015-03-01

337

Population typing of the causal agent of cassava bacterial blight in the Eastern Plains of Colombia using two types of molecular markers  

PubMed Central

Background Molecular typing of pathogen populations is an important tool for the development of effective strategies for disease control. Diverse molecular markers have been used to characterize populations of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), the main bacterial pathogen of cassava. Recently, diversity and population dynamics of Xam in the Colombian Caribbean coast were estimated using AFLPs, where populations were found to be dynamic, diverse and with haplotypes unstable across time. Aiming to examine the current state of pathogen populations located in the Colombian Eastern Plains, we also used AFLP markers and we evaluated the usefulness of Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) as new molecular markers for the study of Xam populations. Results The population analyses showed that AFLP and VNTR provide a detailed and congruent description of Xam populations from the Colombian Eastern Plains. These two typing strategies clearly separated strains from the Colombian Eastern Plains into distinct populations probably because of geographical distance. Although the majority of analyses were congruent between typing markers, fewer VNTRs were needed to detect a higher number of genetic populations of the pathogen as well as a higher genetic flow among sampled locations than those detected by AFLPs. Conclusions This study shows the advantages of VNTRs over AFLPs in the surveillance of pathogen populations and suggests the implementation of VNTRs in studies that involve large numbers of Xam isolates in order to obtain a more detailed overview of the pathogen to improve the strategies for disease control. PMID:24946775

2014-01-01

338

Validation of molecular markers for resistance among Pakistani chickpea germplasm to races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

DNA markers in chickpea have been identified against different races of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris (Foc), but validation of these markers is essential for their effective use in resistant breeding. In view of this, different simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were analysed in Pakistani ger...

339

A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and Quantitative Trait Loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)  

PubMed Central

Background A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L.) over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in melon was constructed using primarily highly transferable anchor markers that have broad potential use for mapping, synteny, and comparative quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, increasing breeding effectiveness and efficiency via marker-assisted selection (MAS). Results Under the framework of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative (ICuGI, http://www.icugi.org), an integrated genetic map has been constructed by merging data from eight independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines. The consensus map spans 1150 cM across the 12 melon linkage groups and is composed of 1592 markers (640 SSRs, 330 SNPs, 252 AFLPs, 239 RFLPs, 89 RAPDs, 15 IMAs, 16 indels and 11 morphological traits) with a mean marker density of 0.72 cM/marker. One hundred and ninety-six of these markers (157 SSRs, 32 SNPs, 6 indels and 1 RAPD) were newly developed, mapped or provided by industry representatives as released markers, including 27 SNPs and 5 indels from genes involved in the organic acid metabolism and transport, and 58 EST-SSRs. Additionally, 85 of 822 SSR markers contributed by Syngenta Seeds were included in the integrated map. In addition, 370 QTL controlling 62 traits from 18 previously reported mapping experiments using genetically diverse parental genotypes were also integrated into the consensus map. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in separate studies mapped to similar genomic positions. For example, independently identified QTL controlling fruit shape were mapped on similar genomic positions, suggesting that such QTL are possibly responsible for the phenotypic variability observed for this trait in a broad array of melon germplasm. Conclusions Even though relatively unsaturated genetic maps in a diverse set of melon market types have been published, the integrated saturated map presented herein should be considered the initial reference map for melon. Most of the mapped markers contained in the reference map are polymorphic in diverse collection of germplasm, and thus are potentially transferrable to a broad array of genetic experimentation (e.g., integration of physical and genetic maps, colinearity analysis, map-based gene cloning, epistasis dissection, and marker-assisted selection). PMID:21797998

2011-01-01

340

Morphological and molecular marker contributions to disentangling the cryptic Hermeuptychia hermes species complex (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae: Euptychiina).  

PubMed

The genus Hermeuptychia is common and widespread through the Americas, from Argentina to the southern United States of America. All eight recognized species within Hermeuptychia are small and brown, with very similar interspecific external morphologies and intraspecifically variable ocelli patterns that render taxonomic identification based on morphology difficult. In our study, we surveyed variability within Hermeuptychia, and evaluated species boundaries based on molecular data (sequences of the 'barcode' mitochondrial DNA COI gene) and morphology (mainly male genitalia), using a phylogenetic approach. We found eight DNA-based and 12 morphological groups in our sampling. Species names were assigned based mainly on comparisons with male genitalia morphology descriptions corresponding to name-bearing type specimens. Morphological and DNA variability were highly congruent, with the exception of group H, the Hermeuptychia cucullina complex. Also, the barcode region showed a clear threshold for intra- and interspecific mean distances around 2%. Based on these results, we circumscribe the species boundaries in the genus Hermeuptychia and discuss conflicts between mitochondrial genes and classic morphological approaches for identifying and delimiting species. Our study revealed cryptic diversity within an ubiquitous genus of Neotropical butterflies. PMID:24034669

Seraphim, N; Marín, M A; Freitas, A V L; Silva-Brandão, K L

2014-01-01

341

Molecular characterization of Platonia insignis Mart. ("bacurizeiro") using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.  

PubMed

Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae) is widespread throughout the Amazon and adjacent areas. The fruits (known locally as "bacuri") have significant commercial potential, but the species is under threat from agro-industrial expansion. The genetic variability within 72 genotypes of P. insignis belonging to ten populations collected in the Brazilian states of Maranhão and Piauí, and maintained in the germplasm collection of Embrapa Meio-Norte, has been determined, and the organization of genetic diversity within populations, between populations and among geographic groups verified. Eighteen selected inter simple sequence repeat primers allowed amplification of 236 loci of which 221 (93.64%) were polymorphic, indicating a high level of genetic diversity. At the population level, the Shannon and Nei diversity indices ranged from 0.082 to 0.323 and from 0.120 to 0.480, respectively. The global coefficient of genetic differentiation (G(ST)) was 0.4730 indicating that differentiation between populations was significant, a finding that was confirmed by analysis of molecular variance (?(ST) = 0.28). UPGMA cluster analysis revealed that the genotypes could be stratified into groups that were well defined and consistent with those identified in the dendrogram constructed using pair wise ?(ST) values. The high genetic diversity established in this study may facilitate the management and conservation of the germplasm of P. insignis. PMID:23275206

Souza, I G B; Souza, V A B; Lima, P S C

2013-05-01

342

Molecular Markers in the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru Describe 20th Century Biomass Burning Variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic geochemical analytical methods were applied to Andean ice core samples, resulting in a multi- molecular biomass burning record spanning 1915 to 2001 AD. The Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru is situated on the eastern flank of the Andes at 14°S and is well situated to receive aeolian inputs of organic matter derived from Amazonian forest fire events. Compounds of interest, which occur in trace quantities in ice, were recovered by stir bar sorptive extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption. These methods permitted identification and quantitation of numerous biomarkers in sample volumes of as little as 10 ml. At least one wet and dry season sample was analyzed for every year. Observed biomarkers that may be derived from vegetation fires include several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), atraric acid, 2-ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate, and a range of other aromatic compounds. Abrupt changes in compound abundances were superimposed on decadal variability. Systematic offsets between wet and dry season abundances were not observed, suggesting that the biomass burning signal is not biased by seasonal depositional effects, such as dust delivery. Inputs likely reflect a combination of sources from anthropogenic burning of the Amazon rainforest as well as natural fires related to aridity, and include both high and low elevation vegetation. These compounds and techniques can be applied to older ice in this and other core locations as an independent estimate of aridity.

Makou, M. C.; Thompson, L. G.; Eglinton, T. I.; Montluçon, D. B.

2007-12-01

343

Krüppel-like factor 5 as potential molecular marker in cervical cancer and the KLF family profile expression.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer (CC) as other cancer types, presents molecular deregulations, such as the alterations of transcription factors. Krüppel-like factors (KLF) are a family of transcriptional regulators. They are involved in diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis among others. Here, we analyzed the expression of all 17 KLF members at messenger RNA (mRNA) level, and protein expression of the two most commonly altered KLF5 and KLF6 in cervical tissues. Fifty-nine cervical tissues ranging from normal tissue to CC were evaluated for KLF1-17 mRNA expression by end-point RT-PCR and KLF5 by qRT-PCR. For KLF5 and KLF6 protein analysis, a tissue microarray was constructed containing the 59 cases and subjected for immunohistochemistry assay and KLF6 IVS1-27G>A single nucleotide polymorphism by direct DNA sequencing. KLF2-16 expressions were present in normal tissue, whereas all 17 were present in Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion, High-Grade-SIL and CC, unrelated to presence of human papillomavirus (HPV). KLF5 mRNA expression gradually increased throughout the subgroups and overexpressed in CC (p?=?0.01). KLF5 and KLF6 proteins were immunodetected in all samples. For the KLF6 SNP analysis, 80 % of the CC population analyzed presented GG genotype and the remaining 20 % presented GA genotype (p?=?0.491). Our present data show that KLFs expression could not be related to HPV presence, at least at transcriptional level, and KLF5 mRNA overexpression could represent a potential molecular marker for CC; KLF6 SNP has no relation to increased risk of CC. PMID:25119587

Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Taniguchi-Ponciano, Keiko; Jimenez-Vega, Florinda; Romero-Morelos, Pablo; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Monica; Mantilla, Alejandra; Rodriguez-Esquivel, Miriam; Hernandez, Daniel; Hernandez, Angeles; Gomez-Gutierrez, Guillermo; Muñoz-Hernandez, Nancy; la Cruz, Hugo Arreola-de; Vargas-Requena, Claudia; Díaz-Hernández, Cecilia; Serna-Reyna, Luis; Meraz-Rios, Marco; Bandala, Cindy; Ortiz-Leon, Jorge; Salcedo, Mauricio

2014-11-01

344

Reproductive immunology: biomarkers of compromised pregnancies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to consider several catagories of biomarkers of human pregnancy. The design of the report is to discuss useful and promising markers and techniques. Research gaps, needs, and priorities are also defined. Useful markers are mixed lymphocyte culture reactions, measures of lymphocytotoxic antibodies, histocompatibility (HLA) typing, and immunohematological evaluations. Promising markers are measures of major basic protein and early pregnancy factor, as well as determinations of trophoblast-lymphocyte cross-reactive (TLX) antigens. Promising techniques are flourescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of maternal blood for fetal and extraembryonic tissues and immunotherapy with TLX and other antigens to prevent spontaneous abortion. It is concluded that immunology has much to offer the development of biomarkers of human pregnancy.

Faulk, W.P.; Coulam, C.B.; McIntyre, J.A.

1987-10-01

345

Centromeric association of small supernumerary marker chromosomes with their sister-chromosomes detected by three dimensional molecular cytogenetics  

PubMed Central

Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are detected in 0.043% of general population and can be characterized for their chromosomal origin, genetic content and shape by molecular cytogenetic approaches. Even though recently progress was achieved towards genotype-phenotype-correlations of sSMC, nothing is known on the influence that an additional derivative extra chromosome has on the nuclear architecture. Results Here we present the first three-dimensional interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for the nuclear architecture of sSMC. It could be shown that sSMC derived from chromosomes 15, 16 or 18 preferentially colocalized with one of their corresponding sister chromosomes. This was true in B- and T-lymphocytes as well as in skin fibroblasts. Additionally, a case with a complex sSMC with a karyotype 47,XY,+der(18)t(8;18)(8p23.2 ~ 23.1;18q11.1) was studied. Here the sSMC co-localized with one homologous chromosome 8 instead of 18. Conclusion Overall, there is a kind of "attraction" between an sSMC and one of its homologous sister chromosomes. This seems to be transmitted by the euchromatic part of the sSMC rather than its heterochromatic one. PMID:22413994

2012-01-01

346

Identification of Ty1-copia retrotransposons in three ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes: evolutionary relationships and use as molecular markers.  

PubMed

We amplified by PCR and sequenced 46 partial Ty1- copia reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes Pisolithus and Laccaria bicolor and the host tree Eucalyptus globulus. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these sequences represent a new class of Ty1- copia RT, characteristic of basidiomycetes but related to plant Ty1- copia retrotransposons. To generate fingerprints of L. bicolor strains, outward facing PCR primers annealing to RTs were designed. This method, which is a modification of the inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) analysis, enables the detection of polymorphisms or changes within the insertion sites of Ty1- copia elements in the genome. Using this method, we investigated whether the transposition of Ty1- copia elements was related to the somaclonal variation observed in L. bicolor S238, an inoculant strain used in French Douglas-fir plantations. Data indicated that no differences in the IRAP fingerprints were detected in phenotypic variants of L. bicolor S238. We reported here for the first time the presence of Ty1- copia retrotransposon sequences in basidiomycetes, which resulted in suitable targets for developing new molecular markers. PMID:12684843

Díez, Jesús; Béguiristain, Thierry; Le Tacon, François; Casacuberta, Josep M; Tagu, Denis

2003-04-01

347

The potential of molecular markers to improve interventions through the natural history of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

EC (oesophageal cancer) is one of the ten most frequent and fatal tumours worldwide and ESCC (oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma) accounts for about 80% of the cases. The first symptoms of ESCC arise late during the progression of the disease and, therefore, the diagnosis is usually done in advanced stages. This leads to an inefficient treatment and consequently to a poor prognosis. Thus, a comprehensive knowledge of ESCC biology is of major importance to identify risk factors, especially in high-incidence areas and biomarkers which could enable ESCC prevention and interventions throughout the natural history of the disease. In this review, we present the current knowledge regarding ESCC aetiology as well as the different genetic and epigenetic alterations already described in this tumour. We also discuss how these alterations could be used to anticipate ESCC diagnosis as well as how they can help improving treatment. A molecular natural history of the disease is proposed pointing out potential markers that may improve interventions at different points of ESCC development. Only when the different layers of complexity behind this tumour are elucidated, it will be possible to successfully perform prevention at different levels. PMID:23837802

da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Soares Lima, Sheila Coelho; de Almeida Simão, Tatiana; Ribeiro Pinto, Luis Felipe

2013-01-01

348

Immunological memory is associative  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-12-31

349

Functional markers based molecular characterization and cloning of resistance gene analogs encoding NBS-LRR disease resistance proteins in finger millet (Eleusine coracana).  

PubMed

Magnaporthe grisea, the blast fungus is one of the main pathological threats to finger millet crop worldwide. A systematic search for the blast resistance gene analogs was carried out, using functional molecular markers. Three-fourths of the recognition-dependent disease resistance genes (R-genes) identified in plants encodes nucleotide binding site (NBS) leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. NBS-LRR homologs have only been isolated on a limited scale from Eleusine coracana. Genomic DNA sequences sharing homology with NBS region of resistance gene analogs were isolated and characterized from resistant genotypes of finger millet using PCR based approach with primers designed from conserved regions of NBS domain. Attempts were made to identify molecular markers linked to the resistance gene and to differentiate the resistant bulk from the susceptible bulk. A total of 9 NBS-LRR and 11 EST-SSR markers generated 75.6 and 73.5% polymorphism respectively amongst 73 finger millet genotypes. NBS-5, NBS-9, NBS-3 and EST-SSR-04 markers showed a clear polymorphism which differentiated resistant genotypes from susceptible genotypes. By comparing the banding pattern of different resistant and susceptible genotypes, five DNA amplifications of NBS and EST-SSR primers (NBS-05(504,) NBS-09(711), NBS-07(688), NBS-03(509) and EST-SSR-04(241)) were identified as markers for the blast resistance in resistant genotypes. Principal coordinate plot and UPGMA analysis formed similar groups of the genotypes and placed most of the resistant genotypes together showing a high level of genetic relatedness and the susceptible genotypes were placed in different groups on the basis of differential disease score. Our results provided a clue for the cloning of finger millet blast resistance gene analogs which not only facilitate the process of plant breeding but also molecular characterization of blast resistance gene analogs from Eleusine coracana. PMID:21116864

Panwar, Preety; Jha, Anand Kumar; Pandey, P K; Gupta, Arun K; Kumar, Anil

2011-06-01

350

Maternal immunomodulation of the offspring's immunological system.  

PubMed

The mother's and the offspring's immunological system are closely related thus one can influence the other. This hypothesis drove our aim to study the impact of the mother's immunological status over the immunological response of their offspring. For this, female mice tolerant or allergic to peanuts were exposed or not to a challenge diet containing peanuts during the gestation-lactation period (TEP/AEP; TNEP/ANEP, respectively). After weaning the offspring was submitted to the peanut allergy or peanut tolerization protocol and then challenged with a peanut diet. Our results showed that when the offspring is submitted to the allergy induction protocol, they behave differently depending on their mother's immunological status. Offspring born to TEP mothers produced the lowest antibody titters while those born to AEP mothers produced the highest antibody titters compared to mice born to TNEP and ANEP. On the other hand when the offspring was submitted to the tolerization protocol all groups presented low antibody titers with no significant difference between groups, independent of the mothers immunological status and/or contact with peanuts during the gestation-lactation period. The analysis of the histological profile of the offspring correlates well to the serological response. In other words, offspring born to TEP mothers and submitted to the allergy induction protocol presented a normal histological profile, while the offspring born to AEP mothers produced the worst gut inflammation. These results indicate that mothers, exposed to the antigen (by the oral route) during gestation, actively influence the immune response of their offspring. This work sheds some light on the importance of the immunomodulation induced by dietary antigens during gestation and their influence on the immunological response of their offspring. However, more work is needed to elucidate the molecular and cellular components of this regulatory phenomenon. PMID:25104403

Campos, Sylvia M N; de Oliveira, Vivian L; Lessa, Leonardo; Vita, Melissa; Conceição, Marcia; Andrade, Luiz Antonio Botelho; Teixeira, Gerlinde Agate Platais Brasil

2014-11-01

351

Immunohistochemical expression of myoepithelial markers in adenomyoepithelioma of the breast: a unique paradoxical staining pattern of high-molecular weight cytokeratins.  

PubMed

To determine which immunohistochemical markers are useful for the identification of neoplastic myoepithelial cells in adenomyoepithelioma of the breast, the expression of seven myoepithelial markers (?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA), calponin, p63, CD10, cytokeratin 5/6, cytokeratin 14, and S-100) was examined in 19 lesions from 16 patients. The lesion consisted of seven spindle and 12 clear cell lesions. For normal myoepithelial cells, ?-SMA, calponin, and p63 were significantly more sensitive than cytokeratin 5/6, cytokeratin 14, and S-100. There was no significant difference in the expression of ?-SMA, calponin, p63, and CD10 in neoplastic myoepithelial cells of adenomyoepithelioma regardless of spindle or clear cell types. In spindle cell lesions, high-molecular weight cytokeratins (HMWCK; cytokeratin 5/6 and cytokeratin 14) tended to show higher staining scores and S-100 showed lower staining scores than other markers. In clear cell lesions, HMWCK showed significantly lower staining scores than the other five markers. There was no significant difference in staining scores among the other five markers. HMWCK showed a unique paradoxical staining pattern in clear cell lesions, with diffusely positive inner epithelial cells and completely negative outer myoepithelial cells. Although the sensitivity of HMWCK in clear cell lesions is low, with this unique paradoxical staining pattern and relatively high sensitivity in spindle cell lesions, HMWCK could be useful in diagnosing adenomyoepithelioma. In choosing immunohistochemical markers, any of the seven markers are useful, but combining HMWCK and any one of ?-SMA, calponin, and p63 would be a good panel for the diagnosis of adenomyoepithelioma. PMID:25479938

Moritani, Suzuko; Ichihara, Shu; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Masaki; Iwakoshi, Akari; Hosoda, Waki; Narita, Michihiko; Nagai, Yuichiro; Asai, Masami; Ujihira, Nobuko; Yuba, Yoshiaki; Jijiwa, Mayumi

2014-12-01

352

Studies on the genetic variation of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae) obtained from different geographical locations using ISSR and RAPD molecular marker.  

PubMed

Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow) is a unicellular green alga, which is considered to be the best astaxanthin-producing organism. Molecular markers are suitable tools for the purpose of finding out genetic variations in organisms; however there have been no studies conducted on ISSR or RAPD molecular markers for this organism. The DNA of 10 different strains of H. pluvialis (four strains from Iran, two strains from Finland, one strain from Switzerland and three strains from the USA) was extracted. A genetic similarity study was carried out using 14 ISSR and 12 RAPD primers. Moreover, the molecular weights of the bands produced ranged from 0.14 to 3.4 Kb. The PCA and dendrogram clustered the H. pluvialis strains into various groups according to their geographical origin. The lowest genetic similarity was between the Iran2 and USA2 strains (0.08) and the highest genetic similarity was between Finland1 and Finland2 (0.64). The maximum numbers of bands produced by the ISSR and RAPD primers were 35 and 6 bands, respectively. The results showed that ISSR and RAPD markers are useful for genetic diversity studies of Haematococcus as they showed geographical discrimination. PMID:21441863

Mostafa, Noroozi; Omar, Hishamuddin; Tan, Soon Guan; Napis, Suhaimi

2011-01-01

353

Searching for non-genetic molecular and imaging PTSD risk and resilience markers: Systematic review of literature and design of the German Armed Forces PTSD biomarker study.  

PubMed

Biomarkers allowing the identification of individuals with an above average vulnerability or resilience for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) would especially serve populations at high risk for trauma exposure like firefighters, police officers and combat soldiers. Aiming to identify the most promising putative PTSD vulnerability markers, we conducted the first systematic review on potential imaging and non-genetic molecular markers for PTSD risk and resilience. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically screened the PubMed database for prospective longitudinal clinical studies and twin studies reporting on pre-trauma and post-trauma PTSD risk and resilience biomarkers. Using 25 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 8151 articles of which we finally included and evaluated 9 imaging and 27 molecular studies. In addition, we briefly illustrate the design of the ongoing prospective German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) PTSD biomarker study (Bw-BioPTSD) which not only aims to validate these previous findings but also to identify novel and clinically applicable molecular, psychological and imaging risk, resilience and disease markers for deployment-related psychopathology in a cohort of German soldiers who served in Afghanistan. PMID:25236294

Schmidt, Ulrike; Willmund, Gerd-Dieter; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kowalski, Jens T; Zimmermann, Peter

2015-01-01

354

Immunology & Human Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

355

Immunological Memory is Associative  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that immunological memory is in the same class of associative memories as Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory , Albus's Cerebellar Model Arithmetic Computer , and Marr's Theory of the Cerebellar Cortex . This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature from a sparse sampling of a huge input space by recognition units (B and T cells

Derek J. Smith; Stephanie Forrest; Alan S. Perelson

1998-01-01

356

Immunology Taught by Humans  

PubMed Central

After a half-century of mouse-dominated research, human immunology is making a comeback. Informed by mouse studies and powered by new techniques, human immune research is both advancing disease treatment and providing new insights into basic biology. PMID:22261029

Davis, Mark M.

2013-01-01

357

Immunological Treatments for Autism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

Gupta, Sudhir

2000-01-01

358

Basic and clinical immunology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

2003-01-01

359

Immune System Computation and the Immunological Homunculus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students for the Master of Science degree at the Weizmann Institute of Science are obliged to spend the first year of the\\u000a two-year program doing three-month rotations through three different laboratories in any of the various faculties at the Institute.\\u000a In 1998, Na’aman Kam rotated through my laboratory in the Department of Immunology where he did molecular modeling of an

Irun R. Cohen

2006-01-01

360

Comparative Chloroplast Genomes of Photosynthetic Orchids: Insights into Evolution of the Orchidaceae and Development of Molecular Markers for Phylogenetic Applications  

PubMed Central

The orchid family Orchidaceae is one of the largest angiosperm families, including many species of important economic value. While chloroplast genomes are very informative for systematics and species identification, there is very limited information available on chloroplast genomes in the Orchidaceae. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genomes of the medicinal plant Dendrobium officinale and the ornamental orchid Cypripedium macranthos, demonstrating their gene content and order and potential RNA editing sites. The chloroplast genomes of the above two species and five known photosynthetic orchids showed similarities in structure as well as gene order and content, but differences in the organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junction and ndh genes. The organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions in the chloroplast genomes of these orchids was classified into four types; we propose that inverted repeats flanking the small single-copy region underwent expansion or contraction among Orchidaceae. The AT-rich regions of the ycf1 gene in orchids could be linked to the recombination of inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions. Relative species in orchids displayed similar patterns of variation in ndh gene contents. Furthermore, fifteen highly divergent protein-coding genes were identified, which are useful for phylogenetic analyses in orchids. To test the efficiency of these genes serving as markers in phylogenetic analyses, coding regions of four genes (accD, ccsA, matK, and ycf1) were used as a case study to construct phylogenetic trees in the subfamily Epidendroideae. High support was obtained for placement of previously unlocated subtribes Collabiinae and Dendrobiinae in the subfamily Epidendroideae. Our findings expand understanding of the diversity of orchid chloroplast genomes and provide a reference for study of the molecular systematics of this family. PMID:24911363

Niu, Zhi-Tao; Liu, Wei; Xue, Qing-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Yu

2014-01-01

361

Combining molecular-marker and chemical analysis of Capparis decidua (Capparaceae) in the Thar Desert of Western Rajasthan (india).  

PubMed

The Thar Desert, a very inhospitable place, accommodates only plant species that survive acute drought, unpredictable precipitation, and those can grow in the limited moisture of sandy soils. Capparis decidua is among one of the few plants able to grow well under these conditions. This species is highly exploited and has been naturally taken, as local people use it for various purposes like food, timber and fuel, although, no management or conservation efforts have been established. The present study was conducted in this arid area of Western Rajasthan (India) with the aim to obtain preliminary molecular information about this group of plants. We evaluated diversity among 46 samples of C. decidua using chemical parameters and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Fourteen chemical parameters and eight minerals (total 22 variables) of this species fruits were estimated. A total of 14 RAPD primers produced 235 band positions, of which 81.27% were polymorphic. Jaccard's similarity coefficients for RAPD primers ranged from 0.34 to 0.86 with a mean genetic similarity of 0.50. As per observed coefficient of variation, NDF (Neutral Detergent Fiber) content was found to be the most variable trait followed by starch and soluble carbohydrate. The Manhattan dissimilarity coefficient values for chemical parameters ranged between 0.02-0.31 with an average of 0.092. The present study revealed a very low correlation (0.01) between chemical parameters and RAPD-based matrices. The low correlation between chemical- and RAPD-based matrices indicated that the two methods were different and highly variable. The chemical-based diversity will assist in selection of nutritionally rich samples for medicinal purpose, while genetic diversity to face natural challenges and find sustainable ways to promote conservation for future use. PMID:23894984

Kumar, Sushil; Sharma, Ramavtar; Kumar, Vinod; Vyas, Govind K; Rathore, Abhishek

2013-03-01

362

Comparison between RAPD and SSR molecular markers in detecting genetic variation in kiwifruit ( Actinidia deliciosa A. Chev)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two different DNA-based techniques, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, were used for fingerprinting kiwifruit genotypes and for detecting undesirable genetic variation in micropropagated plants. The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Two cluster analyses

M. A. Palombi; C. Damiano

2002-01-01

363

[Immunological parameters in the diagnosis of silicotuberculosis].  

PubMed

The study has defined criteria for the concomitant development of tuberculosis as secondary to silicosis. Factorial and discriminant analyses identified the most significant factors of immune homeostasis in silicotuberculosis. The major signs of possible development of tuberculosis in the presence of silicosis are the elevated levels of total IgE and IgG, fibronectin; the cells expressing CD4+ and CD20+ markers; and the decreased concentration of the mucinic antigen 3EG5. The findings were used to construct models of immunity in tuberculosis, silicosis, and silicotuberculosis. The use of a complex of immunological studies promoted the better early diagnosis of silicotuberculosis. PMID:15315128

Borodulin, B E; Borodulina, E A

2004-01-01

364

PM2.5 Characterization for Time Series Studies: Organic Molecular Marker Speciation Methods and Observations from Daily Measurements in Denver  

PubMed Central

Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) has been shown to have a wide range of adverse health effects and consequently is regulated in accordance with the US-EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards. PM2.5 originates from multiple primary sources and is also formed through secondary processes in the atmosphere. It is plausible that some sources form PM2.5 that is more toxic than PM2.5 from other sources. Identifying the responsible sources could provide insight into the biological mechanisms causing the observed health effects and provide a more efficient approach to regulation. This is the goal of the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study, a multi-year PM2.5 source apportionment and health study. The first step in apportioning the PM2.5 to different sources is to determine the chemical make-up of the PM2.5. This paper presents the methodology used during the DASH study for organic speciation of PM2.5. Specifically, methods are covered for solvent extraction of non-polar and semi-polar organic molecular markers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Vast reductions in detection limits were obtained through the use of a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet along with other method improvements. Results are presented for the first 1.5 years of the DASH study revealing seasonal and source-related patterns in the molecular markers and their long-term correlation structure. Preliminary analysis suggests that point sources are not a significant contributor to the organic molecular markers measured at our receptor site. Several motor vehicle emission markers help identify a gasoline/diesel split in the ambient data. Findings show both similarities and differences when compared with other cities where similar measurements and assessments have been made. PMID:20161318

Dutton, Steven J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Garcia, Jessica K.; Vedal, Sverre; Hannigan, Michael P.

2009-01-01

365

High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers  

PubMed Central

The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

Medhi, K.; Sarmah, D.K.; Deka, M.; Bhau, B.S.

2014-01-01

366

High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers.  

PubMed

The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612). PMID:25606454

Medhi, K; Sarmah, D K; Deka, M; Bhau, B S

2014-12-01

367

Genomic analysis of cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare) using sequence-tagged molecular markers. Estimates of divergence based on RFLP and PCR markers derived from stress-responsive genes, and simple-sequence repeats (SSRs).  

PubMed

Three types of molecular markers have been compared for their utility in evaluating genetic diversity among cultivars of Hordeum vulgare. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms at 71 sites were scored with the aid of probes corresponding to stress-responsive genes from barley and wheat, coding for a low-molecular-weight heat shock protein, a dehydrin, an aldose reductase homolog, and a 18.9-kDa drought-induced protein of unknown function. Indexes of genetic diversity computed in the total sample and within groups of cultivars (two-rowed and six-rowed, winter and spring varieties) indicated high values of genetic differentiation ( F (ST) >15%). A second assessment of genetic diversity was performed by PCR amplification of genomic DNA using as primers 13 arbitrary oligonucleotides derived from sequences of the same stress-responsive genes. A high degree of polymorphism was uncovered using these markers also, but they yielded low values for F (ST) (<7%) among groups of cultivars. Finally, 15 different simple-sequence repeats (AC or AG) were amplified with primers based on unique flanking sequences. Levels of polymorphism and differentiation between groups of cultivars revealed by these markers were quite high. Ordination techniques applied to measures of genetic distance among cultivars demonstrated a remarkable ability of the RFLPs associated with stress-responsive genes to discriminate on the basis of growth habit. The correlation with production data for the cultivars in different environments was also significant. This "functional genomics" strategy was therefore as informative as the "structural genomics" (SSR-based) approach, but requires the analysis of fewer probes. PMID:11976962

Maestri, E; Malcevschi, A; Massari, A; Marmiroli, N

2002-04-01

368

Transmission ratio distortion of molecular markers in a doubled haploid population originated from a natural hybrid between Osmunda japonica and O. lancea.  

PubMed

In ferns, intra-gametophytic selfing occurs as a mode of reproduction where two gametes from the same gametophyte form a completely homozygous sporophyte. Intra-gametophytic selfing is considered to be prevented by lethal or deleterious recessive genes in several diploid species. In order to investigate the modes and tempo of selection acting different developmental stages, doubled haploids obtained from intra-gametophytic selfing within isolated gametophytes of a putative F1 hybrid between Osmunda japonica and O. lancea were analyzed with EST_derived molecular markers, and the distribution pattern of transmission ratio distortion (TRD) along linkage map was clarified. As the results, the markers with skewness were clustered in two linkage groups. For the two highly distorted regions, gametophytes and F2 population were also examined. The markers skewed towards O. japonica on a linkage group (LG_2) showed skewness also in gametophytes, and the TRD was generated in the process of spore formation or growth of gametophytes. Also, selection appeared to be operating in the gametophytic stage. The markers on other linkage group (LG_11) showed highest skewness towards O. lancea in doubled haploids, and it was suggested that the segregation of LG_11 were influenced by zygotic lethality or genotypic evaluation and that some deleterious recessive genes exist in LG_11 and reduce the viability of homozygotes with O. japonica alleles. It is very likely that a region of LG_11were responsible for the low frequencies of intra-gametophytic selfing in O. japonica. PMID:23224293

Yatabe-Kakugawa, Yoko; Tsutsumi, Chie; Hirayama, Yumiko; Tsuneki, Shizuka; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Masahiro

2013-07-01

369

Molecular genetic delineation of 2q37.3 deletion in autism and osteodystrophy: report of a case and of new markers for deletion screening by PCR.  

PubMed

We recently studied a patient who meets criteria for autistic disorder and has a 2q37 deletion. Molecular cytogenetic studies were carried out using DNA isolated from 22 different 2q37 mapped BACs to more precisely define the extent of the chromosome deletion. We also analyzed 2q37 mapped polymorphic markers. In addition DNA sequences of BACs in the deletion region were scanned to identify microsatellite repeats. We describe four new polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers in the 2q37.3 region. These markers enabled us to determine the parental origin of the deletion in our patient. DNA from 8-13 unrelated individuals was used to determine heterozygosity estimates for these markers. We review four genes deleted in our patient - genes whose known functions and sites of expression in the brain and/or bone make them candidates for involvement in autism and/or the osteodystrophy observed in patients with 2q37.3 deletions. PMID:11701947

Smith, M; Escamilla, J R; Filipek, P; Bocian, M E; Modahl, C; Flodman, P; Spence, M A

2001-01-01

370

Evaluation of IS200-PCR and Comparison with Other Molecular Markers To Trace Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Typhimurium Bovine Isolates from Farm to Meat  

PubMed Central

A procedure that uses an original molecular marker (IS200-PCR) and that is based on the amplification of DNA with outward-facing primers complementary to each end of IS200 has been evaluated with a collection of 85 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates. These strains were isolated from a group of 10 cows at different stages: during transportation between the farm and the slaughterhouse, on the slaughter line, from the environment, and from the final product (ground beef). The 85 isolates were characterized by their antibiotic resistance patterns and were compared by IS200-PCR and by use of four other genotypic markers. Those markers included restriction profiles for 16S and 23S rRNA (ribotypes) and amplification profiles obtained by different approaches: random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, and PCR ribotyping. The results of the IS200-PCR were in accordance with those of other molecular typing methods for this collection of isolates. Five different genotypes were found, which made it possible to refine the hypotheses on transmission obtained from phenotypic results. The genotyping results indicated the massive contamination of the whole group of animals and of the environment by one clonal strain originally recovered from one cow that excreted the strain. On the other hand, a few animals and their environment appeared to be simultaneously contaminated with genetically different strains. PMID:10834977

Millemann, Yves; Gaubert, Stéphane; Remy, Dominique; Colmin, Catherine

2000-01-01

371

Aptamers in immunological research.  

PubMed

In recent years aptamers, synthetic DNA or RNA single-chain oligonucleotides, have been used in various immunological studies to bind specific ligands. Detailed data on the interactions of an RNA aptamer with a human Fc fragment were obtained by X-ray crystallography. The complex formation involves multiple weak interactions that resemble protein-protein interactions. Aptamers specific to cell surface receptors may serve as antagonists or agonists blocking or stimulating cell activities. As aptamers can modify T-cell reactions, they could be useful in the treatment of chronic diseases such as autoimmune and oncological pathologies. In chimeras constructed for the delivery of active substances to defined targets, aptamers specific to surface proteins may be used to transport constructs directed to targets such as tumor cells. Aptamers are also employed as highly specific reagents in immunological assays after being labeled with reporter groups such as fluorescent dyes or following immobilization on insoluble carriers such as membranes or microspheres. PMID:25447403

Nezlin, Roald

2014-12-01

372

A Trypanosoma cruzi Small Surface Molecule Provides the First Immunological Evidence that Chagas' Disease Is Due to a Single Parasite Lineage  

PubMed Central

Chagas' disease is a major health and economic problem caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Multiple independently evolving clones define a complex parasite population that can be arranged into two broad genetic lineages termed T. cruzi I and II. These lineages have different evolutionary origin and display distinct ecological and biological traits. Here we describe a novel molecule termed TSSA for trypomastigote small surface antigen that provides the first immunological marker allowing discrimination between lineages. TSSA is a surface, glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-anchored mucin-like protein, highly antigenic during the infection. TSSA sequences from different parasite isolates reveal a population dimorphism that perfectly matches with the two T. cruzi lineages. Interestingly, this dimorphism is restricted to the central region of the molecule, which comprises the immunodominant B cell epitopes. This sequence variability has a major impact on TSSA antigenicity, leading to no immunological cross-reactivity between both isoforms for antibodies present either in immunization or infection sera. Furthermore, the absolute seroprevalence for TSSA in confirmed Chagasic patients is restricted to T. cruzi II isoform, strongly suggesting that human infections are due to this particular subgroup. Even though association of T. cruzi II with Chagas' disease has been proposed based on molecular markers, this is the first immunological evidence supporting this hypothesis. The implications of these results for the future research on Chagas' disease could be envisaged. PMID:11854354

Di Noia, Javier M.; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; De Marchi, Claudia R.; Almeida, Igor C.; Frasch, Alberto C.C.

2002-01-01

373

Cosmos-1989 immunology studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

Sonnenfeld, Gerald

1991-01-01

374

Analysis of black carbon molecular markers by two chromatographic methods (GC-FID and HPLC-DAD)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCA) as a quantitative measure for black carbon (BC) in soil and sediment samples is a well-established method [1, 2]. Briefly, the oxidation of polycondensated BC molecules forms seven molecular markers, which can be assigned to BC, and which subsequently can be quantified by GC-FID (gas chromatography with flame ionization detector). Recently this method has been refined for BC quantification in seawater samples measuring BPCA on HPLC-DAD (High performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector) [3]. However, a systematic comparison of BC as determined by both analytical techniques would be essential to the calculation of global BC budgets, but is lacking. Here we present data for the systematic comparison of the two BPCA methods, both for quantity and quality. We prepared chars under well-defined laboratory conditions. Chestnut hardwood chips and rice straw were pyrolysed at temperatures between 200 and 1000°C under constant N2 stream. The BC contents of the chars have been analysed using the BPCA extraction method followed by either GC-FID or HPLC-DAD quantification [4]. It appears that the GC-FID method yields systematically lower concentrations of BPCA in the chars compared to the HPLC-DAD method. Possible reasons for the observed difference are i) higher losses of sample material during preparation for GC-FID; ii) different quality of the linear regression used for quantification; iii) incomplete derivatisation of B5CA and B6CA, which is needed for GC-FID analysis. In a next step, we will test different derivatisation procedures (methylation with dimethyl sulfate or diazomethane, and silylation) for their influence on the GC-FID results. The aim of this study is to test if black carbon can be quantified in soil, sediment and water samples using one single method - a crucial step when attempting a global BC budget. References: [1] Brodowski, S., Rodionov, A., Haumeier L., Glaser, B., Amelung, W. (2005) Org. Geochem. 36, 1299-1310. [2] Glaser, B., Haumeier, L., Guggenberger, G., Zech, W. (1998) Org. Geochem. 29, 811-819. [3] Dittmar, T. (2008) Org. Geochem. 39. 396-407. [4] Schneider, M.P.W., Hilf, M., Vogt, U.F., Schmidt, M.W.I., Org. Geochem. (submitted)

Schneider, Maximilian P. W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

2010-05-01

375

Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L.) Using High-Resolution Melting  

PubMed Central

Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt, a bulk segregant analysis was conducted in susceptible or resistant pools constructed from 13 synthetic alfalfa populations, followed by association mapping in two F1 populations consisted of 352 individuals. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used for genotyping. Phenotyping was done by manual inoculation of the pathogen to replicated cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Marker-trait association was analyzed by TASSEL. Seventeen SNP markers significantly associated with Verticillium wilt resistance were identified and they were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7 and 8. SNP markers identified on chromosomes 2, 4 and 7 co-locate with regions of Verticillium wilt resistance loci reported in M. truncatula. Additional markers identified on chromosomes 1 and 8 located the regions where no Verticillium resistance locus has been reported. This study highlights the value of SNP genotyping by high resolution melting to identify the disease resistance loci in tetraploid alfalfa. With further validation, the markers identified in this study could be used for improving resistance to Verticillium wilt in alfalfa breeding programs. PMID:25536106

Zhang, Tiejun; Yu, Long-Xi; McCord, Per; Miller, David; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Johnson, David; Monteros, Maria J.; Ho, Julie; Reisen, Peter; Samac, Deborah A.

2014-01-01

376

Complete mitochondrial genomes of Taenia multiceps, T. hydatigena and T. pisiformis: additional molecular markers for a tapeworm genus of human and animal health significance  

PubMed Central

Background Mitochondrial genomes provide a rich source of molecular variation of proven and widespread utility in molecular ecology, population genetics and evolutionary biology. The tapeworm genus Taenia includes a diversity of tapeworm parasites of significant human and veterinary importance. Here we add complete sequences of the mt genomes of T. multiceps, T. hydatigena and T. pisiformis, to a data set of 4 published mtDNAs in the same genus. Seven complete mt genomes of Taenia species are used to compare and contrast variation within and between genomes in the genus, to estimate a phylogeny for the genus, and to develop novel molecular markers as part of an extended mitochondrial toolkit. Results The complete circular mtDNAs of T. multiceps, T. hydatigena and T. pisiformis were 13,693, 13,492 and 13,387 bp in size respectively, comprising the usual complement of flatworm genes. Start and stop codons of protein coding genes included those found commonly amongst other platyhelminth mt genomes, but the much rarer initiation codon GTT was inferred for the gene atp6 in T. pisiformis. Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNAs offered novel estimates of the interrelationships of Taenia. Sliding window analyses showed nad6, nad5, atp6, nad3 and nad2 are amongst the most variable of genes per unit length, with the highest peaks in nucleotide diversity found in nad5. New primer pairs capable of amplifying fragments of variable DNA in nad1, rrnS and nad5 genes were designed in silico and tested as possible alternatives to existing mitochondrial markers for Taenia. Conclusions With the availability of complete mtDNAs of 7 Taenia species, we have shown that analysis of amino acids provides a robust estimate of phylogeny for the genus that differs markedly from morphological estimates or those using partial genes; with implications for understanding the evolutionary radiation of important Taenia. Full alignment of the nucleotides of Taenia mtDNAs and sliding window analysis suggests numerous alternative gene regions are likely to capture greater nucleotide variation than those currently pursued as molecular markers. New PCR primers developed from a comparative mitogenomic analysis of Taenia species, extend the use of mitochondrial markers for molecular ecology, population genetics and diagnostics. PMID:20649981

2010-01-01

377

Chapter 17: Occupational immunologic lung disease.  

PubMed

Occupational immunologic lung disease is characterized by an immunologic response in the lung to an airborne agent inhaled in the work environment and can be subdivided into immunologically mediated occupational asthma (OA) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Irritant-induced OA, a separate nonimmunologic entity, can be caused by chronic exposure to inhaled irritants or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, defined as an asthma-like syndrome that persists for >3 months and occurs abruptly after a single exposure to a high concentration of an irritating industrial agent. High-risk fields for OA include farmers, printers, woodworkers, painters, plastic workers, cleaners, spray painters, electrical workers, and health care workers. OA can be triggered by high molecular weight (HMW) proteins that act as complete allergens or low molecular weight (LMW) sensitizers that act as haptens. HMW proteins (>10 kDa) are generally derived from microorganisms (such as molds and bacteria, including thermophilic actinomycetes), plants (such as latex antigens and flour proteins), or animals (such as animal dander, avian proteins, and insect scales) and are not specifically regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). LMW haptens that bind to proteins in the respiratory mucosa include some OSHA-regulated substances such as isocyanates, anhydrides, and platinum. HP can present in an acute, a chronic, or a subacute form. The acute, subacute, and early chronic form is characterized by a CD4(+) T(H)1 and CD8(+) lymphocyte alveolitis. Classically, the bronchoalveolar lavage will show a CD4/CD8 ratio of <1. PMID:22794690

Sabin, Bradley R; Grammer, Leslie C

2012-01-01

378

Immunology and Infectious Disease: recommended sequence of required courses www.immunology.psu.edu Immunology and Infectious Disease  

E-print Network

Immunology and Infectious Disease: recommended sequence of required courses www.immunology.psu.edu Immunology and Infectious Disease Dr. James Endres Howell (814) 867­0194 immunology@psu.edu Year 1 VB SC 050S Microbiology Laboratory MICRB 410(3) Principles of Immunology* B M B 402(3) General Biochemistry Choose

Omiecinski, Curtis

379

Distinctive mitochondrial genome of Calanoid copepod Calanus sinicus with multiple large non-coding regions and reshuffled gene order: Useful molecular markers for phylogenetic and population studies  

PubMed Central

Background Copepods are highly diverse and abundant, resulting in extensive ecological radiation in marine ecosystems. Calanus sinicus dominates continental shelf waters in the northwest Pacific Ocean and plays an important role in the local ecosystem by linking primary production to higher trophic levels. A lack of effective molecular markers has hindered phylogenetic and population genetic studies concerning copepods. As they are genome-level informative, mitochondrial DNA sequences can be used as markers for population genetic studies and phylogenetic studies. Results The mitochondrial genome of C. sinicus is distinct from other arthropods owing to the concurrence of multiple non-coding regions and a reshuffled gene arrangement. Further particularities in the mitogenome of C. sinicus include low A + T-content, symmetrical nucleotide composition between strands, abbreviated stop codons for several PCGs and extended lengths of the genes atp6 and atp8 relative to other copepods. The monophyletic Copepoda should be placed within the Vericrustacea. The close affinity between Cyclopoida and Poecilostomatoida suggests reassigning the latter as subordinate to the former. Monophyly of Maxillopoda is rejected. Within the alignment of 11 C. sinicus mitogenomes, there are 397 variable sites harbouring three 'hotspot' variable sites and three microsatellite loci. Conclusion The occurrence of the circular subgenomic fragment during laboratory assays suggests that special caution should be taken when sequencing mitogenomes using long PCR. Such a phenomenon may provide additional evidence of mitochondrial DNA recombination, which appears to have been a prerequisite for shaping the present mitochondrial profile of C. sinicus during its evolution. The lack of synapomorphic gene arrangements among copepods has cast doubt on the utility of gene order as a useful molecular marker for deep phylogenetic analysis. However, mitochondrial genomic sequences have been valuable markers for resolving phylogenetic issues concerning copepods. The variable site maps of C. sinicus mitogenomes provide a solid foundation for population genetic studies. PMID:21269523

2011-01-01

380

Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers  

PubMed Central

Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic drift or selection during breeding processes. Comparative analysis of allele distribution revealed genetic divergence between improved cultivars and landraces, as well as between cultivars released in different years. These results will be useful for assessing cultivars and for marker-assisted breeding in sesame. PMID:24641723

2014-01-01

381

Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Modelling T cell immunology  

E-print Network

Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Modelling T cell immunology;Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Mathematics is a special science! #12;Mathematics and physics Biology Modelling a population Immunology Classical mechanics (Newton) Figure

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

382

Laboratory markers in ulcerative colitis: Current insights and future advances  

PubMed Central

Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in man. Despite some common features, these forms can be distinguished by different genetic predisposition, risk factors and clinical, endoscopic and histological characteristics. The aetiology of both CD and UC remains unknown, but several evidences suggest that CD and perhaps UC are due to an excessive immune response directed against normal constituents of the intestinal bacterial flora. Tests sometimes invasive are routine for the diagnosis and care of patients with IBD. Diagnosis of UC is based on clinical symptoms combined with radiological and endoscopic investigations. The employment of non-invasive biomarkers is needed. These biomarkers have the potential to avoid invasive diagnostic tests that may result in discomfort and potential complications. The ability to determine the type, severity, prognosis and response to therapy of UC, using biomarkers has long been a goal of clinical researchers. We describe the biomarkers assessed in UC, with special reference to acute-phase proteins and serologic markers and thereafter, we describe the new biological markers and the biological markers could be developed in the future: (1) serum markers of acute phase response: The laboratory tests most used to measure the acute-phase proteins in clinical practice are the serum concentration of C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Other biomarkers of inflammation in UC include platelet count, leukocyte count, and serum albumin and serum orosomucoid concentrations; (2) serologic markers/antibodies: In the last decades serological and immunologic biomarkers have been studied extensively in immunology and have been used in clinical practice to detect specific pathologies. In UC, the presence of these antibodies can aid as surrogate markers for the aberrant host immune response; and (3) future biomarkers: The development of biomarkers in UC will be very important in the future. The progress of molecular biology tools (microarrays, proteomics and nanotechnology) have revolutionised the field of the biomarker discovery. The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve, characterize and analyse large amounts of data generated by the technological advances. The techniques available for biomarkers development are genomics (single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, pharmacogenetics and gene expression analyses) and proteomics. In the future, the addition of new serological markers will add significant benefit. Correlating serologic markers with genotypes and clinical phenotypes should enhance our understanding of pathophysiology of UC.

Cioffi, Michele; Rosa, Antonella De; Serao, Rosalba; Picone, Ilaria; Vietri, Maria Teresa

2015-01-01

383

Laboratory markers in ulcerative colitis: Current insights and future advances.  

PubMed

Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in man. Despite some common features, these forms can be distinguished by different genetic predisposition, risk factors and clinical, endoscopic and histological characteristics. The aetiology of both CD and UC remains unknown, but several evidences suggest that CD and perhaps UC are due to an excessive immune response directed against normal constituents of the intestinal bacterial flora. Tests sometimes invasive are routine for the diagnosis and care of patients with IBD. Diagnosis of UC is based on clinical symptoms combined with radiological and endoscopic investigations. The employment of non-invasive biomarkers is needed. These biomarkers have the potential to avoid invasive diagnostic tests that may result in discomfort and potential complications. The ability to determine the type, severity, prognosis and response to therapy of UC, using biomarkers has long been a goal of clinical researchers. We describe the biomarkers assessed in UC, with special reference to acute-phase proteins and serologic markers and thereafter, we describe the new biological markers and the biological markers could be developed in the future: (1) serum markers of acute phase response: The laboratory tests most used to measure the acute-phase proteins in clinical practice are the serum concentration of C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Other biomarkers of inflammation in UC include platelet count, leukocyte count, and serum albumin and serum orosomucoid concentrations; (2) serologic markers/antibodies: In the last decades serological and immunologic biomarkers have been studied extensively in immunology and have been used in clinical practice to detect specific pathologies. In UC, the presence of these antibodies can aid as surrogate markers for the aberrant host immune response; and (3) future biomarkers: The development of biomarkers in UC will be very important in the future. The progress of molecular biology tools (microarrays, proteomics and nanotechnology) have revolutionised the field of the biomarker discovery. The advances in bioinformatics coupled with cross-disciplinary collaborations have greatly enhanced our ability to retrieve, characterize and analyse large amounts of data generated by the technological advances. The techniques available for biomarkers development are genomics (single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, pharmacogenetics and gene expression analyses) and proteomics. In the future, the addition of new serological markers will add significant benefit. Correlating serologic markers with genotypes and clinical phenotypes should enhance our understanding of pathophysiology of UC. PMID:25685607

Cioffi, Michele; Rosa, Antonella De; Serao, Rosalba; Picone, Ilaria; Vietri, Maria Teresa

2015-02-15

384

Hematology and immunology studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

Kimzey, S. L.

1977-01-01

385

Comparative Assessment of Lymph Node Micrometastasis in Cervical, Endometrial and Vulvar Cancer: Insights on the Real Time qRT-PCR Approach versus Immunohistochemistry, Employing Dual Molecular Markers  

PubMed Central

To address the value of qRT-PCR and IHC in accurately detecting lymph node micrometastasis in gynecological cancer, we performed a systematic approach, using a set of dual molecular tumor-specific markers such as cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), in a series of 46 patients (19 with cervical cancer, 18 with endometrial cancer, and 9 with vulvar cancer). A total of 1281 lymph nodes were analyzed and 28 were found positive by histopathology. Following this documentation, 82 lymph nodes, 11 positive and 71 negative, were randomly selected and further analyzed both by IHC and qRT-PCR for CK19 and CA9 expression. All 11 (100%) expressed CK19 by IHC, while only 6 (54.5%) expressed CA9. On the contrary, all the histologically negative for micrometastases lymph nodes were also negative by IHC analysis for both markers. The comparative diagnostic efficacy of the two markers using qRT-PCR, however, disclosed that the analysis of the same aliquots of the 82 lymph nodes led to 100% specificity for the CK19 biomarker, while, in contrast, CA9 failed to recapitulate a similar pattern. These data suggest that qRT-PCR exhibits a better diagnostic accuracy compared to IHC, while CK19 displays a consistent pattern of detection compared to CA9. PMID:24527437

Pappa, Kalliopi I.; Rodolakis, Alexandros; Christodoulou, Ioanna; Gazouli, Maria; Markaki, Sofia; Antsaklis, Aris; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

2014-01-01

386

Characterization of high-copy-number retrotransposons from the large genomes of the louisiana iris species and their use as molecular markers.  

PubMed Central

The Louisiana iris species Iris brevicaulis and I. fulva are morphologically and karyotypically distinct yet frequently hybridize in nature. A group of high-copy-number TY3/gypsy-like retrotransposons was characterized from these species and used to develop molecular markers that take advantage of the abundance and distribution of these elements in the large iris genome. The copy number of these IRRE elements (for iris retroelement), is approximately 1 x 10(5), accounting for approximately 6-10% of the approximately 10,000-Mb haploid Louisiana iris genome. IRRE elements are transcriptionally active in I. brevicaulis and I. fulva and their F(1) and backcross hybrids. The LTRs of the elements are more variable than the coding domains and can be used to define several distinct IRRE subfamilies. Transposon display or S-SAP markers specific to two of these subfamilies have been developed and are highly polymorphic among wild-collected individuals of each species. As IRRE elements are present in each of 11 iris species tested, the marker system has the potential to provide valuable comparative data on the dynamics of retrotransposition in large plant genomes. PMID:12807789

Kentner, Edward K; Arnold, Michael L; Wessler, Susan R

2003-01-01

387

Molecular characterization of diverse CIMMYT maize inbred lines from eastern and southern Africa using single nucleotide polymorphic markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Knowledge of germplasm diversity and relationships among elite breeding materials is fundamentally important in crop improvement. We genotyped 450 maize lines developed and/or widely used by CIMMYT breeding programs both in Kenya and Zimbabwe using 1065 SNP markers to (i) investigate population stru...

388

The evolution of Hessian Fly from the Old World to the New World: evidence from molecular markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Eighteen microsatellite loci and 22 SNPs were used to assess the validity of the biotype designation in Hessian fly populations. Using these markers, we were able to discern between laboratory populations, but we were also able to ascertain their geographic origin. The differences between the biot...

389

Use of molecular markers aids in the development of diverse inbred backcross lines in beit alpha cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Beit Alpha cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a Mediterranean fresh-market type with a relatively narrow genetic base. To broaden its base for plant improvement, 42 diverse accessions were compared employing a previously defined standard marker array to choose wide-based parental lines for use in bac...

390

DEPARTMENT CODE Department of Microbiology, Immunology  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CODE Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology College of Veterinary Medicine of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology is to pursue excellence in undergraduate, graduate, and veterinary collectively should excel in basic and applied bacteriology, virology, pathology, immunology, parasitology

391

42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.  

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 ...Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency...approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual program must...

2014-10-01

392

DEPARTMENT CODE Department of Microbiology, Immunology  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT CODE Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology College of Veterinary Medicine, Immunology, and Pathology is to pursue excellence in biomedical research, undergraduate education, graduate collectively should excel in basic and applied bacteriology, virology, pathology, immunology, parasitology

Stephens, Graeme L.

393

42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 ...Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency...approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual program must...

2013-10-01

394

Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbnde  

E-print Network

Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbünde: Sonderforschungsbereich 643;Medical Immunology Campus Erlangen Beteiligte Forschungsverbünde: Sonderforschungsbereich 643 Sprecher Klinische Mikrobiologie, Immunologie und Hygiene, Wasserturmstra�e 3-5, 1. Stock #12;Medical Immunology

Fiebig, Peter

395

42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 ...Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency...approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual program must...

2012-10-01

396

42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 ...Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency...approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual program must...

2011-10-01

397

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT Student: Program: Immunology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: PLEASE RETURN TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Immunology Program Administrator Modell Center Harvard Medical

Mekalanos, John

398

42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 ...Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency...approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual program must...

2010-10-01

399

42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.  

...Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis serology and general immunology. Specific criteria for these subspecialties are found at §§ 493.923 and...

2014-10-01

400

42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis serology and general immunology. Specific criteria for these subspecialties are found at §§ 493.923 and...

2011-10-01

401

42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis serology and general immunology. Specific criteria for these subspecialties are found at §§ 493.923 and...

2012-10-01

402

42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis serology and general immunology. Specific criteria for these subspecialties are found at §§ 493.923 and...

2013-10-01

403

42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis serology and general immunology. Specific criteria for these subspecialties are found at §§ 493.923 and...

2010-10-01

404

Molecular characterization of diverse CIMMYT maize inbred lines from eastern and southern Africa using single nucleotide polymorphic markers  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge of germplasm diversity and relationships among elite breeding materials is fundamentally important in crop improvement. We genotyped 450 maize inbred lines developed and/or widely used by CIMMYT breeding programs in both Kenya and Zimbabwe using 1065 SNP markers to (i) investigate population structure and patterns of relationship of the germplasm for better exploitation in breeding programs; (ii) assess the usefulness of SNPs for identifying heterotic groups commonly used by CIMMYT breeding programs; and (iii) identify a subset of highly informative SNP markers for routine and low cost genotyping of CIMMYT germplasm in the region using uniplex assays. Results Genetic distance for about 94% of the pairs of lines fell between 0.300 and 0.400. Eighty four percent of the pairs of lines also showed relative kinship values ? 0.500. Model-based population structure analysis, principal component analysis, neighbor-joining cluster analysis and discriminant analysis revealed the presence of 3 major groups and generally agree with pedigree information. The SNP markers did not show clear separation of heterotic groups A and B that were established based on combining ability tests through diallel and line x tester analyses. Our results demonstrated large differences among the SNP markers in terms of reproducibility, ease of scoring, polymorphism, minor allele frequency and polymorphic information content. About 40% of the SNPs in the multiplexed chip-based GoldenGate assays were found to be uninformative in this study and we recommend 644 of the 1065 for low to medium density genotyping in tropical maize germplasm using uniplex assays. Conclusions There were high genetic distance and low kinship coefficients among most pairs of lines, clearly indicating the uniqueness of the majority of the inbred lines in these maize breeding programs. The results from this study will be useful to breeders in selecting best parental combinations for new breeding crosses, mapping population development and marker assisted breeding. PMID:22443094

2012-01-01

405

Immunological Perspectives of Leishmaniasis  

PubMed Central

Leishmania parasites have been widely used in experimental models to understand generation, maintenance and failure of immune responses underlying resistance and susceptibility to infection. The clinical outcomes of Leishmania infection depend on the infecting species and the immune status of the host. Noticeably most people exposed Leishmania never develop overt disease. Understanding the immunological events that result in failure or successful control of the parasites is fundamental to both design and evaluation of vaccines and therapies against the leishmaniases. Recent studies visualizing immune response to Leishmania major in the skin have given new insights into the different immune cells acting as hosts the parasite during different stage of infection. Control of Leishmania infection and disease progression has been associated with generation of T-helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses respectively. Though still valid in several aspects, the Th1/Th2 paradigm is an oversimplification in need of revision. Th2 polarization has never explained severity of human leishmanial disease and a number of other T-cell subsets, including regulatory T- and Th17- cells, have important roles in susceptibility and resistance of both experimental and human leishmanial disease. This review gives an updated overview of immunological response considered to be of importance in protection, susceptibility, disease progression and cure of leishmaniasis, with a special emphasis on human diseases. PMID:20606969

Nylén, Susanne; Gautam, Shalini

2010-01-01

406

Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.  

PubMed

The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data provide valuable molecular evidence for the effects of the space environment on R. pseudoacacia and may contribute to future space-breeding programs involving forest trees. PMID:23315806

Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

2012-01-01

407

Chemokines: immunology's high impact factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemokines facilitate leukocyte migration and positioning as well as other processes such as angiogenesis and leukocyte degranulation. The burgeoning knowledge on chemokines and their receptors has influenced many aspects of immunology, in part because cell migration is intimately related to leukocyte function. This overview assesses the impact that chemokines have had on our understanding of immunology and infectious diseases. These

Charles R. Mackay

2001-01-01

408

Immunological control of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract: effect of local anaphylaxis on the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight drugs in the rat.  

PubMed

Intestinal absorption of various drugs was examined by means of in situ recirculation technique during local anaphylaxis. The antibody was determined by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis technique in rats immunized once or three times. The optimal condition of local anaphylaxis was determined by the leakage of Evans Blue. The most significant increase in leaks of the dye was observed by the intraluminal challenge with 400 mg of ovalbumin for 10 min in ovalbumin-immunized rats, and this condition was chosen as the optimal condition of local anaphylaxis. Under this condition, intestinal absorption of caffeine, phenylbutazone, and bromthymol blue (BTB) significantly decreased in ovalbumin-immunized rats compared with the control, whereas no significant effect was noted in the intestinal absorption of salicylic acid, quinine, pralidoxime iodide (2-PAM), tetracycline, and phenol red. In normal rats, no significant decrease was obtained in the intestinal absorption of caffeine, phenylbutazone, and BTB. On the other hand, the decreased absorption of BTB was not found in ovalbumin-immunized rats by the intraluminal challenge with bovine gamma-globulin. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the decreased absorption of BTB between rats immunized once and three times. The most effective condition for decreased BTB absorption was observed by the intraluminal challenge with 200 mg of ovalbumin for 10 min in ovalbumin-immunized rats, which almost correlated with the data of Evans Blue leakage. From these observations, it appears that the mucosal immune responses affect the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight drugs. PMID:4093839

Yamamoto, A; Utsumi, E; Hamaura, T; Nakamura, J; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

1985-10-01

409

The onset of CML in blastic crisis: molecular features.  

PubMed

The lack of distinguishing characteristics between lymphoid blastic crisis (BC) of Philadelphia (Ph)+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains an exciting dilemma. Indeed, the genetic defect of approximately half of Ph+ ALL patients is identical to that identified in CML. Here we report the case of one patient admitted with immunological and molecular patterns indicative of Ph+ ALL. The patient was brought into complete remission by chemotherapy and was transplanted with an HLA identical sibling donor, but relapsed a few months later with immunological and molecular evidence of BC of CML, displaying myeloid markers and lacking lymphoid antigens and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) rearrangement. This suggest a CML case with an initial BC without a previous chronic phase or supervening on a subclinical CML. PMID:9498160

Gregorini, A; Filippetti, A; Luchetti, F; Walker, A; Lillington, D M; Papa, S; Valentini, M

1997-01-01

410

RIKEN IMSJSI 2015 International Symposium on Immunology  

E-print Network

RIKEN IMSJSI 2015 International Symposium on Immunology June 18 ­ 19, 2015 Annex Hall, Pacifico Immunology Infectious diseases and vaccine development Metabolism and immune regulations RNA and immune

Fukai, Tomoki

411

Molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes for septoria speckled leaf blotch resistance in barley.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Septoria speckled leaf blotch (SSLB), caused by Septoria passerinii, has emerged as one of the most important foliar diseases of barley in the Upper Midwest region of the United States. To map and tag genes for SSLB resistance, we developed two populations derived from the resistant accessions CIho 4780 and CIho 10644 and the susceptible malting cv. Foster. Segregation analysis of F(2) plants or F(2:3) families from the Foster/CIho 4780 and Foster/CIho 10644 populations revealed that a single dominant gene conferred resistance at the seedling stage. Bulked segregant analysis identified an amplified fragment length polymorphism marker, E-ACT/M-CAA-170, that co-segregated with the SSLB resistance gene Rsp2 in the Foster/CIho 4780 F(2) population. Southern hybridization analysis with DNA from the wheat/barley addition lines localized E-ACT/M-CAA-170 on the short arm of the barley chromosome 5(1H). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with DNA clones previously mapped to the short arm of chromosome 5(1H) placed Rsp2 at a position flanked by the markers Act8 and ksuD14. A sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker (E-ACT/M-CAA-170a) was developed that co-segregated with not only Rsp2 in the Foster/CIho 4780 population but also resistance gene Rsp3 in the Foster/CIho 10644 population. This result indicates that Rsp3 is closely linked to Rsp2 on the short arm of chromosome 5(1H). The utility of SCAR marker E-ACT/M-CAA-170a for selecting Rsp2 in two different breeding populations was validated. PMID:18944055

Zhong, Shaobin; Toubia-Rahme, Hala; Steffenson, Brian J; Smith, Kevin P

2006-09-01

412

Molecular marker analysis of Helianthus annuus L. 2. Construction of an RFLP linkage map for cultivated sunflower  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed linkage map of Helianthus annuus was constructed based on segregation at 234 RFLP loci, detected by 213 probes, in an F2 population of 289 individuals (derived from a cross between the inbred lines HA89 and ZENB8). The genetic markers covered 1380 centiMorgans (cM) of the sunflower genome and were aranged in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid

S. T. Berry; A. J. Leon; C. C. Hanfrey; P. Challis; A. Burkholz; S. R. Barnes; G. K. Rufener; M. Lee; P. D. S. Caligari

1995-01-01

413

Molecular authentication of the medicinal herb Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae) and an adulterant using nuclear and chloroplast DNA markers.  

PubMed

Dried parts of different plant species often look alike, especially in powdered form, making them very difficult to identify. Ruta graveolens, sold as a dried medicinal herb, can be adulterated with Euphorbia dracunculoides. The genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf powder (100 mg each) using the modified CTAB method. Internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA-ITS), and chloroplast spacer sequences (rpoB and rpoC1) are regarded as potential genes for plant DNA barcoding. We amplified and sequenced these spacer sequences and confirmed the sequences with a BLAST search. Sequence alignment was performed using ClustalX to look for differences in the sequences. A DNA marker was developed based on rpoB and rpoC1 of the nrDNA-ITS for the identification of the adulterant E. dracunculoides in samples of R. graveolens that are sold in local herbal markets. Sequence-characterized amplified region markers of 289 and 264 bp for R. graveolens and 424 bp for E. dracunculoides were developed from dissimilar sequences of this nrDNA-ITS to speed up the authentication process. This marker successfully distinguished these species in extracted samples with as little as 5 ng DNA/?L extract. PMID:22095605

Al-Qurainy, F; Khan, S; Tarroum, M; Al-Hemaid, F M; Ali, M A

2011-01-01

414

Marker development  

SciTech Connect

This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

Adams, M.R.

1987-05-01

415

Measurements of organic molecular markers in California using comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatograph High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOF-MS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the sources and transformation processes of organic aerosol requires detailed speciation of organic compounds. Molecular markers specific to individual sources help determine the contribution of each source to organic aerosol emissions. In previous work using one-dimensional gas-chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC/MS), less than 10-20% of the organic fraction has been identified, with a large contribution of unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Two-dimensional gas-chromatograph is a novel technique which provides excellent resolution to separate compounds buried in this complex mixture. In addition to a volatility-based chromatographic separation, compounds are further separated on a second column based on their polarities. Here we report measurements of more than 200 resolved compounds observed on filters collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Pasadena, and during a large biomass burning event in the Los Angeles area (Station Fire). High volume filter samples are thermally desorbed in a Gerstel Thermal Desorption System (TDS2) and preconcentrated on a cooled inlet (CIS). The compounds are then analyzed by comprehensive 2-dimensional GC using a Zoex modulator, followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (Tofwerks). Compound identification is carried out by comparison of retention times with known standards, mass spectral library match, and identification of molecular fragments by exact mass. A wide range of compounds are observed: n-alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as acids, esters and ketones. While levoglucosan was observed in organic aerosol produced during the Station Fire, many other compounds revealed by two-dimensional GC (such as resin acids, lignin pyrolysis products) show elevated signals, suggesting that other molecular markers can provide additional information about aerosol formation processes during biomass burning events.

Chan, A. W.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Schilling, K. A.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Hersey, S. P.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

2011-12-01

416

Immunology for physicists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immune system is a complex system of cells and molecules that can provide us with a basic defense against pathogenic organisms. Like the nervous system, the immune system performs pattern recognition tasks, learns, and retains a memory of the antigens that it has fought. The immune system contains more than 107 different clones of cells that communicate via cell-cell contact and the secretion of molecules. Performing complex tasks such as learning and memory involves cooperation among large numbers of components of the immune system and hence there is interest in using methods and concepts from statistical physics. Furthermore, the immune response develops in time and the description of its time evolution is an interesting problem in dynamical systems. In this paper, the authors provide a brief introduction to the biology of the immune system and discuss a number of immunological problems in which the use of physical concepts and mathematical methods has increased our understanding.

Perelson, Alan S.; Weisbuch, Gérard

1997-10-01

417

Immunology of vaccination.  

PubMed

An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

Beverley, P C L

2002-01-01

418

Modelling Immunological Memory Simon Garrett1  

E-print Network

5 Modelling Immunological Memory Simon Garrett1 , Martin Robbins1 , Joanne Walker1 , William Wilson. Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing high- throughput experiments in silico of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors

Aickelin, Uwe

419

Analytic Immunologic Techniques Joseph G. Kunkel  

E-print Network

Chapter 1 Analytic Immunologic Techniques Joseph G. Kunkel I. Introduction Analytic immunologic that are present in a complex mixture and measure their relative or absolute titers at the same time. Immunology may or may not be replaced by mABs. Before investigators embark on using a particular immunologic

Kunkel, Joseph G.

420

M&ISummer 2011 Microbiology & Immunology  

E-print Network

M&ISummer 2011 Microbiology & Immunology DEPARTMENT OF #12;04 Message Letter from the Chair 08 AID newsletter from the Department of Mi- crobiology & Immunology. In this inaugural issue, I would like Immunology (CCTI), a cross-departmental initiative that will emphasize transla- tion of basic immunological

Biasutti, Michela