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Sample records for immunological molecular markers

  1. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; the US-Japan Workshop on Immunological Molecular Markers in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-01-01

    Supported by the Office of International Affairs, National Cancer Institute (NCI), the "US-Japan Workshop on Immunological Biomarkers in Oncology" was held in March 2009. The workshop was related to a task force launched by the International Society for the Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to identify strategies for biomarker discovery and validation in the field of biotherapy. The effort will culminate on October 28th 2009 in the "iSBTc-FDA-NCI Workshop on Prognostic and Predictive Immunologic Biomarkers in Cancer", which will be held in Washington DC in association with the Annual Meeting. The purposes of the US-Japan workshop were a) to discuss novel approaches to enhance the discovery of predictive and/or prognostic markers in cancer immunotherapy; b) to define the state of the science in biomarker discovery and validation. The participation of Japanese and US scientists provided the opportunity to identify shared or discordant themes across the distinct immune genetic background and the diverse prevalence of disease between the two Nations. Converging concepts were identified: enhanced knowledge of interferon-related pathways was found to be central to the understanding of immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD) of which tumor rejection is a representative facet. Although the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) likely mediates the inflammatory process leading to tumor rejection, it is insufficient by itself and the associated mechanisms need to be identified. It is likely that adaptive immune responses play a broader role in tumor rejection than those strictly related to their antigen-specificity; likely, their primary role is to trigger an acute and tissue-specific inflammatory response at the tumor site that leads to rejection upon recruitment of additional innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Other candidate systemic and/or tissue-specific biomarkers were recognized that might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions. PMID:19534815

  2. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Hideaki; Sato, Marimo; Thurin, Magdalena; Wang, Ena; Butterfield, Lisa H; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Lee, Peter P; Khleif, Samir N; Wigginton, Jon M; Ambs, Stefan; Akutsu, Yasunori; Chaussabel, Damien; Doki, Yuichiro; Eremin, Oleg; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Imai, Kohzoh; Jacobson, James; Jinushi, Masahisa; Kanamoto, Akira; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Kato, Kazunori; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kirkwood, John M; Kleen, Thomas O; Lehmann, Paul V; Liotta, Lance; Lotze, Michael T; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Mayrand-Chung, Shawmarie; Nakamura, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Palucka, A Karolina; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pos, Zoltan; Ribas, Antoni; Rivoltini, Licia; Sato, Noriyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Slingluff, Craig L; Streicher, Howard; Stroncek, David F; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Toyota, Minoru; Wada, Hisashi; Wu, Xifeng; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhao, Yingdong; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Marincola, Francesco M

    2009-01-01

    Supported by the Office of International Affairs, National Cancer Institute (NCI), the "US-Japan Workshop on Immunological Biomarkers in Oncology" was held in March 2009. The workshop was related to a task force launched by the International Society for the Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to identify strategies for biomarker discovery and validation in the field of biotherapy. The effort will culminate on October 28th 2009 in the "iSBTc-FDA-NCI Workshop on Prognostic and Predictive Immunologic Biomarkers in Cancer", which will be held in Washington DC in association with the Annual Meeting. The purposes of the US-Japan workshop were a) to discuss novel approaches to enhance the discovery of predictive and/or prognostic markers in cancer immunotherapy; b) to define the state of the science in biomarker discovery and validation. The participation of Japanese and US scientists provided the opportunity to identify shared or discordant themes across the distinct immune genetic background and the diverse prevalence of disease between the two Nations. Converging concepts were identified: enhanced knowledge of interferon-related pathways was found to be central to the understanding of immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD) of which tumor rejection is a representative facet. Although the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) likely mediates the inflammatory process leading to tumor rejection, it is insufficient by itself and the associated mechanisms need to be identified. It is likely that adaptive immune responses play a broader role in tumor rejection than those strictly related to their antigen-specificity; likely, their primary role is to trigger an acute and tissue-specific inflammatory response at the tumor site that leads to rejection upon recruitment of additional innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Other candidate systemic and/or tissue-specific biomarkers were recognized that might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions. PMID:19534815

  3. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  4. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Selected Genital Tract Immunological Markers and Molecular Vaginal Microbiota in Sub-Saharan African Women, with Relevance to HIV Risk and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kyongo, Jordan K; Crucitti, Tania; Menten, Joris; Hardy, Liselotte; Cools, Piet; Michiels, Johan; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Joseph, Sarah; Fichorova, Raina; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vanham, Guido; Ariën, Kevin K; Jespers, Vicky

    2015-05-01

    Data on immune mediators in the genital tract and the factors that modulate them in sub-Saharan women are limited. Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) samples from 430 sexually active women from Kenya, South Africa, and Rwanda were analyzed for 12 soluble immune mediators using Bio-Plex and Meso Scale Discovery multiplex platforms, as well as single enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Ten bacterial species were quantified in vaginal swab samples. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was defined by Nugent scoring. CVL samples from HIV-infected women showed a clear-cut proinflammatory profile. Pregnant women, adolescents, and women engaging in traditional vaginal practices differed in specific soluble markers compared to reference groups of adult HIV-negative women. Cervical mucus, cervical ectopy, abnormal vaginal discharge, and having multiple sex partners were each associated with an increase in inflammatory mediators. The levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12(p70), and IL-8 were elevated, whereas the IL-1RA/IL-1(α+β) ratio decreased in women with BV. The level of gamma interferon-induced protein 10 was lower in BV-positive than in BV-negative women, suggesting its suppression as a potential immune evasion mechanism by BV-associated bacteria. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus vaginalis were associated with decreased proinflammatory cytokines and each BV-associated species with increased proinflammatory cytokines. Remarkably, the in vitro anti-HIV activity of CVL samples from BV-positive women was stronger than that of BV-negative women. In conclusion, we found significant associations of factors, including vaginal microbiota, which can influence immune mediators in the vaginal environment in sexually active women. These factors need to be considered when establishing normative levels or pathogenic cutoffs of biomarkers of inflammation and associated risks in African women. PMID:25761460

  5. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Selected Genital Tract Immunological Markers and Molecular Vaginal Microbiota in Sub-Saharan African Women, with Relevance to HIV Risk and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kyongo, Jordan K.; Crucitti, Tania; Menten, Joris; Hardy, Liselotte; Cools, Piet; Michiels, Johan; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Joseph, Sarah; Fichorova, Raina; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vanham, Guido; Ariën, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Data on immune mediators in the genital tract and the factors that modulate them in sub-Saharan women are limited. Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) samples from 430 sexually active women from Kenya, South Africa, and Rwanda were analyzed for 12 soluble immune mediators using Bio-Plex and Meso Scale Discovery multiplex platforms, as well as single enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Ten bacterial species were quantified in vaginal swab samples. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was defined by Nugent scoring. CVL samples from HIV-infected women showed a clear-cut proinflammatory profile. Pregnant women, adolescents, and women engaging in traditional vaginal practices differed in specific soluble markers compared to reference groups of adult HIV-negative women. Cervical mucus, cervical ectopy, abnormal vaginal discharge, and having multiple sex partners were each associated with an increase in inflammatory mediators. The levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12(p70), and IL-8 were elevated, whereas the IL-1RA/IL-1(α+β) ratio decreased in women with BV. The level of gamma interferon-induced protein 10 was lower in BV-positive than in BV-negative women, suggesting its suppression as a potential immune evasion mechanism by BV-associated bacteria. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus vaginalis were associated with decreased proinflammatory cytokines and each BV-associated species with increased proinflammatory cytokines. Remarkably, the in vitro anti-HIV activity of CVL samples from BV-positive women was stronger than that of BV-negative women. In conclusion, we found significant associations of factors, including vaginal microbiota, which can influence immune mediators in the vaginal environment in sexually active women. These factors need to be considered when establishing normative levels or pathogenic cutoffs of biomarkers of inflammation and associated risks in African women. PMID:25761460

  6. Biochemical and immunological markers of over-training.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael

    2002-06-01

    Athletes fail to perform to the best of their ability if they become infected, stale, sore or malnourished. Excessive training with insufficient recovery can lead to a debilitating syndrome in which performance and well being can be affected for months. Eliminating or minimizing these problems by providing advice and guidelines on training loads, recovery times, nutrition or pharmacological intervention and regular monitoring of athletes using an appropriate battery of markers can help prevent the development of an overtraining syndrome in athletes. The potential usefulness of objective physiological, biochemical and immunological markers of overtraining has received much attention in recent years. Practical markers would be ones that could be measured routinely in the laboratory and offered to athletes as part of their sports science and medical support. The identification of common factors among overtrained athletes in comparison with well-trained athletes not suffering from underperformance could permit appropriate intervention to prevent athletes from progressing to a more serious stage of the overtraining syndrome. To date, no single reliable objective marker of impending overtraining has been identified. Some lines of research do, however, show promise and are based on findings that overtrained athletes appear to exhibit an altered hormonal response to stress. For example, in response to a standardized bout (or repeated bouts) of high intensity exercise, overtrained athletes show a lower heart rate, blood lactate and plasma cortisol response. Several immune measures that can be obtained from a resting blood sample (e.g. the expression of specific cell surface proteins such as CD45RO+ on T-lymphocytes) also seem to offer some hope of identifying impending overtraining. If an athlete is suspected of suffering from overtraining syndrome, other measures will also required, if only to exclude other possible causes of underperformance including post-viral fatigue, glandular fever, clinical depression, poor diet, anaemia, asthma, allergies, thyroid disorders, myocarditis and other medical problems interfering with recovery. PMID:24688268

  7. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human allotypic marker immunological test system. 866.5065 Section 866.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human allotypic marker immunological test system. 866.5065 Section 866.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human allotypic marker immunological test system. 866.5065 Section 866.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human allotypic marker immunological test system. 866.5065 Section 866.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5065 - Human allotypic marker immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human allotypic marker immunological test system. 866.5065 Section 866.5065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5065 Human allotypic marker immunological test system. (a) Identification. A human allotypic...

  12. Molecular marker applications in plants.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Alice C; Tollenaere, Reece; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Individuals within a population of a sexually reproducing species will have some degree of heritable genomic variation caused by mutations, insertion/deletions (INDELS), inversions, duplications, and translocations. Such variation can be detected and screened using molecular, or genetic, markers. By definition, molecular markers are genetic loci that can be easily tracked and quantified in a population and may be associated with a particular gene or trait of interest. This chapter will review the current major applications of molecular markers in plants. PMID:25373746

  13. An immunological marker of tolerance to infection in wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joseph A; Hall, Amy J; Friberg, Ida M; Ralli, Catriona; Lowe, Ann; Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Turner, Andrew K; Stewart, Alexander; Birtles, Richard J; Paterson, Steve; Bradley, Janette E; Begon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Hosts are likely to respond to parasitic infections by a combination of resistance (expulsion of pathogens) and tolerance (active mitigation of pathology). Of these strategies, the basis of tolerance in animal hosts is relatively poorly understood, with especially little known about how tolerance is manifested in natural populations. We monitored a natural population of field voles using longitudinal and cross-sectional sampling modes and taking measurements on body condition, infection, immune gene expression, and survival. Using analyses stratified by life history stage, we demonstrate a pattern of tolerance to macroparasites in mature compared to immature males. In comparison to immature males, mature males resisted infection less and instead increased investment in body condition in response to accumulating burdens, but at the expense of reduced reproductive effort. We identified expression of the transcription factor Gata3 (a mediator of Th2 immunity) as an immunological biomarker of this tolerance response. Time series data for individual animals suggested that macroparasite infections gave rise to increased expression of Gata3, which gave rise to improved body condition and enhanced survival as hosts aged. These findings provide a clear and unexpected insight into tolerance responses (and their life history sequelae) in a natural vertebrate population. The demonstration that such responses (potentially promoting parasite transmission) can move from resistance to tolerance through the course of an individual's lifetime emphasises the need to incorporate them into our understanding of the dynamics and risk of infection in the natural environment. Moreover, the identification of Gata3 as a marker of tolerance to macroparasites raises important new questions regarding the role of Th2 immunity and the mechanistic nature of the tolerance response itself. A more manipulative, experimental approach is likely to be valuable in elaborating this further. PMID:25004450

  14. An Immunological Marker of Tolerance to Infection in Wild Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joseph A.; Hall, Amy J.; Friberg, Ida M.; Ralli, Catriona; Lowe, Ann; Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Turner, Andrew K.; Stewart, Alexander; Birtles, Richard J.; Paterson, Steve; Bradley, Janette E.; Begon, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Hosts are likely to respond to parasitic infections by a combination of resistance (expulsion of pathogens) and tolerance (active mitigation of pathology). Of these strategies, the basis of tolerance in animal hosts is relatively poorly understood, with especially little known about how tolerance is manifested in natural populations. We monitored a natural population of field voles using longitudinal and cross-sectional sampling modes and taking measurements on body condition, infection, immune gene expression, and survival. Using analyses stratified by life history stage, we demonstrate a pattern of tolerance to macroparasites in mature compared to immature males. In comparison to immature males, mature males resisted infection less and instead increased investment in body condition in response to accumulating burdens, but at the expense of reduced reproductive effort. We identified expression of the transcription factor Gata3 (a mediator of Th2 immunity) as an immunological biomarker of this tolerance response. Time series data for individual animals suggested that macroparasite infections gave rise to increased expression of Gata3, which gave rise to improved body condition and enhanced survival as hosts aged. These findings provide a clear and unexpected insight into tolerance responses (and their life history sequelae) in a natural vertebrate population. The demonstration that such responses (potentially promoting parasite transmission) can move from resistance to tolerance through the course of an individual's lifetime emphasises the need to incorporate them into our understanding of the dynamics and risk of infection in the natural environment. Moreover, the identification of Gata3 as a marker of tolerance to macroparasites raises important new questions regarding the role of Th2 immunity and the mechanistic nature of the tolerance response itself. A more manipulative, experimental approach is likely to be valuable in elaborating this further. PMID:25004450

  15. Molecular and immunological diagnosis of echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gottstein, B

    1992-01-01

    Echinococcosis is an infectious disease of humans caused by the larval (metacestode) stage of the cestode species Echinococcus granulosus (cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease) or Echinococcus multilocularis (alveolar echinococcosis or alveolar hydatid disease). Clinical manifestations depend primarily on localization and size of hepatic lesions and may include hepatomegaly, obstructive jaundice, or cholangitis. Prognostically, alveolar echinococcosis is considered similar to liver malignancies, including a lethality rate of 90% for untreated cases. Diagnosis is based on imaging techniques coupled with immunodiagnostic procedures. Antibody detection tests for E. multilocularis have markedly improved with the use of affinity-purified Em2 antigen and recombinant antigen II/3-10 in enzyme immunoassays. Antigens of corresponding quality for E. granulosus are still unavailable. The detection of circulating antigens and immune complexes in the sera of patients with cystic echinococcosis, the demonstration of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to stimulation with Echinococcus antigens, and the discrimination of serum immunoglobulin isotype activity to various Echinococcus antigens in both cystic and alveolar echinococcosis have been suggested for diagnostic purposes as well as for monitoring patients after treatment. New diagnostic molecular tools include DNA probes for Southern hybridization tests and polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus species-specific DNA fragments. Images PMID:1498767

  16. A review: Immunological markers for malignant salivary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Namboodiripad, P.C. Anila

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers are rare. Around 8 out of 10 salivary gland tumors (80%) are in the parotid. Just fewer than 2 out of 10 salivary gland cancers develop in the other two salivary glands the submandibular or sublingual glands. Fewer than 1 in 10 cancers start in the minor salivary glands. There are many different types of salivary glandcancers. The most common is mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). Just over 3 out of 10 (2535%) salivary gland cancers (SGT, SGC) are of this type. The others include adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), acinic cell carcinoma, carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (Ca-PA), polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) and some newly discovered salivary gland tumors. Because of the infrequency of salivary gland tumors and their complex histopathological diagnosis, it is difficult to exactly predict their clinical course by means of its recurrence, malignant progression or metastasis. Salivary gland tumors always pose problems in diagnosis. This review provides an insight into the recent concepts and immunohistochemical markers to diagnose the malignant salivary gland tumors (SGT), thus guiding the Ear, Nose and Throat specialists, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, General Pathologists and other medical and dental specialists thereby enabling them to make correct diagnosis and provide the appropriate treatment. PMID:25737930

  17. Immunological Markers for PML Prediction in MS Patients Treated with Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Antoniol, Caroline; Stankoff, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (NTZ), a monoclonal antibody recognizing the alpha4 integrin chain, has been approved for the treatment of active multiple sclerosis, but expose to the onset of a rare side effect, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Estimating the individual risk of PML in NTZ-treated patients is a major challenge, and therapeutic strategies are mainly guided by the overall PML risk assessed by identified risk factors: JC virus (JCV) seropositivity, treatment duration (with peak incidence after 24 months), and the previous use of immunosuppressive therapies. Given that this stratification does not yet allow a precise individual prediction of PML, other predictive markers are needed, and several immunological biomarkers have been described. Quantification of anti-JCV antibody levels may improve individual predictive value, with higher baseline titers indicating increased risk. Other immunological biomarkers such as leukocyte cell membrane markers (CD49d, CD11a, and CD62L), detection of circulating JCV-specific activated T effector memory cells (TEM) or genetic screening have been proposed. In this review, we discuss how recent progress in immunology has paved the way for «new combined monitoring», which will include immunological screening, in NTZ-treated patients. PMID:25601865

  18. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease. PMID:26324348

  19. CHARACTERIZING SAFFLOWER GERMPLASM WITH AFLP MOLECULAR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers are useful to improve germplasm collection management and for identifying genes for future enhancement and breeding. Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. After DNA e...

  20. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  1. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  2. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) germplasm with molecular markers is needed to enhance germplasm management and utilization. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was completed in safflower using two selective primer pairs resulting in 102 unambiguous polymor...

  3. Confirmation of Clematis hybrids using molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hybrid origin of two progeny from reciprocal crosses of Clematis tubulosa and C. brevicaudata was investigated using molecular markers generated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Morphologi...

  4. A novel data mining system points out hidden relationships between immunological markers in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a multi-factorial disease, where a single biomarker unlikely can provide comprehensive information. Moreover, due to the non-linearity of biomarkers, traditional statistic is both unsuitable and underpowered to dissect their relationship. Patients affected with primary (PP=14), secondary (SP=33), benign (BB=26), relapsing-remitting (RR=30) MS, and 42 sex and age matched healthy controls were studied. We performed a depth immune-phenotypic and functional analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) by flow-cytometry. Semantic connectivity maps (AutoCM) were applied to find the natural associations among immunological markers. AutoCM is a special kind of Artificial Neural Network able to find consistent trends and associations among variables. The matrix of connections, visualized through minimum spanning tree, keeps non linear associations among variables and captures connection schemes among clusters. Results Complex immunological relationships were shown to be related to different disease courses. Low CD4IL25+ cells level was strongly related (link strength, ls=0.81) to SP MS. This phenotype was also associated to high CD4ROR+ cells levels (ls=0.56). BB MS was related to high CD4+IL13 cell levels (ls=0.90), as well as to high CD14+IL6 cells percentage (ls=0.80). RR MS was strongly (ls=0.87) related to CD4+IL25 high cell levels, as well indirectly to high percentages of CD4+IL13 cells. In this latter strong (ls=0.92) association could be confirmed the induction activity of the former cells (CD4+IL25) on the latter (CD4+IL13). Another interesting topographic data was the isolation of Th9 cells (CD4IL9) from the main part of the immunological network related to MS, suggesting a possible secondary role of this new described cell phenotype in MS disease. Conclusions This novel application of non-linear mathematical techniques suggests peculiar immunological signatures for different MS phenotypes. Notably, the immune-network displayed by this new method, rather than a single marker, might be viewed as the right target of immunotherapy. Furthermore, this new statistical technique could be also employed to increase the knowledge of other age-related multifactorial disease in which complex immunological networks play a substantial role. PMID:23305498

  5. Molecular markers in pediatric neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric molecular neuro-oncology is a fast developing field. A multitude of molecular profiling studies in recent years has unveiled a number of genetic abnormalities unique to pediatric brain tumors. It has now become clear that brain tumors that arise in children have distinct pathogenesis and biology, compared with their adult counterparts, even for those with indistinguishable histopathology. Some of the molecular features are so specific to a particular type of tumors, such as the presence of the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene for pilocytic astrocytomas or SMARCB1 mutations for atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, that they could practically serve as a diagnostic marker on their own. Expression profiling has resolved the existence of 4 molecular subgroups in medulloblastomas, which positively translated into improved prognostication for the patients. The currently available molecular markers, however, do not cover all tumors even within a single tumor entity. The molecular pathogenesis of a large number of pediatric brain tumors is still unaccounted for, and the hierarchy of tumors is likely to be more complex and intricate than currently acknowledged. One of the main tasks of future molecular analyses in pediatric neuro-oncology, including the ongoing genome sequencing efforts, is to elucidate the biological basis of those orphan tumors. The ultimate goal of molecular diagnostics is to accurately predict the clinical and biological behavior of any tumor by means of their molecular characteristics, which is hoped to eventually pave the way for individualized treatment. PMID:23095836

  6. NABIC marker database: A molecular markers information network of agricultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Seol, Young-Joo; Lee, Dong-Jun; Jeong, In-Seon; Yoon, Ung-Han; Lee, Gang-Seob; Hahn, Jang-Ho; Park, Dong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    In 2013, National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) reconstructs a molecular marker database for useful genetic resources. The web-based marker database consists of three major functional categories: map viewer, RSN marker and gene annotation. It provides 7250 marker locations, 3301 RSN marker property, 3280 molecular marker annotation information in agricultural plants. The individual molecular marker provides information such as marker name, expressed sequence tag number, gene definition and general marker information. This updated marker-based database provides useful information through a user-friendly web interface that assisted in tracing any new structures of the chromosomes and gene positional functions using specific molecular markers. Availability The database is available for free at http://nabic.rda.go.kr/gere/rice/molecularMarkers/ PMID:24250118

  7. Estimation of pairwise relatedness with molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M; Ritland, K

    1999-08-01

    Applications of quantitative genetics and conservation genetics often require measures of pairwise relationships between individuals, which, in the absence of known pedigree structure, can be estimated only by use of molecular markers. Here we introduce methods for the joint estimation of the two-gene and four-gene coefficients of relationship from data on codominant molecular markers in randomly mating populations. In a comparison with other published estimators of pairwise relatedness, we find these new "regression" estimators to be computationally simpler and to yield similar or lower sampling variances, particularly when many loci are used or when loci are hypervariable. Two examples are given in which the new estimators are applied to natural populations, one that reveals isolation-by-distance in an annual plant and the other that suggests a genetic basis for a coat color polymorphism in bears. PMID:10430599

  8. Estimation of pairwise relatedness with molecular markers.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M; Ritland, K

    1999-01-01

    Applications of quantitative genetics and conservation genetics often require measures of pairwise relationships between individuals, which, in the absence of known pedigree structure, can be estimated only by use of molecular markers. Here we introduce methods for the joint estimation of the two-gene and four-gene coefficients of relationship from data on codominant molecular markers in randomly mating populations. In a comparison with other published estimators of pairwise relatedness, we find these new "regression" estimators to be computationally simpler and to yield similar or lower sampling variances, particularly when many loci are used or when loci are hypervariable. Two examples are given in which the new estimators are applied to natural populations, one that reveals isolation-by-distance in an annual plant and the other that suggests a genetic basis for a coat color polymorphism in bears. PMID:10430599

  9. Immunologic biomarkers in relation to exposure markers of PCBs and dioxins in Flemish adolescents (Belgium).

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Rosette L; Koppen, Gudrun; Staessen, Jan A; Hond, Elly Den; Verheyen, Geert; Nawrot, Tim S; Roels, Harry A; Vlietinck, Robert; Schoeters, Greet E R

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we investigated 17- to 18-year-old boys and girls to determine whether changes in humoral or cellular immunity or respiratory complaints were related to blood serum levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxin-like compounds after lifetime exposure in Flanders (Belgium). We obtained blood samples from and administered questionnaires to 200 adolescents recruited from a rural area and two urban suburbs. Physicians recorded medical history and respiratory diseases. We measured immunologic biomarkers such as differential blood cell counts, lymphocyte phenotypes, and serum immunoglobulins. As biomarkers of exposure, we determined the serum concentrations of PCBs (PCB 138, PCB 153, and PCB 180) and dioxin-like compounds [chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) bioassay]. The percentages of eosinophils and natural killer cells in blood were negatively correlated with CALUX toxic equivalents (TEQs) in serum (p = 0.009 and p = 0.05, respectively). Increased serum CALUX TEQs resulted in an increase in serum IgA levels (p = 0.05). Furthermore, levels of specific IgEs (measured by radioallergosorbent tests) of cat dander, house dust mite, and grass pollen were also significantly and negatively associated with the CALUX TEQ, with odds ratios (ORs) equal to 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42-0.96], 0.68 (0.5-0.93), and 0.70 (0.52-0.95), respectively. In addition, reported allergies of the upper airways and past use of antiallergic drugs were negatively associated with CALUX TEQs, with ORs equal to 0.66 (0.47-0.93) and 0.58 (0.39-0.85), respectively. We found a negative association between IgGs and marker PCBs in serum (p = 0.009). This study shows that immunologic measurements and respiratory complaints in adolescents were associated with environmental exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs). The negative correlation between PHAHs and allergic responses in adolescents suggested that exposure may entail alterations in the immune status. PMID:12055051

  10. Developmnent of molecular markers for powdery mildew resistance in grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers have been used as a tool for plant breeding for two decades. Markers linked to disease resistance can be used to pyramid resistance genes for improved durability and to improve the efficiency of evaluation. To develop molecular markers linked to resistance to grape powdery mildew ...

  11. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; D'Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  12. Novel Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of molecular biomarkers assures that breast cancer (BC) patients receive optimal treatment. Established biomarkers, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and Ki67, have been playing significant roles in the subcategorization of BC to predict the prognosis and decide the specific therapy to each patient. Antihormonal therapy using 4-hydroxytamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors have been employed in patients whose tumor cells express hormone receptors, while monoclonal antibody to HER2 has been administered to HER2-positive BCs. Although new therapeutic agents have been developed in the past few decades, many patients still die of the disease due to relapse; thus, novel molecular markers that predict therapeutic failure and those that can be targets for specific therapy are expected. We have chosen four of such molecules by reviewing recent publications, which are cyclin E, B-Myb, Twist, and DMP1β. The oncogenicity of these molecules has been demonstrated in vivo and/or in vitro through studies using transgenic mice or siRNAs, and their expressions have been shown to be associated with shortened overall or disease-free survival of BC patients. The former three molecules have been shown to accelerate epithelial–mesenchymal transition that is often associated with cancer stem cell-ness and metastasis; all these four can be novel therapeutic targets as well. Thus, large prospective studies employing immunohistochemistry will be needed to establish the predictive values of these molecules in patients with BC. PMID:26997872

  13. Glioblastoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    PubMed

    Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh; Mansouri, Sheila; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have led to a better understanding of key molecular alterations that underlie glioblastoma (GBM). The current WHO-based classification of GBM is mainly based on histologic features of the tumor, which frequently do not reflect the molecular differences that describe the diversity in the biology of these lesions. The current WHO definition of GBM relies on the presence of high-grade astrocytic neoplasm with the presence of either microvascular proliferation and/or tumor necrosis. High-throughput analyses have identified molecular subtypes and have led to progress in more accurate classification of GBM. These findings, in turn, would result in development of more effective patient stratification, targeted therapeutics, and prediction of patient outcome. While consensus has not been reached on the precise nature and means to sub-classify GBM, it is clear that IDH-mutant GBMs are clearly distinct from GBMs without IDH1/2 mutation with respect to molecular and clinical features, including prognosis. In addition, recent findings in pediatric GBMs regarding mutations in the histone H3F3A gene suggest that these tumors may represent a 3rd major category of GBM, separate from adult primary (IDH1/2 wt), and secondary (IDH1/2 mut) GBMs. In this review, we describe major clinically relevant genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in GBM-such as mutations in IDH1/2, EGFR, PDGFRA, and NF1 genes-altered methylation of MGMT gene promoter, and mutations in hTERT promoter. These markers may be incorporated into a more refined classification system and applied in more accurate clinical decision-making process. In addition, we focus on current understanding of the biologic heterogeneity and classification of GBM and highlight some of the molecular signatures and alterations that characterize GBMs as histologically defined. We raise the question whether IDH-wild type high grade astrocytomas without microvascular proliferation or necrosis might best be classified as GBM, even if they lack the histologic hallmarks as required in the current WHO classification. Alternatively, an astrocytic tumor that fits the current histologic definition of GBM, but which shows an IDH mutation may in fact be better classified as a distinct entity, given that IDH-mutant GBM are quite distinct from a biological and clinical perspective. PMID:25943888

  14. Resolution-associated molecular patterns (RAMP): RAMParts defending immunological homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A M; Panayi, G S; Corrigall, V M

    2011-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is central to the maintenance of good health and immune homeostasis. Recently, several intracellular stress proteins have been described as having extracellular properties that are anti-inflammatory or favour the resolution of inflammation. We propose that these molecules should be defined as resolution-associated molecular patterns (RAMPs). RAMPs are released at times of cellular stress and help to counterbalance the inflammatory effects of pathogen-associated (PAMPs) and damage-associated (DAMPs) molecular patterns. We propose that heat shock protein 10 (HSP10), ?B-crystallin (?BC), HSP27 and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) should be considered founding members of the RAMP family. A greater understanding of RAMP biology may herald the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:21671907

  15. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy: immunological, cytogenetic and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, S; Artusi, T; Selleri, L; Temperani, P; Zucchini, P; Vecchi, A; Emilia, G; Torelli, U

    1990-06-01

    We describe a case of "sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy" (SHML) studied by immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis. The immunophenotyping showed that the lymph node histiocytes were strongly positive for the S-100 protein and MoAb LeuM3, OKM5, KP1 and DRC-1; a portion of these cells was also positive for OKT6 and Leu3A, suggesting a possible relationship with the veiled cells, which represent an intermediate step in the pathway from the Langerhans cell to the interdigitating reticulum cell. Cytogenetic analysis showed a normal prevalent clone and a small hypodiploid clone and the molecular study showed no detectable involvement of the c-fms proto-oncogene, which is related to monocyte/macrophages. Unfortunately all these data do not seem sufficient to define the benign or neoplastic nature of the disease. Further investigations, immunophenotypical, cytogenetic and molecular, are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease, especially for more aggressive cases or for cases with unfavorable evolution. PMID:2375964

  16. APPLICATION OF MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR CUCUMBER IMPROVEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The historicity of marker development, map construction, and the utility of marker-assisted selection is presented. Experimental results indicate that the identification of marker-trait associations will continue to be extremely expensive and time consuming, but will likely pay large dividends for ...

  17. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. Separation and scoring of 392 markers was completed using the Beckman CEQ8000 capillary electrophoresis system. Twelve plants from each of eight...

  18. Molecular markers and strategies to control aflatoxin in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods of isolation of molecular markers and software developed in ARS for finding the most informative markers will be presented. Also, two different approaches being used at the NPRL to reduce aflatoxin in peanut will be discussed. One is the development of phytoalexin-detoxification enzyme inh...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT (SSR) MOLECULAR MARKERS IN STRAWBERRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat, SSR, molecular markers have been shown to be repeatable, co-dominant, highly polymorphic, technically simple to use, and well distributed within the genomes of many plant and animal species. SSR markers have shown great utility for many applications including genetic fingerpr...

  20. Immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Gray, D

    1993-01-01

    The past five or six years has seen a resurgence of interest in immunological memory. Areas in which important advances have been made of late or in which problems in understanding persist are covered here: (i) Selection of virgin B cells for entry into the peripheral pool. (ii) Expression of immunoglobulin isotypes and other markers on memory B cells. (iii) Development of memory B cells as a separate lineage from primary response B cells. (iv) Sites of production of memory B cells. (v) Signals that rescue mutating B cells in germinal centers, forming the basis of affinity selection, and programming further differentiation. (vi) The myriad markers of memory T cells, in particular CD45R isoforms. (vii) Selective migration pathways of memory T cells and its possible molecular basis. (viii) The lifespan of memory cells and factors that influence their long-term survival. The data accumulated during this period which have vastly increased our understanding of memory have at the same time highlighted unresolved problems that could block further progress in the field. The thorny question that we cannot at present answer is: How does a memory cell differ from an activated cell and, in the case of T cells, from an effector cell? The problem bears on the interpretation of any study that sets out to correlate memory phenotype with memory function. Immunologists may have donned an intellectual straitjacket in their search for the memory cell. PMID:8476570

  1. Defending against pathogens – immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  2. Defending against pathogens - immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  3. Molecular Markers Predictive of Chemotherapy Response in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiovitz, Stacey; Grady, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the molecular heterogeneity of colorectal cancer (CRC) has led to the classification of CRC based on a variety of clinical and molecular characteristics. Although the clinical significance of the majority of these molecular alterations is still being ascertained, it is widely anticipated that these characteristics will improve the accuracy of our ability to determine the prognosis and therapeutic response of CRC patients. A few of these markers, such as microsatellite instability and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), show promise as predictive markers for cytotoxic chemotherapy. KRAS is a validated biomarker for EGFR-targeted therapy, while NRAS and PI3KCA are evolving markers for targeted therapies. Multiple new actionable drug targets are being identified on a regular basis, but most are not ready for clinical use at this time. This review focuses on key molecular features of CRCs and the application of these molecular alterations as predictive biomarkers for CRC. PMID:25663616

  4. Molecular marker database for efficient use in agricultural breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Lee, Gang-Seob; Mo, Ji-Su; Bae, Seon-Hwa; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed a web-based molecular marker database to provide information about 7,847 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers identified in the 11 species using a next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. The database consists of three major functional categories: keyword search, detailed viewer and download function. The molecular marker annotation table provides detailed information such as ownership information, basic information, and STS-related characterization information. Availability The database is available for free at http://nabic.rda.go.kr/Molecularmarker PMID:26527854

  5. Analysis of Confined Random Walkers with Applications to Processes Occurring in Molecular Aggregates and Immunological Systems.

    PubMed

    Chase, Matthew; Spendier, Kathrin; Kenkre, V M

    2016-03-31

    Explicit solutions are presented in the Laplace and time domains for a one-variable Fokker-Planck equation governing the probability density of a random walker moving in a confining potential. Illustrative applications are discussed in two unrelated physical contexts: quantum yields in a doped molecular crystal or photosynthetic system, and the motion of signal receptor clusters on the surface of a cell encountered in a problem in immunology. An interesting counterintuitive effect concerning the consequences of confinement is found in the former, and some insights into the driving force for microcluster centralization are gathered in the latter application. PMID:26885727

  6. Molecular markers in the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Martínez-Herrera, Erick; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of coccidioidomycosis in endemic areas has been observed to increase daily. To understand the causes of the spread of the disease and design strategies for fungal detection in clinical and environmental samples, scientists have resorted to molecular tools that allow fungal detection in a natural environment, reliable identification in clinical cases and the study of biological characteristics, such as reproductive and genetic structure, demographic history and diversification. We conducted a review of the most important molecular markers in the epidemiology of Coccidioides spp. and the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. A literature search was performed for scientific publications concerning the application of molecular tools for the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. The use of molecular markers in the epidemiological study and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis has allowed for the typing of Coccidioides spp. isolates, improved understanding of their mode of reproduction, genetic variation and speciation and resulted in the development specific, rapid and sensitive strategies for detecting the fungus in environmental and clinical samples. Molecular markers have revealed genetic variability in Coccidioides spp. This finding influences changes in the epidemiology of coccidioidomycosis, such as the emergence of more virulent or antifungal resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the molecular markers currently used to identify Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are specific and sensitive. However, they must be validated to determine their application in diagnosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270069

  7. Pathological, immunological and biochemical markers of subchronic arsenic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Nain, Sukhbir; Smits, Judit E G

    2012-03-01

    Subchronic exposure to arsenic in rats was investigated to identify sensitive indicators of subclinical toxicity in rats. Immunological, pathological, and biochemical bioindicators were examined in rats exposed to arsenic in their drinking water. Juvenile male Wistar rats were allocated to four treatment groups receiving 0, 0.4, 4, and 40 ppm of arsenite in drinking water for 18 wks. Besides daily monitoring for clinical signs of adverse health effects, clinical biochemistry, B-cell-mediated and innate immune responses, plus gross, and histopathology were examined. In vitro tests of oxidative damage to basic cellular constituents, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, were measured using thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) assays, protein carbonyl formation, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), respectively. Clinical changes in the rats were limited to decreased feed and water intake in the high- (40 ppm) dose group (P < 0.05), however, growth rate was not affected. Serum biochemical changes occurred in blood urea nitrogen, K(+) , Cl(-) , and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) from arsenic exposure. Immunotoxicity was evident through a dose-dependent suppression of the secondary antibody-mediated response to a T-cell-dependent antigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Histopathology of the liver revealed marked fatty infiltration and vacuolization particularly evident in periacinar hepatocytes. This pattern of toxicopathology in the high-exposure group may be related to the significantly higher (P < 0.05) oxidative stress, demonstrated through lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) in the rats exposed to 40 ppm arsenite. The present study revealed that young, growing rats exposed to arsenic for 18 wks tolerated exposures up to 4 ppm. At higher doses, there was evidence of hepatotoxicity, humoral immunity was compromised, and an adverse effect on hepatic organelle and cell membranes was evident through a dose dependent increased in oxidative stress. PMID:20725942

  8. Development and use of molecular markers: past and present.

    PubMed

    Grover, Atul; Sharma, P C

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers, due to their stability, cost-effectiveness and ease of use provide an immensely popular tool for a variety of applications including genome mapping, gene tagging, genetic diversity diversity, phylogenetic analysis and forensic investigations. In the last three decades, a number of molecular marker techniques have been developed and exploited worldwide in different systems. However, only a handful of these techniques, namely RFLPs, RAPDs, AFLPs, ISSRs, SSRs and SNPs have received global acceptance. A recent revolution in DNA sequencing techniques has taken the discovery and application of molecular markers to high-throughput and ultrahigh-throughput levels. Although, the choice of marker will obviously depend on the targeted use, microsatellites, SNPs and genotyping by sequencing (GBS) largely fulfill most of the user requirements. Further, modern transcriptomic and functional markers will lead the ventures onto high-density genetic map construction, identification of QTLs, breeding and conservation strategies in times to come in combination with other high throughput techniques. This review presents an overview of different marker technologies and their variants with a comparative account of their characteristic features and applications. PMID:25430893

  9. Molecular markers in medicinal plant biotechnology: past and present.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, Maryam; Nabi, Gowher; Das, Sandip; Srivastava, Prem Shankar

    2012-03-01

    Plant based medicines have gained popularity worldwide due to their almost negligible side effects. In India, the three traditional medicinal systems, namely homeopathy, Ayurveda and Siddha rely heavily on plants for medicinal formulations. To prevent the indiscriminate collection of these valuable medicinal plants and for their proper authentication and conservation, it is imperative to go for sustained efforts towards proper germplasm cataloguing and devising conservation strategies. For this purpose, molecular markers have a significant role, as they provide information ranging from diversity at nucleotide level (single nucleotide polymorphisms) to gene and allele frequencies (genotype information), the extent and distribution of genetic diversity, and population structure. Over the past twenty years, the molecular marker field has completely transformed the meaning of conservation genetics which has emerged from a theory-based field of population biology to a full-fledged pragmatic discipline. In this review, we have explored the transition and transformation of molecular marker technologies throughout these years. PMID:21649550

  10. Assessment of immunological markers and booster effects of Ag85B peptides, Ag85B, and BCG in blood of BCG vaccinated children: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, the protective immunological markers in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccinated and unvaccinated children were evaluated after vaccination. Further, PBMCs of children with low protective levels were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides to study their booster effects to increase waning BCG induced immunity. Materials and Methods Fifty children from 1 month to 18 years of age were randomized for the study. Blood samples were collected from 27 participants with/without BCG vaccination. Immunological markers (anti-BCG, interferon γ [IFN-γ], and adenosine deaminase activity) were assessed in both serum and PBMCs of children. Children with low levels of protective immunological markers were further recruited and their PBMCs were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides. Results Children in age group of 4-6 years were associated with significantly (p<0.05) higher BCG-specific IgG and IFN-γ levels compared to those in age group greater than 10 years. Vaccinated children had greater repertoire of immunological memory which on in vitro stimulation with BCG showed increase in BCG-specific response compared to unvaccinated controls. Assessment of booster effects of BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides in PBMCs of children revealed greater potential of peptides to boost BCG induced immunity compared to BCG and Ag85B. Conclusion To conclude, children within age 4-6 years are associated with high immunological markers which eventually diminish with age thereby suggesting need for booster dose in later years. Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides along with BCG may be used as attractive candidates to boost such waning BCG induced immunity in children. PMID:26866022

  11. CXCL10, MCP-1, and other immunologic markers involved in neural leprosy.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Mildred F; Rodrigues, Márcia M J; Vital, Robson T; da Costa Nery, José A; Sales, Anna M; de Andrea Hacker, Mariana; Ferreira, Helen; Chimelli, Leila; Sarno, Euzenir N; Antunes, Sérgio L G

    2015-03-01

    Nerve damage in leprosy can be directly induced by Mycobacterium leprae in the early stages of infection, however, immunomediated mechanisms add gravity to the impairment of neural function in symptomatic periods of the disease. This study investigated the immunohistochemical expression of immunomarkers involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of leprosy nerve damage. These markers selected were CXCL10, CCL2 chemokines and immunomarkers as CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CD45RO, CD68, HLA-DR, and metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP9) occurring in nerve biopsy specimens collected from leprosy (23) and nonleprosy patients (5) suffering peripheral neuropathy. CXCL10, CCL2, MMP2, and MMP9 immunoreactivities were found in the leprosy nerves but not in nonleprosy samples. Immunolabeling was predominantly found in recruited macrophages and Schwann cells composing the inflammatory cellular population in the leprosy-affected nerves. The immunohistochemical expression of all the markers, but CXCL10, was associated with fibrosis, however, only CCL2 was, independently from the others, associated with this excessive deposit of extracellular matrix. No difference in the frequency of the immunolabeling was detected between the AFB⁺ and AFB⁻ leprosy subgroups of nerve, exception made to some statistical trend to difference in regard to CD68⁻ and HLA-DR⁺ cells in the AFB⁻ nerves exhibiting epithelioid granuloma. MMP9 expression associated with fibrosis is consistent with previous results of research group. The findings conveys the idea that CCL2 and CXCL10 chemokines at least in advanced stages of leprosy nerve lesions are not determinant for the establishment of AFB⁺ or AFB⁻ leprosy lesions, however, CCL2 is associated with macrophage recruitment and fibrosis. PMID:25221954

  12. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yohe, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact. PMID:26239249

  13. Current immunological and molecular biological perspectives on seafood allergy: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Leung, Nicki Y H; Wai, Christine Y Y; Shu, ShangAn; Wang, Jinjun; Kenny, Thomas P; Chu, Ka Hou; Leung, Patrick S C

    2014-06-01

    Seafood is an important component in human diet and nutrition worldwide. However, seafood also constitutes one of the most important groups of foods in the induction of immediate (type I) food hypersensitivity, which significantly impacts the quality of life and healthcare cost. Extensive efforts within the past two decades have revealed the molecular identities and immunological properties of the major fish and shellfish allergens. The major allergen involved in allergy and cross-reactivity among different fish species was identified as parvalbumin while that responsible for shellfish (crustaceans and mollusks) allergy was identified as tropomyosin. The cloning and expression of the recombinant forms of these seafood allergens facilitate the investigation on the detailed mechanisms leading to seafood allergies, mapping of IgE-binding epitopes, and assessment of their allergenicity and stability. Future research focusing on the immunological cross-reactivity and discovery of novel allergens will greatly facilitate the management of seafood allergies and the design of effective and life-long allergen-specific immunotherapies. PMID:23242979

  14. Clinical and Immunological Markers of Dengue Progression in a Study Cohort from a Hyperendemic Area in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rathakrishnan, Anusyah; Klekamp, Benjamin; Wang, Seok Mui; Komarasamy, Thamil Vaani; Natkunam, Santha Kumari; Sathar, Jameela; Azizan, Azliyati; Sanchez-Anguiano, Aurora; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2014-01-01

    Background With its elusive pathogenesis, dengue imposes serious healthcare, economic and social burden on endemic countries. This study describes the clinical and immunological parameters of a dengue cohort in a Malaysian city, the first according to the WHO 2009 dengue classification. Methodology and Findings This longitudinal descriptive study was conducted in two Malaysian hospitals where patients aged 14 and above with clinical symptoms suggestive of dengue were recruited with informed consent. Among the 504 participants, 9.3% were classified as non-dengue, 12.7% without warning signs, 77.0% with warning signs and 1.0% with severe dengue based on clinical diagnosis. Of these, 37% were misdiagnosed as non-dengue, highlighting the importance of both clinical diagnosis and laboratory findings. Thrombocytopenia, prolonged clotting time, liver enzymes, ALT and AST served as good markers for dengue progression but could not distinguish between patients with and without warning signs. HLA-A*24 and -B*57 were positively associated with Chinese and Indians patients with warning signs, respectively, whereas A*03 may be protective in the Malays. HLA-A*33 was also positively associated in patients with warning signs when compared to those without. Dengue NS1, NS2A, NS4A and NS4B were found to be important T cell epitopes; however with no apparent difference between with and without warning signs patients. Distinction between the 2 groups of patients was also not observed in any of the cytokines analyzed; nevertheless, 12 were significantly differentially expressed at the different phases of illness. Conclusion The new dengue classification system has allowed more specific detection of dengue patients, however, none of the clinical parameters allowed distinction of patients with and without warning signs. While the HLA-A*33 may be predictive marker for development of warning signs; larger studies will be needed to support this findings. PMID:24647042

  15. Detection of Early Cancer: Genetics or Immunology? Serum Autoantibody Profiles as Markers of Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Poletaev, Alexander; Pukhalenko, Alexander; Kukushkin, Andrey; Sviridov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The search for effective methods for detecting cancers at very early stages is currently a top priority of cancer research. While numerous oncogenes have been identified in and associated with human cancers, the last 50 years of molecular and genetic studies have not led to a breakthrough in either the diagnosis or the treatment of cancers. Therefore, the role of oncogenes in carcinogenesis is still unclear, as is their usefulness in the diagnosis of human cancers. In the present review, we discuss the concept of oncogenes and summarize the current approaches for the early detection of human cancers based on antibodies arrays. PMID:26179267

  16. Pilocytic astrocytoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    PubMed

    Collins, V Peter; Jones, David T W; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) were recognized as a discrete clinical entity over 70 years ago. They are relatively benign (WHO grade I) and have, as a group, a 10-year survival of over 90%. Many require merely surgical removal and only very infrequently do they progress to more malignant gliomas. While most show classical morphology, they may present a spectrum of morphological patterns, and there are difficult cases that show similarities to other gliomas, some of which are malignant and require aggressive treatment. Until recently, almost nothing was known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their development. The use of high-throughput sequencing techniques interrogating the whole genome has shown that single abnormalities of the mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are exclusively found in almost all cases, indicating that PA represents a one-pathway disease. The most common mechanism is a tandem duplication of a ≈2 Mb-fragment of #7q, giving rise to a fusion between two genes, resulting in a transforming fusion protein, consisting of the N-terminus of KIAA1549 and the kinase domain of BRAF. Additional infrequent fusion partners have been identified, along with other abnormalities of the MAP-K pathway, affecting tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors at the cell surface (e.g., FGFR1) as well as BRAF V600E, KRAS, and NF1 mutations among others. However, while the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion occurs in all areas, the incidence of the various other mutations identified differs in PAs that develop in different regions of the brain. Unfortunately, from a diagnostic standpoint, almost all mutations found have been reported in other brain tumor types, although some retain considerable utility. These molecular abnormalities will be reviewed, and the difficulties in their potential use in supporting a diagnosis of PA, when the histopathological findings are equivocal or in the choice of individualized therapy, will be discussed. PMID:25792358

  17. Confirmation of hybrid origin in Arisaema (Araceae) using molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A population of hybrids between Arisaema triphyllum subsp. stewardsonii and A. dracontium was investigated using molecular markers to document the hybrid origin. Total genomic DNA was extracted from A. triphyllum, A. dracontium, and the hybrids, and subjected to sequence analysis of various regions...

  18. Acceleration of peanut breeding programs by molecular marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut breeding has played a significant role in yield increases and disease control. Conventional breeding focuses on field selection and phenotypic analysis and it typically takes 12-15 years before a new cultivar can be released. Molecular markers developed from sequencing data can be of great ...

  19. Clinical Relevance of Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and grading of glial tumors by the WHO classification provide clinicians with guidance as to the predicted course of the disease and choice of treatment. Nonetheless, histologically identical tumors may have very different outcome and response to treatment. Molecular markers that carry both diagnostic and prognostic information add useful tools to traditional classification by redefining tumor subtypes within each WHO category. Therefore, molecular markers have become an integral part of tumor assessment in modern neuro-oncology and biomarker status now guides clinical decisions in some subtypes of gliomas. The routine assessment of IDH status improves histological diagnostic accuracy by differentiating diffuse glioma from reactive gliosis. It carries a favorable prognostic implication for all glial tumors and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with codeletion of 1p/19q chromosomes. Glial tumors that contain chromosomal codeletion of 1p/19q are defined as tumors of oligodendroglial lineage and have favorable prognosis. MGMT promoter methylation is a favorable prognostic marker in astrocytic high-grade gliomas and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic gliomas with wild-type IDH1/2 and in glioblastoma of the elderly. The clinical implication of other molecular markers of gliomas like mutations of EGFR and ATRX genes and BRAF fusion or point mutation is highlighted. The potential of molecular biomarker-based classification to guide future therapeutic approach is discussed and accentuated. PMID:26508407

  20. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  1. Molecular markers predictive of chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiovitz, Stacey; Grady, William M

    2015-02-01

    Recognition of the molecular heterogeneity of colorectal cancer (CRC) has led to the classification of CRC based on a variety of clinical and molecular characteristics. Although the clinical significance of the majority of these molecular alterations is still being ascertained, it is widely anticipated that these characteristics will improve the accuracy of our ability to determine the prognosis and therapeutic response of CRC patients. A few of these markers, such as microsatellite instability and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), show promise as predictive markers for cytotoxic chemotherapy. KRAS is a validated biomarker for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy, while NRAS and PI3KCA are evolving markers for targeted therapies. Multiple new actionable drug targets and potential response biomarkers are being identified on a regular basis, but most are not ready for clinical use at this time. This review focuses on key molecular features of CRCs and the application of these molecular alterations as predictive biomarkers for CRC. PMID:25663616

  2. [Molecular markers for transitional cell carcinoma of bladder].

    PubMed

    Kleinmann, Judy; Siegel, Yoram I; Zisman, Amnon

    2003-07-01

    Superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has significant rates of recurrence and progression, therefore accurate urinary makers for early diagnosis and follow-up are essential. Urine cytology is the oldest marker, constantly used clinically and considered the "gold standard". In this review we will summarize the properties of different molecular markers for TCC and their yield compared to cytology. Briefly, the older markers--BTA stat, BTA TRAK and NMP22 are more sensitive than cytology, but their specificity is lower, especially in patients with underlying urologic pathologies. FDP (fibrinogen degradation products) analysis is rapid and the test is available clinically. It's sensitivity is higher than cytology for low grade tumors, but specificity is low. Of the newer markers, telomerase has a high sensitivity, and a specificity similar to urine cytology, but also has an increased rate of false positive results. HA-HAase (Hyaluronidase) and CK20 have promising sensitivity and specificity, but are still unavailable for clinical use. CK20 has the additional advantage of being able to detect premalignant conditions as well as predicting recurrence. The role of urinary markers in replacing cystoscopy and urine sediment cytology in the follow-up of TCC and in hematuria work up is still uncertain. It is possible that urinary markers in different panel arrays will have a role in the future for those indications and perhaps in the screening of populations at risk, such as smokers and workers exposed to occupational hazards. PMID:12908389

  3. DNA marker applications to molecular genetics and genomics in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Tomato is an important crop and regarded as an experimental model of the Solanaceae family and of fruiting plants in general. To enhance breeding efficiency and advance the field of genetics, tomato has been subjected to DNA marker studies as one of the earliest targets in plants. The developed DNA markers have been applied to the construction of genetic linkage maps and the resultant maps have contributed to quantitative trait locus (QTL) and gene mappings for agronomically important traits, as well as to comparative genomics of Solanaceae. The recently released whole genome sequences of tomato enable us to develop large numbers of DNA markers comparatively easily, and even promote new genotyping methods without DNA markers. In addition, databases for genomes, DNA markers, genetic linkage maps and other omics data, e.g., transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and phenome information, will provide useful information for molecular breeding in tomatoes. The use of DNA marker technologies in conjunction with new breeding techniques will promise to advance tomato breeding. PMID:23641178

  4. DNA marker applications to molecular genetics and genomics in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2013-03-01

    Tomato is an important crop and regarded as an experimental model of the Solanaceae family and of fruiting plants in general. To enhance breeding efficiency and advance the field of genetics, tomato has been subjected to DNA marker studies as one of the earliest targets in plants. The developed DNA markers have been applied to the construction of genetic linkage maps and the resultant maps have contributed to quantitative trait locus (QTL) and gene mappings for agronomically important traits, as well as to comparative genomics of Solanaceae. The recently released whole genome sequences of tomato enable us to develop large numbers of DNA markers comparatively easily, and even promote new genotyping methods without DNA markers. In addition, databases for genomes, DNA markers, genetic linkage maps and other omics data, e.g., transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and phenome information, will provide useful information for molecular breeding in tomatoes. The use of DNA marker technologies in conjunction with new breeding techniques will promise to advance tomato breeding. PMID:23641178

  5. Comparison of viro-immunological marker changes between HIV-1 and HIV-2-infected patients in France

    PubMed Central

    Drylewicz, Julia; Matheron, Sophie; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Damond, Florence; Bonnet, Fabrice; Simon, François; Dabis, François; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise; Chêne, Geneviève; Thiebaut, Rodolphe

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is known to be less pathogenic than HIV-1, although the underlying mechanisms are still debated. We compared the changes over time in viro-immunologic markers in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients living in France during natural history and after initiation of the first Combination of AntiRetroviral Treatment (CART). Method Patients were included in the ANRS CO3 HIV-1 cohort (N=6707) or the ANRS CO5 HIV-2 cohort (N=572). HIV-1 infected patients were matched to HIV-2 patients according to sex, age, HIV transmission group and period of treatment initiation. Changes in markers have been estimated with linear mixed models. Results Analyses were performed for three groups of patients: (1) those with estimated date of contamination (98 HIV-1 and 49 HIV-2 seroincident patients), (2) untreated seroprevalent patients (320 HIV-1 and 160 HIV-2) and (3) those who initiated a first CART (59 HIV-1 and 63 HIV-2). In group 1, CD4 T-cell decreased less rapidly in HIV-2 than HIV-1 patients (−9 vs. −49 cells/mm3/year, p<10−4). Estimated slopes in untreated group 2 were similar to those estimated in group 1 (−11 vs. −49 cells/mm3/year, p=0.003). In group 3, baseline CD4 at CART initiation was not different according to the type of infection (269 vs.220 cells/mm3). During the first two months of treatment, CD4 count increased by +59 cells/mm3/month (95% Confidence Interval [CI]=34;84) for HIV-1 and +24 (CI=6;42) for HIV-2. The plasma viral load drop was 3-fold more important in HIV-1 patients: −1.56 log10/ml/month (CI=−1.83; − 1.30) vs. −0.62 (CI=−0.84; −0.40) among HIV-2 patients (p<10−4). Conclusion Differences between the two infections during natural history are similar to those previously described in Africa. Paradoxically, once treatment is started, response is poorer in HIV-2 patients than in HIV-1 patients. PMID:18301058

  6. STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR STUDIES OF DIVERSITY IN GENEBANK HOLDINGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers have many potential advantages over morphological or other marker types to characterize within- and between-species diversity, useful for management of genebank holdings. These include greater number (potentially unlimited) of markers, freedom from pleiotropic effects, greater ease...

  7. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5–2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5–2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  8. Molecular markers for breast cancer: prediction on tumor behavior.

    PubMed

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  9. Molecular markers and sentinel organisms for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Conn, D B

    2008-09-01

    Molecular methods are useful for both to monitor anthropogenic viral, bacterial, and protozoan enteropathogens, and to track pathogen specific markers in a complex environment in order to reveal sources of these pathogens. Molecular genetic markers for fecal viruses, bacteria, and protozoans hold promise for monitoring environmental pollution and water quality. The demand for microbiologically safe waters grows exponentially due to the global demographic rise of the human population. Economically important shellfish, such as oysters, which are harvested commercially and preferentially consumed raw can be of public health importance if contaminated with human waterborne pathogens. However, feral molluscan shellfish which do not have an apparent economic value serve as indicators in monitoring aquatic environments for pollution with human waterborne pathogens and for sanitary assessment of water quality. Current technology allows for multiplexed species-specific identification, genotyping, enumeration, viability assessment, and source-tracking of human enteropathogens which considerably enhances the pathogen source-tracking efforts. PMID:18814723

  10. Clinical Applications of Molecular Markers in Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Meera

    2015-11-01

    Pathologic diagnosis of primary bone neoplasms can be challenging primarily due to rarity of the disease entities, overlapping imaging and histologic findings, and lack of tumor-specific immunohistochemical stains. Although slow to evolve, in recent years there has been a rapid advance in the discovery of new and novel molecular markers in primary bone neoplasms, which has enhanced diagnostic accuracy and has shed light into their pathogenesis. Modern technological approaches such as next-generation sequencing including RNA sequencing are serving as "rapid discovery platforms" for new and novel mutations and translocations with diagnostic, prognostic, and possible therapeutic applicability. As next-generation sequencing technologies are finding their place in clinical laboratories, one could envision routine testing for mutations spanning across a gene or translocations with multiple breakpoints and partner genes. This review will focus on the clinical relevance and applicability of molecular markers in primary bone neoplasms with examples. PMID:26452209

  11. Effects of Low Molecular Weight Yeast β-Glucan on Antioxidant and Immunological Activities in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Na; Wang, Mi; Zhang, Lifang; Xiao, Sui; Fei, Chengzhong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Keyu; Zheng, Wenli; Wang, Chunmei; Yang, Ruile; Xue, Feiqun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant and immune effects of low molecular yeast β-glucan on mice, three sulfated glucans from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sGSCs) with different molecular weight (MW) and degrees of sulfation (DS) were prepared. The structures of the sGSCs were analyzed through high performance liquid chromatography-gel permeation chromatography (HPLC-GPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). sGSC1, sGSC2, and sGSC3 had MW of 12.9, 16.5 and 19.2 kDa, respectively, and DS of 0.16, 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the antioxidant and immunological activities of the sGSCs. In vitro experiment, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities were determined. In vivo experiment, 50 male BALB/c mice were divided into five groups. The sGSC1, sGSC2 and sGSC3 treatment groups received the corresponding sGSCs at 50 mg/kg/day each. The GSC (glucans from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treatment group received 50 mg/kg/day GSC. The normal control group received equal volume of physiological saline solution. All treatments were administered intragastrically for 14 day. Results showed that sGSC1, sGSC2 and sGSC3 can scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vitro. The strength of the radical scavenging effects of the sGSCs was in the order of sGSC1 > sGSC2 > sGSC3. Oral administration of sGSC1 significantly improved serum catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in mice. sGSC1 significantly improved the spleen and thymus indexes and the lymphocyte proliferation, effectively enhanced the percentage of CD4⁺ T cells, decreased the percentage of CD8⁺ T cells, and elevated the CD4⁺/CD8⁺ ratio. sGSC1 significantly promoted the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ. These results indicate that sGSC1 with low MW and DS has better antioxidant and immunological activities than the other sGSCs, and sGSC1 could be used as a new antioxidant and immune-enhancing agent. PMID:26370978

  12. Effects of Low Molecular Weight Yeast β-Glucan on Antioxidant and Immunological Activities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Na; Wang, Mi; Zhang, Lifang; Xiao, Sui; Fei, Chengzhong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Keyu; Zheng, Wenli; Wang, Chunmei; Yang, Ruile; Xue, Feiqun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant and immune effects of low molecular yeast β-glucan on mice, three sulfated glucans from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sGSCs) with different molecular weight (MW) and degrees of sulfation (DS) were prepared. The structures of the sGSCs were analyzed through high performance liquid chromatography-gel permeation chromatography (HPLC-GPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). sGSC1, sGSC2, and sGSC3 had MW of 12.9, 16.5 and 19.2 kDa, respectively, and DS of 0.16, 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the antioxidant and immunological activities of the sGSCs. In vitro experiment, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities were determined. In vivo experiment, 50 male BALB/c mice were divided into five groups. The sGSC1, sGSC2 and sGSC3 treatment groups received the corresponding sGSCs at 50 mg/kg/day each. The GSC (glucans from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treatment group received 50 mg/kg/day GSC. The normal control group received equal volume of physiological saline solution. All treatments were administered intragastrically for 14 day. Results showed that sGSC1, sGSC2 and sGSC3 can scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vitro. The strength of the radical scavenging effects of the sGSCs was in the order of sGSC1 > sGSC2 > sGSC3. Oral administration of sGSC1 significantly improved serum catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in mice. sGSC1 significantly improved the spleen and thymus indexes and the lymphocyte proliferation, effectively enhanced the percentage of CD4+ T cells, decreased the percentage of CD8+ T cells, and elevated the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. sGSC1 significantly promoted the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ. These results indicate that sGSC1 with low MW and DS has better antioxidant and immunological activities than the other sGSCs, and sGSC1 could be used as a new antioxidant and immune-enhancing agent. PMID:26370978

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Pummelo and Molecular Marker Development

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hang; Su, Shiying; Yi, Hualin; Chai, Lijun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Pummelo (Citrus grandis) is an important fruit crop worldwide because of its nutritional value. To accelerate the pummelo breeding program, it is essential to obtain extensive genetic information and develop relative molecular markers. Here, we obtained a 12-Gb transcriptome dataset of pummelo through a mixture of RNA from seven tissues using Illumina pair-end sequencing, assembled into 57,212 unigenes with an average length of 1010 bp. The annotation and classification results showed that a total of 39,584 unigenes had similar hits to the known proteins of four public databases, and 31,501 were classified into 55 Gene Ontology (GO) functional sub-categories. The search for putative molecular markers among 57,212 unigenes identified 10,276 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 64,720 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). High-quality primers of 1174 SSR loci were designed, of which 88.16% were localized to nine chromosomes of sweet orange. Of 100 SSR primers that were randomly selected for testing, 87 successfully amplified clear banding patterns. Of these primers, 29 with a mean PIC (polymorphic information content) value of 0.52 were effectively applied for phylogenetic analysis. Of the 20 SNP primers, 14 primers, including 54 potential SNPs, yielded target amplifications, and 46 loci were verified via Sanger sequencing. This new dataset will be a valuable resource for molecular biology studies of pummelo and provides reliable information regarding SNP and SSR marker development, thus expediting the breeding program of pummelo. PMID:25799271

  14. Molecular markers in prostate cancer. Part I: predicting lethality

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sachin; Dunsmuir, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the lethality of 'early,' potentially organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the central controversies in modern-day urological clinical practice. Such cases are often considered for radical 'curative' treatment, although active surveillance may be equally appropriate for many men. Moreover, the balance between judicious intervention and overtreatment can be difficult to judge. The patient's age, comorbidities, family history and philosophy of self-health care can be weighed against clinical features such as the palpability of disease, the number and percentage of biopsy cores involved with the disease, histological grade, presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and possible previous PSA kinetics. For many years, scientists and physicians have sought additional molecular factors that may be predictive for disease stage, progression and lethality. Usually, claims for a 'new' unique marker fall short of true clinical value. More often than not, such molecular markers are useful only in multivariate models. This review summarizes relevant molecular markers and models reported up to and including 2008. PMID:19050690

  15. New molecular markers in resistant B-CLL.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Julien; Deriano, Ludovic; Delic, Jozo; Merle-Béral, Hélène

    2006-05-01

    B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course which has long remained a stumbling block for clinicians. This variability appears to arise from complex molecular alterations identified in malignant cells from patient subsets. Recent studies have focused in particular on identifying new molecular markers to help predict the most effective and adapted treatments. In addition to the mutation status of immunoglobulin variable heavy-chain region (IgVH) genes, which is a well-established predictive factor in B-CLL, these new markers include defects of cell factors involved in the maintenance of genome stability, such as telomere function, DNA repair, ATM and p53. Other predictive factors, such as tyrosine kinase Zap-70 and soluble factors found in patient sera, may be associated with B-cell receptor signal transduction. Interestingly, an alteration of these factors fits closely, though not strikingly, with the absence of somatic mutations in IgVH genes, suggesting that the latter may be due either to epigenetic events leading to an unstable genome or to an inherited defect in the immune response of malignant B-cells. Recent lessons from Zap-70 expression/phosphorylation suggest that some of these markers may reflect the defective pathways in B-CLL cells rather than being markers of cell malignancy per se. Furthermore, specific subsets of markers are found in patient cells resistant to treatment. Current studies on gene expression profiling and proteomic analyses should soon lead to a better understanding of how these pathways are affected, especially in multi-drug resistant B-CLL. PMID:16753863

  16. Immunological and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from a bovine foetus.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Ridieri, Karine Forster; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Hartwig, Daiane Drawanz; Amaral, Marta Gonçalves; Hartleben, Cláudia Pinho; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Cattle are commonly infected with pathogenic leptospires, and similarly to rodents, they excrete the bacteria in their urine and can transmit the pathogen from animal to animal or animal to human. Thus, surveillance and monitoring systems for detection of new Leptospira serovars are important for the control of leptospirosis. Here, we report the isolation of a spirochete from a stillborn bovine foetus and its characterization by immunological and molecular techniques. A variable number tandem repeat profile using seven discriminatory primers identified the spirochete as belonging to species Leptospira interrogans serogroup Australis serovar Muenchen. A phenotypic analysis using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against leptospiral membrane-associated proteins confirmed the expression of important virulence and pathogenicity factors (LipL32 and LigBrep). Out of 120 reference sera tested, 22 positive (36.66%) and 9 negative (15%) also reacted with the new isolate. Furthermore, the serovar Muenchen isolate was virulent in hamster model. The animal inoculated developed acute lethal infection characterized by hepatic, pulmonary and renal lesions. Local isolates exhibited unique characteristics that differed from those of reference strains; therefore, isolation of leptospires is useful in the surveillance of local pathogenic serovars. In conclusion, the data obtained from this study can contribute to the epidemiological understanding and control of leptospirosis in southern Brazil. PMID:25976319

  17. Persistently high IgA serum levels are a marker of immunological or virological failure of combined antiretroviral therapy in children with perinatal HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Gabiano, Clara; de Martino, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Non-expensive and low-complexity surrogate markers for monitoring the response to combined antiretroviral therapy (combined-ART) are needed in poor-resource settings where routine assessment of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and viral load can not be afforded. We longitudinally evaluated Ig serum levels in 234 HIV-1 infected children receiving combined-ART with ≥ 3 drugs. Since Ig levels physiologically vary with age, differences at different age periods were evaluated as differences in z-scores calculated using the mean and standard deviation of the normal population for each age period. Data from 17 (7·3%) children with immunological failure and from 54 (23·1%) children with virological failure of combined-ART were compared with data from not-failed children. At baseline children with immunological failure showed higher IgM z-scores (P = 0·042) than children without. After 3–12 months of therapy immunologically failed children displayed higher viral loads (P < 0·0001) and IgA (P = 0·043) z-scores than not-failed children. Similarly, at the same follow-up time, children with virological failure showed lower CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentages (P = 0·005) and higher IgA z-scores (P < 0·0001) than not-failed children. No difference in IgG or IgM z-scores was evidenced between failed and not-failed children after 3–12 months of therapy. In conclusion, IgA serum level is a cheap and low-complexity marker of immunological or virological failure of combined-ART which might be adopted in poor-resource settings. PMID:15807857

  18. The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

  19. GnRH molecular variants in the brain and pituitary gland of pejerrey, Odontesthes bonariensis (Atheriniformes). Immunological and chromatographic evidence for the presence of a novel molecular variant.

    PubMed

    Stefano, A V; Canosa, L F; D'Eramo, J L; Fridman, O; Affanni, J M; Somoza, G M

    1997-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) molecular variants in the brain and pituitary gland of pejerrey, Odontesthes bonariensis (Atheriniformes), were characterized by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Eluted fractions were tested in radioimmunoassays with different antisera. The results show that the brain extract contains three forms of GnRH: one is immunologically and chromatographically similar to cIIGnRH (chicken II), and another is similar to sGnRH (salmon). A third GnRH appears to be chromatographic and immunologically different from the nine other known forms of the vertebrate hormone. This is the only variant present in the pituitary gland. PMID:9467885

  20. Pyrogenic molecular markers: linking PAH with BPCA analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Brodowski, Sonja; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Molecular characterization of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is of great interest to understand the formation and behavior of these increasingly abundant materials in the environment. Two molecular marker methods have often been used to characterize and trace PyOM: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) analysis. Since both methods target pyrogenic polycyclic compounds, we investigated the linkages between the two approaches using chars that were produced under controlled conditions. Rye and maize straws and their analogues charred at 300, 400 and 500 °C, respectively, were thus analyzed with both methods. Moreover, we also measured BPCAs directly on the lipid extracts, on which PAHs were analyzed, and on the respective extraction residues, too. Both methods revealed important features of the chars, in particular the increasing degree of aromatic condensation with increasing highest heating temperature (HTT). The overlap between the two methods was identified in the lipid fraction, where the proportion of benzenetricarboxylic acids (B3CAs) correlated with PAH abundance. The results confirmed the validity and complementarity of the two molecular marker methods, which will likely continue to play a crucial role in PyOM research due to the recent developments of compound-specific PAH and BPCA stable carbon (δ(13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotope methods. PMID:25084061

  1. Molecular, immunological, enzymatic and biochemical studies of coproporphyrinogen oxidase deficiency in a family with hereditary coproporphyria.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Puy, H; Kühnel, A; Meissauer, U; Deybach, J C; Jacob, K; Martasek, P; Nordmann, Y; Doss, M O

    2002-02-01

    A 27-year-old woman who had recurrent pain in renal bed since 1998 with increasing character, was stationary admitted. The patient showed dark urine, complained of hair loss and took since 1994 a hormonal oral contraceptive. No photosensitivity was observed. Determinations of urinary porphyrin metabolites in 1998 revealed a porphyria cutanea tarda like excretion pattern with elevations of uro- (1767 nmol/24 hr, normal <29 nmol/24 hr) and heptacarboxyporphyrin (568 nmol/24 hr; normal <4 nmol/24 hr). Follow-up studies in feces showed the characteristics of a hereditary coproporphyria with dominance of coproporphyrin isomer III (total= 1470 nmol/g, isomer III= 93%), (normal: <37 nmol/g, isomer III = 25-35%). The excretion of porphyrin precursors (delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen) was increased by taking an ethinylestradiol-cyproteronacetate-preparation, but acute and/or chronic manifestations were not observed. Coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was decreased to 35% in the patient (normal=138+/-21 pkat/g protein; x+/-s), whereas the activity of red cell uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase was normal. Her mother and both sisters could be verified as heterozygous gene carriers of hereditary coproporphyria by their urinary and fecal excretion parameters and because of reduced coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity up to 50%. The father was normal with respect to his genotype. Molecular analysis revealed a hitherto unknown mutation with the transversion of a cytosine to thymine at nucleotide position 854 in exon 4 of the coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene. The gene defect was confirmed by DGGE in the mother and her three daughters. The investigation of the immunological nature of the defective coproporphyrinogen oxidase gene from the whole family revealed decreased concentrations of coproporphyrinogen oxidase protein in the patient, her mother and her two sisters. PMID:11929047

  2. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  3. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  4. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele . E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  5. Molecular and immunological characterization of a novel polymorphic lipoprotein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Wallich, R; Simon, M M; Hofmann, H; Moter, S E; Schaible, U E; Kramer, M D

    1993-10-01

    We describe the cloning, expression, and molecular characterization of a novel polymorphic Borrelia burgdorferi lipoprotein recognized by monoclonal antibody LA7. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a 21,866-Da polypeptide (IpLA7). Comparison with other known proteins indicated sequence similarity between IpLA7 signal peptides and those of other prokaryotic lipoproteins, including the immunodominant B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins OspA, OspB, pC, and OspD. Both natural IpLA-7 and recombinant IpLA-7 could be biosynthetically labeled with [3H]palmitate. Upon solubilization of intact B. burgdorferi with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114, IpLA7 was extracted together with other lipoproteins into the detergent phase. Indirect immunolabeling studies indicated that the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody LA7 is mainly located in the periplasmic space. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting confirmed the calculated acidic pI of 5.7 for IpLA-7. The LA7 gene was shown to be species specific and to be located on the linear chromosome of B. burgdorferi. The analysis of 40 individual spirochetal isolates on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed considerable genotypic heterogeneity of LA7 corresponding to that previously found for ospA. Native IpLA-7 and recombinant IpLA-7 were recognized by immune sera from infected mice as well as some human sera derived from infected but healthy donors and may thus prove useful as an additional marker for the serodiagnosis of Lyme disease. PMID:8104894

  6. Cellular and molecular functions of hepatic stellate cells in inflammatory responses and liver immunology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a central immunological organ. Liver resident macrophages, Kupffer cells (KC), but also sinusoidal endothelial cells, dendritic cells (DC) and other immune cells are involved in balancing immunity and tolerance against pathogens, commensals or food antigens. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have been primarily characterized as the main effector cells in liver fibrosis, due to their capacity to transdifferentiate into collagen-producing myofibroblasts (MFB). More recent studies elucidated the fundamental role of HSC in liver immunology. HSC are not only the major storage site for dietary vitamin A (Vit A) (retinol, retinoic acid), which is essential for proper function of the immune system. This pericyte further represents a versatile source of many soluble immunological active factors including cytokines [e.g., interleukin 17 (IL-17)] and chemokines [C-C motif chemokine (ligand) 2 (CCL2)], may act as an antigen presenting cell (APC), and has autophagy activity. Additionally, it responds to many immunological triggers via toll-like receptors (TLR) (e.g., TLR4, TLR9) and transduces signals through pathways and mediators traditionally found in immune cells, including the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway or inflammasome activation. Overall, HSC promote rather immune-suppressive responses in homeostasis, like induction of regulatory T cells (Treg), T cell apoptosis (via B7-H1, PDL-1) or inhibition of cytotoxic CD8 T cells. In conditions of liver injury, HSC are important sensors of altered tissue integrity and initiators of innate immune cell activation. Vice versa, several immune cell subtypes interact directly or via soluble mediators with HSC. Such interactions include the mutual activation of HSC (towards MFB) and macrophages or pro-apoptotic signals from natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and gamma-delta T cells (γδ T-cells) on activated HSC. Current directions of research investigate the immune-modulating functions of HSC in the environment of liver tumors, cellular heterogeneity or interactions promoting HSC deactivation during resolution of liver fibrosis. Understanding the role of HSC as central regulators of liver immunology may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for chronic liver diseases. PMID:25568859

  7. STRATEGIES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF MOLECULAR MARKERS IN PLANT BREEDING PROGRAMS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular markers have been slow to meet expectations, but markers are currently providing real benefits in a number of breeding programs. Improved technologies provide opportunities to increase the usefulness of markers to breeding programs by reducing their costs and labor requirements and by inc...

  8. Immunologic contact urticaria.

    PubMed

    McFadden, John

    2014-02-01

    The wheal and flare reaction from direct contact with a chemical or protein agent is known as contact urticaria. Contact urticaria can be either nonimmunologic (no sensitization required) or immunologic (sensitization required). Immunologic contact urticaria often gives a more aggravated response and has the potential to spread from the local vicinity. Skin testing in immunologic contact urticaria gives a quicker response compared with skin testing in nonimmunologic contact urticaria. There are a wide variety of agents that can cause immunologic contact urticaria, and they can be either low-molecular-weight chemicals (haptens) or proteins. PMID:24262696

  9. Is interferon-gamma the right marker for bacille Calmette-Guérin-induced immune protection? The missing link in our understanding of tuberculosis immunology.

    PubMed

    Abebe, F

    2012-09-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), developed a century ago, is the only licensed tuberculosis (TB) vaccine in use to date. The protective efficacy of BCG against TB varies with no apparent protection in some population, and mechanisms of its immune protection is poorly known, and yet BCG is the most widely used vaccine, with more than 4 billion BCG-vaccinated children globally. BCG is probably the only licensed vaccine currently in use believed to mediate immune protection through the production of interferon (IFN)-γ by CD4 T cells, which in turn activates macrophages to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Currently, a number of new TB candidate vaccines are in different phases of clinical trial. The majority of these new vaccines are either recombinant forms of BCG or prime boosters of BCG (rBCG) and their immunogenicity is tested using BCG as a benchmark by measuring specific IFN-γ produced by CD4(+) T cells as a protective immune marker. However, some recent studies that examined mechanisms of immune protection of BCG in animals and humans have reported a lack of correlation between IFN-γ production by CD4 cells and BCG-induced immune protection. These studies point to the fact that there is a missing link in our understanding of TB immunology. Conversely, there is emerging evidence that other T cell subsets (gammadelta, γδ), CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells may play a vital role in immune protection against Mtb infection and BCG-induced immune protection. γδ T cells and NK cells, which were considered to be part of the innate immunity in the past, have been shown to develop immunological memory upon re-encounter with the same pathogen. In this paper, the controversy over the role of IFN-γ as a marker for protective immunity against TB, and emerging data on the role of γδ T cells, CD8(+) and NK cells in TB immunology, will be presented. PMID:22861360

  10. Molecular markers for identifying municipal, domestic and agricultural sources of organic matter in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Harwood, John J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers can be used to determine the sources of organic pollution in water. This review summarizes progress made during the last two decades in identifying reliable molecular markers to distinguish pollution from sewage, animal production, and other sources. Two artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame-K, are sufficiently stable to be molecular markers and easily associated with domestic wastewater. Waste from different animal species may be distinguished by profiling fecal sterols and bile acids. Other markers which have been evaluated, including caffeine, detergent components, and compounds commonly leached from landfills are discussed. PMID:24200048

  11. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  12. Molecular mechanisms and functional implications of polarized actin remodeling at the T cell immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Le Floc'h, Audrey; Huse, Morgan

    2015-02-01

    Transient,specialized cell-cell interactions play a central role in leukocyte function by enabling specific intercellular communication in the context of a highly dynamic systems level response. The dramatic structural changes required for the formation of these contacts are driven by rapid and precise cytoskeletal remodeling events. In recent years, the immunological synapse that forms between a T lymphocyte and its antigen-presenting target cell has emerged as an important model system for understanding immune cell interactions. In this review, we discuss how regulators of the cortical actin cytoskeleton control synaptic architecture and in this way specify T cell function. PMID:25355055

  13. Molecular mechanisms and functional implications of polarized actin remodeling at the T cell immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Le Floc’h, Audrey; Huse, Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Transient, specialized cell-cell interactions play a central role in leukocyte function by enabling specific intercellular communication in the context of a highly dynamic systems level response. The dramatic structural changes required for the formation of these contacts are driven by rapid and precise cytoskeletal remodeling events. In recent years, the immunological synapse that forms between a T lymphocyte and its antigen-presenting target cell has emerged as an important model system for understanding immune cell interactions. In this review, we discuss how regulators of the cortical actin cytoskeleton control synaptic architecture and in this way specify T cell function. PMID:25355055

  14. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J.; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program. PMID:26697053

  15. A MOLECULAR MARKER MAP IN KANOTA X OGLE HEXAPLOID OAT (AVENA SP.) ENHANCED BY ADDITIONAL MARKERS AND A ROBUST FRAMEWORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular mapping of cultivated oats was conducted to update the previous reference map constructed using a recombinant inbred (RI) population derived from Avena byzantina C. Koch cv. 'Kanota' X A. sativa L. cv. 'Ogle.' In the current work, 607 new markers were scored, many on a larger set of RI lin...

  16. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

  17. ZIP4 is a novel molecular marker for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Yongzhi; Yang, Jingxuan; Zhu, Vivian F.; Liu, Yulun; Cui, Xiaobo; Chen, Leon; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Hergenroeder, Georgene W.; Fletcher, Stephen A.; Levine, Jonathan M.; Kim, Dong H.; Tandon, Nitin; Zhu, Jay-Jiguang; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated zinc transport has been observed in many cancers. However, the status of zinc homeostasis and the expression profile of zinc transporters in brain and brain tumors have not been reported. Methods The gene profiles of 14 zinc importers (ZIPs) and 10 zinc exporters (ZnTs) in patients with glioma were studied by investigating the association between the zinc transporters and brain tumor characteristics (tumor grade and overall survival time). Three independent cohorts were analyzed to cross-validate the findings: the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGCA) cohort (n = 186), the US National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) cohort (n = 335), and The University of Texas (UT) cohort (n = 34). Results The expression of ZIP3, 4, 8, 14, ZnT5, 6, and 7 were increased, and the expression of ZnT10 was decreased in grade IV gliomas, compared with grade II gliomas. Among all 24 zinc transporters, ZIP4 is most significantly associated with tumor grade and overall survival; this finding is consistent across 2 independent cohorts (CGCA and REMBRANDT) and is partially validated by the third cohort (UT). High ZIP4 expression was significantly associated with higher grade of gliomas and shorter overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.53, P = .040 in CGCA cohort; hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval = 1.08–1.61, P = .007 in REMBRANDT cohort). Conclusions Dysregulated expression of zinc transporters is involved in the progression of gliomas. Our results suggest that ZIP4 may serve as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for gliomas. PMID:23595627

  18. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  19. Baseline blood immunological profiling differentiates between Her2breast cancer molecular subtypes: implications for immunomediated mechanisms of treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Tudoran, Oana; Virtic, Oana; Balacescu, Loredana; Lisencu, Carmen; Fetica, Bogdan; Gherman, Claudia; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer patients response to treatment is highly dependent on the primary tumor molecular features, with triple-negative breast tumors having the worst prognosis of all subtypes. According to the molecular features, tumors stimulate the microenvironment to induce distinct immune responses, baseline immune activation being associated with higher likelihood of pathologic response. In this study, we investigated the deconvolution of the immunological status of triple-negative tumors in comparison with luminal tumors and the association with patients clinicopathological characteristics. Patients and methods Gene expression of 84 inflammatory molecules and their receptors were analyzed in 40 peripheral blood samples from patients with Her2? primary breast cancer tumors. We studied the association of triple-negative phenotype with age, clinical stage, tumor size, lymph nodes, and menopausal status. Results We observed that more patients with estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR)-negative tumors had grade III, while more patients with ER/PR-positive tumors had grade II tumors. Gene expression analysis revealed a panel of 14 genes to have differential expression between the two groups: several interleukins: IL13, IL16, IL17C and IL17F, IL1A, IL3; interleukin receptors: IL10RB, IL5RA; chemokines: CXCL13 and CCL26; and cytokines: CSF2, IFNA2, OSM, TNSF13. Conclusion The expression levels of these genes have been previously shown to be associated with reduced immunological status; indeed, the triple-negative breast cancer patients presented with lower counts of lymphocytes and eosinophils than the ER/PR-positive ones. These results contribute to a better understanding of the possible role of antitumor immune responses in mediating the clinical outcome. PMID:26604799

  20. Molecular markers for leaf rust resistance genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Chełkowski, J; Stepień, L

    2001-01-01

    Over 100 genes of resistance to rust fungi: Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici, (47 Lr - leaf rust genes), P. striiformis (18 Yr - yellow rust genes) and P. graminis f. sp. tritici (41 Sr - stripe rust genes) have been identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its wild relatives according to recent papers. Sixteen Lr resistance genes have been mapped using restriction fragments length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on wheat chromosomes. More than ten Lr genes can be identified in breeding materials by sequence tagged site (STS) specific markers. Gene Lrk 10, closely linked to gene Lr 10, has been cloned and its function recognized. Available markers are presented in this review. The STS, cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) markers found in the literature should be verified using Triticum spp. with different genetic background. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers for Lr resistance genes are now also available. PMID:14564046

  1. Molecular Markers of Radiation-related Normal Tissue Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Okunieff, Paul; Chen, Yuhchyau; Maguire, David J.; Huser, Amy K.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past five decades, those interested in markers of radiation effect have focused primarily on tumor response. More recently, however, the view has broadened to include irradiated normal tissuesmarkers that predict unusual risk of side-effects, prognosticate during the prodromal and therapeutic phases, diagnose a particular toxicity as radiation-related, and, in the case of bioterror, allow for tissue-specific biodosimetry. Currently, there are few clinically useful radiation-related biomarkers. Notably, levels of some hormones such as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) have been used successfully as markers of dysfunction, indicative of the need for replacement therapy, and for prevention of cancers. The most promising macromolecular markers are cytokines: TGF?, IL-1, IL-6, and TNF? being lead molecules in this class as both markers and targets for therapy. Genomics and proteomics are still in nascent stages and are actively being studied and developed. PMID:18506399

  2. Immunology Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    Mission Statement The Immunology Faculty disseminates information, encourages collaborations among investigators, and identifies core needs to improve the quality of immunology research within the NCI intramural program. How To Join NCI intramural princip

  3. Immunology Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    The goals of the NCI Immunology Faculty are to: 1) Disseminate information. 2) Encourage collaborations among NCI intramural investigators. 3) Identify core needs to improve the quality of immunology research within the NCI intramural research program.

  4. Immunological markers for tolerance to avian malaria in Hawai`i `Amakihi: new tools for restoring native Hawaiian forest birds?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated three assays for non-specific or innate immune capacity to see if measurements were independent of malarial infection and capable of distinguishing malaria-tolerant, low-elevation Hawaiʽi ʽAmakihi from malaria-susceptible, high-elevation ʽAmakihi. ʽAmakihi were captured at Malama Ki Forest Reserve (20 m), Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (1800 m), and Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve (1700 m), bled for collection of plasma and packed erythrocytes for malarial diagnostics, and either transported to Kīlauea Field Station Aviary and held in captivity for 48 hours for inoculation of wing webs with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) or released immediately in the field after collection of a blood sample. All birds were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microscopy to determine infection status. We found no significant association between malarial infection status and degree of wing web swelling after inoculation with PHA (T = -0.174, df = 13, P = 0.864) and no association between origin of birds from low- and high-elevation populations and degree of wing web swelling (T = 0.113, df = 52, P = 0.911). Infected ʽAmakihi from low elevation had significantly higher small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity than uninfected individuals from the same population (T = -2.675, df = 21, P = 0.014), so we limited comparisons to uninfected birds. Uninfected ʽAmakihi from low elevations did not differ in small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity from uninfected ʽAmakihi from high elevation (T = -0.260, df = 46, P = 0.796). Compared to high-elevation birds, low-elevation ʽAmakihi had significantly higher titers of natural antibodies (NAb) as measured by complement-mediated lysis of rabbit erythrocytes (Mann-Whitney U = 27, X2= 32.332, df = 1, P < 0.0001). This innate immunological difference may be related to ability to survive malarial infection and may prove to be important for understanding possible mechanisms for the evolution of disease tolerance in Hawaiʽi’s native bird species.

  5. IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

  6. Immunologic mechanisms in Lyme neuroborreliosis: the potential role of autoimmunity and molecular mimicry.

    PubMed

    Sigal, L H

    1997-03-01

    Most of the clinical manifestations of Lyme disease are due to the local presence of the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, in the affected tissues. However, the precise means of tissue damage are not well understood and there is no proof that the organism, live or dead, is always present. An understanding of the complex interaction between the organism, the immune response elicited by the organism, and the host can explain manifestations of the disease and persistence of symptoms and signs after the antibiotic-induced death of the organism. It is possible that dead spirochetes, or fragments thereof may persist and act as a focus of ongoing inflammation. Different immunogenetic types may predispose to different immunologic responses, with distinct clinical outcomes. Vascular changes induced by the infection, either by local infection or the effects of cytokines on the vessel wall, may underlie tissue pathology. Finally, the immune response to B. burgdorferi may elicit the production of antibodies capable of recognizing and damaging or modifying normal host tissues. Only by establishing the mechanisms causing tissue damage in Lyme disease can rational therapeutic strategies be developed. Only by understanding these mechanisms can physicians and patients interpret clinical responses to therapy and accurately appreciate the clinical prognosis. PMID:9166962

  7. No selection on immunological markers in response to a highly virulent pathogen in an Arctic breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Legagneux, Pierre; Berzins, Lisha L; Forbes, Mark; Harms, Naomi Jane; Hennin, Holly L; Bourgeon, Sophie; Gilchrist, H G; Bêty, Joël; Soos, Catherine; Love, Oliver P; Foster, Jeffrey T; Descamps, Sébastien; Burness, Gary

    2014-08-01

    In natural populations, epidemics provide opportunities to look for intense natural selection on genes coding for life history and immune or other physiological traits. If the populations being considered are of management or conservation concern, then identifying the traits under selection (or 'markers') might provide insights into possible intervention strategies during epidemics. We assessed potential for selection on multiple immune and life history traits of Arctic breeding common eiders (Somateria mollissima) during annual avian cholera outbreaks (summers of 2006, 2007 & 2008). We measured prelaying body condition, immune traits, and subsequent reproductive investment (i.e., clutch size) and survival of female common eiders and whether they were infected with Pasteurella multocida, the causative agent of avian cholera. We found no clear and consistent evidence of directional selection on immune traits; however, infected birds had higher levels of haptoglobin than uninfected birds. Also, females that laid larger clutches had slightly lower immune responses during the prelaying period reflecting possible downregulation of the immune system to support higher costs of reproduction. This supports a recent study indicating that birds investing in larger clutches were more likely to die from avian cholera and points to a possible management option to maximize female survival during outbreaks. PMID:25469158

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  9. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  10. Molecular markers and conservation of plant species in Latin America: the case of Phaedranassa viridflora (Amaryllidaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites are molecular markers with great potential for investigating genetic structure of populations. This information is valuable for generating effective conservation plans. We studied the endemic and endangered Phaedranassa viridiflora (Amaryllidaceae) to show the utility of microsatelli...

  11. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  12. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  13. Molecular detection and immunological localization of gill Na+/H+ exchanger in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Claiborne, James B; Choe, Keith P; Morrison-Shetlar, Alison I; Weakley, Jill C; Havird, Justin; Freiji, Abe; Evans, David H; Edwards, Susan L

    2008-03-01

    The dogfish (Squalus acanthias) can make rapid adjustments to gill acid-base transfers to compensate for internal acidosis/alkalosis. Branchial Na+/H+ exchange (NHE) has been postulated as one mechanism driving the excretion of H+ following acidosis. We have cloned gill cDNA that includes an open reading frame coding for a 770-residue protein most homologous (approximately 71%) to mammalian NHE2. RT-PCR revealed NHE2 transcripts predominantly in gill, stomach, rectal gland, intestine, and kidney. In situ hybridization with an antisense probe against NHE2 in gill sections revealed a strong mRNA signal from a subset of interlamellar and lamellae cells. We developed dogfish-specific polyclonal antibodies against NHE2 that detected a approximately 70-kDa protein in Western blots and immunologically recognized branchial cells having two patterns of protein expression. Cytoplasmic and apical NHE2 immunoreactivity were observed in cells coexpressing basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase. Other large ovoid cells more generally staining for NHE2 also were strongly positive for basolateral H+-ATPase. Gill mRNA levels for NHE2 and H+-ATPase did not change following systemic acidosis (as measured by quantitative PCR 2 h after a 1- or 2-meq/kg acid infusion). These data indicate that posttranslational adjustments of NHE2 and other transport systems (e.g., NHE3) following acidosis may be of importance in the short-term pH adjustment and net branchial H+ efflux observed in vivo. NHE2 may play multiple roles in the gills, involved with H+ efflux from acid-secreting cells, basolateral H+ reabsorption for pHi regulation, and in parallel with H+-ATPase for the generation of HCO3(-) in base-secreting cells. PMID:18094061

  14. Molecular structure, distribution, and immunology function of TNFSF13B (BAFF) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Jiaxin; Li, Jianfeng; Song, Jinyun; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2016-04-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF)is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family and plays roles in B cell survival and maturation. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) BAFF (tBAFF) was amplified from the spleen by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a protein of 261 amino acids containing a predicted transmembrane domain and a furin protease cleavage site, similar to mammalian, avian, and reptile BAFF. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed that tBAFF is present in various tissues and is predominantly expressed in the spleen. The predicted three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) soluble BAFF (tsBAFF) monomer was determined by (3D) structure modeling monomeranalyzed by (3D) structure mouse counterpart. Both tsBAFF and EGFP/tsBAFF were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), as confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. After purification, the EGFP/tsBAFF fusion protein showed a fluorescence spectrum similar to that of EGFP. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that EGFP/tsBAFF bound to its receptor. In vitro, tsBAFF promoted the proliferation of Nile tilapia and mouse splenic B cells together with/without a priming agent (Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1, SAC) or anti-mouse IgM. Furthermore, tsBAFF showed a similar proliferation-stimulating effect on mouse B cells compared to msBAFF. These findings indicate that tsBAFF plays an important role in the proliferation of Nile tilapia B cells and has functional cross-reactivity among Nile tilapia and mammals. Therefore, BAFF may represent a useful factor for enhancing immunological efficacy in animals. PMID:26915306

  15. Identification of Putative Molecular Markers Associated with Root Traits in Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Devaraja; Awati, Mallikarjuana G.; Udayakumar, M.; Prasad, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Coffea canephora exhibit poor root system and are very sensitive to drought stress that affects growth and production. Deeper root system has been largely empirical as better avoidance to soil water limitation in drought condition. The present study aimed to identify molecular markers linked to high root types in Coffea canephora using molecular markers. Contrasting parents, L1 valley with low root and S.3334 with high root type, were crossed, and 134 F1 individuals were phenotyped for root and associated physiological traits (29 traits) and genotyped with 41 of the 320 RAPD and 9 of the 55 SSR polymorphic primers. Single marker analysis was deployed for detecting the association of markers linked to root associated traits by SAS software. There were 13 putative RAPD markers associated with root traits such as root length, secondary roots, root dry weight, and root to shoot ratio, in which root length associated marker OPS1850 showed high phenotypic variance of 6.86%. Two microsatellite markers linked to root length (CPCM13400) and root to shoot ratio (CM211300). Besides, 25 markers were associated with more than one trait and few of the markers were associated with positively related physiological traits and can be used in marker assisted trait selection. PMID:25821599

  16. PlantMarkers—a database of predicted molecular markers from plants

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Stephen; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Molecular markers are required in a broad spectrum of gene screening approaches, ranging from gene-mapping within traditional ‘forward’-genetics approaches through QTL identification studies to genotyping and haplotyping studies. As we enter the post-genomics era, the need for genetic markers does not diminish, even in the species with fully sequenced genomes. PlantMarkers is a genetic marker database that contains a comprehensive pool of predicted molecular markers. We have adopted contemporary techniques to identify putative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), simple sequence repeat (SSR) and conserved orthologue set markers. A systematic approach to identify as broad a range of putative markers has been undertaken by screening the available openSputnik unigene consensus sequences from over 50 plant species. A web presence at http://markers.btk.fi provides functionality so that a user may search for species-specific markers on the basis of many specific criteria not limited to non-synonymous SNPs segregating between different varieties or measured polymorphic SSRs. Feedback forms are provided with all sequence entries to enable inclusion of, for example, map location for markers validated by the research community. PMID:15608276

  17. Identification of Putative Molecular Markers Associated with Root Traits in Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner.

    PubMed

    Achar, Devaraja; Awati, Mallikarjuana G; Udayakumar, M; Prasad, T G

    2015-01-01

    Coffea canephora exhibit poor root system and are very sensitive to drought stress that affects growth and production. Deeper root system has been largely empirical as better avoidance to soil water limitation in drought condition. The present study aimed to identify molecular markers linked to high root types in Coffea canephora using molecular markers. Contrasting parents, L1 valley with low root and S.3334 with high root type, were crossed, and 134 F1 individuals were phenotyped for root and associated physiological traits (29 traits) and genotyped with 41 of the 320 RAPD and 9 of the 55 SSR polymorphic primers. Single marker analysis was deployed for detecting the association of markers linked to root associated traits by SAS software. There were 13 putative RAPD markers associated with root traits such as root length, secondary roots, root dry weight, and root to shoot ratio, in which root length associated marker OPS1850 showed high phenotypic variance of 6.86%. Two microsatellite markers linked to root length (CPCM13400) and root to shoot ratio (CM211300). Besides, 25 markers were associated with more than one trait and few of the markers were associated with positively related physiological traits and can be used in marker assisted trait selection. PMID:25821599

  18. The immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions underlying regulation of the immune response take place in a nano-scale gap between T cells and antigen presenting cells, termed the immunological synapse. If these interactions are regulated appropriately, the host is defended against a wide range of pathogens and deranged host cells. If these interactions are dis-regulated, the host is susceptible to pathogens or tumor escape at one extreme and autoimmunity at the other. Treatments targeting the synapse have helped to establish immunotherapy as a mainstream element in cancer treatment. This Masters primer will cover the basics of the immunological synapse and some of the applications to tumor immunology. PMID:25367977

  19. Analysis of plant diversity with retrotransposon-based molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Kalendar, R; Flavell, A J; Ellis, T H N; Sjakste, T; Moisy, C; Schulman, A H

    2011-01-01

    Retrotransposons are both major generators of genetic diversity and tools for detecting the genomic changes associated with their activity because they create large and stable insertions in the genome. After the demonstration that retrotransposons are ubiquitous, active and abundant in plant genomes, various marker systems were developed to exploit polymorphisms in retrotransposon insertion patterns. These have found applications ranging from the mapping of genes responsible for particular traits and the management of backcrossing programs to analysis of population structure and diversity of wild species. This review provides an insight into the spectrum of retrotransposon-based marker systems developed for plant species and evaluates the contributions of retrotransposon markers to the analysis of population diversity in plants. PMID:20683483

  20. Identifying molecular markers associated with stigma characteristics in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stigma characteristics play essential roles in hybrid seed production of rice and marker-assisted breeding plays essential role because they are quantitatively inherited with single-flowered perfect spikelet. Ninety four accessions originated from 47 countries were selected from the USDA rice core c...

  1. A GENETIC MAP OF MOLECULAR MARKERS IN TRITICOSECALE WITTMACK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map of triticale produced with polymorphic markers based on PCR technology (RAPD, RAMP, AFLP and SSR) is reported. These revealed levels of polymorphism of 7.6%, 6.2%, 7.9% and 28.4%, respectively. The plant materials employed were two hexaploid triticale cultivars, 'Torote' and 'Presto', ...

  2. Characterization and Immunological Evaluation of Low-Molecular- Weight Alginate Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Bi, Decheng; Wan, Min

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a naturally occurring acidic linear polysaccharide obtained from marine brown seaweed. Low molecular weight structurally diverse derivatives and oligosaccharides derived from alginate have shown various tremendous biological and pharmacological activities. It has been demonstrated that immuno-inflammation is involved in many prevalent human diseases, such as cancer, severe infection and neurodegeneration. Given the activities of marine natural products in the regulation of immune responses, increasing efforts are being made toward the development of lowmolecular- weight natural compounds that aid in the prevention and treatment of immune- and inflammatory-related diseases. In this review, we describe the development of chemical modification and molecular depolymerization methods that modify the physicochemical and biological characteristics of alginate. Additionally, current progress in research on immuno-inflammatory, anti-neurodegenerative and anti-tumor activities of alginate derivatives is highlighted. PMID:26311423

  3. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  4. Stimulated proliferative responses in vertically HIV-infected children on HAART correlate with clinical and immunological markers

    PubMed Central

    RESINO, S; ABAD, M L; NAVARRO, J; BELLÓN, J M; SÁNCHEZ-RAMÓN, S; ÁNGELES MUÑOZ-FERNÁNDEZ, M

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between various CD4+ T cell subsets and the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate to several stimuli in vertically human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. We studied 29 HIV-1-infected children on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (median duration: 12·3 months). T cell subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Plasma viral load (VL) was quantified using a standardized molecular method. Proliferative responses were evaluated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Decreased proliferative responses of PBMC to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were found for HIV-1-infected children in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) clinical categories B and C when compared to the control group (P < 0·05). Similarly, children with ≤ 15% CD4+ T cells showed a decrease in proliferative responses to PWM (P < 0·01), anti-CD3 + anti-CD28 (P < 0·01) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) (P < 0·05) with respect to the control group and to children with CD4+ T cells ≥ 25%. Proliferative responses to PWM, anti-CD3+, anti-CD28 and PHA had a statistically significant positive correlation with CD3+/mm3, CD4+/mm3, % CD4 T cells, CD4/CD8 ratio and the percentage of naive T cell subsets (CD4+CD45RO−HLA-DR−, CD4+ CD45RA+ CD62L+, CD4+ CD45RA+), CD4+ CD62L+ and CD4+ T cells co-expressing CD38+ (CD4+ HLA-DR−CD38+, CD4+ CD38+). Moreover, we found a negative correlation between PBMC proliferative responses and % CD8 T cells, memory, memory-activated and activated CD4+ T cell subsets. Lower proliferative responses to PWM (P < 0·01) and PHA (P < 0·01) were associated with higher VL. Our data show that higher proliferative responses to PWM, anti-CD3 + anti-CD28 and PHA are associated with both non-activated and naive CD4+ T cell subsets in HIV-1-infected children on HAART. PMID:12519396

  5. Novel molecular, cytotoxical, and immunological study on promising and selective anticancer activity of Mung bean sprouts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The anticancer and immunomodulatory activity of mung bean sprouts (MBS) and the underlying mechanisms against human cervical and hepatocarcinoma cancer cells were explored. Methods MBS cytotoxicity and MBS-induced anticancer cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-β from cancer cells, and immunological cytokines, IL-4, IFN-γ, and IL-10 from peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) were assessed by MTS and ELISA assays. Apoptotic cells were investigated by flow cytometry. The expression level of apoptotic genes (Bax, BCL-2, Capsases 7–9) and cell cycle regulatory genes (cyclin D, E, and A) and tumor suppressor proteins (p27, p21, and p53) was assessed by real-time qPCR in the cancer cells treated with extract IC50. Results The cytotoxicity on normal human cells was significantly different from HeLa and HepG2 cells, 163.97 ± 5.73, 13.3 ± 0.89, and 14.04 ± 1.5 mg/ml, respectively. The selectivity index (SI) was 12.44 ± 0.83 for HeLa and 11.94 ± 1.2 for HepG2 cells. Increased levels of TNF-α and IFN-β were observed in the treated HeLa and HepG2 culture supernatants when compared with untreated cells. MBS extract was shown to be an immunopolarizing agent by inducing IFNγ and inhibiting IL-4 production by PBMC; this leads to triggering of CMI and cellular cytotoxicity. The extract induced apoptosis, in a dose and time dependent manner, in treated HeLa and HepG2, but not in untreated, cells (P < 0.05). The treatment significantly induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 in HeLa cells. The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase of the treated HeLa cells increased from 62.87 ± 2.1%, in untreated cells, to 80.48 ± 2.97%. Interestingly, MBS IC50 induced the expression of apoptosis and tumor suppressor related genes in both HeLa and HepG2 cells. MBS extract succeeded in inducing cdk-inhibitors, p21, p53, and p27 in HeLa cells while it induced only p53 in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). This is a clue for the cell type- specific interaction of the studied extract. These proteins inhibit the cyclin-cdk complexes apart from the presence of some other components that might stimulate some cyclins such as cyclin E, A, and D. Conclusion MBS extract was shown to be a potent anticancer agent granting new prospects of anticancer therapy using natural products. PMID:23122182

  6. Choosing the right molecular genetic markers for studying biodiversity: from molecular evolution to practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Chenuil, Anne; Anne, Chenuil

    2006-05-01

    The use of molecular genetic markers (MGMs) has become widespread among evolutionary biologists, and the methods of analysis of genetic data improve rapidly, yet an organized framework in which scientists can work is lacking. Elements of molecular evolution are summarized to explain the origin of variation at the DNA level, its measures, and the relationships linking genetic variability to the biological parameters of the studied organisms. MGM are defined by two components: the DNA region(s) screened, and the technique used to reveal its variation. Criteria of choice belong to three categories: (1) the level of variability, (2) the nature of the information (e.g. dominance vs. codominance, ploidy, ... ) which must be determined according to the biological question and (3) some practical criteria which mainly depend on the equipment of the laboratory and experience of the scientist. A three-step procedure is proposed for drawing up MGMs suitable to answer given biological questions, and compiled data are organized to guide the choice at each step: (1) choice, determined by the biological question, of the level of variability and of the criteria of the nature of information, (2) choice of the DNA region and (3) choice of the technique. PMID:16850217

  7. The Effects of Water Matrix on Decay of Human Fecal Molecular Markers and Campylobacter spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although molecular source tracking for human fecal contamination is used on a wide range of sample types, little is known about comparative decay of proposed molecular markers under different conditions, or correlation with pathogen decay. Our purpose was to measure correlations ...

  8. DNA markers in molecular diagnostics for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying-Hsiu; Lin, Selena Y; Song, Wei; Jain, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, mainly due to the difficulty of early detection and limited therapeutic options. The implementation of HCC surveillance programs in well-defined, high-risk populations were only able to detect about 40–50% of HCC at curative stages (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stages 0 & 1) due to the low sensitivities of the current screening methods. The advance of sequencing technologies has identified numerous modifications as potential candidate DNA markers for diagnosis/surveillance. Here we aim to provide an overview of the DNA alterations that result in activation of cancer pathways known to potentially drive HCC carcinogenesis and to summarize performance characteristics of each DNA marker in the periphery (blood or urine) for HCC screening. PMID:25098554

  9. Molecular breeding in Brassica for salt tolerance: importance of microsatellite (SSR) markers for molecular breeding in Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manu; Choi, Ju-Young; Kumari, Nisha; Pareek, Ashwani; Kim, Seong-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the important abiotic factors for any crop management in irrigated as well as rainfed areas, which leads to poor harvests. This yield reduction in salt affected soils can be overcome by improving salt tolerance in crops or by soil reclamation. Salty soils can be reclaimed by leaching the salt or by cultivation of salt tolerance crops. Salt tolerance is a quantitative trait controlled by several genes. Poor knowledge about mechanism of its inheritance makes slow progress in its introgression into target crops. Brassica is known to be a good reclamation crop. Inter and intra specific variation within Brassica species shows potential of molecular breeding to raise salinity tolerant genotypes. Among the various molecular markers, SSR markers are getting high attention, since they are randomly sparsed, highly variable and show co-dominant inheritance. Furthermore, as sequencing techniques are improving and softwares to find SSR markers are being developed, SSR markers technology is also evolving rapidly. Comparative SSR marker studies targeting Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica species which lie in the same family will further aid in studying the salt tolerance related QTLs and subsequent identification of the “candidate genes” and finding out the origin of important QTLs. Although, there are a few reports on molecular breeding for improving salt tolerance using molecular markers in Brassica species, usage of SSR markers has a big potential to improve salt tolerance in Brassica crops. In order to obtain best harvests, role of SSR marker driven breeding approaches play important role and it has been discussed in this review especially for the introgression of salt tolerance traits in crops. PMID:26388887

  10. Molecular breeding in Brassica for salt tolerance: importance of microsatellite (SSR) markers for molecular breeding in Brassica.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manu; Choi, Ju-Young; Kumari, Nisha; Pareek, Ashwani; Kim, Seong-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the important abiotic factors for any crop management in irrigated as well as rainfed areas, which leads to poor harvests. This yield reduction in salt affected soils can be overcome by improving salt tolerance in crops or by soil reclamation. Salty soils can be reclaimed by leaching the salt or by cultivation of salt tolerance crops. Salt tolerance is a quantitative trait controlled by several genes. Poor knowledge about mechanism of its inheritance makes slow progress in its introgression into target crops. Brassica is known to be a good reclamation crop. Inter and intra specific variation within Brassica species shows potential of molecular breeding to raise salinity tolerant genotypes. Among the various molecular markers, SSR markers are getting high attention, since they are randomly sparsed, highly variable and show co-dominant inheritance. Furthermore, as sequencing techniques are improving and softwares to find SSR markers are being developed, SSR markers technology is also evolving rapidly. Comparative SSR marker studies targeting Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica species which lie in the same family will further aid in studying the salt tolerance related QTLs and subsequent identification of the "candidate genes" and finding out the origin of important QTLs. Although, there are a few reports on molecular breeding for improving salt tolerance using molecular markers in Brassica species, usage of SSR markers has a big potential to improve salt tolerance in Brassica crops. In order to obtain best harvests, role of SSR marker driven breeding approaches play important role and it has been discussed in this review especially for the introgression of salt tolerance traits in crops. PMID:26388887

  11. Molecular, Kinetic, and Immunological Properties of the 6-Phosphofructokinase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum1

    PubMed Central

    Botha, Frederik C.; Turpin, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The ATP:d-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFK) from Selenastrum minutum was purified to homogeneity. The purified plastid enzyme had a specific activity of 180 micromoles per milligram of protein per minute. It is a homomer with a subunit molecular weight of 70,000. The smallest enzymatically active form of the protein is a homotetramer of 280,000 daltons. The enzyme can, however, aggregate into different active forms, the largest of which has a molecular weight of more than 6 × 106. The pH optimum, regardless of aggregation state, is 7.25. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with respect to fructose-6-phosphate and hyperbolic kinetics with respect to ATP. Phosphate changes the sigmoidal fructose-6-phosphate saturation kinetics to hyperbolic. Phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-oxoglutarate, malate, citrate and ATP all inhibit the enzyme. The ratios of phosphoenolpyruvate and/or 3-PGA to phosphate are probably the most important factors regulating PFK activity in vivo. The enzyme cross-reacts with several antisera against both cytosolic and plastidic PFKs as well as against native potato pyrophosphate dependent phosphofructokinase suggesting that the algal PFK represents an evolutionarily primitive form. Images Figure 2 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:16667595

  12. Purification and Molecular and Immunological Characterization of a Unique Phosphoribulokinase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Turpin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    A unique phosphoribulokinase (ADP:D-ribulose 5-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.19) has been purified to homogeneity from the green alga Selenastrum minutum. The enzyme has a native molecular mass of about 83 kilodaltons and a native isoelectric point of 5.1. The enzyme consists of two different-sized subunits of 41 and 40 kilodaltons, implying that it is a heterodimer. This is the first report of a eukaryotic heterodimeric phosphoribulokinase. The in vivo existence of two nonidentical subunits of S. minutum phosphoribulokinase was confirmed by western blot analysis of crude protein extracts from trichloroacetic acid-killed cells. These two subunits were immunologically similar, as rabbit immunoglobulin G affinity purified against the 41 kilodalton subunit of S. minutum phosphoribulokinase (PRK) cross-reacts with the 40 kilodalton subunit and vice versa. Antibodies against S. minutum phosphoribulokinase also cross-react with the spinach enzyme. NH2-terminal sequencing revealed that the two S. minutum PRK subunits shared a considerable degree of structure homology with each other and with the enzymes from spinach and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but not with PRK from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. There are, however, differences between the NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of the two S. minutum PRK subunits, that imply that they are the products of separate genes or products of two different mRNAs spliced from a single gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668652

  13. Clinical aspects on molecular probes, markers and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, U

    1994-01-01

    Though today techniques utilizing molecular methods are emphasized, we must not neglect to put the molecular data into a clinical context. Extrapolations should be handled with great care. The knowledge on alcohol has many levels, and facts are often taken out of context. For a proper report of a clinical state or situation, validity lies both in the precision of clinical descriptions and in the accuracy of the molecular parameter. Alcohol as a medical risk factor is often disregarded, and there is often a communication gap. PMID:8032144

  14. Applications and Implications of Neutral versus Non-neutral Markers in Molecular Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R.

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection. PMID:21747718

  15. Immunology Faculty

    Cancer.gov

    Immunology Faculty Listserv IMMUNOLFAC-L NCI Immunology Faculty Seminar Series Seminars are held every Tuesday from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Building 10, Room 2S235, on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD. This seminar series adjourns in July and resumes in

  16. Molecular and cellular markers of toxicity in the Japanese Medaka @

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; D'Surney, S.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hull, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been recommended for use as a model organism to detect carcinogenic, teratogenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic compounds in aquatic systems. Because a long latent period often occurs between initial contact with deleterious chemicals and subsequent expression of the pathology, we are investigating early biologically-relevant responses that can be used as genotoxicity markers of exposure and effect. This project focuses on the development of genotoxic bioassays and experimental protocols for exposing Japanese Medaka to genotoxic compounds. 21 refs., 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  17. Molecular markers associated with seed weight in two soybean populations.

    PubMed

    Mian, M A; Bailey, M A; Tamulonis, J P; Shipe, E R; Carter, T E; Parrott, W A; Ashley, D A; Hussey, R S; Boerma, H R

    1996-11-01

    Seed weight (SW) is a component of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., seed yield, as well as an important trait for food-type soybeans. Two soybean populations, 120 F4-derived lines of 'Young'xPI416937 (Pop1) and 111 F2-derived lines of PI97100x'Coker 237' (Pop2), were mapped with RFLP makers to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conditioning SW across environments and populations. The genetic map of Pop1 consisted of 155 loci covering 973 cM, whereas Pop2 involved 153 loci and covered 1600 cM of map distance. For Pop1, the phenotypic data were collected from Plains, GA., Windblow, N.C., and Plymouth, N.C., in 1994. For Pop2, data were collected from Athens, GA., in 1994 and 1995, and Blackville, S.C., in 1995. Based on single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), seven and nine independent loci were associated with SW in Pop1 and Pop2, respectively. Together the loci explained 73% of the variability in SW in Pop1 and 74% in Pop2. Transgressive segregation occurred among the progeny in both populations. The marker loci associated with SW were highly consistent across environments and years. Two QTLs on linkage group (LG) F and K were located at similar genomic regions in both populations. The high consistency of QTLs across environments indicates that effective marker-assisted selection is feasible for soybean SW. PMID:24162474

  18. Molecular Prognostic and Predictive Markers in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeffrey K.

    2011-01-01

    In parallel with our growing understanding of the molecular pathways underlying colorectal neoplasia, significant advances have been made in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). For the past few decades, 5-fluorouracil-based therapy has been the cornerstone of adjuvant therapy. More recently, additional cytotoxic drugs and molecular-targeted therapies have provided additional clinical benefit in certain patient populations. Unfortunately, overall survival remains about 45%. Notably, our understanding of why certain patients do or do not respond to treatment remains limited. Thus, as therapeutic options for CRC continue to expand, there is now an even greater imperative to identify reliable biomarkers that have the potential to predict prognosis as well as response to chemotherapy. In this review, we will summarize the current status of such molecular prognostic and predictive biomarkers in CRC and assess their usefulness in tailoring therapeutic options. PMID:21572547

  19. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ3 integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein. PMID:25099015

  20. Predictive and prognostic molecular markers for cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sunali; Shelling, Andrew; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Lasham, Annette; Blenkiron, Cherie; Laking, George; Print, Cristin

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 10 years there has been an explosion of information about the molecular biology of cancer. A challenge in oncology is to translate this information into advances in patient care. While there are well-formed routes for translating new molecular information into drug therapy, the routes for translating new information into sensitive and specific diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests are still being developed. Similarly, the science of using tumor molecular profiles to select clinical trial participants or to optimize therapy for individual patients is still in its infancy. This review will summarize the current technologies for predicting treatment response and prognosis in cancer medicine, and outline what the future may hold. It will also highlight the potential importance of methods that can integrate molecular, histopathological and clinical information into a synergistic understanding of tumor progression. While these possibilities are without doubt exciting, significant challenges remain if we are to implement them with a strong evidence base in a widely available and cost-effective manner. PMID:21789130

  1. Molecular Characterization of Entomopathogenic Fungi Using Microsatellite Markers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of entomopathogenic fungi isolated from their arthropod hosts or other sources can be cumbersome when certain morphological features are not clear or time consuming when the organism needs to reach a certain growth stage for proper identification. Molecular tools can be handy and offe...

  2. Genetic diversity of spineless Cereus jamacaru accessions using morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F I C; Bordallo, P N; Castro, A C R; Correia, D

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the genetic diversity of mandacaru cactus (Cereus jamacaru P. DC.). Plants of spineless mandacaru are commonly found in gardens and parks of urban areas in northeastern Brazil. In addition to exploring their ornamental potential, morphological, and genetic characterization may contribute to the development of plant materials that can be used as a source of macromolecules of potential economic interest. The goal of this study was to estimate the genetic variability of spineless mandacaru accessions using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers, and to characterize their morphology. Ten samples of newly emitted shoots with differentiated areolas and ribs were collected from each accession from the Cactaceous Germplasm Collection of Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, in Fortaleza, CE. Shoot shape and aspects of spine primordia (presence, location, grouping, and size of spines) were evaluated. The morphological analysis showed that the spineless mandacaru presented spine primordia. Twenty-six RAPD and 15 ISSR primers were polymorphic. A total of 262 markers were obtained, 129 of which were polymorphic. The average polymorphism of ISSR markers was higher than that of RAPD markers. The dendrograms for both analyses showed differentiation between accessions. Nevertheless, the molecular markers detected higher levels of diversity and a different pattern of diversity than those found using morphological markers. The molecular results revealed significant genetic variability both within and between groups. PMID:24222234

  3. Ultrasound-based Measurement of Molecular Marker Concentration in Large Blood Vessels: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Mauldin, F. William; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging has demonstrated efficacy in pre-clinical studies for cancer and cardiovascular inflammation. However, these techniques often require lengthy protocols due to waiting periods or additional control microbubble injections. Moreover, they are not capable of quantifying molecular marker concentration in human tissue environments that exhibit variable attenuation and propagation path lengths. Our group recently investigated a modulated Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based imaging sequence, which was demonstrated to detect targeted adhesion independent of control measurements. In the present study, this sequence was tested against various experimental parameters to determine feasibility for quantitative measurements of molecular marker concentration. Results demonstrated that measurements obtained from the sequence (residual-to-saturation ratio, Rresid) were independent of acoustic pressure and attenuation (p> 0.13, n = 10)when acoustic pressures were sufficiently low. The Rresid parameter exhibited a linear relationship with measured molecular marker concentration (R2> 0.94). Consequently, feasibility was demonstrated in vitro, for quantification of molecular marker concentration in large vessels using a modulated ARF-based sequence. Moreover, these measurements were independent of absolute acoustic reflection amplitude and used short imaging protocols(3 min) without control measurements. PMID:25308943

  4. Ultrasound-based measurement of molecular marker concentration in large blood vessels: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiying; Mauldin, F William; Klibanov, Alexander L; Hossack, John A

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging has demonstrated efficacy in pre-clinical studies for cancer and cardiovascular inflammation. However, these techniques often require lengthy protocols because of waiting periods or additional control microbubble injections. Moreover, they are not capable of quantifying molecular marker concentration in human tissue environments that exhibit variable attenuation and propagation path lengths. Our group recently investigated a modulated acoustic radiation force-based imaging sequence, which was found to detect targeted adhesion independent of control measurements. In the present study, this sequence was tested against various experimental parameters to determine its feasibility for quantitative measurements of molecular marker concentration. Results indicated that measurements obtained from the sequence (residual-to-saturation ratio, Rresid) were independent of acoustic pressure and attenuation (p > 0.13, n = 10) when acoustic pressures were sufficiently low. The Rresid parameter exhibited a linear relationship with measured molecular marker concentration (R(2) > 0.94). Consequently, feasibility was illustrated in vitro, for quantification of molecular marker concentration in large vessels using a modulated acoustic radiation force-based sequence. Moreover, these measurements were independent of absolute acoustic reflection amplitude and used short imaging protocols (3 min) without control measurements. PMID:25308943

  5. Molecular Markers of Secondary Organic Aerosol in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Fu, Pingqing; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Chen, Jing; Li, Jie; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Huansheng; Liao, Hong; Ding, Aijun; Umarji, G S; Patil, R S; Chen, Qi; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-05-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are generally considered to be more abundant in summer than in winter. Here, polar organic marker compounds in urban background aerosols from Mumbai were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, we found that concentrations of biogenic SOA tracers at Mumbai were several times lower in summer (8-14 June 2006; wet season; n = 14) than in winter (13-18 February 2007; dry season; n = 10). Although samples from less than 10% of the season are extrapolated to the full season, such seasonality may be explained by the predominance of the southwest summer monsoon, which brings clean marine air masses to Mumbai. While heavy rains are an important contributor to aerosol removal during the monsoon season, meteorological data (relative humidity and T) suggest no heavy rains occurred during our sampling period. However, in winter, high levels of SOA and their day/night differences suggest significant contributions of continental aerosols through long-range transport together with local sources. The winter/summer pattern of SOA loadings was further supported by results from chemical transport models (NAQPMS and GEOS-Chem). Furthermore, our study suggests that monoterpene- and sesquiterpene-derived secondary organic carbon (SOC) were more significant than those of isoprene- and toluene-SOC at Mumbai. PMID:27045808

  6. Standardization for transcriptomic molecular markers to screen human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Vos, Paul W; Ijames, Stephanie; Lysle, Donald T; Flake, Gordon; Sinar, Dennis R; Naziri, Wade; Marcuard, Stephan P

    2007-01-01

    Establishing test performance criteria for a transcriptomic colon cancer marker approach must be carried out in a standardized fashion in order tso ensure that the test will perform the same way in any laboratory, anywhere. Condition of sample preservation and shipping prior to total RNA extraction is critical, and we recommend preserving stool samples in an appropriate preservative and shipping them in cold packs so as to keep stools at 4 degrees C. It is not necessary to isolate colonocytes to obtain adequate RNA for testing. It is, however, important to obtain samples from both mucin-rich and non-mucin rich to have a good representation of both left- and right-side colon cancers. Employing a commercial total RNA extraction kit that contains an RLT buffer from Qiagen Corporation (Valencia, CA, USA) removes bacterial RNA from stool preparations and results in a high yield of undegraded RNA of human origin. Genes selected based on the enormous resources of NCI's Cancer Genome Anatomy project give good results. Primers for PCR should span more than one exon. Use of semiquantitative PCR, preferably with several reference housekeeping genes of various copy numbers, depending on tested genes, should enhance confidence in the quantitative results. Having standardized the testing conditions in our ongoing work, it is now imperative that a larger prospective randomized clinical study utilizing stool and tissue samples derived from several control and colon cancer patients, to allow for statistically valid analyses, be conducted in order to determine the true sensitivity and specificity of the transcriptomic screening approach for this cancer whose incidence is on the rise worldwide. PMID:18204205

  7. Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Volker; Peckmann, Jörn; Seifert, Richard; Wehrung, Patrick; Reitner, Joachim; Michaelis, Walter

    1999-12-01

    We propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C 20 isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C 25 homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely 13C-depleted isotope compositions (δ 13C ≈ -108 to -115.6‰ PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. We postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values (δ 13C ≈ -88‰) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO 2 and H 2; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H 2. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as "cold seep microbialites" rather than mere "authigenic" carbonates.

  8. Molecular markers for oocyte competence in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kussano, N R; Leme, L O; Guimarães, A L S; Franco, M M; Dode, M A N

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to quantify the expression of candidate genes in cumulus cells (CCs) from cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with high and low potential for in vitro development up to the blastocyst stage. First, the effects of individual culture and biopsy on embryo development were evaluated. Individuals cultured using the well of the well system were compared with individuals cultured in 20 μL droplets (microdroplets) and those cultured in groups (control). Blastocyst rates were lower for the individual culture systems (P < 0.05; well of the well = 17.9%, n = 95; microdrop = 26.3%, n = 95) than for the control group (45.0%, n = 209). Second, the effects of biopsy on embryo production were compared between the control and microdroplet cultures, and no effects (P > 0.05) were observed for either group. Finally, the expression profiles of glypican 4 (GPC4), IGF4-binding protein, follicle-stimulating hormonereceptor, growth hormone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor 11, solute carrier family 2 member 1, solute carrier family 2 member 3,sprouty homolog 1, versican, and keratin protein 8 in CCs obtained by biopsy were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cumulus cells were categorized on the basis of the fates of the COCs: expanded blastocyst, cleaved and arrested, and uncleaved. The GPC4 gene was overexpressed (P = 0.007) in CCs from oocytes that formed embryos compared with those that produced cleaved and arrested embryos. We concluded that individual culture reduced blastocyst production; however, biopsy did not affect embryo development. The profile of GPC4 expression can be used as a marker to distinguish COCs with potential for embryo development from those with limited developmental potential. PMID:26792377

  9. Biomedical wellness monitoring system based upon molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Whitney

    2012-06-01

    We wish to assist caretakers with a sensor monitoring systems for tracking the physiological changes of homealone patients. One goal is seeking biomarkers and modern imaging sensors like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), which has achieved visible imaging at the nano-scale range. Imaging techniques like STORM can be combined with a fluorescent functional marker in a system to capture the early transformation signs from wellness to illness. By exploiting both microscopic knowledge of genetic pre-disposition and the macroscopic influence of epigenetic factors we hope to target these changes remotely. We adopt dual spectral infrared imaging for blind source separation (BSS) to detect angiogenesis changes and use laser speckle imaging for hypertension blood flow monitoring. Our design hypothesis for the monitoring system is guided by the user-friendly, veteran-preferred "4-Non" principles (noninvasive, non-contact, non-tethered, non-stop-to-measure) and by the NIH's "4Ps" initiatives (predictive, personalized, preemptive, and participatory). We augment the potential storage system with the recent know-how of video Compressive Sampling (CSp) from surveillance cameras. In CSp only major changes are saved, which reduces the manpower cost of caretakers and medical analysts. This CSp algorithm is based on smart associative memory (AM) matrix storage: change features and detailed scenes are written by the outer-product and read by the inner product without the usual Harsh index for image searching. From this approach, we attempt to design an effective household monitoring approach to save healthcare costs and maintain the quality of life of seniors.

  10. Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, V.; Peckmann, J.; Seifert, R.; Wehrung, P.; Reitner, J.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-12-01

    The authors propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C{sub 20} isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C{sub 25} homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely {sup 13}C-depleted isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}108 to {minus}115.6% PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. The authors postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}88%) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H{sub 2}. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as cold seep microbialites rather than mere antigenic carbonates.

  11. Role of Vanadium in Cellular and Molecular Immunology: Association with Immune-Related Inflammation and Pharmacotoxicology Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tsave, Olga; Petanidis, Savvas; Kioseoglou, Efrosini; Yavropoulou, Maria P.; Yovos, John G.; Anestakis, Doxakis; Tsepa, Androniki; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, a diverse spectrum of vanadium compounds has arisen as anti-inflammatory therapeutic metallodrugs targeting various diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that select well-defined vanadium species are involved in many immune-driven molecular mechanisms that regulate and influence immune responses. In addition, advances in cell immunotherapy have relied on the use of metallodrugs to create a “safe,” highly regulated, environment for optimal control of immune response. Emerging findings include optimal regulation of B/T cell signaling and expression of immune suppressive or anti-inflammatory cytokines, critical for immune cell effector functions. Furthermore, in-depth perusals have explored NF-κB and Toll-like receptor signaling mechanisms in order to enhance adaptive immune responses and promote recruitment or conversion of inflammatory cells to immunodeficient tissues. Consequently, well-defined vanadium metallodrugs, poised to access and resensitize the immune microenvironment, interact with various biomolecular targets, such as B cells, T cells, interleukin markers, and transcription factors, thereby influencing and affecting immune signaling. A synthetically formulated and structure-based (bio)chemical reactivity account of vanadoforms emerges as a plausible strategy for designing drugs characterized by selectivity and specificity, with respect to the cellular molecular targets intimately linked to immune responses, thereby giving rise to a challenging field linked to the development of immune system vanadodrugs. PMID:27190573

  12. Molecular markers linked to the leaf rust resistance gene Lr24 in different wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Dedryver, F; Jubier, M F; Thouvenin, J; Goyeau, H

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to find molecular markers (RAPD and SCAR) for the wheat leaf rust resistance gene Lr24. A backcross line, RL 6064, possessing a single resistance gene to leaf rust (Lr24) and its recurrent parent 'Thatcher' were used to find RAPD markers linked to the Lr24 gene. Among 125 RAPD primers tested, only one (OP-H5) detected an additional band in the resistant line RL 6064. The genetic linkage of this molecular marker to Lr24 was tested on a segregating F2 population derived from a cross between the leaf rust resistant line RL 6064 and the susceptible line 'Chinese Spring'. This marker showed complete linkage to the Lr24 resistance gene. A more reliable and specific marker for this resistance gene was made by converting it into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR). The presence of a single amplification product allowed direct detection of the gene in the test tube by the addition of ethidium bromide. This SCAR marker linked to the leaf rust resistance gene Lr24 could be used easily in a practical breeding program. PMID:8890515

  13. Volatility of organic molecular markers used for source apportionment analysis: measurements and implications for atmospheric lifetime.

    PubMed

    May, Andrew A; Saleh, Rawad; Hennigan, Christopher J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-11-20

    Molecular markers are organic species used to define fingerprints for source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter. Traditionally, these markers have been assumed to be stable in the atmosphere. This work investigates the gas-particle partitioning of eight organic species used as molecular markers in receptor models for biomass burning (levoglucosan), motor vehicles (5α-cholestane, n-hexacosane, n-triacontane, 1,2-benz[a]anthracene, coronene), and meat cooking (cholesterol, oleic acid). Experiments were conducted using a thermodenuder to measure the evaporation of single component particles. The data were analyzed using the integrated volume method to determine saturation concentrations and enthalpies of vaporization for each compound. The results indicate that appreciable quantities (>10%) of most of these markers exist in the gas phase under typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, these species should be considered semivolatile. Predictions from a chemical kinetics model indicate that gas-particle partitioning has important effects on the atmospheric lifetime of these species. The atmospheric decay of semivolatile compounds proceeds much more rapidly than nonvolatile compounds because gas-phase oxidation induces evaporation of particle-phase material. Therefore, both gas-particle partitioning and chemical reactions need to be accounted for when semivolatile molecular markers are used for source apportionment studies. PMID:23013599

  14. [PSM2 and POLR2J gene families as molecular markers of the higher primate evolution].

    PubMed

    Shematorova, E K; Shpakovski?, D G; Shpakovski?, G V

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the molecular evolution of two gene families specific for primates: POLR2J of the transcription system and PMS2 of the MMR repair system. The appearance and improvement of the genetic structure in each of the families was shown to strongly correlate with the main stages of the higher primates biological evolution. Our results indicate that the PSM2 and POLR2J genes can serve as helpful and reliable molecular markers of anthropogenesis. PMID:21061629

  15. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanut cultivars and breeding lines revealed by highly informative SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts e...

  16. RiceCAP: Development of molecular markers associated with long grain milling yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. rice breeders are focused on developing new cultivars that have high yield and high milling quality. Using traditional breeding methods, it takes approximately ten years to develop a new cultivar. Development of molecular markers that are closely linked to traits of economic value will increase...

  17. Molecular markers highlight variation within and among Kentucky bluegrass varieties and accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing relationships among germplasm and cultivars of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is limited to field evaluations or a small set of molecular markers. To improve the efficiency of characterizing Kentucky bluegrass cultivars and germplasm, this study was designed to develop a larger set...

  18. Assessing Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) genetic diversity and population structure using RAPD and microsatellite molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two molecular marker systems, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellites, were used to evaluate population diversity and differentiation in four northern Nevada Bromus tectorum populations. We found 16 RAPD primers that yielded 165 strong repeatable bands. Of those bands, 60 (35.8%...

  19. QUANTITATION, DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT PRECISION OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work focuses on analysis of organic molecular markers in airborne particulate matter (PM) by Gas Chromatography/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (GC/IT MS). The particulate samples used in the method development were collected as PM10 in metropolitan Philadelphia during...

  20. A novel molecular marker for the study of Neotropical cichlid phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Fabrin, T M C; Gasques, L S; Prioli, S M A P; Prioli, A J

    2015-01-01

    The use of molecular markers has contributed to phylogeny and to the reconstruction of species' evolutionary history. Each region of the genome has different evolution rates, which may or may not identify phylogenetic signal at different levels. Therefore, it is important to assess new molecular markers that can be used for phylogenetic reconstruction. Regions that may be associated with species characteristics and are subject to selective pressure, such as opsin genes, which encode proteins related to the visual system and are widely expressed by Cichlidae family members, are interesting. Our aim was to identify a new nuclear molecular marker that could establish the phylogeny of Neotropical cichlids and is potentially correlated with the visual system. We used Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analysis to support the use of the nuclear opsin LWS gene in the phylogeny of eight Neotropical cichlid species. Their use concatenated to the mitochondrial gene COI was also tested. The LWS gene fragment comprised the exon 2-4 region, including the introns. The LWS gene provided good support for both analyses up to the genus level, distinguishing the studied species, and when concatenated to the COI gene, there was a good support up to the species level. Another benefit of utilizing this region, is that some polymorphisms are associated with changes in spectral properties of the LWS opsin protein, which constitutes the visual pigment that absorbs red light. Thus, utilization of this gene as a molecular marker to study the phylogeny of Neotropical cichlids is promising. PMID:26782460

  1. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  2. [Molecular markers: an important tool in the diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Frías-de León, María Guadalupe; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Martínez-Rivera, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has represented a difficult problem for management of patients with this infection due to its high rate of mortality, limited knowledge concerning its diagnosis, and therapeutic practice. The difficulty in management of patients with aspergillosis initiates with detection of the fungus in the specimens of immunosuppressed patients infected with Aspergillus fumigatus; in addition, difficulty exists in terms of the development of resistance to antifungals as a consequence of their indiscriminate use in prophylactic and therapeutic practice and to ignorance concerning the epidemiological data of aspergillosis. With the aim of resolving these problems, molecular markers is employed at present with specific and accurate results. However, in Mexico, the use of molecular markers has not yet been implemented in the routine of intrahospital laboratories; despite the fact that these molecular markers has been widely referred in the literature, it is necessary for it to validated and standardized to ensure that the results obtained in any laboratory would be reliable and comparable. In the present review, we present an update on the usefulness of molecular markers in accurate identification of A. fumigatus, detection of resistance to antifugal triazoles, and epidemiological studies for establishing the necessary measures for prevention and control of aspergillosis. PMID:25510798

  3. Cloning and characterization of resistance gene candidate sequences and molecular marker development in gerbera (Gerbera hybrida)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving disease resistance has become an important breeding objective in gerbera, one of the most important floricultural crops in the world. Development and application of molecular markers are expected to assist selection of gerberas with improved disease resistance. The availability of resistan...

  4. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundances of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10...

  5. Improving a Lecture-Size Molecular Model Set by Repurposing Used Whiteboard Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of an inexpensive model set from whiteboard markers and either HGS molecular model set or atoms made of wood is described. The model set is relatively easy to prepare and is sufficiently large to be suitable as an instructor set for use in lectures.

  6. New DNA Markers for High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunits in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-use quality is one of the priorities of modern wheat breeding. Even though quality is a complex trait, high molecular weight (HMW) glutenins play a major role in determining the bread making quality of wheat. DNA markers developed from the sequences of HMW glutenin genes were reported in several...

  7. An Educational Software for Simulating the Sample Size of Molecular Marker Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    We developed educational software to show graduate students how to plan molecular marker experiments. These computer simulations give the students feedback on the precision of their experiments. The objective of the software was to show students using a hands-on approach how: (1) environmental variation influences the range of the estimates of the…

  8. Proceedings of the second international symposium on molecular markers in horticulture Acta Horticulturae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Molecular Markers in Horticulture was held at the CH2M Hill Alumni Center at Oregon State University (OSU), Corvallis (Oregon, US), from July 29 to August 1st, 2009. This symposium was convened by a scientist at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) of...

  9. An Educational Software for Simulating the Sample Size of Molecular Marker Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    We developed educational software to show graduate students how to plan molecular marker experiments. These computer simulations give the students feedback on the precision of their experiments. The objective of the software was to show students using a hands-on approach how: (1) environmental variation influences the range of the estimates of the

  10. Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Ali Khan, Asif; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Qadir Ahmad, Muhammad; Hasan Abbasi, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  11. Molecular markers and cotton genetic improvement: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Malik, Waqas; Ashraf, Javaria; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Khan, Asif Ali; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Ahmad, Muhammad Qadir; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  12. A global analysis of molecular markers and phenotypic traits in local chicken breeds in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, C S; Chen, C F; Berthouly-Salazar, C; Chazara, O; Lee, Y P; Chang, C M; Chang, K H; Bed'Hom, B; Tixier-Boichard, M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular and phenotypic data have been combined to characterize the genetic diversity of six local chicken breeds maintained with a long-term conservation programme. Hua-Tung, Hsin-Yi, Ju-Chi and Quemoy originated from Taiwan, Shek-Ki is from South China, and Nagoya is from Japan. Molecular tools included 24 microsatellite markers, melanocortin 1 receptor (alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor) (MC1R), the LEI0258 marker located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and mitochondrial DNA. Performance was recorded on the same individuals for body weight, panting rate in summer and antibody response (antigens: Newcastle disease virus and sheep red blood cells). A multivariate method previously proposed for taxonomy was used to combine the different data sets. Melanocortin 1 receptor (alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor) and the MCW330 marker contributed the most to the first axis of the multiple coinertia analysis of molecular markers. Melanocortin 1 receptor (alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor) showed evidence of selection, probably related to its effect on feather colour. The MHC exhibited a large diversity, with 16 alleles of the LEI0258 marker. Immune response traits contributed the most to the principal component analysis of phenotypic data. Eight mitochondrial DNA haplotypes related to clades A, B, C and E were distributed across breeds and revealed an important contribution of Indian and European breeds to Ju-Chi, Quemoy and Hsin-Yi. Phenotypic data contributed less than molecular data to the combined analysis, and two markers, LEI0258 and LEI0228, contributed the most. The combined analysis could clearly discriminate all breeds, except Ju-Chi, which was similar to Quemoy for many criteria, except immune response. PMID:22404353

  13. Development of molecular genetic markers from a cDNA subtraction library of Frosty Pod inoculated cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been employing a candidate gene approach to identify molecular markers associated with disease resistance in Theobroma cacao. Candidate genes can be turned into molecular markers using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. As a novel approach to identifying genes associa...

  14. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers, and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research efforts on genetic mapping in Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa have been disconnected, utilizing separate mapping populations and different sets of molecular markers. Here we present public immortal mapping populations, molecular markers and linkage maps for rapid cycling B. rapa a...

  15. Intestinal microflora molecular markers of spleen-deficient rats and evaluation of traditional Chinese drugs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Zhuo; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Chun-Fu; Yang, Jing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Bo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To find a rapid and efficient analysis method of gastrointestinal microflora in Pi-deficient (spleen-deficient) rats and to evaluate traditional Chinese drugs. METHODS: Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) based assay was performed to examine changes of intestinal microflora in two Pi-deficienct animal models and to evaluate the efficacy of four traditional Chinese drugs as well as a probiotic recipe and another therapy in Pi-deficient rats. RESULTS: A molecular marker was identified for Pi-deficiency in rats. The pharmacodynamic evaluation system, including identified molecular markers (net integral area and abundance of DNA bands), Shannon’s index for diversity of intestinal microflora, and Sorenson’s pairwise similarity coefficient, was established. The four major clinical recipes of traditional Chinese drugs for Pi-deficiency in rats, especially at their medium dose (equivalence to the clinical dose), produced more pronounced recovery activities in Pi-deficient rats, while higher doses of these recipes did not show a better therapeutic effect but some toxic effects such as perturbation deterioration of intestinal microflora. CONCLUSION: Both fingerprint analysis and identified marker can show Pi-deficiency in rats and its difference after treatment. The identified molecular marker may be applied in screening for the active compounds both in relative traditional Chinese drugs and in pharmacodynamic study of Pi-deficiency in rats. PMID:19437561

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular markers for detecting Aegilops uniaristata chromosomes in a wheat background.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Li, Guangrong; Zhou, Jianping; Li, Genying; Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chengyan; Zhao, Zhendong; Yang, Zujun

    2014-09-01

    Aegilops uniaristata has many agronomically useful traits that can be used for wheat breeding. So far, a Triticum turgidum - Ae. uniaristata amphiploid and one set of Chinese Spring (CS) - Ae. uniaristata addition lines have been produced. To guide Ae. uniaristata chromatin transformation from these lines into cultivated wheat through chromosome engineering, reliable cytogenetic and molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes need to be developed. Standard C-banding shows that C-bands mainly exist in the centromeric regions of Ae. uniaristata but rarely at the distal ends. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using (GAA)8 as a probe showed that the hybridization signal of chromosomes 1N-7N are different, thus (GAA)8 can be used to identify all Ae. uniaristata chromosomes in wheat background simultaneously. Moreover, a total of 42 molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes were developed by screening expressed sequence tag - sequence tagged site (EST-STS), expressed sequence tag - simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR), and PCR-based landmark unique gene (PLUG) primers. The markers were subsequently localized using the CS - Ae. uniaristata addition lines and different wheat cultivars as controls. The cytogenetic and molecular markers developed herein will be helpful for screening and identifying wheat - Ae. uniaristata progeny. PMID:25486537

  17. Molecular marker development and genetic diversity exploration by RNA-seq in Platycodon grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jungsu; Kim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Je Min; Choi, Doil; Yeam, Inhwa

    2015-10-01

    Platycodon grandiflorum, generally known as the bellflower or balloon flower, is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae. Platycodon plants have been traditionally used as a medicinal crop in East Asia for their antiphlogistic, antitussive, and expectorant properties. Despite these practical uses, marker-assisted selection and molecular breeding in platycodons have lagged due to the lack of genetic information on this genus. In this study, we performed RNA-seq analysis of three platycodon accessions to develop molecular markers and explore genetic diversity. First, genic simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were retrieved and compared; dinucleotide motifs were the most abundant repeats (39%-40%) followed by trinucleotide (25%-31%), tetranucleotide (1.5%-1.9%), and pentanucleotide (0.3%-1.0%) repeats. The result of in silico SSR analysis, three SSR markers were detected and showed possibility to distinguish three platycodon accessions. After several filtering procedures, 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to design 40 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers. Twelve of these PCR-based markers were validated as highly polymorphic and utilized to investigate genetic diversity in 21 platycodon accessions collected from various regions of South Korea. Collectively, the 12 markers yielded 35 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.087 to 0.693, averaging 0.373 per locus. Since platycodon genetics have not been actively studied, the sequence information and the DNA markers generated from our research have the potential to contribute to further genetic improvements, genomic studies, and gene discovery in this genus. PMID:26501479

  18. Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

  19. Isolation, purification, and immunological activities of a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide from the Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lina; Luo, Xi; Tang, Qingjiu; Liu, Yanfang; Zhou, Shuai; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Jingsong

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immuno-enhancing activity, hot water extract of Ganoderma lucidum fruit bodies was separated by membrane ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography, and the immunological activities of fractions were assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. A novel polysaccharide (TB3-2-2) was successfully isolated and purified. TB3-2-2 is a homogeneous polysaccharide, with a relative molecular weight of 5.11 × 103 Da, identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and was composed of galactose and glucose in a molar ratio of 2:3 determined by high-performance anion exchange chromatography. TB3-2-2 had a carbohydrate content of 99%, as measured using the phenol-sulfuric acid method. Proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes and the expression level of interleukin-6 was significantly increased by TB3-2-2. Results indicate that the low-molecular-weight polysaccharide with immunological activity in G. lucidum is worthy of further research and development. PMID:23796222

  20. How do molecular marker patterns of BC change at increasing age of chars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. P. W.; Hilf, M.; Schmidt, M. W. I.

    2009-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is considered to be a relatively stable form of organic carbon. However, previous results have shown that the physical and chemical properties of BC can vary considerably with formation temperature. Thus, to understand the long-term carbon sink potential of BC there is increasing interest to gain more information about i) the conditions under which BC was formed, and ii) the resulting degradability of BC under natural conditions. In a first step, we synthesised chars from two different sources of biomass (chestnut wood, rice straw) under well-defined conditions as model substances to analyse the changes in their molecular structure at increasing formation temperature. Results are presented obtained from a set of laboratory produced char samples pyrolysed at increasing temperatures with a high resolution between 200 and 1000 °C. The chars were characterized by a molecular marker method for pyrogenic carbon quantification, which additionally provides information about the degree of condensation of chars. At temperatures between 275 and 500°C, which typically are observed during wildfires and thus are relevant for natural char formation, the molecular marker pattern of the chars remains almost constant. In a next step, we analysed changes in the molecular marker patterns of chars from a chronosequence, with BC deposited between 0 and 100 years ago. Based on the data obtained from the laboratory char series, we compare changes in the molecular marker patterns of the chars from the chronosequence over time. These results show if less condensed forms of BC are degraded preferentially and more condensed, aromatic backbone of BC becomes enriched in the soils with time of degradation. Our results provide information about the fate of BC in the environment, which has important implications in the context of carbon sequestration strategies.

  1. Mechanisms of immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Herman

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in establishing diagnostic markers of immunological tolerance applicable to efforts to minimize drug immunosuppression in transplantation and chronic immunological diseases. It is hoped that an understanding of the diverse mechanisms that can contribute to tolerance will guide efforts to establish diagnostic tolerance biomarkers. Not only would these be valuable for management of autoimmune diseases, transplants and allergies, but they might also guide efforts to override tolerance processes in cancer and vaccine development. Where tolerance is generated by deletion or inactivation of antigen reactive lymphocytes, it is unlikely that any long-term-valid blood biomarkers might be found. Where tolerance is mediated by active regulatory mechanisms, indicators that can be usefully measured may emerge, but these would likely show significant heterogeneity reflecting the diversity of active tolerance processes operating in different individuals. Given this, the most useful "kits" might be those "smart" enough to detect this diversity of tolerance players. PMID:26036868

  2. [Developing waxy wheat with backcrossing approach and molecular markers-assisted selection].

    PubMed

    Shu, Shou-Gui; Wang, Tao

    2006-05-01

    A series of Chinese Spring Wx loci near-isogenic lines were used to identify the specific bands of 6 STS markers and 1 CAPS marker of Wx genes. After optimizing PCR amplification and separation of PCR products, 3 co-dominant and dominant STS-markers were identified at the Wx-A1, Wx-D1 loci and Wx-B1 loci, respectively, which were used in molecular markers-assisted selection of waxy wheat in our breeding program. A cross between waxy wheat "98Y1441" and variety "Chuanyu 12" was made, and I2-KI dying method was used to select full waxy genotype individual from F2 seeds. The full waxy genotype individual was crossed with recurrent parent "Chuanyu 12". After 5 generations of self-cross and backcross, BC5F2 segregating population was obtained. Using the markers above, 8 Wx genotypes were developed from the BC5F2 population, which follows Mendelian segregation. Among them, there were 2 aabbdd waxy plants whose amylose content in the BC5F3 seeds were 1.81% and 0.82%, respectively. In addition, there were partial waxy plants (AAbbdd and aabbDD) whose amylose content in the BC5F3 seeds were 15.24 % and 17.57%, respectively. Most agricultural traits of the BC5F2 segregating population resembled those of the recurrent parent "Chuanyu 12", and superior to waxy wheat parent "98Y1441". This shows that backcross approach in combination with molecular markers-assisted selection of waxy genes is helpful to develop partial and full waxy wheat with good traits in the waxy wheat breeding program. PMID:16735236

  3. Use of molecular markers to compare Fusarium verticillioides pathogenic strains isolated from plants and humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Macêdo, D P C; Souza-Motta, C M; Oliveira, N T

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of agriculturally important crops, especially maize. It is considered one of the most important pathogens responsible for fumonisin contamination of food products, which causes severe, chronic, and acute intoxication in humans and animals. Moreover, it is recognized as a cause of localized infections in immunocompetent patients and disseminated infections among severely immunosuppressed patients. Several molecular tools have been used to analyze the intraspecific variability of fungi. The objective of this study was to use molecular markers to compare pathogenic isolates of F. verticillioides and isolates of the same species obtained from clinical samples of patients with Fusarium mycoses. The molecular markers that we used were inter-simple sequence repeat markers (primers GTG5 and GACA4), intron splice site primer (primer EI1), random amplified polymorphic DNA marker (primer OPW-6), and restriction fragment length polymorphism-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) from rDNA. From the data obtained, clusters were generated based on the UPGMA clustering method. The amplification products obtained using primers ITS4 and ITS5 and loci ITS1-5.8-ITS2 of the rDNA yielded fragments of approximately 600 bp for all the isolates. Digestion of the ITS region fragment using restriction enzymes such as EcoRI, DraI, BshI, AluI, HaeIII, HinfI, MspI, and PstI did not permit differentiation among pathogenic and clinical isolates. The inter-simple sequence repeat, intron splice site primer, and random amplified polymorphic DNA markers presented high genetic homogeneity among clinical isolates in contrast to the high variability found among the phytopathogenic isolates of F. verticillioides. PMID:24065642

  4. Identification of molecular markers of bipolar cells in the murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Douglas S; Ross, Sarah E; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M; Aach, John; Greenberg, Michael E; Cepko, Constance L

    2008-01-01

    Retinal bipolar neurons serve as relay interneurons that connect rod and cone photoreceptor cells to amacrine and ganglion cells. They exhibit diverse morphologies essential for correct routing of photoreceptor cell signals to specific postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cells. The development and physiology of these interneurons have not been completely defined molecularly. Despite previous identification of genes expressed in several bipolar cell subtypes, molecules that mark each bipolar cell type still await discovery. In this report, novel genetic markers of murine bipolar cells were found. Candidates were initially generated by using microarray analysis of single bipolar cells and mining of retinal serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) data. These candidates were subsequently tested for expression in bipolar cells by RNA in situ hybridization. Ten new molecular markers were identified, five of which are highly enriched in their expression in bipolar cells within the adult retina. Double-labeling experiments using probes for previously characterized subsets of bipolar cells were performed to identify the subtypes of bipolar cells that express the novel markers. Additionally, the expression of bipolar cell genes was analyzed in Bhlhb4 knockout retinas, in which rod bipolar cells degenerate postnatally, to delineate further the identity of bipolar cells in which novel markers are found. From the analysis of Bhlhb4 mutant retinas, cone bipolar cell gene expression appears to be relatively unaffected by the degeneration of rod bipolar cells. Identification of molecular markers for the various subtypes of bipolar cells will lead to greater insights into the development and function of these diverse interneurons. PMID:18260140

  5. Molecular marker development from transcript sequences and germplasm evaluation for cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Ze; Gallo, Maria; Tillman, Barry L; Rowland, Diane; Wang, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Molecular markers are important tools for genotyping in genetic studies and molecular breeding. The SSR and SNP are two commonly used marker systems developed from genomic or transcript sequences. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assemble and annotate the publicly available ESTs in Arachis and the in-house short reads, (2) develop and validate SSR and SNP markers, and (3) investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection using developed SSR markers. An NCBI EST dataset with 252,951 sequences and an in-house 454 RNAseq dataset with 288,701 sequences were assembled separately after trimming. Transcript sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that peanut is closer to cowpea and scarlet bean than to soybean, common bean and Medicago. From these two datasets, 6455 novel SSRs and 11,902 SNPs were identified. Of the discovered SSRs, 380 representing various SSR types were selected for PCR validation. The amplification rate was 89.2 %. Twenty-two (6.5 %) SSRs were polymorphic between at least one pair of four genotypes. Sanger sequencing of PCR products targeting 110 SNPs revealed 13 true SNPs between tetraploid genotypes and 193 homoeologous SNPs within genotypes. Eight out of the 22 polymorphic SSR markers were selected to evaluate the genetic diversity of Florida peanut breeding lines and the U.S. peanut mini core collection. This marker set demonstrated high discrimination power by displaying an average polymorphism information content value of 0.783, a combined probability of identity of 10(-11), and a combined power of exclusion of 0.99991. The structure analysis revealed four sub-populations among the peanut accessions and lines evaluated. The results of this study enriched the peanut genomic resources, provided over 6000 novel SSR markers and the credentials for true peanut SNP marker development, and demonstrated the power of newly developed SSR markers in genotyping peanut germplasm and breeding materials. PMID:26362763

  6. A note on the rationale for estimating genealogical coancestry from molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic relatedness or similarity between individuals is a key concept in population, quantitative and conservation genetics. When the pedigree of a population is available and assuming a founder population from which the genealogical records start, genetic relatedness between individuals can be estimated by the coancestry coefficient. If pedigree data is lacking or incomplete, estimation of the genetic similarity between individuals relies on molecular markers, using either molecular coancestry or molecular covariance. Some relationships between genealogical and molecular coancestries and covariances have already been described in the literature. Methods We show how the expected values of the empirical measures of similarity based on molecular marker data are functions of the genealogical coancestry. From these formulas, it is easy to derive estimators of genealogical coancestry from molecular data. We include variation of allelic frequencies in the estimators. Results The estimators are illustrated with simulated examples and with a real dataset from dairy cattle. In general, estimators are accurate and only slightly biased. From the real data set, estimators based on covariances are more compatible with genealogical coancestries than those based on molecular coancestries. A frequently used estimator based on the average of estimated coancestries produced inflated coancestries and numerical instability. The consequences of unknown gene frequencies in the founder population are briefly discussed, along with alternatives to overcome this limitation. Conclusions Estimators of genealogical coancestry based on molecular data are easy to derive. Estimators based on molecular covariance are more accurate than those based on identity by state. A correction considering the random distribution of allelic frequencies improves accuracy of these estimators, especially for populations with very strong drift. PMID:21749687

  7. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  8. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker. PMID:26535806

  9. Molecular cloning and development of RAPD-SCAR markers for Dimocarpus longan variety authentication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luquan; Fu, Shelly; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Zeng, Weimin; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-01-01

    As an edible fruit and source of traditional medicine, D. longan is grown in most areas of Southern China. Identification of D. longan cultivars by using molecular markers is important genetically. In this study, we cloned fragments from improved randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and developed stably diagnostic sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. The specific RAPD bands of D. longan cultivars from Guangxi, with size ranging from 500 bp to 900 bp were gel-purified, cloned and sequenced. Four clones named LY2-1, LY4-7, LY4-8 and LY5-2 were identified. In order to investigate whether the fragments were specific for the species, four pairs of SCAR primers were then designed. PCR amplifications were conducted to analyze 18 samples including different D. longan cultivars and other species. The specific bands with expected sizes were amplified in five D. longan samples but not in others. To identify and characterize the difference between D. longan and D. confinis, PCR amplifications were performed again. The specific bands with expected sizes were found in D. longan but not in D. confinis by SCAR markers LY2-1, LY4-7 and LY5-2, respectively. These results showed that our developed SCAR markers could be very useful as a specific D. longan variety authentication. Therefore, our study provides an effective and precise PCR-based diagnostic method and markers to identify D. longan species. PMID:24130961

  10. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case. PMID:23933412

  11. The prognostic value of molecular marker analysis in patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harpole, D H; Moore, M B; Herndon, J E; Aloia, T; D'Amico, T A; Sporn, T; Parr, A; Linoila, I; Allegra, C

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the prognostic value of a group of molecular tumor markers in a well-staged population of patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer. The original pretreatment paraffin-embedded endoscopic esophageal tumor biopsy material was obtained from 118 patients treated with concurrent cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + 45 Gy radiation followed by resection from 1986 until 1997 at the Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Three markers of possible platinum chemotherapy association [metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), P-glycoprotein (P-gp or multidrug resistance)] and one marker of possible 5-FU association [thymidylate synthase (TS)] were measured using immunohistochemistry. The median cancer-free survival was 25.0 months, with a significantly improved survival for the 38 patients who had a complete response (P < 0.001). High-level expression of GST-pi, P-gp, and TS were associated with a decreased survival. MT was not significant in this population. Multivariate analysis identified high-level expression in two of the platinum markers (GST-pi and P-gp) and the 5-FU marker TS as independent predictors of early recurrence and death. In conclusion, this investigation measured three possible markers associated with platinum and one possible marker associated with 5-FU in a cohort of esophageal cancer patients. Independent prognostic significance was observed, which suggests that it may be possible to predict which patients may benefit most from trimodality therapy. These data need to be reproduced in a prospective investigation. PMID:11297249

  12. Chromatographic measurement of molecular markers of sources of atmospheric aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, P R; Hansen, K J; Barkley, R M; Sievers, R E

    1996-06-01

    Various organic compounds in aerosol particles in ambient air near a coniferous forest fire in Boulder, Colorado were identified as molecular markers of wood burning and forest fires. Particle samples were collected by filtering small volumes of air. The samples were analysed using thermal desorption followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection, a highly sensitive analytical method. Several compounds unique to softwood combustion were identified in the samples. Additionally, a predominance of odd-carbon-numbered n-alkanes over the corresponding even-carbon-numbered n-alkanes was observed. This predominance is a well-documented molecular pattern indicative of epicutical waxes in plants. PMID:24194378

  13. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  14. Molecular markers linked to the blast resistance gene pi-z in oryza sativa for use in marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified DNA markers that cosegregate with the blast resistance gene Pi-z using microsatellite markers found in public databases and degenerate primer pairs based on the P-loop, nucleotide binding site and kinase domain motifs of previously cloned resistance genes. These markers are ploym...

  15. Evaluation of Pakistan wheat germplasms for stripe rust resistance using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sobia, Tabassum; Muhammad, Ashraf; Chen, XianMing

    2010-09-01

    Wheat production in Pakistan is seriously constrained due to rust diseases and stripe rust (yellow) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, which could limit yields. Thus development and cultivation of genetically diverse and resistant varieties is the most sustainable solution to overcome these diseases. The first objective of the present study was to evaluate 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars that have been grown over the past 60 years. These cultivars were inoculated at the seedling stage with two virulent stripe rust isolates from the United States and two from Pakistan. None of the wheat cultivars were resistant to all tested stripe rust isolates, and 16% of cultivars were susceptible to the four isolates at the seedling stage. The data indicated that none of the Pakistan wheat cultivars contained either Yr5 or Yr15 genes that were considered to be effective against most P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates from around the world. Several Pakistan wheat cultivars may have gene Yr10, which is effective against isolate PST-127 but ineffective against PST-116. It is also possible that these cultivars may have other previously unidentified genes or gene combinations. The second objective was to evaluate the 100 Pakistan wheat cultivars for stripe rust resistance during natural epidemics in Pakistan and Washington State, USA. It was found that a higher frequency of resistance was present under field conditions compared with greenhouse conditions. Thirty genotypes (30% of germplasms) were found to have a potentially high temperature adult plant (HTAP) resistance. The third objective was to determine the genetic diversity in Pakistan wheat germplasms using molecular markers. This study was based on DNA fingerprinting using resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) marker analysis. The highest polymorphism detected with RGAP primer pairs was 40%, 50% and 57% with a mean polymorphism of 36%. A total of 22 RGAP markers were obtained in this study. RGAP, simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers were used to determine the presence and absence of some important stripe rust resistance genes, such as Yr5, Yr8, Yr9, Yr15 and Yr18. Of the 60 cultivars analyzed, 17% of cultivars showed a RGAP marker band for Yr9 and 12% of cultivars exhibited the Yr18 marker band. No marker band was detected for Yr5, Yr8 and Yr15, indicating a likely absence of these genes in the tested Pakistan wheat cultivars. Cluster analysis based on molecular and stripe rust reaction data is useful in identifying considerable genetic diversity among Pakistan wheat cultivars. The resistant germplasms identified with 22 RGAP markers and from the resistance evaluations should be useful in developing new wheat cultivars with stripe rust resistance. PMID:21104373

  16. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  17. Trend of different molecular markers in the last decades for studying human migrations.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-02-10

    Anatomically modern humans are known to have widely migrated throughout history. Different scientific evidences suggest that the entire human population descended from just several thousand African migrants. About 85,000 years ago, the first wave of human migration was out of Africa, that followed the coasts through the Middle East, into Southern Asia via Sri Lanka, and in due course around Indonesia and into Australia. Another wave of migration between 40,000 and 12,000 years ago brought humans northward into Europe. However, the frozen north limited human expansion in Europe, and created a land bridge, "Bering land bridge", connecting Asia with North America about 25,000 years ago. Although fossil data give the most direct information about our past, it has certain anomalies. So, molecular archeologists are now using different molecular markers to trace the "most recent common ancestor" and also the migration pattern of modern humans. In this study, we have studied the trend of molecular markers and also the methodologies implemented in the last decades (2003-2014). From our observation, we can say that D-loop region of mtDNA and Y chromosome based markers are predominant. Nevertheless, mtDNA, especially the D-loop region, has some unique features, which makes it a more effective marker for tracing prehistoric footprints of modern human populations. Although, natural selection should also be taken into account in studying mtDNA based human migration. As per technology is concerned, Sanger sequencing is the major technique that is being used in almost all studies. But, the emergence of different cost-effective-and-easy-to-handle NGS platforms has increased its popularity over Sanger sequencing in studying human migration. PMID:25510397

  18. Morphological versus molecular markers to describe variability in Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa (Cupressaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Douaihy, Bouchra; Sobierajska, Karolina; Jasińska, Anna Katarzyna; Boratyńska, Krystyna; Ok, Tolga; Romo, Angel; Machon, Nathalie; Didukh, Yakiv; Bou Dagher-Kharrat, Magda; Boratyński, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Juniperus excelsa M.-Bieb. is a major forest element in the mountains of the eastern part of Mediterranean and sub-Mediterranean regions. This study comprises the first morphological investigation covering a large part of the geographical range of J. excelsa and aims to verify the congruency between the morphological results and molecular results of a previous study. Methodology We studied 14 populations sampled from Greece, Cyprus, Ukraine, Turkey and Lebanon, 11 of which have previously been investigated using molecular markers. Three hundred and ninety-four individuals of J. excelsa were examined using nine biometric features characterizing cones, seeds and shoots, and eight derived ratios. Statistical analyses were conducted in order to evaluate the intra- and inter-population morphological variability. Principal results The level of intra-population variability observed did not show any geographical trends. The total variation mostly depended on the ratios of cone diameter/seed width and seed width/seed length. The discrimination analysis, the Ward agglomeration method and barrier analysis results showed a separation of the sampled populations into three main clusters. These results confirmed, in part, the geographical differentiation revealed by molecular markers with a lower level of differentiation and a less clear geographical pattern. The most differentiated populations using both markers corresponded to old, isolated populations in the high altitudes of Lebanon (>2000 m). Moreover, a separation of the northern Turkish population from the southern Turkish populations was observed using both markers. Conclusions Morphological variation together with genetic and biogeographic studies make an effective tool for detecting relict plant populations and also populations subjected to more intensive selection. PMID:22822421

  19. Transcriptome Analysis and Development of SSR Molecular Markers in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Meiling; Hou, Junling; Qing, Mei; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is an important traditional Chinese medicine with clinical and industrial applications. Genetic resources of licorice are insufficient for analysis of molecular biology and genetic functions; as such, transcriptome sequencing must be conducted for functional characterization and development of molecular markers. In this study, transcriptome sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing platform generated a total of 5.41 Gb clean data. De novo assembly yielded a total of 46,641 unigenes. Comparison analysis using BLAST showed that the annotations of 29,614 unigenes were conserved. Further study revealed 773 genes related to biosynthesis of secondary metabolites of licorice, 40 genes involved in biosynthesis of the terpenoid backbone, and 16 genes associated with biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid. Analysis of unigenes larger than 1 Kb with a length of 11,702 nt presented 7,032 simple sequence repeats (SSR). Sixty-four of 69 randomly designed and synthesized SSR pairs were successfully amplified, 33 pairs of primers were polymorphism in in Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. This study not only presents the molecular biology data of licorice but also provides a basis for genetic diversity research and molecular marker-assisted breeding of licorice. PMID:26571372

  20. Progesterone 5β-reductase genes of the Brassicaceae family as function-associated molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Munkert, J; Costa, C; Budeanu, O; Petersen, J; Bertolucci, S; Fischer, G; Müller-Uri, F; Kreis, W

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to define progesterone 5β-reductases (P5βR, EC 1.3.99.6, enone 1,4-reductases) as function-associated molecular markers at the plant family level. Therefore cDNAs were isolated from 25 Brassicaceae species, including two species, Erysimum crepidifolium and Draba aizoides, known to produce cardiac glycosides. The sequences were used in a molecular phylogeny study. The cladogram created is congruent to the existing molecular analyses. Recombinant His-tagged forms of the P5βR cDNAs from Aethionema grandiflorum, Draba aizoides, Nasturtium officinale, Raphanus sativus and Sisymbrium officinale were expressed in E. coli. Enone 1,4-reductase activity was demonstrated in vitro using progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates. Evidence is provided that functional P5βRs are ubiquitous in the Brassicaceae. The recombinant P5βR enzymes showed different substrate preferences towards progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Sequence comparison of the catalytic pocket of the P5βR enzymes and homology modelling using Digitalis lanata P5βR (PDB ID: 2V6G) as template highlighted the importance of the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket for substrate discrimination. It is concluded that P5βR genes or P5βR proteins can be used as valuable function-associated molecular markers to infer taxonomic relationship and evolutionary diversification from a metabolic/catalytic perspective. PMID:26108256

  1. Seasonal abundance of organic molecular markers in urban particulate matter from Philadelphia, PA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; McDow, Stephen R.; Tollerud, David J.; Mazurek, Monica A.

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundance of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10 samples were collected seasonally in 2000 for four 2-week periods (January, April, August, and October). The North Broad Street site is within a heavily populated location in Philadelphia, PA. A suite of 52 individual organic marker compounds was monitored in the PM10 samples. Molecular markers, homologous compound series, and nonpolar and polar organic compounds were detected at ng m -3 ambient concentrations using gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/IT MS). Organic diacids (C 3-C 9) and monoacids (C 10-C 30) had seasonal mass concentrations ranging from 91.0 (winter) to 261.8 ng m -3 (summer). Total n-alkanes (C 25-C 33) ranged from 25.9 (spring) to 49.5 ng m -3 (fall), total PAHs from 2.1 ng m -3 (summer) to 4.1 ng m -3 (winter), and total hopanes ranged from 4.0 ng m -3 (winter) to 7.4 ng m -3 (fall). The molecular marker ambient mass concentrations were normalized by the annual average mass of PM10 elemental carbon (EC) for the central Philadelphia area. The ambient mass concentrations to EC and OC ratios ranged from 2.6×10 -3 for total PAHs to EC to 115.3×10 -3 for total n-alkanoic acids to EC, 0.5×10 -3 for total PAHs to OC to 23.8×10 -3 for total n-alkanoic acids to OC. Ambient concentrations of individual markers are similar to other reported levels for metropolitan Los Angeles, CA and Atlanta, GA. Seasonal and daily variations of marker compounds are consistent with motor vehicle exhaust, particularly in winter. Summer concentration patterns indicate the importance of secondary organic aerosol to the PM10 ambient mass.

  2. Prospective molecular markers for the identification of illegally traded angelsharks (Squatina) and dolphin (Sotalia guianensis).

    PubMed

    Falco, L H O; Furtado-Neto, M A A; Maggioni, R; Faria, V V

    2014-01-01

    Endangered angelsharks and a protected dolphin species are illegally traded in Brazil. In this study, we determined prospective molecular markers for detecting these species in the trade of angelshark carcasses and 'dolphin' eyeball amulets. We compiled publicly available as well as new and unpublished cytochrome b (cyt b) DNA sequences for species involved in these trades. These sequences were digested in silico using restriction enzymes. We then described prospective polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers for distinguishing between protected species and the species whose trade was legally allowed in these two trade groups. The prospective marker for identifying angelshark carcasses consists of cyt b PCR and digestion by BstXI, BsgI, BspMI, BsrDI, and HaeII restriction enzymes. The prospective marker for identifying eyeball amulets consists of cyt b PCR and digestion by ApoI, BtsI, HindII, BsaAI, BplI, and SspI restriction enzymes. This is the first study to deposit in GenBank cyt b sequences for the angelshark species Squatina argentina, Squatina guggenheim, and Squatina occulta. Moreover, the S. argentina haplotype is the first DNA sequence for this species deposited in GenBank. PMID:25501182

  3. Prediction of Genetic Values of Quantitative Traits in Plant Breeding Using Pedigree and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Crossa, José; Campos, Gustavo de los; Pérez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; Burgueño, Juan; Araus, José Luis; Makumbi, Dan; Singh, Ravi P.; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Yan, Jianbing; Arief, Vivi; Banziger, Marianne; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    The availability of dense molecular markers has made possible the use of genomic selection (GS) for plant breeding. However, the evaluation of models for GS in real plant populations is very limited. This article evaluates the performance of parametric and semiparametric models for GS using wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays) data in which different traits were measured in several environmental conditions. The findings, based on extensive cross-validations, indicate that models including marker information had higher predictive ability than pedigree-based models. In the wheat data set, and relative to a pedigree model, gains in predictive ability due to inclusion of markers ranged from 7.7 to 35.7%. Correlation between observed and predictive values in the maize data set achieved values up to 0.79. Estimates of marker effects were different across environmental conditions, indicating that genotype × environment interaction is an important component of genetic variability. These results indicate that GS in plant breeding can be an effective strategy for selecting among lines whose phenotypes have yet to be observed. PMID:20813882

  4. Recent trends and perspectives of molecular markers against fungal diseases in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Goutam, Umesh; Kukreja, Sarvjeet; Yadav, Rakesh; Salaria, Neha; Thakur, Kajal; Goyal, Aakash K.

    2015-01-01

    Wheat accounts for 19% of the total production of major cereal crops in the world. In view of ever increasing population and demand for global food production, there is an imperative need of 40–60% increase in wheat production to meet the requirement of developing world in coming 40 years. However, both biotic and abiotic stresses are major hurdles for attaining the goal. Among the most important diseases in wheat, fungal diseases pose serious threat for widening the gap between actual and attainable yield. Fungal disease management, mainly, depends on the pathogen detection, genetic and pathological variability in population, development of resistant cultivars and deployment of effective resistant genes in different epidemiological regions. Wheat protection and breeding of resistant cultivars using conventional methods are time-consuming, intricate and slow processes. Molecular markers offer an excellent alternative in development of improved disease resistant cultivars that would lead to increase in crop yield. They are employed for tagging the important disease resistance genes and provide valuable assistance in increasing selection efficiency for valuable traits via marker assisted selection (MAS). Plant breeding strategies with known molecular markers for resistance and functional genomics enable a breeder for developing resistant cultivars of wheat against different fungal diseases. PMID:26379639

  5. Recent trends and perspectives of molecular markers against fungal diseases in wheat.

    PubMed

    Goutam, Umesh; Kukreja, Sarvjeet; Yadav, Rakesh; Salaria, Neha; Thakur, Kajal; Goyal, Aakash K

    2015-01-01

    Wheat accounts for 19% of the total production of major cereal crops in the world. In view of ever increasing population and demand for global food production, there is an imperative need of 40-60% increase in wheat production to meet the requirement of developing world in coming 40 years. However, both biotic and abiotic stresses are major hurdles for attaining the goal. Among the most important diseases in wheat, fungal diseases pose serious threat for widening the gap between actual and attainable yield. Fungal disease management, mainly, depends on the pathogen detection, genetic and pathological variability in population, development of resistant cultivars and deployment of effective resistant genes in different epidemiological regions. Wheat protection and breeding of resistant cultivars using conventional methods are time-consuming, intricate and slow processes. Molecular markers offer an excellent alternative in development of improved disease resistant cultivars that would lead to increase in crop yield. They are employed for tagging the important disease resistance genes and provide valuable assistance in increasing selection efficiency for valuable traits via marker assisted selection (MAS). Plant breeding strategies with known molecular markers for resistance and functional genomics enable a breeder for developing resistant cultivars of wheat against different fungal diseases. PMID:26379639

  6. Inhibitory neurons in the anterior piriform cortex of the mouse: classification using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Bekkers, John M

    2010-05-15

    The primary olfactory cortex (or piriform cortex, PC) is attracting increasing attention as a model system for the study of cortical sensory processing, yet little is known about inhibitory neurons in the PC. Here we provide the first systematic classification of GABA-releasing interneurons in the anterior PC of mice, based on the expression of molecular markers. Our experiments used GAD67-GFP transgenic mice, in which gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cells are labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first confirmed, using paired whole-cell recordings, that GFP(+) neurons in the anterior PC of GAD67-GFP mice are functionally GABAergic. Next, we performed immunolabeling of GFP(+) cells to quantify their expression of every possible pairwise combination of seven molecular markers: calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, cholecystokinin, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide. We found that six main categories of interneurons could be clearly distinguished in the anterior PC, based on the size and laminar location of their somata, intensity of GFP fluorescence, patterns of axonal projections, and expression of one or more of the seven markers. A number of rarer categories of interneurons could also be identified. These data provide a road map for further work that examines the functional properties of the six main classes of interneurons. Together, this information elucidates the cellular architecture of the PC and provides clues about the roles of GABAergic interneurons in olfactory processing. PMID:20235162

  7. TRACKING FECAL CONTAMINATION WITH BACTEROIDALES MOLECULAR MARKERS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF FECAL CONTAMINATION IN THE TILLAMOOK BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although amplification of source-specific molecular markers from Bacteroidales fecal bacteria can identify several different kinds of fecal contamination in water, it remains unclear how this technique relates to fecal indicator measurements in natural waters. The objectives of t...

  8. Novel molecular markers for the detection of methanogens and phylogenetic analyses of methanogenic communities

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Pyzik, Adam; Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Sobczak, Adam; Szczesny, Pawel; Lipinski, Leszek; Bartosik, Dariusz; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic Archaea produce approximately one billion tons of methane annually, but their biology remains largely unknown. This is partially due to the large phylogenetic and phenotypic diversity of this group of organisms, which inhabit various anoxic environments including peatlands, freshwater sediments, landfills, anaerobic digesters and the intestinal tracts of ruminants. Research is also hampered by the inability to cultivate methanogenic Archaea. Therefore, biodiversity studies have relied on the use of 16S rRNA and mcrA [encoding the α subunit of the methyl coenzyme M (methyl-CoM) reductase] genes as molecular markers for the detection and phylogenetic analysis of methanogens. Here, we describe four novel molecular markers that should prove useful in the detailed analysis of methanogenic consortia, with a special focus on methylotrophic methanogens. We have developed and validated sets of degenerate PCR primers for the amplification of genes encoding key enzymes involved in methanogenesis: mcrB and mcrG (encoding β and γ subunits of the methyl-CoM reductase, involved in the conversion of methyl-CoM to methane), mtaB (encoding methanol-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide Co-methyltransferase, catalyzing the conversion of methanol to methyl-CoM) and mtbA (encoding methylated [methylamine-specific corrinoid protein]:coenzyme M methyltransferase, involved in the conversion of mono-, di- and trimethylamine into methyl-CoM). The sensitivity of these primers was verified by high-throughput sequencing of PCR products amplified from DNA isolated from microorganisms present in anaerobic digesters. The selectivity of the markers was analyzed using phylogenetic methods. Our results indicate that the selected markers and the PCR primer sets can be used as specific tools for in-depth diversity analyses of methanogenic consortia. PMID:26217325

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid tau levels are a marker for molecular subtype in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Karch, André; Hermann, Peter; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Arora, Amandeep; Zafar, Saima; Llorens, Franc; Müller-Heine, Annika; Zerr, Inga

    2015-05-01

    The molecular subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is an important prognostic marker for patient survival. However, subtype determination is not possible during lifetime. Because the rate of disease progression is associated with the molecular subtype, this study aimed at investigating if total tau, a marker of neuronal death, allows premortem diagnosis of molecular subtype when codon 129 genotype is known. Two hundred ninety-six sCJD patients were tested for their cerebrospinal fluid total tau level at the time of diagnosis and were investigated for their sCJD subtype postmortem. There was a significant association between tau levels and the prion protein type in patients with codon 129 MM (p < 0.001), MV (p = 0.004), and VV (p = 0.001) genotype. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed values of area under the curve of 0.76-0.80 for the different genotypes indicating a good diagnostic validity of the test. Total tau can be used as a diagnostic test for the assessment of prion protein type when codon 129 genotype is known. It provides valuable information for physicians and next of kin about the further course of disease. PMID:25749129

  10. [Molecular Prognostic Markers and Their Clinical Relevance in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Navrkalová, V; Kantorová, B; Jarošová, M; Pospíšilová, Š

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in Western countries affecting particularly elderly adults. Despite the constantly improving therapy options, chronic lymphocytic leukemia is still an incurable disease owing to considerable clinical and bio-logical heterogeneity. Pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia is not fully understood; however, aberrant antigenic stimulation, apoptosis deregulation and microenvironmental interactions play a crucial role in disease development. The most important molecular prognostic markers with clinical relevance include mutation status of heavychain immunoglobulin genes (IGHV), presence of cytogenetic aberrations and TP53 and ATM gene mutations. Recent implementation of next generation sequencing technologies has enabled more accurate analysis of both wellestablished and novel potential prognostic markers. The most relevant candidates are mutations in SF3B1, NOTCH1 and BIRC3 genes, which are now intensively studied with respect to their clinical importance. The other examined molecular mechanisms of chronic lympho-cytic leukemia pathogenesis include deregulation of B cell receptor signalization and abnormal regulation of gene expression by microRNA. The precise characterization of molecular abnormalities improves the risk stratification of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, which could possibly benefit from new treatment approaches. PMID:26489496

  11. Molecular marker approaches for tracking redox damage and protection in keratins.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jolon M; Cornellison, Charisa D; Grosvenor, Anita J; Clerens, Stefan; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of reductive and oxidative (redox) protein damage in protein-based materials including, hair, wool, nails, and skin. Light-induced damage to protein-based materials is of particular concern because of its impact on age-related degradation and product life spans. Consequently, cosmetic applications frequently target hair and skin restoration, where the integrity of the constituent filamentous proteins is essential to a healthy appearance. The keratins constitute an important subset of the structural proteins within skin, hair, and wool. We will introduce a means to assess damage to this important group of proteins at the molecular level, utilizing proteomic techniques to track the formation or degradation of sensitive peptides within intermediate filament proteins. The degradation of three molecular markers of redox damage, the peptides SFGYR, LASDDFR, and DVEEWYIR, along with the formation of their oxidized products, is demonstrated after exposure to ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, and blue light. The method is shown to be suitable for evaluating the protective effect of treatments, as lower levels of oxidative markers were observed after the application of a protective fiber treatment. Molecular-level redox tracking will allow more targeted design and evaluation of protection and repair treatments for protein systems. PMID:24602820

  12. Determination of specific molecular markers of biomass burning in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgeorg, Torben; Schüpbach, Simon; Kehrwald, Natalie; McWethy, David; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Fire influences regional to global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Molecular markers of biomass burning archived in lake sediments are becoming increasingly important in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and may help determine interactions between climate and fire activity. One group of these molecular markers is the monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan. Several aerosol studies and recent ice core research use these compounds as a marker for biomass burning, but studies from lake sediment cores are rare. Previous sediment methods used gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and required derivatization of samples. Here, we present a high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry method to allow separation and detection of the three monosaccharide anhydrides in lake sediments with implications for reconstructing past biomass burning events. We validated the method by quantifying levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in selected sediment core samples from Lake Kirkpatrick, New Zealand. The freeze-dried, milled and homogenized sediment samples were first extracted with methanol by pressurized solvent extraction, pre-concentrated and finally separated and analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry. We compared these isomers with macroscopic charcoal concentrations, as charcoal is a well-known proxy for biomass burning. In addition, we applied the method to a sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala to prove the suitability of these markers for reconstructing biomass burning history over the entire Holocene. In the Lake Kirkpatrick samples, levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan concentrations significantly correlate with macroscopic charcoal concentrations. The three isomers are present in samples without any macroscopic charcoal, and may reflect the presence of microscopic charcoal. Levoglucosan/mannosan and levoglucosan/(mannosan+galactosan) ratios differ between samples with high macroscopic charcoal concentrations and samples without any charcoal. These ratios may help determine not only when fires occurred, but also past changes in the primary burned vegetation. However, the possibility that these isomer ratios help differentiate changes in burned vegetation needs further evaluation. The preliminary results of the Lake Petén Itzá samples demonstrate the occurrence of all three molecular markers in the entire core, covering the past approximately 10,000 years. The three monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan may be an additional tool for reconstructing past fire events over decadal to millennial time scales in sediment cores.

  13. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26030936

  14. TMED6-COG8 is a novel molecular marker of TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongcan; Rao, Qiu; Xia, Qiuyuan; Shi, Shanshan; Shi, Qunli; Ma, Henghui; Lu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma is a highly aggressive malignancy which often occurs primarily in children and young adults. The pathognomonic molecular lesion in this subtype is a translocation event involving the TFE3 transcription factor at chromosome Xp11.2. Hence, the pathological diagnosis of an Xp11.2 translocation RCC is based upon morphology, TFE3 immunohistochemistry, or genetic analyses. However, due to the false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 IHC and expensive for TFE3 break-apart FISH assay, additional molecular markers are necessary to help provide early diagnose and individualization treatment. Owing to recent advances in microarray and RNA-Seq, Pflueger et al. have discovered that TMED6-COG8 is dramatically increased in TFE3 translocation RCCs, compared with clear cell RCCs and papillary RCCs, implying that TMED6-COG8 might be a new molecular tumor marker of TFE3 translocation RCCs. To extend this observation, we firstly validated the TMED6-COG8 expression level by qRT-PCR in RCCs including Xp11.2 translocation RCCs (n=5), clear cell RCCs (n=7) and papillary RCCs (n=5). Then, we also examined the expression level of TMED6-COG8 chimera in Xp11.2 translocation alveolar soft part sarcoma. We found that TMED6-COG8 chimera expression level was higher in Xp11.2 translocation RCCs than in ASPS (P<0.05). What's more, the expression levels of TMED6-COG8 chimera in esophagus cancers (n=32), gastric cancers (n=11), colorectal cancers (n=12), hepatocellular carcinomas (n=10) and non-small-cell lung cancers (n=12) were assessed. Unexpectedly, TMED6-COG8 chimera was decreased in these five human types. Therefore, our observations from this study indicated that TMED6-COG8 chimera might act as a novel diagnostic marker in Xp11.2 translocation RCCs. PMID:26045774

  15. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients.

  16. Oral keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells: specific markers, molecular signaling pathways and potential uses.

    PubMed

    Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Caruntu, Constantin; Tanase, Cristiana; Battino, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Oral keratinocyte stem cells reside in the basal layers of the oral epithelium, representing a minor population of cells with a great potential to self-renew and proliferate over the course of their lifetime. As a result of the potential uses of oral keratinocyte stem cells in regenerative medicine and the key roles they play in tissue homeostasis, inflammatory conditions, wound healing and tumor initiation and progression, intense scientific efforts are currently being undertaken to identify, separate and reprogram these cells. Although currently there is no specific marker that can characterize and isolate oral keratinocyte stem cells, several suggestions have been made. Thus, different stem/progenitor-cell subpopulations have been categorized based on combinations of positive and/or negative membrane-surface markers, which include integrins, clusters of differentiation and cytokeratins. Important advances have also been made in understanding the molecular pathways that govern processes such as self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation, wound healing and programmed cell death. A thorough understanding of stem-cell biology and the molecular players that govern cellular fate is paramount in the quest for using stem-cell-derived therapies in the treatment of various oral pathologies. The current review focuses on recent advances in understanding the molecular signaling pathways coordinating the behavior of these cells and in identifying suitable markers used for their isolation and characterization. Special emphasis will also be placed on the roles played by oral keratinocyte stem and progenitor cells in normal and diseased oral tissues and on their potential uses in the fields of general medicine and dentistry. PMID:26252402

  17. Identification of essentially derived varieties with molecular markers: an approach based on statistical test theory and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Heckenberger, M; Bohn, M; Frisch, M; Maurer, H P; Melchinger, A E

    2005-08-01

    Genetic similarities (GS) based on molecular markers have been proposed as a tool for identification of essentially derived varieties (EDVs). Nevertheless, scientifically reliable criteria for discrimination of EDVs and independently derived varieties with GS estimates are scanty, and implementation into practical breeding has not yet taken place. Our objectives were to (1) assess the influence of chromosome number and length, marker density, and distribution, as well as the degree of polymorphism between the parental inbreds on the distribution of GS between parental inbreds and their progenies [GS(P1,O)] derived from F2 and different backcross populations and (2) evaluate these factors with regard to the power for distinguishing F2- versus BC1- and BC1- versus BC2-derived lines with molecular markers. We developed an approach based on statistical test theory for the identification of EDVs with molecular markers. Standard deviations and overlaps of distributions of GS(P1,O) of F2-, BC1-, and BC2-derived lines were smaller with (1) increasing chromosome number and length, (2) increasing marker density, and (3) uniformly instead of randomly distributed markers, approaching a lower boundary determined by the genetic parameters. The degree of polymorphism between the parental inbreds influenced the power only if the remaining number of polymorphic markers was low. Furthermore, suggestions are made for (1) determining the number of markers required to ascertain a given power and (2) EDV identification procedures. PMID:15918007

  18. [Molecular-biological markers as prognostic factors in breast cancer of I-IIA stage].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E V; Zagrekova, E I; Ermilova, V D; Turbin, A D; Petrovichev, N N; Vysotskaia, I V; Dbar, Zh N; Pashchenko, N V; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Lichinitser, M R

    2003-01-01

    The study of molecular-biological markers for prediction of recurrence-free survival in breast cancer stage I-IIA demonstrates that high expression of thymidilate synthetase and high maximal density of microvessels are prognostically effective and that the prognosis is influenced by expression of both Bcl-2 and Bax. Low recurrence-free survival was observed in Bcl-2-/Bax patients (31%, median 44 months) while such survival was high in Bcl-2+/Bax patients (86%, median was not reached). The findings can be used for prognostication of a breast cancer clinical course. PMID:12879604

  19. Molecular markers for rust and pyricularia leaf spot disease resistance in pearl millet.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R N; Wilson, J P; Hanna, W W; Ozias-Akins, P

    1998-03-01

    Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R.Br.] is a warm-season grass used for food, feed, fodder and forage, primarily in countries of Africa and India but grown around the world. The two most-destructive diseases to pearl millet in the United States are rust (caused by Puccinia substriata var. indica) and pyricularia leaf spot (caused by Pyricularia grisea). Genes for disease resistance to both pathogens have been transferred into agronomically acceptable forage and grain cultivars. A study was undertaken to identify molecular markers for three rust loci and one pyricularia resistance locus. Three segregating populations were screened for RAPDs using random decamer primers and for RFLPs using a core set of probes detecting single-copy markers on the pearl millet map. The rust resistance gene Rr 1 from the pearl millet subspecies P. glaucum ssp. monodii was linked 8.5 cM from the RAPD OP-G8350. The linkage of two RFLP markers, Xpsm108 (15.5 cM) and Xpsm174 (17.7 cM), placed the Rr 1 gene on linkage-group 3 of the pearl millet map. Rust resistance genes from both Tift 89D2 and ICMP 83506 were placed on linkage-group 4 by determining genetic linkage to the RFLP marker Xpsm716 (4.9 and 0.0 cM, respectively). Resistance in ICMP 83506 was also linked to the RFLP marker Xpsm306 (10.0 cM), while resistance in Tift 89D2 was linked to RAPD markers OP-K19350 (8.8 cM) and OP-O8350 (19.6 cM). Fragments from OP-K19 and OP-O8 in the ICMP 83506 population, and Xpsm306 in the Tift 89D2 population, were monomorphic. Only one RAPD marker (OP-D11700, 5.6 cM) was linked to pyricularia leaf spot resistance. Attempts to detect polymorphisms with rice RFLP probes linked to rice blast resistance (Pyricularia oryzae; syn=P. grisea) were unsuccessful. PMID:24710880

  20. Evaluation of immunological, parasitological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection before and after chemotherapy treatment with praziquantel in experimentally infected Nectomys squamipes.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Rosana; Gonçalves, Margareth Maria Lessa; da Costa Neto, Sócrates Fraga; da Costa, Maristella Matos; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Peralta, José Mauro

    2011-08-25

    In low endemicity areas of schistosomiasis, the recommended diagnostic method of coprological examination results in an underestimation of infection cases. Alternative diagnostic methods have been developed, such as immunodiagnostic and molecular techniques. In this study we evaluated three methods used in the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection: parasitological (Kato-Katz), immunological (ELISA) and molecular (real time PCR), and also investigated the sensitivity of each technique in the cure determination after treatment with praziquantel using the water rat Nectomys squamipes, a natural reservoir for S. mansoni, as an experimental model. Two infection laboratory experiments were carried out. The first experiment aimed to observe the evolution of the immunological response in the first moments after infection and in the first months after treatment. The second experiment aimed to compare the efficacy of the three diagnostic techniques after infection and after treatment over a more extended time period. In the first experiment, 44% of the infected animals showed IgG reactivity after two weeks of infection, and 94% were positive based on serology 30 days after infection. The serological IgG titers increased just after infection but decreased gradually after treatment. In the second experiment, 89% of the animals showed positive IgG titers 22 days after infection. Only 68% of the animals showed positive results on the coproscopic diagnostic analysis and 79% did so by qPCR, 50 days after infection. Treated animals showed negative results on coproscopy one month after treatment but remained positive by serology even 12 months after treatment, although showing a decline in immunologic reaction after treatment. By qPCR analysis, all animals showed negative results three months after treatment, except for one animal. The parasitosis can be detected by coproscopy only six weeks after infection, and by serology 14 days after infection. The qPCR was a better diagnostic method for confirming the infection cure of S. mansoni. In early infection, this method was less efficient than serology but was slightly more efficient than the Kato-Katz method. We suggest that the methods should be used in low endemic areas as follows: serology should be used in the initial diagnosis in a population with potential positive cases; subsequently, coproscopy should be used in IgG positive cases to confirm the current infection; and qPCR should be used to evaluate the infection cure after treatment and is also a very valuable tool when there are cases showing positive IgG and negative coproscopy. PMID:21458922

  1. Identification of Verbena officinalis based on ITS sequence analysis and RAPD-derived molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Joana; Lukas, Brigitte; Merza, Lina; Göhler, Irina; Abel, Gudrun; Popp, Michael; Novak, Johannes

    2009-09-01

    Verbenae herba is a widely used drug and consists of the aerial parts of Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae). Until now, the identification has been performed based on morphological and phytochemical analyses, which are not reliable enough to distinguish Verbena officinalis from other relevant species of the genus Verbena. Hence, impurities and adulterants, negatively influencing the therapeutic effect of the drug, may remain undetected. In an attempt to generate an accurate authentication method we used two different DNA-based approaches: comparison of ITS sequences and molecular markers (RAPD). Both approaches generally enabled discrimination of V. officinalis from the rest of the genus despite the intraspecific variation existing within V. officinalis. The application of the two independent methods, supporting each other, increases the security of identification. For better reproducibility and faster analysis, however, a SCAR marker and primers for HRM were derived from the RAPD results. The SCAR marker could distinguish V. officinalis from all other verbena species except its closest relative V. hastata, while discrimination of V. officinalis even from V. hastata was unproblematic with HRM. PMID:19350481

  2. Molecular Markers for Prostate Cancer in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Montes, Melania; Oliván, Mireia; Rigau, Marina; Colás, Eva; de Torres, Inés; Morote, Juan; Reventós, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer in developed countries. The decisive method of diagnosis is based on the results of biopsies, morphologically evaluated to determine the presence or absence of cancer. Although this approach leads to a confident diagnosis in most cases, it can be improved by using the molecular markers present in the tissue. Both miRNAs and proteins are considered excellent candidates for biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, due to their stability over long periods of time. In the last few years, a concerted effort has been made to develop the necessary tools for their reliable measurement in these types of samples. Furthermore, the use of these kinds of markers may also help in establishing tumor grade and aggressiveness, as well as predicting the possible outcomes in each particular case for the different treatments available. This would aid clinicians in the decision-making process. In this review, we attempt to summarize and discuss the potential use of microRNA and protein profiles in FFPE tissue samples as markers to better predict PCa diagnosis, progression, and response to therapy. PMID:24371818

  3. Population structure and genotypic variation of Crataegus pontica inferred by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Woeste, Keith E; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Alikhani, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Information about the natural patterns of genetic variability and their evolutionary bases are of fundamental practical importance for sustainable forest management and conservation. In the present study, the genetic diversity of 164 individuals from fourteen natural populations of Crataegus pontica K.Koch was assessed for the first time using three genome-based molecular techniques; inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP); inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism. IRAP, ISSR and SCoT analyses yielded 126, 254 and 199 scorable amplified bands, respectively, of which 90.48, 93.37 and 83.78% were polymorphic. ISSR revealed efficiency over IRAP and SCoT due to high effective multiplex ratio, marker index and resolving power. The dendrograms based on the markers used and combined data divided individuals into three major clusters. The correlation between the coefficient matrices for the IRAP, ISSR and SCoT data was significant. A higher level of genetic variation was observed within populations than among populations based on the markers used. The lower divergence levels depicted among the studied populations could be seen as evidence of gene flow. The promotion of gene exchange will be very beneficial to conserve and utilize the enormous genetic variability. PMID:26143753

  4. Molecular cloning of the human esterase D gene, a genetic marker of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E Y; Lee, W H

    1986-01-01

    Retinoblastoma, the most common intraocular tumor, represents one of the prototypes of inheritable cancers. To elucidate the mechanisms that give rise to this tumor, the retinoblastoma gene (RB) must be molecularly cloned. The difficulty encountered in cloning the gene is that little of its function or structure is known. The human esterase D gene, on the other hand, has been localized cytogenetically to the same sub-band of chromosome 13q14:11 as the RB gene. The esterase D gene thus provides a convenient starting point for cloning the RB gene. In this communication, we describe the isolation of the esterase D cDNA clone. Its identification is based on three lines of evidence. This cDNA encodes a protein immunologically related to the esterase D protein. The deduced amino acid sequences of this clone contain sequences identical to the three CNBr-cleaved peptides of the esterase D protein. This clone is mapped to the chromosome 13q14 region by Southern genomic blotting using different deletion mutants. The availability of this clone should allow for the cloning of the RB gene by chromosome walking; the diagnosis of genetic defects such as retinoblastomas and Wilson disease, whose genes are closely linked to the esterase D gene; and the exploration of the large family of human esterase genes. Images PMID:3462698

  5. Bladder Carcinoma Data with Clinical Risk Factors and Molecular Markers: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Gonzalez, Enrique; de Castro, Leandro Nunes; Moreno-Sierra, Jesús; Maestro de las Casas, María Luisa; Vera-Gonzalez, Vicente; Ferrari, Daniel Gomes; Corchado, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer occurs in the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder and is amongst the most common types of cancer in humans, killing thousands of people a year. This paper is based on the hypothesis that the use of clinical and histopathological data together with information about the concentration of various molecular markers in patients is useful for the prediction of outcomes and the design of treatments of nonmuscle invasive bladder carcinoma (NMIBC). A population of 45 patients with a new diagnosis of NMIBC was selected. Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), muscle invasive bladder carcinoma (MIBC), carcinoma in situ (CIS), and NMIBC recurrent tumors were not included due to their different clinical behavior. Clinical history was obtained by means of anamnesis and physical examination, and preoperative imaging and urine cytology were carried out for all patients. Then, patients underwent conventional transurethral resection (TURBT) and some proteomic analyses quantified the biomarkers (p53, neu, and EGFR). A postoperative follow-up was performed to detect relapse and progression. Clusterings were performed to find groups with clinical, molecular markers, histopathological prognostic factors, and statistics about recurrence, progression, and overall survival of patients with NMIBC. Four groups were found according to tumor sizes, risk of relapse or progression, and biological behavior. Outlier patients were also detected and categorized according to their clinical characters and biological behavior. PMID:25866762

  6. Multigene assays and molecular markers in breast cancer: systematic review of health economic analyses.

    PubMed

    Rouzier, Roman; Pronzato, Paolo; Chéreau, Elisabeth; Carlson, Josh; Hunt, Barnaby; Valentine, William J

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and is associated with a significant clinical and economic burden. Multigene assays and molecular markers represent an opportunity to direct chemotherapy only to patients likely to have significant benefit. This systematic review examines published health economic analyses to assess the support for adjuvant therapy decision making. Literature searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and congress databases were carried out to identify economic evaluations of multigene assays and molecular markers published between 2002 and 2012. After screening and data extraction, study quality was assessed using the Quality of Health Economic Studies instrument. The review identified 29 publications that reported evaluations of two assays: Oncotype DX(®) and MammaPrint. Studies of both tests provided evidence that their routine use was cost saving or cost-effective versus conventional approaches. Benefits were driven by optimal allocation of adjuvant chemotherapy and reduction in chemotherapy utilization. Findings were sensitive to variation in the frequency of chemotherapy prescription, chemotherapy costs, and patients' risk profiles. Evidence suggests that multigene assays are likely cost saving or cost-effective relative to current approaches to adjuvant therapy. They should benefit decision making in early-stage breast cancer in a variety of settings worldwide. PMID:23722312

  7. Molecular Markers for Biomass Traits: Association, Interaction and Genetic Divergence in Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Appukuttannair R; Jingade, Anuradha H; Urs, Raje S

    2007-01-01

    Improvement of high yielding, disease resistant silkworm strains became imminent to increase production of silk, which is a major revenue earner for sericulturists. Since environment interacts with phenotype, conventional breeding did not result in commendable yield improvement in synthetic strains of silkworm, Bombyx mori. Identification of DNA markers associated with different economically important biomass traits and its introgression could assist molecular breeding and expression of stabilized high yielding characters, but genetic basis of most quantitative traits in silkworm is poorly understood due to its polygenic control. Correlation analysis (R = 0.9) revealed significant interrelation among biomass traits viz., larval duration (TLD), larval weight (LWT), cocoon weight (CWT), shell weight (SWT), shell ratio (SR) and floss content. PCR using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers revealed 92% polymorphism among 14 tropical and temperate strains of B. mori, with average diversity index of 0.747. Stepwise multiple regression analysis (MRA) selected 35 ISSR markers positively or negatively correlated with different biomass traits, illustrated polygenic control. ISSR marker 830.81050bp was significantly associated with LWT, CWT, SWT, SR and floss content, indicated its pleiotropic role. Two ISSR markers, 835.51950bp and 825.9710bp showed significant association with floss content and TLD. These markers were segregated in F2 generation and Chi-square test confirmed (χ2 = ~45; P < 0.05) its genetic contribution to the associated biomass traits. Strains, with both positively and negatively correlated markers, had intermediate mean value for biomass traits (eg. SWT = 0.17 ± 0.014 g in GNM and Moria) indicated interaction of loci in natural populations. Low yielding Indian strains grouped together by Hierarchical clustering. Chinese and Japanese strains were distributed in the periphery of ALSCAL matrix indicated convergence of genetic characters in Indian strains. Average genetic distance between Chinese strains and Indian strains (0.193) significantly (P < 0.01) varied from that between Chinese and Japanese strains. Interaction of loci and allelic substitutions induced phenotypic plasticity in temperate B. mori populations on tropic adaptation in India. These outcomes show possibility to combine favorable alleles at different QTL to increase larval, cocoon and shell weight. PMID:19662204

  8. Genetic molecular analysis of Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae) hybrids using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Suresh, Narayana; Bhat, Asha M; Suryaprakash, Nayani; Kumar, Saya Satheesh; Kumar, Anil; Jayarama

    2011-06-01

    In Coffea arabica (arabica coffee), the phenotypic as well as genetic variability has been found low because of the narrow genetic basis and self fertile nature of the species. Because of high similarity in phenotypic appearance among the majority of arabica collections, selection of parental lines for inter-varietals hybridization and identification of resultant hybrids at an early stage of plant growth is difficult. DNA markers are known to be reliable in identifying closely related cultivars and hybrids. Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) is a new molecular marker technology developed based on PCR. In this paper, sixty arabica-hybrid progenies belonging to six crosses were analyzed using 31 highly polymorphic SRAP markers. The analysis revealed seven types of SRAP marker profiles which are useful in discriminating the parents and hybrids. The number of bands amplified per primer pair ranges from 6.13 to 8.58 with average number of seven bands. Among six hybrid combinations, percentage of bands shared between hybrids and their parents ranged from 66.29% to 85.71% with polymorphic bands varied from 27.64% to 60.0%. Percentage of hybrid specific fragments obtained in various hybrid combinations ranged from 0.71% to 10.86% and ascribed to the consequence of meiotic recombination. Based on the similarity index calculation, it was observed that F1 hybrids share maximum number of bands with the female parent compared to male parent. The results obtained in the present study revealed the effectiveness of SRAP technique in cultivar identification and hybrid analysis in this coffee species. PMID:21717853

  9. Transcriptome survey of Patagonian southern beech Nothofagus nervosa (= N. Alpina): assembly, annotation and molecular marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nothofagus nervosa is one of the most emblematic native tree species of Patagonian temperate forests. Here, the shotgun RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) of the transcriptome of N. nervosa, including de novo assembly, functional annotation, and in silico discovery of potential molecular markers to support population and associations genetic studies, are described. Results Pyrosequencing of a young leaf cDNA library generated a total of 111,814 high quality reads, with an average length of 447 bp. De novo assembly using Newbler resulted into 3,005 tentative isotigs (including alternative transcripts). The non-assembled sequences (singletons) were clustered with CD-HIT-454 to identify natural and artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads, leading to 21,881 unique singletons. 15,497 out of 24,886 non-redundant sequences or unigenes, were successfully annotated against a plant protein database. A substantial number of simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs) were discovered in the assembled and annotated sequences. More than 40% of the SSR sequences were inside ORF sequences. To confirm the validity of these predicted markers, a subset of 73 SSRs selected through functional annotation evidences were successfully amplified from six seedlings DNA samples, being 14 polymorphic. Conclusions This paper is the first report that shows a highly precise representation of the mRNAs diversity present in young leaves of a native South American tree, N. nervosa, as well as its in silico deduced putative functionality. The reported Nothofagus transcriptome sequences represent a unique resource for genetic studies and provide a tool to discover genes of interest and genetic markers that will greatly aid questions involving evolution, ecology, and conservation using genetic and genomic approaches in the genus. PMID:22747958

  10. Molecular markers define progressing stages of phosphorus limitation in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Crocosphaera.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nicole; Shilova, Irina N; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    Crocosphaera watsonii is a marine cyanobacterium that frequently inhabits low phosphate environments in oligotrophic oceans. While C. watsonii has the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, its growth may be limited by availability of phosphorus. Biomarkers that indicate cellular phosphorus status give insight into how P-limitation can affect the distribution of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial populations. However, adaptation to phosphorus stress is complex and one marker may not be sufficient to determine when an organism is P-limited. In this study, we characterized the transcription of key genes, activated during phosphorus stress in C. watsonii WH8501, to determine how transcription changed during the phosphorus stress response. Transcription of pstS, which encodes a high-affinity phosphate binding protein, was discovered to be quickly up-regulated in phosphorus-depleted cells as an immediate stress response; however, its transcription declined after a period of phosphorus starvation. In addition, diel regulation of pstS in C. watsonii WH8501 complicates the interpretation of this marker in field applications. Transcription of the gene coding for the arsenite efflux protein, arsB, was upregulated after pstS in phosphorus limited cells, but it remained upregulated at later stages of phosphorus limitation. These results demonstrate that a single molecular marker does not adequately represent the entire phosphorus stress response in C. watsonii WH8501. Using both markers, the variations in transcriptional response over a range of degrees of phosphorus limitation may be a better approach for defining cellular phosphorus status. PMID:27037592

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Megahed H; Alghamdi, Salem S; Migdadi, Hussein M; Khan, Muhammad A; El-Harty, Ehab H; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A

    2015-05-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels. PMID:25972757

  12. Polyploidy creates higher diversity among Cynodon accessions as assessed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Osman; Sever-Mutlu, Songul; Mutlu, Nedim; Tuna, Metin; Karaguzel, Osman; Shearman, Robert C; Riordan, Terrance P; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M

    2009-05-01

    Developing a better understanding of associations among ploidy level, geographic distribution, and genetic diversity of Cynodon accessions could be beneficial to bermudagrass breeding programs, and would enhance our understanding of the evolutionary biology of this warm season grass species. This study was initiated to: (1) determine ploidy analysis of Cynodon accessions collected from Turkey, (2) investigate associations between ploidy level and diversity, (3) determine whether geographic and ploidy distribution are related to nuclear genome variation, and (4) correlate among four nuclear molecular marker systems for Cynodon accessions' genetic analyses. One hundred and eighty-two Cynodon accessions collected in Turkey from an area south of the Taurus Mountains along the Mediterranean cost and ten known genotypes were genotyped using sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), peroxidase gene polymorphism (POGP), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The diploids, triploids, tetraploids, pentaploids, and hexaploids revealed by flow cytometry had a linear present band frequency of 0.36, 0.47, 0.49, 0.52, and 0.54, respectively. Regression analysis explained that quadratic relationship between ploidy level and band frequency was the most explanatory (r = 0.62, P < 0.001). The AMOVA results indicated that 91 and 94% of the total variation resided within ploidy level and provinces, respectively. The UPGMA analysis suggested that commercial bermudagrass cultivars only one-third of the available genetic variation. SRAP, POGP, ISSR, and RAPD markers differed in detecting relationships among the bermudagrass genotypes and rare alleles, suggesting more efficiency of combinatory analysis of molecular marker systems. Elucidating Cynodon accessions' genetic structure can aid to enhance breeding programs and broaden genetic base of commercial cultivars. PMID:19229513

  13. The interrelationship of biological marker maturity parameters and molecular yields during contact metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, A. N.; Abbott, G. D.

    1993-08-01

    Jurassic siltstone samples were collected, on a centimetre scale, as a function of increasing distance from a dolerite dyke (Isle of Skye, northwest Scotland). The constant origin and type of the organic matter in this single lithological horizon is indicated by organic petrological observations as well as organic geochemical analyses. Therefore, changes in biological marker distributions, with distance from the dyke contact, can be unequivocally correlated with the thermal influence of the intrusion. The vitrinite reflectance ( R0 Average) values of these samples increase gradually from 0.35% to 3.60% as the dyke contact is approached. Four classical biological marker maturity parameters ( 20S/(20S + 20R), TA/(TA + MA), C 20/(C 20 + C 28) , and 22S/(22S + 22R)). have been measured from GCMS analyses of the sample extracts. Changes in these molecular parameters were compared with changes in the concentrations of the individual biological marker compounds, expressed relative to mass of rock extracted. This comparison revealed that these molecular parameters are not governed by the conventional productreactant relationships (chiral isomerisation, aromatisation or side-chain cracking reactions) operating solely in the free saturated or aromatic hydrocarbon structures. Release/formation from macromolecular and/or functionalised moieties (hydrocarbon or non-hydrocarbon) followed by compound loss provide an alternative paradigm in all four cases in this particular thermal regime. Direct chiral isomerisation in the free sterane or homohopane cannot, however, be completely ruled out as a contributor to an admixture of processes. Similarly, aromatisation in the free hydrocarbon fraction may account for a proportion of the triaromatic steroids.

  14. At3g08030 transcript: a molecular marker of seed ageing

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Caligaris, Luz Elena; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida Odette; Alvarado-López, Sandra; Zúñiga-Sánchez, Esther; Orozco-Segovia, Alma; Pérez-Ruíz, Rigoberto V.; Gamboa-deBuen, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Prolonged storage generally reduces seed viability and vigour, although the rate of deterioration varies among species and environmental conditions. Here, we suggest a possible ageing molecular marker: At3g08030 mRNA. At3g08030 is a member of the DUF642 highly conserved family of cell-wall-associated proteins that is specific for spermatophytes. Methods At3g08030 expression was performed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analysis in seed samples differing in their rate of germination and final germination following a matrix priming and/or controlled deterioration (rapid ageing) treatment. Key Results The At3g08030 gene transcript was present during the entire Arabidopsis thaliana plant life cycle and in seeds, during maturation, the ripening period and after germination. Matrix priming treatment increased the rate of germination of control seeds and seeds aged by controlled deterioration. Priming treatments also increased At3g08030 expression. To determine whether the orthologues of this gene are also age markers in other plant species, At3g08030 was cloned in two wild species, Ceiba aesculifolia and Wigandia urens. As in A. thaliana, the At3g08030 transcript was not present in aged seeds of the tested species but was present in recently shed seeds. A reduction in germination performance of the aged seeds under salt stress was determined by germination assays. Conclusions At3g08030 mRNA detection in a dry seed lot has potential for use as a molecular marker for germination performance in a variety of plant species. PMID:22975286

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity among faba bean genotypes using agro-morphological and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Megahed H.; Alghamdi, Salem S.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad A.; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.

    2015-01-01

    Forty faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes were evaluated for their agro-morphological performance and molecular diversity under Central Region of Saudi Arabia conditions during 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons. Field performance results showed that faba genotypes exhibited a significant amount of variation for their agro-morphological studied parameters. Giza40 recorded the tallest genotype (139.5 cm), highest number of seeds per plants (100.8), and the highest seed yield per plant (70.8 g). The best performing genotypes were Giza40, FLIP03-014FB, Gazira1 and Goff1. Genetic variability among genotypes was determined using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 183 amplified fragments (alleles) and 1758 polymorphic fragments (bands) in SRAP and 202 alleles and 716 bands in AFLP were obtained using six SRAP and four AFLP primer combinations respectively. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for AFLP and SRAP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among faba tested genotypes. The UPGMA based clustering of faba genotypes was largely based on origin and/or genetic background. Result of cluster analysis based on SRAP showed weak and not significant correlation while, it was highly significant based on AFLP analysis with agro-morphological characters (r = 0.01, p > 0.54 and r = 0.26, p < 0.004 respectively). Combined SRAP and AFLP markers proved to be significantly useful for genetic diversity assessment at molecular level. They exhibited high discrimination power, and were able to distinguish the faba bean genotypes with high efficiency and accuracy levels. PMID:25972757

  16. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8–27.6% and 9.5–23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5–26.5% and 7.5%–15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48–49% and 30.5–45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321–0.854 and 0.299–0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil. PMID:26808306

  17. Molecular Assortment of Lens Species with Different Adaptations to Drought Conditions Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Taunk, Jyoti; Singh, Ranjeet; Maurya, Sadhana; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Pal, Madan; Singh, Rajendra; Dubey, Sarawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The success of drought tolerance breeding programs can be enhanced through molecular assortment of germplasm. This study was designed to characterize molecular diversity within and between Lens species with different adaptations to drought stress conditions using SSR markers. Drought stress was applied at seedling stage to study the effects on morpho-physiological traits under controlled condition, where tolerant cultivars and wilds showed 12.8-27.6% and 9.5-23.2% reduction in seed yield per plant respectively. When juxtaposed to field conditions, the tolerant cultivars (PDL-1 and PDL-2) and wild (ILWL-314 and ILWL-436) accessions showed 10.5-26.5% and 7.5%-15.6% reduction in seed yield per plant, respectively under rain-fed conditions. The reductions in seed yield in the two tolerant cultivars and wilds under severe drought condition were 48-49% and 30.5-45.3% respectively. A set of 258 alleles were identified among 278 genotypes using 35 SSR markers. Genetic diversity and polymorphism information contents varied between 0.321-0.854 and 0.299-0.836, with mean value of 0.682 and 0.643, respectively. All the genotypes were clustered into 11 groups based on SSR markers. Tolerant genotypes were grouped in cluster 6 while sensitive ones were mainly grouped into cluster 7. Wild accessions were separated from cultivars on the basis of both population structure and cluster analysis. Cluster analysis has further grouped the wild accessions on the basis of species and sub-species into 5 clusters. Physiological and morphological characters under drought stress were significantly (P = 0.05) different among microsatellite clusters. These findings suggest that drought adaptation is variable among wild and cultivated genotypes. Also, genotypes from contrasting clusters can be selected for hybridization which could help in evolution of better segregants for improving drought tolerance in lentil. PMID:26808306

  18. Cytotoxic immunological synapses

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.; Long, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the most fundamental activities of the adaptive immune system is to kill infected cells and tumor cells. Two distinct pathways mediate this process, both of which are facilitated by a cytotoxic immunological synapse. While traditionally thought of as innate immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells are now appreciated to have the capacity for long-term in reactions to chemical and viral insults. These cells integrate multiple positive and negative signals through NK cell cytotoxic or inhibitory synapses. The traditional CD8+αβ T-cell receptor-positive cells are among the best models for the concept of an immunological synapse, in which vectoral signaling is linked to directed secretion in a stable interface to induce apoptotic cell death in an infected cell. Large-scale molecular organization in synapses generated a number of hypotheses. Studies in the past five years have started to provide clear answers regarding the validity of these models. In vivo imaging approaches have provided some hints as to the physiological relevance of these processes with great promise for the future. This review provides an overview of work on cytotoxic immunological synapses and suggests pathways forward in applying this information to the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:20536553

  19. Combustion inputs into a terrestrial archive over 265 years as evidenced by BPCA molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2015-04-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) such as char and soot is produced during the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel. It is composed of condensed aromatic structures and can resist degradation processes, maybe over long periods of time. Land-use changes, industrial activity and its transport by wind and water affect the fluxes of PyOM from the source to its sedimentary archive. Investigating environmental PyOM with the molecular marker benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method provides various information about quantity, quality (BPCA distribution pattern) and about its isotopic composition (13C and 14C). Assessing PyOM quality can indicate whether it is mostly combustion condensate (soot) or combustion residue (charcoal) and potentially allow source apportionment. Our study area is the Pettaquamscutt River catchment area (35 km2), Rhode Island, U.S.A. It is located down-wind of industrial areas recording deposition of long-distance atmospheric transport as well as local catchment inputs, both from natural and anthropogenic sources. We investigated 50 samples of a sediment record over a time span of 265 years (1733-1998 AD). Previous investigations provided information on the age of deposition, the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as of the radiocarbon contents of total organic carbon (TOC) and PAH (Lima, 2004). We used the BPCA molecular marker method to quantify and characterize PyOM in the same record. First results show that quantity and quality of PyOM change over 265 years. Our investigation aims at understanding how different sources of PyOM are reflected in terrestrial archives by comparing the results of BPCA with radiocarbon-dated TOC and PAH records. Among other aspects, the PAH record reflects the Great Depression and the 1970s oil embargo in North America. We interpret the BPCA distribution patterns regarding the simultaneous shift of dominant fuels including wood, coal, petroleum and gas. Future work will include compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of BPCA molecular markers to improve our understanding of the sources and residence time of PyOM. References Lima, A.L.C., 2004. Molecular and Isotopic Records of Combustion Inputs to the Environment Over the Last 250 Years, doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MIT/WHOI).

  20. Source apportionment of primary and secondary organic aerosols using positive matrix factorization (PMF) of molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YuanXun; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Schauer, James J.; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Edney, Edward O.

    Monthly average ambient concentrations of more than eighty particle-phase organic compounds, as well as total organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), were measured from March 2004 through February 2005 in five cities in the Midwestern United States. A multi-variant source apportionment receptor model, positive matrix factorization (PMF), was applied to explore the average source contributions to the five sampling sites using molecular markers for primary and secondary organic aerosols (POA, SOA). Using the molecular makers in the model, POA and SOA were estimated for each month at each site. Three POA factors were derived, which were dominated by primary molecular markers such as EC, hopanes, steranes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and which represented the following POA sources: urban primary sources, mobile sources, and other combustion sources. The three POA sources accounted for 57% of total average ambient OC. Three factors, characterized by the presence of reaction products of isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene, and displaying distinct seasonal trends, were consistent with the characteristics of SOA. The SOA factors made up 43% of the total average measured OC. The PMF-derived results are in good agreement with estimated SOA concentrations obtained from SOA to tracer yield estimates obtained from smog chamber experiments. A linear regression comparing the smog chamber yield estimates and the PMF SOA contributions had a regression slope of 1.01 ± 0.07 and an intercept of 0.19 ± 0.10 μg OC m -3 (adjusted R2 of 0.763, n = 58).

  1. Molecular cloning, expression and immunological characterisation of Pas n 1, the major allergen of Bahia grass Paspalum notatum pollen.

    PubMed

    Davies, Janet M; Mittag, Diana; Dang, Thanh D; Symons, Karen; Voskamp, Astrid; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2008-12-01

    Bahia grass, Paspalum notatum, is a clinically important subtropical grass with a prolonged pollination season from spring to autumn. We aimed to clone and characterise the major Bahia grass pollen allergen, Pas n 1. Grass pollen-allergic patients presenting to a tertiary hospital allergy clinic were tested for IgE reactivity with Bahia grass pollen extract by skin prick testing, ImmunoCAP, ELISA and immunoblotting. Using primers deduced from the N-terminal peptide sequence of a group 1 allergen of Bahia grass pollen extract separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the complete Pas n 1 cDNA was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and cloned. Biological relevance of recombinant Pas n 1 expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by serum IgE reactivity and basophil activation. Twenty-nine of 34 (85%) consecutive patients presenting with grass pollen allergy were skin prick test positive to Bahia grass pollen. The Pas n 1 cDNA has sequence homology with the beta-expansin 1 glycoprotein family and is more closely related to the maize pollen group 1 allergen (85% identity) than to ryegrass Lol p 1 or Timothy grass Phl p 1 (64 and 66% identity, respectively). rPas n 1 reacted with serum IgE in 47 of 55 (85%) Bahia grass pollen-allergic patients, activated basophils and inhibited serum IgE reactivity with the 29 kDa band of Bahia grass pollen extract. In conclusion the cDNA for the major group 1 allergen of the subtropical Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1, was identified and cloned. rPas n 1 is immunologically active and is a valuable reagent for diagnosis and specific immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy. PMID:18817975

  2. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry. PMID:24755444

  3. Use of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to study immunological markers resulting from exposure to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract from Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rivera, Evasomary; Gioda, Adriana; Sanchez-Rivera, Diana; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R.; Jimenez-Velez, Braulio D.

    2010-03-15

    Fine particulate air pollutants, mainly their organic fraction, have been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. Puerto Rico has been reported to have the highest prevalence of pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma) in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the immunological response of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to organic extracts isolated from airborne particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) in Puerto Rico. Organic extracts from PM{sub 2.5} collected throughout an 8-month period (2000-2001) were pooled (composite) in order to perform chemical analysis and biological activity testing. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract to assess cytotoxicity, levels of cytokines and relative gene expression of MHC-II, hPXR and CYP3A5. Our findings show that organic PM{sub 2.5} consist of toxic as well as bioactive components that can regulate the secretion of cytokines in BEAS-2B, which could modulate inflammatory response in the lung. Trace element analyses confirmed the presence of metals in organic extracts highlighting the relative high abundance of Cu and Zn in polar organic extracts. Polar organic extracts exhibited dose-dependant toxicity and were found to significantly induce the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1beta and IL-7 while significantly inhibiting the secretion of IL-8, G-CSF and MCP-1. Moreover, MHC-II transcriptional activity was up-regulated after 24 h of exposure, whereas PXR and CYP3A5 were down-regulated. This research provides a new insight into the effects of PM{sub 2.5} organic fractions on specific effectors and their possible role in the development of respiratory inflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico.

  4. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology(1.).

    PubMed

    Robarts, Daniel W H; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2014-07-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  5. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  6. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  7. A slippery molecular assembly allows water as a self-erasable security marker

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Rajasekaran; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul Dev; Praveen, Vakayil K.; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-01-01

    Protection of currency and valuable documents from counterfeit continues to be a challenge. While there are many embedded security features available for document safety, they are not immune to forgery. Fluorescence is a sensitive property, which responds to external stimuli such as solvent polarity, temperature or mechanical stress, however practical use in security applications is hampered due to several reasons. Therefore, a simple and specific stimuli responsive security feature that is difficult to duplicate is of great demand. Herein we report the design of a fluorescent molecular assembly on which water behaves as a self-erasable security marker for checking the authenticity of documents at point of care. The underlying principle involves the disciplined self-assembly of a tailor-made fluorescent molecule, which initially form a weak blue fluorescence (λem = 425 nm, Φf = 0.13) and changes to cyan emission (λem = 488 nm,Φf = 0.18) in contact with water due to a reversible molecular slipping motion. This simple chemical tool, based on the principles of molecular self-assembly and fluorescence modulation, allows creation of security labels and optically masked barcodes for multiple documents authentication. PMID:25940779

  8. Targeted pathways in breast cancer: molecular and protein markers guiding therapeutic decisions.

    PubMed

    Kourea, Helen P; Zolota, Vassiliki; Scopa, Chrisoula D

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is currently considered as a group of diseases, differing not only in histopathologic phenotype, as indicated by histologic type and grade, but also in their protein, genetic and epigenetic molecular profile. The standard of care indicates that the core information for patient management includes data on Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PgR) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), while there is an emerging role for the proliferation marker Ki67. These indices can be provided even in low resource settings and are indispensable for prognostication and therapeutic patient management. With the progress in molecular and translational research, there is a growing body of information on the molecular subtypes of breast carcinoma and their significance, and multigene signature assays are used to dictate prognosis and guide therapeutics in high resource settings. In addition, several cellular pathways involved in tumor growth and spread are dissected and targeted in clinical trials. Among these are the p53, RB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/MAPK pathways, alterations associated with genetic instability and epigenetic alterations including histone methylation and acetylation, DNA methylation and microRNAs expression. The tumor immune microenvironment, including the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is attracting significant research interest. This review summarizes the mechanisms of function of the above factors in breast tumorigenesis with emphasis on their prognostic and predictive value and their use as therapeutic targets. PMID:25563853

  9. Immunology of human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, D G; Secor, W E

    2014-01-01

    There is a wealth of immunologic studies that have been carried out in experimental and human schistosomiasis that can be classified into three main areas: immunopathogenesis, resistance to reinfection and diagnostics. It is clear that the bulk of, if not all, morbidity due to human schistosomiasis results from immune-response-based inflammation against eggs lodged in the body, either as regulated chronic inflammation or resulting in fibrotic lesions. However, the exact nature of these responses, the antigens to which they are mounted and the mechanisms of the critical regulatory responses are still being sorted out. It is also becoming apparent that protective immunity against schistosomula as they develop into adult worms develops slowly and is hastened by the dying of adult worms, either naturally or when they are killed by praziquantel. However, as with anti-egg responses, the responsible immune mechanisms and inducing antigens are not clearly established, nor are any potential regulatory responses known. Finally, a wide variety of immune markers, both cellular and humoral, can be used to demonstrate exposure to schistosomes, and immunologic measurement of schistosome antigens can be used to detect, and thus diagnose, active infections. All three areas contribute to the public health response to human schistosome infections. PMID:25142505

  10. Association of molecular markers with cold tolerance and green period in zoysiagrass (Zoysia Willd.).

    PubMed

    Guo, Hai-Lin; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Liu, Jian-Xiu; Zhang, Yuan-Ming; Zheng, Yi-Qi

    2012-12-01

    Cold tolerance and the green period are key traits in the breeding of zoysiagrass (Zoysia Willd.). Identification of molecular markers associated with cold tolerance and the green period of zoysiagrass will contribute to efficient selection of elite cultivars. These two traits were measured in 96 zoysiagrass accessions in 2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. The mapping population was screened with 29 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and 54 pairs of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) primers. A multi-loci in silico mapping approach implemented with an empirical Bayes method was applied for association mapping of cold tolerance and green period. We detected 254 SSR polymorphic loci and 338 SRAP polymorphic loci, among which three SSR loci (Xgwm131-3B-187, Xgwm469-6D-194 and Xgwm234-5B-244) and one SRAP locus (Me11Em7-406) were significantly associated with cold tolerance with effect values of 57.83%, 38.05%, 36.92% and 37%, respectively. Three SSR loci (Xgwm132-6B-225, Xgwm111-7D-34 and Xgwm102-2D-97) and two SRAP loci (Me19Em5-359 and Me16Em8-483) were significantly associated with the green period with effect values of 79.54%, 62.59%, 99.04%, 49.01% and 82.57%. These markers will be useful for genetic improvement of the cold tolerance and green period of zoysiagrass by marker-assisted breeding. PMID:23341745

  11. Molecular analysis of soybean varying in water use efficiency using SSRs markers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mithlesh; Lal, S K

    2015-07-01

    A set of 91 soybean germplasm lines, collected from different parts of the world, were screened for Water Use Efficiency (WUE) using Carbon Isotope Discrimination (CID) technique and were characterized for 10 quantitative traits. After screening under field condition, 44 soybean genotypes showed variations in WUE. Molecular diversity of these 44 diverse soybean lines was carried out with 26 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) markers, of which 10 were polymorphic (38.47% polymorphism). 28 alleles were observed which were distributed over 10 loci, with an average of 2.8 alleles per locus. Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) value of 10 polymorphic markers ranged from 0.40 (locus Satt460) to 0.67 (locus satt260), with an average of 0.46. Pair-wise genetic similarity value, as calculated by simple matching coefficient, ranged from 0.99 to 0.40, with an average of 0.70. Genotypes were clustered using NTSYS-pc software employing unweighted paired group method using arithmetic averages to generate the dendrogram. Dendrogram exhibited 8 distinct clusters with a similarity coefficient of 0.69. Genotypes having low to medium and medium to high CID value were clustered in distant groups indicating usefulness of these polymorphic SSRs markers for differentiating genotypes on the basis of their CID value. The findings of this study indicate the need for broadening genetic base of the present Indian soybean cultivars through use of exotic sources of variation towards WUE. Thus, diverse genotypes identified in this study would be beneficial to soybean breeders to develop mapping population to identify QTLs for WUE. PMID:26364483

  12. A molecular linkage map of olive (Olea europaea L) based on RAPD, microsatellite, and SCAR markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Biao; Collins, Graham; Sedgley, Margaret

    2004-02-01

    An integrated molecular linkage map of olive (Olea europaea L.) was constructed based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR), and microsatellite markers using the pseudo-testcross strategy. A mapping population of 104 individuals was generated from an F1 full-sib family of a cross between 'Frantoio' and 'Kalamata'. The hybridity of the mapping population was confirmed by genetic similarity and nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Twenty-three linkage groups were mapped for 'Kalamata', covering 759 cM of the genome with 89 loci and an average distance between loci of 11.5 cM. Twenty-seven linkage groups were mapped for 'Frantoio', covering 798 cM of the genome with 92 loci and an average distance between loci of 12.3 cM. For the integrated map, 15 linkage groups covered 879 cM of the genome with 101 loci and an average distance between loci of 10.2 cM. The size of the genomic DNA was estimated to be around 3000 cM. A sequence characterized amplified region marker linked to olive peacock disease resistance was mapped to linkage group 2 of the integrated map. These maps will be the starting point for studies on the structure, evolution, and function of the olive genome. When the mapping progeny pass through their juvenile phase and assume their adult characters, mapping morphological markers and identification of quantitative trait loci for adaptive traits will be the primary targets. PMID:15060599

  13. De novo Transcriptome Analysis and Molecular Marker Development of Two Hemarthria Species

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiu; Yan, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Xin-Quan; Zhang, Jian; Frazier, Taylor P.; Huang, De-Jun; Lu, Lu; Huang, Lin-Kai; Liu, Wei; Peng, Yan; Ma, Xiao; Yan, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hemarthria R. Br. is an important genus of perennial forage grasses that is widely used in subtropical and tropical regions. Hemarthria grasses have made remarkable contributions to the development of animal husbandry and agro-ecosystem maintenance; however, there is currently a lack of comprehensive genomic data available for these species. In this study, we used Illumina high-throughput deep sequencing to characterize of two agriculturally important Hemarthria materials, H. compressa “Yaan” and H. altissima “1110.” Sequencing runs that used each of four normalized RNA samples from the leaves or roots of the two materials yielded more than 24 million high-quality reads. After de novo assembly, 137,142 and 77,150 unigenes were obtained for “Yaan” and “1110,” respectively. In addition, a total of 86,731 “Yaan” and 48,645 “1110” unigenes were successfully annotated. After consolidating the unigenes for both materials, 42,646 high-quality SNPs were identified in 10,880 unigenes and 10,888 SSRs were identified in 8330 unigenes. To validate the identified markers, high quality PCR primers were designed for both SNPs and SSRs. We randomly tested 16 of the SNP primers and 54 of the SSR primers and found that the majority of these primers successfully amplified the desired PCR product. In addition, high cross-species transferability (61.11–87.04%) of SSR markers was achieved for four other Poaceae species. The amount of RNA sequencing data that was generated for these two Hemarthria species greatly increases the amount of genomic information available for Hemarthria and the SSR and SNP markers identified in this study will facilitate further advancements in genetic and molecular studies of the Hemarthria genus. PMID:27148320

  14. IL-32 is a molecular marker of a host defense network in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Dennis; Inkeles, Megan S.; Liu, Phillip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Teles, Rosane M. B.; Vaidya, Poorva; Munoz, Marcos A.; Schenk, Mirjam; Swindell, William R.; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Horvath, Steve; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease–related death worldwide; however, only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop disease. Factors that contribute to protection could prove to be promising targets for M. tuberculosis therapies. Analysis of peripheral blood gene expression profiles of active tuberculosis patients has identified correlates of risk for disease or pathogenesis. We sought to identify potential human candidate markers of host defense by studying gene expression profiles of macrophages, cells that, upon infection by M. tuberculosis, can mount an antimicrobial response. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed an association between the cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) and the vitamin D antimicrobial pathway in a network of interferon-γ– and IL-15–induced “defense response” genes. IL-32 induced the vitamin D–dependent antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4 and to generate antimicrobial activity in vitro, dependent on the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In addition, the IL-15–induced defense response macrophage gene network was integrated with ranked pairwise comparisons of gene expression from five different clinical data sets of latent compared with active tuberculosis or healthy controls and a coexpression network derived from gene expression in patients with tuberculosis undergoing chemotherapy. Together, these analyses identified eight common genes, including IL-32, as molecular markers of latent tuberculosis and the IL-15–induced gene network. As maintaining M. tuberculosis in a latent state and preventing transition to active disease may represent a form of host resistance, these results identify IL-32 as one functional marker and potential correlate of protection against active tuberculosis. PMID:25143364

  15. Molecular markers as a method to evaluate the movement of Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari)

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Zulma Nancy; Benavides, Pablo; Souza, Og De; Acevedo, Flor Edith; Lima, Eraldo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a methodology to describe the movement of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the field through: (i) the evaluation of allele variation of a microsatellite marker on polymorphic Colombian H. hampei populations; (ii) the invention of a device for releasing H. hampei adults; (iii) the standardization of a release-recapture technique for H. hampei populations; (iv) the estimation of the flight distance of the insect; and (v) the calculation of a mathematical expression that describes the movement of H. hampei in space over time. The results indicated that: (i) the microsatellite molecular marker HHK.1.6 was exclusively present in a population from Guapotá-Santander, was dominant and allows the evaluation of H. hampei movement for several generations; (ii) a device that released 88.8% of H. hampei adults in 2 s was designed; (iii) this device was used as H. hampei populations containing HHK.1.6 marker release strategy, and coffee seeds as recapture strategy; (iv) it was estimated that H. hampei adults flew as far as 65 m, however, 90% were recovered in a radius of <40 m. Finally, (v) the mathematical expression that described the movement of H. hampei in space over time was Y^=αβXi, being Y^ the average number of borer beetles recaptured per tree, and x the distance in meters. This method will allow to determine the movement of H. hampei from different environmental and ecological scenarios. PMID:26078300

  16. Molecular markers as a method to evaluate the movement of Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari).

    PubMed

    Gil, Zulma Nancy; Benavides, Pablo; De Souza, Og; Acevedo, Flor Edith; Lima, Eraldo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a methodology to describe the movement of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the field through: (i) the evaluation of allele variation of a microsatellite marker on polymorphic Colombian H. hampei populations; (ii) the invention of a device for releasing H. hampei adults; (iii) the standardization of a release-recapture technique for H. hampei populations; (iv) the estimation of the flight distance of the insect; and (v) the calculation of a mathematical expression that describes the movement of H. hampei in space over time. The results indicated that: (i) the microsatellite molecular marker HHK.1.6 was exclusively present in a population from Guapotá-Santander, was dominant and allows the evaluation of H. hampei movement for several generations; (ii) a device that released 88.8% of H. hampei adults in 2 s was designed; (iii) this device was used as H. hampei populations containing HHK.1.6 marker release strategy, and coffee seeds as recapture strategy; (iv) it was estimated that H. hampei adults flew as far as 65 m, however, 90% were recovered in a radius of <40 m. Finally, (v) the mathematical expression that described the movement of H. hampei in space over time was [Formula: see text], being [Formula: see text] the average number of borer beetles recaptured per tree, and x the distance in meters. This method will allow to determine the movement of H. hampei from different environmental and ecological scenarios. PMID:26078300

  17. Molecular and morphological markers for rapid distinction between 2 Colletotrichum species.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Sônia Alvim Veiga; Vieira de Oliveira, Sarah Franco; Andrade, Caroline Waculicz; Vicente, Vânia Aparecida; Dalzoto, Patrícia do Rocio; Kniphoff da Cruz, Gerson; Gabardo, Juarez; Massola, Nelson Sidnei; Tozze, Hugo José; Pileggi, Marcos; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia Vitória; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval; Stringari, Danyelle; Glienke, Chirlei

    2009-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms reside asymptomatically within plants and are a source of new bioactive products for use in medicine, agriculture, and industry. Colletotrichum (teleomorph Glomerella) is a fungus widely cited in the literature as a producer of antimicrobial substances. Identification at the species level, however, has been a problem in this type of study. Several authors have reported the presence of endophytic fungi from the medicinal plant Maytenus ilicifolia ("espinheira-santa") in Brazil that has antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Therefore, Colletotrichum strains were isolated from M. ilicifolia and identified based on morphology, RAPD markers, sequence data of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS-1 and ITS-2), the 5.8S gene, and species-specific PCR. The analyses suggested the presence of 2 species, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum boninense. Two morphological markers were characterized to allow C. gloeosporioides and C. boninense to be distinguished quickly and accurately. The molecular diagnosis of C. boninense was confirmed by using Col1 and ITS4 primers. This species of Colletotrichum is reported for the first time in M. ilicifolia. PMID:19898550

  18. Molecular markers in colorectal cancer: genetic bases for a customised treatment.

    PubMed

    Casado, E; De Castro, J; Belda-Iniesta, C; Cejas, P; Feliu, J; Sereno, M; González-Barón, M

    2007-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in Western countries. CRC treatment is based on the employment of three chemotherapeutic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan, and the use of recently incorporated targeted agents directed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The approval of these biologicals and of others to come holds great promise for the improvement of patient outcome. The molecular bases for this lethal disease have been extensively investigated, laying the foundations for a rational and customised treatment approach, expanding the therapeutic index of current drugs and easing the incorporation of new molecules. Individual markers have been mainly investigated based on drug targets and metabolism. Also, the increasing availability of highthroughput technologies has prompted the opportunity for blind studies capable of screening new markers and of identifying the specific oncogenic pathways responsible for drug resistance in a given patient. An updated review of the field is presented in this article. PMID:17921101

  19. Photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂-mediated photosynthetic downregulation in nodulated alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Erice, Gorka; Aranjuelo, Iker; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aguirreolea, Jone; Irigoyen, Juan José; Sanchez-Diaz, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    Elevated CO₂ leads to a decrease in potential net photosynthesis in long-term experiments and thus to a reduction in potential growth. This process is known as photosynthetic downregulation. There is no agreement on the definition of which parameters are the most sensitive for detecting CO₂ acclimation. In order to investigate the most sensitive photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂ acclimation, the effects of elevated CO₂, and associated elevated temperature were analyzed in alfalfa plants inoculated with different Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. Plants (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón) were grown in summer or autumn in temperature gradient greenhouses (TGG). At the end of the experiment, all plants showed acclimation in both seasons, especially under elevated summer temperatures. This was probably due to the lower nitrogen (N) availability caused by decreased N₂-fixation under higher temperatures. Photosynthesis measured at growth CO₂ concentration, rubisco in vitro activity and maximum rate of carboxylation were the most sensitive parameters for detecting downregulation. Severe acclimation was also related with decreases in leaf nitrogen content associated with declines in rubisco content (large and small subunits) and activity that resulted in a drop in photosynthesis. Despite the sensitivity of rubisco content as a marker of acclimation, it was not coordinated with gene expression, possibly due to a lag between gene transcription and protein translation. PMID:23480453

  20. Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R.; Hildemann, L.M.; Mazurek, M.A.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The molecular composition of fine particulate (D{sub p} {ge} 2 {mu}m) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available.

  1. Molecular marker analysis as a guide to the sources of fine organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R. ); Hildemann, L.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mazurek, M.A. ); Simoneit, B.R.T. Environmental Geochemistry Group)

    1992-07-01

    The molecular composition of fine particulate (D[sub p] [ge] 2 [mu]m) organic aerosol emissions from the most important sources in the Los Angeles area has been determined. Likewise, ambient concentration patterns for more than 80 single organic compounds have been measured at four urban sites (West Los Angeles, Downtown Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Rubidoux) and at one remote offshore site (San Nicolas Island). It has been found that cholesterol serves as a marker compound for emissions from charbroilers and other meat cooking operations. Vehicular exhaust being emitted from diesel and gasoline powered engines can be traced in the Los Angeles atmosphere using fossil petroleum marker compounds such as steranes and pentacyclic triterpanes (e.g., hopanes). Biogenic fine particle emission sources such as plant fragments abraded from leaf surfaces by wind and weather can be traced in the urban atmosphere. Using distinct and specific source organic tracers or assemblages of organic compounds characteristic for the sources considered it is possible to estimate the influence of different source types at any urban site where atmospheric data are available.

  2. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; D`Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, and molecular markers in soils of Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bucheli, Thomas D; Blum, Franziska; Desaules, Andr; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2004-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were analysed in 23 soil samples (0-10 cm layer) from the Swiss soil monitoring network (NABO) together with total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) concentration, as well as some PAH source diagnostic ratios and molecular markers. The concentrations of the sum of 16 EPA priority PAHs ranged from 50 to 619 microg/kg dw. Concentrations increased from arable, permanent and pasture grassland, forest, to urban soils and were 21-89% lower than median numbers reported in the literature for similar Swiss and European soils. NABO soils contained BC in concentrations from 0.4 to 1.8 mg/g dw, except for two sites with markedly higher levels. These numbers corresponded to 1-6% of TOC and were comparable to the limited published BC data in soil and sediments obtained with comparable analytical methods. The various PAH ratios and molecular markers pointed to a domination of pyrogenically formed PAHs in Swiss soils. In concert, the gathered data suggest the following major findings: (1) gas phase PAHs (naphthalene to fluorene) were long-range transported, cold-condensated at higher altitudes, and approaching equilibrium with soil organic matter (OM); (2) (partially) particle-bound PAHs (phenanthrene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were mostly deposited regionally in urban areas, and not equilibrated with soil OM; (3) Diesel combustion appeared to be a major emission source of PAH and BC in urban areas; and (4) wood combustion might have contributed significantly to PAH burdens in some soils of remote/alpine (forest) sites. PMID:15276719

  4. A better surgical resectability of WHO grade II gliomas is independent of favorable molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Goz, Catherine; Schdelin, Sabine; Rigau, Valrie; Mariani, Luigi; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    A higher extent of resection (EOR) in WHO grade II gliomas (GIIG) is correlated with longer survival. However, the molecular markers also feature prognostic relevance. Here, we examined whether maximal EOR was related to the genetic profile. We retrospectively investigated the predictive value of 1p19q, IDH1, 53 expression and Ki67 index for the EOR in 200 consecutive GIIGs (2007-2013). Data were modeled in a linear model. The analysis was performed with two statistical methods (arcsin-sqrt and Beta-regression model with logit link). There was no deletion 1p19q in 118 cases, codeletion 1p19q (57 cases), single deletion 1p (4 cases) or19q (16 cases). 155 patients had a mutation of IDH1. p53 was graded in 4 degrees (0:92 cases, 1:52 cases, 2:31 cases, 3:8 cases). Mean Ki67 index was 5.2 % (range 1-20 %). Mean preoperative tumor volume was 60.8 cm(3) (range 3.3-250 cm(3)) and mean EOR was 0.917 (range 0.574-1). The statistical analysis was significant for a lower EOR in patients with codeletion 1p19q (OR 0.738, p = 0.0463) and with a single deletion 19q (OR 0.641, p = 0.0168). There was no significant correlation between IDH1 or p53 and the EOR. Higher Ki67 was marginally associated with higher EOR (p = 0.0603). The study demonstrates in a large cohort of GIIG that a higher EOR is not attributable to favorable genetic markers. This original result supports maximal surgical resection as an important therapeutic factor per se to optimize prognosis, independently of the molecular pattern. PMID:25261925

  5. Investigation of Molecular Marker Lipids in Alpine Ice Cores Via Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makou, M. C.; Eglinton, T. I.; Thompson, L. G.; Hughen, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Recently developed analytical techniques were employed to identify and quantify organic molecular markers trapped in high-altitude ice. While various compounds represent potentially useful proxies for biomass burning, vegetation type, atmospheric circulation, and anthropogenic activity, prior attempts to measure organic compounds in ice cores have typically required large volumes of sample material that are incompatible with generation of high-resolution paleoclimate records. We employed stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD), coupled with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), to examine the organic content of small quantities (≤ 30 ml) of ice. To test the utility of the approach, post-industrial ice core samples from the Huascarán and Sajama sites (Andes), the Dasuopu and Puruogangri sites (Tibetan Plateau), and Mt. Kilimanjaro (east Africa) were tested. n-Alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl amides and nitriles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and various diterpenoids were identified in this suite of cores. These marker compounds suggest inputs from biomass burning, fresh vascular plant material, and anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion. Differences in distributions of the alkyl amide and nitrile homologues between the different sites suggest a predominantly local or regional supply of organic matter. Pre-industrial samples from the Sajama and Puruogangri ice cores were also analyzed in order to assess the character of biomarker assemblages in the absence of anthropogenic contributions and investigate changes in inputs over time. PAHs and diterpenoids, which may result from biomass burning and were observed in the modern Sajama samples, occurred in two Holocene Sajama samples, but not in a last glacial sample. Enhanced inputs of terrestrial vegetation combustion biomarkers were consistent with periods of enhanced aridity in both cores. This study demonstrates the utility of SBSE, TD, and GC/TOF-MS for isolating organic compounds from small amounts of alpine ice and paves the way for development of high-resolution molecular stratigraphic records from tropical ice cores.

  6. Altered Expression of Retinal Molecular Markers in the Canine RPE65 Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Maria; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Rodriguez, F. David; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Vecino, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a group of childhood-onset retinal diseases characterized by severe visual impairment or blindness. One form is caused by mutations in the RPE65 gene, which encodes the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) isomerase. In this study, the retinal structure and expression of molecular markers for different retinal cell types were characterized, and differences between control and RPE65 mutant dogs during the temporal evolution of the disease were analyzed. Methods. Retinas from normal and mutant dogs of different ages were examined by immunofluorescence with a panel of 16 different antibodies. Results. Cones and rods were preserved in the mutant retinas, and the number of cones was normal. However, there was altered expression of cone arrestin and delocalization of rod opsin. The ON bipolar cells showed sprouting of the dendritic arbors toward the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and retraction of their axons in the inner nuclear layer (INL). A decreased expression of GABA, and an increased expression of intermediate filament glial markers was also found in the mutant retinas. These changes were more evident in the adult than the young mutant retinas. Conclusions. The structure of the retina is well preserved in the mutant retina, but several molecular changes take place in photoreceptors and in bipolar and amacrine cells. Some of these changes are structural, whereas others reflect a change in localization of the examined proteins. This study provides new information that can be applied to the interpretation of outcomes of retinal gene therapy in animal models and humans. PMID:20671290

  7. Characterization of Pyricularia grisea in the United States Using Independent Genetic and Molecular Markers.

    PubMed

    Correll, J C; Harp, T L; Guerber, J C; Zeigler, R S; Liu, B; Cartwright, R D; Lee, F N

    2000-12-01

    ABSTRACT A total of 540 isolates of Pyricularia grisea from rice in the United States were examined for vegetative compatibility, MGR586 DNA fingerprint diversity, and mating type based on hybridization with the mat1-1 and mat1-2 sexual mating type alleles. The collections contained both archived and contemporary field isolates representative of the known MGR586 lineages and races that occur throughout the United States. Complementary nitrate nonutilizing (nit) or sulfate nonutilizing (sul) mutants were used to assess vegetative compatibility in P. grisea. There was a complete correspondence between vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), MGR586 lineage, and mating type among 527 contemporary isolates (collected between 1991 and 1997) from Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, and Texas; all isolates in MGR586 lineages A, B, C, and D belonged to VCGs US-01, US-02, US-03, and US-04, respectively. In addition, all isolates tested in VCGs US-01 and US-04 had the mat1-1 mating type allele whereas those in VCGs US-02 and US-03 had the mat1-2 allele. The strict association of independent markers during this sample period was consistent with a strictly asexual mode of reproduction. However, examination of archived isolates collected in the 1970s and 1980s and contemporary isolates revealed an incongruent relationship between the independent markers. MGR586 C and E isolates were vegetatively compatible which indicated that multiple robust MGR586 delineated lineages could be nested within certain VCGs. Although isolates in lineages C and E were vegetatively compatible, they were of opposite mating type. Several hypotheses, including recombination, could account for the incongruence between the various markers. Among the eight MGR586 lineages (A through H) that occur in the United States, all isolates in lineages A, D, E, G, and H had the mat1-1 allele, whereas isolates in lineages B, C, and F had the mat1-2 allele. Nit mutants can be recovered relatively easy from P. grisea and should allow large numbers of individuals within a population to be assessed for vegetative compatibility. VCGs may prove to be an effective multilocus marker in P. grisea. Thus, VCGs should be a useful means for characterizing genetic structure in populations of the rice blast fungus worldwide, provide a useful genetic framework to assist in interpreting molecular population data, and may provide insight into potential sexual or asexual recombination events. PMID:18943382

  8. [The effectiveness of molecular markers for the identification of Lr28, Lr35, and Lr47 genes in common wheat].

    PubMed

    Gul'tiaeva, E I; Orina, A S; Gannibal, F B; Mitrofanova, O P; Odintsova, I G; Laĭkova, L I

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness of molecular markers for the identification of leaf rust resistance genes Lr28, Lr35, Lr47 transferred to common wheat was assessed the using samplesof Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp. from Ae. speltoides. Markers Sr39F2/R3, BCD260F1/35R2 of gene Lr35 and PS10 of Lr47 gene were characterized by high efficiency and were revealed in a line of common wheat containing these genes, and samples of Ae. speltoides (their donor). Marker SCS421 of Lr28gene and markers Sr39#22r, Sr39#50s, BE500705 of Lr35/Sr39 genes turned out to be less specific. Marker SCS421 was amplified in the samples of the T. timopheevii species, and markers Sr39#22r, Sr39#50s--in the Ae. speltoides, Ae. tauschii, T. timopheevii, line KS90WRC010 (Lr41), the sort of common wheat In Memory of Maistrenko, obtained using synthetic hexaploid T. timopheevii x Ae. tauschii and introgressive lines obtained using Ae. speltoides. Marker BE500705, which indicates the absence of Lr35/Sr39 genes, was not revealed in lines TcLr35 and MqSr39, in Ae. speltoides, Ae. tauschii and T. boeoticum (kk-61034, 61038). Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of amplification products obtained with the markers SCS421 and Sr39#22r indicated their low homology with TcLr28 and TcLr35. Using molecular markers, we showed a different distribution of Lr28 (77%), Lr35 (100%) and Lr47 (15%) genes in 13 studied samples ofAe. speltoides. In introgressive lines derived from Ae. speltoides, contemporary Russian sorts of common wheat and triticale variants Lr28, Lr35, Lr47 genes were not revealed. PMID:25711022

  9. NCI Center of Excellence in Immunology

    Cancer.gov

    Centers of Excellence Chromosome Biology Genitourinary Malignancies HIV/AIDS Integrative Cancer Biology and Genomics Faculties and Working Groups Immunology Faculty Molecular Targets Faculty Vaccine Working Group  Organizations Cancer Therapy Evaluation P

  10. Transcriptomic molecular markers for screening human colon cancer in stool and tissue.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Vos, Paul; iJames, Stephanie; Lysle, Donald T; Allison, Ron R; Flake, Gordon; Sinar, Dennis R; Naziri, Wade; Marcuard, Stefan P; Pennington, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for sensitive and specific diagnostic molecular markers that can be used to monitor early patterns of gene expression in non-invasive exfoliated colonocytes shed in the stool, and in situ in adenoma-carcinoma epithelium of the colon. RNA-based detection methods are more comprehensive than either DNA-, protein- or methylation-based screening methods. By routinely and systematically being able to perform quantitative gene expression studies on these samples using less than ten colon cancer genes selected by the enormous resources of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genome Anatomy Project, we were able to monitor changes at various stages in the neoplastic process, allowing for reliable diagnostic screening of colon cancer particularly at the early, pre-malignant stages. Although the expression of some of the genes tested in tissue showed less variability in normal or cancerous patients than in stool, the stool by itself is suitable for screening. Thus, a transcriptomic approach using stool or tissue samples promises to offer more sensitivity and specificity than currently used molecular screening methods for colon cancer. A larger prospective clinical study utilizing stool and tissue samples derived from many control and colon cancer patients, to allow for a statistically valid analysis, is now urgently required to determine the true sensitivity and specificity of the transcriptomic screening approach for this preventable cancer. PMID:17726236

  11. Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks. PMID:17150982

  12. Structural characterization of low molecular weight polysaccharide from Astragalus membranaceus and its immunologic enhancement in recombinant protein vaccine against systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Xiao, Chunyu; Qu, Jing; Wang, Guiyun

    2016-07-10

    Structure and immunologic enhancement of low molecular weight polysaccharide (LMW-ASP) isolated from the root of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) Bge. Were detected in recombinant protein vaccine. Structure analysis of LMW-ASP revealed that LMW-ASP (Mw=5.6kDa) was an acid heteropolysaccharide, which consisted of Glc, Gal, Ara, Xyl and GalA in ratio of 10.0:1.3:1.7:1.0:0.9. Recombinant protein (rP-HSP90C) contained epitope C (LKVIRK) from heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) of Candida albicans was used as a vaccine. The results indicated that LMW-ASP significantly promoted specific antibody titers IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 in sera of mice immunized with rP-HSP90C (p<0.05). It was also found LMW-ASP improved DTH response in HSP90C-injceted mice. More importantly, the mice immunized with rP-HSP90C/LMW-ASP had fewer CFU (colony forming unites) in the kidneys compared to the mice immunized with rP-HSP90C (p<0.05). Therefore, LMW-ASP could be exploited into the novel adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of recombinant protein vaccine. PMID:27106150

  13. Diversity of long-chain toxins in Tityus zulianus and Tityus discrepans venoms (Scorpiones, Buthidae): molecular, immunological, and mass spectral analyses.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adolfo; García, Carmen C; Lugo, Elizabeth; Alfonzo, Marcelo J; Jowers, Michael J; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2006-01-01

    In Venezuela, stings by Tityus zulianus scorpions produce cardiorespiratory arrest, whereas envenoming by Tityus discrepans involves gastrointestinal/pancreatic complications, suggesting structural and/or functional differences. We sought to compare their toxin repertoires through immunological, molecular, and mass spectral analyses. First, in vivo tests showed that neutralization of T. zulianus venom toxicity by the anti-T. discrepans antivenom was not complete. To compare T. discrepans and T. zulianus long-chain (sodium channel-active) toxins, their most toxic Sephadex G-50 fractions, TdII and TzII, were subjected to acid-urea PAGE, which showed differences in composition. Amplification of toxin-encoding mRNAs using a leader peptide-based oligonucleotide rendered cDNAs representing twelve T. discrepans and two T. zulianus distinct toxin transcripts, including only one shared component, indicating divergence between T. zulianus and T. discrepans 5' region-encoded, toxin signal peptides. A 3'-UTR polymorphism was also noticed among the transcripts encoding shared components Tz1 and Td4. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of TdII and TzII produced species-specific spectra, with seven of the individual masses matching those predicted by cDNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the unique T. zulianus transcript-encoded sequence, Tz2, is structurally related to Tityus serrulatus and Centruroides toxins. Together with previous reports, this work indicates that T. zulianus and T. discrepans toxin repertoires differ structurally and functionally. PMID:16356783

  14. [Genetic polymorphism of flax Linum usitatissimum based on use of molecular cytogenetic markers].

    PubMed

    Rachinskaia, O A; Lemesh, V A; Muravenko, O V; Iurkevich, O Iu; Guzenko, E V; Bol'sheva, N L; Bogdanova, M V; Samatadze, T E; Popov, K V; Malyshev, S V; Shostak, N G; Heller, K; Khotyleva, L V; Zelenin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Using a set of approaches based on the use of molecular cytogenetic markers (DAPI/C-banding, estimation of the total area of DAPI-positive regions in prophase nuclei, FISH with 26S and 5S rDNA probes) and the microsatellite (SSR-PCR) assay, we studied genomic polymorphism in 15 flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) varieties from different geographic regions belonging to three directions of selection (oil, fiber, and intermediate flaxes) and in the k-37 x Viking hybrid. All individual chromosomes have been identified in the karyotypes of these varieties on the basis of the patterns of differential DAPI/C-banding and the distribution of 26S and 5S rDNA, and idiograms of the chromosomes have been generated. Unlike the oil flax varieties, the chromosomes in the karyotypes of the fiber flax varieties have, as a rule, pericentromeric and telomeric DAPI-positive bands of smaller size, but contain larger intercalary regions. Two chromosomal rearrangements (chromosome 3 inversions) were discovered in the variety Luna and in the k-37 x Viking hybrid. In both these forms, no colocalization of 26S rDNA and 5S rDNA on the satellite chromosome was detected. The SSR assay with the use of 20 polymorphic pairs of primers revealed 22 polymorphic loci. Based on the SSR data, we analyzed genetic similarity of the flax forms studied and constructed a genetic similarity dendrogram. The genotypes studied here form three clusters. The oil varieties comprise an independent cluster. The genetically related fiber flax varieties Vita and Luna, as well as the landrace Lipinska XIII belonging to the intermediate type, proved to be closer to the oil varieties than the remaining fiber flax varieties. The results of the molecular chromosomal analysis in the fiber and oil flaxes confirm their very close genetic similarity. In spite of this, the combined use of the chromosomal and molecular markers has opened up unique possibilities for describing the genotypes of flax varieties and creating their genetic passports. PMID:21446184

  15. Identification and grouping of mycoplasmalike organisms associated with grapevine yellows and clover phyllody diseases based on immunological and molecular analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, K H; Credi, R; Loi, N; Maixner, M; Chen, T A

    1994-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining, dot blot hybridization, PCR, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, and restriction fragment length polymorphism wee used to study the genetic relatedness among mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) associated with several geographically diverse grapevine yellows diseases (CA1, CH1, SA1, and SA2 from Bologna, Italy; GYU from Udine, Italy; GYR from Rome, Italy; and GYG from Germany). The relationship between these and MLOs associated with clover phyllody diseases in Italy (CPhB and CPhC) and Canada (CPhCa) was also examined. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with MLOs of GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected periwinkles. Dot blot hybridization with two cloned GYU DNA fragments, GYD-1 and GYD-2 inserts, showed that both hybridized with DNAs of GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected periwinkles but not with those of GYR and CPhCa. In addition, GYD-1 insert hybridized with DNAs of CA1, CH1, SA1, SA2, and GYG. Three primer pairs were developed in PCR experiments for this study. By using primer set GYD2P1F and GYD2P1R, a 600-bp DNA fragment was amplified only when DNAs from GYU-, CPhB-, and CPhC-infected plants were used as templates. With the primer pair GYD2P1F and GYD2P2R, a 550-bp DNA fragment was amplified from GYU, CPhB, CPhC, and GYG. The primer pair GYD1P1F and GYD1P2R, on the other hand, could amplify all isolates, although the patterns of PCR products were not identical for all isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8031086

  16. Immunological identification of a high molecular weight protein as a condidate for the product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, L.; Krstenansky, J.; Mendell, J.; Rammohan, K.W.; Gruenstein, E. )

    1988-06-01

    An oligopeptide was synthesized based on translation of the nucleotide sequence of the putative exon region of clone pERT87-25 from the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Immunization of rabbits with this oligopeptide induced the formation of antibodies directed against a protein present in human, rat, and rabbit skeletal muscle. This protein, which is missing in the skeletal muscle of two patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has a molecular mass of {approx}320-420 kDa and is clearly different from the putative Duchenne muscular dystrophy-related protein nebulin. The data suggest that this 320-420-kDa protein is produced by the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

  17. Molecular, Immunological, and Biological Characterization of Tityus serrulatus Venom Hyaluronidase: New Insights into Its Role in Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Mendes, Bárbara Bruna Ribeiro; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Felicori, Liza Figueiredo; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo Andrez; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2014-01-01

    Background Scorpionism is a public health problem in Brazil, and Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is primarily responsible for severe accidents. The main toxic components of Ts venom are low-molecular-weight neurotoxins; however, the venom also contains poorly characterized high-molecular-weight enzymes. Hyaluronidase is one such enzyme that has been poorly characterized. Methods and principal findings We examined clones from a cDNA library of the Ts venom gland and described two novel isoforms of hyaluronidase, TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2. The isoforms are 83% identical, and alignment of their predicted amino acid sequences with other hyaluronidases showed conserved residues between evolutionarily distant organisms. We performed gel filtration followed by reversed-phase chromatography to purify native hyaluronidase from Ts venom. Purified native Ts hyaluronidase was used to produce anti-hyaluronidase serum in rabbits. As little as 0.94 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum neutralized 1 LD50 (13.2 µg) of Ts venom hyaluronidase activity in vitro. In vivo neutralization assays showed that 121.6 µl of anti-hyaluronidase serum inhibited mouse death 100%, whereas 60.8 µl and 15.2 µl of serum delayed mouse death. Inhibition of death was also achieved by using the hyaluronidase pharmacological inhibitor aristolochic acid. Addition of native Ts hyaluronidase (0.418 µg) to pre-neutralized Ts venom (13.2 µg venom+0.94 µl anti-hyaluronidase serum) reversed mouse survival. We used the SPOT method to map TsHyal-1 and TsHyal-2 epitopes. More peptides were recognized by anti-hyaluronidase serum in TsHyal-1 than in TsHyal-2. Epitopes common to both isoforms included active site residues. Conclusions Hyaluronidase inhibition and immunoneutralization reduced the toxic effects of Ts venom. Our results have implications in scorpionism therapy and challenge the notion that only neurotoxins are important to the envenoming process. PMID:24551256

  18. Molecular marker characterization and source appointment of particulate matter and its organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Kyu; Ban, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yong-Pyo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Yi, Seung-Muk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to identify possible sources and to estimate their contribution to total suspended particle (TSP) organic aerosol (OA) contents. A total of 120 TSP and PM2.5 samples were collected simultaneously every third day over a one-year period in urban area of Incheon, Korea. High concentration in particulate matters (PM) and its components (NO3(-), water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), and n-alkanoic acids) were observed during the winter season. Among the organics, n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, levoglucosan, and phthalates were major components. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis identified seven sources of organic aerosols including combustion 1 (low molecular weight (LMW)-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)), combustion 2 (high molecular weight (HMW)-PAHs), biomass burning, vegetative detritus (n-alkane), secondary organic aerosol 1 (SOA1), secondary organic aerosol 2 (SOA2), and motor vehicles. Vegetative detritus increased during the summer season through an increase in biogenic/photochemical activity, while most of the organic sources were prominent in the winter season due to the increases in air pollutant emissions and atmospheric stability. The correlation factors were high among the main components of the organic carbon (OC) in the TSP and PM2.5. The results showed that TSP OAs had very similar characteristics to the PM2.5 OAs. SOA, combustion (PAHs), and motor vehicle were found to be important sources of carbonaceous PM in this region. Our results imply that molecular markers (MMs)-PMF model can provide useful information on the source and characteristics of PM. PMID:26022138

  19. Ribosomal DNA as molecular markers and their applications in the identification of fish parasites (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from India

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Anshu; Verma, Chandni; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2014-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques for taxonomic analysis of monogenean parasites has led to a great increase for proper identification and factualness. These molecular techniques, in particular the use of molecular markers, have been used to identify and validate the monogenean parasites. Although, improvements in marker detection systems particularly of elements of rDNA like 18S, ITS and 28S used in monogeneans parasites have enabled great advances to be made in recent years in India. However, the molecular sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationships among the parasitic helminthes is unconventional in India. Many workers have been always questioned the validity of Indian species of monogeneans and emphasized the need to ascertain the status of species from Indian fish. Here we would like to provide additional resolution for the interpretation of use of molecular markers in study of monogeneans in India. This review provides an overview of current stage of studies in India that have been used in applying molecular techniques to monogenean.

  20. USING CARBOHYDRATES AS MOLECULAR MARKERS TO DETERMINE THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGRICULTURAL SOIL TO AMBIENT FINE AND COURSE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project research optimized the quantification technique for carbohydrates that also allows quantification of other non-polar molecular markers based on using an isotopically labeled internal standard (D-glucose-1,2,3,4,5,6,6-d7) to monitor extraction efficiency, extraction usi...

  1. Evaluation of molecular markers for discriminating Gonatocerus morrilli (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae): a biological control agent for Homalodisca vitripennis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the utility of molecular markers for distinguishing between two closely related species, Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) and G. walkerjonesi, S. Triapitsyn, to evaluate whether post-release G. morrilli specimens could be discriminated in the field. Initially, post-release specimens from Cal...

  2. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we describe public immortal mapping populations of self-compatible lines, molecular markers, and linkage maps for Brassica rapa and B. oleracea. We propose that these resources are valuable reference tools for the Brassica community. The B. rapa population consists of 150 recombinant...

  3. Construction of a genetic linkage map of black gram, Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper, based on molecular markers and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Souframanien, J; Gopalakrishna, T

    2008-08-01

    A genetic linkage map of black gram, Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper, was constructed with 428 molecular markers using an F9 recombinant inbred population of 104 individuals. The population was derived from an inter-subspecific cross between a black gram cultivar, TU94-2, and a wild genotype, V. mungo var. silvestris. The linkage analysis at a LOD score of 5.0 distributed all 428 markers (254 AFLP, 47 SSR, 86 RAPD, and 41 ISSR) into 11 linkage groups. The map spanned a total distance of 865.1 cM with an average marker density of 2 cM. The largest linkage group spanned 115 cM and the smallest linkage group was of 44.9 cM. The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 11 to 86 and the average distance between markers varied from 1.1 to 5.6 cM. Comparison of the map with other published azuki bean and black gram maps showed high colinearity of markers, with some inversions. The current map is the most saturated map for black gram to date and will provide a useful tool for identification of QTLs and for marker-assisted selection of agronomically important characters in black gram. PMID:18650952

  4. Molecular markers linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-z in rice for use in marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Conaway-Bormans, C A; Marchetti, M A; Johnson, C W; McClung, A M; Park, W D

    2003-10-01

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Pyricularia grisea, is a serious disease affecting rice-growing regions around the world. Current methods for identification of blast-resistant germplasm and progeny typically utilize phenotypic screening. However, phenotypic screens are influenced by environmental conditions and the presence of one resistance gene can sometimes phenotypically mask other genes conferring resistance to the same blast race. Pi-z is a dominant gene located on the short arm of chromosome 6 that confers complete resistance to five races of blast. Using sequence data found in public databases and degenerate primer pairs based on the P-loop, nucleotide binding sites and kinase domain motifs of previously cloned resistance genes, we have developed PCR-based DNA markers that cosegregate with the gene. These markers are polymorphic in a wide range of germplasm, including the narrow crosses characteristic of applied rice-breeding programs. They can now be used as a low cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional phenotypic screening for direct detection of blast resistance genes, allowing rapid introgression of genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more-durable blast resistance. PMID:12955204

  5. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  6. Molecular analysis of East Anatolian traditional plum and cherry accessions using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Öz, M H; Vurgun, H; Bakir, M; Büyük, İ; Yüksel, C; Ünlü, H M; Çukadar, K; Karadoğan, B; Köse, Ö; Ergül, A

    2013-01-01

    We conducted SSR analyses of 59 accessions, including 29 traditional plum (Prunus domestica), 24 sweet cherry (Prunus avium), and 1 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) selected from East Anatolian gene sources and 3 plum and 2 cherry reference accessions for molecular characterization and investigation of genetic relationships. Eight SSR loci [1 developed from the apricot (UDAp-404), 4 from the peach (UDP96-010, UDP96-001, UDP96-019, Pchgms1) and 3 from the cherry (UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31) genome] for plum accessions and 9 SSR loci [5 developed from the cherry (PS12A02, UCD-CH13, UCD-CH17, UCD-CH31, UCD-CH21), 3 from the peach (Pchgms1, UDP96-001, UDP96-005) and 1 from the plum (CPSCT010) genome] for cherry accessions were used for genetic identification. A total of 66 and 65 alleles were obtained in the genetic analyses of 31 plum and 28 cherry accessions, respectively. The number of alleles revealed by SSR analysis ranged from 4 to 14 alleles per locus, with a mean value of 8.25 in plum accessions, and from 5 to 10 alleles per locus with a mean value of 7.2 in cherry accessions. Only one case of synonym was identified among the cherry accessions, while no case of synonym was observed among the plum accessions. Genomic SSR markers used in discrimination of plum and cherry accessions showed high cross-species transferability in the Prunus genus. Because of their appreciable polymorphism and cross species transferability, the SSR markers that we evaluated in this study will be useful for studies involving fingerprinting of cherry and plum cultivars. PMID:24301792

  7. Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  8. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  9. Development and evaluation of robust molecular markers linked to disease resistance in tomato for distinctness, uniformity and stability testing.

    PubMed

    Arens, Paul; Mansilla, Carmen; Deinum, Daniël; Cavellini, Laetitia; Moretti, André; Rolland, Sophie; van der Schoot, Hanneke; Calvache, David; Ponz, Fernando; Collonnier, Cécile; Mathis, René; Smilde, Diederik; Caranta, Carole; Vosman, Ben

    2010-02-01

    Molecular markers linked to phenotypically important traits are of great interest especially when traits are difficult and/or costly to be observed. In tomato where a strong focus on resistance breeding has led to the introgression of several resistance genes, resistance traits have become important characteristics in distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS) testing for Plant Breeders Rights (PBR) applications. Evaluation of disease traits in biological assays is not always straightforward because assays are often influenced by environmental factors, and difficulties in scoring exist. In this study, we describe the development and/or evaluation of molecular marker assays for the Verticillium genes Ve1 and Ve2, the tomato mosaic virus Tm1 (linked marker), the tomato mosaic virus Tm2 and Tm2 ( 2 ) genes, the Meloidogyne incognita Mi1-2 gene, the Fusarium I (linked marker) and I2 loci, which are obligatory traits in PBR testing. The marker assays were evaluated for their robustness in a ring test and then evaluated in a set of varieties. Although in general, results between biological assays and marker assays gave highly correlated results, marker assays showed an advantage over biological tests in that the results were clearer, i.e., homozygote/heterozygote presence of the resistance gene can be detected and heterogeneity in seed lots can be identified readily. Within the UPOV framework for granting of PBR, the markers have the potential to fulfil the requirements needed for implementation in DUS testing of candidate varieties and could complement or may be an alternative to the pathogenesis tests that are carried out at present. PMID:19855951

  10. Presence of a thapsigargin-sensitive calcium pump in Trypanosoma evansi: Immunological, physiological, molecular and structural evidences.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gordones, M C; Serrano, M L; Rojas, H; Martínez, J C; Uzcanga, G; Mendoza, M

    2015-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) is characterized for its high sensitivity to low concentrations of thapsigargin (TG), a very specific inhibitor. In contrast, SERCA-like enzymes with different sensitivities to TG have been reported in trypanosomatids. Here, we characterized a SERCA-like enzyme from Trypanosoma evansi and evaluated its interaction with TG. Confocal fluorescence microscopy using BODIPY FL TG and specific anti-SERCA antibodies localized the T. evansi SERCA-like enzyme in the ER and confirmed its direct interaction with TG. Moreover, the use of either 1 μM TG or 25 μM 2',5'-di (tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone prevented the reuptake of Ca(2+) and consequently produced a small increase in the parasite cytosolic calcium concentration in a calcium-free medium, which was released from the ER pool. A 3035 bp-sequence coding for a protein with an estimated molecular mass of 110.2 kDa was cloned from T. evansi. The corresponding gene product contained all the invariant residues and conserved motifs found in other P-type ATPases but lacked the calmodulin binding site. Modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the parasite enzyme revealed that the amino acid changes found in the TG-SERCA binding pocket do not compromise the interaction between the enzyme and the inhibitor. Therefore, we concluded that T. evansi possesses a SERCA-like protein that is inhibited by TG. PMID:26297682

  11. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  12. Molecular markers of biomass burning, fungal spores and biogenic SOA in the Taklimakan desert aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pingqing; Zhuang, Guoshun; Sun, Yele; Wang, Qiongzhen; Chen, Jing; Ren, Lujie; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zifa; Pan, Xiaole; Li, Xiangdong; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic primary organic aerosols (POA) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are important organic constituents of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). In order to better understand the atmospheric abundances, molecular compositions and sources of the desert aerosols, biomass-burning tracers (e.g. levoglucosan), primary saccharides including fungal spore tracers, and SOA tracers from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (e.g. isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene) have been studied in ambient aerosols from the Taklimakan desert, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that the total concentrations of biomass-burning tracers at Hetian (177-359 ng m-3, mean 233 ng m-3 in PM2.5) in the south rim of the desert were much higher than those at Tazhong (1.9-8.8 ng m-3 in PM2.5 and 5.9-32 ng m-3 in TSP) in the central Taklimakan desert. Molecular markers of fungal spores were also detected in all the desert aerosols, highlighting the importance of primary bioaerosols in the Asian dust particles. A specific pattern of the dominance of 2-methylglyceric acid over 2-methyltetrols and C5-alkene triols was found in the Taklimakan desert aerosols, especially during the dust storm events, which is different from the 2-methyltetrols-dominated pattern in other ambient aerosols. Our results provide direct evidence on the biogenic POA and SOA tracers in the Taklimakan desert region, which help to better understand their impact on the aerosol chemistry in the down-wind regions.

  13. Molecular characterization of sour orange (Citrus aurantium) accessions and their relatives using SSR and SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Polat, I; Kacar, Y A; Yesiloglu, T; Uzun, A; Tuzcu, O; Gulsen, O; Incesu, M; Kafa, G; Turgutoglu, E; Anil, S

    2012-01-01

    Citrus production with its many varieties is of importance since it provides economically important products for Turkish exports. Sour orange is a rootstock commonly used for propagating the different scion varieties. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of the rootstock accessions would be useful in order to improve citrus breeding programs. We studied genetic relationships and diversity of 51 accessions of sour orange (Citrus aurantium) and their relatives using SSR (simple sequence repeat) and SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism) molecular markers. Twenty-one SRAP primer combinations were tested on these accessions and relatives, producing 167 polymorphic fragments, with a mean of 8.0 and a mean polymorphism information content value of 0.47. Seventeen SSR primers also produced 30 polymorphic fragments, with a mean of 1.4 per primer and a mean polymorphism information content value of 0.39. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average analysis using combined SSR and SRAP data showed a similarity range from 0.71 to 1.00 among the accessions. In the cluster analysis, sour orange relatives were indicated as a separate group from sour orange. 'Macrophylla' and 'Mexican lime' were the accessions most distinct (0.71) from the others. We conclude that genetic diversity in these sour orange accessions is lower and some of them were identical. PMID:23079821

  14. Current Status of Molecular Markers for Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankar; Baine, Michael J.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal malignancy with near 100% mortality. This is in part due to the fact that most patients present with metastatic or locally advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Significantly, in nearly 95% of PC patients there is neither an associated family history of PC nor of diseases known to be associated with an increased risk of PC. These groups of patients who comprise the bulk of PC cases are termed as “sporadic PC” in contrast to the familial PC cases that comprise only about 5% of all PCs. Given the insidious onset of the malignancy and its extreme resistance to chemo and radiotherapy, an abundance of research in recent years has focused on identifying biomarkers for the early detection of PC, specifically aiming at the sporadic PC cohort. However, while several studies have established that asymptomatic individuals with a positive family history of PC and those with certain heritable syndromes are candidates for PC screening, the role of screening in identifying sporadic PC is still an unsettled question. The present review attempts to assess this critical question by investigating the recent advances made in molecular markers with potential use in the early diagnosis of sporadic PC- the largest cohort of PC cases worldwide. It also outlines a novel yet simple risk-factor based stratification system that could be potentially employed by clinicians to identify those individuals who at an elevated-risk for the development of sporadic PC and therefore candidates for screening. PMID:20888394

  15. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  16. Pink berry grape (Vitis vinifera L.) characterization: Reflectance spectroscopy, HPLC and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Rustioni, Laura; De Lorenzis, Gabriella; Hr?a, Monica; Failla, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Color has a fundamental role for the qualitative evaluation and cultivar characterization of fruits. In grape, a normally functional pigment biosynthesis leads to the accumulation of a high quantity of anthocyanins. In this work, 28 Vitis vinifera L. cultivars accumulating low anthocyanins in berries were studied to characterize the biosynthetic dysfunctions in both a phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Reflectance spectroscopy, HPLC profiles and molecular markers related to VvMybA1 and VvMybA2 genes allowed a detailed description of the pigment-related characteristics of these cultivars. Data were consistent concerning the heterozygosity of the non-functional allele in both investigated genes, resulting in a low colored phenotype as described by reflectance. However, the variability in berry colour among our samples was not fully explained by MybA locus, probably due to specific interferences among the biosynthetic pathways, as suggested by the anthocyanin profile variations detected among our samples. The results presented in this work confirmed the importance of the genetic background: grapes accumulating high levels of cyanidin-3-O-glucosides (di-substituted anthocyanin) are generally originated by white cultivar retro-mutations and they seem to preserve the anomalies in the flavonoid hydroxylases enzymes which negatively affect the synthesis of tri-substituted anthocyanins. PMID:26687319

  17. Peptides, specific proteolysis products, as molecular markers of allergenic proteins - in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Dziuba, Marta; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Dąbek, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse allergenic proteins by identifying their molecular biomarkers for detection in food using bioinformatics tools. The protein and epitope sequences were from BIOPEP database, proteolysis was simulated using BIOPEP program and UniProt database screening via BLAST and FASTA programs. The biomarkers of food proteins were proposed: for example for whey proteins - TPEVDDEALEKFDKALKALPMHIR (β-Lg: fragment 141-164), chicken egg - AAVSVDCSEYPKPDCTAEDRPL (ovomucoid: 156-177), wheat - KCNGTVEQVESIVNTLNAGQIASTDVVEVVVSPPY (triose phosphate isomerase: 12-46) and peanuts - QARQLKNNNPFKFFVPPFQQSPRAVA (arachin: 505-530). The results are annotated in the BIOPEP database of allergenic proteins and epitopes, available at http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia. The epitope-receptor interactions are attributed to the epitope's sequence and suggest that in silico proteolysis products showing the highest degree of sequence identity with an epitope or its part are characteristic of a given protein or a group of cross-reactive homologs. The protein markers from basic food groups were proposed based on the above assumption. PMID:24584870

  18. The phylogenetic relationship between Astigmata and Oribatida (Acari) as indicated by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Domes, Katja; Althammer, Max; Norton, Roy A; Scheu, Stefan; Maraun, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Astigmata comprise a diverse group of acariform mite species with a remarkable range of life histories, most of which involve parasitic or commensal relationships with other organisms. Several authors have suggested that Astigmata evolved as a paedomorphic clade from within Oribatida, and both morphology and gland-chemistry strongly suggest that their sister-clade is within the oribatid subgroup Desmonomata. The biologies of these groups contrast greatly, since oribatid mites are mostly soil-living detritivores and fungivores, and have life cycles that are much longer than those in Astigmata. We tested the hypothesis that Astigmata evolved from within Desmonomata using two molecular markers, the ribosomal 18S region (18S) and the nuclear elongation factor 1 alpha (ef1alpha) gene. Representative acariform mites included 28 species of Oribatida, eight of Astigmata, two of Prostigmata and two of Endeostigmata; outgroups included members of Opilioacariformes, Parasitiformes and Ricinulei. To minimize the possibility of long-branch attraction artifacts, we limited highly variable sites by removing gaps (18S) and third codon positions (ef1alpha) from the sequences. Maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining and Bayesian algorithms formed trees that consistently placed Astigmata outside monophyletic Oribatida, usually as sister-group of the endeostigmatid mite Alicorhagia sp. Analyses with and without outgroups resulted in similar topologies, showing no evidence for long-branch artifacts and leaving the conflict with morphological and biochemical data unexplained. PMID:17611803

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. using AFLP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Pereira, A M S; Coppede, J S; França, S C; Ming, L C; Bertoni, B W

    2016-01-01

    Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. is a medicinal plant native to Cerrado vegetation in Brazil, and it is popularly used to treat urogenital tract infections. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic variability of natural C. antisyphiliticus populations using AFLP molecular markers. Accessions were collected in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Goiás. The genotyping of individuals was performed using a LI-COR® DNA Analyzer 4300. The variability within populations was found to be greater than the variability between them. The FST value was 0.3830, which indicated that the populations were highly structured. A higher percentage of polymorphic loci (92.16%) and greater genetic diversity were found in the population accessions from Pratinha-MG. Gene flow was considered restricted (Nm = 1.18), and there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The populations of C. antisyphiliticus exhibited an island-model structure, which demonstrates the vulnerability of the species. PMID:26909989

  20. Molecular markers for identifying a new selected variety of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Li, Fuhua; Huang, Hao; Li, Yijun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during the last decade has produced new varieties exhibiting high growth rates and disease resistance. However, the identification of new varieties of shrimps from their phenotypic characters is difficult. This study introduces a new approach for identifying varieties of shrimps using molecular markers of microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences. The method was employed to identify a new selected variety, Kehai No. 1 (KH-1), from three representative stocks (control group): Zhengda; Tongwei; and a stock collected from Fujian Province, which is now cultured in mainland China. By pooled genotyping of KH-1 and the control group, five microsatellites showing differences between KH-1 and the control group were screened out. Individual genotyping data confirmed the results from pooled genotyping. The genotyping data for the five microsatellites were applied to the assignment analysis of the KH-1 group and the control group using the partial Bayesian assignment method in GENECLASS2. By sequencing the mitochondrial control regions of individuals from the KH-1 and control group, four haplotypes were observed in the KH-1 group, whereas 14 haplotypes were obtained in the control group. By combining the microsatellite assignment analysis with mitochondrial control region analysis, the average accuracy of identification of individuals in the KH-1 group and control group reached 89%. The five selected microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences were highly polymorphic and could be used to distinguish new selected varieties of L. vannamei from other populations cultured in China.

  1. Carbohydrate microarrays for the recognition of cross-reactive molecular markers of microbes and host cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Denong; Liu, Shaoyi; Trummer, Brian J; Deng, Chao; Wang, Aili

    2002-03-01

    We describe here the development of a carbohydrate-based microarray to extend the scope of biomedical research on carbohydrate-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses. We have demonstrated that microbial polysaccharides can be immobilized on a surface-modified glass slide without chemical conjugation. With this procedure, a large repertoire of microbial antigens (approximately 20,000 spots) can be patterned on a single micro-glass slide, reaching the capacity to include most common pathogens. Glycoconjugates of different structural characteristics are shown here to be applicable for microarray fabrication, extending the repertoires of diversity and complexity of carbohydrate microarrays. The printed microarrays can be air-dried and stably stored at room temperature for long periods of time. In addition, the system is highly sensitive, allowing simultaneous detection of a broad spectrum of antibody specificities with as little as a few microliters of serum specimen. Finally, the potential of carbohydrate microarrays is demonstrated by the discovery of previously undescribed cellular markers, Dex-Ids. PMID:11875429

  2. Identification of molecular markers for DNA barcoding in the Aphidiinae (Hym. Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Derocles, Stephane A P; LE Ralec, Anne; Plantegenest, Manuel; Chaubet, Bernard; Cruaud, Corinne; Cruaud, Astrid; Rasplus, Jean-Yves

    2012-03-01

    Reliable identification of Aphidiinae species (Braconidae) is a prerequisite for conducting studies on aphid-parasitoid interactions at the community level. However, morphological identification of Aphidiinae species remains problematic even for specialists and is almost impossible with larval stages. Here, we compared the efficiency of two molecular markers [mitochondrial cytochrome c oxydase I (COI) and nuclear long wavelength rhodopsin (LWRh)] that could be used to accurately identify about 50 species of Aphidiinae that commonly occur in aphid-parasitoid networks in northwestern Europe. We first identified species on a morphological basis and then assessed the consistency of genetic and morphological data. Probably because of mitochondrial introgression, Aphidius ervi and A. microlophii were indistinguishable on the basis of their COI sequences, whereas LWRh sequences discriminated these species. Conversely, because of its lower variability, LWRh failed to discriminate two pairs of species (Aphidius aquilus, Aphidius salicis, Lysiphlebus confusus and Lysiphlebus fabarum). Our study showed that no unique locus but a combination of two genes should be used to accurately identify members of Aphidiinae. PMID:22004100

  3. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Zemtsova, Lyudmila V; Grushetskaya, Zoya E; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Mozgova, Galina V; Pilyuk, Yadviga E; Volovik, Valentina T; Melnikova, Natalia V; Zelenin, Alexandr V; Lemesh, Valentina A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2014-04-01

    The application of DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine allowed us to increase the resolution of chromosome C-banding and DAPI-banding patterns and to investigate chromosomal polymorphism in karyotypes of seven spring and six winter rape varieties. It was shown that the pericentromeric and intercalary C-bands of most of the chromosomes in spring rape were smaller in size and less polymorphic than those of winter rape. More 26S and 5S rDNA sites were found in the winter rape karyotypes than the spring varieties. Separate or colocalized 26S and 5S rDNA sites were revealed on chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16 and 18. Intervarietal and intravarietal polymorphism of the number and chromosomal localization of rDNA sites were detected. The generalized idiogram of chromosomes of 13 Brassica napus varieties with account of all possibilities of C-banding patterns as well as localization of 26S and 5S rDNA sites were constructed. Polymorphism of the examined molecular and cytogenetic markers as well as the heterozygosis level of FAE1.1 gene controlling erucic acid synthesis in rapeseed was higher in the winter varieties than in the spring ones. The obtained data were in a atisfactory agreement with increased tolerance to environmental stress conditions of winter rape. PMID:24840830

  4. Molecular markers and mechanisms of stroke: RNA studies of blood in animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Frank R; Jickling, Glen C; Stamova, Boryana; Tian, Yingfang; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, DaZhi; Kuczynski, Beth; Cox, Christopher D; Ander, Bradley P

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome expression microarrays can be used to study gene expression in blood, which comes in part from leukocytes, immature platelets, and red blood cells. Since these cells are important in the pathogenesis of stroke, RNA provides an index of these cellular responses to stroke. Our studies in rats have shown specific gene expression changes 24 hours after ischemic stroke, hemorrhage, status epilepticus, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, global ischemia, and following brief focal ischemia that simulated transient ischemic attacks in humans. Human studies show gene expression changes following ischemic stroke. These gene profiles predict a second cohort with >90% sensitivity and specificity. Gene profiles for ischemic stroke caused by large-vessel atherosclerosis and cardioembolism have been described that predict a second cohort with >85% sensitivity and specificity. Atherosclerotic genes were associated with clotting, platelets, and monocytes, and cardioembolic genes were associated with inflammation, infection, and neutrophils. These gene profiles predicted the cause of stroke in 58% of cryptogenic patients. These studies will provide diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic markers, and will advance our understanding of stroke in humans. New techniques to measure all coding and noncoding RNAs along with alternatively spliced transcripts will markedly advance molecular studies of human stroke. PMID:21505474

  5. Treatment Outcome and Prognostic Molecular Markers of Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Kyu-Won; Han, Jung Woo; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Kim, Jun Won; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify prognostic factors and define the optimal management of patients with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNETs), we investigated treatment outcomes and explored the prognostic value of specific molecular markers. Methods A total of 47 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed sPNETs between May 1985 and June 2012 were included. Immunohistochemical analysis of LIN28, OLIG2, and Rad51 expression was performed and correlated with clinical outcome. Results With a median follow-up of 70 months, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 55.5% and 40%, respectively, for all patients. Age, surgical extent, and radiotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Patients who received initially planned multimodal treatment without interruption (i.e., radiotherapy and surgery (≥subtotal resection), with or without chemotherapy) showed significantly higher 5-year OS (71.2%) and PFS (63.1%). In 29 patients with available tumor specimens, tumors with high expression of either LIN28 or OLIG2 or elevated level of Rad51 were significantly associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions We found that multimodal treatment improved outcomes for sPNET patients, especially when radiotherapy and ≥subtotal resection were part of the treatment regimen. Furthermore, we confirmed the prognostic significance of LIN28 and OLIG2 and revealed the potential role of Rad51 in sPNETs. PMID:27074032

  6. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    PubMed

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  7. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test.

  8. Validation of molecular markers associated with boron tolerance, powdery mildew resistance and salinity tolerance in field peas

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Muhammad; Rosewarne, Garry M.; Sudheesh, Shimna; Kant, Pragya; Leonforte, Antonio; Lombardi, Maria; Kennedy, Peter R.; Cogan, Noel O. I.; Slater, Anthony T.; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2015-01-01

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important grain legume consumed both as human food and animal feed. However, productivity in low rainfall regions can be significantly reduced by inferior soils containing high levels of boron and/or salinity. Furthermore, powdery mildew (PM) (Erysiphe pisi) disease also causes significant yield loss in warmer regions. Breeding for tolerance to these abiotic and biotic stresses are major aims for pea breeding programs and the application of molecular markers for these traits could greatly assist in developing improved germplasm at a faster rate. The current study reports the evaluation of a near diagnostic marker, PsMlo, associated with PM resistance and boron (B) tolerance as well as linked markers associated with salinity tolerance across a diverse set of pea germplasm. The PsMlo1 marker predicted the PM and B phenotypic responses with high levels of accuracy (>80%) across a wide range of field pea genotypes, hence offers the potential to be widely adapted in pea breeding programs. In contrast, linked markers for salinity tolerance were population specific; therefore, application of these markers would be suitable to relevant crosses within the program. Our results also suggest that there are possible new sources of salt tolerance present in field pea germplasm that could be further exploited. PMID:26579164

  9. Transport of sewage molecular markers through saturated soil column and effect of easily biodegradable primary substrate on their removal.

    PubMed

    Foolad, Mahsa; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiangyong

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and artificial sweeteners (ASs) are emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) in the aquatic environment. The presence of PPCPs and ASs in water bodies has an ecologic potential risk and health concern. Therefore, it is needed to detect the pollution sources by understanding the transport behavior of sewage molecular markers in a subsurface area. The aim of this study was to evaluate transport of nine selected molecular markers through saturated soil column experiments. The selected sewage molecular markers in this study were six PPCPs including acetaminophen (ACT), carbamazepine (CBZ), caffeine (CF), crotamiton (CTMT), diethyltoluamide (DEET), salicylic acid (SA) and three ASs including acesulfame (ACF), cyclamate (CYC), and saccharine (SAC). Results confirmed that ACF, CBZ, CTMT, CYC and SAC were suitable to be used as sewage molecular markers since they were almost stable against sorption and biodegradation process during soil column experiments. In contrast, transport of ACT, CF and DEET were limited by both sorption and biodegradation processes and 100% removal efficiency was achieved in the biotic column. Moreover, in this study the effect of different acetate concentration (0-100mg/L) as an easily biodegradable primary substrate on a removal of PPCPs and ASs was also studied. Results showed a negative correlation (r(2)>0.75) between the removal of some selected sewage chemical markers including ACF, CF, ACT, CYC, SAC and acetate concentration. CTMT also decreased with the addition of acetate, but increasing acetate concentration did not affect on its removal. CBZ and DEET removal were not dependent on the presence of acetate. PMID:26210019

  10. Dynamics of molecular markers linked to the resistance loci in a mosquito-Plasmodium system.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guiyun; Severson, David W

    2003-01-01

    Models on the evolution of resistance to parasitism generally assume fitness tradeoffs between the costs of being parasitized and the costs associated with resistance. This study tested this assumption using the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and malaria parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum system. Experimental mosquito populations were created by mixing susceptible and resistant strains in equal proportions, and then the dynamics of markers linked to loci for Plasmodium resistance and other unlinked neutral markers were determined over 12 generations. We found that when the mixed population was maintained under parasite-free conditions, the frequencies of alleles specific to the susceptible strain at markers closely linked to the loci for resistance (QTL markers) as well as other unlinked markers increased significantly in the first generation and then fluctuated around equilibrium frequencies for all six markers. However, when the mixed population was exposed to an infected blood meal every generation, allele frequencies at the QTL markers for resistance were not significantly changed. Small population size caused significant random fluctuations of allele frequencies at all marker loci. Consistent allele frequency changes in the QTL markers and other unlinked markers suggest that the reduced fitness in the resistant population has a genome-wide effect on the genetic makeup of the mixed population. Continuous exposure to parasites promoted the maintenance of alleles from the resistant Moyo-R strain in the mixed population. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed malaria control strategy through genetic disruption of vector competence. PMID:12807772

  11. Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a "modified backcross" involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062 cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID:22936937

  12. Molecular Linkage Mapping and Marker-Trait Associations with NlRPT, a Downy Mildew Resistance Gene in Nicotiana langsdorffii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouan; Gao, Muqiang; Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii is one of two species of Nicotiana known to express an incompatible interaction with the oomycete Peronospora tabacina, the causal agent of tobacco blue mold disease. We previously showed that incompatibility is due to the hypersensitive response (HR), and plants expressing the HR are resistant to P. tabacina at all stages of growth. Resistance is due to a single dominant gene in N. langsdorffii accession S-4-4 that we have named NlRPT. In further characterizing this unique host-pathogen interaction, NlRPT has been placed on a preliminary genetic map of the N. langsdorffii genome. Allelic scores for five classes of DNA markers were determined for 90 progeny of a “modified backcross” involving two N. langsdorffii inbred lines and the related species N. forgetiana. All markers had an expected segregation ratio of 1:1, and were scored in a common format. The map was constructed with JoinMap 3.0, and loci showing excessive transmission distortion were removed. The linkage map consists of 266 molecular marker loci defined by 217 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 26 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs), 10 conserved orthologous sequence markers, nine inter-simple sequence repeat markers, and four target region amplification polymorphism markers arranged in 12 linkage groups with a combined length of 1062 cM. NlRPT is located on linkage group three, flanked by four AFLP markers and one SSR. Regions of skewed segregation were detected on LGs 1, 5, and 9. Markers developed for N. langsdorffii are potentially useful genetic tools for other species in Nicotiana section Alatae, as well as in N. benthamiana. We also investigated whether AFLPs could be used to infer genetic relationships within N. langsdorffii and related species from section Alatae. A phenetic analysis of the AFLP data showed that there are two main lineages within N. langsdorffii, and that both contain populations expressing dominant resistance to P. tabacina. PMID:22936937

  13. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich.

    PubMed

    Marubodee, Rusama; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Isemura, Takehisa; Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  14. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich

    PubMed Central

    Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  15. Predicting Quantitative Traits With Regression Models for Dense Molecular Markers and Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Naya, Hugo; Gianola, Daniel; Crossa, José; Legarra, Andrés; Manfredi, Eduardo; Weigel, Kent; Cotes, José Miguel

    2009-01-01

    The availability of genomewide dense markers brings opportunities and challenges to breeding programs. An important question concerns the ways in which dense markers and pedigrees, together with phenotypic records, should be used to arrive at predictions of genetic values for complex traits. If a large number of markers are included in a regression model, marker-specific shrinkage of regression coefficients may be needed. For this reason, the Bayesian least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) (BL) appears to be an interesting approach for fitting marker effects in a regression model. This article adapts the BL to arrive at a regression model where markers, pedigrees, and covariates other than markers are considered jointly. Connections between BL and other marker-based regression models are discussed, and the sensitivity of BL with respect to the choice of prior distributions assigned to key parameters is evaluated using simulation. The proposed model was fitted to two data sets from wheat and mouse populations, and evaluated using cross-validation methods. Results indicate that inclusion of markers in the regression further improved the predictive ability of models. An R program that implements the proposed model is freely available. PMID:19293140

  16. Development of RAPD-SCAR markers for different Ganoderma species authentication by improved RAPD amplification and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Fu, J J; Mei, Z Q; Tania, M; Yang, L Q; Cheng, J L; Khan, M A

    2015-01-01

    The sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) is a valuable molecular technique for the genetic identification of any species. This method is mainly derived from the molecular cloning of the amplified DNA fragments achieved from the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In this study, we collected DNA from 10 species of Ganoderma mushroom and amplified the DNA using an improved RAPD technique. The amplified fragments were then cloned into a T-vector, and positive clones were screened, indentified, and sequenced for the development of SCAR markers. After designing PCR primers and optimizing PCR conditions, 4 SCAR markers, named LZ1-4, LZ2-2, LZ8-2, and LZ9-15, were developed, which were specific to Ganoderma gibbosum (LZ1-4 and LZ8-2), Ganoderma sinense (LZ2-2 and LZ8-2), Ganoderma tropicum (LZ8-2), and Ganoderma lucidum HG (LZ9-15). These 4 novel SCAR markers were deposited into GenBank with the accession Nos. KM391935, KM391936, KM391937, and KM391938, respectively. Thus, in this study we developed specific SCAR markers for the identification and authentication of different Ganoderma species. PMID:26125765

  17. Monitoring disease activity by stool analyses: from occult blood to molecular markers of intestinal inflammation and damage.

    PubMed

    Foell, D; Wittkowski, H; Roth, J

    2009-06-01

    It is a common experience that gastrointestinal symptoms urge us to differentiate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from functional disorders. Furthermore, in patients with proven IBD the disease activity has to be accurately monitored. Faecal markers of neutrophil influx into the mucosa are promising indicators of intestinal inflammation. Some neutrophil-derived proteins may be linked to the pathogenesis of IBD due to their functions as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs). Phagocyte-specific DAMPs of the S100 family are released from neutrophils or monocytes, followed by pro-inflammatory activation of pattern recognition receptors. The complex of S100A8/S100A9 was termed "calprotectin" and has been in use as a faecal marker for 10 years. More recently, faecal S100A12 has been reported to be an even more accurate faecal marker of inflammation. We review the biology of this novel group of molecules which can be used as surrogate markers directly linked to the molecular mechanisms of gut inflammation. PMID:19136508

  18. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of wheat-barley hybrids using genomic in situ hybridization and barley microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, L; Sjakste, T; Matzk, F; Röder, M; Ganal, M

    2003-04-01

    In the present investigation, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and barley microsatellite markers were used to analyse the genome constitution of wheat-barley hybrids from two backcross generations (BC1 and BC2). Two BC1 plants carried 3 and 6 barley chromosomes, respectively, according to GISH data. Additional chromosomal fragments were detected using microsatellites. Five BC2 plants possessed complete barley chromosomes or chromosome segments and six BC2 plants did not preserve barley genetic material. Molecular markers revealed segments of the barley genome with the size of one marker only, which probably resulted from recombination between wheat and barley chromosomes. The screening of backcrossed populations from intergeneric hybrids could be effectively conducted using both genomic in situ hybridization and molecular microsatellite markers. GISH images presented a general overview of the genome constitution of the hybrid plants, while microsatellite analysis revealed the genetic identity of the alien chromosomes and chromosomal segments introgressed. These methods were complementary and provided comprehensive information about the genomic constitution of the plants produced. PMID:12723047

  19. Molecular characterization of Brazilian equid herpesvirus type 1 strains based on neuropathogenicity markers

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Enio; Lara, Maria do Carmo C.S.H.; Cunha, Elenice M.S.; Villalobos, Eliana M.C.; Mori, Claudia M.C.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Brandão, Paulo E.; Fernandes, Wilson R.; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J.

    2015-01-01

    Partial nucleotide sequences of ORF72 (glycoprotein D, gD), ORF64 (infected cell protein 4, ICP4) and ORF30 (DNA polymerase) genes were compared with corresponding sequences of EHV-1 reference strains to characterize the molecular variability of Brazilian strains. Virus isolation assays were applied to 74 samples including visceral tissue, total blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasal swabs of specimens from a total of 64 animals. Only one CSF sample (Iso07/05 strain) was positive by virus isolation in cell culture. EHV-1 Iso07/05 neurologic strain and two abortion visceral tissues samples (Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) were PCR-positive for ORF33 (glycoprotein B, gB) gene of EHV-1. A sequence analysis of the ORF72, ORF64 and ORF30 genes from three EHV-1 archival strains (A3/97, A4/72, A9/92) and three clinical samples (Iso07/05, Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) suggested that among Brazilian EHV-1 strains, the amplified region of the gD gene sequence is highly conserved. Additionally, the analysis of ICP4 gene showed high nucleotide and amino acid identities when compared with genotype P strains, suggesting that the EHV-1 Brazilian strains belonged to the same group. All the EHV-1 Brazilian strains were classified as non-neuropathogenic variants (N752) based on the ORF30 analysis. These findings indicate a high conservation of the gD-, ICP4- and ORF30-encoding sequences. Different pathotypes of the EHV-1 strain might share identical genes with no specific markers, and tissue tropism is not completely dependent on the gD envelope, immediate-early ICP4 and DNA polymerase proteins. PMID:26273275

  20. Molecular markers of trichloroethylene-induced toxicity in human kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Horwitz, Beth P.

    2005-08-07

    Difficulties in evaluation of trichloroethylene (TRI)-induced toxicity in humans and extrapolation of data from laboratory animals to humans are due to the existence of multiple target organs, multiple metabolic pathways, sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in both metabolism and susceptibility to toxicity, and the lack or minimal amount of human data for many target organs. The use of human tissue for mechanistic studies is thus distinctly advantageous. The kidneys are one target organ for TRI and metabolism by the glutathione (GSH) conjugation pathway is responsible for nephrotoxicity. The GSH conjugate is processed further to produce the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. Confluent, primary cultures of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells were used as the model system. Although cells in log-phase growth, which are undergoing more rapid DNA synthesis, would give lower LD{sub 50} values, confluent cells more closely mimic the in vivo proximal tubule. DCVC caused cellular necrosis only at relatively high doses (>100 {mu}M) and long incubation times (>24 h). In contrast, both apoptosis and enhanced cellular proliferation occurred at relatively low doses (10-100 {mu}M) and early incubation times (2-8 h). These responses were associated with prominent changes in expression of several proteins that regulate apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, Apaf-1, Caspase-9 cleavage, PARP cleavage) and cellular growth, differentiation and stress response (p53, Hsp27, NF-{kappa}B). Effects on p53 and Hsp27 implicate function of protein kinase C, the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and the cytoskeleton. The precise pattern of expression of these and other proteins can thus serve as molecular markers for TRI exposure and effect in human kidney.

  1. Cryptic Diversity within the Major Trypanosomiasis Vector Glossina fuscipes Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Shik; Darby, Alistair C.; Causse, Sandrine; Kapitano, Berisha; Hall, Martin J. R.; Steen, Keith; Lutumba, Pascal; Madinga, Joules; Torr, Steve J.; Okedi, Loyce M.; Lehane, Michael J.; Donnelly, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes s.l. is responsible for the transmission of approximately 90% of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness. Three G. fuscipes subspecies have been described, primarily based upon subtle differences in the morphology of their genitalia. Here we describe a study conducted across the range of this important vector to determine whether molecular evidence generated from nuclear DNA (microsatellites and gene sequence information), mitochondrial DNA and symbiont DNA support the existence of these taxa as discrete taxonomic units. Principal Findings The nuclear ribosomal Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) provided support for the three subspecies. However nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data did not support the monophyly of the morphological subspecies G. f. fuscipes or G. f. quanzensis. Instead, the most strongly supported monophyletic group was comprised of flies sampled from Ethiopia. Maternally inherited loci (mtDNA and symbiont) also suggested monophyly of a group from Lake Victoria basin and Tanzania, but this group was not supported by nuclear loci, suggesting different histories of these markers. Microsatellite data confirmed strong structuring across the range of G. fuscipes s.l., and was useful for deriving the interrelationship of closely related populations. Conclusion/Significance We propose that the morphological classification alone is not used to classify populations of G. fuscipes for control purposes. The Ethiopian population, which is scheduled to be the target of a sterile insect release (SIT) programme, was notably discrete. From a programmatic perspective this may be both positive, given that it may reflect limited migration into the area or negative if the high levels of differentiation are also reflected in reproductive isolation between this population and the flies to be used in the release programme. PMID:21858237

  2. Detection of chloroquine and artemisinin resistance molecular markers in Plasmodium falciparum: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, S; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Hamide, Abdoul; Bhat, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Emergence of chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has increased the morbidity and mortality of falciparum malaria worldwide. Artemisinin-based combination therapies are now recommended by the World Health Organization as the first line treatment for falciparum malaria. Numerous molecular markers have been implicated in the CQ and artemisinin resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 26 confirmed cases of falciparum malaria (by giemsa stained thick and thin smear, quantitative buffy coat, immunochromatographic test, or polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) were included in the study. About 5 ml of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood sample was collected and stored at −20°C till use. Plasmodium DNA was extracted using QIAamp whole blood DNA extraction kit. PCR was done to amplify pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfserca, and pfmrp1 genes and the amplicons obtained were sequenced by Macrogen, Inc., Korea. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was done using Bio-Edit Sequence Alignment Editor. Results: Out of the four genes targeted, we noted a SNP in the pfcrt gene alone. This SNP (G > T) was noted in the 658th position of the gene, which was seen in 13 patients. The pfmdr1 and pfserca genes were present in 9 and 14 patients respectively. But we could not find any SNPs in these genes. This SNP in pfcrt gene was not significantly associated with any adverse outcome and neither altered disease progression. Conclusion: Presence of a single SNP may not be associated with any adverse clinical outcome. As the sample size was small, we may have not been able to detect any other known or unknown polymorphisms. PMID:26998436

  3. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines. PMID:19178083

  4. Characterizing the transcriptome and molecular markers information for roach, Rutilus rutilus.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wei; Ma, Xufa; Niu, Jiangong; Zou, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Rutilus rutilus (roach) is native to most of Europe and western Asia, and the Irtysh River basin in Sinkiang, northwest China is the marginal area of their natural distribution. The wide distribution and unique characteristic of this species makes it an ideal model for analysing ecological and comparative genomics. However, the limited genome sequences available for this species have hindered these investigations. Transcriptomes from the brains and livers of five individuals collected from the Irtysh River basin were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. A collection of 132,289 unigenes for this species were obtained using a de novo assembly method based on nearly 120 million clean reads encompassing more than 14 Gb data. Approximately 37.5% (49,656), 27.1% (35,867) and 21.2% (27,987) of the transcriptome had homologues deposited in Nt, Nr and Swiss-Prot, respectively; 12.3% (16,328) were assigned to eukaryotic orthologous groups of proteins classifications, and 21.5% (28,429) harboured Interpro domains. On the basis of the assembled transcriptome, we detected 177,493 single-nuc leotide variation resident in 39.3% (52,029) of the sequences and 20.8% (27,497) of the sequences harbouring 36,639 simple sequence repeats. The identified molecular markers are a basis for further ecological analysis, and the transcriptome reported here allows for more extensive evolutionary analyses of the Cyprinidae, the most species-rich family of freshwater fishes. PMID:27019431

  5. Molecular markers indicate different dynamics of leaves and roots during litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Jens; Jansen, Boris; Palviainen, Marjo; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Up to now there is only a poor understanding of the sources contributing to organic carbon in forest soils, especially the contribution of leaves and roots. Studies of the last 2 decades have shown that methods like pyrolysis and CuO oxidation are suitable tools to trace back the main contributors of organic matter in water, sediments and soils. Lignin derived monomers, extractable lipids, cutin and suberin derived compounds have been used frequently for identification of plant material. However, for the selection of suitable biomarker the decomposition patterns and stability of these compounds are of high importance but they are only poorly understood. In this study we focused on following questions: (I) Which compounds are characteristic to identify certain plant parts and plant species? (II) How stable are these compounds during the first 3 years of litter decomposition? We studied the chemical composition of samples from a 3-year litterbag decomposition experiment with roots and leaves of spruce, pine and birch which was done in Finland. Additionally to mass loss, carbon and nitrogen contents, free lipids were extracted; by alkaline hydrolysis non extractable lipids were gained. The extracts were analyzed afterwards by GC-MS, the insoluble residues were analyzed by curie-point Pyrolysis GC-MS. In addition to the identification and quantification of a variety of different compounds and compound ratios we used statistical classification methods to get deeper insights into the patterns of leaf and root-derived biomarkers during litter decomposition. The mass loss was largely different between the litter species and we always observed larger mass loss for leaf-derived litter in comparison to root derived litter. This trend was also observed by molecular analysis. The increase of the ratio of vanillic acid to vanillin was correlated to the mass loss of the samples over time. This shows that the degree of decomposition of plant material was linked with the degree of lignin degradation. Preliminary results show, that we were able to distinguish the different species and plant parts using various approaches, e.g., abundance and patterns of different substances and different ratios of compounds. The polyesters suberin and cutin were particularly useful to differentiate between roots and leaves. We conclude that knowledge of the decomposition patterns of molecular markers will largely improve the identification power of organic matter sources in soils.

  6. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  7. Diversity of Rhodopirellula and related planctomycetes in a North Sea coastal sediment employing carB as molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Žure, Marina; Munn, Colin B; Harder, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Rhodopirellula is an abundant marine member of the bacterial phylum Planctomycetes. Cultivation studies revealed the presence of several closely related Rhodopirellula species in European coastal sediments. Because the 16S rRNA gene does not provide the desired taxonomic resolution to differentiate Rhodopirellula species, we performed a comparison of the genomes of nine Rhodopirellula strains and six related planctomycetes and identified carB, coding for the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase, as a suitable molecular marker. In this study, we investigated the diversity of Rhodopirellula in coastal intertidal surface sediments of Sylt island, North Sea, using the 16S rRNA and carB genes as molecular markers. The carB clone and pyrosequencing libraries revealed the presence of 12 species of Rhodopirellula and of 66 species in closely related undescribed genera, a diversity that was not detected with a 16S rRNA gene library. This study demonstrates that the carB gene is a powerful molecular marker for detecting Rhodopirellula species in the environment and may be used for the taxonomic evaluation of new strains. PMID:26253575

  8. Direct Analysis of Low-Volatile Molecular Marker Extract from Airborne Particulate Matter Using Sensitivity Correction Method.

    PubMed

    Irei, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Molecular marker analysis of environmental samples often requires time consuming preseparation steps. Here, analysis of low-volatile nonpolar molecular markers (5-6 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs, hopanoids, and n-alkanes) without the preseparation procedure is presented. Analysis of artificial sample extracts was directly conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After every sample injection, a standard mixture was also analyzed to make a correction on the variation of instrumental sensitivity caused by the unfavorable matrix contained in the extract. The method was further validated for the PAHs using the NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) and then applied to airborne particulate matter samples. Tests with the SRMs showed that overall our methodology was validated with the uncertainty of ~30%. The measurement results of airborne particulate matter (PM) filter samples showed a strong correlation between the PAHs, implying the contributions from the same emission source. Analysis of size-segregated PM filter samples showed that their size distributions were found to be in the PM smaller than 0.4 μm aerodynamic diameter. The observations were consistent with our expectation of their possible sources. Thus, the method was found to be useful for molecular marker studies. PMID:27127511

  9. Direct Analysis of Low-Volatile Molecular Marker Extract from Airborne Particulate Matter Using Sensitivity Correction Method

    PubMed Central

    Irei, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Molecular marker analysis of environmental samples often requires time consuming preseparation steps. Here, analysis of low-volatile nonpolar molecular markers (5-6 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs, hopanoids, and n-alkanes) without the preseparation procedure is presented. Analysis of artificial sample extracts was directly conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After every sample injection, a standard mixture was also analyzed to make a correction on the variation of instrumental sensitivity caused by the unfavorable matrix contained in the extract. The method was further validated for the PAHs using the NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) and then applied to airborne particulate matter samples. Tests with the SRMs showed that overall our methodology was validated with the uncertainty of ~30%. The measurement results of airborne particulate matter (PM) filter samples showed a strong correlation between the PAHs, implying the contributions from the same emission source. Analysis of size-segregated PM filter samples showed that their size distributions were found to be in the PM smaller than 0.4 μm aerodynamic diameter. The observations were consistent with our expectation of their possible sources. Thus, the method was found to be useful for molecular marker studies. PMID:27127511

  10. Molecular studies of the immunological effects of the sevoflurane preconditioning in the liver and lung in a rat model of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Mikrou, Angeliki; Kalimeris, Konstantinos A; Lilis, Ioannis; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Nastos, Konstantinos; Papadaki, Helen; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia G; Zarkadis, Ioannis K

    2016-04-01

    Sevoflurane has been shown to improve ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) through several mechanisms, including amelioration of inflammatory response. However, there haven't been any studies considering the potential role of the complement system in sevoflurane-mediated amelioration of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our purpose was to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in sevoflurane preconditioning in liver and lung injury induced by liver ischemia-reperfusion (LIR), giving emphasis to the immunological mechanisms. In order to do that, fifty male Wistar rats were randomly allocated in five groups (n=10 each): Animals in group LIR received ketamine and xylazine and were then subjected to ischemia of the right and median hepatic lobe for 45min and reperfusion for 6h. Group SEVO/LIR received sevoflurane and then LIR was induced, as in group LIR. Animals in group SHAM/LIR were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine and then laparotomy followed. Group SHAM/SEVO received sevoflurane for 30min and then laparotomy followed. Finally, in group VEN, animals only received ketamine and xylazine. Our results showed that sevoflurane preconditioning significantly improved liver-biochemical tests (decreased Alanine transaminase (ALT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Aspartate transaminase (AST) and Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels) and limited inflammatory cell infiltration in BALF. Additionally, compared with the LIR group, the reduction in plasma C3 was significantly reduced in the SEVO/LIR group. No significant differences were observed in histological examination in the liver and lung. Immunostaining of the liver for Intracellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM1) however, showed a decrease in ICAM1 levels in the SEVO/LIR group. In the lung, sevoflurane seemed to exert no effect in ICAM1 levels. Caspase 3 (CASP3) levels in the liver and the lung also appeared unaffected by sevoflurane preconditioning. In the SEVO/LIR group, ICAM1 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the liver. No statistical significantly differences were observed in Complement component 3 (C3), Complement component 5 (C5) and Clusterin (CLU) mRNA levels in the liver or the lung tissue. Summarizing, sevoflurane preconditioning seems to ameliorate LIR-induced injury in the rats, mediated by mechanisms that include ICAM1 and complement C3 down regulation. PMID:26922039

  11. Short Communication: Genetic linkage map of Cucurbita maxima with molecular and morphological markers.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y; Li, X; Yang, X X; Cui, C S; Qu, S P

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbita maxima is one of the most widely cultivated vegetables in China and exhibits distinct morphological characteristics. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with 57 simple-sequence repeats, 21 amplified fragment length polymorphisms, 3 random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and one morphological marker revealed 20 genetic linkage groups of C. maxima covering a genetic distance of 991.5 cM with an average of 12.1 cM between adjacent markers. Genetic linkage analysis identified the simple-sequence repeat marker 'PU078072' 5.9 cM away from the locus 'Rc', which controls rind color. The genetic map in the present study will be useful for better mapping, tagging, and cloning of quantitative trait loci/gene(s) affecting economically important traits and for breeding new varieties of C. maxima through marker-assisted selection. PMID:26125744

  12. [RAPD and SCAR molecular markers linked to the sexuality of cycads (Cycas tanqingii D. Y. Wang)].

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian-Zhou; Jin, Hong; Li, Dong-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Yong

    2007-11-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to amplify DNA fragment, aiming at finding markers linked to the sex trait in Cycas tanqingii D. Y. Wang. A total number of 160 random primers were screened in the RAPD-PCR and more than 2500 RAPD fragments were generated from the male or the female plants. One fragment of about 500 bp was amplified steadily and repeatedly by the S0465 (CCCCGGTAAC) primer only from female plants but not male plants. The RAPD marker was then converted into female-linked dominant SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Regions) marker named STQC-S465-483. The development of this sex-linked SCAR marker provides a possibility of identifying the sex of Cycas tanqingii before sexual maturation, which is very important to in situ or ex situ conservation. PMID:18257243

  13. Immunology of normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti M; Silver, Robert; Dalton, Jess

    2006-10-01

    Since Medawar's initial contemplations in 1953 on the mechanisms of immune evasion allowing for the survival of the allogeneic conceptus in an immunologically competent mother, physicians and immunologists alike have struggled to understand the immunological paradox of pregnancy. Ultimately, our attempts to define the immunology of normal pregnancy have broadened our appreciation of the myriad mechanisms at play that enable the promotion of implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. In this review, we summarise what is known regarding the immunology of normal pregnancy, with special emphasis on the relation to common disorders of pregnancy. PMID:16784908

  14. [Molecular genetic markers in evaluating risk of cardiovascular diseases in coal miners of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Kundiev, Iu I; Basanets, A V; Andrushchenko, T A; Dolinchuk, L V

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricle hypertrophy increases risk of cardiac failure and influences life expectancy. The authors demonstrated diagnostic reliability of genetic markers in evaluating left ventricle hypertrophy formation and their advantages over clinical signs, as outlines prognosis of diseases development on preclinical stage. Through genetic markers analysis with consideration of echo-cardiographic values of left ventricle myocardial weight, the authors determined genotypes associated with left ventricle hypertrophy development. PMID:25335421

  15. Investigation and Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Diospyros Germplasms Using SCoT Molecular Markers in Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Chen, Hu; Qin, Zhenshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about genetic diversity and relationships among germplasms could be an invaluable aid in diospyros improvement strategies. Methods This study was designed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship of local and natural varieties in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China using start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT) markers. The accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms belonging to four species Diospyros kaki Thunb, D. oleifera Cheng, D. kaki var. silverstris Mak, and D. lotus Linn were collected from different eco-climatic zones in Guangxi and were analyzed using SCoT markers. Results Results indicated that the accessions of 95 diospyros germplasms could be distinguished using SCoT markers, and were divided into three groups at similarity coefficient of 0.608; these germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together; of these, the degree of genetic diversity of the natural D. kaki var. silverstris Mak population was richest among the four species; the geographical distance showed that the 12 natural populations of D. kaki var. silverstris Mak were divided into two groups at similarity coefficient of 0.19. Meanwhile, in order to further verify the stable and useful of SCoT markers in diospyros germplasms, SSR markers were also used in current research to analyze the genetic diversity and relationship in the same diospyros germplasms. Once again, majority of germplasms that belong to the same species were clustered together. Thus SCoT markers were stable and especially useful for analysis of the genetic diversity and relationship in diospyros germplasms. Discussion The molecular characterization and diversity assessment of diospyros were very important for conservation of diospyros germplasm resources, meanwhile for diospyros improvement. PMID:26317414

  16. Semi-volatile organic compounds as molecular markers for atmospheric and ecosystem transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genualdi, Susan

    The use of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) as molecular markers to identify the contributions of regional and long-range atmospheric transport, as well as current and historic sources, and contaminant deposition in remote ecosystems of the Western U.S. was investigated. Trans-Pacific air masses influenced by Siberian biomass burning events had elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the historic use pesticides dieldrin and alpha-HCH, while air masses influenced by regional fires in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had enhanced concentrations of PAHs and the current-use pesticides dacthal and endosulfan. This suggests that previously deposited SOCs, such as pesticides, revolatilize to the atmosphere during forest fires. In addition, forest soils collected from a burned area in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had significantly lower SOC concentrations (34 to 100 %) than soils collected from an unburned area separated only by a two lane road. This confirms that SOCs re-volatilize and/or degrade from soils and vegetation during the burning process. The chiral signatures of alpha-HCH in air masses at three sites in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. indicated that the boundary layer has a non-racemic alpha-HCH signature likely due to re-volatilization of alpha-HCH from the Pacific Ocean and that the free troposphere is a source of racemic alpha-HCH. Racemic alpha-HCH was also associated with Asian and trans-Pacific air masses. Racemic cis and trans-chlordane in Pacific Northwestern U.S. air masses indicated that U.S. urban areas continue to be a source of chlordane to the atmosphere. The deposition of non-racemic alpha-HCH in seasonal snowpack in continental Western U.S. national park high elevation ecosystems reflected regional transport, while the high latitude, Alaskan national parks were influenced by long-range atmospheric transport of racemic alpha-HCH. The chiral signature of alpha-HCH in fish collected from high elevation and high latitude ecosystems in Western U.S. national parks reflected the chiral signature of the seasonal snowpack in the lake catchment. This indicates that the fish in these ecosystems do not enantioselectively biotransform alpha-HCH. Racemic cis-chlordane was measured in seasonal snowpack and lake sediments in Sequoia National Park due to the high population density surrounding the park and the past use of chlordane as a termiticide in urban areas. Non-racemic cis-chlordane was measured in sediment collected from Rocky Mountain National Park because this park receives chlordane due to re-volatilization from regional agricultural soil.

  17. Bladder tumor markers: from hematuria to molecular diagnostics--where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Shirodkar, Samir P; Lokeshwar, Vinata B

    2008-07-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy in the USA. Currently, the detection of initial tumors and recurrent disease is based on evaluation of voided urinary specimens, often followed by cystoscopy. With the high rate of recurrence, cystoscopies are regularly repeated with the aim of halting progression of the disease. For patients, this process is fraught with anxiety, pain and high cost. As a result, intense work is being done in the field of bladder tumor markers with the goal of identifying bladder cancer earlier, both in the initial diagnosis and in recurrences of known tumor. The possibility of identifying a marker that could noninvasively differentiate benign and malignant causes of hematuria, and identify recurrences prior to their pathologic progression is the objective of this area of research. Currently, a large number of tumor markers exist, each scrutinized in both the laboratory and in clinical trials. Here we present many of the most widely used and tested markers. Background details are provided as to the mechanism of detection of malignant cells, the results of recent trials and future directions of study. Some novel modalities for tumor detection are also presented. The next few years will no doubt bring newer markers and lead to the elimination of others. Studies continue to refine the role of these markers in clinical practice, but their ultimate efficacy will need to be borne out in large-scale clinical trials in a multitude of settings. PMID:18588456

  18. Molecular diversity and population structure of the forage grass Hemarthria compressa (Poaceae) in south China based on SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Huang, L-K; Zhang, X-Q; Xie, W-G; Zhang, J; Cheng, L; Yan, H D

    2012-01-01

    Hemarthria compressa is one of the most important and widely utilized forage crops in south China, owing to its high forage yield and capability of adaptation to hot and humid conditions. We examined the population structure and genetic variation within and among 12 populations of H. compressa in south China using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. High genetic diversity was found in these samples [percentage polymorphic bands (PPB) = 82.21%, Shannon's diversity index (I) = 0.352]. However, there was relatively low level of genetic diversity at the population level (PPB = 29.17%, I = 0.155). A high degree of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on other measures and molecular markers (Nei's genetic diversity analysis: G(ST) = 54.19%; AMOVA analysis: F(ST) = 53.35%). The SRAP markers were found to be more efficient than ISSR markers for evaluating population diversity. Based on these findings, we propose changes in sampling strategies for appraising and utilizing the genetic resources of this species. PMID:22653675

  19. Combined Use of Molecular Markers and High-Resolution Melting (HRM) to Assess Chromosome Dosage in Potato Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Villano, Clizia; Miraglia, Valeria; Iorizzo, Massimo; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    In plants, the most widely used cytological techniques to assess parental genome contributions are based on in situ hybridization (FISH and GISH), but they are time-consuming and need specific expertise and equipment. Recent advances in genomics and molecular biology have made PCR-based markers a straightforward, affordable technique for chromosome typing. Here, we describe the development of a molecular assay that uses single-copy conserved ortholog set II (COSII)-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the high-resolution melting (HRM) technique to assess the chromosome dosage of interspecific hybrids between a Solanum phureja-S. tuberosum diploid (2n = 2x = 24) hybrid and its wild relative S. commersonii. Screening and analysis of 45 COSII marker sequences allowed S. commersonii-specific SNPs to be identified for all 12 chromosomes. Combining the HRM technique with the establishment of synthetic DNA hybrids, SNP markers were successfully used to predict the expected parental chromosome ratio of 5 interspecific triploid hybrids. These results demonstrate the ability of this strategy to distinguish diverged genomes from each other, and to estimate chromosome dosage. The method could potentially be applied to any species as a tool to assess paternal to maternal ratios in the framework of a breeding program or following transformation techniques. PMID:26663623

  20. Characterization of the Miiuy Croaker (Miichthys miiuy) Transcriptome and Development of Immune-Relevant Genes and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Che, Rongbo; Sun, Yueyan; Sun, Dianqiao; Xu, Tianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) is an important species of marine fish that supports capture fisheries and aquaculture. At present commercial scale aquaculture of this species is limited due to diseases caused by pathogens and parasites which restrict production and limit commercial value. The lack of transcriptomic and genomic information for the miiuy croaker limits the ability of researchers to study the pathogenesis and immune system of this species. In this study we constructed a cDNA library from liver, spleen and kidney which was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing to enable gene discovery and molecular marker development. Principal Findings In our study, a total of 69,071 unigenes with an average length of 572 bp were obtained. Of these, 45,676 (66.13%) were successfully annotated in public databases. The unigenes were also annotated with Gene Ontology, Clusters of Orthologous Groups and KEGG pathways. Additionally, 498 immune-relevant genes were identified and classified. Furthermore, 14,885 putative simple sequence repeats (cSSRs) and 8,510 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from the 69,071 unigenes. Conclusion The miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) transcriptome data provides a large resource to identify new genes involved in many processes including those involved in the response to pathogens and diseases. Furthermore, the thousands of potential cSSR and SNP markers found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of molecular marker assisted breeding programs for the miiuy croaker. PMID:24714210

  1. Laboratory studies of oxidation of primary emissions: Oxidation of organic molecular markers and secondary organic aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Emily A.

    Particulate matter (PM) is solid particles and liquid droplets of complex composition suspended in the atmosphere. In 1997, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for PM was modified to include new standards for fine particulate (particles smaller than 2.5mum, PM2.5) because of their association with adverse health effects, mortality and visibility reduction. Fine PM may also have large impacts on the global climate. Chemically, fine particulate is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic material, from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large fraction of PM2.5 is organic. The first objective was to investigate heterogeneous oxidation of condensed-phase molecular markers for two major organic source categories, meat-cooking emissions and motor vehicle exhaust. Effective reaction rate constants of key molecular markers were measured over a range of atmospherically relevant experimental conditions, including a range of concentrations and relative humidities, and with SOA condensed on the particles. Aerosolized meat grease was reacted with ozone to investigate the oxidation of molecular markers for meat-cooking emissions. Aerosolized motor oil, which is chemically similar to vehicle exhaust aerosol and contains the molecular markers used in source apportionment, was reacted with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to investigate oxidation of motor vehicle molecular markers. All molecular markers of interest - oleic acid, palmitoleic acid, and cholesterol for meat-cooking emissions, and hopanes and steranes for vehicle exhaust - reacted at rates that are significant for time scales on the order of days assuming typical summertime oxidant concentrations. Experimental conditions influenced the reaction rate constants. For both systems, experiments conducted at high relative humidity (RH) had smaller reaction rate constants than those at low RH. SOA coating slowed the reaction rate constants for meat-cooking markers, but had no effect on the oxidation of vehicle markers. Aerosol composition is a key influence on reaction rate constants, perhaps more significant than external influences. Alkenoic acid concentrations in the meat grease particles appear to influence cholesterol oxidation rates. Also, the reaction rate constants for new motor oil were faster than those of the more viscous used motor oil. The measured reaction rate constants were used to oxidize source profiles that were subsequently run in the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model. Oxidizing the molecular markers in the meat-cooking profile led to unrealistically high meat-cooking aerosol contributions to the total organic carbon (OC), often more than 100%. This suggests that there is either unaccounted for sources of meat-cooking molecular markers in the ambient samples, or there is some property of atmospheric aerosols that significantly inhibits reaction that was not captured in this study. Oxidation of motor vehicle profiles led to both higher estimates of total vehicle OC and a quadrupling of gasoline OC, while the diesel contribution changed very little. The increase in gasoline OC changes gasoline vehicle emissions from a relatively minor source to a major one. Thus, oxidation of molecular markers can have a significant impact on receptor model predictions. The second objective was to investigate SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of whole diesel exhaust. Diluted exhaust from a diesel engine was photo-oxidized in a smog chamber to investigate SOA production. Photochemical oxidation rapidly produced significant SOA, almost doubling the organic aerosol contribution of primary emissions after several hours of processing. Less than 10% of the SOA mass could be explained using a SOA model and the measured oxidation of known precursors, such as light aromatics. However, the ultimate yield of SOA is uncertain because it is sensitive to treatment of particle and vapor losses to the chamber walls. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) mass spectra reveal that the organic aerosol becomes progressively more oxidized throughout the experiments. The data provide strong evidence that oxidation of a wide array of precursors that are currently not accounted for in existing models contribute to ambient SOA formation. Results from this study have the potential to influence the way organic aerosols are treated in models. We provide evidence that two key assumptions used in models - that POA is non-reactive and that SOA is formed primarily from high volatility precursors - may not be valid. These assumptions can lead to the underestimation of important sources of OC. For example, assuming POA is non-reactive can lead to an underestimation of source contributions in receptor models, and assuming SOA is formed primarily from high-volatility precursors may overlook a major source of SOA. Our improved understanding of organic aerosol can be used to improve model estimates and better regulate emission sources.

  2. Multiscale modelling in immunology: a review.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Antonio; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2016-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to get a unified view of observations made from the molecular up to the organism scale. Towards this goal, multiscale models have been highly instrumental in contexts such as the cardiovascular field, angiogenesis, neurosciences and tumour biology. More recently, such models are becoming an increasingly important resource to address immunological questions as well. Systematic mining of the literature in multiscale modelling led us to identify three main fields of immunological applications: host-virus interactions, inflammatory diseases and their treatment and development of multiscale simulation platforms for immunological research and for educational purposes. Here, we review the current developments in these directions, which illustrate that multiscale models can consistently integrate immunological data generated at several scales, and can be used to describe and optimize therapeutic treatments of complex immune diseases. PMID:25810307

  3. Towards the Development of a Molecular Map in Switchgrass: I. Microsatellite Marker Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, L.E.

    2001-08-23

    The long-term goal of the switchgrass breeding program is to improve regionally adapted varieties and increase biomass yield and feedstock quality. Although, to some extent, biomass yields are dependent on environmental constraints, increased yield can be achieved through the development of genotypes with improved seasonal adaptation, tolerance to unfavorable environmental conditions, and improved resistance to pest and disease. To date, improvement in switchgrass has relied on recurrent breeding strategies based on phenotypic or genotypic selection. Yield improvements have been modest by this method. If we expect to make significant increase in yields, we need tools that will allow us to map complex traits and uncover the genes that influence them. A genetic linkage map could be a powerful tool for accelerating switchgrass development through marker-assisted selection, breeding and recombination. This type of mapping requires the development of markers that can be associated with phenotypic traits in a population of known pedigree. The most commonly used markers for mapping include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR). At ORNL, we have been concentrating on the development of SSR markers, while our colleagues at the University of Georgia are developing RFLP markers in order to select parents to produce a mapping population and from there to create a framework map from {approx}100 F1 progeny.

  4. Genomic-Enabled Prediction Based on Molecular Markers and Pedigree Using the Bayesian Linear Regression Package in R.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Paulino; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Crossa, José; Gianola, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The availability of dense molecular markers has made possible the use of genomic selection in plant and animal breeding. However, models for genomic selection pose several computational and statistical challenges and require specialized computer programs, not always available to the end user and not implemented in standard statistical software yet. The R-package BLR (Bayesian Linear Regression) implements several statistical procedures (e.g., Bayesian Ridge Regression, Bayesian LASSO) in a unifi ed framework that allows including marker genotypes and pedigree data jointly. This article describes the classes of models implemented in the BLR package and illustrates their use through examples. Some challenges faced when applying genomic-enabled selection, such as model choice, evaluation of predictive ability through cross-validation, and choice of hyper-parameters, are also addressed. PMID:21566722

  5. Genomic-Enabled Prediction Based on Molecular Markers and Pedigree Using the Bayesian Linear Regression Package in R

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Paulino; de los Campos, Gustavo; Crossa, José; Gianola, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The availability of dense molecular markers has made possible the use of genomic selection in plant and animal breeding. However, models for genomic selection pose several computational and statistical challenges and require specialized computer programs, not always available to the end user and not implemented in standard statistical software yet. The R-package BLR (Bayesian Linear Regression) implements several statistical procedures (e.g., Bayesian Ridge Regression, Bayesian LASSO) in a unifi ed framework that allows including marker genotypes and pedigree data jointly. This article describes the classes of models implemented in the BLR package and illustrates their use through examples. Some challenges faced when applying genomic-enabled selection, such as model choice, evaluation of predictive ability through cross-validation, and choice of hyper-parameters, are also addressed. PMID:21566722

  6. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  7. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express–in the form of dendrograms–the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  8. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express-in the form of dendrograms-the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  9. A molecular approach towards the taxonomy of fresh water prawns Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) using mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Jose, Deepak; Nidhin, B; Anil Kumar, K P; Pradeep, P J; Harikrishnan, M

    2016-07-01

    Genus Macrobrachium includes freshwater prawns which inhabit most diverse habitats ranging from low saline areas to inland hill streams and impounded water bodies. Being morphologically conserved, this genus has been exposed to severe disputes related to their taxonomy, systematics and phylogeny. Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens represent two morphologically related congeneric species within this genus. Earlier, M. striatum was considered as a striped form of M. equidens. Though these species are now well-described morphologically and differentiated into two species, no molecular level investigation has been carried out in support of their speciation. We report a study on M. striatum and M. equidens with emphasis to their molecular data through mitochondrial markers (16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I). Results obtained from developed molecular markers of the two species revealed considerable genetic differentiation between them. Phylogram generated using Minimum evolution and Neighbour joining analyses differentiated M. striatum and M. equidens as two independent species. Genetic distance data showed high interspecific divergence (ranging from 3.9% to 17.0% for 16S rRNA sequences and 13.8% to 21.0% for COI sequences) between M. striatum and M. equidens confirming the findings of phylogram. Hence, it could be delineated that M. striatum and M. equidens represent two distinct species within genus Macrobrachium with emphasis to their morphology and genetics. PMID:26119113

  10. Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance to several anti-malarial drugs since the introduction of the widespread use of ACT, the presence of molecular markers associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was assessed in local isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., Pfcrt, Pfdhfr, Pfdhps and Pfmdr1, and the copy number of Pfmdr1 were evaluated for a panel of 174 isolates collected from patients recruited at the military hospital of Dakar from 14 October 2009 to 19 January 2010. Results The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 37.2% of the samples. The Pfmdr1 86Y and 184F mutations were found in 16.6% and 67.6% of the tested samples, respectively. Twenty-eight of the 29 isolates with the 86Y mutation were also mutated at codon 184. Only one isolate (0.6%) had two copies of Pfmdr1. The Pfdhfr 108N/T, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 82.4%, 83.5% and 74.1% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 83.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 75.3%. The Pfdhps 437G, 436F/A and 613S mutations were found in 40.2%, 35.1% and 1.8% of the samples, respectively. There was no double mutant (437G and 540E) or no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R and Pfdhps 437G and 540E). The prevalence of the quadruple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R and Pfdhps 437G) was 36.5%. Conclusions Since 2004, the prevalence of chloroquine resistance had decreased. The prevalence of isolates with high-level pyrimethamine resistance is 83.5%. The prevalence of isolates resistant to sulphadoxine is 40.2%. However, no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R and Pfdhps 437G and 540E), which is associated with a high level of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, has been identified to date. The resistance to amodiaquine remains moderate. PMID:22694921

  11. GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A ROOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

  12. A Molecular Marker-Based Linkage Map of Phaseolus Vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. E.; Sakiyama, N. S.; Chase, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A seed and flower color marker (P), nine seed protein, nine isozyme and 224 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci were used to construct a linkage map of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (n = 11). The mapping population consisted of a backcross progeny between the Mesoamerican breeding line `XR-235-1-1' and the Andean cultivar `Calima'; the former was used as the recurrent parent. A bean PstI genomic library enriched for single copy sequences (95%) was the source of DNA probes. Sixty percent of the probes tested detected polymorphisms betwen the parental genotypes with at least one of the four restriction enzymes used here (DraI, EcoRI, EcoRV and HindIII). The computer software Mapmaker was used to determine the linkage relationships and linear order of segregating markers. These markers assorted into 11 linkage groups covering 960 cM of the bean genome. Partial linkage data were used to estimate the total length of the genome at 1200 cM. This estimate and that for the physical size of the genome yield an average ratio of 530 kb/cM. The relatively small size of the genome makes this crop species a good candidate for the isolation of genes via chromosome walking techniques. PMID:1352759

  13. Identification of molecular markers associated with low chill/heat tolerance in raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New genetic markers were developed which are linked to cold and heat tolerant raspberries. Raspberry is a cool season crop, and as such, cannot tolerate the high temperatures of the South during the normal growing season. Expanding the commercial growth range of raspberry production to the southern...

  14. Molecular markers to determine ecological fate of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (“Bt”) is a ubiquitous soil bacterium with entomopathogenic properties. One strain, Bt subsp. kurstaki (“Btk”), is highly toxic to lepidopteran larvae and used in many commercial products for biological pest control. We designed a set of DNA markers that successfully identifi...

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Lathyrus species: insights from sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Marghali, S; Touati, A; Gharbi, M; Sdouga, D; Trifi-Farah, N

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers were used to evaluate the intra- and interspecific variation among 40 Lathyrus genotypes (four species) (Fabaceae). Ten SRAP primer combinations resulted in a total of 94 bands, and they exhibited high interspecific variability. The genetic differentiation among Lathyrus, estimated using AMOVA, was highly significant. The results indicated that 58% of the total genetic variation existed among species, and 42% of the differentiation was within species. This was explained by the high level of genome conservation of these species as well as the recent and slow evolution of this genus. These results were confirmed by the topology of the neighbor-joining cladogram and the results of the principal coordinate analysis. Our data support previous results based on seed protein diversity. These results make SRAP markers choice markers for the study of functional polymorphism that is directly related to the transcriptomic data. The SRAP markers used in this study provide an accurate picture of the population structure within Lathyrus germplasm, which is critically important information for the design of genetic diversity and structure analyses. Moreover, further extensive studies are necessary to fully examine other Lathyrus species and tests that adopt the SRAP technique to enrich the Lathyrus library for next-generation sequencing, thus providing a potent protocol for the study of polymorphism. PMID:27051021

  16. Molecular characterization of the marker chromosome associated with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E. ); Duncan, A.M.V. ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S.; Sellinger, B. ); Siegel-Bartelt, J. ); Greenberg, C.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome which is derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In this study the authors have used dosage and RFLP analyses on 10 CES patients with marker chromosomes, by using probes to five loci mapped to 22q11.2. The sequences recognized by the probes D22S9, D22S43, and D22S57 are in four copies in all patients, but the sequences at the more distal loci, D22S36 and D22S75, are duplicated only in some individuals. D22S36 is present in three copies in some individuals, and D22S75 is present in two copies in the majority of cases. Only three individuals have a duplication of the most distal locus examined (D22S75), and these individuals have the largest marker chromosomes identified in this study. From the dosage analysis it was found that the marker chromosomes are variable in size and can be asymmetric in nature. There is no obvious correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the size of the duplication. The distal boundary of the CES critical region (D22S36) is proximal to that of DiGeorge syndrome, a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome of 22q11.2. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Molecular characterization of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] is an important medicinal fruit with immense health benefits and antioxidant activity. In this study, microsatellite markers were used as DNA fingerprinting tools for the identification and characterization of peach germplasm in the United States. Eleven microsatel...

  18. Molecular markers associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize: QTL and discriminant analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of maize (Zea mays L.) grain caused by Aspergillus flavus is a serious health hazard to animals and humans. Resistance to infection by A. flavus is poorly understood. The objectives of this investigation were to identify potential candidate markers associated with resistance ...

  19. Identification of Single-Copy Orthologous Genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Physalis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei’s genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis. PMID:23166835

  20. Molecular characterization of RAPD and SCAR markers linked to the Tm-1 locus in tomato.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, T; Murata, M; Motoyoshi, F

    1996-02-01

    We have cloned and sequenced six RAPD fragments tightly linked to the Tm-1 gene which confers tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) resistance in tomato. The terminal ten bases in each of these clones exactly matched the sequence of the primer for amplifying the corresponding RAPD marker, except for one in which the 5'-endmost two nucleotides were different from those of the primer. These RAPD clones did not cross-hybridize with each other, suggesting that they were derived from different loci. From Southern-hybridization experiments, five out of the six RAPD clones were estimated to be derived from middle- or high-repetitive sequences, but not from any parts of the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), which are known to be tightly linked with the Tm-1 locus. The remaining clone appeared to be derived from a DNA family consisting of a few copies. These six RAPD fragments were converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, each of which was detectable using a pair of primers having the same sequence as that at either end of the corresponding RAPD clone. All pairs of SCAR primers amplified distinct single bands whose sizes were the same as those of the RAPD clones. In four cases, the SCAR markers were present in the line with Tm-1 but absent in the line without it, as were the corresponding RAPD markers. In the two other cases, the products of the same size were amplified in both lines. When these SCAR products were digested with different restriction endonucleases which recognize 4-bp sequences, however, polymorphisms in fragment length were found between the two lines. These co-dominant markers are useful for differentiating heterozygotes from both types of homozygote. PMID:24166161

  1. Molecular Diversity in Ukrainian Melon Collection as Revealed by AFLP and Microsatellite Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-eight melon accessions, which are of primary breeding importance in the Ukraine, were analyzed for diversity. These collections represent a major non-US and non-west Europe source of melon germplasm that have not yet been subjected to molecular characterization. Molecular diversity was esti...

  2. Applications of molecular markers and DNA sequences in identifying fungal pathogens of cool season grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular techniques have now been widely applied in many disciplines of biological sciences including fungal identification in microbial ecology and plant pathology. In plant pathology, it is now common to use molecular techniques to identify and study plant pathogens of many agronomic and horticul...

  3. Molecular markers for tolerance of European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) to dieback disease identified using Associative Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Andrea L.; McKinney, Lea Vig; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Havlickova, Lenka; Li, Yi; Trick, Martin; Fraser, Fiona; Wang, Lihong; Fellgett, Alison; Sollars, Elizabeth S. A.; Janacek, Sophie H.; Downie, J. Allan; Buggs, Richard. J. A.; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Bancroft, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Tree disease epidemics are a global problem, impacting food security, biodiversity and national economies. The potential for conservation and breeding in trees is hampered by complex genomes and long lifecycles, with most species lacking genomic resources. The European Ash tree Fraxinus excelsior is being devastated by the fungal pathogen Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, which causes ash dieback disease. Taking this system as an example and utilizing Associative Transcriptomics for the first time in a plant pathology study, we discovered gene sequence and gene expression variants across a genetic diversity panel scored for disease symptoms and identified markers strongly associated with canopy damage in infected trees. Using these markers we predicted phenotypes in a test panel of unrelated trees, successfully identifying individuals with a low level of susceptibility to the disease. Co-expression analysis suggested that pre-priming of defence responses may underlie reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. PMID:26757823

  4. Molecular markers for tolerance of European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) to dieback disease identified using Associative Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Harper, Andrea L; McKinney, Lea Vig; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Havlickova, Lenka; Li, Yi; Trick, Martin; Fraser, Fiona; Wang, Lihong; Fellgett, Alison; Sollars, Elizabeth S A; Janacek, Sophie H; Downie, J Allan; Buggs, Richard J A; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Bancroft, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Tree disease epidemics are a global problem, impacting food security, biodiversity and national economies. The potential for conservation and breeding in trees is hampered by complex genomes and long lifecycles, with most species lacking genomic resources. The European Ash tree Fraxinus excelsior is being devastated by the fungal pathogen Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, which causes ash dieback disease. Taking this system as an example and utilizing Associative Transcriptomics for the first time in a plant pathology study, we discovered gene sequence and gene expression variants across a genetic diversity panel scored for disease symptoms and identified markers strongly associated with canopy damage in infected trees. Using these markers we predicted phenotypes in a test panel of unrelated trees, successfully identifying individuals with a low level of susceptibility to the disease. Co-expression analysis suggested that pre-priming of defence responses may underlie reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. PMID:26757823

  5. Selective DNA pooling for determination of linkage between a molecular marker and a quantitative trait locus

    SciTech Connect

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-12-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: {open_quotes}selective DNA pooling{close_quotes}) takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F{sub 2} and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Molecular identification and genetic variation of varieties of Styphnolobium japonicum (Fabaceae) using SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Sun, R X; Zhang, C H; Zheng, Y Q; Zong, Y C; Yu, X D; Huang, P

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-four Styphnolobium japonicum varieties were analyzed using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers, to investigate genetic variation and test the effectiveness of SRAP markers in DNA fingerprint establishment. Twelve primer pairs were selected from 120 primer combinations for their reproducibility and high polymorphism. We found a total of 430 amplified fragments, of which 415 fragments were considered polymorphic with an average of 34.58 polymorphic fragments for each primer combination. The percentage of polymorphic fragments was 96.60%, and four primer pairs showed 100% polymorphism. Moreover, simple matched coefficients ranged between 0.68 and 0.89, with an average of 0.785, indicating that the genetic variation among varieties was relatively low. This could be because of the narrow genetic basis of the selected breeding material. Based on the similarity coefficient value of 0.76, the varieties were divided into four major groups. In addition, abundant and clear SRAP fingerprints were obtained and could be used to establish DNA fingerprints. In the DNA fingerprints, each variety had its unique pattern that could be easily distinguished from others. The results demonstrated that 34 varieties of S. japonicum had a relatively narrow genetic variation. Hence, a broadening of the genetic basis of breeding material is necessary. We conclude that establishment of DNA fingerprint is feasible by means of SRAP markers. PMID:27173318

  7. Molecular markers for species identification of Hessian fly males caught on sticky pheromone traps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shun; Wheeler, Shanda; Davis, Holly; Whitworth, R Jeff; Knutson, Allen; Giles, Kristopher L; Royer, Tom A; Skinner, Margaret

    2014-06-01

    Pheromone traps have been widely used to monitor insect population activity. However, sticky pheromone traps for the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor), one of the most destructive pests of wheat, have been used only in recent years. Hessian fly male adults are small and fragile, and preserving specimens during sorting of sticky pheromone traps is a challenge when intact specimens are often required to visually distinguish them from related insects such as fungus gnats. In this study, we have established a quick and reliable method based on polymerase chain reaction markers to correctly distinguish Hessian fly males from other closely related insects. Two Hessian fly-specific markers were established, one based on the trypsin gene MDP-10 and the other based on a gene encoding the salivary gland protein SSGP31-5. Both markers provided > 98% identification success of 110 Hessian fly samples prepared from single insects. The method should provide a useful tool to allow for identification of Hessian fly individuals on sticky pheromone traps or in other situations when Hessian fly eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults are difficult to distinguish from other insects. PMID:25026671

  8. Selective DNA Pooling for Determination of Linkage between a Molecular Marker and a Quantitative Trait Locus

    PubMed Central

    Darvasi, A.; Soller, M.

    1994-01-01

    Selective genotyping is a method to reduce costs in marker-quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage determination by genotyping only those individuals with extreme, and hence most informative, quantitative trait values. The DNA pooling strategy (termed: ``selective DNA pooling'') takes this one step further by pooling DNA from the selected individuals at each of the two phenotypic extremes, and basing the test for linkage on marker allele frequencies as estimated from the pooled samples only. This can reduce genotyping costs of marker-QTL linkage determination by up to two orders of magnitude. Theoretical analysis of selective DNA pooling shows that for experiments involving backcross, F(2) and half-sib designs, the power of selective DNA pooling for detecting genes with large effect, can be the same as that obtained by individual selective genotyping. Power for detecting genes with small effect, however, was found to decrease strongly with increase in the technical error of estimating allele frequencies in the pooled samples. The effect of technical error, however, can be markedly reduced by replication of technical procedures. It is also shown that a proportion selected of 0.1 at each tail will be appropriate for a wide range of experimental conditions. PMID:7896115

  9. Identification of a novel mitochondrial genome type and development of molecular markers for cytoplasm classification in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunggil; Lim, Heerae; Park, Suhyung; Cho, Kang-Hee; Sung, Soon-Kee; Oh, Dae-Geun; Kim, Ki-Taek

    2007-11-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have complex configurations resulting from the multipartite structures and highly rearranged substoichiometric molecules created by repetitive sequences. To expedite the reliable classification of the diverse radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cytoplasmic types, we have developed consistent molecular markers within their complex mitochondrial genomes. orf138, a gene responsible for Ogura male-sterility, was detected in normal cultivars in the form of low-copy-number substoichiometric molecules. In addition to the dominant orf138-atp8 Ogura mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization, three novel substoichiometric organizations linked to the atp8 gene were identified in this study. PCR amplification profiles of seven atp8- and atp6-linked sequences were divided into three groups. Interestingly, the normal cytoplasm type, which had previously been considered a single group, showed two patterns by PCR amplification. The most prominent difference between the two normal mtDNAs was size variation within four short-repeat sequences linked to the atp6 gene. This variation appeared to be the result of a double crossover, mediated by these homologous, short-repeat sequences. Specific PCR amplification profiles reflecting the stoichiometry of different mtDNA fragments were conserved within cultivars and across generations. Therefore, the specific sequences detected in these profiles were used as molecular markers for the classification of diverse radish germplasm. Using this classification system, a total of 90 radish cultivars, or accessions, were successfully assigned to three different mitotypes. PMID:17828522

  10. A reference consensus genetic map for molecular markers and economically important traits in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is among the earliest domesticated crops from the Near East. Today this legume is a key protein feed and food worldwide and continues to serve an important role in culinary traditions throughout Middle East, Mediterranean region, China and Ethiopia. Adapted to a wide range of soil types, the main faba bean breeding objectives are to improve yield, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed quality and other agronomic traits. Genomic approaches aimed at enhancing faba bean breeding programs require high-quality genetic linkage maps to facilitate quantitative trait locus analysis and gene tagging for use in a marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to construct a reference consensus map in faba bean by joining the information from the most relevant maps reported so far in this crop. Results A combination of two approaches, increasing the number of anchor loci in diverse mapping populations and joining the corresponding genetic maps, was used to develop a reference consensus map in faba bean. The map was constructed from three main recombinant inbreed populations derived from four parental lines, incorporates 729 markers and is based on 69 common loci. It spans 4,602 cM with a range from 323 to 1041 loci in six main linkage groups or chromosomes, and an average marker density of one locus every 6 cM. Locus order is generally well maintained between the consensus map and the individual maps. Conclusion We have constructed a reliable and fairly dense consensus genetic linkage map that will serve as a basis for genomic approaches in faba bean research and breeding. The core map contains a larger number of markers than any previous individual map, covers existing gaps and achieves a wider coverage of the large faba bean genome as a whole. This tool can be used as a reference resource for studies in different genetic backgrounds, and provides a framework for transferring genetic information when using different marker technologies. Combined with syntenic approaches, the consensus map will increase marker density in selected genomic regions and will be useful for future faba bean molecular breeding applications. PMID:24377374

  11. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts in Stage I-IIIA NSCLC: Prognostic Impact and Their Correlations with Tumor Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kilvaer, Thomas K.; Khanehkenari, Mehrdad Rakaee; Hellevik, Turid; Al-Saad, Samer; Paulsen, Erna-Elise; Bremnes, Roy M.; Busund, Lill-Tove

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) are thought to regulate tumor growth and metastasis. Fibroblast Activating Protein 1 (FAP-1) is a marker for fibroblast activation and by many recognized as the main marker of CAFs. Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) is a general myofibroblast marker, and can be used to identify CAFs. This study investigates the prognostic impact of FAP-1 and α-SMA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and correlates their expression to 105 proteins investigated in the same cohort. Methods Tumor specimens from 536 NSCLC patients were obtained and tissue micro-arrays were constructed. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of FAP-1 and α-SMA and explore their impact on survival and association with other tumor molecular markers in NSCLC patients. Results High expression of FAP-1, but not α-SMA, in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, P = 0.043, HR = 0.63 95% CI 0.40–0.99) was significantly associated with increased disease-specific survival. FAP-1 and α-SMA were not significantly correlated to each other. Analyses of FAP-1 and α-SMA associated with other tumor-related proteins revealed histotype-specific correlation patterns. Conclusion The presence of FAP-1 expressing CAFs is an indicator of positive outcome for NSCLC-SCC patients. In addition, correlation analyses suggest FAP-1 and α-SMA to label different subsets of fibroblasts and their associations with other tumor-related proteins diverge according to histological subtype. PMID:26252379

  12. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19720084

  13. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A.; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2010-01-01

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegenaration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19720084

  14. RNA-Seq SSRs of Moth Orchid and Screening for Molecular Markers across Genus Phalaenopsis (Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shium; Chang, Chia-Hung; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background The moth orchid (Phalaenopsis species) is an ornamental crop that is highly commercialized worldwide. Over 30,000 cultivars of moth orchids have been registered at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). These cultivars were obtained by artificial pollination of interspecific hybridization. Therefore, the identification of different cultivars is highly important in the worldwide market. Methods/Results We used Illumina sequencing technology to analyze an important species for breeding, Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana and develop the expressed sequence tag (EST)-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. After de novo assembly, the obtained sequence covered 29.1 Mb, approximately 2.2% of the P. aphrodite subsp. formosana genome (1,300 Mb), and a total of 1,439 EST-SSR loci were detected. SSR occurs in the exon region, including the 5’ untranslated region (UTR), coding region (CDS), and 3’UTR, on average every 20.22 kb. The di- and tri-nucleotide motifs (51.49% and 35.23%, respectively) were the two most frequent motifs in the P. aphrodite subsp. formosana. To validate the developed EST-SSR loci and to evaluate the transferability to the genus Phalaenopsis, thirty tri-nucleotide motifs of the EST-SSR loci were randomly selected to design EST-SSR primers and to evaluate the polymorphism and transferability across 22 native Phalaenopsis species that are usually used as parents for moth orchid breeding. Of the 30 EST-SSR loci, ten polymorphic and transferable SSR loci across the 22 native taxa can be obtained. The validated EST-SSR markers were further proven to discriminate 12 closely related Phalaenopsis cultivars. The results show that it is not difficult to obtain universal SSR markers by transcriptome deep sequencing in Phalaenopsis species. Conclusions This study supported that transcriptome analysis based on deep sequencing is a powerful tool to develop SSR loci in non-model species. A large number of EST-SSR loci can be isolated, and about 33.33% EST-SSR loci are universal markers across the Phalaenopsis breeding germplasm after preliminary validation. The potential universal EST-SSR markers are highly valuable for identifying all of Phalaenopsis cultivars. PMID:26523377

  15. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham; Moseley, Pope; Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy. PMID:25654553

  16. Molecular markers discriminate closely related species Encarsia diaspidicola and Encarsia berlesei (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae): biocontrol candidate agents for white peach scale in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    De León, Jesse H; Neumann, Gabor; Follett, Peter A; Hollingsworth, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    We genetically characterized Encarsia diapsidicola Silvestri and Encarsia berlesei Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) by two molecular methods: phylogenetic analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI) and intersimple sequence repeat-polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR) DNA fingerprinting. These two closely related endoparasitoids are candidate biological control agents for the white peach scale, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona Targioni-Tozetti (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), in Hawaii. We developed species-specific COI molecular markers that discriminated the two species, and we tested the utility of the E. diaspidicola-specific COI marker to detect parasitism of white peach scale. The COI sequence data uncovered 46-bp differences between the two Encarsia spp. The level of COI genetic divergence between the two species was 9.7%, and the two clustered into their own clade on a parismonious phylogram. ISSR-PCR readily discriminated the two Encarsia spp. because each was observed with fixed species-specific banding patterns. The COI molecular markers were specific for each species because cross-reactivity was not observed with nontarget species. The E. diaspidicola-specific COI markers were successful at detecting parasitism of white peach scale by E. diaspidicola by 24 h. Both molecular marker types successfully discriminated the two Encarsia spp., whereas the COI markers will be useful as tools to assess levels of parasitism in the field and to study competitive interactions between parasitoids. PMID:20568638

  17. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations. PMID:26589702

  18. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  19. Molecular markers for tracking the origin and worldwide distribution of invasive strains of Puccinia striiformis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stephanie; Ali, Sajid; Kemen, Eric; Nazari, Kumarse; Bahri, Bochra A; Enjalbert, Jérôme; Hansen, Jens G; Brown, James K M; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Justesen, Annemarie F

    2016-05-01

    Investigating the origin and dispersal pathways is instrumental to mitigate threats and economic and environmental consequences of invasive crop pathogens. In the case of Puccinia striiformis causing yellow rust on wheat, a number of economically important invasions have been reported, e.g., the spreading of two aggressive and high temperature adapted strains to three continents since 2000. The combination of sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which were developed from two specific AFLP fragments, differentiated the two invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2 from all other P. striiformis strains investigated at a worldwide level. The application of the SCAR markers on 566 isolates showed that PstS1 was present in East Africa in the early 1980s and then detected in the Americas in 2000 and in Australia in 2002. PstS2 which evolved from PstS1 became widespread in the Middle East and Central Asia. In 2000, PstS2 was detected in Europe, where it never became prevalent. Additional SSR genotyping and virulence phenotyping revealed 10 and six variants, respectively, within PstS1 and PstS2, demonstrating the evolutionary potential of the pathogen. Overall, the results suggested East Africa as the most plausible origin of the two invasive strains. The SCAR markers developed in the present study provide a rapid, inexpensive, and efficient tool to track the distribution of P. striiformis invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2. PMID:27066253

  20. Tagging QTLs for maximum root length in rainfed lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.) using molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Toorchi, Mahmoud; Shashidhar, H E; Sharma, Naveen; Hittalmani, Shailaja

    2002-01-01

    A number of morphological, physiological and phenological traits are known to improve the performance of rice challenged by drought. Root morphological traits and stress-induced response form important components of drought tolerance. Enhancing grain yield remains the principal objective of most breeding programs. Interaction between primary traits poses a formidable challenge while dealing with grain yield under stress. The evaluation of root morphology at three different growth stages and grain yield along with related characteristics under contrasting moisture regimes was made using nine backcrosses along with their parent and standard checks. The backcrosses invoved transgressant double haploid lines derived from IR64 and Azucena with IR64. Marked genotypic differences were observed for all root morphology as well as grain yield related characteristics across the sampling dates as revealed by individual and combined ANOVA. Among the nine backcrosses studied in this experiment, the BC1F2 population of P124 x IR64 were evaluated for forwarding based on their performance with respect to maximum root length and grain yield under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Sixty-nine plants - ten percent of the backcross population - were selectively genotyped using RAPD primers. Under well-watered conditions two RAPD markers showed strong linkage to QTLs for maximum root length evaluated under ww conditions. Two other markers could explain the considerable amount of variation in MRL under LMS. One of the markers identified under low-moisture stress conditions was also able to explain variability in maximum root length in the mean environment. PMID:12378237

  1. Toolbox Approaches Using Molecular Markers and 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Data Sets for Identification of Fecal Pollution in Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Staley, C; Sadowsky, M J; Gyawali, P; Sidhu, J P S; Palmer, A; Beale, D J; Toze, S

    2015-10-01

    In this study, host-associated molecular markers and bacterial 16S rRNA gene community analysis using high-throughput sequencing were used to identify the sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 92 fecal and composite wastewater samples were collected from different host groups (cat, cattle, dog, horse, human, and kangaroo), and 18 water samples were collected from six sites (BR1 to BR6) along the Brisbane River in Queensland, Australia. Bacterial communities in the fecal, wastewater, and river water samples were sequenced. Water samples were also tested for the presence of bird-associated (GFD), cattle-associated (CowM3), horse-associated, and human-associated (HF183) molecular markers, to provide multiple lines of evidence regarding the possible presence of fecal pollution associated with specific hosts. Among the 18 water samples tested, 83%, 33%, 17%, and 17% were real-time PCR positive for the GFD, HF183, CowM3, and horse markers, respectively. Among the potential sources of fecal pollution in water samples from the river, DNA sequencing tended to show relatively small contributions from wastewater treatment plants (up to 13% of sequence reads). Contributions from other animal sources were rarely detected and were very small (<3% of sequence reads). Source contributions determined via sequence analysis versus detection of molecular markers showed variable agreement. A lack of relationships among fecal indicator bacteria, host-associated molecular markers, and 16S rRNA gene community analysis data was also observed. Nonetheless, we show that bacterial community and host-associated molecular marker analyses can be combined to identify potential sources of fecal pollution in an urban river. This study is a proof of concept, and based on the results, we recommend using bacterial community analysis (where possible) along with PCR detection or quantification of host-associated molecular markers to provide information on the sources of fecal pollution in waterways. PMID:26231650

  2. Toolbox Approaches Using Molecular Markers and 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Data Sets for Identification of Fecal Pollution in Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Staley, C.; Sadowsky, M. J.; Gyawali, P.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Palmer, A.; Beale, D. J.; Toze, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, host-associated molecular markers and bacterial 16S rRNA gene community analysis using high-throughput sequencing were used to identify the sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 92 fecal and composite wastewater samples were collected from different host groups (cat, cattle, dog, horse, human, and kangaroo), and 18 water samples were collected from six sites (BR1 to BR6) along the Brisbane River in Queensland, Australia. Bacterial communities in the fecal, wastewater, and river water samples were sequenced. Water samples were also tested for the presence of bird-associated (GFD), cattle-associated (CowM3), horse-associated, and human-associated (HF183) molecular markers, to provide multiple lines of evidence regarding the possible presence of fecal pollution associated with specific hosts. Among the 18 water samples tested, 83%, 33%, 17%, and 17% were real-time PCR positive for the GFD, HF183, CowM3, and horse markers, respectively. Among the potential sources of fecal pollution in water samples from the river, DNA sequencing tended to show relatively small contributions from wastewater treatment plants (up to 13% of sequence reads). Contributions from other animal sources were rarely detected and were very small (<3% of sequence reads). Source contributions determined via sequence analysis versus detection of molecular markers showed variable agreement. A lack of relationships among fecal indicator bacteria, host-associated molecular markers, and 16S rRNA gene community analysis data was also observed. Nonetheless, we show that bacterial community and host-associated molecular marker analyses can be combined to identify potential sources of fecal pollution in an urban river. This study is a proof of concept, and based on the results, we recommend using bacterial community analysis (where possible) along with PCR detection or quantification of host-associated molecular markers to provide information on the sources of fecal pollution in waterways. PMID:26231650

  3. Insights into the phylogeny of sporadotrichid ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora: Hypotricha) based on genealogical analyses of multiple molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaozhong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Al-Farraj, Saleh A.; Song, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    The sporadotrichid ciliates are an especially diverse group. A number of investigators have studied the morphological, morphogenetic, and molecular relationships among members of this group. Despite this, a consistent classification is still lacking and several important questions about the phylogenetic relationships within this group remain unsolved. To improve our understanding of these relationships, we constructed phylogenetic trees using the nucleotide sequences of the small-subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene and amino acid sequences of actin I and α-tubulin. Analyses of SSrRNA gene sequences indicated that: 1) the Sporadotrichida sensu Lynn (2008) and the Oxytrichidae are polyphyletic; 2) the Uroleptus species, which are classified to urostylids, formed a sister group with the oxytrichids; 3) Halteria grandinella, which is grouped morphologically with oligotrich species, clustered within the oxytrichids. These results are congruent with previous studies based on SSrRNA gene sequences. However, the amino acid sequences of actin I and α-tubulin yielded different topologies. The main results are: 1) in all phylogenetic trees, the genus Oxytricha was paraphyletic; 2) Uroleptus was sister to a subset of Urostyla and Holosticha, albeit with low supporting values; 3) Halteria grandinella was separated distantly from the Oxytrichidae in trees inferred from actin I amino acid sequences but clustered with oligotrichids in the α-tubulin analysis. The inconsistency among the trees inferred from these different molecular markers may be caused by rapidly accumulated genetic characterizations of ciliates. Further studies with additional molecular markers and sampling of more taxa are expected to better address the relationships among sporadotrichids.

  4. Protein based molecular markers provide reliable means to understand prokaryotic phylogeny and support Darwinian mode of evolution.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz S; Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-01-01

    The analyses of genome sequences have led to the proposal that lateral gene transfers (LGTs) among prokaryotes are so widespread that they disguise the interrelationships among these organisms. This has led to questioning of whether the Darwinian model of evolution is applicable to prokaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of taxon-specific molecular markers such as conserved signature indels (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) for understanding the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes and to assess the influence of LGTs on prokaryotic evolution. The analyses of genomic sequences have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are unique properties of different groups of prokaryotes ranging from phylum to genus levels. The species distribution patterns of these molecular signatures strongly support a tree-like vertical inheritance of the genes containing these molecular signatures that is consistent with phylogenetic trees. Recent detailed studies in this regard on the Thermotogae and Archaea, which are reviewed here, have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are specific for the species from these two taxa and a number of their major clades. The genetic changes responsible for these CSIs (and CSPs) initially likely occurred in the common ancestors of these taxa and then vertically transferred to various descendants. Although some CSIs and CSPs in unrelated groups of prokaryotes were identified, their small numbers and random occurrence has no apparent influence on the consistent tree-like branching pattern emerging from other markers. These results provide evidence that although LGT is an important evolutionary force, it does not mask the tree-like branching pattern of prokaryotes or understanding of their evolutionary relationships. The identified CSIs and CSPs also provide novel and highly specific means for identification of different groups of microbes and for taxonomical and biochemical studies. PMID:22919687

  5. Protein based molecular markers provide reliable means to understand prokaryotic phylogeny and support Darwinian mode of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Vaibhav; Naushad, Hafiz S.; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2012-01-01

    The analyses of genome sequences have led to the proposal that lateral gene transfers (LGTs) among prokaryotes are so widespread that they disguise the interrelationships among these organisms. This has led to questioning of whether the Darwinian model of evolution is applicable to prokaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of taxon-specific molecular markers such as conserved signature indels (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs) for understanding the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes and to assess the influence of LGTs on prokaryotic evolution. The analyses of genomic sequences have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are unique properties of different groups of prokaryotes ranging from phylum to genus levels. The species distribution patterns of these molecular signatures strongly support a tree-like vertical inheritance of the genes containing these molecular signatures that is consistent with phylogenetic trees. Recent detailed studies in this regard on the Thermotogae and Archaea, which are reviewed here, have identified large numbers of CSIs and CSPs that are specific for the species from these two taxa and a number of their major clades. The genetic changes responsible for these CSIs (and CSPs) initially likely occurred in the common ancestors of these taxa and then vertically transferred to various descendants. Although some CSIs and CSPs in unrelated groups of prokaryotes were identified, their small numbers and random occurrence has no apparent influence on the consistent tree-like branching pattern emerging from other markers. These results provide evidence that although LGT is an important evolutionary force, it does not mask the tree-like branching pattern of prokaryotes or understanding of their evolutionary relationships. The identified CSIs and CSPs also provide novel and highly specific means for identification of different groups of microbes and for taxonomical and biochemical studies. PMID:22919687

  6. Generation of expressed sequence tags under cadmium stress for gene discovery and development of molecular markers in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Gupta, Meetu

    2014-07-01

    Chickpea is the world's third most important legume crop and belongs to Fabaceae family but suffered from severe yield loss due to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Development of modern genomic tools such as molecular markers and identification of resistant genes associated with these stresses facilitate improvement in chickpea breeding towards abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, 1597 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from a cDNA library of variety Pusa 1105 root tissue after cadmium (Cd) treatment. Assembly of ESTs resulted in a total of 914 unigenes of which putative homology was obtained for 38.8 % of unigenes after BLASTX search. In terms of species distribution, majority of sequences found similarity with Medicago truncatula followed by Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa and Pisum sativum sequences. Functional annotation was assigned using Blast2Go, and the Gene Ontology (GO) terms were categorized into biological process, molecular function and cellular component. Approximately 10.83 % of unigenes were assigned at least one GO term. Moreover, in the distribution of transcripts into various biological pathways, 20 of the annotated transcripts were assigned to ten pathways in KEGG database. A majority of the genes were found to be involved in sulphur and nitrogen metabolism. In the quantitative real-time PCR analysis, five of the transcription factors and three of the transporter genes were found to be highly expressed after Cd treatment. Besides, the utility of ESTs was demonstrated by exploiting them for the development of 83 genic molecular markers including EST-simple sequence repeats and intron targeted polymorphism that would assist in tagging of genes related to metal stress for future prospects. PMID:24414095

  7. Molecular marker assisted gene stacking for biotic and abiotic stress resistance genes in an elite rice cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gitishree; Rao, G. J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe yield loss due to various biotic stresses like bacterial blight (BB), gall midge (insect) and Blast (disease) and abiotic stresses like submergence and salinity are a serious constraint to the rice productivity throughout the world. The most effective and reliable method of management of the stresses is the enhancement of host resistance, through an economical and environmentally friendly approach. Through the application of marker assisted selection (MAS) technique, the present study reports a successful pyramidization of genes/QTLs to confer resistance/tolerance to blast (Pi2, Pi9), gall Midge (Gm1, Gm4), submergence (Sub1), and salinity (Saltol) in a released rice variety CRMAS2621-7-1 as Improved Lalat which had already incorporated with three BB resistance genes xa5, xa13, and Xa21 to supplement the Xa4 gene present in Improved Lalat. The molecular analysis revealed clear polymorphism between the donor and recipient parents for all the markers that are tagged to the target traits. The conventional backcross breeding approach was followed till BC3F1 generation and starting from BC1F1 onwards, marker assisted selection was employed at each step to monitor the transfer of the target alleles with molecular markers. The different BC3F1s having the target genes/QTLs were inter crossed to generate hybrids with all 10 stress resistance/tolerance genes/QTLs into a single plant/line. Homozygous plants for resistance/tolerance genes in different combinations were recovered. The BC3F3 lines were characterized for their agronomic and quality traits and promising progeny lines were selected. The SSR based background selection was done. Most of the gene pyramid lines showed a high degree of similarity to the recurrent parent for both morphological, grain quality traits and in SSR based background selection. Out of all the gene pyramids tested, two lines had all the 10 resistance/tolerance genes and showed adequate levels of resistance/tolerance against the five target stresses. The study demonstrates the potential of MAS for stacking of several genes into a single line with a high degree of parental genome recovery. PMID:26483798

  8. Molecular diversity assessment using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) Markers in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Salem S; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A; Migdadi, Hussein M; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; El-Harty, Ehab H; Ammar, Megahed H

    2012-01-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationship among 58 faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes. Fourteen SRAP primer combinations amplified a total of 1036 differently sized well-resolved peaks (fragments), of which all were polymorphic with a 0.96 PIC value and discriminated all of the 58 faba bean genotypes. An average pairwise similarity of 21% was revealed among the genotypes ranging from 2% to 65%. At a similarity of 28%, UPGMA clustered the genotypes into three main groups comprising 78% of the genotypes. The local landraces and most of the Egyptian genotypes in addition to the Sudan genotypes were grouped in the first main cluster. The advanced breeding lines were scattered in the second and third main clusters with breeding lines from the ICARDA and genotypes introduced from Egypt. At a similarity of 47%, all the genotypes formed separated clusters with the exceptions of Hassawi 1 and Hassawi 2. Group analysis of the genotypes according to their geographic origin and type showed that the landraces were grouped according to their origin, while others were grouped according to their seed type. To our knowledge, this is the first application of SRAP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity in faba bean. Such information will be useful to determine optimal breeding strategies to allow continued progress in faba bean breeding. PMID:23211669

  9. Molecular portraits revealing the heterogeneity of breast tumor subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Yang; Bai, Zhonghu; Tang, Xu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous. The subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers and gene expression profilings (GEP) are related but not equivalent, with inter-connections under investigated. Our previous study revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (diff-genes), containing 1015 mRNAs and 69 miRNAs, which characterize the immunohistochemistry-defined breast tumor subtypes at the GEP level. However, they may convey redundant information due to the large amount of genes included. By reducing the dimension of the diff-genes, we identified 119 mRNAs and 20 miRNAs best explaining breast tumor heterogeneity with the most succinct number of genes found using hierarchical clustering and nearest-to-center principle. The final signature panel contains 119 mRNAs, whose superiority over diff-genes was replicated in two independent public datasets. The comparison of our signature with two pioneering signatures, the Sorlie’s signature and PAM50, suggests a novel marker, FOXA1, in breast cancer classification. Subtype-specific feature genes are reported to characterize each immunohistochemistry-defined subgroup. Pathway and network analysis reveal the critical roles of Notch signalings in [ER+|PR+]HER2− and cell cycle in [ER+|PR+]HER2+ tumors. Our study reveals the primary differences among the four immunohistochemistry-defined breast tumors at the mRNA and miRNA levels, and proposes a novel signature for breast tumor subtyping given GEP data. PMID:26404658

  10. Molecular Diversity Assessment Using Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) Markers in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Salem S.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.; Migdadi, Hussein M.; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; El-Harty, Ehab H.; Ammar, Megahed H.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationship among 58 faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes. Fourteen SRAP primer combinations amplified a total of 1036 differently sized well-resolved peaks (fragments), of which all were polymorphic with a 0.96 PIC value and discriminated all of the 58 faba bean genotypes. An average pairwise similarity of 21% was revealed among the genotypes ranging from 2% to 65%. At a similarity of 28%, UPGMA clustered the genotypes into three main groups comprising 78% of the genotypes. The local landraces and most of the Egyptian genotypes in addition to the Sudan genotypes were grouped in the first main cluster. The advanced breeding lines were scattered in the second and third main clusters with breeding lines from the ICARDA and genotypes introduced from Egypt. At a similarity of 47%, all the genotypes formed separated clusters with the exceptions of Hassawi 1 and Hassawi 2. Group analysis of the genotypes according to their geographic origin and type showed that the landraces were grouped according to their origin, while others were grouped according to their seed type. To our knowledge, this is the first application of SRAP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity in faba bean. Such information will be useful to determine optimal breeding strategies to allow continued progress in faba bean breeding. PMID:23211669

  11. Molecular Mapping of Restriction-Site Associated DNA Markers in Allotetraploid Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yangkun; Ning, Zhiyuan; Hu, Yan; Chen, Jiedan; Zhao, Rui; Chen, Hong; Ai, Nijiang; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., 2n = 52, AADD) is an allotetraploid, therefore the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is difficult. The recent emergence of genome complexity reduction technologies based on the next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform has greatly expedited SNP discovery in crops with highly repetitive and complex genomes. Here we applied restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing technology for de novo SNP discovery in allotetraploid cotton. We identified 21,109 SNPs between the two parents and used these for genotyping of 161 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Finally, a high dense linkage map comprising 4,153 loci over 3500-cM was developed based on the previous result. Using this map quantitative trait locus (QTLs) conferring fiber strength and Verticillium Wilt (VW) resistance were mapped to a more accurate region in comparison to the 1576-cM interval determined using the simple sequence repeat (SSR) genetic map. This suggests that the newly constructed map has more power and resolution than the previous SSR map. It will pave the way for the rapid identification of the marker-assisted selection in cotton breeding and cloning of QTL of interest traits. PMID:25894395

  12. Molecular mapping of hybrid necrosis genes Ne1 and Ne2 in hexaploid wheat using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Chu, C-G; Faris, J D; Friesen, T L; Xu, S S

    2006-05-01

    Hybrid necrosis is the gradual premature death of leaves or plants in certain F1 hybrids of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and it is caused by the interaction of two dominant complementary genes Ne1 and Ne2 located on chromosome arms 5BL and 2BS, respectively. To date, molecular markers linked to these genes have not been identified and linkage relationships of the two genes with other important genes in wheat have not been established. We observed that the F1 hybrids from the crosses between the bread wheat variety 'Alsen' and four synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) lines (TA4152-19, TA4152-37, TA4152-44, and TA4152-60) developed at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) exhibited hybrid necrosis. This study was conducted to determine the genotypes of TA4152-60 and Alsen at the Ne1 and Ne2 loci, and to map the genes using microsatellite markers in backcross populations. Genetic analysis indicated that Alsen has the genotype ne1ne1Ne2Ne2 whereas the SHW lines have Ne1Ne1ne2ne2. The microsatellite marker Xbarc74 was linked to Ne1 at a genetic distance of 2.0 cM on chromosome arm 5BL, and Xbarc55 was 3.2 cM from Ne2 on 2BS. Comparison of the genetic maps with the chromosome deletion-based physical maps indicated that Ne1 lies in the proximal half of 5BL, whereas Ne2 is in the distal half of 2BS. Genetic linkage analysis showed that Ne1 was about 35 cM proximal to Tsn1, a locus conferring sensitivity to the host selective toxin Ptr ToxA produced by the tan spot fungus. The closely linked microsatellite markers identified in this study can be used to genotype parental lines for Ne1 and Ne2 or to eliminate the two hybrid necrosis genes using marker-assisted selection. PMID:16518615

  13. Yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) transcriptome sequencing: molecular marker development and comparative studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) is a minor legume crop characterized by its high seed protein content. Although grown in several temperate countries, its orphan condition has limited the generation of genomic tools to aid breeding efforts to improve yield and nutritional quality. In this study, we report the construction of 454-expresed sequence tag (EST) libraries, carried out comparative studies between L. luteus and model legume species, developed a comprehensive set of EST-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and validated their utility on diversity studies and transferability to related species. Results Two runs of 454 pyrosequencing yielded 205 Mb and 530 Mb of sequence data for L1 (young leaves, buds and flowers) and L2 (immature seeds) EST- libraries. A combined assembly (L1L2) yielded 71,655 contigs with an average contig length of 632 nucleotides. L1L2 contigs were clustered into 55,309 isotigs. 38,200 isotigs translated into proteins and 8,741 of them were full length. Around 57% of L. luteus sequences had significant similarity with at least one sequence of Medicago, Lotus, Arabidopsis, or Glycine, and 40.17% showed positive matches with all of these species. L. luteus isotigs were also screened for the presence of SSR sequences. A total of 2,572 isotigs contained at least one EST-SSR, with a frequency of one SSR per 17.75 kbp. Empirical evaluation of the EST-SSR candidate markers resulted in 222 polymorphic EST-SSRs. Two hundred and fifty four (65.7%) and 113 (30%) SSR primer pairs were able to amplify fragments from L. hispanicus and L. mutabilis DNA, respectively. Fifty polymorphic EST-SSRs were used to genotype a sample of 64 L. luteus accessions. Neighbor-joining distance analysis detected the existence of several clusters among L. luteus accessions, strongly suggesting the existence of population subdivisions. However, no clear clustering patterns followed the accession’s origin. Conclusion L. luteus deep transcriptome sequencing will facilitate the further development of genomic tools and lupin germplasm. Massive sequencing of cDNA libraries will continue to produce raw materials for gene discovery, identification of polymorphisms (SNPs, EST-SSRs, INDELs, etc.) for marker development, anchoring sequences for genome comparisons and putative gene candidates for QTL detection. PMID:22920992

  14. Molecular variation of Sporisorium scitamineum in mainland China revealed by RAPD and SRAP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane smut caused by the fungus Sporisorium scitamineum is found worldwide in sugarcane producing countries and can cause serious loss in stalk yield and sugar quality. In order to reveal the molecular evolution of S. scitamineum, twenty-three S. scitamineum isolates collected from the six prima...

  15. Hairy cell leukemia. Immunological study.

    PubMed

    Stela, R; Berceanu, S; Munteanu, N; Ursea, C; Motoiu, I; Moraru, I

    1990-01-01

    The study has been performed on peripheral blood and splenic malignant cells from 16 patients with hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). The cell surface markers were identified by rosette techniques and using monoclonal antibodies (m Ab). The surface markers' expression of the hairy cells (HC) varied. The E receptors, the T-cell antigens, the HLA-DR antigens and smIgG were either expressed or not according to the affected organ, the progress of illness, or the treatment. The surface pattern changed sometimes in the same patient during the progress of illness. These observations demonstrate that HCL is a unique disease with malignant cells characterized by a marked variability of the cell surface markers. To demonstrate the ability of hairy cells to bind labile smIgG, the cells were studied by affinity chromatography on SpA-Sepharose 6MB and by ES-rosette assay. The percent of cells bound on SpA-Sepharose varied between 6% and 66%, representing the hairy cells with labile-bound smIgG. With affinity chromatography it was also possible to separate the hairy cells with a special phenotype: T3+ T4+ T8+ T11+ surface membrane labile-bound IgG+ (11gG+) FcR+, HLA-DR+ EACD+ (Ripley rosette forming cells), resembling a normal subset of large granular lymphocytes (LGL). The percentage of these cells varied between 60% and 86% of the bound cells. These observations suggest that in HCL, the malignant transformation might involve a common progenitor for the B, T and LGL lineages, the hairy cell being a hybrid type of malignant cell. Its main immunological peculiarity is the marked mobility of the surface membrane structures and hence the lability (plasticity) of the surface markers' expression. PMID:2101805

  16. Use of molecular markers and flow cytometry to preserve ancient Annurca apple germplasm.

    PubMed

    Iannaccone, Marco; Palumbo, Daniela; Ventimiglia, Ilaria; Patocchi, Andrea; Spigno, Paola; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2007-02-01

    The old Annurca apple cultivar (Malus domestica), particularly appreciated for its peculiar flavor and crispy flesh, was studied in order to preserve its ancient germplasm. Twelve clones of Annurca were analyzed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Two out of 30 RAPD primers and nine out of ten SSR primers were able to discriminate all the clones analyzed. Data were confirmed by measuring DNA content using flow cytometry. The results provide a good procedure to improve germplasm field management, in order to removing redundant material in the Annurca collection. This represents an efficient way to create a data bank in order to preserve the genetic variability of the Annurca cultivar. PMID:17120090

  17. A multi-molecular marker assessment of organic pollution in shore sediments from the Río de la Plata Estuary, SW Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Natalia; Bícego, Márcia C; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio T; García-Rodríguez, Felipe; Brugnoli, Ernesto; Muniz, Pablo

    2015-02-28

    Organic pollution was evaluated in surface sediments along the middle portion of the Río de la Plata Estuary, SW Atlantic. A multi-molecular marker approach was performed to identify major sources of organic compounds using diagnostic indices. The relative contribution of different sources of hydrocarbons was quantified by source apportionment employing Principal Component Analysis/Multiple Linear Regression (PCA/MLR) as chemometric technique. All molecular markers indicated high chronic organic pollution in the stations of Montevideo Bay. Main sources of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were petroleum inputs and combustion, due to oil transport and refinement, harbour activities and vehicular emissions. Major sources of linear alkylbenzenes and steroids were industrial and domestic sewage. Although, significant anthropogenic inputs, a natural footprint of terrestrial higher plants contribution was recognized. Multi-molecular marker and comprehensive assessments can improve the establishment of more precise regulation actions to reduce pollution levels. PMID:25060626

  18. Subdivisions of the adult zebrafish pallium based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Julia; Kroehne, Volker; Freudenreich, Dorian; Machate, Anja; Geffarth, Michaela; Braasch, Ingo; Kaslin, Jan; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: The telencephalon shows a remarkable structural diversity among vertebrates. In particular, the everted telencephalon of ray-finned fishes has a markedly different morphology compared to the evaginated telencephalon of all other vertebrates. This difference in development has hampered the comparison between different areas of the pallium of ray-finned fishes and the pallial nuclei of all other vertebrates. Various models of homology between pallial subdivisions in ray-finned fishes and the pallial nuclei in tetrapods have been proposed based on connectional, neurochemical, gene expression and functional data. However, no consensus has been reached so far. In recent years, the analysis of conserved developmental marker genes has assisted the identification of homologies for different parts of the telencephalon among several tetrapod species. Results: We have investigated the gene expression pattern of conserved marker genes in the adult zebrafish ( Danio rerio) pallium to identify pallial subdivisions and their homology to pallial nuclei in tetrapods. Combinatorial expression analysis of ascl1a, eomesa, emx1, emx2, emx3, and Prox1 identifies four main divisions in the adult zebrafish pallium. Within these subdivisions, we propose that Dm is homologous to the pallial amygdala in tetrapods and that the dorsal subdivision of Dl is homologous to part of the hippocampal formation in mouse. We have complemented this analysis be examining the gene expression of emx1, emx2 and emx3 in the zebrafish larval brain. Conclusions: Based on our gene expression data, we propose a new model of subdivisions in the adult zebrafish pallium and their putative homologies to pallial nuclei in tetrapods. Pallial nuclei control sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, like memory, learning and emotion. The identification of pallial subdivisions in the adult zebrafish and their homologies to pallial nuclei in tetrapods will contribute to the use of the zebrafish system as a model for neurobiological research and human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25713698

  19. Designing a SCAR molecular marker for monitoring Trichoderma cf. harzianum in experimental communities* #

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Gabriel; Verdejo, Valentina; Gondim-Porto, Clarissa; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Several species of the fungal genus Trichoderma establish biological interactions with various micro- and macro-organisms. Some of these interactions are relevant in ecological terms and in biotechnological applications, such as biocontrol, where Trichoderma could be considered as an invasive species that colonizes a recipient community. The success of this invasion depends on multiple factors, which can be assayed using experimental communities as study models. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to monitor the colonization and growth of T. cf. harzianum when it invades experimental communities. For this study, 16 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers of 10-mer were used to generate polymorphic patterns, one of which generated a band present only in strains of T. cf. harzianum. This band was cloned, sequenced, and five primers of 20–23 mer were designed. Primer pairs 2F2/2R2 and 2F2/2R3 successfully and specifically amplified fragments of 278 and 448 bp from the T. cf. harzianum BpT10a strain DNA, respectively. Both primer pairs were also tested against the DNA from 14 strains of T. cf. harzianum and several strains of different fungal genera as specificity controls. Only the DNA from the strains of T. cf. harzianum was successfully amplified. Moreover, primer pair 2F2/2R2 was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fungal DNA mixtures and DNA extracted from fungal experimental communities as templates. T. cf. harzianum was detectable even when as few as 100 copies of the SCAR marker were available or even when its population represented only 0.1% of the whole community. PMID:25367789

  20. De novo transcriptome analysis of Hevea brasiliensis tissues by RNA-seq and screening for molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, is a species native to the Brazilian Amazon region and it supplies almost all the world’s natural rubber, a strategic raw material for a variety of products. One of the major challenges for developing rubber tree plantations is adapting the plant to biotic and abiotic stress. Transcriptome analysis is one of the main approaches for identifying the complete set of active genes in a cell or tissue for a specific developmental stage or physiological condition. Results Here, we report on the sequencing, assembling, annotation and screening for molecular markers from a pool of H. brasiliensis tissues. A total of 17,166 contigs were successfully annotated. Then, 2,191 Single Nucleotide Variation (SNV) and 1.397 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were discriminated from the sequences. From 306 putative, mainly non-synonymous SNVs located in CDS sequences, 191 were checked for their ability to characterize 23 Hevea genotypes by an allele-specific amplification technology. For 172 (90%), the nucleotide variation at the predicted genomic location was confirmed, thus validating the different steps from sequencing to the in silico detection of the SNVs. Conclusions This is the first study of the H. brasiliensis transcriptome, covering a wide range of tissues and organs, leading to the production of the first developed SNP markers. This process could be amplified to a larger set of in silico detected SNVs in expressed genes in order to increase the marker density in available and future genetic maps. The results obtained in this study will contribute to the H. brasiliensis genetic breeding program focused on improving of disease resistance and latex yield. PMID:24670056

  1. Transgene-specific and event-specific molecular markers for characterization of transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Jen; Chen, Shu; Kung, Yi-Jung; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Su, Tien-Tsai; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2009-12-01

    The commercially valuable transgenic papaya lines carrying the coat protein (CP) gene of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and conferring virus resistance have been developed in Hawaii and Taiwan in the past decade. Prompt and sensitive protocols for transgene-specific and event-specific detections are essential for traceability of these lines to fulfill regulatory requirement in EU and some Asian countries. Here, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches, we demonstrated different detection protocols for characterization of PRSV CP-transgenic papaya lines. Transgene-specific products were amplified using different specific primer pairs targeting the sequences of the promoter, the terminator, the selection marker, and the transgene, and the region across the promoter and transgene. Moreover, after cloning and sequencing the DNA fragments amplified by adaptor ligation-PCR, the junctions between plant genomic DNA and the T-DNA insert were elucidated. The event-specific method targeting the flanking sequences and the transgene was developed for identification of a specific transgenic line. The PCR patterns using primers designed from the left or the right flanking DNA sequence of the transgene insert in three selected transgenic papaya lines were specific and reproducible. Our results also verified that PRSV CP transgene is integrated into transgenic papaya genome in different loci. The copy number of inserted T-DNA was further confirmed by real-time PCR. The event-specific molecular markers developed in this investigation are crucial for regulatory requirement in some countries and intellectual protection. Also, these markers are helpful for prompt screening of a homozygote-transgenic progeny in the breeding program. PMID:19526355

  2. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  3. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  4. The rpb2 gene represents a viable alternative molecular marker for the analysis of environmental fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Větrovský, Tomáš; Kolařík, Miroslav; Žifčáková, Lucia; Zelenka, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Although the commonly used internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA (ITS) is well suited for taxonomic identification of fungi, the information on the relative abundance of taxa and diversity is negatively affected by the multicopy nature of rDNA and the existence of ITS paralogues. Moreover, due to high variability, ITS sequences cannot be used for phylogenetic analyses of unrelated taxa. The part of single-copy gene encoding the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2) was thus compared with first spacer of ITS as an alternative marker for the analysis of fungal communities in spruce forest topsoil, and their applicability was tested on a comprehensive mock community. In soil, rpb2 exhibited broad taxonomic coverage of the entire fungal tree of life including basal fungal lineages. The gene exhibited sufficient variation for the use in phylogenetic analyses and taxonomic assignments, although it amplifies also paralogues. The fungal taxon spectra obtained with rbp2 region and ITS1 corresponded, but sequence abundance differed widely, especially in the basal lineages. The proportions of OTU counts and read counts of major fungal groups were close to the reality when rpb2 was used as a molecular marker while they were strongly biased towards the Basidiomycota when using the ITS primers ITS1/ITS4. Although the taxonomic placement of rbp2 sequences is currently more difficult than that of the ITS sequences, its discriminative power, quantitative representation of community composition and suitability for phylogenetic analyses represent significant advantages. PMID:26287723

  5. Annexin A8 is a novel molecular marker for detecting lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Kazuki; Tokuzen, Norihiko; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but its accurate assessment after sentinel node biopsy or neck dissection is often limited to the histopathological examination of only one or two sections. Previous our study showed the usefulness of the reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) targeting keratin 19 (KRT19) mRNA for the genetic detection of lymph node metastasis, but the sensitivity was insufficient. Here, we have attempted to identify novel molecular markers for OSCC cells in lymph nodes. We performed microarray analysis to identify genes overexpressed in 7 metastatic lymph nodes from OSCC patients, compared to 1 normal lymph node and 5 salivary glands from non-cancer patients. We then used real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and RT-LAMP to compare the expression of these genes in newly resected metastatic and normal lymph nodes. Of 4 genes identified by microarray analysis, annexin A8 (ANXA8) and desmoglein 3 mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR in metastatic lymph nodes but not in normal lymph nodes. Furthermore, ANXA8 mRNA expression was detected in all KRT19-negative metastatic lymph nodes. Both KRT19 and ANXA8 mRNA may be useful markers for detecting lymph node metastases in OSCC patients. PMID:26700817

  6. Genetic diversity of Cercospora kikuchii isolates from soybean cultured in Argentina as revealed by molecular markers and cercosporin production.

    PubMed

    Lurá, María Cristina; Latorre Rapela, María Gabriela; Vaccari, María Celia; Maumary, Roxana; Soldano, Anabel; Mattio, Mónica; González, Ana María

    2011-05-01

    Leaf blight and purple seed, caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora kikuchii (Matsumoto & Tomoyasu) M. W. Gardner are very important diseases of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Argentina. The aims of this work were: (a) to confirm and to assess the genetic variability among C. kikuchii isolates collected from different soybean growing areas in Santa Fe province using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers and sequence information from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and (b) to analyze the cercosporin production of the regional C. kikuchi isolates in order to assess whether there was any relationship between the molecular profiles and the toxin production. Isolates from different regions in Santa Fe province were studied. The sequence of the ITS regions showed high similarity (99-100%) to the GenBank sequences of C. kikuchii BRCK179 (accession number AY633838). The ISSR markers clustered all the isolates into many groups and cercosporin content was highly variable among isolates. No relationship was observed between ITS region, ISSR groups and origin or cercosporin content. The high degree of genetic variability and cercosporin production among isolates compared in this study characterizes a diverse population of C. kikuchii in the region. PMID:20835913

  7. A molecular marker associated with low-temperature induction of dormancy in red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea).

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Erl; Wilen, Ron; Stevenson, Robert; Liu, Rensong; Tanino, Karen K

    2007-03-01

    Dormancy induction in temperate deciduous plants is thought to be regulated by short photoperiods, but low temperature has been shown to eliminate the short photoperiod requirement in northern ecotypes. An F2 population (191 plants) red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L.) derived from a polycross of an F1 population produced from reciprocal crosses of the parental clonal ecotypes, Northwest Territories (NWT, 62 degrees N) and Utah (42 degrees N), was examined to identify molecular markers of temperature-induced endodormancy. Dormancy induction curves were generated for each individual in the F2 population and a standard point prior to vegetative maturity (i-VM) was inferred from the change in slope of the dormancy acquisition curve. Under Saskatoon, Saskatchewan field conditions (52 degrees N), the NWT ecotype entered i-VM on average 5-6 weeks before the Utah ecotype. Two sub-populations of the F2 population were distinguishable based on VM acquisition on exposure to low temperature but not to short photoperiods. A sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker was developed that correctly (> 92%) identified individual plants within the F2 subpopulation that were responsive to low-temperature induction of VM. Timing of bud break was strongly associated with the timing of VM in the geographical ecotypes but not in the F2 population, indicating that these are separate traits under genetic control. PMID:17241980

  8. Development of molecular markers linked to disease resistance genes in common bean based on whole genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Meziadi, Chouaïb; Richard, Manon M S; Derquennes, Amandine; Thareau, Vincent; Blanchet, Sophie; Gratias, Ariane; Pflieger, Stéphanie; Geffroy, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important grain legume for direct human consumption in the world, particularly in developing countries where it constitutes the main source of protein. Unfortunately, common bean yield stability is constrained by a number of pests and diseases. As use of resistant genotypes is the most economic and ecologically safe means for controlling plant diseases, efforts have been made to genetically characterize resistance genes (R genes) in common bean. Despite its agronomic importance, genomic resources available in common bean were limited until the recent sequencing of common bean genome (Andean genotype G19833). Besides allowing the annotation of Nucleotide Binding-Leucine Rich Repeat (NB-LRR) encoding gene family, which is the prevalent class of disease R genes in plants, access to the whole genome sequence of common bean can be of great help for intense selection to increase the overall efficiency of crop improvement programs using marker-assisted selection (MAS). This review presents the state of the art of common bean NB-LRR gene clusters, their peculiar location in subtelomeres and correlation with genetically characterized monogenic R genes, as well as how the availability of the whole genome sequence can boost the development of molecular markers for MAS. PMID:26566851

  9. Molecular markers for rapidly identifying candidate genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Ery1 and ery2 encode chloroplast ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Amber K; Keller, Jennifer A; Dutcher, Susan K

    2003-08-01

    To take advantage of available expressed sequence tags and genomic sequence, we have developed 64 PCR-based molecular markers in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that map to the 17 linkage groups. These markers will allow the rapid association of a candidate gene sequence with previously identified mutations. As proof of principle, we have identified the genes encoded by the ERY1 and ERY2 loci. Mendelian mutations that confer resistance to erythromycin define three unlinked nuclear loci in C. reinhardtii. Candidate genes ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) and L22 (RPL22) are tightly linked to the ERY1 locus and ERY2 locus, respectively. Genomic DNA for RPL4 from wild type and five mutant ery1 alleles was amplified and sequenced and three different point mutations were found. Two different glycine residues (G(102) and G(112)) are replaced by aspartic acid and both are in the unstructured region of RPL4 that lines the peptide exit tunnel of the chloroplast ribosome. The other two alleles change a splice site acceptor site. Genomic DNA for RPL22 from wild type and three mutant ery2 alleles was amplified and sequenced and revealed three different point mutations. Two alleles have premature stop codons and one allele changes a splice site acceptor site. PMID:12930744

  10. Annexin A8 is a novel molecular marker for detecting lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oka, Ryota; Nakashiro, Koh-Ichi; Goda, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Kazuki; Tokuzen, Norihiko; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-26

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but its accurate assessment after sentinel node biopsy or neck dissection is often limited to the histopathological examination of only one or two sections. Previous our study showed the usefulness of the reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) targeting keratin 19 (KRT19) mRNA for the genetic detection of lymph node metastasis, but the sensitivity was insufficient. Here, we have attempted to identify novel molecular markers for OSCC cells in lymph nodes. We performed microarray analysis to identify genes overexpressed in 7 metastatic lymph nodes from OSCC patients, compared to 1 normal lymph node and 5 salivary glands from non-cancer patients. We then used real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and RT-LAMP to compare the expression of these genes in newly resected metastatic and normal lymph nodes. Of 4 genes identified by microarray analysis, annexin A8 (ANXA8) and desmoglein 3 mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR in metastatic lymph nodes but not in normal lymph nodes. Furthermore, ANXA8 mRNA expression was detected in all KRT19-negative metastatic lymph nodes. Both KRT19 and ANXA8 mRNA may be useful markers for detecting lymph node metastases in OSCC patients. PMID:26700817

  11. Molecular Phylogeny of a tick, Ixodes granulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) based on cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana Che; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; George, Ernna; Nor, Shukor Md

    2014-09-01

    Identification of a local species of tick, Ixodes granulatus from the family Ixodidae is essential because it has potential to be vector for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia and tick thypus. The aim of this study is to portray the relationships among several populations of I. granulatus collected from different species of animal hosts and localities in Peninsular Malaysia. Polymerase Chain Reaction was conducted by amplifying mitochondrial DNA marker, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from 15 individual ticks that attached to five different hosts caught from three different localities. Confirmation of the species identity was accomplished using BLAST program. Neighbor-joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) tree based on COI sequences were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 to identify the relationship among species. The result of this study showed a high genetic heterogeneity between I. granulatus and other species of the same genus (7.2-23.7%). Furthermore, a low intraspecific variation was observed among the species of I. granulatus collected from different localities (0-3.7%). This study produced the first establishment of molecular marker for clarifying genetic species variation and diversity of local I. granulatus tick which contribute to the control of tick-borne infections.

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing: A powerful tool for the discovery of molecular markers in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hitchintan; Mao, Shihong; Shah, Seema; Gorski, David H.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic screening leads to frequent biopsies and concomitant overdiagnosis of breast cancer, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Some DCIS lesions rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma whereas others remain indolent. Because we cannot yet predict which lesions will not progress, all DCIS is regarded as malignant, and many women are overtreated. Thus, there is a pressing need for a panel of molecular markers in addition to the current clinical and pathologic factors to provide prognostic information. Genomic technologies such as microarrays have made major contributions to defining sub-types of breast cancer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) modalities offer unprecedented depth of expression analysis through revealing transcriptional boundaries, mutations, rare transcripts and alternative splice variants. NGS approaches are just beginning to be applied to DCIS. Here, we review the applications and challenges of NGS in discovering novel potential therapeutic targets and candidate biomarkers in the premalignant progression of breast cancer. PMID:23477556

  13. Genetic variation assessment of acid lime accessions collected from south of Iran using SSR and ISSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Ata Allah; Abkenar, Asad Asadi; Sharafi, Ali; Masaeli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Iran has a long history of acid lime cultivation and propagation. In this study, genetic variation in 28 acid lime accessions from five regions of south of Iran, and their relatedness with other 19 citrus cultivars were analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Nine primers for SSR and nine ISSR primers were used for allele scoring. In total, 49 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data showed that most of the acid lime accessions (19 genotypes) have hybrid origin and genetically distance with nucellar of Mexican lime (9 genotypes). As nucellar of Mexican lime are susceptible to phytoplasma, these acid lime genotypes can be used to evaluate their tolerance against biotic constricts like lime "witches' broom disease". PMID:27186022

  14. Resistance to sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma: From molecular mechanisms to predictive markers and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Joosten, S C; Hamming, L; Soetekouw, P M; Aarts, M J; Veeck, J; van Engeland, M; Tjan-Heijnen, V C

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of agents that inhibit tumor angiogenesis by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has made a significant impact on the survival of patients with metastasized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGF receptor, has become the mainstay of treatment for these patients. Although treatment with sunitinib substantially improved patient outcome, the initial success is overshadowed by the occurrence of resistance. The mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of resistance will help to better understand the biology of RCC and can ultimately aid the development of more effective therapies for patients with this infaust disease. In this review we comprehensively discuss molecular mechanisms of resistance to sunitinib and the involved biological processes, summarize potential biomarkers that predict response and resistance to treatment with sunitinib, and elaborate on future perspectives in the treatment of metastasized RCC. PMID:25446042

  15. Identifying differentially expressed genes under heat stress and developing molecular markers in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) through transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, L K; Yan, H D; Zhao, X X; Zhang, X Q; Wang, J; Frazier, T; Yin, G; Huang, X; Yan, D F; Zang, W J; Ma, X; Peng, Y; Yan, Y H; Liu, W

    2015-11-01

    Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) is a long-lived, cool-season forage grass that is commonly used for hay production. Despite its economic importance, orchardgrass genome remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we used Illumina RNA sequencing to identify gene-associated molecular markers, including simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as heat stress-induced differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in two orchardgrass genotypes, 'Baoxing' (heat resistant) and '01998' (heat susceptible). Approximately 163 million high-quality trimmed reads were generated from 207 million raw reads using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 126,846 unigenes were obtained after de novo assembly of the trimmed reads, and 40,078 unigenes were identified as coding sequences (CDSs). Based on the assembled unigenes, 669,300 high-quality SNPs, including 416,099 transitions and 257,736 transversions, were contained in 75,875 unigenes. In addition, a total of 8475 microsatellites were detected in 7764 unigenes. When placed under heat stress, the total number of DEGs in 'Baoxing' (3527) was higher than in '01998' (2649), indicating that in comparison with heat-susceptible '01998', heat-resistant 'Baoxing' seems to have more unigenes that respond to heat stress. The high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of orchardgrass under heat stress provides useful information for gene identification and for the development of SNP and SSR molecular markers. The comparison of DEGs under different periods of heat stress allowed us to identify a wealth of candidate DEGs that can be further analysed in order to determine the genetic mechanisms underlying heat tolerance in orchardgrass. PMID:25894804

  16. Classification of genetic variation for cadmium tolerance in Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] using physiological traits and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Luo, Hongji; Hu, Longxing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Lou, Yanhong; Fu, Jinmin

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic pollutants that caused severe threats to animal and human health. Bermudagrass is a dominant species in Cd contaminated soils, which can prevent Cd flow and spread. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variations in major physiological traits related to Cd tolerance in six populations of Bermudagrass collected from China, and to examine the genetic diversity and relationships among these accessions that vary in Cd tolerance using molecular markers. Plants of 120 accessions (116 natural accessions and 4 commercial cultivars) were exposed to 0 (i.e. control) or 1.5 mM CdSO4·8/3H2O for 3 weeks in hydroponic culture. Turf quality, transpiration rate, chlorophyll content, leaf water content and growth rate showed wide phenotypic variation. The membership function method was used to comprehensively evaluate Cd-tolerance. According to the average subordinate function value, four accessions were classified as the most tolerant genotypes and four accessions as Cd-sensitive genotypes. The trend of Cd tolerance among the six studied populations was as follows: Hunan > South China > North China > Central China > West South China and Xinjiang population. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of accessions from the same or adjacent regions were clustered into the same groups or subgroups, and the accessions with similar cadmium tolerance displayed a close phylogenetic relationship. Screening genetically diverse germplasm by combining the physiological traits and molecular markers could prove useful in developing Cd-tolerant Bermudagrass for the remediation of mill tailings and heavy metal polluted soils. PMID:24804624

  17. Assessing molecular and morpho-agronomical diversity and identification of ISSR markers associated with fruit traits in quince (Cydonia oblonga).

    PubMed

    Ganopoulos, I; Merkouropoulos, G; Pantazis, S; Tsipouridis, C; Tsaftaris, A

    2011-01-01

    Quince is a deciduous tree known to the countries around the Mediterranean since antiquity. Nowadays, quince is used as an ornamental plant, and as a rootstock for pear trees, with its fruit being appreciated mainly for production of jam and sweets rather than for raw consumption. Quince leaves contain compounds with antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancerous properties that have been the focus of recent research on pharmaceutical and medical uses as well as for food preservatives. An orchard has been established in Greece, composed of quince varieties (Cydonia oblonga, N = 49) collected from different sites of the country (mainly from home gardens), constituting a unique quince gene bank collection for southeast Europe. We made a phenotypic analysis using 26 morphological plus seven agronomical descriptors coupled with molecular techniques in order to examine the genetic diversity within the collection. Principal component analysis using the 33 descriptors identified 10 components explaining the existence of more than 70% of the total variation. Subsequent cluster analysis classified most of the previously identified productive varieties of the quince orchard in the same clade of a dendrogram. Molecular analysis generated by 13 inter-simple sequence repeat primers amplified 139 bands, including 109 polymorphic bands, indicating a level of polymorphism of 79%; mean gene diversity was calculated to be 0.309. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, a number of markers significantly associated with fire blight susceptibility, yield, mean fruit weight, citric acid content, soluble solid content, and fruit drop were identified. Hence, data extracted by multiple regression analysis could be useful in marker-assisted breeding programs, especially when no previous genetic information is available. PMID:22095599

  18. Comparative Anatomy of Phagocytic and Immunological Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Niedergang, Florence; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of “phagocytic synapse.” Here, we discuss both types of structures, their organization, and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated. PMID:26858721

  19. Comparative Anatomy of Phagocytic and Immunological Synapses.

    PubMed

    Niedergang, Florence; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of "phagocytic synapse." Here, we discuss both types of structures, their organization, and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated. PMID:26858721

  20. Molecular markers and biological targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer: expert opinion and recommendations derived from the 11th ESMO/World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, 2009.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, E; Dicato, M; Arber, N; Berlin, J; Cervantes, A; Ciardiello, F; De Gramont, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Ducreux, M; Geva, R; Glimelius, B; Glynne Jones, R; Grothey, A; Gruenberger, T; Haller, D; Haustermans, K; Labianca, R; Lenz, H J; Minsky, B; Nordlinger, B; Ohtsu, A; Pavlidis, N; Rougier, P; Schmiegel, W; Van de Velde, C; Schmoll, H J; Sobrero, A; Tabernero, J

    2010-06-01

    The article summarizes the expert discussion and recommendations on the use of molecular markers and of biological targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), as well as a proposed treatment decision strategy for mCRC treatment. The meeting was conducted during the 11th ESMO/World Gastrointestinal Cancer Congress (WGICC) in Barcelona in June 2009. The manuscript describes the outcome of an expert discussion leading to an expert recommendation. The increasing knowledge on clinical and molecular markers and the availability of biological targeted therapies have major implications in the optimal management in mCRC. PMID:20534623

  1. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  2. Study Of Genetic Diversity Between Grasspea Landraces Using Morphological And Molecular Marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Abbasali Vahabi; Lotfi, Asefeh; Solooki, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Grass pea is a beneficial crop to Iran since it has some major advantageous such as high grain and forage quality, high drought tolerance and medium level of salinity tolerance and a good native germplasm variation which accessible for breeding programs. This study was carried out to evaluate morphological traits of the grass pea landraces using a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at Research Farm of Isfahan University of Technology. To evaluate genetic diversity of 14 grass pea landraces from various locations in Iran were investigated using 32 RAPD & ISJ primers at Biocenter of University of Zabol. Analysis of variance indicated a highly significant differences among 14 grass pea landrace for the morphological traits. Average of polymorphism percentage of RAPD primer was 73.9%. Among used primer, 12 random primers showed polymorphism and a total of 56 different bands were observed in the genotypes. Jafar-abad and Sar-chahan genotypes with similarity coefficient of 66% and Khoram-abad 2 and Khoram-abad 7 genotypes with similarity coefficient of 3% were the most related and the most distinct genotypes, respectively. Fourteen primers out of 17 semi random primers produced 70 polymorphic bands which included 56% of the total 126 produced bands. Genetic relatedness among population was investigated using Jacard coefficient and unweighted pair group mean analysis (UPGMA) algorithm. The result of this research verified possibility of use of RAPD & ISJ markers for estimation of genetic diversity, management of genetic resources and determination of repetitive accessions in grass pea.

  3. Molecular characterization and differentiation of five horse breeds raised in Algeria using polymorphic microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Berber, N; Gaouar, S; Leroy, G; Kdidi, S; Tabet Aouel, N; Saïdi Mehtar, N

    2014-10-01

    In this study, genetic analyses of diversity and differentiation were performed on five horse breeds raised in Algeria (Barb, Arab-Barb, Arabian, Thoroughbred and French Trotter). All microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic in all the breeds. A total of 123 alleles from 14 microsatellite loci were detected in 201 horses. The average number of alleles per locus was the highest in the Arab-Barb horses (7.86) and lowest in the thoroughbred breed (5.71), whereas the observed and expected heterozygosities per breed ranged from 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.752 (Barb) and 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.77 (Arab-Barb), respectively. The genetic differentiation between the breeds was significant (p < 0.01) based on the infinitesimal model (FST ). Three different approaches for evaluating the genetic relationships were applied. Genetic distances, the factorial correspondence analysis and structure analysis showed that a significant amount of genetic variation is maintained in the native horse populations and the other breeds. The Barb and Arab-Barb breeds seem to be the most genetically related and support the decision to consider the breeds as same population. PMID:24834806

  4. Genetic identification of bucktooth parrotfish Sparisoma radians (Valenciennes, 1840) (Labridae, Scarinae) by chromosomal and molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Fabilene Gomes; Brandão, José Henrique Souza Galdino; Sampaio, Iracilda; de Mello Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes; Diniz, Débora

    2014-01-01

    Parrotfishes (Labridae, Scarinae) comprise a large marine fish group of difficult identification, particularly during juvenile phase when the typical morphology and coloration of adults are absent. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test cytogenetic markers and DNA barcoding in the identification of bucktooth parrtotfish Sparisoma radians from the northeastern coast of Brazil. Sequencing of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) confirmed all studied samples as S. radians, and all showed high similarity (99–100%) with Caribbean populations. The karyotype of this species was divergent from most marine Perciformes, being composed of 2n = 46 chromosomes. These consisted of a large number of metacentric and submetacentric pairs with small amounts of heterochromatin and GC-rich single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) not syntenic to 5S rDNA clusters. These are the first data about DNA barcoding in parrotfish from the Brazilian province and the first refined chromosomal analysis in Scarinae, providing useful data to a reliable genetic identification of S. radians. PMID:25505839

  5. Population genetic structure and trait associations in forest savory using molecular, morphological and phytochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah; Karimi, Ehsan; Hadian, Javad

    2014-08-10

    In this investigation, morphological, phytochemical and ISSR markers were used to estimate the relationships among and within seven populations of white savory (Satureja mutica), belonging to four provinces in Iran. The individuals were phenotypically diverse, which stamen length, corolla length, corolla diameter, calyx length, bract length, inflorescence length, calyx length and bracteole width were characteristics with the highest variation. Leaf dimensions were in significant correlation with flower and inflorescence characteristics. Chemical compounds of essential oils were found variable in various individuals and all samples were principally composed of phenolic constituents (carvacrol and/or thymol). As a consequence, the plants were classified into two major chemotypes including carvacrol and thymol. A total of 197 band positions were produced by 14 ISSR primers, of which 176 were found polymorphic with 88.91% polymorphism. ISSR genetic similarity values among individuals ranged between 0.45 and 0.94 which was indicative of a high level of genetic variation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) revealed that phytochemical compositions as dependent variable, showed statistically significant correlation and in association with leaf and flower traits as independent variable, indicating a main role of leaf and flower on production of these compounds. Also, several ISSR fragments were found associated with some morphological traits and phytochemical compositions. The high diversity within and among populations of S. mutica according to different data systems could provide useful information for conservation and selection of cross-parents in breeding programs. PMID:24878369

  6. Retrotransposon-Based Molecular Markers for Analysis of Genetic Diversity within the Genus Linum

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Yurkevich, Olga Yu.; Speranskaya, Anna S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krinitsina, Anastasia A.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Uroshlev, Leonid A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Koroban, Nadezda V.; Amosova, Alexandra V.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Guzenko, Elena V.; Lemesh, Valentina A.; Savilova, Anastasya M.; Rachinskaia, Olga A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    SSAP method was used to study the genetic diversity of 22 Linum species from sections Linum, Adenolinum, Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, and 46 flax cultivars. All the studied flax varieties were distinguished using SSAP for retrotransposons FL9 and FL11. Thus, the validity of SSAP method was demonstrated for flax marking, identification of accessions in genebank collections, and control during propagation of flax varieties. Polymorphism of Fl1a, Fl1b, and Cassandra insertions were very low in flax varieties, but these retrotransposons were successfully used for the investigation of Linum species. Species clusterization based on SSAP markers was in concordance with their taxonomic division into sections Dasylinum, Stellerolinum, Adenolinum, and Linum. All species of sect. Adenolinum clustered apart from species of sect. Linum. The data confirmed the accuracy of the separation in these sections. Members of section Linum are not as closely related as members of other sections, so taxonomic revision of this section is desirable. L. usitatissimum accessions genetically distant from modern flax cultivars were revealed in our work. These accessions are of utmost interest for flax breeding and introduction of new useful traits into flax cultivars. The chromosome localization of Cassandra retrotransposon in Linum species was determined. PMID:25243121

  7. Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijewski, T.; Śmietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2011-02-01

    The genetic constitution of mussels ( Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction between the Black Sea and Mediterranean populations and a higher incidence of M. trossulus than reported so far in northern European populations. The frequency of M. galloprovincialis nuclear alleles was high along the Iberian Peninsula and decreased abruptly along the French coasts with a high frequency of M. edulis alleles in the Bay of Biscay, The Netherlands, Germany, Iceland, Barents and White Seas, and with little evidence of introgression between the two taxa. M. trossulus alleles were observed in the Baltic Sea and Danish Straits as expected. In addition, occurrence of M. trossulus alleles in cold waters of Iceland, Barents Sea and White Sea is reported for the first time.

  8. Molecular characterization of twenty polymorphic microsatellite markers in the polyploid fruit tree species Syzygium samarangense (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Lai, J M; Tsai, C C; Yen, C R; Ko, Y Z; Chen, S R; Weng, I S; Lin, Y S; Chiang, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & Perry (wax apple) is an important commercial fruit tree in Southeast Asia. Here, microsatellite markers were developed to evaluate genetic diversity and distinguish cultivars in this species. In total, 161 microsatellite loci with sufficient flanking sequences to design primer sets were isolated from wax apple using a magnetic bead-enrichment method. Fifty-eight primer sets were designed based on the flanking sequences of each single sequence repeat (SSR) locus and were tested using 14 wax apple cultivars/lines. Twenty SSR loci were found to be polymorphic and transferable across the 14 wax apple cultivars/lines. The number of alleles and effective number of alleles detected per locus ranged from 4 to 12 and from 1.697 to 9.800, respectively. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.150 to 0.595 (mean = 0.414). Polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.502 to 0.866 (mean = 0.763). These new microsatellite loci will be of value for characterization of genetic diversity in wax apples and for the identification of cultivars. PMID:26505454

  9. Estimating Animal Abundance in Ground Beef Batches Assayed with Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Simila, Janika; Platz, Sindey Schueler; Moore, Stephen S.; Plastow, Graham; Meghen, Ciaran N.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating animal abundance in industrial scale batches of ground meat is important for mapping meat products through the manufacturing process and for effectively tracing the finished product during a food safety recall. The processing of ground beef involves a potentially large number of animals from diverse sources in a single product batch, which produces a high heterogeneity in capture probability. In order to estimate animal abundance through DNA profiling of ground beef constituents, two parameter-based statistical models were developed for incidence data. Simulations were applied to evaluate the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of a joint likelihood function from multiple surveys, showing superiority in the presence of high capture heterogeneity with small sample sizes, or comparable estimation in the presence of low capture heterogeneity with a large sample size when compared to other existing models. Our model employs the full information on the pattern of the capture-recapture frequencies from multiple samples. We applied the proposed models to estimate animal abundance in six manufacturing beef batches, genotyped using 30 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, from a large scale beef grinding facility. Results show that between 411∼1367 animals were present in six manufacturing beef batches. These estimates are informative as a reference for improving recall processes and tracing finished meat products back to source. PMID:22479559

  10. Genetic diversity of Iranian Aegilops tauschii Coss. using microsatellite molecular markers and morphological traits.

    PubMed

    Tahernezhad, Zahra; Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Solouki, Mahmood; Zahravi, Mehdi; Imamjomeh, Abbas Ali; Jafaraghaei, Mohammad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza

    2010-10-01

    Aegilops tauschii Coss. is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14,DD) goat grass species which has contributed the D genome in common wheat. Genetic variations in 28 accessions of Aegilops tauschii belonged to different provinces of Iran, were evaluated using 16 morphological traits and 19 SSR markers. In number of spikelet per spike and plant height, there was a high variation in ssp. tauschii and ssp. strangulata respectively and for days to mature a low variation in both subspecies was found. Discriminant function analysis showed that 67.9% of original grouped cases correctly classified. Factor analysis indicated that three factor explain 66.49% of total variation. The three clusters revealed by the cluster analysis were not consistent with their geographical distributions. We determined 208 alleles using 19 microsatellites. Average of alleles for every locus was 10.94. The total average of PIC was 0.267. 2261 bands produced for total of genotypes and Chinese Spring had the highest bands (95 alleles). The range of similarity coefficients was between 0.23 and 0.73. Genotypes were clustered using UPGMA method. The accessions did not match according to morphological cluster and geographical regions. 51.2% of total variations were related to 9 principle components. PMID:19967455

  11. Estimating animal abundance in ground beef batches assayed with molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Simila, Janika; Platz, Sindey Schueler; Moore, Stephen S; Plastow, Graham; Meghen, Ciaran N

    2012-01-01

    Estimating animal abundance in industrial scale batches of ground meat is important for mapping meat products through the manufacturing process and for effectively tracing the finished product during a food safety recall. The processing of ground beef involves a potentially large number of animals from diverse sources in a single product batch, which produces a high heterogeneity in capture probability. In order to estimate animal abundance through DNA profiling of ground beef constituents, two parameter-based statistical models were developed for incidence data. Simulations were applied to evaluate the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of a joint likelihood function from multiple surveys, showing superiority in the presence of high capture heterogeneity with small sample sizes, or comparable estimation in the presence of low capture heterogeneity with a large sample size when compared to other existing models. Our model employs the full information on the pattern of the capture-recapture frequencies from multiple samples. We applied the proposed models to estimate animal abundance in six manufacturing beef batches, genotyped using 30 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, from a large scale beef grinding facility. Results show that between 411∼1367 animals were present in six manufacturing beef batches. These estimates are informative as a reference for improving recall processes and tracing finished meat products back to source. PMID:22479559

  12. Acrocomia emensis (Arecaceae) genetic structure and diversity using SSR molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Neiva, D S; Melo Júnior, A F; Oliveira, D A; Royo, V A; Brandão, M M; Menezes, E V

    2016-01-01

    Acrocomia emensis, popularly known as the creeping tucum, belongs to the family Arecaceae, and is an oilseed specie of the Brazilian Savannah. The expansion of agricultural activity has rapidly destroyed its natural habitat, leading to a decrease in its population size. Genetic studies can be used to investigate the genetic variability, and may assist with the charting future conservation strategies. In this study the genetic diversity and structure of 150 individuals sampled in three locations in Minas Gerais were analysed, based on the transferability of six microsatellite markers, previously developed for A. aculeata. The results indicate that the populations studied have low levels of genetic variability (Ho = 0.148) and high, positive and significant inbreeding coefficient, indicating an excess of homozygotes. The average heterozygosity within the population (Hs = 0.700) accounted for 95.03% of the total genetic diversity, indicating that there is greater variability within population than between them, consistent with low genetic differentiation between population (GST = 0.046). Bayesian analysis identified three distinct groups; however, populations shared large numbers of alleles, which can be explained by the reduced distance between populations. These results reveal the need to implement genetic conservation programs for the maintenance of this species and to prioritize population from Bonito and Brasília, which showed the lowest values of genetic diversity. PMID:27050985

  13. Use of molecular markers to determine postremission treatment in acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Edward A; Grunwald, Michael R; Druhan, Lawrence J; Avalos, Belinda R

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be induced into complete remission, but postremission treatment is required for cure. The choice of postremission therapy in a majority of nonelderly patients, between intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, is largely determined by the results of conventional cytogenetic analysis. In 45% of patients with a normal karyotype, the presence or absence of specific molecular mutations should be used to determine the prognosis and postremission treatment. In addition, the identification of mutations may indicate a role for targeted intervention, including following transplantation. PMID:26459077

  14. Molecular identification of Echinococcus granulosus on the Tibetan Plateau using mitochondrial DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Hu, D; Song, X; Wang, N; Zhong, X; Wang, J; Liu, T; Jiang, Z; Dawa, T; Gu, X; Peng, X; Yang, G

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that causes large economic losses and human suffering. Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of CE, exhibits different genotypes in different locations. In order to identify its genotypes and analyze its genetic structure on the Tibetan Plateau, we collected 72 hydatid cysts from different intermediate hosts and amplified and sequenced their mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2) genes. Seventy isolates were identified as the E. granulosus G1 genotype, while two isolates belonged to the G6 genotype. There were 18 haplotypes among the 70 E. granulosus isolates, which exhibited a star-like network pattern and shared a common haplotype (H1). There was little difference between geographical sub-populations. Our results suggest that a recent E. granulosus population expansion occurred on the Tibetan Plateau, suggesting that E. granulosus was introduced into China. This study increases the basic molecular data needed for the molecular diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention, and control of Echinococcus diseases. PMID:26535707

  15. Molecular and contextual markers of hepatitis C virus and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Drumright, Lydia N; Frost, Simon D W; Commins, Deborah; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L; Scott, William K; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde; Page, J Bryan; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Francisco; Singer, Elyse; Levine, Andrew; Minagar, Alireza; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Kotila, Taiwo; Chiappelli, Francesco; Sinnott, John T

    2009-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves a complex interplay of social risks, and molecular factors of both virus and host. Injection drug abuse is the most powerful risk factor for HCV infection, followed by sexual transmission and additional non-injection drug abuse factors such as co-infection with other viruses and barriers to treatment. It is clearly important to understand the wider context in which the factors related to HCV infection occur. This understanding is required for a comprehensive approach leading to the successful prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV. An additional consideration is that current treatments and advanced molecular methods are generally unavailable to socially disadvantaged patients. Thus, the recognition of behavioral/social, viral, and host factors as components of an integrated approach to HCV is important to help this vulnerable group. Equally important, this approach is key to the development of personalized patient treatment - a significant goal in global healthcare. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the impact of drug abuse, epidemiology, social behavior, virology, immunopathology, and genetics on HCV infection and the course of disease. PMID:19650670

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Christopher P.; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300–1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  17. Validity of the bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae) based on morphological and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Muto, Maki; Yamada, Minoru; Arizono, Naoki; Rausch, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    The bear tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ursi is described based upon the morphology of adult tapeworms recovered from the brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi) and larval plerocercoids found in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from Kodiak Island in Alaska in 1952. However, in 1987 D. ursi was synonymized with Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, and the taxonomic relationship between both species has not subsequently been revised. In this study mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) sequences of holotype and paratype D. ursi specimens that had been preserved in a formalin-acetic acid-alcohol solution since the time the species was initially described approximately 60 yr ago were analyzed. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 sequences revealed that D. ursi is more closely related to D. dendriticum than it is to Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense and Diphyllobothrium latum. In addition to molecular evidence, differences in the life cycle and ecology of the larval plerocercoids between D. ursi and D. dendriticum also suggest that D. ursi is a distinct species, separate from D. dendriticum and D. nihonkaiense, and also possibly from D. latum . PMID:22663179

  18. Molecular and Contextual Markers of Hepatitis C Virus and Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Drumright, Lydia N.; Frost, Simon D.W.; Commins, Deborah; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Scott, William K.; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde; Page, J. Bryan; Giunta, Brian; Fernandez, Francisco; Singer, Elyse; Levine, Andrew; Minagar, Alireza; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Kotila, Taiwo; Chiappelli, Francesco; Sinnott, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection involves a complex interplay of social risks, and molecular factors of both virus and host. Injection drug abuse is the most powerful risk factor for HCV infection, followed by sexual transmission and additional non-injection drug abuse factors such as co-infection with other viruses and barriers to treatment. It is clearly important to understand the wider context in which the factors related to HCV infection occur. This understanding is required for a comprehensive approach leading to the successful prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV. An additional consideration is that current treatments and advanced molecular methods are generally unavailable to socially disadvantaged patients. Thus, the recognition of behavioral/social, viral, and host factors as components of an integrated approach to HCV is important to help this vulnerable group. Equally important, this approach is key to the development of personalized patient treatment – a significant goal in global healthcare. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the impact of drug abuse, epidemiology, social behavior, virology, immunopathology, and genetics on HCV infection and the course of disease. PMID:19650670

  19. Comparative protein profiles: potential molecular markers from spermatozoa of Acipenseriformes (Chondrostei, Pisces).

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Hulak, Martin; Rodina, Marek; Sulc, Miroslav; Li, Zhi-Hua; Linhart, Otomar

    2010-12-01

    Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseriformes), the source of roe consumed as caviar, are a unique and commercially valuable group of ancient fishes. In this study, comparative proteomics was used to analyze protein profiles of spermatozoa from five sturgeon species and one paddlefish: Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii), sterlet (A. ruthenus), Russian sturgeon (A. gueldenstaedtii), starry sturgeon (A. stellatus), beluga (Huso huso), and Mississippi paddlefish (Polyodon spathula). Protein profiles of spermatozoa were determined by isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) high-resolution gels. The peptides, previously selected by 2-DE analysis as potentially species-specific, were obtained by "in-gel" tryptic digestion, followed by matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Among the 23 protein spots selected, 14 were identified as isoforms of enolase B present in all species, but with different isoelectric points or molecular mass. Exceptions were A. ruthenus and H. huso, species with a close phylogenetic relationship. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was detected exclusively in P. spathula. Phosphoglycerate kinase was detected only in A. ruthenus and H. huso, and 3 additional proteins (fructose bisphosphate aldolase A-2, glycogen phosphorylase type IV and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) were found exclusively in A. gueldenstaedtii and H. huso. This study points to the application of proteomics for differential characterization and comparative studies of acipenseriform species at the molecular level. PMID:20869341

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Christopher P; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Minogue, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is an epidemic of increasing magnitude requiring rapid identification and profiling for appropriate and timely therapeutic measures and containment strategies. In this context, ciprofloxacin is part of the first-line of countermeasures against numerous high consequence bacteria. Significant resistance can occur via single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and deletions within ciprofloxacin targeted genes. Ideally, use of ciprofloxacin would be prefaced with AR determination to avoid overuse or misuse of the antibiotic. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of genetic variants known to confer ciprofloxacin resistance in Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. Sequencing results demonstrate MIPs capture and amplify targeted regions of interest at significant levels of coverage. Depending on the genetic variant, limits of detection (LOD) for high-throughput pooled sequencing ranged from approximately 300-1800 input genome copies. LODs increased 10-fold in the presence of contaminating human genome DNA. In addition, we show that MIPs can be used as an enrichment step with high resolution melt (HRM) real-time PCR which is a sensitive assay with a rapid time-to-answer. Overall, this technology is a multiplexable upfront enrichment applicable with multiple downstream molecular assays for the detection of targeted genetic regions. PMID:27174456

  1. The importance of molecular markers for diagnosis and selection of targeted treatments in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobin, N P; Foukakis, T; De Petris, L; Bergh, J

    2015-12-01

    The past 30 years have seen the introduction of a number of cancer therapies with the aim of restricting the growth and spread of primary and metastatic tumours. A shared commonality among these therapies is their targeting of various aspects of the cancer hallmarks, that is traits that are essential to successful tumour propagation and dissemination. The evolution of molecular-scale technology has been central to the identification of new cancer targets, and it is not a coincidence that improved therapies have emerged at the same time as gene expression arrays and DNA sequencing have enhanced our understanding of cancer genetics. Modern tumour pathology is now viewed at the molecular level ranging from IHC biomarkers, to gene signature classifiers and gene mutations, all of which provide crucial information about which patients will respond to targeted therapy regimens. In this review, we briefly discuss the general types of targeted therapies used in a clinical setting and provide a short background on immunohistochemical, gene expression and DNA sequencing technologies, before focusing on three tumour types: breast, lung and colorectal cancers. For each of these cancer types, we provide a background to the disease along with an overview of the current standard therapies and then focus on the relevant targeted therapies and the pathways they inhibit. Finally, we highlight several strategies that are pivotal to the successful development of targeted anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26373821

  2. Delimiting Species-Poor Data Sets using Single Molecular Markers: A Study of Barcode Gaps, Haplowebs and GMYC.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Flot, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Most single-locus molecular approaches to species delimitation available to date have been designed and tested on data sets comprising at least tens of species, whereas the opposite case (species-poor data sets for which the hypothesis that all individuals are conspecific cannot by rejected beforehand) has rarely been the focus of such attempts. Here we compare the performance of barcode gap detection, haplowebs and generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) models to delineate chimpanzees and bonobos using nuclear sequence markers, then apply these single-locus species delimitation methods to data sets of one, three, or six species simulated under a wide range of population sizes, speciation rates, mutation rates and sampling efforts. Our results show that barcode gap detection and GMYC models are unable to delineate species properly in data sets composed of one or two species, two situations in which haplowebs outperform them. For data sets composed of three or six species, bGMYC and haplowebs outperform the single-threshold and multiple-threshold versions of GMYC, whereas a clear barcode gap is only observed when population sizes and speciation rates are both small. The latter conditions represent a "sweet spot" for molecular taxonomy where all the single-locus approaches tested work well; however, the performance of these methods decreases strongly when population sizes and speciation rates are high, suggesting that multilocus approaches may be necessary to tackle such cases. PMID:25601944

  3. Morphological and molecular profiling of Spirogyra from northeastern and northern Thailand using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Wongsawad, Pheravut; Peerapornpisal, Yuwadee

    2015-07-01

    Green algae, Spirogyra (Chlorophyta), are found in a wide range of habitats including small stagnant water bodies, rivers, and streams. Species identification of Spirogyra based on morphological characteristics has proven to be a difficult process. An accurate identification method is required to evaluate genetic variations. This study is aimed at investigating the molecular profiling of 19 samples of Spirogyra from northern and northeastern Thailand. The morphological characteristics of each sample were recorded, viz. cell dimensions (width and length), along with the number and arrangement of chloroplast spirals/pyrenoids. With regard to a correlation of the biological and ecological parameters, conductivity was clearly significantly related to the number of pyrenoids. While DO is negatively related to the number of chloroplast spirals. Molecular studies with 10 ISSR primers were amplified to examine the DNA fingerprints. Morphological characters were determined to be significantly different by revealing 5 traits (P < 0.05) for all specimens. In addition, the DNA markers of all specimens were investigated using 10 ISSR primers. The results show that the PCR technique amplified 108 fragments. An analysis of the DNA fragments grouped all samples by ISRR-PCR, which were then separated into two groups according to their distribution. PMID:26150742

  4. Recombinant Inbred Strain and Interspecific Backcross Analysis of Molecular Markers Flanking the Murine Agouti Coat Color Locus

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Buchberg, A. M.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recombinant inbred strain and interspecific backcross mice were used to create a molecular genetic linkage map of the distal portion of mouse chromosome 2. The orientation and distance of the Ada, Emv-13, Emv-15, Hck-1, Il-1a, Pck-1, Psp, Src-1 and Svp-1 loci from the β(2)-microglobulin locus and the agouti locus were established. Our mapping results have provided the identification of molecular markers both proximal and distal to the agouti locus. The recombinants obtained provide valuable resources for determining the direction of chromosome walking experiments designed to clone sequences at the agouti locus. Comparisons between the mouse and human genome maps suggest that the human homolog of the agouti locus resides on human chromosome 20q. Three loci not present on mouse chromosome 2 were also identified and were provisionally named Psp-2, Hck-2 and Hck-3. The Psp-2 locus maps to mouse chromosome 14. The Hck-2 locus maps near the centromere of mouse chromosome 4 and may identify the Lyn locus. The Hck-3 locus maps near the distal end of mouse chromosome 4 and may identify the Lck locus. PMID:2759422

  5. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations is of importance for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise physiology. Increases of cfDNA due to exercise are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome and might be related to, or trigger adaptations of, immune function induced by strenuous exercise. At the same time, exercise provides a practicable model for studying the phenomenon of cfDNA that is described to be of pathophysiological relevance for different topics in clinical medicine like autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review, we are summarizing the current knowledge of exercise-based acute and chronic alterations in cfDNA levels and their physiological significance. The effects of acute exercise on cfDNA concentrations have been investigated in resistance exercises and in continuous, stepwise and interval endurance exercises of different durations. cfDNA concentrations peaked immediately after acute exercise and showed a rapid return to baseline levels. Typical markers of skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase, uric acid, C-reactive protein) show delayed kinetics compared with the cfDNA peak response. Exercise parameters such as intensity, duration or average energy expenditure do not explain the extent of increasing cfDNA concentrations after strenuous exercise. This could be due to complex processes inside the human organism during and after physical activity. Therefore, we hypothesize composite effects of different physiological stress parameters that come along with exercise to be responsible for increasing cfDNA concentrations. We suggest that due to acute stress, cfDNA levels increase rapidly by a spontaneous active or passive release mechanism that is not yet known. As a result of the rapid and parallel increase of cfDNA and lactate in an incremental treadmill test leading to exhaustion within 15-20 minutes, it is unlikely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by typical necrosis or apoptosis of cells in acute exercise settings. Recently, rapid DNA release mechanisms of activated immune-competent cells like NETosis (pathogen-induced cell death including the release of neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) have been discovered. cfDNA accumulations might comprise a similar kind of cell death including trap formation or an active release of cfDNA. Just like chronic diseases, chronic high-intensity resistance training protocols induced persistent increases of cfDNA levels. Chronic, strenuous exercise protocols, either long-duration endurance exercise or regular high-intensity workouts, induce chronic inflammation that might lead to a slow, constant release of DNA. This could be due to mechanisms of cell death like apoptosis or necrosis. Yet, it has neither been implicated nor proven sufficiently whether cfDNA can serve as a marker for overtraining. The relevance of cfDNA with regard to overtraining status, performance level, and the degree of physical exhaustion still remains unclear. Longitudinal studies are required that take into account standardized and controlled exercise, serial blood sampling, and large and homogeneous cohorts of different athletic achievement. Furthermore, it is important to establish standardized laboratory procedures for the measurement of genomic cfDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We introduce a new hypothesis based on acute exercise and chronic exposure to stress, and rapid active and passive chronic release of cfDNA fragments into the circulation. PMID:22694348

  6. Applicability of molecular markers to determine parasitic infection origins in the animal trade: a case study from Sarcoptes mites in wildebeest.

    PubMed

    Alasaad, Samer; Schuster, Rolf K; Gakuya, Francis; Theneyan, Mohamed; Jowers, Michael J; Maione, Sandra; Min, Annarita Molinar; Soriguer, Ramón C; Rossi, Luca

    2012-09-01

    The development of non-manipulative molecular tools to determine the origin of parasite infections in the animal trade (if infected before their export or import) is of great interest worldwide for both the animal trade industry and for animal welfare. Molecular tools have a wide range of applications, including forensic identification, wildlife preservation and conservation, veterinary public health protection, and food safety. Nonetheless, genetic markers were not reported to detect the source of infection in the animal trade. In this study we tested the applicability of molecular tools to detect the origin of Sarcoptes mite infection of wildebeest imported by the United Arab Emirate (UAE) from Tanzania. Using one multiplex of seven microsatellite markers and control samples from UAE, Kenya and Italy, we demonstrated the usefulness of the multiplex STR-typing as a molecular tool of pivotal interest to help commercialist, authorities, and conservationists, to identify the geographical origin of parasitic infections. PMID:21814832

  7. Application of molecular markers to detect DNA damage caused by environmental pollutants in lichen species.

    PubMed

    Cansaran-Duman, D; Altunkaynak, E; Aslan, A; Byk, I; Aras, S

    2015-01-01

    Pseudevernia furfuracea L. (Zopf), Peltigera praetextata (Flrke ex Sommerf.) Zopf, Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm., and Usnea longissima Ach. lichen species were used as bioindicators to assess the genotoxicity of air pollutants. In the present study, we examined significant environmetal pollutants and investigate how changes may lead to damage in DNA structure using RAPD markers. In the study area (Erzurum, Turkey), poor-quality lignite, which generates a large amount of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particle matter, is used for domestic heating, and vehicles also contribute to air pollution. Control lichen samples were collected far from large urban and industrial settlements and transplanted to four polluted sites for 4, 8, or 12 months. The total soluble protein content of the examined four lichen species did not significantly change with exposure time (P < 0.05). The four lichen samples exposed to the pollutants for 8 months had the highest ratio of DNA changes. The ratio of band differences in P. praetextata was higher than that in the other three lichen species, possibly because it has broad leaves that accumulated more pollutants. The average incidences of polymorphism were 64.14, 54.58, 65.76, and 43.06% for P. furfuracea, P. praetextata, L. pulmonaria, and U. longissima, respectively. The genomic template stability (GTS) significantly decreased following exposure to pollutants. GTS ratios revealed that the highest value (98.36%) belonged to U. longissima samples from Site 1 (10 m) after 4 months of exposure, and the lowest values belonged to P. praetextata (73.58%) from Site 3 (100 m) after 8 months of exposure. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of P. praetextata as an indicator of genotoxicity. PMID:25966238

  8. Metabolomics and molecular marker analysis to explore pepper (Capsicum sp.) biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Wahyuni, Yuni; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; Tikunov, Yury; de Vos, Ric C H; Pelgrom, Koen T B; Maharijaya, Awang; Sudarmonowati, Enny; Bino, Raoul J; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2013-02-01

    An overview of the metabolic diversity in ripe fruits of a collection of 32 diverse pepper (Capsicum sp.) accessions was obtained by measuring the composition of both semi-polar and volatile metabolites in fruit pericarp, using untargeted LC-MS and headspace GC-MS platforms, respectively. Accessions represented C. annuum, C. chinense, C. frutescens and C. baccatum species, which were selected based on variation in morphological characters, pungency and geographic origin. Genotypic analysis using AFLP markers confirmed the phylogenetic clustering of accessions according to Capsicum species and separated C. baccatum from the C. annuum-C. chinense-C. frutescens complex. Species-specific clustering was also observed when accessions were grouped based on their semi-polar metabolite profiles. In total 88 semi-polar metabolites could be putatively identified. A large proportion of these metabolites represented conjugates of the main pepper flavonoids (quercetin, apigenin and luteolin) decorated with different sugar groups at different positions along the aglycone. In addition, a large group of acyclic diterpenoid glycosides, called capsianosides, was found to be highly abundant in all C. annuum genotypes. In contrast to the variation in semi-polar metabolites, the variation in volatiles corresponded well to the differences in pungency between the accessions. This was particularly true for branched fatty acid esters present in pungent accessions, which may reflect the activity through the acyl branch of the metabolic pathway leading to capsaicinoids. In addition, large genetic variation was observed for many well-established pepper aroma compounds. These profiling data can be used in breeding programs aimed at improving metabolite-based quality traits such as flavour and health-related metabolites in pepper fruits. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-012-0432-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:23335867

  9. A set of multiplex panels of microsatellite markers for rapid molecular characterization of rice accessions

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa-Filho, Marco; Beló, André; Alcochete, António AN; Rangel, Paulo HN; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to analyze the efficiency of three new microsatellite multiplex panels, which were designed to evaluate a total of 16 loci of the rice genome, based on single PCR reactions of each panel. A sample of 548 accessions of traditional upland rice landraces collected in Brazil in the last 25 years was genotyped, a database of allelic frequencies was established, estimates of genetic parameters were performed and analysis of genetic structure of the collection was developed. Results The three panels yielded a combined matching probability of 6.4 × 10-21, polymorphism information content (PIC) of 0.637, and a combined power of exclusion greater than 99.99%. A few samples presented a genetic background of indica rice. The 16 SSR loci produced a total of 229 alleles. Gene diversity values averaged 0.667, and PIC values averaged 0.637. Genetic structure analysis of the collection using a Bayesian approach detected three possible major clusters, with an overall FST value of 0.177. Important inputs on the knowledge about upland rice germplasm differentiations which happened in Brazil in the last few centuries were also achieved and are discussed. Conclusion The three multiplex panels described here represent a powerful tool for rice genetic analysis, offering a rapid and efficient option for rice germplasm characterization. The data gathered demonstrates the feasibility of genotyping extensive germplasm collections using panels of multiplexed microsatellite markers. It contributes to the advancement of research on large scale characterization and management of germplasm banks, as well as identification, protection and assessments of genetic relationship of rice germplasm. PMID:17517133

  10. Persistent γH2AX: A promising molecular marker of DNA damage and aging.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Sabbir; François, Maxime; Fenech, Michael F; Leifert, Wayne R

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest cellular responses to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is the phosphorylation of the core histone protein H2AX (termed γH2AX). Persistent γH2AX is the level of γH2AX above baseline, measured at a given time-point beyond which DNA DSBs are normally expected to be repaired (usually persist for days to months). This review summarizes the concept of persistent γH2AX in the context of exogenous source induced DNA DSBs (e.g. ionizing radiation (IR), chemotherapeutic drugs, genotoxic agents), and endogenous γH2AX levels in normal aging and accelerated aging disorders. Summary of the current literature demonstrates the following (i) γH2AX persistence is a common phenomenon that occurs in humans and animals; (ii) nuclei retain persistent γH2AX foci for up to several months after IR exposure, allowing for retrospective biodosimetry; (iii) the combination of various radiosensitizing drugs with ionizing radiation exposure leads to persistent γH2AX response, thus enabling the potential for monitoring cancer patients' response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as tailoring cancer treatments; (iv) persistent γH2AX accumulates in telomeric DNA and in cells undergoing cellular senescence; and (v) increased endogenous γH2AX levels may be associated with diseases of accelerated aging. In summary, measurement of persistent γH2AX could potentially be used as a marker of radiation biodosimetry, evaluating sensitivity to therapeutic genotoxins and radiotherapy, and exploring the association of unrepaired DNA DSBs on telomeres with diseases of accelerated aging. PMID:26596544

  11. Molecular characterization of accessions of Cratylia argentea (Camaratuba) using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Luz, G A; Gomes, S O; Araujo Neto, R B; Nascimento, M S C B; Lima, P S C

    2015-01-01

    Cratylia argentea (Desv.) Kuntze (Fabaceae) is a drought-tolerant, perennial legume found primarily in Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru. The shrub is well adapted to acid soils and exhibits high productivity and nutritional value, characteristics that would favor its use as a dry season animal forage supplement in semiarid regions. In plant improvement programs, the production of elite hybrids with superior traits is generally achieved by crossing parents that exhibit the highest level of genetic divergence. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess genetic diversity among 13 accessions of C. argentea from the same population maintained in the active germplasm bank of Embrapa Meio-Norte using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Genetic similarities between C. argentea accessions were estimated from Jaccard coefficients, and a dendrogram was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA). The set of 15 primers selected for ISSR analysis generated a total of 313 loci of which 79.23% were polymorphic. The mean number of bands per primer was 20.87, and the amplicons ranged from 280 to 3000 bp in size. Primers UBC834 and UBC827 generated the largest number of polymorphic loci and exhibited 90.91 and 100% polymorphism, respectively. The coefficients of genetic similarity among accessions varied between 0.49 and 0.73. UPGMA cluster analysis allowed the identification of four genotypic groups and demonstrated the existence of considerable variability within the collection. Potential progenitors were selected that would offer good possibilities of obtaining unusual and favorable combinations of genes in a plant breeding program. PMID:26634487

  12. ADM3, TFF3 and LGALS3 are discriminative molecular markers in fine-needle aspiration biopsies of benign and malignant thyroid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Karger, S; Krause, K; Gutknecht, M; Schierle, K; Graf, D; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Führer, D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, we reported a six-marker gene set, which allowed a molecular discrimination of benign and malignant thyroid tumours. Now, we evaluated these markers in fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) in a prospective, independent series of thyroid tumours with proven histological outcome. Methods: Quantitative RT–PCR was performed (ADM3, HGD1, LGALS3, PLAB, TFF3, TG) in the needle wash-out of 156 FNAB of follicular adenoma (FA), adenomatous nodules, follicular and papillary thyroid cancers (TC) and normal thyroid tissues (NT). Results: Significant expression differences were found for TFF3, HGD1, ADM3 and LGALS3 in FNAB of TC compared with benign thyroid nodules and NT. Using two-marker gene sets, a specific FNAB distinction of benign and malignant tumours was achieved with negative predictive values (NPV) up to 0.78 and positive predictive values (PPV) up to 0.84. Two FNAB marker gene combinations (ADM3/TFF3; ADM3/ACTB) allowed the distinction of FA and malignant follicular neoplasia with NPV up to 0.94 and PPV up to 0.86. Conclusion: We demonstrate that molecular FNAB diagnosis of benign and malignant thyroid tumours including follicular neoplasia is possible with recently identified marker gene combinations. We propose multi-centre FNAB studies on these markers to bring this promising diagnostic tool closer to clinical practice. PMID:22223087

  13. Immunological and Molecular Characterization of Susceptibility in Relationship to Bacterial Strain Differences in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, R.; Mackintosh, C. G.; Bakker, D.; Kopecna, M.; Pavlik, I.; Griffin, J. F. T.

    2006-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) infection, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, represents a major disease problem in farmed ruminants. Although JD has been well characterized in cattle and sheep, little is known of the infection dynamics or immunological response in deer. In this study, typing of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from intestinal lymphatic tissues from 74 JD-infected animals showed that clinical isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from New Zealand farmed red deer were exclusively of the bovine strain genotype. The susceptibility of deer to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was further investigated by experimental oral-route infection studies using defined isolates of virulent bovine and ovine M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains. Oral inoculation with high (109 CFU/animal) or medium (107 CFU/animal) doses of the bovine strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis established 100% infection rates, compared to 69% infection following inoculation with a medium dose of the ovine strain. The high susceptibility of deer to the bovine strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was confirmed by a 50% infection rate following experimental inoculation with a low dose of bacteria (103 CFU/animal). This study is the first to report experimental M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in red deer, and it outlines the strong infectivity of bovine-strain M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates for cervines. PMID:16714585

  14. How do novel molecular genetic markers influence treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay P; Levine, Ross L

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia diagnosed in adults, and the majority of patients with AML die from relapsed disease. Although many studies over the past 4 decades have identified disease alleles in AML, recent genome-wide and candidate gene studies have identified additional recurrent somatic mutations in AML patients with biologic, clinical, and therapeutic importance. Herein we review our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of AML and discuss how mutational profiling can be used to refine prognostication in AML and to inform therapeutic approaches. We also review the current challenges in translating genomic studies to the clinical setting, which remains a significant challenge and an urgent priority. PMID:23233557

  15. Molecular diversity of Enteromorpha from the coast of Yantai: a dual-marker assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Zhengyi; Wang, Yinchu; Zhao, Yushan; Qin, Song

    2013-11-01

    We collected nine Enteromorpha specimens from the coast of Yantai and evaluated their diversity based on analyses of their ITS (internal transcribed spacer) and 5S rDNA NTS (non-transcribed spacer) sequences. The ITS sequences showed slight nucleotide divergences between Enteromorpha linza and Enteromorpha prolifera. In contrast, multiple highly variable regions were found in the ITS region of Enteromorpha flexuosa. In general, there were more variable sites in the NTS region than in the ITS region in the three species. The variations in 5S rDNA NTS sequences indicated that the molecular diversity of Enteromorpha from the coast of Yantai is very high. However, a phylogenetic tree constructed using 5S rDNA NTS sequence data indicated that genetic differences were not directly related to geographical distribution.

  16. Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 gene mutations: A potential new molecular marker in malignant gliomas (Review).

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Songtao

    2012-01-01

    Alterations of the Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (TET2) gene in myeloid malignancies and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations in gliomas and myeloid malignancies have recently been identified using molecular, comparative genomic hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism array techniques. The mutations of the TET2 gene have been shown to be mutually exclusive with IDH1/2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and evidence has been found to provide a biochemical basis for the mutual exclusivity of IDH1/2 and TET2 gene mutations. Based on mounting evidence, we aimed to investigate whether TET2 mutations may be identified as novel mutations in malignant gliomas without IDH1/2 mutations, and indicate their possible significance in gliomas. PMID:22740846

  17. Reconfigurable hybrid interface for molecular marker diagnostics and in-situ reporting.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Kristina; Guinn, Michael T; Quarton, Tyler; Zhang, Michael Q; Bleris, Leonidas

    2015-12-15

    Combinations of molecular signals such as transcription factors and microRNAs in cells are a reliable indicator of multi-gene disorders. A system capable of detecting these conditions in-situ may be used as a tool for diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Here, we engineer genetic circuits that sense endogenous levels of the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and the microRNA hsa-miR-21 (miR-21) in cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Furthermore, using the mediator molecule human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), we interface the intracellular information to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test strips. We demonstrate that this hybrid genetic circuit and test-strip interface can accommodate combinatorial, low-cost, and in-situ reporting, a versatile profiling tool. PMID:26210472

  18. Cytokines and other immunological biomarkers in children's environmental health studies

    PubMed Central

    Duramad, Paurene; Tager, Ira B.; Holland, Nina T.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental exposures (e.g. pesticides, air pollution, and environmental tobacco smoke) during prenatal and early postnatal development have been linked to a growing number of childhood diseases including allergic disorders and leukemia. Because the immune response plays a critical role in each of these diseases, it is important to study the effects of toxicants on the developing immune system. Children's unique susceptibility to environmental toxicants has become an important focus of the field of immunotoxicology and the use of immune biomarkers in molecular epidemiology of children's environmental health is a rapidly expanding field of research. In this review, we discuss how markers of immune status and immunotoxicity are being applied to pediatric studies, with a specific focus on the various methods used to analyze T-helper-1/2 (Th1/Th2) cytokine profiles. Furthermore, we review recent data on the effects of children's environmental exposures to volatile organic compounds, metals, and pesticides on Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and the associations of Th1/Th2 profiles with adverse health outcomes such as pediatric respiratory diseases, allergies, cancer and diabetes. Although cytokine profiles are increasingly used in children's studies, there is still a need to acquire distribution data for different ages and ethnic groups of healthy children. These data will contribute to the validation and standardization of cytokine biomarkers for future studies. Application of immunological markers in epidemiological studies will improve the understanding of mechanisms that underlie associations between environmental exposures and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:17624696

  19. The Transferrin Receptor: A Potential Molecular Imaging Marker for Human Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Högemann-Savellano, Dagmar; Bos, Erik; Blondet, Cyrille; Sato, Fuminori; Abe, Tatsuya; Josephson, Lee; Weissleder, Ralph; Gaudet, Justin; Sgroi, Dennis; Peters, Peter J.; Basilion, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive imaging of differences between the molecular properties of cancer and normal tissue has the potential to enhance the detection of tumors. Because overexpression of endogenous transferrin receptor (TfR) has been qualitatively described for various cancers and is presumably due to malignant transformation of cells, TfR may represent a suitable target for application of molecular imaging technologies to increase detection of smaller tumors. In the work reported here, investigation into the biology of this receptor using electron microscopy has demonstrated that iron oxide particles targeted to TfR are internalized and accumulate in lysosomal vesicles within cells. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of imaging probes with cells overexpressing the TfR demonstrated that the extent of accumulation, and therefore probe efficacy, is dependent on the nature of the chemical cross-link between transferrin and the iron oxide particle. These data were utilized to design and synthesize an improved imaging probe. Experiments demonstrate that the novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe is sensitive enough to detect small differences in endogenous TfR expression in human cancer cell lines. Quantitative measurement of TfR overexpression in a panel of 27 human breast cancer patients demonstrated that 74% of patient cancer tissues overexpressed the TfR and that the sensitivity of the new imaging agent was suitable to detect TfR overexpression in greater than 40% of these cases. Based on a biochemical and cell biological approach, these studies have resulted in the synthesis and development of an improved MRI probe with the best in vitro and in vivo imaging properties reported to date. PMID:14965443

  20. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  1. Immunology's theories of cognition.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary immunology has established its fundamental theory as a biological expression of personal identity, wherein the "immune self" is defended by the immune system. Protection of this agent putatively requires a cognitive capacity by which the self and the foreign are perceived and thereby discriminated; from such information, discernment of the environment is achieved and activation of pathways leading to an immune response may be initiated. This so-called cognitive paradigm embeds such functions as "perception," "recognition," "learning," and "memory" to characterize immune processes, but the conceptual character of such functions has meanings that vary with the particular theory adopted. When different formulations of cognition are considered, immunology's conceptual infrastructure shifts: Extensions of conventional psychological understanding of representational cognition based on a subject-object dichotomy support notions of immune agency; alternatively, formulations of perception that dispense with representations and attendant notions of agency reconfigure the predicate epistemology dominating current immune theory. Reviewing immunological literature of the past five decades, these two understandings of perception--representational and non-representational (considered here from ecological, enactivist, and autopoietic perspectives)--offer competing views of immune cognitive functions. These, in turn, provide competing philosophical understandings of immunology's conceptual foundations, which reflect parallel controversies dominating current debates in philosophy of mind and attendant discussions about personal identity. PMID:24466634

  2. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  3. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  4. Sequestration of organic nitrogen in a paddy soil chronosequence as assessed by amino sugars molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Philipp; Lehndorff, E.; Cao, Z.; Amelung, W.

    2010-05-01

    Available nitrogen is a limiting factor in paddy rice systems due to ammonia volatilization, denitrification and stabilization in organic complexes. Soil organic nitrogen (SON) might therefore constitute a critical component of the nitrogen cycle in rice systems. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of microorganisms for the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms. For this purpose we analyzed amino sugars as markers for the residues of bacteria and fungi in a chronosequence of soils that were used for paddy rice production for a period of 0 to 2000 years in the Hangzhou bay area in Southeast China. Within the soil profile, amino sugar concentrations were generally highest in the puddled Ap horizon and decreased with increasing depth along with organic carbon concentrations regardless of the time of rice cultivation. Nevertheless, a sharp increase of total amino sugar concentration from 0.1 g kg-1 to 0.3 g kg-1 was observed in the Ah horizon when comparing tidal wetland to salt marsh that had been impoldered 30 years ago, indicating an increasing importance of microbial residues in SON stabilization following the conversion of the semiaquatic marsh to a terrestrial system. With increased time of paddy rice cropping, amino sugar concentrations continued to increase up to a maximum of 2.1 g kg-1 after 300 years of paddy cultivation but declined again to 1 g kg-1 in soils with 700-2000 years history of cultivation despite increasing organic matter accumulation. Changes in the composition of the amino sugars were also most pronounced at initial stages of paddy rice management. The proportions of glucosamine (abundant in fungal chitin) decreased during the first 50 years of cultivation relative to mainly galactosamine (abundant in bacterial gums) and muramic acid (abundant in bacterial peptidoglycan), that remained at constantly low levels. At later stages of paddy rice cultivation, the ratios of glucosamine to galactosamine and to muramic acid re-increased. We conclude that microorganisms significantly contribute to the sequestration of paddy N in organic forms during the first 300 years of cropping, within an increasing contribution of bacteria as cropping time proceeds. At even longer periods of paddy rice cultivation, there appears to be a backshift to lower concentrations of microbial residues with higher proportions of fungal N remaining.

  5. Reproductive immunology: biomarkers of compromised pregnancies

    SciTech Connect

    Faulk, W.P.; Coulam, C.B.; McIntyre, J.A.

    1987-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to consider several catagories of biomarkers of human pregnancy. The design of the report is to discuss useful and promising markers and techniques. Research gaps, needs, and priorities are also defined. Useful markers are mixed lymphocyte culture reactions, measures of lymphocytotoxic antibodies, histocompatibility (HLA) typing, and immunohematological evaluations. Promising markers are measures of major basic protein and early pregnancy factor, as well as determinations of trophoblast-lymphocyte cross-reactive (TLX) antigens. Promising techniques are flourescence-activated cell-sorter analysis of maternal blood for fetal and extraembryonic tissues and immunotherapy with TLX and other antigens to prevent spontaneous abortion. It is concluded that immunology has much to offer the development of biomarkers of human pregnancy.

  6. Evaluation of molecular markers for discriminating Gonaterocerus morrilli: A biological control agent imported from the origin of the glassy-winged sharpshooter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the utility of molecular markers for discriminating between two very closely related species, Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) (imported from Texas) and G. walkerjonesi S. Triapitsyn (native to California), to determine whether post-release G. morrilli specimens could be detected and discri...

  7. A centennial record of anthropogenic impacts and extreme weather events in southwestern Taiwan: Evidence from sedimentary molecular markers in coastal margin

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Lee, Chon-Lin; Louchouarn, Patrick; Huh, Chih-An; Liu, James T.; Chen, Jian-Cheng; Lee, Kun-Je

    2014-09-15

    A 100-year history of human and natural disturbances in southwestern Taiwan was reconstructed using a suite of molecular markers in four dated sediment cores from the upper slope region off the Gaoping River mouth. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) tracked Taiwan's industrialization/urbanization starting in the 1970s, and the enactment of environmental regulatory policies thereafter.

  8. [Immunologic studies in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Vogt, S; Ewers, P; Goos, H; Krosse, B; Löbe, M; Ladusch, M; Seim, K; Wolff, M

    1992-04-01

    In 10 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy the HLA-loci (A, B, C, DR) and marker expression on lymphocytes were studied. In this group the T4/T8-ratio was decreased and interleukin-2-expression was increased in relation to normals or patients with chronic coronary heart disease, respectively. 9 patients had the HLA-A1 or HLA-A2-locus in their siblings. In correlation analysis between immunological and hemodynamic parameters a good correlation of the number of NK-cells to the ejection fraction (r = 0.79) and negative correlation of helpercells (CD4) to the cardiac output were found (r = -0.80). The results of this attempt suggest an immunological pathogenesis of the dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:1595301

  9. Separation of DNA for molecular markers analysis from leaves of the Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Nazhad, Nafiseh Rigi; Solouki, Mahmood

    2008-06-01

    In the present study, three DNA extraction procedures were examined to determine which might yield DNA from Grape leaves suitable for molecular analysis for RAPD, SSR. AFLP and etc analysis. The three methods examined were: the miniprep procedure and the modified CTAB for difficult species and protocol CTAB. Only the modified CTAB method consistently yielded DNA suitable for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification, regardless of plant growing conditions or leaf age. The quality and quantity of extracted genomic DNA gained from these methods are deliberated by means UV biophotometer, electrophoresis in 1.2% agarose gel and PCR. In this regard, application chosen for young and mature leaves, the most value of qualified DNA, is extracted from fully expanded leave when PVP was added to the extraction buffer. This same procedure also yielded PCR-amplifiable DNA from various other perennial, woody species and from other fruit species such as apple (Malus domestica), cherry (Prunus avium), peach (Prunuspersica), plum (Prunus domestica). DNA yield from this procedure is high (up to 1 mg g(-1) of leaf tissue). DNA is completely digestible with restriction endonucleases and amplifiable in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). PMID:18817243

  10. Molecular Markers in the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru Describe 20th Century Biomass Burning Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makou, M. C.; Thompson, L. G.; Eglinton, T. I.; Montluçon, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Organic geochemical analytical methods were applied to Andean ice core samples, resulting in a multi- molecular biomass burning record spanning 1915 to 2001 AD. The Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru is situated on the eastern flank of the Andes at 14°S and is well situated to receive aeolian inputs of organic matter derived from Amazonian forest fire events. Compounds of interest, which occur in trace quantities in ice, were recovered by stir bar sorptive extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption. These methods permitted identification and quantitation of numerous biomarkers in sample volumes of as little as 10 ml. At least one wet and dry season sample was analyzed for every year. Observed biomarkers that may be derived from vegetation fires include several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), atraric acid, 2-ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate, and a range of other aromatic compounds. Abrupt changes in compound abundances were superimposed on decadal variability. Systematic offsets between wet and dry season abundances were not observed, suggesting that the biomass burning signal is not biased by seasonal depositional effects, such as dust delivery. Inputs likely reflect a combination of sources from anthropogenic burning of the Amazon rainforest as well as natural fires related to aridity, and include both high and low elevation vegetation. These compounds and techniques can be applied to older ice in this and other core locations as an independent estimate of aridity.

  11. Optimized measurements of separations and angles between intra-molecular fluorescent markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Kim I.; Sung, Jongmin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a novel, yet simple tool for the study of structure and function of biomolecules by extending two-colour co-localization microscopy to fluorescent molecules with fixed orientations and in intra-molecular proximity. From each colour-separated microscope image in a time-lapse movie and using only simple means, we simultaneously determine both the relative (x,y)-separation of the fluorophores and their individual orientations in space with accuracy and precision. The positions and orientations of two domains of the same molecule are thus time-resolved. Using short double-stranded DNA molecules internally labelled with two fixed fluorophores, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of our method using the known structure of double-stranded DNA as a benchmark, resolve 10-base-pair differences in fluorophore separations, and determine the unique 3D orientation of each DNA molecule, thereby establishing short, double-labelled DNA molecules as probes of 3D orientation of anything to which one can attach them firmly.

  12. Optimized measurements of separations and angles between intra-molecular fluorescent markers

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Kim I.; Sung, Jongmin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel, yet simple tool for the study of structure and function of biomolecules by extending two-colour co-localization microscopy to fluorescent molecules with fixed orientations and in intra-molecular proximity. From each colour-separated microscope image in a time-lapse movie and using only simple means, we simultaneously determine both the relative (x,y)-separation of the fluorophores and their individual orientations in space with accuracy and precision. The positions and orientations of two domains of the same molecule are thus time-resolved. Using short double-stranded DNA molecules internally labelled with two fixed fluorophores, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of our method using the known structure of double-stranded DNA as a benchmark, resolve 10-base-pair differences in fluorophore separations, and determine the unique 3D orientation of each DNA molecule, thereby establishing short, double-labelled DNA molecules as probes of 3D orientation of anything to which one can attach them firmly. PMID:26509412

  13. Optimized measurements of separations and angles between intra-molecular fluorescent markers.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Kim I; Sung, Jongmin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel, yet simple tool for the study of structure and function of biomolecules by extending two-colour co-localization microscopy to fluorescent molecules with fixed orientations and in intra-molecular proximity. From each colour-separated microscope image in a time-lapse movie and using only simple means, we simultaneously determine both the relative (x,y)-separation of the fluorophores and their individual orientations in space with accuracy and precision. The positions and orientations of two domains of the same molecule are thus time-resolved. Using short double-stranded DNA molecules internally labelled with two fixed fluorophores, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of our method using the known structure of double-stranded DNA as a benchmark, resolve 10-base-pair differences in fluorophore separations, and determine the unique 3D orientation of each DNA molecule, thereby establishing short, double-labelled DNA molecules as probes of 3D orientation of anything to which one can attach them firmly. PMID:26509412

  14. Molecular marker and stable carbon isotope analyses of carbonaceous Ambassador uranium ores of Mulga Rock in Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaraula, C.; Schwark, L.; Moreau, X.; Grice, K.; Bagas, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mulga Rock is a multi-element deposit containing uranium hosted by Eocene peats and lignites deposited in inset valleys incised into Permian rocks of the Gunbarrel Basin and Precambrian rocks of the Yilgarn Craton and Albany-Fraser Orogen. Uranium readily adsorbs onto minerals or phytoclasts to form organo-uranyl complexes. This is important in pre-concentrating uranium in this relatively young ore deposit with rare uraninite [UO2] and coffinite [U(SiO4)1-x(OH)4x], more commonly amorphous and sub-micron uranium-bearing particulates. Organic geochemical and compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses were conducted to identify possible associations of molecular markers with uranium accumulation and to recognize effect(s) of ionizing radiation on molecular markers. Samples were collected from the Ambassador deposit containing low (<200 ppm) to high (>2000 ppm) uranium concentrations. The bulk rock C/N ratios of 82 to 153, Rock-Eval pyrolysis yields of 316 to 577 mg hydrocarbon/g TOC (Hydrogen Index, HI) and 70 to 102 mg CO2/g TOC (Oxygen Index, OI) are consistent with a terrigenous and predominantly vascular plant OM source deposited in a complex shallow water system, ranging from lacustrine to deltaic, swampy wetland and even shallow lake settings as proposed by previous workers. Organic solvent extracts were separated into saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, ketone, and a combined free fatty acid and alcohol fraction. The molecular profiles appear to vary with uranium concentration. In samples with relatively low uranium concentrations, long-chain n-alkanes, alcohols and fatty acids derived from epicuticular plant waxes dominate. The n-alkane distributions (C27 to C31) reveal an odd/even preference (Carbon Preference Index, CPI=1.5) indicative of extant lipids. Average δ13C of -27 to -29 ‰ for long-chain n-alkanes is consistent with a predominant C3 plant source. Samples with relatively higher uranium concentrations contain mostly intermediate-length n-alkanes, ketones, alcohols, and fatty acids (C20 to C24) with no preferential distribution (CPI~1). Intermediate length n-alkanes have modest carbon isotope enrichment compared to long-chain n-alkanes. These shorter-chain hydrocarbons are interpreted to represent alteration products. The diversity and relative abundance of ketones in highly mineralised Mulga Rock peats and lignites are not consistent with aerobic and diagenetic degradation of terrigenous OM in oxic environments. Moreover, molecular changes cannot be associated with thermal breakdown due to the low maturity of the deposits. It is possible that the association of high uranium concentrations and potential radiolysis resulted in the oxidation of alcohol functional groups into aldehydes and ketones and breakdown of highly aliphatic macromolecules (i.e. spores, pollen, cuticles, and algal cysts). These phytoclasts are usually considered to be recalcitrant as they evolved to withstand chemical and physical degradation. Previous petrographic analyses show that spores, pollen and wood fragments are preferentially enriched in uranium. Their molecular compositions are feasible sources of short- to intermediate-length n-alkanes that dominate the mineralised peats and lignites.

  15. Molecular signature of salivary gland tumors: potential use as diagnostic and prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Sena Filho, Marcondes; Altemani, Albina; Speight, Paul M; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions with diverse microscopic appearances and variable clinical behavior. The use of clinical and histological parameters to predict patient prognosis and survival rates has been of limited utility, and the search for new biomarkers that could not only aid in a better understanding of their pathogenesis but also be reliable auxiliaries for prognostic determination and useful diagnostic tools has been performed in the last decades with very exciting results. Hence, gene rearrangements such as CRTC1-MAML2 in mucoepidermoid carcinomas have shown excellent specificity, and more than that, it has been strongly correlated with low-grade tumors and consequently with an increased survival rate and better prognosis of patients affected by neoplasms carrying this translocation. Moreover, MYB-NFIB and EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions were shown to be specifically found in cases of adenoid cystic carcinomas and hyalinizing clear cell carcinomas, respectively, in the context of salivary gland tumors, becoming reliable diagnostic tools for these entities and potential therapeutic targets for future therapeutic protocols. Finally, the identification of ETV6-NTRK3 in cases previously diagnosed as uncommon acinic cell carcinomas, cystadenocarcinomas, and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified led to the characterization of a completely new and now widely accepted entity, including, therefore, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in the list of well-recognized salivary gland carcinomas. Thus, further molecular investigations of salivary gland tumors are warranted, and the recognition of other genetic abnormalities can lead to the acknowledgment of new entities and the acquirement of reliable biomarkers. PMID:25990369

  16. Hypodiploid multiple myeloma is characterized by more aggressive molecular markers than non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Van Wier, Scott; Braggio, Esteban; Baker, Angela; Ahmann, Gregory; Levy, Joan; Carpten, John D; Fonseca, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    Multiple myeloma can be categorized into hyperdiploid or non-hyperdiploid myeloma based on the number of chromosomes found in the tumor clone. Among the non-hyperdiploid myelomas, the hypodiploid subtype has the most aggressive clinical phenotype, but the genetic differences between groups are not completely defined. In order to understand the genetic background of hypodiploid multiple myeloma better, we compared the genomic (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) and transcriptomic (gene expression profiling) background of 49 patients with hypodiploid myeloma with 50 other non-hyperdiploid and 125 hyperdiploid myeloma patients. There were significant chromosomal and gene expression differences between hyperdiploid patients and non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients. Non-hyperdiploid and hypodiploid patients shared most of the chromosomal abnormalities; nevertheless a subset of these abnormalities, such as monosomies 13, 14 and 22, was markedly increased in hypodiploid patients. Furthermore, deletions of 1p, 12p, 16q and 17p, all associated with poor outcome or progression in multiple myeloma, were significantly enriched in hypodiploid patients. Molecular risk-stratification indices reinforce the worse prognosis associated with hypodiploid multiple myeloma compared with non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. Gene expression profiling clustered hypodiploid and non-hyperdiploid subgroups closer than hyperdiploid myeloma but also highlighted the up-regulation of CCND2, WHSC1/MMSET and FGFR3 in the hypodiploid subtype. In summary, hypodiploid multiple myeloma is genetically similar to non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma but characterized by a higher prevalence of genetic alterations associated with poor outcome and disease progression. It is provocative to hypothesize that hypodiploid multiple myeloma is an advanced stage of non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma. PMID:23716545

  17. Identification of Molecular Markers of Delayed Graft Function Based on the Regulation of Biological Ageing

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Dagmara; Leierer, Johannes; Shapter, Olivier; Mohammed, Suhaib; Gingell-Littlejohn, Marc; Kingsmore, David B.; Little, Ann-Margaret; Kerschbaum, Julia; Schneeberger, Stefan; Maglione, Manuel; Nadalin, Silvio; Wagner, Sylvia; Königsrainer, Alfred; Aitken, Emma; Whalen, Henry; Clancy, Marc; McConnachie, Alex; Koppelstaetter, Christian; Stevenson, Karen S.; Shiels, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function is a prevalent clinical problem in renal transplantation for which there is no objective system to predict occurrence in advance. It can result in a significant increase in the necessity for hospitalisation post-transplant and is a significant risk factor for other post-transplant complications. Methodology The importance of microRNAs (miRNAs), a specific subclass of small RNA, have been clearly demonstrated to influence many pathways in health and disease. To investigate the influence of miRNAs on renal allograft performance post-transplant, the expression of a panel of miRNAs in pre-transplant renal biopsies was measured using qPCR. Expression was then related to clinical parameters and outcomes in two independent renal transplant cohorts. Results Here we demonstrate, in two independent cohorts of pre-implantation human renal allograft biopsies, that a novel pre-transplant renal performance scoring system (GRPSS), can determine the occurrence of DGF with a high sensitivity (>90%) and specificity (>60%) for donor allografts pre-transplant, using just three senescence associated microRNAs combined with donor age and type of organ donation. Conclusion These results demonstrate a relationship between pre-transplant microRNA expression levels, cellular biological ageing pathways and clinical outcomes for