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Sample records for immunophenotypes effector cells

  1. Aberrant immunophenotypes of mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlaeger, Ch; Lange, K; Merz, H; Feller, A C

    2003-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) are characterized by cytomorphological criteria, a distinct immunophenotype and a characteristic chromosomal aberration (t(11;14)). In morphological variants of MCL the immunohistochemical constellation with CD5-positivity and CD23-negativity is a helpful and decisive diagnostic aid to differentiate MCL from other B-cell-lymphomas, e.g. lymphocytic lymphomas (B-CLL). In this study the morphological, immunophenotypical, and genetical features of 50 MCL were analysed. Five cases revealed an aberrant immunophenotype with lacking expression of CD5 (n = 3) and positive reactivity to CD23 (n = 2) while cyclin D1 expression could be demonstrated in all 5 cases. These constellations show that there is, besides morphological subgroups, a small group of MCL with aberrant immunophenotypes, which has to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis to lymphocytic lymphoma and other lymphomas. PMID:12688344

  2. Immunophenotyping of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Lack of correlation between immunophenotype and cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, H. J.; van Baarlen, J.; Huppes, W.; Lam, B. W.; Verdonck, L. F.; van Unnik, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of Clusters of Differentiation for T- and B-lymphoid cells during International Workshops on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens prompted the authors to evaluate the immunophenotypes in 160 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In this group, 130 were of B-lymphocyte lineage (117 by monotypic immunoglobulin expression), and 30 of T-cell lineage. In the B-NHL series the expression of immunoglobulin isotypes, B-cell maturation/differentiation antigens of CD9, CD10, CD19-24, CD37, and CD38 (OKT10), HLA-DR and peanut agglutinin binding showed no significant relationship with histopathologic diagnosis as defined by the Kiel classification. Of the T-cell markers, CD5, CD6, and CD7 showed lineage promiscuity by their presence on some B-NHL. Conversely, the authors grouped the cases according to phenotypes (either CD antigens or immunoglobulin isotypes) which occur in distinct stages of (physiologic) B-cell maturation/differentiation. Eighty-six of the 130 cases could be fitted according to CD phenotype expression. This approach did not yield a significant relationship between phenotype and individual histopathologic categories either. The staging by CD phenotype and by immunoglobulin isotype yielded different results in this respect. Most B-NHL had an intermediate stage of B-cell maturation/differentiation. In the T-NHL series most cases showed a phenotype (CD1-CD8, CD38, TdT, and peanut agglutinin binding capacity) compatible with mature T-lymphocyte characteristics. The exceptions were lymphoblastic convoluted lymphomas, which exhibited an immature immunophenotype. It is concluded that NHL in distinct histopathologic categories are heterogeneous in immunologic phenotypes, and that the immunophenotype of lymphoma cells has no evident association with that of their presumed counterparts in physiologic cell maturation/differentiation. PMID:3310650

  3. Immunophenotyping in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Kimlinger, Teresa; Morice, William

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasma cell disorders form a spectrum ranging from the asymptomatic presence of small monoclonal populations of plasma cells to conditions like plasma cell leukemia and multiple myeloma, in which the bone marrow can be replaced by the accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells. Immunophenotyping has become an invaluable tool in the management of hematological malignancies and is increasingly finding a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell disorders. Multiparameter flow cytometry has evolved considerably during the past decade with an increasing ability to screen large numbers of events and to detect multiple antigens at the same time. This, along with a better understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the clonal plasma cells in different disorders, has made immunophenotyping an indispensible tool in the diagnosis, prognostic classification and management of plasma cell disorders. This book chapter addresses the approaches taken to evaluate monoclonal plasma cell disorders, and the different markers and techniques that are important for the study of these diseases. PMID:21112041

  4. Myoepithelial cells in lobular carcinoma in situ: distribution and immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Jindal, Sonali; Martel, Maritza; Wu, Yaping; Schedin, Pepper; Troxell, Megan

    2016-09-01

    Myoepithelial cells have important physical and paracrine roles in breast tissue development, maintenance, and tumor suppression. Recent molecular and immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated phenotypic alterations in ductal carcinoma in situ-associated myoepithelial cells. Although the relationship of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and myoepithelial cells was described in 1980, further characterization of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells is lacking. We stained 27 breast specimens harboring abundant LCIS with antibodies to smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and calponin. Dual stains for E-cadherin/smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and CK7/p63 were also performed. In each case, the intensity and distribution of staining in LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells were compared with normal breast tissue on the same slide. In 78% of the cases, LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells demonstrated decreased staining intensity for one or more myoepithelial markers. The normal localization of myoepithelial cells (flat against the basement membrane, pattern N) was seen in 96% of LCIS, yet 85% of cases had areas with myoepithelial cell cytoplasm oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane (pattern P), and in 30% of cases, myoepithelial cells appeared focally admixed with LCIS cells (pattern C). This study characterizes detailed architectural and immunophenotypic alterations of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells. The finding of variably diminished staining favors application of several myoepithelial immunostains in clinical practice. The interaction of LCIS with myoepithelial cells, especially in light of the perpendicular and central architectural arrangements, deserves further mechanistic investigation. PMID:27195907

  5. Genotypes and immunophenotypes of Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drexler, H G; Leber, B F; Norton, J; Yaxley, J; Tatsumi, E; Hoffbrand, A V; Minowada, J

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the geno- and immunophenotypic analysis of the Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines HDLM-2, KM-H2, and L-428. The lines were all positive for the antigens CD15 (Leu-M1), CD30 (Ki-1), Hefi-1 (antigen detected by a monoclonal antibody produced against L-428), HLA class I and II, and activation/proliferation markers. The cells from all 3 cell lines lacked almost all cell lineage-associated/specific markers: HDLM-2 was only CD2+, KM-H2 was only CD9+ and CD21+, and L-428 was negative for all the specific markers tested. Genomic analysis of HDLM-2 cells revealed monoclonal rearrangements of T cell receptor beta and gamma loci and germ line configuration of immunoglobulin genes. Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were rearranged in KM-H2 and L-428. These data suggest a possible lymphoid origin for HDLM-2, KM-H2, and L-428. Although the data presented do not provide formal proof of a lymphoid nature of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and do not unequivocally exclude a derivation from other hematopoietic cells, extrapolation of the results from the in vitro cultures to the in vivo situation suggests a lymphoid (T or B cell) origin of these cells. PMID:3131596

  6. A morphological and immunophenotypic map of the immune response in Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Noreen M; Fleming, Kirsten E; Hanly, John G; Dakin Hache, Kelly; Doucette, Steve; Ferrara, Gerardo; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The susceptibility of Merkel cell carcinoma to the host immune response has prompted a search for effective immunotherapy. CD8-positive T lymphocytes are considered key effectors of this response, but the cellular infiltrates also harbor tumor-protective agents. By developing a comprehensive morphological and immunophenotypic map of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILS) in Merkel cell carcinoma, we aimed to establish a useful template for future studies. Twenty-two cases (mean age, 79years [range, 52-95]; male-female ratio, 10:12) were studied. TILS were categorized as brisk (7), nonbrisk (9), and absent(6). Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV)-positive (16) and -negative (6) cases were included, as were those with pure (18) and combined (4) morphologies. One MCPyV+ case had undergone spontaneous regression. Immunohistochemical markers included CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, FoxP3, PD-1, and CD123. Statistical analysis used Fisher exact tests and Spearman correlations. There was a significant correlation between brisk TILs and MCPyV+ status (P=.025). CD8+ T lymphocytes predominated, were present in significantly higher proportions in brisk infiltrates (P=.003), and showed a significant predilection for the intratumoral environment (P=.003). Immune inhibitors including T regulatory cells (FOXP3+) and PD-1+ "exhausted" immunocytes were present in lower proportions. Our findings support (1) the link between a brisk immune response and MCPyV positivity, (2) the supremacy of CD8+ cells in effecting immunity, and (3) the incorporation of immune inhibitors within the global infiltrate. Efforts to therapeutically arm the "effectors" and disarm the "detractors" are well focused. These will likely have the greatest impact on MCPyV-positive cases. PMID:26980039

  7. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  8. A case of lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells: aggressive immunophenotype but indolent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Savage, Natasha M; Salman, Huda; Morice, William G

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Distinguishing chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells from aggressive NK-cell leukemia is critical because they have distinct clinical course and management. Immunophenotyping plays a key role in distinguishing these two entities, however, it could not be used as sole criteria and clinical/laboratory findings are equally important. PMID:26401278

  9. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  10. Selective Immunophenotyping for Diagnosis of B-cell Neoplasms: Immunohistochemistry and Flow Cytometry Strategies and Results

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Scott D.; Natkunam, Yasodha; Allen, John R.; Warnke, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the immunophenotype of hematologic malignancies is now an indispensible part of diagnostic classification, and can help to guide therapy, or to predict clinical outcome. Diagnostic workup should be guided by morphologic findings and evaluate clinically important markers, but ideally should avoid the use of overly-broad panels of immunostains that can reveal incidental findings of uncertain significance and give rise to increased costs. Here, we outline our approach to diagnosis of B cell neoplasms, combining histologic and clinical data with tailored panels of immunophenotyping reagents, in the context of the 2008 World Health Organization classification. We present data from cases seen at our institution from 2004-8 using this approach, to provide a practical reference for findings seen in daily diagnostic practice. PMID:22820658

  11. Enumeration of absolute cell counts using immunophenotypic techniques.

    PubMed

    Mandy, F; Brando, B

    2001-05-01

    Absolute counting of cells or cell subsets has a number of significant clinical applications: monitoring the disease status of HIV-infected patients, enumerating residual white blood cells in leukoreduced blood products, and assessing immunodeficiency in a variety of situations. The single-platform method (flow cytometry alone) has emerged as the method of choice for absolute cell enumeration. This technology counts only the cells of interest in a precisely determined blood volume. Exact cell identification is accomplished by a logical electronic gating algorithm capable of identifying lineage-specific immunofluorescent markers. Exclusion of unwanted cells is automatic. This extensive and detailed unit presents protocols for both volumetric and flow-rate determination of residual white blood cells and of leukocyte subsets. PMID:18770719

  12. Immunophenotypic characterization of lymphoid cell infiltrates in vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sosa, S; Aguirre-Lombardo, M; Jimenez-Brito, G; Ruiz-Argüelles, A

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of vitiligo is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the nature of lymphoid cells infiltrating depigmented areas of skin in vitiligo. Immunochemical procedures were carried out in biopsies from 20 patients with active lesions to search for cells expressing CD1a, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD25, CD30, CD56, CD68 and CD79a. Results indicate that early lesions are infiltrated mainly by dendritic cells, whereas older lesions display significantly lower proportions of these cells and increased percentages of mature T cells. This finding might suggest that the autoimmune reactivity towards melanocyte antigens might be T cell-dependent and antigen-driven. It is possible that a non-immune offence of melanocytes is responsible for the exposure of intracellular antigens, while autoreactivity might be a secondary, self-perpetuating mechanism. PMID:23607858

  13. A Cell Surfaceome Map for Immunophenotyping and Sorting Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gundry, Rebekah L.; Riordon, Daniel R.; Tarasova, Yelena; Chuppa, Sandra; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Juhasz, Ondrej; Wiedemeier, Olena; Milanovich, Samuel; Noto, Fallon K.; Tchernyshyov, Irina; Raginski, Kimberly; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Marshall, Shannon; Duncan, Stephen A.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wersto, Robert P.; Rao, Sridhar; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boheler, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Induction of a pluripotent state in somatic cells through nuclear reprogramming has ushered in a new era of regenerative medicine. Heterogeneity and varied differentiation potentials among induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines are, however, complicating factors that limit their usefulness for disease modeling, drug discovery, and patient therapies. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop nonmutagenic rapid throughput methods capable of distinguishing among putative iPSC lines of variable quality. To address this issue, we have applied a highly specific chemoproteomic targeting strategy for de novo discovery of cell surface N-glycoproteins to increase the knowledge-base of surface exposed proteins and accessible epitopes of pluripotent stem cells. We report the identification of 500 cell surface proteins on four embryonic stem cell and iPSCs lines and demonstrate the biological significance of this resource on mouse fibroblasts containing an oct4-GFP expression cassette that is active in reprogrammed cells. These results together with immunophenotyping, cell sorting, and functional analyses demonstrate that these newly identified surface marker panels are useful for isolating iPSCs from heterogeneous reprogrammed cultures and for isolating functionally distinct stem cell subpopulations. PMID:22493178

  14. Heterogeneity and immunophenotypic plasticity of malignant cells in human liposarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Young, Eric D.; Bill, Katelynn; Belousov, Roman; Peng, Tingsheng; Lazar, Alexander J; Pollock, Raphael E; Simmons, Paul J.; Lev, Dina; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2013-01-01

    Liposarcomas are tumors arising in white adipose tissue (WAT) with avidity for local recurrence. Aggressive dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLS) may arise from well-differentiated subtypes (WDLS) upon disease progression, however, this key issue is unresolved due in large part to knowledge gaps about liposarcoma cellular composition. Here, we wished to improve insights into liposarcoma cellular hierarchy. Tumor section analysis indicated that the populations, distinguishable based on expression of CD34 (a marker of adipocyte progenitors) and CD36 (a marker of adipocyte differentiation), occupy distinct intra-tumoral locations in both WDLS and DDLS. Taking advantage of these markers, we separated cells from a panel of fresh human surgical specimens by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Based on chromosome analysis and the culture phenotypes of the composing populations, we demonstrate that malignant cells comprise four mesenchymal populations distinguished by expression of CD34 and CD36, while vascular (CD31+) and hematopoietic (CD45+) components are non-neoplastic. Finally, we show that mouse xenografts are derivable from both CD36-negative and CD36-positive DDLS cells, and that each population recreates the heterogeneity of CD36 expression in vivo. Combined, our results show that malignant cells in WDLS and DDLS can be classified according to distinct stages of adipogenesis and indicate immonophenotypic plasticity of malignant liposarcoma cells. PMID:23770802

  15. Immunophenotyping of immune cell populations in the raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Franziska; Jungwirth, Nicole; Carlson, Regina; Tipold, Andrea; Böer, Michael; Scheibe, Thomas; Molnár, Viktor; von Dörnberg, Katja; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-12-15

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a highly adaptable carnivore that has rapidly conquered Europe over the last decades and represents a potential candidate as pathogen reservoir, bearing the risk for transmission of infectious agents, as zoonosis or spill-over, to other wild life and domestic animals and man. Comprehensive investigations of infectious diseases in raccoons require a detailed knowledge of the participating immune cell populations. To close this gap of knowledge, various antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity with leukocytes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood of raccoons using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Eight out of 16 antibodies, directed against CD3, CD79α, Pax-5, IgG, CD44, MHC class II, myeloid/histiocyte antigen (MAC387), and Iba-1 exhibited a specific immunoreaction with cells in distinct anatomical compartments in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 7 out of 18 antibodies directed against CD11c, CD14, CD21, CD44, CD79α, MHC class I and II cross-reacted with peripheral blood-derived raccoon leukocytes. Summarized, the usefulness of several cross-reacting antibodies was determined for the characterization of raccoon immune cells in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, offering the opportunity to study the raccoon immune system under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:26672912

  16. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma) and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12), E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53) was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1%) of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2%) were without and 26 (38.8%) with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%). Sixty (89.5%) of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors). The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions. PMID:20178635

  17. [Immunophenotyping of leukemia: overview].

    PubMed

    Huber, K; Worofka, B; Kittl, E; Tomasits, J; Hofmann, J; Bauer, K

    1994-01-01

    Leukaemias that cannot be classified properly by morphological/cytochemical parameters may be diagnosed clearly by immunophenotyping. In this way, the neoplastic cells can be designated to either the myeloid or the lymphatic line of blood cells. Furthermore, myeloid leukaemias can be subtyped immunophenotypically in cases of type M0, M6, and M7, leukaemias, as well as in cases of mixed lineage or undifferentiated leukaemias. In patients with non-Hodgkin-lymphomas the cells can be characterized as being of B- or T-cell origin, and their activational or proliferative state can be assessed. Notably with acute lymphatic leukaemias, the prodigious therapeutical progress over the past years must be attributed to the refined definition of subtypes by immunophenotyping. PMID:8023514

  18. Tissue Specific Heterogeneity in Effector Immune Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Saba; Badrealam, Khan Farheen; Sherwani, Asif; Gupta, Umesh D.; Owais, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct “homing codes” (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors) during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A) and sunlight (vitamin D3) prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centre stage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue-tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues along with giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells. PMID:23986763

  19. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  20. Immunophenotyping of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma in peripheral blood and associated tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Martin; Feyen, Oliver; Hofmann, Heiko; Teriete, Peter; Biegner, Thorsten; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-03-01

    The immune system is important for elimination of cancer cells. Tumors including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are capable of escaping detection by host immune cells through apoptotic depletion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and corresponding TILs of tumor specimen were evaluated before and after curative tumor resection (n = 30) compared with PBLs of controls (n = 87). PBLs were characterized for the total number of T cells (CD3(+)), T helper cells (Th, CD3(+)/CD4(+)), regulatory T cells (Treg, CD4(+)/CD25(+)/CD127(low)), cytotoxic T cells (Tc, CD3(+)/CD8(+)), activated T cells (CD3(+)/HLA-DR(+)), and natural killer (NK) cells (CD3(-)/CD16(+)/CD56(+)). In tumor tissue, the prevalence of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) TILs was assessed using immunohistochemistry, whereas the incidence of apoptosis was assessed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. In PBLs of pretreated OSCC patients, a highly significant decrease in total number of T cells (p = 0.0001), Th cells (p < 0.0001), Treg cells (p < 0.0001), Tc cells (p < 0.0001), and NK cells (p = 0.0037) were found compared with controls. Decreased PBLs of OSCC patients were correlated with decreased numbers of corresponding TILs, which were associated with increased detection of apoptosis in the tumor tissue. Compared with the controls, the total number of T cells remained unchanged after surgery but the total number of NK cells significantly increased. Standardized immunophenotyping of OSCC may help to identify patients likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapy strategies and/or chemoradiation. Finally, future attempts to enhance an effective tumor-reactive immune response by immunotherapy or vaccination should be made by promoting tumor-specific Th and/or Tc cell/NK cell responses. PMID:26474587

  1. Comparative immunophenotyping of equine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: an approach toward a standardized definition.

    PubMed

    Paebst, Felicitas; Piehler, Daniel; Brehm, Walter; Heller, Sandra; Schroeck, Carmen; Tárnok, Attila; Burk, Janina

    2014-08-01

    Horses are an approved large animal model for therapies of the musculoskeletal system. Especially for tendon disease where cell-based therapy is commonly used in equine patients, the translation of achieved results to human medicine would be a great accomplishment. Immunophenotyping of equine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) remains the last obstacle to meet the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) definition of human MSCs. Therefore, the surface antigen expression of CD 29, CD 44, CD 73, CD 90, CD 105, CD 14, CD 34, CD 45, CD 79α, and MHC II in equine MSCs from adipose tissue, bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, umbilical cord tissue, and tendon tissue was analyzed using flow cytometry. Isolated cells from the different sources and donors varied in their expression pattern of MSC-defining antigens. In particular, CD 90 and 105 showed most heterogeneity. However, cells from all samples were robustly positive for CD 29 and CD 44, while being mostly negative for CD 73 and the exclusion markers CD 14, CD 34, CD 45, CD 79α and MHC II. Furthermore, it was evident that enzymes used for cell detachment after in vitro-culture affected the detection of antigen expression. These results emphasize the need of standardization of MSC isolation, culturing, and harvesting techniques. As the equine MSCs did not meet all criteria the ISCT defined for human MSCs, further investigations for a better characterization of the cell type should be conducted. PMID:24894974

  2. Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenotyping of Subpopulations of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Boram; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Fan, Rong; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    An accurate measurement of the immune status in patients with immune system disorders is critical in evaluating the stage of diseases and tailoring drug treatments. The functional cellular immunity test is a promising method to establish the diagnosis of immune dysfunctions. The conventional functional cellular immunity test involves measurements of the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines when stimulated ex vivo. However, this “bulk” assay measures the overall reactivity of a population of lymphocytes and monocytes, making it difficult to pinpoint the phenotype or real identity of the reactive immune cells involved. In this research, we develop a large surface micromachined polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfiltration membrane (PMM) with high porosity, which is integrated in a microfluidic microfiltration platform. Using the PMM with functionalized microbeads conjugated with antibodies against specific cell surface proteins, we demonstrated rapid, efficient and high-throughput on-chip isolation, enrichment, and stimulation of subpopulations of immune cells from blood specimens. Furthermore, the PMM-integrated microfiltration platform, coupled with a no-wash homogeneous chemiluminescence assay (“AlphaLISA”), enables us to demonstrate rapid and sensitive on-chip immunophenotyping assays for subpopulations of immune cells isolated directly from minute quantities of blood samples. PMID:23335389

  3. Primary CNS T-cell Lymphomas: A Clinical, Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhu P; Nicolae, Alina; Meeker, Hillary; Raffeld, Mark; Xi, Liqiang; Jegalian, Armin G; Miller, Douglas C; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas are relatively rare with the most common subtype being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Primary CNS T-cell lymphomas (PCNSTL) account for <5% of CNS lymphomas. We report the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular characteristics of 18 PCNSTLs. Fifteen cases were classified as peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, 2 of which were of γδ T-cell derivation and 1 was TCR silent; there was 1 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-positive and 2 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-negative. Median age was 58.5 years (range, 21 to 81 y), with an M:F ratio of 11:7. Imaging results showed that 15 patients had supratentorial lesions. Regardless of subtype, necrosis and perivascular cuffing of tumor cells were frequently observed (11/18 cases). CD3 was positive in all cases but 1; 10/17 were CD8-positive, and 5/17 were CD4-positive. Most cases studied had a cytotoxic phenotype with expression of TIA1 (13/15) and granzyme-B (9/13). Polymerase chain reaction analysis of T-cell receptor γ rearrangement confirmed a T-cell clone in 14 cases with adequate DNA quality. Next-generation sequencing showed somatic mutations in 36% of cases studied; 2 had >1 mutation, and none showed overlapping mutations. These included mutations in DNMT3A, KRAS, JAK3, STAT3, STAT5B, GNB1, and TET2 genes, genes implicated previously in other T-cell neoplasms. The outcome was heterogenous; 2 patients are alive without disease, 4 are alive with disease, and 6 died of disease. In conclusion, PCNSTLs are histologically and genomically heterogenous with frequent phenotypic aberrancy and a cytotoxic phenotype in most cases. PMID:26379152

  4. Primary plasma cell leukemia: clinical, immunophenotypic, DNA ploidy, and cytogenetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz, R; Orfão, A; González, M; Tabernero, M D; Bladé, J; Moro, M J; Fernández-Calvo, J; Sanz, M A; Pérez-Simón, J A; Rasillo, A; Miguel, J F

    1999-02-01

    We report on a series of 26 patients diagnosed with primary (de novo) plasma cell (PC) leukemia (PCL) in whom we analyzed the clinicobiologic characteristics of the disease together with the immunophenotype, DNA cell content, proliferative index, and numeric chromosomal aberrations of the neoplastic PC, and compared them with 664 multiple myeloma (MM) patients at diagnosis. The median age, sex ratio, and bone lesion extension were similar, but PCL cases displayed a higher prevalence of clinical stage III, extramedullary involvement, and Bence Jones cases, with fewer IgA cases than for MM patients. In addition, according to several prognostic indicators (beta2-microglobulin serum level, proportion of S-phase PCs, proteinuria, calcium serum level, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH] and renal function), the incidence of adverse prognostic factors was significantly higher in PCL versus MM. Immunophenotypic expression was similar for CD38, CD138, CD2, CD3, CD16, CD10, CD13, and CD15, but PCL differed from MM in the expression of CD56, CD9 HLA-DR, CD117, and CD20 antigens. Twenty-two PCL cases were diploid and one was hypodiploid, while most MM cases (57%) showed DNA hyperdiploidy. With the fluorescent in situ hydridization (FISH) technique, 12 of 13 PCL cases displayed the numeric aberrations, -13 (86%), +/-1 (57%), +18 (43%), and -X in women (25%), but they lacked several numeric aberrations usually found in MM such as +3, +6, +9, +11, and +15. PCL cases had a lower overall response to therapy than MM cases (38% v 63%, P =.01332). Among PCL patients, a trend for a worse response was observed in cases treated with melphalan and prednisone (MP) versus polychemotherapy. Overall survival was significantly worse in PCL versus MM patients (8 v 36 months, P <.0001), but it was significantly better in PCL patients treated with polychemotherapy versus MP (18 v 3 months, P =.0137). By contrast, MM patients did not show significant differences in overall survival according to the

  5. Immunophenotyping and T-cell proliferative capacity in a healthy aged population.

    PubMed

    Peres, Alessandra; Bauer, Moisés; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Chies, José Artur Bogo

    2003-01-01

    The age-related decline of immunological functions is well established but it remains largely unknown which specific changes are related to disease. We analyzed peripheral blood lymphocytes of 42 healthy elderly as well as 24 healthy young subjects from southern Brazil. No differences in phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation and CD4:CD8 ratio were found between the subjects. However, CD4 expression (considering mean fluorescence intensity) was found upregulated in elderly subjects. No changes in activation molecules CD25, CD28, CD69 and CD95 were observed. A reduced proportion of naive (CD45RA+) T cells was found in the elderly compared to young subjects. No changes in adhesion molecule expression (CD11c and CD31) were observed. However, the frequencies of CD49d-positive cells, as well as expression of CD62L, were increased in the eldery subjects. We further described two subgroups of eldery subjects with an immunological risk profile defined by lower CD4:CD8 ratio and reduced proliferative response to mitogens. These data suggest that healthy aging is associated with intact T-cell proliferation and some compensatory immunophenotypical changes. PMID:14618026

  6. Immunophenotypic, immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from equine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Maia, Leandro; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda C; Da Mota, Ligia S L Silveira; De Assis Golim, Marjorie; Laufer-Amorim, Reneé; De Vita, Bruna; Barberini, Danielle Jaqueta; Listoni, Amanda Jeronimo; De Moraes, Carolina Nogueira; Heckler, Marta Cristina Thomas; Amorim, Rogério Martins

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, culture, and characterize mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from horse bone marrow (BM) using the techniques of flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, cytogenetics, and electron microscopy. Immunophenotypic analysis revealed the presence of MSCs with high expression of the CD90 marker, lower expression of the CD44 marker, and absent expression of the CD34 marker. In assays of differentiation, the positive response to osteogenic (OST), chondrogenic (CDG), and adipogenic (ADP) differentiation signals was observed and characterized by deposition of calcium-rich extracellular matrix (OST), proteoglycans and collagen II (CDG) and intracellular deposition of fat drops (ADP). In immunocytochemical characterization, MSCs were immunopositive for CD44, vimentin, and PCNA, and they were negative for CD13. In the ultrastructural analysis of MSCs, the most outstanding characteristic was the presence of rough endoplasmic reticulum with very dilated cisterns filled with a low electrodensity material. Additionally, MSCs had normal karyotypes (2n = 64) as evidenced by cytogenetic analysis, and aneuploidy in metaphase was not observed. The protocols for isolating, culturing, and characterizing equine MSCs used in this study were shown to be appropriate for the production of a cell population with a good potential for differentiation and without aneuploidy that can be used to study future cellular therapies. PMID:23533133

  7. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain. PMID:26484613

  8. Comparison of Stromal/Stem Cells Isolated from Human Omental and Subcutaneous Adipose Depots: Differentiation and Immunophenotypic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Forum S; Li, Jie; Dietrich, Marilyn; Wu, Xiying; Hausmann, Mark G; LeBlanc, Karl A; Wade, James W; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine has identified adipose tissue as an abundant source of stromal/stem cells for tissue engineering applications. Therefore, we have compared the differentiation and immunophenotypic features of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASC) isolated from either omental or subcutaneous adipose depots. Human tissue samples were obtained from bariatric and plastic surgical practices at a university-affiliated teaching hospital and a private practice, respectively, with informed patient consent. Primary cultures of human ASC were isolated from adipose specimens within 24 h of surgery and culture expanded in vitro. The passaged ASC were induced to undergo adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation as assessed by histochemical methods or evaluated for surface antigen expression profiles by flow cytometry. ASC yields per unit weight of tissue were comparable between omental and subcutaneous depots. At passage 0, the immunophenotype of omental and subcutaneous ASC were not significantly different with the exception of CD105 and endoglin, a component of the transforming growth factor β receptor. The adipogenic differentiation of omental ASC was less robust than that of subcutaneous ASC based on in vitro histochemical and PCR assays. Although the yield and immunophenotype of ASC from omental adipose depots resembled that of subcutaneous ASC, omental ASC displayed significantly reduced adipogenic differentiation capacity following chemical induction. Further studies are necessary to evaluate and optimize the differentiation function of omental ASC in vitro and in vivo. Pending such analyses, omental ASC should not be used interchangeably with subcutaneous ASC for regenerative medical applications. PMID:26089088

  9. Hepatic effector CD8+ T-cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Iannacone, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play a critical role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) pathogenesis. During acute, self-limited infections, these cells are instrumental to viral clearance; in chronic settings, they sustain repetitive cycles of hepatocellular necrosis that promote hepatocellular carcinoma development. Both CD8+ T-cell defensive and destructive functions are mediated by antigen-experienced effector cells and depend on the ability of these cells to migrate to the liver, recognize hepatocellular antigens and perform effector functions. Understanding the signals that modulate the spatiotemporal dynamics of CD8+ T cells in the liver, particularly in the context of antigen recognition, is therefore critical to gaining insight into the pathogenesis of acute and chronic HBV infection. Here, we highlight recent data on how effector CD8+ T cells traffic within the liver, and we discuss the potential for novel imaging techniques to shed light on this important aspect of HBV pathogenesis. PMID:25242274

  10. Robot End Effector To Place and Solder Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Encapsulated in robot end effector is RF induction-heating coil for heating solar cell while in transit. Holes in encapsulant permit end of unit to act as vacuum pickup to grip solar cell. Use of RF induction heating allows cell to be heated without requiring direct mechanical and thermal contact of bonding tool such as soldering iron.

  11. Identification of immunophenotypic subtypes with different prognoses in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Zuo, Zhuo; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Yang, Qun-Pei; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Tang, Yuan; Zhao, Sha; Mo, Xian-Ming; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the differentiation characteristics of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, one nude mouse model, cell lines SNK6 and SNT8, and 16 fresh human samples were analyzed by flow cytometry immunophenotyping and immunohistochemistry staining; and 115 archived cases were used for phenotypic detection and prognostic analysis. We found that CD25 was expressed by most tumor cells in all samples, and CD56(+)CD25(+) cells were the predominant population in the mouse model, the 2 cell lines, and 10 of the 16 fresh tumor samples; in the other 6 fresh tumor samples, the predominant cell population was of the CD16(+)CD25(+) phenotype, and only a minor population showed the CD56(+)CD25(+) phenotype. The phenotype detected by immunohistochemistry staining generally was consistent with the phenotype found by flow cytometry immunophenotyping. According to the expression of CD56 and CD16, 115 cases could be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes: CD56(-)CD16(-), CD56(+)CD16(-), and CD56(dim/-)CD16(+). Patients with tumors of the CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) phenotype had a poorer prognosis than patients with tumors of the other phenotypes. Differentiation of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type apparently resembles the normal natural killer cell developmental pattern, and these tumors can be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes of different aggressiveness. Expression of CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) implies a poorer prognosis. PMID:25213430

  12. T Cell Signaling Targets for Enhancing Regulatory or Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; Jiang, Shuiping

    2015-01-01

    To respond to infection, resting or naïve T cells must undergo activation, clonal expansion, and differentiation into specialized functional subsets of effector T cells. However, to prevent excessive or self-destructive immune responses, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are instrumental in suppressing the activation and function of effector cells, including effector T cells. The transcription factor Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) regulates the expression of genes involved in the development and function of Tregs. Foxp3 interacts with other transcription factors and with epigenetic elements such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases. Treg suppressive function can be increased by exposure to HDAC inhibitors. The individual contributions of different HDAC family members to Treg function and their respective mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. A study showed that HDAC6, HDAC9, and Sirtuin-1 had distinct effects on Foxp3 expression and function, suggesting that selectively targeting HDACs individually or in combination may enhance Treg stability and suppressive function. Another study showed that the receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1), a well-known inhibitor of T cell activation, halted cell cycle progression in effector T cells by inhibiting the transcription of the gene encoding the substrate-recognition component (Skp2) of the ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2. Together, these findings reveal new signaling targets for enhancing Treg or effector T cell function that may be helpful in designing future therapies, either to increase Treg suppressive function in transplantation and autoimmune diseases or to block PD-1 function, thus increasing the magnitude of antiviral or antitumor immune responses of effector T cells. PMID:22855503

  13. Histopathological, immunophenotypic and clinical particularities and evolution of a case of hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma in transformation to leukemia.

    PubMed

    Benedek Lázár, Erzsébet; Köpeczi, Judit Beáta; Tunyogi, Aliz Beáta; Kakucs, Enikő; Horváth, Emőke; Turcu, M; Benedek, I

    2013-01-01

    We present the possibilities of diagnosis correlating the pathological, immunophenotyping and clinical aspects of a rare case of T-cell lymphoma in a 23-year-old patient with leukemic transformation. In our consideration, it is very important to describe this case because in the literature there are very few cases presented and the treatment of this type of lymphoma does not present optimal results, the evolution of the patients being from three months to two years. The treatment modality that gives the possibility to prolong survival and cure is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24399013

  14. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-19

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  15. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  16. Clinicopathologic and Immunophenotypic Characterization of 25 Cases of Acinic Cell Carcinoma with High-Grade Transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D; Aslam, Muhammad N; Stall, Jennifer N; Udager, Aaron M; Chiosea, Simion; McHugh, Jonathan B

    2016-06-01

    Acinic cell carcinoma (AiCC) with high-grade transformation is a rare variant of AiCC composed of both a conventional low-grade (LG) AiCC and a separate high-grade (HG) component. We describe here, the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 25 cases diagnosed between 1990 and 2015. Available tissue was analyzed and compared with a cohort of pure LG AiCC for the morphologic and immunophenotypic profile. Incidence was higher in females (1.8:1) than males with an overall mean age at presentation of 63.2 years. All tumors occurred in the parotid gland including 76 % with facial nerve trunk and branches involvement. Most patients were treated with extensive resection and adjuvant therapy. Local recurrence or distant metastasis occurred in most patients, with 72.7 % dead with disease (mean 2.9 years) and 3 patients alive with disease (mean 2.4 years). The majority of the tumors were composed of a LG microcystic AiCC and a HG component consisting of invasive lobules of undifferentiated cells with predominantly solid, cribriform, and glandular patterns. Acinic differentiation was still present in HG areas but aggressive features such as perineural invasion (76 %), lymphovascular invasion (62 %), positive margins (72 %), high mitotic rate, atypical mitoses and/or comedonecrosis (86 %) were easily identified. Compared to the pure LG AiCC, the cases with HG transformation showed significantly increased expression of cyclin-D1, p53 and Ki-67. Most HG areas of AiCC expressed membranous β-catenin (92 %) and were negative for p63 (three cases were focally positive), S100, SMA, androgen, and estrogen receptors. DOG1 expression was present in all LG AiCC tested with retained expression in 91 % of cases with HG transformation, supporting acinic differentiation in the HG foci. Recognition of AiCC with high-grade transformation is imperative as more aggressive clinical management is warranted. PMID:26245749

  17. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of feline bone marrow cells and haematopoietic progenitor cells using anti-human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Araghi, Atefeh; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Atyabi, Nahid; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Elham

    2014-04-01

    There is a paucity of species-specific antibodies available for feline haematopoietic conditions. The purpose of this study was to broaden the panel of antibodies available for use in the immunophenotypic characterisation of feline haematopoietic cells by testing clones of anti-human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on normal, neoplastic and cultured feline haematopoietic progenitors to determine cross-reactivity to feline counterparts. In this study, 24 clones of anti-human mAbs were tested on normal or neoplastic feline bone marrow and peripheral blood cells. Six of these mAbs, including anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)61, anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41 and anti-CD29, cross-reacted with normal feline bone marrow cells, whereas anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 cross-reacted with the blast cells in the bone marrow of two cats with myelodysplastic syndrome, and anti-CD71, anti-235a, anti-41 and anti-42 cross-reacted with immature erythroid cells in a cat with erythroleukaemia. In a feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat, bone marrow cells were labelled with anti-CD33, anti-14 and anti-45. Anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD41 and anti-CD61 also reacted with the peripheral blood cells of the healthy cats. The feline haematopoietic progenitors formed colonies in the methylcellulose-based semisolid medium with significant enrichment of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, monocyte and burst-forming unit-erythroid. A panel of six anti-feline mAbs (anti-CD21-like, anti-T lymphocytes, anti-CD172a, anti-granulocyte, anti-CD45-like and anti-CD18) and eight anti-human antibodies (anti-CD71, anti-CD33, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41, anti-CD61, anti-CD117, anti-CD38 and anti-CD34) were used for the immunophenotypic characterisation of the feline bone marrow progenitors. CD45, CD33, CD235a and CD18 were expressed by the feline haematopoietic progenitor cells, with the highest expression level for CD45. PMID:24065708

  18. Immunophenotypic and Clinical Differences Between the Nasal and Extranasal Subtypes of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing-Feng; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ning; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Ouyang, Han; Jin, Jing; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate, in a large cohort of patients, the immunophenotypic and clinical differences of nasal and extranasal extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT-NKTCL) and examine the relevance of the immunophenotype on the clinical behavior, prognosis, and treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 231 patients with UADT-NKTCL were recruited. One hundred eighty-one patients had primary location in the nasal cavity (nasal UADT-NKTCL), and 50 patients had primary extranasal UADT-NKTCL. Results: Patients with extranasal UADT-NKTCL had more adverse clinical features, including advanced-stage disease, regional lymph node involvement, B symptoms, and poor performance status, than patients with nasal UADT-NKTCL. In addition, CD56 and granzyme B were less frequently expressed in extranasal UADT-NKTCL. The 5-year overall survival rate was 74.1% for the entire group and 76.0% for early-stage disease. The 5-year overall survival rate for extranasal UADT-NKTCL was similar or superior to that of nasal UADT-NKTCL for all disease stages (76.9% vs 73.4%, P=.465), stage I disease (75.9% vs 79.2%, P=.786), and stage II disease (83.3% vs 50.3%, P=.018). CD56 expression and a Ki-67 proliferation rate ≥50% predicted poorer survival for extranasal UADT-NKTCL but not for nasal UADT-NKTCL. Conclusions: Patients with nasal and extranasal UADT-NKTCL have significantly different clinical features, immunophenotypes, and prognosis. Extranasal UADT-NKTCL should be considered as a distinct subgroup apart from the most commonly diagnosed prototype of nasal UADT-NKTCL.

  19. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection. PMID:25911759

  20. Experimental approaches to investigate effector translocation into host cells in the Ustilago maydis/maize pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Djamei, Armin; Presti, Libera Lo; Schipper, Kerstin; Winterberg, Sarah; Amati, Simone; Becker, Dirk; Büchner, Heike; Kumlehn, Jochen; Reissmann, Stefanie; Kahmann, Regine

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Ustilago maydis is a pathogen that establishes a biotrophic interaction with Zea mays. The interaction with the plant host is largely governed by more than 300 novel, secreted protein effectors, of which only four have been functionally characterized. Prerequisite to examine effector function is to know where effectors reside after secretion. Effectors can remain in the extracellular space, i.e. the plant apoplast (apoplastic effectors), or can cross the plant plasma membrane and exert their function inside the host cell (cytoplasmic effectors). The U. maydis effectors lack conserved motifs in their primary sequences that could allow a classification of the effectome into apoplastic/cytoplasmic effectors. This represents a significant obstacle in functional effector characterization. Here we describe our attempts to establish a system for effector classification into apoplastic and cytoplasmic members, using U. maydis for effector delivery. PMID:26118724

  1. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cui-Ping; Qing, Xi; Wu, Cui-Yun; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Hai-Yan

    2012-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ALL patients, with 18 healthy individuals being selected as controls. The results suggested that 22 patients had B cell ALL (B-ALL) and 13 had T cell ALL (T-ALL) among the 35 ALL patients. In B-ALL patients, the surface antigen CD19 was most commonly expressed; in T-ALL patients, CD7 was most common. Furthermore, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients was higher compared to that of healthy individuals (P<0.05). Additionally, IL-10 and TGF-β levels in cell culture supernatants from B-ALL and T-ALL patients were higher compared to those in the controls (P<0.05); IL-2 levels were lower in ALL patients. No significant differences were observed in the levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells, IL-2, IL-10 or TGF-β in B-ALL versus T-ALL patients. The authors concluded that CD19 and CD7 may serve as diagnostic markers of B-ALL and T-ALL, respectively. The increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and the altered levels of secreted cytokines are indicative of an immunosuppressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALL. PMID:22740924

  2. The effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines on immunophenotype, differentiation capacity and immunomodulatory functions of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pourgholaminejad, Arash; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), as cells with potential clinical utilities, have demonstrated preferential incorporation into inflammation sites. Immunophenotype and immunomodulatory functions of MSCs could alter by inflamed-microenvironments due to the local pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu. A major cellular mediator with specific function in promoting inflammation and pathogenicity of autoimmunity are IL-17-producing T helper 17 (Th17) cells that polarize in inflamed sites in the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and IL-23. Since MSCs are promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, Th17 cell polarizing factors may alter MSCs phenotype and function. In this study, human bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSC) were cultured with or without IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23 as pro-inflammatory cytokines. The surface markers and their differentiation capacity were measured in cytokine-untreated and cytokine-treated MSCs. MSCs-mediated immunomodulation was analyzed by their regulatory effects on mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and the level of IL-10, TGF-β, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α production as immunomodulatory cytokines. Pro-inflammatory cytokines showed no effect on MSCs morphology, immunophenotype and co-stimulatory molecules except up-regulation of CD45. Adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity increased in CD45+ MSCs. Moreover, cytokine-treated MSCs preserved the suppressive ability of allogeneic T cell proliferation and produced higher level of TGF-β and lower level of IL-4. We concluded pro-inflammatory cytokines up-regulate the efficacy of MSCs in cell-based therapy of degenerative, inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. PMID:27288632

  3. Fibrocytes: emerging effector cells in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reilkoff, Ronald A.; Bucala, Richard; Herzog, Erica L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrocytes are mesenchymal cells that arise from monocyte precursors. They are present in injured organs and have both the inflammatory features of macrophages and the tissue remodelling properties of fibroblasts. Chronic inflammatory stimuli mediate the differentiation, trafficking and accumulation of these cells in fibrosing conditions associated with autoimmunity, cardiovascular disease and asthma. This Opinion article discusses the immunological mediators controlling fibrocyte differentiation and recruitment, describes the association of fibrocytes with chronic inflammatory diseases and compares the potential roles of fibrocytes in these disorders with those of macrophages and fibroblasts. It is hoped that this information prompts new opportunities for the study of these unique cells. PMID:21597472

  4. Immunophenotyping of selected hematologic disorders--focus on lymphoproliferative disorders with more than one malignant cell population.

    PubMed

    Porwit, A

    2013-06-01

    Currently, clinical laboratories face increasing demand for flow cytometry testing combined with limited funding. Therefore, many laboratories search for panels that would provide sufficient immunophenotyping information and meet economical requirements. At the Flow Cytometry Laboratory, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada, we apply two 10-color tubes of surface markers for diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). These tubes contain most of the mandatory B- and T-cell markers according to European Leukemia Net (www.leukemia-net.org) recommendations. The B-cell-oriented panel includes the following antibodies: Kappa-FITC/lambda-PE/CD19-ECD/CD38-PC5.5/CD20-PC7/CD34-APC/CD23 APC-AF700/CD10 APC-AF750/CD5-PB/CD45-KO. A different combination is applied to detect cytoplasmic Ig light chain expression and aberrant immunophenotype of plasma cells. The T-cell panel allows enumeration of various T- and NK-cell subsets: CD57-FITC/CD11c-PE/CD8-ECD/CD3-PC5.5/CD2-PC7/CD56-APC/CD7-APC-AF700/CD4-APC-AF750/CD5-PB/CD45-KO. The reported overall incidence of B-cell chronic LPDs presenting with more than one aberrant population is approximately 5%. Multicolor analysis facilitates the detection of multiple aberrant populations in the same sample because expression of multiple antigens can be studied simultaneously in each defined population. Examples of LPDs with multiple aberrant populations are presented. PMID:23590655

  5. Memory CD4 T cells emerge from effector T-cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Laurie E; Janowski, Karen M; Oliver, James R; Zajac, Allan J; Weaver, Casey T

    2008-03-20

    A hallmark of adaptive immunity is the generation of memory T cells that confer long-lived, antigen-specific protection against repeat challenges by pathogens. Understanding the mechanisms by which memory T cells arise is important for rational vaccination strategies and improved therapeutic interventions for chronic infections and autoimmune disorders. The large clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in response to some infections has made the development of CD8 T-cell memory more amenable to study, giving rise to a model of memory cell differentiation in which a fraction of fully competent effector T cells transition into long-lived memory T cells. Delineation of CD4 T-cell memory development has proved more difficult as a result of limitations on tracking the smaller populations of CD4 effector T cells generated during a pathogenic challenge, complicating efforts to determine whether CD4 memory T cells are direct descendants of effector T cells or whether they develop by alternative pathways. Here, using two complementary cytokine reporter mouse models to identify interferon (IFN)-gamma-positive effector T cells and track their fate, we show that the lineage relationship between effector and memory CD4 T cells resembles that for CD8 T cells responding to the same pathogen. We find that, in parallel with effector CD8 T cells, IFN-gamma-positive effector CD4 T cells give rise to long-lived memory T cells capable of anamnestic responses to antigenic rechallenge. PMID:18322463

  6. Immunophenotypic and gene expression analysis of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis shows biologic characteristics associated with good prognosis CLL.

    PubMed

    Lanasa, M C; Allgood, S D; Slager, S L; Dave, S S; Love, C; Marti, G E; Kay, N E; Hanson, C A; Rabe, K G; Achenbach, S J; Goldin, L R; Camp, N J; Goodman, B K; Vachon, C M; Spector, L G; Rassenti, L Z; Leis, J F; Gockerman, J P; Strom, S S; Call, T G; Glenn, M; Cerhan, J R; Levesque, M C; Weinberg, J B; Caporaso, N E

    2011-09-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a hematologic condition wherein small B-cell clones can be detected in the blood of asymptomatic individuals. Most MBL have an immunophenotype similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and 'CLL-like' MBL is a precursor to CLL. We used flow cytometry to identify MBL from unaffected members of CLL kindreds. We identified 101 MBL cases from 622 study subjects; of these, 82 individuals with MBL were further characterized. In all, 91 unique MBL clones were detected: 73 CLL-like MBL (CD5(+)CD20(dim)sIg(dim)), 11 atypical MBL (CD5(+)CD20(+)sIg(+)) and 7 CD5(neg) MBL (CD5(neg)CD20(+)sIg(neg)). Extended immunophenotypic characterization of these MBL subtypes was performed, and significant differences in cell surface expression of CD23, CD49d, CD79b and FMC-7 were observed among the groups. Markers of risk in CLL such as CD38, ZAP70 and CD49d were infrequently expressed in CLL-like MBL, but were expressed in the majority of atypical MBL. Interphase cytogenetics was performed in 35 MBL cases, and del 13q14 was most common (22/30 CLL-like MBL cases). Gene expression analysis using oligonucleotide arrays was performed on seven CLL-like MBL, and showed activation of B-cell receptor associated pathways. Our findings underscore the diversity of MBL subtypes and further clarify the relationship between MBL and other lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:21617698

  7. Translocation of Magnaporthe oryzae effectors into rice cells and their subsequent cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Khang, Chang Hyun; Berruyer, Romain; Giraldo, Martha C; Kankanala, Prasanna; Park, Sook-Young; Czymmek, Kirk; Kang, Seogchan; Valent, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge remains limited about how fungal pathogens that colonize living plant cells translocate effector proteins inside host cells to regulate cellular processes and neutralize defense responses. To cause the globally important rice blast disease, specialized invasive hyphae (IH) invade successive living rice (Oryza sativa) cells while enclosed in host-derived extrainvasive hyphal membrane. Using live-cell imaging, we identified a highly localized structure, the biotrophic interfacial complex (BIC), which accumulates fluorescently labeled effectors secreted by IH. In each newly entered rice cell, effectors were first secreted into BICs at the tips of the initially filamentous hyphae in the cell. These tip BICs were left behind beside the first-differentiated bulbous IH cells as the fungus continued to colonize the host cell. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments showed that the effector protein PWL2 (for prevents pathogenicity toward weeping lovegrass [Eragrostis curvula]) continued to accumulate in BICs after IH were growing elsewhere. PWL2 and BAS1 (for biotrophy-associated secreted protein 1), BIC-localized secreted proteins, were translocated into the rice cytoplasm. By contrast, BAS4, which uniformly outlines the IH, was not translocated into the host cytoplasm. Fluorescent PWL2 and BAS1 proteins that reached the rice cytoplasm moved into uninvaded neighbors, presumably preparing host cells before invasion. We report robust assays for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underpin effector secretion into BICs, translocation to the rice cytoplasm, and cell-to-cell movement in rice. PMID:20435900

  8. The interplay of effector and regulatory T cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Eil, Robert L; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress effector T (Teff) cells and prevent immune-mediated rejection of cancer. Much less appreciated are mechanisms by which Teff cells antagonize Treg cells. Herein, we consider how complex reciprocal interactions between Teff and Treg cells shape their population dynamics within tumors. Under states of tolerance, including during tumor escape, suppressed Teff cells support Treg cell populations through antigen-dependent provision of interleukin (IL)-2. During immune activation, Teff cells can lose this supportive capacity and directly antagonize Treg cell populations to neutralize their immunosuppressive function. While this latter state is rarely achieved spontaneously within tumors, we propose that therapeutic induction of immune activation has the potential to stably disrupt immunosuppressive population states resulting in durable cancer regression. PMID:25728990

  9. Effector T cell subclasses associate with tumor burden in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Farschtschi, Said; Park, Su-Jin; Sawitzki, Birgit; Oh, Su-Jun; Kluwe, Lan; Mautner, Victor F; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a hereditary tumor syndrome caused by mutations of the NF1 gene and resulting dysregulation of the Ras-pathway. In addition to peripheral nerve tumors, affected tissues include the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system. The immune system has recently been suggested as a possible modulator NF1-related phenotypes. Therefore, we determined the immune phenotype in NF1 patients and investigated its relationship with the phenotypic severity of NF1-related tumor manifestations. We quantified global leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations of peripheral blood from 37 NF1 patients and 21 healthy controls by flow cytometry. To associate immune phenotype with tumor phenotype, all NF1 patients underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and total internal tumor volume was calculated. The immunophenotypes were compared among four NF1 groups with different total internal tumor burdens and between NF1 patients and non-NF1 subjects. We found that NF1 patients show a generalized lymphopenia. Closer analysis revealed that the CD8(+)/CD27(-) and CD8(+)/CD57(+) effector T cell fractions strongly increase in NF1 patients with low tumor load and decrease to levels below control in patients with high tumor load. Moreover, increased production of IL2, IFN-γ and TNF-α was found in T cells of NF1 patients upon phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation compared to healthy controls. The data indicate that decreasing CD8(+)/CD57(+) and CD27(-) T cell fractions correspond to increasing tumor load in NF1 patients, potentially making these populations useful marker for internal tumor burden. PMID:27448806

  10. Clinicopathologic Spectrum of Gastrointestinal T-cell Lymphoma: Reappraisal Based on T-cell Receptor Immunophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Hideko; Elsayed, Ahmed Ali; Satou, Akira; Asano, Naoko; Kohno, Kei; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Goto, Hidemi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Kato, Seiichi

    2016-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of primary gastrointestinal EBV T-cell lymphoma (GITCL) includes enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Type II EATL is considered to be a tumor of intraepithelial lymphocytes. However, the evaluation of intraepithelial lymphocytosis by biopsy specimens is challenging, which poses a diagnostic problem between the EATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. This situation requested us to establish a pragmatic diagnostic approach for the classification of GITCL. We identified 42 cases of GITCL and analyzed clinicopathologic features, especially addressing their T-cell receptor (TCR) phenotype. Nine (21%) of 42 GITCL cases were positive for TCRγ protein expression. Among these TCRγ cases, TCRβ expression or not was detected in 5 and 4, respectively, but resulted in no further clinicopathologic differences. TCRβ positivity without TCRγ expression (βγ) was seen in 9 GITCL patients (21%). Twenty-four patients (57%) were negative for TCRβ and γ expression (βγ). Compared with TCRβγ or βγ type, TCRγ cases were characterized by exclusive involvement of intestinal sites (100% vs. 11%, P<0.001; 100% vs. 58%, P=0.032, respectively), but not of stomach (0% vs. 78%, P=0.002; 0% vs. 38%, P=0.039, respectively). Notably, TCRγ positivity was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor among our GITCL patients (P<0.001). Considering our results, TCRγ GITCL, that is, intestinal γδ T-cell lymphoma, appears to constitute a distinct disease entity. PMID:26975035

  11. Prenatal diagnosis from maternal blood: simultaneous immunophenotyping and FISH of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated by negative magnetic cell sorting.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y L; Carter, N P; Price, C M; Colman, S M; Milton, P J; Hackett, G A; Greaves, M F; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1993-01-01

    Fetal nucleated cells in the maternal circulation constitute a potential source of cells for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal genetic abnormalities. We have investigated the use of the Magnetic Activated Cell Sorter (MACS) for enriching fetal nucleated erythrocytes. Mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for CD45 and CD32 were used to deplete leucocytes from maternal blood using MACS sorting, thus enriching for fetal nucleated erythrocytes which do not express either of these antigens. However, significant maternal contamination was present even after MACS enrichment preventing the accurate analysis of fetal cells by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). To overcome this problem, we used simultaneous immunophenotyping of cells with the mouse antifetal haemoglobin antibody, UCH gamma, combined with FISH analysis using chromosome X and Y specific DNA probes. This approach enables selective FISH analysis of fetal cells within an excess of maternal cells. Furthermore, we have confirmed the potential of the method for clinical practice by a pilot prospective study of fetal sex in women referred for amniocentesis between 13 and 17 weeks of gestation. Images PMID:8133505

  12. Classification and clinical behavior of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms according to their maturation-associated immunophenotypic profile

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Lourdes; López, Antonio; Vidriales, Belén; Caballero, María Dolores; Rodrigues, António Silva; Ferreira, Silvia Inês; Lima, Margarida; Almeida, Sérgio; Valverde, Berta; Martínez, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Candeias, Jorge; Ruíz-Cabello, Francisco; Buadesa, Josefa Marco; Sempere, Amparo; Villamor, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare subtype of leukemia/lymphoma, whose diagnosis can be difficult to achieve due to its clinical and biological heterogeneity, as well as its overlapping features with other hematologic malignancies. In this study we investigated whether the association between the maturational stage of tumor cells and the clinico-biological and prognostic features of the disease, based on the analysis of 46 BPDCN cases classified into three maturation-associated subgroups on immunophenotypic grounds. Our results show that blasts from cases with an immature plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) phenotype exhibit an uncommon CD56− phenotype, coexisting with CD34+ non-pDC tumor cells, typically in the absence of extramedullary (e.g. skin) disease at presentation. Conversely, patients with a more mature blast cell phenotype more frequently displayed skin/extramedullary involvement and spread into secondary lymphoid tissues. Despite the dismal outcome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy (with central nervous system prophylaxis) and/or allogeneic stem cell transplantation appeared to be the only effective therapies. Overall, our findings indicate that the maturational profile of pDC blasts in BPDCN is highly heterogeneous and translates into a wide clinical spectrum -from acute leukemia to mature lymphoma-like behavior-, which may also lead to variable diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26056082

  13. Immune-surveillance through exhausted effector T-cells.

    PubMed

    Zehn, Dietmar; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Thimme, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) and certain strains of the rodent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) establish a state of persisting viral replication. This occurs besides strong adoptive immune responses and the induction of large numbers of activated pathogen-specific T-cells. The failure of the immune system to clear these viruses is typically attributed to a loss of effector T-cell function-a phenomenon referred to as T-cell exhaustion. Though largely accepted, this loss of function concept is being more and more challenged by comprehensive clinical and experimental observations which highlight that T-cells in chronic infections are more functional than previously considered. Here, we highlight examples that demonstrate that such T-cells mediate a profound form of immune-surveillance. We also briefly discuss the opportunities and limitations of employing 'exhausted' T-cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26826950

  14. Equine mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord: immunophenotypic characterization and differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Studies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasing due to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and tissue regenerative properties. However, there is still no agreement about the best source of equine MSCs for a bank for allogeneic therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cell culture and immunophenotypic characteristics and differentiation potential of equine MSCs from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) under identical in vitro conditions, to compare these sources for research or an allogeneic therapy cell bank. Methods The BM-MSCs, AT-MSCs and UC-MSCs were cultured and evaluated in vitro for their osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential. Additionally, MSCs were assessed for CD105, CD44, CD34, CD90 and MHC-II markers by flow cytometry, and MHC-II was also assessed by immunocytochemistry. To interpret the flow cytometry results, statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA. Results The harvesting and culturing procedures of BM-MSCs, AT-MSCs and UC-MSCs were feasible, with an average cell growth until the third passage of 25 days for BM-MSCs, 15 days for AT-MSCs and 26 days for UC-MSCs. MSCs from all sources were able to differentiate into osteogenic (after 10 days for BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs and 15 days for UC-MSCs), adipogenic (after 8 days for BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs and 15 days for UC-MSCs) and chondrogenic (after 21 days for BM-MSCs, AT-MSCs and UC-MSCs) lineages. MSCs showed high expression of CD105, CD44 and CD90 and low or negative expression of CD34 and MHC-II. The MHC-II was not detected by immunocytochemistry techniques in any of the MSCs studied. Conclusions The BM, AT and UC are feasible sources for harvesting equine MSCs, and their immunophenotypic and multipotency characteristics attained minimal criteria for defining MSCs. Due to the low expression of MHC-II by MSCs, all of the sources could be used in clinical trials involving allogeneic therapy

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Placenta, Cord Blood, and Fetal Liver, Based on Their Immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, Maria D.; Kyryk, Vitaliy M.; Svitina, Hanna M.; Shablii, Yulia M.; Lukash, Lubov L.; Lobyntseva, Galina S.; Shablii, Volodymyr A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with the CD34+CD45lowSSClow phenotype from full-term placental tissue (FTPT) as compared to cord blood (CB) and fetal liver (FL) cells. We demonstrated the presence of cell subpopulations at various stages of the differentiation with such immunophenotypes as CD34+/lowCD45low/−, CD34++CD45low/−, CD34+++CD45low/−, CD34+/lowCD45hi, and CD34++CD45hi in both first trimester placental tissue (FiTPT) and FTPT which implies their higher phenotypic heterogeneity compared to CB. HPCs of the FTPT origin expressed the CD90 antigen at a higher level compared to its expression by the CB HPCs and the CD133 antigen expression being at the same level in both cases. The HPCs compartment of FTPT versus CB contained higher number of myeloid and erythroid committed cells but lower number of myeloid and lymphoid ones compared to FL HPCs. HPCs of the FTPT and CB origin possess similar potentials for the multilineage differentiation in vitro and similar ratios of myeloid and erythroid progenitors among the committed cells. This observation suggests that the active hematopoiesis occurs in the FTPT. We obtained viable HPCs from cryopreserved placental tissue fragments allowing us to develop procedures for banking and testing of placenta-derived HPCs for clinical use. PMID:26347038

  16. Do CD8 effector cells need IL-7R expression to become resting memory cells?

    PubMed

    Buentke, Eva; Mathiot, Anne; Tolaini, Mauro; Di Santo, James; Zamoyska, Rose; Seddon, Benedict

    2006-09-15

    The role for IL-7R expression in the differentiation of effector T cells into resting memory remains controversial. Here, using a conditional IL-7R transgenic model, we were able to test directly whether CD8 effector T cells require IL-7R expression for their differentiation into resting memory cells. In the absence of IL-7R expression, effector cells transferred into "full" hosts underwent a protracted and unremitting contraction compared with IL-7R-expressing control cells and were unable to develop into long-term resting memory cells. Surprisingly, when the same effector cells were transferred into empty T-cell-deficient hosts, they could generate long-lived fully functional resting memory cells independently of IL-7R expression. Formation of these latter cells was found to be dependent on IL-15, because the same IL-7R-deficient effector cells were rapidly lost from IL-15-deficient hosts, having a half-life of less than 40 hours. Therefore, our data suggest that, under physiological conditions, both IL-7 and IL-15 synergize to promote the formation of memory cells directly by limiting the contraction of effectors that occurs following an immune response and that reexpression of IL-7R is a key checkpoint in the regulation of this process. PMID:16705084

  17. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein interactions in the context of living cells can generate critical information about localization, dynamics, and interacting partners. This information is particularly valuable in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Many pathogen proteins function within host cells in a variety of way such as, enabling evasion of the host immune system and survival within the intracellular environment. To study these pathogen-protein host-cell interactions, several approaches are commonly used, including: in vivo infection with a strain expressing a tagged or mutant protein, or introduction of pathogen genes via transfection or transduction. Each of these approaches has advantages and disadvantages. We sought a means to directly introduce exogenous proteins into cells. Electroporation is commonly used to introduce nucleic acids into cells, but has been more rarely applied to proteins although the biophysical basis is exactly the same. A standard electroporator was used to introduce affinity-tagged bacterial effectors into mammalian cells. Human epithelial and mouse macrophage cells were cultured by traditional methods, detached, and placed in 0.4 cm gap electroporation cuvettes with an exogenous bacterial pathogen protein of interest (e.g. Salmonella Typhimurium GtgE). After electroporation (0.3 kV) and a short (4 hr) recovery period, intracellular protein was verified by fluorescently labeling the protein via its affinity tag and examining spatial and temporal distribution by confocal microscopy. The electroporated protein was also shown to be functional inside the cell and capable of correct subcellular trafficking and protein-protein interaction. While the exogenous proteins tended to accumulate on the surface of the cells, the electroporated samples had large increases in intracellular effector concentration relative to incubation alone. The protocol is simple and fast enough to be done in a parallel fashion, allowing for high

  18. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  19. TFE3 Translocation Associated Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Neoplasm (PEComa) of the Gynecologic Tract: Morphology, Immunophenotype, Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Schoolmeester, J. Kenneth; Dao, Linda N.; Sukov, William R.; Park, Kay J.; Murali, Rajmohan; Hameed, Meera R.; Soslow, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    TFE3 translocation associated PEComa is a distinct form of perivascular epithelioid cell neoplasm, the features of which are poorly defined owing to their general infrequency and limited prior reports with confirmed rearrangement or fusion totaling nine cases. Recent investigation has found a lack of TSC gene mutation in these tumors compared to their nonrearranged counterparts which underscores the importance of recognizing the translocated variant due to hypothetical ineffectiveness of targeted mTOR inhibitor therapy. Six cases were identified and TFE3 rearrangement was confirmed by FISH. Patient age ranged 46 to 66 years (median 50) and none had a history of tuberous sclerosis complex. Three cases arose in the uterine corpus, one in the vagina, and one pelvic tumor and one pulmonary tumor were likely a recurrence/metastasis from a probable uterine primary. Five cases had purely clear cell epithelioid morphology that showed a spectrum of atypia while one case had a mixture of clear cell epithelioid and spindle cells. A mostly consistent immunophenotype was observed in the purely clear cell epithelioid cases: each demonstrated diffuse TFE3, HMB45, CathepsinK labeling, either focal or no melanA staining and variably weak reactivity to smooth muscle markers. The mixed clear cell epithelioid and spindle cell case had a similar pattern in its epithelioid component, but strong muscle marker positivity in its spindle cell component. Follow up ranged 1 to 57 months. Three cases demonstrated aggressive behavior and three cases had no evidence of recurrence. Both GYN-specific and traditional sets of criteria for malignancy were evaluated. The GYN model showed improved inclusion and specificity in comparison to the traditional model. PMID:25517951

  20. Molecular regulation of effector and memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, John T; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity and an important goal of vaccination strategies. Here we highlight advances in the understanding of the diverse T lymphocyte subsets that provide acute and long-term protection from infection. These include new insights into the transcription factors, and the upstream ‘pioneering’ factors that regulate their accessibility to key sites of gene regulation, as well as metabolic regulators that contribute to the differentiation of effector and memory subsets; ontogeny and defining characteristics of tissue-resident memory lymphocytes; and origins of the remarkable heterogeneity exhibited by activated T cells. Collectively, these findings underscore progress in delineating the underlying pathways that control diversification in T cell responses but also reveal gaps in the knowledge, as well as the challenges that arise in the application of this knowledge to rationally elicit desired T cell responses through vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:25396352

  1. Wheat protein antigens and effector cells of aspecific immunity.

    PubMed

    Roccatello, D; Coppo, R; Cavalli, G; Piccoli, G; Amprimo, M C; Guerra, M G; Amore, A; Di Mauro, C; Quattrocchio, G; Cacace, G

    1990-04-01

    The effects of gliadin and glyc-gli on leukocyte chemiluminescence response, cytotoxic activity and locomotion were assessed in vitro. A dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence response of neutrophils stimulated by Zymosan was observed by using gliadin at concentrations ranging between 1 and 20 micrograms. By increasing glyc-gli concentrations, a bimodal response was observed with an enhancement up to 50 micrograms/ml, followed by dose-dependent suppressive effects. The cytotoxic activity of a suspension of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the human myeloid line K562 was assessed in a Chromium release assay. By pretreating effector cells with optimal doses of gliadin (5 micrograms/ml) or glyc-gli (50 micrograms/ml), an enhancement of cytotoxic activity, similar to that of the gamma-Interferon, could be achieved. Finally glyc-gli was found to elicit neutrophil chemokinesis. The possible implications of these findings in diseases characterized by gluten intolerance are discussed. PMID:1967061

  2. Uncoupling T-cell expansion from effector differentiation in cell-based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACT) is a potentially curative therapy for patients with advanced cancer. Eradication of tumor in mouse models and humans correlates with both a high dose of adoptively transferred cells and cells with a minimally differentiated phenotype that maintain replicative capacity and multipotency. We speculate that response to ACT not only requires transfer of cells with immediate cytolytic effector function to kill the bulk of fast-growing tumor, but also transfer of tumor-specific cells that maintain an ability for self-renewal and the capacity to produce a continual supply of cytolytic effector progeny until all malignant cells are eliminated. Current in vitro methods to expand cells to sufficient numbers and still maintain a minimally differentiated phenotype are hindered by the biological coupling of clonal expansion and effector differentiation. Therefore, a better understanding of the physiologic mechanism that couples cell expansion and differentiation in CD8+ T cells may improve the efficacy of ACT. PMID:24329803

  3. Cell-autonomous effector mechanisms against mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2014-10-01

    Few pathogens run the gauntlet of sterilizing immunity like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This organism infects mononuclear phagocytes and is also ingested by neutrophils, both of which possess an arsenal of cell-intrinsic effector mechanisms capable of eliminating it. Here Mtb encounters acid, oxidants, nitrosylating agents, and redox congeners, often exuberantly delivered under low oxygen tension. Further pressure is applied by withholding divalent Fe²⁺, Mn²⁺, Cu²⁺, and Zn²⁺, as well as by metabolic privation in the form of carbon needed for anaplerosis and aromatic amino acids for growth. Finally, host E3 ligases ubiquinate, cationic peptides disrupt, and lysosomal enzymes digest Mtb as part of the autophagic response to this particular pathogen. It is a testament to the evolutionary fitness of Mtb that sterilization is rarely complete, although sufficient to ensure most people infected with this airborne bacterium remain disease-free. PMID:25081628

  4. Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    MacMicking, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Few pathogens run the gauntlet of sterilizing immunity like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This organism infects mononuclear phagocytes and is also ingested by neutrophils, both of which possess an arsenal of cell-intrinsic effector mechanisms capable of eliminating it. Here Mtb encounters acid, oxidants, nitrosylating agents, and redox congeners, often exuberantly delivered under low oxygen tension. Further pressure is applied by withholding divalent Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+, as well as by metabolic privation in the form of carbon needed for anaplerosis and aromatic amino acids for growth. Finally, host E3 ligases ubiquinate, cationic peptides disrupt, and lysosomal enzymes digest Mtb as part of the autophagic response to this particular pathogen. It is a testament to the evolutionary fitness of Mtb that sterilization is rarely complete, although sufficient to ensure most people infected with this airborne bacterium remain disease-free. PMID:25081628

  5. Pathogen-induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Obar, Joshua J; Jellison, Evan R; Sheridan, Brian S; Blair, David A; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-11-15

    In response to infection, CD8(+) T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived effector cells (SLECs; CD127(low)KLRG1(high)) and memory precursor effector cells (CD127(high)KLRG1(low)) from an early effector cell that is CD127(low)KLRG1(low) in phenotype. CD8(+) T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in early effector cell differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generation was dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection was enhanced by administration of CpG-DNA, through an IL-12-dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNA treatment enhanced effector CD8(+) T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12-independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8(+) T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127(high)KLRG1(high) memory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8(+) T cell. These subsets persisted for several months but were less effective in recall than memory precursor effector cells. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  6. Polarized Dendritic Cells as Cancer Vaccines: Directing Effector-type T Cells to Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Pawel; Okada, Hideho

    2010-01-01

    Ex-vivo-generation and antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) from cancer patients helps to bypass the dysfunction of endogenous DCs. It also allows to control the process of DC maturation and to imprint in maturing DCs several functions essential for induction of effective forms of cancer immunity. Recent reports from several groups including ours demonstrate that distinct conditions of DC generation and maturation can prime DCs for preferential interaction with different (effector versus regulatory) subsets of immune cells. Moreover, differentially-generated DCs have been shown to imprint different effector mechanisms in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (delivery of “signal three”) and to induce their different homing properties (delivery of “signal four”). These developments allow for selective induction of tumor-specific T cells with desirable effector functions and tumor-relevant homing properties and to direct the desirable types of immune cells to tumors. PMID:20409732

  7. Human adult stem cells from diverse origins: an overview from multiparametric immunophenotyping to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Bruna R; Parreira, Ricardo C; Fonseca, Emerson A; Amaya, Maria J; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Lacerda, Samyra M S N; Lalwani, Pritesh; Santos, Anderson K; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Kihara, Alexandre H; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are known for their capacity to self-renew and differentiate into at least one specialized cell type. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated initially from bone marrow but are now known to exist in all vascularized organ or tissue in adults. MSCs are particularly relevant for therapy due to their simplicity of isolation and cultivation. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has proposed a set of standards to define hMSCs for laboratory investigations and preclinical studies: adherence to plastic in standard culture conditions; in vitro differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondroblasts; specific surface antigen expression in which ≥95% of the cells express the antigens recognized by CD105, CD73, and CD90, with the same cells lacking (≤2% positive) the antigens CD45, CD34, CD14 or CD11b, CD79a or CD19, and HLA-DR. In this review we will take an historical overview of how umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, adipose-derived, placental and amniotic fluid, and menstrual blood stem cells, the major sources of human MSC, can be obtained, identified and how they are being used in clinical trials to cure and treat a very broad range of conditions, including heart, hepatic, and neurodegenerative diseases. An overview of protocols for differentiation into hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, neuronal, adipose, chondrocytes, and osteoblast cells are highlighted. We also discuss a new source of stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) and some pathways, which are common to MSCs in maintaining their pluripotent state. PMID:24700575

  8. CD19 and immunophenotype of bone marrow plasma cells in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zandecki, M; Facon, T; Bernardi, F; Izydorczyk, V; Dupond, L; François, M; Reade, R; Iaru, T; Bauters, F; Cosson, A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether a particular phenotype or antigen is preferentially related to monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). METHODS--Bone marrow specimens from 56 patients with MGUS were stained immunocytochemically (ABC peroxidase) for CD38, CD56, CD9, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD22, and MB2. Specimens from patients recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma and reactive bone marrow samples were studied in parallel. RESULTS--CD38 was expressed on all plasma cells from all MGUS samples tested, while 36% were positive for CD56, CD9 and MB2 were both expressed strongly; CD20 was moderately expressed, and staining for CD10 and CD22 was uncommon. For these five B cell antigens there was no clear difference between their expression in MGUS and in multiple myeloma. A great difference was found for CD19: in MGUS this antigen was expressed on 2-91% of plasma cells (mean 35%) and 77% patients had > 10% positive plasma cells; in multiple myeloma its expression was low and only 12% patients had > 10% positive plasma cells. When these results were converted to numbers of CD19 positive plasma cells per 100 nucleated bone marrow cells, reactive bone marrow and MGUS specimens had a similar number of positive plasma cells. There was no correlation between expression of any of the antigens tested. CONCLUSIONS--Many of the so-called pre-B, B or activation antigens are present on plasma cells from MGUS specimens, and expression of CD9, CD10, CD20, CD22, MB2, and CD38 in MGUS was very similar to that in multiple myeloma. CD56 was frequently expressed in MGUS. In this series CD19 was highly expressed in MGUS but not in multiple myeloma. Plasma cells bearing this antigen could represent the non-neoplastic process and determination of its expression could be useful for the diagnosis of MGUS. PMID:7545187

  9. Immunophenotypic characterization and tenogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from equine umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Niharika; Gulati, Baldev R; Kumar, Rajesh; Gera, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Somasundaram, Rajesh K; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) in equines have not been well characterized with respect to the expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers and for tenogenic differentiation potential in vitro. The plastic adherent fibroblast-like cells isolated from 13 out of 20 UCB samples could proliferate till passage 20. The cells expressed pluripotency markers (OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2) and MSC surface markers (CD90, CD73, and CD105) by RT-PCR, but did not express CD34, CD45, and CD14. On immunocytochemistry, the isolated cells showed expression of CD90 and CD73 proteins, but tested negative for CD34 and CD45. In flow cytometry, CD29, CD44, CD73, and CD90 were expressed by 96.36 ± 1.28%, 93.40 ± 0.70%, 73.23 ± 1.29% and 46.75 ± 3.95% cells, respectively. The UCB-MSCs could be differentiated to tenocytes by culturing in growth medium supplemented with 50 ng/ml of BMP-12 by day 10. The differentiated cells showed the expression of mohawk homeobox (Mkx), collagen type I alpha 1 (Col1α1), scleraxis (Scx), tenomodulin (Tnmd) and decorin (Dcn) by RT-PCR. In addition, flow cytometry detected tenomodulin and decorin protein in 95.65 ± 2.15% and 96.30 ± 1.00% of differentiated cells in comparison to 11.30 ± 0.10% and 19.45 ± 0.55% cells, respect vely in undifferentiated control cells. The findings support the observation that these cells may be suitable for therapeutic applications, including ruptured tendons in racehorses. PMID:24414976

  10. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8+ T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion. PMID:26451304

  11. Peripheral regulatory cells immunophenotyping in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction IL-10--producing B cells, Foxp3-expressing T cells (Tregs) and the IDO-expressing dendritic cells (pDC) are able to modulate inflammatory processes, to induce immunological tolerance and, in turn, to inhibit the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. The aim of the study was to characterize and to enumerate peripheral IL-10--producing B cells, Tregs and pDCregs in primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) patients in regard of their clinical and serologic activity. Methods Fifty pSS patients and 25 healthy individuals were included in the study. CD19+--expressing peripheral B lymphocytes were purified by positive selection. CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/IL-10--producing B cells, CD4+/CD25hi/Foxp3+ and CD8+/CD28-/Foxp3+ Tregs, as well as CCR6+/CD123+/IDO+ DCs, were quantitated by flow cytometry. Results Immature/transitional circulating IgA+ IL-10--producing B cells had higher levels in pSS patients versus control group, whereas CD19+/CD38hi/IgG+/IL-10+ cells had lower percentage versus control. Indeed CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD5+/IL-10+, CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD10+/IL-10+, CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD20+/IL-10+, CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD27-/IL-10+, and CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CXCR7+/IL-10+ cells had higher frequency in clinical inactive pSS patients when compared with control group. Remarkably, only percentages of CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD10+/IL-10+ and CD19+/CD24hi/CD38hi/CD27-/IL-10+ subsets were increased in pSS serologic inactive versus control group (P < 0.05). The percentage of IDO-expressing pDC cells was higher in pSS patients regardless of their clinical or serologic activity. There were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of CD4+/CD25hi/Foxp3+ Tregs between patient groups versus controls. Nonetheless, a decrease in the frequency of CD8+/CD28-/Foxp3+ Tregs was found in inactive pSS patients versus controls (P < 0.05). Conclusions The findings of this exploratory study show that clinical inactive pSS patients have an increased frequency of IL-10--producing B cells

  12. T Cell factor 1 represses CD8+ effector T cell formation and function.

    PubMed

    Tiemessen, Machteld M; Baert, Miranda R M; Kok, Lianne; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; van den Elsen, Peter J; Arens, Ramon; Staal, Frank J T

    2014-12-01

    The Wnt-responsive transcription factor T cell factor 1 (Tcf1) is well known for its role in thymic T cell development and the formation of memory CD8(+) T cells. However, its role in the initial phases of CD8(+) T effector cell formation has remained unexplored. We report that high levels of Wnt signaling and Tcf1 are operational in naive and memory CD8(+) T cells, whereas Wnt signaling and Tcf1 were low in effector CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells deficient in Tcf1 produce IFN-γ more rapidly, coinciding with increased demethylation of the IFN-γ enhancer and higher expression of the transcription factors Tbet and Blimp1. Moreover, virus-specific Tcf1(-/-) CD8(+) T cells show accelerated expansion in acute infection, which is associated with increased IFN-γ and TNF production and lower viral load. Genetic complementation experiments with various Tcf1 isoforms indicate that Tcf1 dosage and protein stability are critical in suppressing IFN-γ production. Isoforms lacking the β-catenin binding domain are equally effective in inhibiting CD8(+) effector T cell formation. Thus, Tcf1 functions as a repressor of CD8(+) effector T cell formation in a β-catenin/Wnt-independent manner. PMID:25355919

  13. EZH2 is crucial for both differentiation of regulatory T cells and T effector cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Ping; Jiang, Kan; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Vahedi, Golnaz; Afzali, Behdad; Sciume, Giuseppe; Bonelli, Michael; Sun, Hong-Wei; Jankovic, Dragana; Kanno, Yuka; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O’Shea, John J.; Laurence, Arian

    2015-01-01

    The roles of EZH2 in various subsets of CD4+ T cells are controversial and its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. FOXP3-positive Treg cells are a critical helper T cell subset, and dysregulation of Treg generation or function results in systemic autoimmunity. FOXP3 associates with EZH2 to mediate gene repression and suppressive function. Herein, we demonstrate that deletion of Ezh2 in CD4 T cells resulted in reduced numbers of Treg cells in vivo and differentiation in vitro and an increased proportion of memory CD4 T cells in part due to exaggerated production of effector cytokines. Furthermore, we found that both Ezh2-deficient Treg cells and T effector cells were functionally impaired in vivo: Tregs failed to constrain autoimmune colitis and T effector cells neither provided a protective response to T. gondii infection nor mediated autoimmune colitis. The dichotomous function of EZH2 in regulating differentiation and senescence in effector and regulatory T cells helps to explain the apparent existing contradictions in literature. PMID:26090605

  14. NK cell immunophenotypic and genotypic analysis of infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Juárez-Vega, Guillermo; Monjarás-Ávila, César; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco; Rangel-Ramírez, Verónica; Cadena-Mota, Sandra; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Reduced numbers of NK cells have been reported in infants with severe RSV infection; however, the precise role of NK cells during acute RSV infection is unclear. In this study the NK and T cell phenotypes, LILRB1 gene polymorphisms and KIR genotypes of infants hospitalized with RSV infection were analyzed. Compared to controls, infants with acute RSV infection showed a higher proportion of LILRB1+ T cells; in addition, a subgroup of infants with RSV infection showed an increase in LILRB1+ NK cells. No differences in NKG2C, NKG2A, or CD161 expression between RSV infected infants and controls were observed. LILRB1 genotype distribution of the rs3760860 A>G, and rs3760861 A>G single nucleotide polymorphisms differed between infants with RSV infection and healthy donors, whereas no differences in any of the KIR genes were observed. Our results suggest that LILRB1 participates in the pathogenesis of RSV infection. Further studies are needed to define the role of LILRB1+ NK in response to RSV and to confirm an association between LILRB1 polymorphisms and the risk of severe RSV infection. PMID:25988502

  15. Radiation-induced CXCL16 release by breast cancer cells attracts effector T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Wang, Baomei; Kawashima, Noriko; Braunstein, Steve; Badura, Michelle; Cameron, Thomas O.; Babb, James S.; Schneider, Robert J.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Dustin, Michael L.; Demaria, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of effector T cells to inflamed peripheral tissues is regulated by chemokines and their receptors, but the factors regulating recruitment to tumors remain largely undefined. Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a common treatment modality for breast and other cancers. Used as a cytocidal agent for proliferating cancer cells, IR in combination with immunotherapy has been shown to promote immune-mediated tumor destruction in pre-clinical studies. Here we demonstrate that IR markedly enhanced the secretion by mouse and human breast cancer cells of CXCL16, a chemokine that binds to CXCR6 on Th1 and activated CD8 effector T cells, and plays an important role in their recruitment to sites of inflammation. Employing a poorly immunogenic mouse model of breast cancer, we found that irradiation increased the migration of CD8+CXCR6+ activated T cells to tumors in vitro and in vivo. CXCR6-deficient mice showed reduced infiltration of tumors by activated CD8 T cells and impaired tumor regression following treatment with local IR to the tumor and antibodies blocking the negative regulator of T cell activation CTLA-4. These results provide the first evidence that IR can induce the secretion by cancer cells of pro-inflammatory chemotactic factors that recruit anti-tumor effector T cells. The ability of IR to convert tumors into “inflamed” peripheral tissues could be exploited to overcome obstacles at the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and improve the therapeutic efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:18713980

  16. Lytic effector cell function in schizophrenia and depression.

    PubMed

    Urch, A; Müller, C; Aschauer, H; Resch, F; Zielinski, C C

    1988-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) were tested in patients with schizophrenia or depression. It was found that NK activity as well as ADCC were significantly lower in both groups, as compared to healthy control individuals (P less than 0.001). Psychopharmacologic treatment with neuroleptics and antidepressives resulted in a significant increase in NK activity and ADCC (P less than 0.005) in patients with schizophrenia but not in treated patients with depression. In patients with schizophrenia, no correlation could be established between the dose of neuroleptic given and the increase in NK activity. Lithium also did not produce an increase in NK activity and ADCC. The addition of serum, derived from untreated patients with schizophrenia, to cell cultures in concentrations of 10 and 20% had an inhibitory effect upon the ADCC and, to a lesser degree, upon NK activity (20% serum concentration only); sera from treatment schizophrenics produced no inhibition of NK activity, but did affect ADCC. No serum-derived inhibitory effect upon either NK activity or ADCC was found to be present in sera from patients with depression. We conclude that lytic effector mechanisms are impaired in patients with schizophrenia or depression and that this defect is reversed in schizophrenic patients on treatment, but not in depressives on therapy. Patients with schizophrenia also tend to have a reversible serum-mediated inhibition of NK activity which is absent in patients with depression. PMID:2898486

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells differentially modulate effector CD8+ T cell subsets and exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Justin D; Smith, Matthew D; Calabresi, Peter A; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a promising candidate for inflammatory suppression and disease amelioration, especially of neuro-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Auto-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells acquire pathogenic IFNγ-producing- (Type I) and IL-17A-producing- (Type 17) effector phenotypes in MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Although MSC have been extensively demonstrated to suppress pathogenic effector CD4+ T cells and CD4+ T cell-mediated EAE, surprisingly few studies have addressed their modulation of effector CD8+ T cells represented in MS or their impact on CD8+ T cell-mediated EAE. We find that MSC differentially modulate CD8+ T cell development depending on effector T cell subtype. MSC drive activated low-IFNγ producers toward an enhanced high-IFNγ Tc1-like phenotype but strongly inhibit the production of IL-17A and Tc17 polarization in vitro. These observations are underscored by differential MSC modulation of T cell activation, proliferation, and signature transcription factor up-regulation. In addition, effector CD8+ T cells co-cultured with MSC exhibited increased production of IL-2, a molecule known to enhance IFNγ, yet suppress IL-17A, production. Based on these in vitro effects on CD8+ T cells, we next evaluated their impact on the severity of EAE. To better evaluate CD8+ T cells, we immunized mice with MOG37-50 , which is a CD8-targeted epitope. Our results revealed a worsening of disease, consistent with their in vitro stimulation of Tc1 cells. These findings highlight the emerging duality of MSC in immune modulation and provide implications for their future use in immune-related diseases. PMID:24911892

  18. Canine and Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Serum Free Media Have Altered Immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kaitlin C; Kol, Amir; Shahbenderian, Salpi; Granick, Jennifer L; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is being increasingly used to treat dogs and horses with naturally-occurring diseases. However these animals also serve as critical large animal models for ongoing translation of cell therapy products to the human market. MSC manufacture for clinical use mandates improvement in cell culture systems to meet demands for higher MSC numbers and removal of xeno-proteins (i.e. fetal bovine serum, FBS). While serum-free media (SFM) is commercially available, its affects on MSC phenotype and immunomodulatory functions are not fully known. The objective of this study was to determine if specific MSC culture conditions, MSC expansion in HYPERFlasks® or MSC expansion in a commercially available SFM, would alter MSC proliferation, phenotype or immunomodulatory properties in vitro. MSCs cultured in HYPERFlasks® were similar in phenotype, proliferative capacity and immunomodulatory functions to MSCs grown in standard flasks however MSC yield was markedly increased. HYPERFlasks® therefore provide a viable option to generate greater cell numbers in a streamlined manner. Canine and equine MSCs expanded in SFM displayed similar proliferation, surface phenotype and inhibitory effect on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. However, MSCs cultured in the absence of FBS secreted significantly less PGE2, and were significantly less able to inhibit IFNγ secretion by activated T-cells. Immunomodulatory functions altered by expansion in SFM were species dependent. Unlike equine MSCs, in canine adipose-derived MSCs, the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was not principally modulated by PGE2. The removal of FBS from both canine and equine MSC culture systems resulted in altered immunomodulatory properties in vitro and warrants further investigation prior to moving towards FBS-free culture conditions. PMID:26638159

  19. Immunophenotypic parameters and RBC alloimmunization in children with sickle cell disease on chronic transfusion.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Robert S; Horan, John T; Fasano, Ross M; Meyer, Erin; Josephson, Cassandra D; Winkler, Anne M; Yee, Marianne E M; Kean, Leslie S; Hendrickson, Jeanne E

    2015-12-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cell (RBC) antigens is a cause of morbidity and mortality in transfused patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To investigate distinguishing characteristics of patients who develop RBC alloantibodies after transfusion (responders) versus those who do not (non-responders), a cross-sectional study of 90 children with SCD on chronic RBC transfusion therapy at a single institution was conducted in which 18 immune parameters (including T and B cell subsets) were tested via flow cytometry, and medical records were reviewed. RBC alloimmunization was present in 26/90 (29%) patients, with anti-E, K, and C among the most commonly detected alloantibodies despite prophylactic matching for these antigens at the study institution. In addition, RBC autoantibodies had been detected in 18/26 (69%) of alloimmunized versus 7/64 (11%) of non-alloimmunized patients (P < 0.0001). Alloimmunized patients were significantly older (median 13.0 years vs. 10.7 years, P = 0.010) and had more RBC unit exposures (median 148 U vs. 82 U, P = 0.020) than non-alloimmunized patients. Sex, age at initiation of chronic transfusion, splenectomy, stroke, and transfusion outside of the study institution were not significantly associated with RBC alloimmunization. Alloimmunized patients had a significantly increased percentage of CD4+ T memory cells compared to non-alloimmunized patients (57% vs. 49%, P = 0.0047), with no other significant differences in immune cell subsets or laboratory values detected between these groups. Additional research of RBC alloimmunization is needed to optimize transfusion therapy and to develop strategies to prevent alloimmunization. PMID:26361243

  20. Flow Cytometric Immunophenotyping Is Sensitive for the Early Diagnosis of De Novo Aggressive Natural Killer Cell Leukemia (ANKL): A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wei, Jia; Mao, Xia; Gao, Qingping; Liu, Longlong; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yicheng; Meng, Li; Sun, Hanying; Li, Dengju; Huang, Mei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Jinniu; Zhang, Donghua

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a fatal hematological neoplasm characterized by a fulminating clinical course and extremely high mortality. Current diagnosis of this disease is not effective during the early stages and it is easily misdiagnosed as other NK cell disorders. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and flow cytometric immunophenotype of 47 patients with ANKL. Patients with extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) and chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cell (CLPD-NK), who were diagnosed during the same time period were used for comparisons. Abnormal NK cells in ANKL were found to have a distinctiveCD56bright/CD16dim immunophenotype and markedly increased Ki-67 expression, whereas CD57 negativity and reduced expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), CD161, CD7, CD8 and perforin were exhibited compared with other NK cell proliferative disorders (p<0.05). The positive rates of flow cytometry detection (97.4%) was higher than those of cytomorphological (89.5%), immunohistochemical (90%), cytogenetic (56.5%) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18-FDG-PET/CT) examinations (50%) (p<0.05). ANKL is a highly aggressive leukemia with high mortality. Flow cytometry detection is sensitive for the early and differential diagnosis of ANKL with high specificity. PMID:27483437

  1. Flow Cytometric Immunophenotyping Is Sensitive for the Early Diagnosis of De Novo Aggressive Natural Killer Cell Leukemia (ANKL): A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xia; Gao, Qingping; Liu, Longlong; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Xinhua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yicheng; Meng, Li; Sun, Hanying; Li, Dengju; Huang, Mei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Jinniu; Zhang, Donghua

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a fatal hematological neoplasm characterized by a fulminating clinical course and extremely high mortality. Current diagnosis of this disease is not effective during the early stages and it is easily misdiagnosed as other NK cell disorders. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and flow cytometric immunophenotype of 47 patients with ANKL. Patients with extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) and chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cell (CLPD-NK), who were diagnosed during the same time period were used for comparisons. Abnormal NK cells in ANKL were found to have a distinctiveCD56bright/CD16dim immunophenotype and markedly increased Ki-67 expression, whereas CD57 negativity and reduced expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), CD161, CD7, CD8 and perforin were exhibited compared with other NK cell proliferative disorders (p<0.05). The positive rates of flow cytometry detection (97.4%) was higher than those of cytomorphological (89.5%), immunohistochemical (90%), cytogenetic (56.5%) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18-FDG-PET/CT) examinations (50%) (p<0.05). ANKL is a highly aggressive leukemia with high mortality. Flow cytometry detection is sensitive for the early and differential diagnosis of ANKL with high specificity. PMID:27483437

  2. Immunophenotypic analysis of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, J F; Vidriales, M B; Ocio, E; Mateo, G; Sánchez-Guijo, F; Sánchez, M L; Escribano, L; Bárez, A; Moro, M J; Hernández, J; Aguilera, C; Cuello, R; García-Frade, J; López, R; Portero, J; Orfao, A

    2003-04-01

    Immunophenotyping has become an essential tool for diagnosis of hematological malignancies. By contrast, for diagnosis of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) immunophenotyping is used only occasionally. From 150 patients with a IgM monoclonal gammopathy we have selected 60 cases with (1) morphological lymphoplasmocytoid bone marrow (BM) infiltration (>20%); (2) IgM paraprotein (>10g/L); and (3) absence of features of other lymphoma types. Immunophenotypic analysis was based on the use of the triple or quadruple monoclonal antibody (MoAb) combinations. To increase the sensitivity of the analysis of antigen expression, selected CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells were targeted. We have also explored the antigenic characteristics of both the plasma cell (PC) and mast cell (MC) compartments present in the BM from 15 WM patients. Clonal WM lymphocytes were characterized by the constant expression of pan-B markers (CD19, CD20, CD22, CD24) together with sIg, predominantly kappa (5:1, kappa:lambda ratio). A high proportion of cases (75%) were positive for FMC7 and CD25, but in contrast to hairy cell leukemia (HCL), these lymphocytes were always negative for CD103 and CD11c. CD10 antigen was also absent in all WM patients and less than one fifth of patients were positive for CD5 and CD23, while CD27, CD45RA, and BCL-2 were present in most malignant cells. In two cases, the coexistence of two different clones of B lymphocytes was identified, and in eight additional cases, intraclonal phenotypic heterogeneity was observed. As far as PCs are concerned, in most patients (85%) the number of PCs was within the normal range (median, 0.36%). The antigenic profile of these PCs differed from that observed in normal and myelomatous PC (CD38(++)CD19(++/-)CD56(-)CD45(++)CD20(+)). In three cases, PCs showed aberrant expression for CD5, CD22, or FMC7. Finally, the number of mast cells was significantly higher (0.058 +/- 0.13) as compared to normal BM (0.019 +/- 0.02) (P <.01), although they were

  3. Ubiquitin Ligases and Deubiquitinating Enzymes in CD4+ T Cell Effector Fate Choice and Function.

    PubMed

    Layman, Awo A K; Oliver, Paula M

    2016-05-15

    The human body is exposed to potentially pathogenic microorganisms at barrier sites such as the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. To mount an effective response against these pathogens, the immune system must recruit the right cells with effector responses that are appropriate for the task at hand. Several types of CD4(+) T cells can be recruited, including Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17), T follicular helper cells, and regulatory T cells. These cells help to maintain normal immune homeostasis in the face of constantly changing microbes in the environment. Because these cells differentiate from a common progenitor, the composition of their intracellular milieu of proteins changes to appropriately guide their effector function. One underappreciated process that impacts the levels and functions of effector fate-determining factors is ubiquitylation. This review details our current understanding of how ubiquitylation regulates CD4(+) T cell effector identity and function. PMID:27183634

  4. A recurrent pattern of chromosomal aberrations and immunophenotypic appearance defines anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Heselmeyer, K.; du Manoir, S.; Blegen, H.; Friberg, B.; Svensson, C.; Schröck, E.; Veldman, T.; Shah, K.; Auer, G.; Ried, T.

    1997-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus are rare neoplasias that account for about 3% of large bowel tumours. Infections with human papillomaviruses are frequently detected in these cancers, suggesting that pathogenic pathways in anal carcinomas and in carcinomas of the uterine cervix are similar. Little is known regarding recurrent chromosomal aberrations in this subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas. We have applied comparative genomic hybridization to identify chromosomal gains and losses in 23 cases of anal carcinomas. A non-random copy number increase of chromosomes 17 and 19, and chromosome arm 3q was observed. Consistent losses were mapped to chromosome arms 4p, 11q, 13q and 18q. A majority of the tumours were aneuploid, and most of them showed increased proliferative activity as determined by staining for Ki-67 antigen. p53 expression was low or undetectable, and expression of p21/WAF-1 was increased in most tumours. Sixteen cancers were satisfactorily tested for the presence of HPV by consensus L1-primer polymerase chain reaction; nine were HPV positive, of which eight were positive for HPV 16. Images Figure 2 PMID:9374370

  5. Regulatory T Cells: Molecular Actions on Effector Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Álvarez-Luquín, Diana Denisse; Tamaya-Domínguez, Beatriz; Gomez-Fuentes, Sandra; Trejo-García, Abel; Melo-Salas, Marlene; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Juan; Adalid-Peralta, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells play a key role in the control of the immune response, both in health and during illness. While the mechanisms through which T regulatory cells exert their function have been extensively described, their molecular effects on effector cells have received little attention. Thus, this revision is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge on those regulation mechanisms on the target cells from a molecular perspective. PMID:27298831

  6. Burkitt-Type Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Precursor B-Cell Immunophenotype and Partial Tetrasomy of 1q: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuya; Kurosawa, Hidemitsu; Fukushima, Keitaro; Okuya, Mayuko; Arisaka, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Burkitt-type acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is thought as a variant of Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia and derived from mature B-cell lymphoblast.B-ALL was developed in a 10-year-old girl. Two characteristics were apparent in this case. First, the lymphoblastic cells were positive for CD10, CD19, CD20, and CD22, but negative for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and surface immunoglobulins, indicating a B-cell immunophenotype. The detection of t(8;14)(q24;q32) with a chromosomal analysis is required for a diagnosis of B-ALL. Second, der(1)(pter → q32.1::q32.1 → q21.1::q11 → qter) was detected, in which 1q21.1 to 1q32.1 was inverted and inserted. Finally, partial tetrasomy of 1q was also present. Because B-ALL with abnormal chromosome 1 has been reported poor outcome, the usual chemotherapy for stage 4 Burkitt lymphoma with added rituximab was administered for our patient.We report B-ALL with precursor B-cell immunophenotype and interesting partial tetrasomy of 1q. PMID:26962787

  7. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  8. Mass cytometric functional profiling of acute myeloid leukemia defines cell cycle and immunophenotypic properties that correlate with known responses to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, Gregory K.; Samusik, Nikolay; Bjornson, Zach B.; Fantl, Wendy J.; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by a high relapse rate that has been attributed to the quiescence of leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which renders them resistant to chemotherapy. However, this hypothesis is largely supported by indirect evidence and fails to explain the large differences in relapse rates across AML subtypes. To address this, bone marrow aspirates from 41 AML patients and five healthy donors were analyzed by high-dimensional mass cytometry. All patients displayed immunophenotypic and intracellular signaling abnormalities within CD34+CD38low populations and several karyotype and genotype-specific surface marker patterns were identified. The immunophenotypic stem and early progenitor cell populations from patients with clinically favorable core-binding factor AML demonstrated a five-fold higher fraction of cells in S-phase compared to other AML samples. Conversely, LSCs in less clinically favorable FLT3-ITD AML exhibited dramatic reductions in S-phase fraction. Mass cytometry also allowed direct observation of the in vivo effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:26091827

  9. Pluripotent Allospecific CD8+ Effector T Cells Traffic to Lung in Murine Obliterative Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Lavoie, Tera L.; Orens, Jonathan B.; Chen, Edward S.; Ye, Shui Q.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; McDyer, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-α and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-γ as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-γ was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process. PMID:16195540

  10. Autophagy is essential for effector CD8 T cell survival and memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojin; Araki, Koichi; Li, Shuzhao; Han, Jin-Hwan; Ye, Lilin; Tan, Wendy G.; Konieczny, Bogumila T.; Bruinsma, Monique W.; Martinez, Jennifer; Pearce, Erika L; Green, Douglas R.; Jones, Dean P.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of autophagy in memory CD8 T cell differentiation in vivo is not well defined. We show here that autophagy is dynamically regulated in virus-specific CD8 T cells during acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Autophagy decreased in activated proliferating T cells, and was then upregulated at the peak of the effector T cell response. Consistent with this model, deletion of the key autophagy genes Atg7 or Atg5 in virus-specific CD8 T cells had minimal effect on generating effector cells but greatly enhanced their death during the contraction phase resulting in compromised memory formation. These findings provide insight into when autophagy is needed during effector and memory T cell differentiation in vivo and also warrant a re-examination of our current concepts about the relationship between T cell activation and autophagy. PMID:25362489

  11. Extensive expansion of primary human gamma delta T cells generates cytotoxic effector memory cells that can be labeled with Feraheme for cellular MRI.

    PubMed

    Siegers, Gabrielle M; Ribot, Emeline J; Keating, Armand; Foster, Paula J

    2013-03-01

    Gamma delta T cells (GDTc) comprise a small subset of cytolytic T cells shown to kill malignant cells in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a novel protocol to expand GDTc from human blood whereby GDTc were initially expanded in the presence of alpha beta T cells (ABTc) that were then depleted prior to use. We achieved clinically relevant expansions of up to 18,485-fold total GDTc, with 18,849-fold expansion of the Vδ1 GDTc subset over 21 days. ABTc depletion yielded 88.1 ± 4.2 % GDTc purity, and GDTc continued to expand after separation. Immunophenotyping revealed that expanded GDTc were mostly CD27-CD45RA- and CD27-CD45RA+ effector memory cells. GDTc cytotoxicity against PC-3M prostate cancer, U87 glioblastoma and EM-2 leukemia cells was confirmed. Both expanded Vδ1 and Vδ2 GDTc were cytotoxic to PC-3M in a T cell antigen receptor- and CD18-dependent manner. We are the first to label GDTc with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles for cellular MRI. Using protamine sulfate and magnetofection, we achieved up to 40 % labeling with clinically approved Feraheme (Ferumoxytol), as determined by enumeration of Perls' Prussian blue-stained cytospins. Electron microscopy at 2,800× magnification verified the presence of internalized clusters of iron oxide; however, high iron uptake correlated negatively with cell viability. We found improved USPIO uptake later in culture. MRI of GDTc in agarose phantoms was performed at 3 Tesla. The signal-to-noise ratios for unlabeled and labeled cells were 56 and 21, respectively. Thus, Feraheme-labeled GDTc could be readily detected in vitro via MRI. PMID:23100099

  12. Allergic pulmonary inflammation in mice is dependent on eosinophil-induced recruitment of effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Pero, Ralph S.; Taranova, Anna G.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Colbert, Dana C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm surrounding allergen-mediated T helper type 2 (Th2) immune responses in the lung suggests an almost hegemonic role for T cells. Our studies propose an alternative hypothesis implicating eosinophils in the regulation of pulmonary T cell responses. In particular, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/challenged mice devoid of eosinophils (the transgenic line PHIL) have reduced airway levels of Th2 cytokines relative to the OVA-treated wild type that correlated with a reduced ability to recruit effector T cells to the lung. Adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OVA-specific transgenic T cells (OT-II) alone into OVA-challenged PHIL recipient mice failed to restore Th2 cytokines, airway histopathologies, and, most importantly, the recruitment of pulmonary effector T cells. In contrast, the combined transfer of OT-II cells and eosinophils into PHIL mice resulted in the accumulation of effector T cells and a concomitant increase in both airway Th2 immune responses and histopathologies. Moreover, we show that eosinophils elicit the expression of the Th2 chemokines thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 and macrophage-derived chemokine/CCL22 in the lung after allergen challenge, and blockade of these chemokines inhibited the recruitment of effector T cells. In summary, the data suggest that pulmonary eosinophils are required for the localized recruitment of effector T cells. PMID:18316417

  13. Controlling transcription in human pluripotent stem cells using CRISPR-effectors.

    PubMed

    Genga, Ryan M; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-05-15

    The ability to manipulate transcription in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is fundamental for the discovery of key genes and mechanisms governing cellular state and differentiation. Recently developed CRISPR-effector systems provide a systematic approach to rapidly test gene function in mammalian cells, including hPSCs. In this review, we discuss recent advances in CRISPR-effector technologies that have been employed to control transcription through gene activation, gene repression, and epigenome engineering. We describe an application of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs by targeting a synthetic promoter driving a GFP transgene, demonstrating the ease and effectiveness of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs. PMID:26525193

  14. Immunophenotyping of Waldenströms Macroglobulinemia Cell Lines Reveals Distinct Patterns of Surface Antigen Expression: Potential Biological and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Aneel; Chitta, Kasyapa S.; Wallace, Paul K.; Advani, Pooja P.; Akhtar, Sharoon; Kuranz-Blake, Maja; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Chanan-Khan, Asher A.

    2015-01-01

    Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM) is a subtype of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in which the tumor cell population is markedly heterogeneous, consisting of immunoglobulin-M secreting B-lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. Due to rarity of disease and scarcity of reliable preclinical models, many facets of WM molecular and phenotypic architecture remain incompletely understood. Currently, there are 3 human WM cell lines that are routinely used in experimental studies, namely, BCWM.1, MWCL-1 and RPCI-WM1. During establishment of RPCI-WM1, we observed loss of the CD19 and CD20 antigens, which are typically present on WM cells. Intrigued by this observation and in an effort to better define the immunophenotypic makeup of this cell line, we conducted a more comprehensive analysis for the presence or absence of other cell surface antigens that are present on the RPCI-WM1 model, as well as those on the two other WM cell lines, BCWM.1 and MWCL-1. We examined expression of 65 extracellular and 4 intracellular antigens, comprising B-cell, plasma cell, T-cell, NK-cell, myeloid and hematopoietic stem cell surface markers by flow cytometry analysis. RPCI-WM1 cells demonstrated decreased expression of CD19, CD20, and CD23 with enhanced expression of CD28, CD38 and CD184, antigens that were differentially expressed on BCWM.1 and MWCL-1 cells. Due to increased expression of CD184/CXCR4 and CD38, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model in which to study the effects anti-CXCR4 or anti-CD38 targeted therapies that are actively being developed for treatment of hematologic cancers. Overall, differences in surface antigen expression across the 3 cell lines may reflect the tumor clone population predominant in the index patients, from whom the cell lines were developed. Our analysis defines the utility of the most commonly employed WM cell lines as based on their immunophenotype profiles, highlighting unique differences that can be further studied for therapeutic exploit

  15. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. PMID:26676327

  16. Escape from suppression: tumor-specific effector cells outcompete regulatory T cells following stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Tan, Gladys; Zhou, Gang; Morino, Tricia; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution of autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with the progeny of mature T cells in the graft leads to profound changes in the emerging functional T-cell repertoire. In the steady state, the host is frequently tolerant to tumor antigens, reflecting dominant suppression of naive and effector T cells by regulatory T cells (Tregs). We examined the relative frequency and function of these 3 components within the tumor-specific T-cell compartment during immune reconstitution. Grafts from tumor-bearing donors exerted a significant antitumor effect in irradiated, syngeneic tumor-bearing recipients. This was associated with dramatic clonal expansion and interferon-γ (IFNγ) production by previously tolerant tumor-specific T cells. While donor-derived Tregs expanded in recipients, they did not inhibit the antigen-driven expansion of effector T cells in the early posttransplantation period. Indeed, the repopulation of tumor-specific effector T cells significantly exceeded that of Tregs, the expansion of which was limited by IL-2 availability. Although the intrinsic suppressive capacity of Tregs remained intact, their diminished frequency was insufficient to suppress effector cell function. These findings provide an explanation for the reversal of tolerance leading to tumor rejection in transplant recipients and likely contribute to the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies in lymphopenic hosts. PMID:18063750

  17. Immunophenotyping of rheumatoid arthritis reveals a linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype, CXCR4 expression on memory CD4+ T cells, and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, Yasuo; Shoda, Hirofumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Kato, Rika; Tsuchida, Yumi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Sakurai, Keiichi; Hanata, Norio; Tateishi, Shoko; Kanda, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that leads to destructive arthritis. Although the HLA class II locus is the strongest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, the relationship between HLA class II alleles and lymphocyte activation remains unclear. We performed immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on 91 HLA-DRB1-genotyped RA patients and 110 healthy donors. The frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells, and not Th1 and Th17 cells, was significantly associated with disease severity by multiple linear regression analysis. RA patients with one or more susceptible HLA-DR haplotypes (shared epitope: SE) displayed a significantly higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Moreover, the frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells significantly correlated with the expression level of HLA-DR on B cells, which was elevated in RA patients with SE. In vitro analysis and transcriptomic pathway analysis suggested that the interaction between HLA-DR and T cell receptors is an important regulator of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Clinically, a higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells predicted a better response to CTLA4-Ig. Memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells may serve as a powerful biomarker for unraveling the linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype and disease activity in RA. PMID:27385284

  18. Pathogen induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Obar, Joshua J.; Jellison, Evan R.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Blair, David A.; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-01-01

    In response to infection CD8+ T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived (SLEC; CD127lowKLRG1high) and memory-precursor (MPEC; CD127highKLRG1low) effector cells from an early-effector cell (EEC) that is CD127lowKLRG1low in phenotype. CD8+ T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in EEC differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generationwas dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during VSV infection wasenhanced by administration ofCpG-DNA, through an IL-12 dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNAtreatment enhanced effector CD8+ T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12 independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8+ T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127highKLRG1highmemory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8+ T cell. These subsets persisted for several months, but were less effective in recall than MPECs. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  19. Bacterial effectors target the plant cell nucleus to subvert host transcription

    PubMed Central

    Canonne, Joanne; Rivas, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote virulence, Gram-negative bacteria have evolved the ability to inject so-called type III effector proteins into host cells. The plant cell nucleus appears to be a subcellular compartment repeatedly targeted by bacterial effectors. In agreement with this observation, mounting evidence suggests that manipulation of host transcription is a major strategy developed by bacteria to counteract plant defense responses. It has been suggested that bacterial effectors may adopt at least three alternative, although not mutually exclusive, strategies to subvert host transcription. T3Es may (1) act as transcription factors that directly activate transcription in host cells, (2) affect histone packing and chromatin configuration, and/or (3) directly target host transcription factor activity. Here, we provide an overview on how all these strategies may lead to host transcriptional re-programming and, as a result, to improved bacterial multiplication inside plant cells. PMID:22353865

  20. Comparative Immunophenotypic Characteristics, Proliferative Features, and Osteogenic Differentiation of Stem Cells Isolated from Human Permanent and Deciduous Teeth with Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, Farzaneh; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Khanjani, Sayeh; Edalatkhah, Haleh; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Kazemnejad, Somaieh

    2016-06-01

    To find out differences and similarities in phenotypic, proliferative, and trans-differentiation properties of stem cells isolated from pulp of deciduous (SHEDs) and permanent (DPSCs) teeth with human bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), we examined the expression of mesenchymal and embryonic stem cell markers in relation to the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potentials of these cells. In this way, after isolating SHEDs, DPSCs, and BMSCs, cell proliferation was evaluated and population doubling time was calculated accordingly. Expression patterns of mesenchymal, hematopoietic, and embryonic stem cell markers were assessed followed by examining differentiation potential toward osseous tissue through alizarin red staining and qRT-PCR. Based on the results, the proliferation rates of SHEDs and DPSCs were significantly higher than that of BMSCs (P < 0.0001). High expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers and weak expression of hematopoietic markers were observed in all the three groups. The mean expression of OCT-4 was significantly higher in SHEDs and DPSCs (P = 0.028), while the expression of SSEA-4 was lower (P = 0.006) compared to BMSCs. Osteogenic differentiation potential of SHEDs was greater than DPSCs; however, it was lower than that of BMSCs. Conclusively, the distinctive immunophenotyping, proliferation rate, and differentiation pattern of SHEDs and DPSCs discriminate these cells from BMSCs. Furthermore, dissimilarity in differentiation potential is evidence implying that SHEDs might be more primitive stem cell population compared to DPSCs. PMID:27126695

  1. Extensive characterization of the immunophenotype and pattern of cytokine production by distinct subpopulations of normal human peripheral blood MHC II+/lineage− cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, J; Bueno, C; Alguero, M C; Sanchez, M L; Cañizo, M C; Fernandez, M E; Vaquero, J M; Laso, F J; Escribano, L; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    1999-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) represent the most powerful professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. The aim of the present study was to analyse, on a single-cell basis by multiparametric flow cytometry with simultaneous four-colour staining and a two-step acquisition procedure, the immunophenotypic profile and cytokine production of DC from 67 normal whole peripheral blood (PB) samples. Two clearly different subsets of HLA-II+/lineage− were identified on the basis of their distinct phenotypic characteristics: one DC subset was CD33strong+ and CD123dim+ (0.16 ± 0.06% of the PB nucleated cells and 55.9 ± 11.9% of all PB DC) and the other, CD33dim+ and CD123strong+ (0.12 ± 0.04% of PB nucleated cells and 44.53 ± 11.5% of all PB DC). Moreover, the former DC subpopulation clearly showed higher expression of the CD13 myeloid-associated antigen, the CD29 and CD58 adhesion molecules, the CD2, CD5 and CD86 costimulatory molecules, the CD32 IgG receptor and the CD11c complement receptor. In addition, these cells showed stronger HLA-DR and HLA-DQ expression and a higher reactivity for the IL-6 receptor α-chain (CD126) and for CD38. In contrast, the CD123strong+/CD33dim+ DC showed a stronger reactivity for the CD4 and CD45RA molecules, whereas they did not express the CD58, CD5, CD11c and CD13 antigens. Regarding cytokine production, our results show that while the CD33strong+/CD123dim+ DC are able to produce significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β (97 ± 5% of positive cells), IL-6 (96 ± 1.1% of positive cells), IL-12 (81.5 ± 15.5% of positive cells) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (84 ± 22.1% of positive cells) as well as chemokines such as IL-8 (99 ± 1% of positive cells), the functional ability of the CD123strong+/CD33dim+ DC subset to produce cytokines under the same conditions was almost null. Our results therefore clearly show the presence of two distinct subsets of DC in normal human PB, which differ not only in

  2. A Secreted Effector Protein of Ustilago maydis Guides Maize Leaf Cells to Form Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Redkar, Amey; Hoser, Rafal; Schilling, Lena; Zechmann, Bernd; Krzymowska, Magdalena; Walbot, Virginia; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis infects all aerial organs of maize (Zea mays) and induces tumors in the plant tissues. U. maydis deploys many effector proteins to manipulate its host. Previously, deletion analysis demonstrated that several effectors have important functions in inducing tumor expansion specifically in maize leaves. Here, we present the functional characterization of the effector See1 (Seedling efficient effector1). See1 is required for the reactivation of plant DNA synthesis, which is crucial for tumor progression in leaf cells. By contrast, See1 does not affect tumor formation in immature tassel floral tissues, where maize cell proliferation occurs independent of fungal infection. See1 interacts with a maize homolog of SGT1 (Suppressor of G2 allele of skp1), a factor acting in cell cycle progression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and an important component of plant and human innate immunity. See1 interferes with the MAPK-triggered phosphorylation of maize SGT1 at a monocot-specific phosphorylation site. We propose that See1 interferes with SGT1 activity, resulting in both modulation of immune responses and reactivation of DNA synthesis in leaf cells. This identifies See1 as a fungal effector that directly and specifically contributes to the formation of leaf tumors in maize. PMID:25888589

  3. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  4. Signals required for programming effector and memory development by CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mescher, Matthew F; Curtsinger, Julie M; Agarwal, Pujya; Casey, Kerry A; Gerner, Michael; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Popescu, Flavia; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2006-06-01

    Stimulation of naïve CD8+ T cells with antigen and costimulation results in proliferation and weak clonal expansion, but the cells fail to develop effector functions and are tolerant long term. Initiation of the program leading to the strong expansion and development of effector functions and memory requires a third signal that can be provided by interleukin-12 (IL-12) or interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). CD4+ T cells condition dendritic cells (DCs) to effectively present antigen to CD8+ T cells, and this conditioning involves, at least in part, CD40-dependent upregulation of the production of these signal 3 cytokines by the DCs. Upon being fully activated, the cytotoxic T lymphocytes develop activation-induced non-responsiveness (AINR), a form of split anergy characterized by an inability to produce IL-2 to support continued expansion. If antigen remains present, IL-2 provided by CD4+ T cells can reverse AINR to allow further expansion of the effector population and conversion to responsive memory cells following antigen clearance. If IL-2 or potentially other proliferative signals are not available, persistent antigen holds cells in the AINR state and prevents the development of a responsive memory population. Thus, in addition to antigen and costimulation, CD8+ T cells require cytokine signals at distinct stages of the response to be programmed for optimal generation of effector and memory populations. PMID:16824119

  5. KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymph node based lymphomas in HIV seronegative subjects. Report of two cases with anaplastic large cell morphology and plasmablastic immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Vaccher, E; Marchetti, G; Gaidano, G; Tirelli, U

    2005-01-01

    Background: Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) associated lymphomas, which often develop in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with advanced AIDS, present predominantly as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) or, less frequently, as “solid” extracavitary based lymphomas, associated with serous effusions. These last lymphomas, also called “solid PEL”, have been reported before the development of an effusion lymphoma and after resolution of PEL. Interestingly, KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphomas that present as solid or extracavitary based lesions in HIV seropositive patients without serous effusions have been reported recently. Methods/Results: This paper provides evidence for the existence of a previously undescribed KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphoma in HIV seronegative patients without serous effusions. These lymphomas exhibit a predilection for the lymph nodes and display anaplastic large cell morphology. These tumours were completely devoid of common cell type specific antigens, including epithelial and melanocytic cell markers. B and T cell associated antigens and other commonly used lymphoid markers were absent or weakly demonstrable in a fraction of the tumour cells. Conversely, immunohistochemical studies showed strong immunostaining with plasma cell reactive antibodies. Conclusions: Analysis of viral infection and immunohistological studies are of primary importance to define this lymph node based KSHV/HHV-8 associated lymphoma with anaplastic large cell morphology and plasmablastic immunophenotype occurring in HIV seronegative patients without serous effusions. PMID:16189148

  6. Large B-cell lymphoma in a dog: A cyto-histopathological evaluation and Immunophenotyping according to WHO classification for canine lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nikousefat, Zahra; Hashemnia, Mohammad; Javdani, Moosa

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we described cyto-histopathological features and immunophenotyping of the large B-cell lymphoma in an 8-year-old mixed breed dog with applying the World Health Organization (WHO) system of classification of canine lymphomas. In fine-needle aspiration (FNA), lymph nodes were involved by neoplastic cells of intermediate to large size with deep blue cytoplasm; consist of centroblasts, immunoblast and medium-sized cells. Histopathologically, the follicles and sinuses of lymph nodes were replaced by sheets of numerous immunoblasts (less than 90.0% of total cells) and centroblasts. Numerous mitotic figures were also observed. Immunohistochemical analysis presented that the neoplastic cells express B-cell phenotype CD20 and CD79a, but do not stain for T phenotype CD3. On the basis of cytology, histopathology and immunohistochemical findings, the present tumor was diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, high-grade centroblastic type (DLBCL-CB) according to WHO histological classification. Applying this classification system for diagnosis of canine lymphomas is very useful and has a high accuracy and consistency. However, further co-operative studies between clinicians and pathologists should be performed, in order to improve the effectiveness of this classification. PMID:27226892

  7. T Cells: Soldiers and Spies—The Surveillance and Control of Effector T Cells by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, T cells were CD4+ helper or CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and with antibodies, they were the soldiers of immunity. Now, many functionally distinct subsets of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described, each with distinct cytokine and transcription factor expression. For CD4+ T cells, these include Th1 cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-β; Th2 cells expressing GATA-3 and the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13; and Th17 cells expressing RORγt and cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. The cytokines produced determine the immune inflammation that they mediate. T cells of the effector lineage can be naïve T cells, recently activated T cells, or memory T cells that can be distinguished by cell surface markers. T regulatory cells or spies were characterized as CD8+ T cells expressing I-J in the 1970s. In the 1980s, suppressor cells fell into disrepute when the gene for I-J was not present in the mouse MHC I region. At that time, a CD4+ T cell expressing CD25, the IL-2 receptor-α, was identified to transfer transplant tolerance. This was the same phenotype of activated CD4+CD25+ T cells that mediated rejection. Thus, the cells that could induce tolerance and undermine rejection had similar badges and uniforms as the cells effecting rejection. Later, FOXP3, a transcription factor that confers suppressor function, was described and distinguishes T regulatory cells from effector T cells. Many subtypes of T regulatory cells can be characterized by different expressions of cytokines and receptors for cytokines or chemokines. In intense immune inflammation, T regulatory cells express cytokines characteristic of effector cells; for example, Th1-like T regulatory cells express T-bet, and IFN-γ–like Th1 cells and effector T cells can change sides by converting to T regulatory cells. Effector T cells and T regulatory cells use similar molecules to be activated and mediate their function, and thus, it can be

  8. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Cano, Liliana M; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus "Las" is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  9. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Cano, Liliana M.; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus “Las” is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  10. The Salmonella effector protein SpvC, a phosphothreonine lyase is functional in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christina; Fraiture, Malou; Hernàndez-Reyes, Casandra; Akum, Fidele N.; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chen, Ying; Pateyron, Stephanie; Colcombet, Jean; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Hirt, Heribert; Brunner, Frédéric; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is one of the most prominent causes of food poisoning and growing evidence indicates that contaminated fruits and vegetables are an increasing concern for human health. Successful infection demands the suppression of the host immune system, which is often achieved via injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In this report we present the function of Salmonella effector protein in plant cell, supporting the new concept of trans-kingdom competence of this bacterium. We screened a range of Salmonella Typhimurium effector proteins for interference with plant immunity. Among these, the phosphothreonine lyase SpvC attenuated the induction of immunity-related genes when present in plant cells. Using in vitro and in vivo systems we show that this effector protein interacts with and dephosphorylates activated Arabidopsis Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase 6 (MPK6), thereby inhibiting defense signaling. Moreover, the requirement of Salmonella SpvC was shown by the decreased proliferation of the ΔspvC mutant in Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that some Salmonella effector proteins could have a conserved function during proliferation in different hosts. The fact that Salmonella and other Enterobacteriaceae use plants as hosts strongly suggests that plants represent a much larger reservoir for animal pathogens than so far estimated. PMID:25368608

  11. Immunophenotypic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid cell populations with the Cell-Dyn Sapphire haematology analyser: method feasibility and preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Adam, P; Sobek, O; Scott, C S; Dolezil, D; Kasik, J; Hajdukova, L; Adam, D

    2010-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n=50) from patients with neurological disease (bacterial infection, viral infection, neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis) were analysed to characterize cell populations by fluorescent immunocytometry with the CD-Sapphire haematology analyser. Reagent combinations applied to all CSF samples comprised CD3/CD19/HLA-DR and CD4/CD8, with some being further analysed using CD3/CD4, CD3/CD16 and CD3/CD25 protocols. Of the 50 samples, 11 were excluded because of high proportions of nonviable cells (n=2) or insufficient cell numbers (n=9). Apart from bacterial infection with granulocytosis, all diagnostic groups showed high proportions (51.4-77.0%) of CD3+ T cells. There was a modest association between T-cell and B-cell counts, but absolute B-cell numbers exceeded 5 cells/microl in only 7/39 cases (neuroborreliosis, n=6; bacterial meningitis, n=1). CD3/Ia antigen (activation) co-expression was low and only exceeded 5% in 7/39 samples with no diagnostic correlation. Primary CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets showed similar quantitative trends and CD4/CD8 co-analysis revealed the presence in all diagnostic groups (neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis in particular) of a CD4+CD8int fraction that was predominantly CD3+ and CD16- and had a morphological profile consistent with small lymphoid cells. Supplementary CD-Sapphire cellular immunological analysis of most CSF samples is feasible using the procedure detailed in this communication. PMID:19500178

  12. A genetic screen to isolate type III effectors translocated into pepper cells during Xanthomonas infection

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Anne Roden, Branids Belt, Jason Barzel Ross, Thomas Tachibana, Joe Vargas, Mary Beth Mudgett

    2004-11-23

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) uses a type III secretion system (TTSS) to translocate effector proteins into host plant cells. The TTSS is required for Xcv colonization, yet the identity of many proteins translocated through this apparatus is not known. We used a genetic screen to functionally identify Xcv TTSS effectors. A transposon 5 (Tn5)-based transposon construct including the coding sequence for the Xcv AvrBs2 effector devoid of its TTSS signal was randomly inserted into the Xcv genome. Insertion of the avrBs2 reporter gene into Xcv genes coding for proteins containing a functional TTSS signal peptide resulted in the creation of chimeric TTSS effector::AvrBs2 fusion proteins. Xcv strains containing these fusions translocated the AvrBs2 reporter in a TTSS-dependent manner into resistant BS2 pepper cells during infection, activating the avrBs2-dependent hypersensitive response (HR). We isolated seven chimeric fusion proteins and designated the identified TTSS effectors as Xanthomonas outer proteins (Xops). Translocation of each Xop was confirmed by using the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cydase reporter assay. Three xop genes are Xanthomonas spp.-specific, whereas homologs for the rest are found in other phytopathogenic bacteria. XopF1 and XopF2 define an effector gene family in Xcv. XopN contains a eukaryotic protein fold repeat and is required for full Xcv pathogenicity in pepper and tomato. The translocated effectors identified in this work expand our knowledge of the diversity of proteins that Xcv uses to manipulate its hosts.

  13. Transcriptional Regulation with CRISPR/Cas9 Effectors in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hannah; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-based regulation of gene expression provides the scientific community with a new high-throughput tool to dissect the role of genes in molecular processes and cellular functions. Single-guide RNAs allow for recruitment of a nuclease-dead Cas9 protein and transcriptional Cas9-effector fusion proteins to specific genomic loci, thereby modulating gene expression. We describe the application of a CRISPR-Cas9 effector system from Streptococcus pyogenes for transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells resulting in activation or repression of transcription. We present methods for appropriate target site selection, sgRNA design, and delivery of dCas9 and dCas9-effector system components into cells through lentiviral transgenesis to modulate transcription. PMID:26463376

  14. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-01

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:25941086

  15. Cytokine Production and Antigen Recognition by Human Mucosal Homing Conjunctival Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geraint P.; Pachnio, Annette; Long, Heather M.; Rauz, Saaeha; Curnow, S. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Conjunctival epithelial T cells are dominated by CD3+CD56-TCRαβ+CD8αβ+ lymphocytes. In this study we explored the antigen experience status, mucosal homing phenotype, cytokine expression, and viral antigen recognition of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals. Methods. Following ocular surface impression cytology, conjunctival cells were recovered by gentle agitation and analyzed by flow cytometry for cell surface markers, cytokine production (stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA]/ionomycin), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunodominant epitope recognition using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide tetramers. Results. In contrast to peripheral blood, conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells were dominantly CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells, and the vast majority expressed the mucosal homing integrin αEβ7. Conjunctival memory CD8+ T cells maintained effector functions with the ability to secrete IFN-γ and expression of Granzyme B, although they expressed significantly reduced amounts per cell compared to peripheral blood T cells. Interestingly, herpetic virus-specific CD8+ T cells recognizing epitopes derived from EBV and CMV could be detected in the conjunctival cells of healthy virus carriers, although they were generally at lower frequencies than in the peripheral blood of the same donor. Virus-specific conjunctival CD8+ T cells were dominated by CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells that expressed αEβ7. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that the majority of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells are mucosal homing αEβ7+ effector memory T cells, which can recognize viral epitopes and are capable of secreting Granzyme B and IFN-γ. PMID:25395484

  16. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  17. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Wu, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy––a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4+ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh) and CD8+ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.); intracellular markers (FOXP3); epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic); and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4+ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors. PMID:26999211

  18. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Wu, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy--a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4⁺ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh) and CD8⁺ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.); intracellular markers (FOXP3); epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic); and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4⁺ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors. PMID:26999211

  19. Potential effector and immunoregulatory functions of mast cells in mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Laurent L; Sibilano, Riccardo; Mukai, Kaori; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells of hematopoietic origin that normally reside in mucosal tissues, often near epithelial cells, glands, smooth muscle cells, and nerves. Best known for their contributions to pathology during IgE-associated disorders such as food allergy, asthma, and anaphylaxis, MCs are also thought to mediate IgE-associated effector functions during certain parasite infections. However, various MC populations also can be activated to express functional programs – such as secreting pre-formed and/or newly synthesized biologically active products – in response to encounters with products derived from diverse pathogens, other host cells (including leukocytes and structural cells), damaged tissue, or the activation of the complement or coagulation systems, as well as by signals derived from the external environment (including animal toxins, plant products, and physical agents). In this review, we will discuss evidence suggesting that MCs can perform diverse effector and immunoregulatory roles that contribute to homeostasis or pathology in mucosal tissues. PMID:25669149

  20. Ras Effector Switching Promotes Divergent Cell Fates in C. elegans Vulval Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Tanya P.; Reiner, David J.; Der, Channing J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The C. elegans vulva is patterned by epidermal growth factor (EGF) activation of Ras to control 1° fate, and 1° fate induces antagonistic Notch-dependent 2° fate. Furthermore, a spatial EGF gradient, in addition to inducing 1° fate, directly contributes to 2° fate via an unknown pathway. We find that in addition to its canonical effector, Raf, vulval Ras utilizes an exchange factor for the Ral small GTPase (RalGEF), such that Ras-RalGEF-Ral antagonizes Ras-Raf pro-1° fate activity. Consistent with its restricted expression pattern, Ral participates in EGF pro-2° activity. Thus, we have delineated a Ras effector-switching mechanism whereby position within the morphogen gradient dictates that Ras effector usage is switched to RalGEF from Raf to promote 2° instead of 1° fate. Our observations define the utility of Ras effector switching during normal development, and may provide a possible mechanistic basis for cell and cancer type differences in effector dependency and activation. PMID:21238927

  1. Temporal Dynamics of CD8+ T Cell Effector Responses during Primary HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Korey R.; Makedonas, George; Buggert, Marcus; Eller, Michael A.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Li, Chris K.; Eller, Leigh Anne; Rono, Kathleen; Maganga, Lucas; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kibuuka, Hannah; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Slifka, Mark K.; Haynes, Barton F.; Bernard, Nicole F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of HIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic function is a primary factor underlying progressive HIV infection, but whether HIV-specific CD8+ T cells initially possess cytolytic effector capacity, and when and why this may be lost during infection, is unclear. Here, we assessed CD8+ T cell functional evolution from primary to chronic HIV infection. We observed a profound expansion of perforin+ CD8+ T cells immediately following HIV infection that quickly waned after acute viremia resolution. Selective expression of the effector-associated transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin in cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differentiated HIV-specific from bulk memory CD8+ T cell effector expansion. As infection progressed expression of perforin was maintained in HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with high levels of T-bet, but not necessarily in the population of T-betLo HIV-specific CD8+ T cells that expand as infection progresses. Together, these data demonstrate that while HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV infection initially possess cytolytic potential, progressive transcriptional dysregulation leads to the reduced CD8+ T cell perforin expression characteristic of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27486665

  2. miR-150 Regulates Differentiation and Cytolytic Effector Function in CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Norah L.; Wissink, Erin M.; Grimson, Andrew; Rudd, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate most mammalian genes, and they control numerous aspects of immune system development and function. Their precise roles in the CD8+ T cell response, however, remain unclear. In this report, we show that in the absence of the microRNA miR-150, CD8+ T cells fail to undergo robust expansion and differentiation into short-lived terminal effector cells in response to primary infection with Listeria monocytogenes or Vaccinia virus. Notably, even after transitioning into the memory pool, miR-150−/− cells still mount a weaker recall response to secondary infection, and remain less differentiated than their wild-type counterparts. Transcriptome analysis shows miR-150 gene targets are globally upregulated in cells lacking miR-150, and amongst these targets, we found misregulation of genes associated with proliferation and effector cell function. These transcriptome data suggest that miR-150 deficient CD8+ T cells are less efficient in killing infected cells, which we validate experimentally. Together, these results reveal a cell-intrinsic role for miR-150 in the regulation of effector CD8+ T cell fate and function. PMID:26549197

  3. IL-15 induces CD4+ effector memory T cell production and tissue emigration in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.; Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward F.; Hagen, Shoko I.; Edgar, John B.; Hansen, Scott G.; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Maino, Vernon C.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Villinger, Francois

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection selectively targets CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, resulting in dramatic depletion of CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector sites in early infection. Regeneration of the TEM cell compartment is slow and incomplete, even when viral replication is controlled by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, we demonstrate that IL-15 dramatically increases in vivo proliferation of rhesus macaque (RM) CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells with little effect on the naive or central memory T (TCM) cell subsets, a response pattern that is quite distinct from that of either IL-2 or IL-7. TEM cells produced in response to IL-15 did not accumulate in blood. Rather, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling studies suggest that many of these cells rapidly disperse to extralymphoid effector sites, where they manifest (slow) decay kinetics indistinguishable from that of untreated controls. In RMs with uncontrolled SIV infection and highly activated immune systems, IL-15 did not significantly increase CD4+ TEM cell proliferation, but with virologic control and concomitant reduction in immune activation by ART, IL-15 responsiveness was again observed. These data suggest that therapeutic use of IL-15 in the setting of ART might facilitate specific restoration of the CD4+ T cell compartment that is the primary target of HIV with less risk of exhausting precursor T cell compartments or generating potentially deleterious regulatory subsets. PMID:16691294

  4. miR-150 Regulates Differentiation and Cytolytic Effector Function in CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Norah L; Wissink, Erin M; Grimson, Andrew; Rudd, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate most mammalian genes, and they control numerous aspects of immune system development and function. Their precise roles in the CD8+ T cell response, however, remain unclear. In this report, we show that in the absence of the microRNA miR-150, CD8+ T cells fail to undergo robust expansion and differentiation into short-lived terminal effector cells in response to primary infection with Listeria monocytogenes or Vaccinia virus. Notably, even after transitioning into the memory pool, miR-150(-/-) cells still mount a weaker recall response to secondary infection, and remain less differentiated than their wild-type counterparts. Transcriptome analysis shows miR-150 gene targets are globally upregulated in cells lacking miR-150, and amongst these targets, we found misregulation of genes associated with proliferation and effector cell function. These transcriptome data suggest that miR-150 deficient CD8+ T cells are less efficient in killing infected cells, which we validate experimentally. Together, these results reveal a cell-intrinsic role for miR-150 in the regulation of effector CD8+ T cell fate and function. PMID:26549197

  5. Temporal Dynamics of CD8+ T Cell Effector Responses during Primary HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Demers, Korey R; Makedonas, George; Buggert, Marcus; Eller, Michael A; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Li, Chris K; Eller, Leigh Anne; Rono, Kathleen; Maganga, Lucas; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kibuuka, Hannah; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Slifka, Mark K; Haynes, Barton F; McMichael, Andrew J; Bernard, Nicole F; Robb, Merlin L; Betts, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    The loss of HIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic function is a primary factor underlying progressive HIV infection, but whether HIV-specific CD8+ T cells initially possess cytolytic effector capacity, and when and why this may be lost during infection, is unclear. Here, we assessed CD8+ T cell functional evolution from primary to chronic HIV infection. We observed a profound expansion of perforin+ CD8+ T cells immediately following HIV infection that quickly waned after acute viremia resolution. Selective expression of the effector-associated transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin in cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differentiated HIV-specific from bulk memory CD8+ T cell effector expansion. As infection progressed expression of perforin was maintained in HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with high levels of T-bet, but not necessarily in the population of T-betLo HIV-specific CD8+ T cells that expand as infection progresses. Together, these data demonstrate that while HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV infection initially possess cytolytic potential, progressive transcriptional dysregulation leads to the reduced CD8+ T cell perforin expression characteristic of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27486665

  6. CD8+ Effector T Cell Migration to Pancreatic Islet Grafts Is Dependent on Cognate Antigen Presentation by Donor Graft Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Dai, Hehua; Yatim, Karim M; Abou-Daya, Khodor; Williams, Amanda L; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Camirand, Geoffrey; Rudd, Christopher E; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising therapy for diabetes, but acute rejection of the islets by host effector T cells has hindered clinical application. In this study, we addressed the mechanisms of CD8(+) effector T cell migration to islet grafts because interrupting this step is key to preventing rejection. We found that effector T cell migration to revascularized islet transplants in mice is dependent on non-self Ag recognition rather than signaling via Gαi-coupled chemokine receptors. Presentation of non-self Ag by donor cells was necessary for migration, whereas Ag presentation by recipient cells was dispensable. We also observed that deficiency of SKAP1, an immune cell adaptor downstream of the TCR and important for integrin activation, prolongs allograft survival but does not reduce effector T cell migration to the graft. Therefore, effector T cell migration to transplanted islets is Ag driven, not chemokine driven, but SKAP1 does not play a critical role in this process. PMID:27357151

  7. Five Xanthomonas type III effectors suppress cell death induced by components of immunity-associated MAP kinase cascades

    PubMed Central

    Teper, Doron; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Martin, Gregory B; Sessa, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play a fundamental role in signaling of plant immunity and mediate elicitation of cell death. Xanthomonas spp. manipulate plant signaling by using a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into host cells. We examined the ability of 33 Xanthomonas effectors to inhibit cell death induced by overexpression of components of MAPK cascades in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Five effectors inhibited cell death induced by overexpression of MAPKKKα and MEK2, but not of MAP3Kϵ. In addition, expression of AvrBs1 in yeast suppressed activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAPK pathway, suggesting that the target of this effector is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. These results indicate that Xanthomonas employs several type III effectors to suppress immunity-associated cell death mediated by MAPK cascades. PMID:26237448

  8. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  9. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Hildeman, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immunization, naïve T cells undergo a massive expansion culminating in the generation of a robust effector T cell population. This peak effector response is relatively short-lived and, while most effector T cells die by apoptosis, some remain and develop into memory cells. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this cell fate decision remain incompletely defined, substantial progress has been made, particularly with regards to CD8+ T cells. For example, the effector CD8+ T cells generated during a response are heterogeneous, consisting of cells with more or less potential to develop into full-fledged memory cells. Development of CD8+ T cell memory is regulated by the transcriptional programs that control the differentiation and survival of effector T cells. While the type of antigenic stimulation and level of inflammation control effector CD8+ T cell differentiation, availability of cytokines and their ability to control expression and function of Bcl-2 family members governs their survival. These distinct differentiation and survival programs may allow for finer therapeutic intervention to control both the quality and quantity of CD8+ T cell memory. Effector to memory transition of CD4+ T cells is less well characterized than CD8+ T cells, emerging details will be discussed. This review will focus on the recent progress made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of T cell memory with an emphasis on factors controlling survival of effector T cells

  10. The transcription factor BATF operates as an essential differentiation checkpoint in early effector CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurachi, Makoto; Barnitz, R. Anthony; Yosef, Nir; Odorizzi, Pamela M.; Dilorio, Michael A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Yates, Kathleen; Godec, Jernej; Klatt, Martin G.; Regev, Aviv; Wherry, E. John; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor BATF is required for interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cell (TH17) and follicular helper T cell (TFH) differentiation. Here, we show that BATF also has a fundamental role in regulating effector CD8+ T cell differentiation. BATF-deficient CD8+ T cells show profound defects in effector expansion and undergo proliferative and metabolic catastrophe early after antigen encounter. BATF, together with IRF4 and Jun proteins, binds to and promotes early expression of genes encoding lineage-specific transcription-factors (T-bet and Blimp-1) and cytokine receptors, while paradoxically repressing genes encoding effector molecules (IFN-γ and granzyme B). Thus, BATF amplifies TCR-dependent transcription factor expression and augments inflammatory signal propagation but restrains effector gene expression. This checkpoint prevents irreversible commitment to an effector fate until a critical threshold of downstream transcriptional activity has been achieved. PMID:24584090

  11. Immunophenotype Heterogeneity in Nasal Glomangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Magkou, Christina; Lae, Marick

    2015-01-01

    Nasal glomangiopericytoma is rare. The immunophenotype is heterogeneous, more frequently smooth-muscle-actin and CD34-positive. We report expression patterns for several vascular-related proteins such as CD99, CD146, Bcl2, and WT1 as well as for treatment-related proteins such as mTOR and EGFR in a nasal glomangiopericytoma. The patient (woman, 86 years) presented with a left nasal tumefaction. The resected specimen (1.5-cm) showed a glomangiopericytoma. Tumor cells expressed smooth-muscle-actin, CD31, CD34, and progesterone receptor. They also expressed the vascular-cell-related proteins Bcl2, CD99, CD146, and WT1, as well as mTOR and EGFR. Nasal glomangiopericytomas show immunohistochemical heterogeneity for vascular-related markers, suggesting a possible extensive pericytic differentiation. The expression of potential targets for drug treatments such as mTOR and EGFR may impact on the clinical follow-up of these tumors occurring at advanced ages, which may require complex surgery. PMID:26351605

  12. Cellular Neural Network Models of Growth and Immune of Effector Cells Response to Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yongmei; Min, Lequan

    Four reaction-diffusion cellular neural network (R-D CNN) models are set up based on the differential equation models for the growths of effector cells and cancer cells, and the model of the immune response to cancer proposed by Allison et al. The CNN models have different reaction-diffusion coefficients and coupling parameters. The R-D CNN models may provide possible quantitative interpretations, and are good in agreement with the in vitro experiment data reported by Allison et al.

  13. Evidence for the existence of regulatory and effector B cell populations in Peyer's patches of sheep.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, S; Griebel, P J; Townsend, H; Babiuk, L A; Mutwiri, G

    2016-06-01

    IL-10 secreting CD21(+) B cells exist in sheep Peyer's patches (PP). It's not known however, whether all PP B cells are regulatory or whether an effector population also exists in this tissue. To further characterize the subpopulations of B cells in PP's, highly purified B cells were negatively sorted from jejunal PP and fractionated according to co-expression of CD72(+)CD21(+)or CD72(+)CD21(-) molecules and then stimulated with the TLR9-agonist, CpG ODN. IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, and IgM production were then assayed. We observed that only highly purified CD72(+)CD21(+) B cells spontaneously secreted high levels of IL-10, but they did not produce any IL-12, IFN-γ or IgM suggesting that this cell population contains regulatory B cells. In contrast, CD72(+)CD21(-) B cells did not secrete IL-10, but secreted IL-12, IFN-γ, and IgM, suggesting they include effector cells. In addition, B cells expressing surface IgA, IgM and IgG1 all secreted similar levels of IL-10. We further confirmed that only B cells produce IL-10, while other cells in the PP including DCs and T cells do not. Our investigations may provide evidence for the existence of two sub-populations in sheep PP; IL-10 secreting regulatory (CD72(+)CD21(+)) cells, and IL-12/IFN-γ/IgM-secreting effector (CD72(+)CD21(-)) cells. PMID:27185260

  14. CTLA4Ig inhibits effector T cells through regulatory T cells and TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    Deppong, Christine M.; Bricker, Traci L.; Rannals, Brandy D.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Green, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The CD28 costimulatory receptor is a critical regulator of T cell function making it an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of immune mediated diseases. CTLA4Ig, now approved for use in humans, prevents naive T cell activation by binding to B7-proteins and blocking engagement of CD28. However, CTLA4Ig suppresses inflammation even if administered when disease is established, suggesting alternative mechanisms. We identified a novel, CD28-independent mechanism by which CTLA4Ig inhibits activated T cells. We show that in vitro, CTLA4Ig synergizes with nitric oxide from bone marrow derived macrophages to inhibit T cell proliferation. Depletion of Tregs or interference with TGFβ signaling abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTLA4Ig. Parallel in vivo experiments using an allergic airway inflammation model demonstrated that this novel mechanism required both macrophages andTregs. Furthermore, CTLA4Ig was ineffective in SMAD3-deficient mice, supporting a requirement for TGFβ signaling. Thus, in addition to preventing naïve T cells from being fully activated, CTLA4Ig can turn off already activated effector T cells by an NO/Treg/TGFβ-dependent pathway. This mechanism is similar to cell extrinsic effects of endogenous CTLA-4 and may be particularly important in the ability of CTLA4Ig to treat chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:23956428

  15. Continuous Effector CD8(+) T Cell Production in a Controlled Persistent Infection Is Sustained by a Proliferative Intermediate Population.

    PubMed

    Chu, H Hamlet; Chan, Shiao-Wei; Gosling, John Paul; Blanchard, Nicolas; Tsitsiklis, Alexandra; Lythe, Grant; Shastri, Nilabh; Molina-París, Carmen; Robey, Ellen A

    2016-07-19

    Highly functional CD8(+) effector T (Teff) cells can persist in large numbers during controlled persistent infections, as exemplified by rare HIV-infected individuals who control the virus. Here we examined the cellular mechanisms that maintain ongoing T effector responses using a mouse model for persistent Toxoplasma gondii infection. In mice expressing the protective MHC-I molecule, H-2L(d), a dominant T effector response against a single parasite antigen was maintained without a contraction phase, correlating with ongoing presentation of the dominant antigen. Large numbers of short-lived Teff cells were continuously produced via a proliferative, antigen-dependent intermediate (Tint) population with a memory-effector hybrid phenotype. During an acute, resolved infection, decreasing antigen load correlated with a sharp drop in the Tint cell population and subsequent loss of the ongoing effector response. Vaccination approaches aimed at the development of Tint populations might prove effective against pathogens that lead to chronic infection. PMID:27421704

  16. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. PMID:25786176

  17. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenal-Muñoz, Elena Gutiérrez, Gabriel Ramos-Morales, Francisco

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration.

  18. Induction of CD4+ Regulatory and Polarized Effector/helper T Cells by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to play major roles during the induction of T cell immune responses as well as the maintenance of T cell tolerance. Naive CD4+ T cells have been shown to respond with high plasticity to signals inducing their polarization into effector/helper or regulatory T cells. Data obtained from in vitro generated bone-marrow (BM)-derived DCs as well as genetic mouse models revealed an important but not exclusive role of DCs in shaping CD4+ T cell responses. Besides the specialization of some conventional DC subsets for the induction of polarized immunity, also the maturation stage, activation of specialized transcription factors and the cytokine production of DCs have major impact on CD4+ T cells. Since in vitro generated BM-DCs show a high diversity to shape CD4+ T cells and their high similarity to monocyte-derived DCs in vivo, this review reports data mainly on BM-DCs in this process and only touches the roles of transcription factors or of DC subsets, which have been discussed elsewhere. Here, recent findings on 1) the conversion of naive into anergic and further into Foxp3− regulatory T cells (Treg) by immature DCs, 2) the role of RelB in steady state migratory DCs (ssmDCs) for conversion of naive T cells into Foxp3+ Treg, 3) the DC maturation signature for polarized Th2 cell induction and 4) the DC source of IL-12 for Th1 induction are discussed. PMID:26937228

  19. Chemical Genetics Reveals Bacterial and Host Cell Functions Critical for Type IV Effector Translocation by Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Xavier; Gabay, Joëlle E.; Reyes, Moraima; Zhu, Jing W.; Weiss, Arthur; Shuman, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    Delivery of effector proteins is a process widely used by bacterial pathogens to subvert host cell functions and cause disease. Effector delivery is achieved by elaborate injection devices and can often be triggered by environmental stimuli. However, effector export by the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system cannot be detected until the bacterium encounters a target host cell. We used chemical genetics, a perturbation strategy that utilizes small molecule inhibitors, to determine the mechanisms critical for L. pneumophila Icm/Dot activity. From a collection of more than 2,500 annotated molecules we identified specific inhibitors of effector translocation. We found that L. pneumophila effector translocation in macrophages requires host cell factors known to be involved in phagocytosis such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases, actin and tubulin. Moreover, we found that L. pneumophila phagocytosis and effector translocation also specifically require the receptor protein tyrosine phosphate phosphatases CD45 and CD148. We further show that phagocytosis is required to trigger effector delivery unless intimate contact between the bacteria and the host is artificially generated. In addition, real-time analysis of effector translocation suggests that effector export is rate-limited by phagocytosis. We propose a model in which L. pneumophila utilizes phagocytosis to initiate an intimate contact event required for the translocation of pre-synthesized effector molecules. We discuss the need for host cell participation in the initial step of the infection and its implications in the L. pneumophila lifestyle. Chemical genetic screening provides a novel approach to probe the host cell functions and factors involved in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:19578436

  20. Characterization of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; M. M. Amaro, Tiago M.; Motion, Graham B.; Pham, Jasmine; Huitema, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centers on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signaling. Here, we characterized three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localization of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organization, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility. PMID:24155749

  1. Ultraviolet B suppresses immunity by inhibiting effector and memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sabita; Byrne, Scott Napier; MacDonald, Linda Joanne; Chan, Carling Yan-Yan; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2008-04-01

    Contact hypersensitivity is a T-cell-mediated response to a hapten. Exposing C57BL/6 mice to UV B radiation systemically suppresses both primary and secondary contact hypersensitivity responses. The effects of UVB on in vivo T-cell responses during UVB-induced immunosuppression are unknown. We show here that UVB exposure, before contact sensitization, inhibits the expansion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes and reduces the number of CD4+ and IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells infiltrating challenged ear skin. In the absence of UVB, at 10 weeks after initial hapten exposure, the ear skin of sensitized mice was infiltrated by dermal effector memory CD8+ T cells at the site of challenge. However, if mice were previously exposed to UVB, this cell population was absent, suggesting an impaired development of peripheral memory T cells. This finding occurred in the absence of UVB-induced regulatory CD4+ T cells and did not involve prostaglandin E2, suggesting that the importance of these two factors in mediating or initiating UVB-induced immunosuppression is dependent on UVB dose. Together these data indicate that in vivo T-cell responses are prone to immunoregulation by UVB, including a novel effect on both the activated T-cell pool size and the development of memory T cells in peripheral compartments. PMID:18292235

  2. Ultraviolet B Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting Effector and Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sabita; Byrne, Scott Napier; MacDonald, Linda Joanne; Chan, Carling Yan-Yan; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2008-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity is a T-cell-mediated response to a hapten. Exposing C57BL/6 mice to UV B radiation systemically suppresses both primary and secondary contact hypersensitivity responses. The effects of UVB on in vivo T-cell responses during UVB-induced immunosuppression are unknown. We show here that UVB exposure, before contact sensitization, inhibits the expansion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes and reduces the number of CD4+ and IFN-γ+ CD8+ T cells infiltrating challenged ear skin. In the absence of UVB, at 10 weeks after initial hapten exposure, the ear skin of sensitized mice was infiltrated by dermal effector memory CD8+ T cells at the site of challenge. However, if mice were previously exposed to UVB, this cell population was absent, suggesting an impaired development of peripheral memory T cells. This finding occurred in the absence of UVB-induced regulatory CD4+ T cells and did not involve prostaglandin E2, suggesting that the importance of these two factors in mediating or initiating UVB-induced immunosuppression is dependent on UVB dose. Together these data indicate that in vivo T-cell responses are prone to immunoregulation by UVB, including a novel effect on both the activated T-cell pool size and the development of memory T cells in peripheral compartments. PMID:18292235

  3. Determination of Rab5 activity in the cell by effector pull-down assay.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaoyao; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Zonghua; Lu, Guodong; Li, Guangpu

    2015-01-01

    Rab5 targets to early endosomes and is a master regulator of early endosome fusion and endocytosis in all eukaryotic cells. Like other GTPases, Rab5 functions as a molecular switch by alternating between GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms, with the former being biologically active via interactions with multiple effector proteins. Thus the Rab5-GTP level in the cell reflects Rab5 activity in promoting endosome fusion and endocytosis and is indicative of cellular endocytic activity. In this chapter, we describe a Rab5 activity assay by using GST fusion proteins with the Rab5 effectors such as Rabaptin-5, Rabenosyn-5, and EEA1 that specifically bind to GTP-bound Rab5. We compare the efficiencies of the three GST fusion proteins in the pull-down of mammalian and fungal Rab5 proteins. PMID:25800849

  4. KLRG+ invariant natural killer T cells are long-lived effectors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kanako; Sato, Yusuke; Shinga, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Endo, Takaho; Asakura, Miki; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tsuji, Moriya; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ohara, Osamu; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2014-08-26

    Immunological memory has been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. However, natural killer (NK) cells and γδT cells, which traditionally are classified as innate immune cells, have been shown in recent studies to have hallmark features of memory cells. Invariant NKT cell (iNKT cell)-mediated antitumor effects indicate that iNKT cells are activated in vivo by vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded CD1d(+) cells, but not by vaccination with unbound NKT cell ligand. In such models, it previously was thought that the numbers of IFN-γ-producing cells in the spleen returned to the basal level around 1 wk after the vaccination. In the current study, we demonstrate the surprising presence of effector memory-like iNKT cells in the lung. We found long-term antitumor activity in the lungs of mice was enhanced after vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded dendritic cells. Further analyses showed that the KLRG1(+) (Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G, member 1-positive) iNKT cells coexpressing CD49d and granzyme A persisted for several months and displayed a potent secondary response to cognate antigen. Finally, analyses of CDR3β by RNA deep sequencing demonstrated that some particular KLRG1(+) iNKT-cell clones accumulated, suggesting the selection of certain T-cell receptor repertoires by an antigen. The current findings identifying effector memory-like KLRG1(+) iNKT cells in the lung could result in a paradigm shift regarding the basis of newly developed extrathymic iNKT cells and could contribute to the future development of antitumor immunotherapy by uniquely energizing iNKT cells. PMID:25118276

  5. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  6. IRF4 at the crossroads of effector T-cell fate decision.

    PubMed

    Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is a transcription factor that is expressed in hematopoietic cells and plays pivotal roles in the immune response. Originally described as a lymphocyte-specific nuclear factor, IRF4 promotes differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into T helper 2 (Th2), Th9, Th17, or T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and is required for the function of effector regulatory T (eTreg) cells. Moreover, IRF4 is essential for the sustained differentiation of cytotoxic effector CD8(+) T cells, for CD8(+) T-cell memory formation, and for differentiation of naïve CD8(+) T cells into IL-9-producing (Tc9) and IL-17-producing (Tc17) CD8(+) T-cell subsets. In this review, we focus on recent findings on the role of IRF4 during the development of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets and the impact of IRF4 on T-cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PMID:24782159

  7. Effector Functions of Natural Killer Cell Subsets in the Control of Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Angela; Stabile, Helena; Nisti, Paolo; Santoni, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of hematological malignant disorders has been improved over the last years, but high relapse rate mainly attributable to the presence of minimal residual disease still persists. Therefore, it is of great interest to explore novel therapeutic strategies to obtain long-term remission. Immune effector cells, and especially natural killer (NK) cells, play a crucial role in the control of hematological malignancies. In this regard, the efficiency of allogeneic stem cell transplantation clearly depends on the immune-mediated graft versus leukemia effect without the risk of inducing graft versus host disease. Alloreactive donor NK cells generated following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ameliorate the outcome of leukemia patients; in addition, in vivo transfer of in vitro expanded NK cells represents a crucial tool for leukemia treatment. To improve NK cell effector functions against resistant leukemia cells, novel immunotherapeutic strategies are oriented to the identification, isolation, expansion, and administration of particular NK cell subsets endowed with multifunctional anti-tumor potential and tropism toward tumor sites. Moreover, the relationship between the emergence and persistence of distinct NK cell subsets during post-graft reconstitution and the maintenance of a remission state is still rather unclear. PMID:26594216

  8. Regulation of effector and memory CD8(+) T cell function by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Valbon, Stefanie F; Condotta, Stephanie A; Richer, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Cells communicate with each other through the production and secretion of cytokines, which are integral to the host response to infection. Once recognized by specific cytokine receptors expressed on the cell surface, these exogenous signals direct the biological function of a cell in order to adapt to their microenvironment. CD8(+) T cells are critical immune cells that play an important role in the control and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Current findings have demonstrated that cytokines influence all aspects of the CD8(+) T cell response to infection or immunization. The cytokine milieu induced at the time of activation impacts the overall magnitude and function of the effector CD8(+) T cell response and the generation of functional memory CD8(+) T cells. This review will focus on the impact of inflammatory cytokines on different aspects of CD8(+) T cell biology. PMID:26688544

  9. Immunophenotyping with CD135 and CD117 predicts the FLT3, IL-7R and TLX3 gene mutations in childhood T-cell acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Elda Pereira; Andrade, Francianne Gomes; Zampier, Carolina; de Andrade, Camilla F C G; Terra-Granado, Eugênia; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2016-03-01

    With the combination of immunophenotyping and molecular tests, it is still a challenge to identify the characteristics of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) associated with distinct outcomes. This study tests the possible correlation of cellular expression of CD135 and CD117 with somatic gene mutations in T-ALL. One hundred sixty-two samples were tested, including 143 at diagnosis, 15 from T-lymphoblastic lymphoma at relapse, and four relapse samples from sequential follow-up of T-ALL. CD135 and CD117 monoclonal antibodies were included in the T-ALL panel of flow cytometry. The percentage of cells positivity and the median fluorescence intensity were correlated with gene mutational status. STIL-TAL1, TLX3, FLT3 and IL7R mutations were tested using standard techniques. STIL-TAL1 was found in 24.8%, TLX3 in 12%, IL7R in 10% and FLT3-ITD in 5% of cases. FLT3 and IL7R mutations were mutually exclusive, as were FLT3-ITD and STIL-TAL1. Associations of CD135(high) (p<0.01), CD117(intermediate/high) (p=0.02) and FLT3-ITD, CD117(low) with IL7R(mutated) (p<0.01) and CD135(high) with TLX3(pos) were observed. We conclude that the addition of CD135 and CD117 to the diagnosis can predict molecular aberrations in T-ALL settings, mainly segregating patients with FLT3-ITD, who would benefit from treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine. PMID:26852660

  10. Altered effector functions of NK cells in chronic hepatitis C are associated with IFNL3 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Markova, Antoaneta A; Taranta, Andrzej; Lunemann, Sebastian; Schlaphoff, Verena; Flisiak, Robert; Manns, Michael P; Cornberg, Markus; Kraft, Anke R M; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    Interferon α-mediated effector functions of NK cells may contribute to the control of HCV replication and the pathogenesis of liver disease. The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860 near IFNL3 (previously known as IL28B) is important in response to IFN-α treatment and in spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C. The role of the IFNL3 polymorphism in NK cell function is unclear. Thus, we investigated the role of IFNL3 polymorphism in type I IFN-dependent regulation of NK cell functions in patients with cHC and healthy control subjects. We demonstrated a marked polarization of NK cells toward cytotoxicity in response to IFN-α stimulation in patients with hepatitis C. That TRAIL up-regulation was present, particularly in patients with the IFNL3-TT allele, was supported by a shift in the pSTAT-1:pSTAT-4 ratios toward pSTAT-1. In patients bearing the IFNL3-TT allele, NK cell effector function correlated with liver disease activity. In contrast, higher cytokine production of NK cells was observed in healthy individuals with the IFNL3-CC genotype, which may support spontaneous HCV clearance in acute infection. Overall, these findings show that the role of NK cells may differ in chronic infection vs. early antiviral defense and that the IFNL3 genotype differentially influences NK cell function. PMID:26034208

  11. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Julius C.; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database. PMID:24604781

  12. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Julius C; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H

    2014-05-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database. PMID:24604781

  13. Mcl-1 antagonizes Bax/Bak to promote effector CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, P; Koss, B; Opferman, J T; Hildeman, D A

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family have critical roles in regulating tissue homeostasis by modulating apoptosis. Anti-apoptotic molecules physically interact and restrain pro-apoptotic family members preventing the induction of cell death. However, the specificity of the functional interactions between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remains unclear. The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bcl-2 interacting mediator of death (Bim) has a critical role in promoting the death of activated, effector T cells following viral infections. Although Bcl-2 is an important Bim antagonist in effector T cells, and Bcl-xL is not required for effector T-cell survival, the roles of other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in regulating effector T-cell responses in vivo. We found, at the peak of the response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, that Mcl-1 expression was increased in activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Retroviral overexpression of Mcl-1-protected activated T cells from death, whereas deletion of Mcl-1 during the course of infection led to a massive loss of LCMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the co-deletion of Bim failed to prevent the loss of Mcl-1-deficient T cells. Furthermore, lck-driven overexpression of a Bcl-xL transgene only partially rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T cells suggesting a lack of redundancy between the family members. In contrast, additional loss of Bax and Bak completely rescued Mcl-1-deficient effector T-cell number and function, without enhancing T-cell proliferation. These data suggest that Mcl-1 is critical for promoting effector T-cell responses, but does so by combating pro-apoptotic molecules beyond Bim. PMID:23558951

  14. Immunophenotypic characterization of the cutaneous exanthem of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. Apposition of degenerative Langerhans cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes during the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ringler, D. J.; Hancock, W. W.; King, N. W.; Letvin, N. L.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Murphy, G. F.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has recently been isolated from immunodeficient rhesus monkeys. This virus has remarkable similarities to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Subsequent studies of simian infection with SIV have shown it to be a relevant animal model for studying the pathogenesis of AIDS in man. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys, a cutaneous maculopapular eruption has been described. To date, the pathogenesis and possible relationship of these exanthema to the evolution of systemic immunosuppression have remained obscure. In this study, the mononuclear cell infiltrates that characterize skin rashes of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys were found to be composed predominantly of cells with phenotypic characteristics of cytotoxic/suppressor (T8+) lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Many of these cells expressed membrane-bound interleukin-2 receptor molecules. Double labeling and immunoelectron microscopy revealed these cells in direct contact with degenerative Langerhans cells within the epidermis and dermis. These observations suggest that the cutaneous rash associated with SIV infection may be the consequence of target cell injury of Langerhans cells by effector cells with cytotoxic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3030113

  15. Immunophenotypic Analysis of AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Clinical Implications in Patients From AIDS Malignancies Consortium Clinical Trials 010 and 034

    PubMed Central

    Chadburn, Amy; Chiu, April; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Chen, Xia; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Banham, Alison H.; Noy, Ariela; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Bhatia, Kishor; Cesarman, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents a clinically heterogeneous disease. Models based on immunohistochemistry predict clinical outcome. These include subdivision into germinal center (GC) versus non-GC subtypes; proliferation index (measured by expression of Ki-67), and expression of BCL-2, FOXP1, or B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (Blimp-1)/PRDM1. We sought to determine whether immunohistochemical analyses of biopsies from patients with DLBCL having HIV infection are similarly relevant for prognosis. Patients and Methods We examined 81 DLBCLs from patients with AIDS in AMC010 (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP] v CHOP-rituximab) and AMC034 (etoposide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and dose-adjusted cyclophosphamide plus rituximab concurrent v sequential) clinical trials and compared the immunophenotype with survival data, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity, and CD4 counts. Results The GC and non-GC subtypes of DLBCL did not differ significantly with respect to overall survival or CD4 count at cancer presentation. EBV could be found in both subtypes of DLBCL, although less frequently in the GC subtype, and did not affect survival. Expression of FOXP1, Blimp-1/PRDM1, or BCL-2 was not correlated with the outcome in patients with AIDS-related DLBCL. Conclusion These data indicate that with current treatment strategies for lymphoma and control of HIV infection, commonly used immunohistochemical markers may not be clinically relevant in HIV-infected patients with DLBCL. The only predictive immunohistochemical marker was found to be Ki-67, where a higher proliferation index was associated with better survival, suggesting a better response to therapy in patients whose tumors had higher proliferation rates. PMID:19752343

  16. MicroRNA-155 confers encephalogenic potential to Th17 cells by promoting effector gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruozhen; Huffaker, Thomas B; Kagele, Dominique A; Runtsch, Marah C; Bake, Erin; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2013-06-15

    Th17 cells are central to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, and recently specific noncoding microRNAs have been shown to regulate their development. However, it remains unclear whether microRNAs are also involved in modulating Th17 cell effector functions. Consequently, we examined the role of miR-155 in differentiated Th17 cells during their induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we found that highly purified, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein Ag-specific Th17 cells lacking miR-155 were defective in their capacity to cause experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Gene expression profiling of purified miR-155(-/-)IL-17F(+) Th17 cells identified a subset of effector genes that are dependent on miR-155 for their proper expression through a mechanism involving repression of the transcription factor Ets1. Among the genes reduced in the absence of miR-155 was IL-23R, resulting in miR-155(-/-) Th17 cells being hyporesponsive to IL-23. Taken together, our study demonstrates a critical role for miR-155 in Th17 cells as they unleash autoimmune inflammation and finds that this occurs through a signaling network involving miR-155, Ets1, and the clinically relevant IL-23-IL-23R pathway. PMID:23686497

  17. Progenitor cell niches in the human pancreatic duct system and associated pancreatic duct glands: an anatomical and immunophenotyping study.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Guido; Renzi, Anastasia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Overi, Diletta; Rossi, Massimo; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) are tubule-alveolar glands associated with the pancreatic duct system and can be considered the anatomical counterpart of peribiliary glands (PBGs) found within the biliary tree. Recently, we demonstrated that endodermal precursor niches exist fetally and postnatally and are composed functionally of stem cells and progenitors within PBGs and of committed progenitors within PDGs. Here we have characterized more extensively the anatomy of human PDGs as novel niches containing cells with multiple phenotypes of committed progenitors. Human pancreata (n = 15) were obtained from cadaveric adult donors. Specimens were processed for histology, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. PDGs were found in the walls of larger pancreatic ducts (diameters > 300 μm) and constituted nearly 4% of the duct wall area. All of the cells identified were negative for nuclear expression of Oct4, a pluripotency gene, and so are presumably committed progenitors and not stem cells. In the main pancreatic duct and in large interlobular ducts, Sox9(+) cells represented 5-30% of the cells within PDGs and were located primarily at the bottom of PDGs, whereas rare and scattered Sox9(+) cells were present within the surface epithelium. The expression of PCNA, a marker of cell proliferation, paralleled the distribution of Sox9 expression. Sox9(+) PDG cells proved to be Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+/-) /Oct4A(-) . Nearly 10% of PDG cells were positive for insulin or glucagon. Intercalated ducts contained Sox9(+) /Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+) cells, a phenotype that is presumptive of committed endocrine progenitors. Some intercalated ducts appeared in continuity with clusters of insulin-positive cells organized in small pancreatic islet-like structures. In summary, PDGs represent niches of a population of Sox9(+) cells exhibiting a pattern of phenotypic traits implicating a radial axis of maturation from the bottoms of the PDGs to the surface of pancreatic ducts. Our results complete the

  18. Mycosis fungoides with a CD56+ immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Wain, E Mary; Orchard, Guy E; Mayou, Susan; Atherton, David J; Misch, Klaus J; Russell-Jones, Robin

    2005-07-01

    We report 3 cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) with a CD56+ cytotoxic immunophenotype. Each patient presented with a different clinical phenotype: one exhibited limited poikilodermatous patches (skin stage T1); one, widespread hypopigmented lesions (skin stage T2); and one, poikiloderma with a single cutaneous tumor (skin stage T3). MF was confirmed both histologically and by the presence of a T-cell receptor clone in lesional skin in all cases. CD56 and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 were expressed by the malignant lymphocytes in all patients and two expressed CD8. No sample demonstrated loss of the pan T-cell markers CD2 or CD3. None of the 3 developed systemic disease and T-cell receptor gene analysis of peripheral blood was polyclonal in all cases. Only 3 cases of CD56+ MF have been reported previously, none of which exhibited tumor-stage disease. Currently, the disease in our patients appears to be behaving in a manner similar to that predicted for MF with a normal immunophenotype but the prognosis has to be guarded in view of the rarity of this subtype. PMID:15965442

  19. Dicer Regulates the Balance of Short-Lived Effector and Long-Lived Memory CD8 T Cell Lineages.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Florian M; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute a major post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling protein expression, and are emerging as key regulators during T cell development and function. Recent reports of augmented CD8 T cell activation and effector differentiation, and aberrant migratory properties upon ablation of Dicer/miRNAs in naïve cells have established a regulatory role of miRNAs during priming. Whether miRNAs continue to exert similar functions or are dispensable during later stages of CD8 T cell expansion and memory differentiation remains unclear. Here, we report a critical role of Dicer/miRNAs in regulating the balance of long-lived memory and short-lived terminal effector fates during the post-priming stages when CD8 T cells undergo clonal expansion to generate a large cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) pool and subsequently differentiate into a quiescent memory state. Conditional ablation of Dicer/miRNAs in early effector CD8 T cells following optimal activation and expression of granzyme B, using unique dicerfl/fl gzmb-cre mice, led to a strikingly diminished peak effector size relative to wild-type antigen-specific cells in the same infectious milieu. Diminished expansion of Dicer-ablated CD8 T cells was associated with lack of sustained antigen-driven proliferation and reduced accumulation of short-lived effector cells. Additionally, Dicer-ablated CD8 T cells exhibited more pronounced contraction after pathogen clearance and comprised a significantly smaller proportion of the memory pool, despite significantly higher proportions of CD127Hi memory precursors at the effector peak. Combined with previous reports of dynamic changes in miRNA expression as CD8 T cells differentiate from naïve to effector and memory states, these findings support distinct stage-specific roles of miRNA-dependent gene regulation during CD8 T cell differentiation. PMID:27627450

  20. Effector T Cells Abrogate Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Kryczek, Ilona; Dostál, Lubomír; Lin, Heng; Tan, Lijun; Zhao, Lili; Lu, Fujia; Wei, Shuang; Maj, Tomasz; Peng, Dongjun; He, Gong; Vatan, Linda; Szeliga, Wojciech; Kuick, Rork; Kotarski, Jan; Tarkowski, Rafał; Dou, Yali; Rattan, Ramandeep; Munkarah, Adnan; Liu, J Rebecca; Zou, Weiping

    2016-05-19

    Effectorcells and fibroblasts are major components in the tumor microenvironment. The means through which these cellular interactions affect chemoresistance is unclear. Here, we show that fibroblasts diminish nuclear accumulation of platinum in ovarian cancer cells, resulting in resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We demonstrate that glutathione and cysteine released by fibroblasts contribute to this resistance. CD8(+) T cells abolish the resistance by altering glutathione and cystine metabolism in fibroblasts. CD8(+) T-cell-derived interferon (IFN)γ controls fibroblast glutathione and cysteine through upregulation of gamma-glutamyltransferases and transcriptional repression of system xc(-) cystine and glutamate antiporter via the JAK/STAT1 pathway. The presence of stromal fibroblasts and CD8(+) T cells is negatively and positively associated with ovarian cancer patient survival, respectively. Thus, our work uncovers a mode of action for effectorcells: they abrogate stromal-mediated chemoresistance. Capitalizing upon the interplay between chemotherapy and immunotherapy holds high potential for cancer treatment. PMID:27133165

  1. The Cdc42 Effector Kinase PAK4 Localizes to Cell-Cell Junctions and Contributes to Establishing Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Widyawilis; Tay, Pei-Ling Felicia; Baskaran, Yohendran; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase PAK4 is a Cdc42 effector whose role is not well understood; overexpression of PAK4 has been associated with some cancers, and there are reports that correlate kinase level with increased cell migration in vitro. Here we report that PAK4 is primarily associated with cell-cell junctions in all the cell lines we tested, and fails to accumulate at focal adhesions or at the leading edge of migrating cells. In U2OS osteosarcoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines, PAK4 depletion did not affect collective cell migration, but affected cell polarization. By contrast, Cdc42 depletion (as reported by many studies) caused a strong defect in junctional assembly in multiple cells lines. We also report that the depletion of PAK4 protein or treatment of cells with the PAK4 inhibitor PF-3758309 can lead to defects in centrosome reorientation (polarization) after cell monolayer wounding. These experiments are consistent with PAK4 forming part of a conserved cell-cell junctional polarity Cdc42 complex. We also confirm β-catenin as a target for PAK4 in these cells. Treatment of cells with PF-3758309 caused inhibition of β-catenin Ser-675 phosphorylation, which is located predominantly at cell-cell junctions. PMID:26068882

  2. The Cdc42 Effector Kinase PAK4 Localizes to Cell-Cell Junctions and Contributes to Establishing Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Selamat, Widyawilis; Tay, Pei-Ling Felicia; Baskaran, Yohendran; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase PAK4 is a Cdc42 effector whose role is not well understood; overexpression of PAK4 has been associated with some cancers, and there are reports that correlate kinase level with increased cell migration in vitro. Here we report that PAK4 is primarily associated with cell-cell junctions in all the cell lines we tested, and fails to accumulate at focal adhesions or at the leading edge of migrating cells. In U2OS osteosarcoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines, PAK4 depletion did not affect collective cell migration, but affected cell polarization. By contrast, Cdc42 depletion (as reported by many studies) caused a strong defect in junctional assembly in multiple cells lines. We also report that the depletion of PAK4 protein or treatment of cells with the PAK4 inhibitor PF-3758309 can lead to defects in centrosome reorientation (polarization) after cell monolayer wounding. These experiments are consistent with PAK4 forming part of a conserved cell-cell junctional polarity Cdc42 complex. We also confirm β-catenin as a target for PAK4 in these cells. Treatment of cells with PF-3758309 caused inhibition of β-catenin Ser-675 phosphorylation, which is located predominantly at cell-cell junctions. PMID:26068882

  3. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV1) induces alterations in the immunophenotypic profile of equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Claessen, Christophe; De Lange, Valérie; Huang, Teng; Ma, Guanggang; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Favoreel, Herman; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2016-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV1) is an α-herpesvirus that can infect a variety of different cells in vitro and in vivo, including dendritic cells (DC) which are essential in the immune response against EHV1. Infection of equine monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) with EHV1 induced down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI), CD83, CD86, CD206, CD29 and CD172a, but not of CD11a/CD18 and MHCII. This down-regulation was not mediated by the virion host-shutoff (VHS) protein or pUL49.5. Interestingly, down-regulation of CD83 and CD86 was in part mediated by pUL56. Taken together, these data indicate that EHV1 employs different and still unresolved mechanisms to induce down-regulation of several functionally important cell surface proteins on equine DC. PMID:26920348

  4. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as effectors of immune suppression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pyzer, Athalia Rachel; Cole, Leandra; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Avigan, David E

    2016-11-01

    The tumor microenvironment consists of an immunosuppressive niche created by the complex interactions between cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells. A critical component of this environment are myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells arrested at different stages of differentiation and expanded in response to a variety of tumor factors. MDSCs exert diverse effects in modulating the interactions between immune effector cells and the malignant cells. An increased presence of MDSCs is associated with tumor progression, poorer outcomes, and decreased effectiveness of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this article, we will review our current understanding of the mechanisms that underlie MDSC expansion and their immune-suppressive function. Finally, we review the preclinical studies and clinical trials that have attempted to target MDSCs, in order to improve responses to cancer therapies. PMID:27299510

  5. Unbalanced recovery of regulatory and effector T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation contributes to chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Alho, Ana C.; Kim, Haesook T.; Chammas, Marie J.; Reynolds, Carol G.; Matos, Tiago R.; Forcade, Edouard; Whangbo, Jennifer; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey S.; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The development and maintenance of immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires the balanced reconstitution of donor-derived CD4 regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) as well as effector CD4 (conventional CD4 T cells [CD4Tcons]) and CD8 T cells. To characterize the complex mechanisms that lead to unbalanced recovery of these distinct T-cell populations, we studied 107 adult patients who received T-replete stem cell grafts after reduced-intensity conditioning. Immune reconstitution of CD4Treg, CD4Tcon, and CD8 T cells was monitored for a 2-year period. CD3 T-cell counts gradually recovered to normal levels during this period but CD8 T cells recovered more rapidly than either CD4Tregs or CD4Tcons. Reconstituting CD4Tregs and CD4Tcons were predominantly central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) cells and CD8 T cells were predominantly terminal EM cells. Thymic generation of naive CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells was maintained but thymic production of CD4Tregs was markedly decreased with little recovery during the 2-year study. T-cell proliferation was skewed in favor of CM and EM CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells, especially 6 to 12 months after HSCT. Intracellular expression of BCL2 was increased in CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells in the first 3 to 6 months after HSCT. Early recovery of naive and CM fractions within each T-cell population 3 months after transplant was also strongly correlated with the subsequent development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). These dynamic imbalances favor the production, expansion, and persistence of effector T cells over CD4Tregs and were associated with the development of chronic GVHD. PMID:26670634

  6. Immunophenotypic and Ultrastructural Analysis of Mast Cells in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type-1: A Possible Connection to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.; Cruse, Glenn; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Leerkes, Maarten; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; O’Brien, Kevin J.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Stone, Kelly; Gahl, William A.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2016-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 (HPS-1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in HPS1 which result in reduced expression of the HPS-1 protein, defective lysosome-related organelle (LRO) transport and absence of platelet delta granules. Patients with HPS-1 exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, colitis, bleeding and pulmonary fibrosis postulated to result from a dysregulated immune response. The effect of the HPS1 mutation on human mast cells (HuMCs) is unknown. Since HuMC granules classify as LROs along with platelet granules and melanosomes, we set out to determine if HPS-1 cutaneous and CD34+ culture-derived HuMCs have distinct granular and cellular characteristics. Cutaneous and cultured CD34+-derived HuMCs from HPS-1 patients were compared with normal cutaneous and control HuMCs, respectively, for any morphological and functional differences. One cytokine-independent HPS-1 culture was expanded, cloned, designated the HP proMastocyte (HPM) cell line and characterized. HPS-1 and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) alveolar interstitium showed numerous HuMCs; HPS-1 dermal mast cells exhibited abnormal granules when compared to healthy controls. HPS-1 HuMCs showed increased CD63, CD203c and reduced mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation when compared with normal HuMCs. HPM cells also had the duplication defect, expressed FcɛRI and intracytoplasmic proteases and exhibited less mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation. HPM cells constitutively released IL-6, which was elevated in patients’ serum, in addition to IL-8, fibronectin-1 (FN-1) and galectin-3 (LGALS3). Transduction with HPS1 rescued the abnormal HPM morphology, cytokine and matrix secretion. Microarray analysis of HPS-1 HuMCs and non-transduced HPM cells confirmed upregulation of differentially expressed genes involved in fibrogenesis and degranulation. Cultured HPS-1 HuMCs appear activated as evidenced by surface activation marker expression, a decrease in mediator content and

  7. Immunophenotypic and Ultrastructural Analysis of Mast Cells in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type-1: A Possible Connection to Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Arnold S; Cruse, Glenn; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Leerkes, Maarten; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Fischer, Elizabeth R; O'Brien, Kevin J; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Stone, Kelly; Gahl, William A; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2016-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 (HPS-1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in HPS1 which result in reduced expression of the HPS-1 protein, defective lysosome-related organelle (LRO) transport and absence of platelet delta granules. Patients with HPS-1 exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, colitis, bleeding and pulmonary fibrosis postulated to result from a dysregulated immune response. The effect of the HPS1 mutation on human mast cells (HuMCs) is unknown. Since HuMC granules classify as LROs along with platelet granules and melanosomes, we set out to determine if HPS-1 cutaneous and CD34+ culture-derived HuMCs have distinct granular and cellular characteristics. Cutaneous and cultured CD34+-derived HuMCs from HPS-1 patients were compared with normal cutaneous and control HuMCs, respectively, for any morphological and functional differences. One cytokine-independent HPS-1 culture was expanded, cloned, designated the HP proMastocyte (HPM) cell line and characterized. HPS-1 and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) alveolar interstitium showed numerous HuMCs; HPS-1 dermal mast cells exhibited abnormal granules when compared to healthy controls. HPS-1 HuMCs showed increased CD63, CD203c and reduced mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation when compared with normal HuMCs. HPM cells also had the duplication defect, expressed FcɛRI and intracytoplasmic proteases and exhibited less mediator release following FcɛRI aggregation. HPM cells constitutively released IL-6, which was elevated in patients' serum, in addition to IL-8, fibronectin-1 (FN-1) and galectin-3 (LGALS3). Transduction with HPS1 rescued the abnormal HPM morphology, cytokine and matrix secretion. Microarray analysis of HPS-1 HuMCs and non-transduced HPM cells confirmed upregulation of differentially expressed genes involved in fibrogenesis and degranulation. Cultured HPS-1 HuMCs appear activated as evidenced by surface activation marker expression, a decrease in mediator content and

  8. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  9. Hodgkin lymphoma: A clinicopathological and immunophenotypic study

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Paul, Tara Roshni; Uppin, Shantveer G.; Rao, Digumarti Raghunadha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is defined in terms of its microscopic appearance (histology) and the expression of cell surface markers (immunophenotype). Aims and objectives: This study aims to analyze the clinical features, histomorphology, and immunoprofile of over 200 patients of HL diagnosed over a period of 4 years at our institute and to determine relative frequency of various histological subtypes (based on WHO classification) in relation to age and sex distribution in this part of the country. Materials and Methods: All HL cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2009 were retrieved from hospital records. The histopathology of both lymph node and bone marrow biopsy (where ever available) along with immunohistochemistry (CD15, CD30, CD20, and ALK) were reviewed. Results: There was a bimodal age distribution. HL affected people a decade earlier than in the western population. The most common presenting complaint was cervical lymphadenopathy. Mixed cellularity was the most frequent subtype (67%), followed by nodular sclerosing subtype (23.5%). Group A (CD15+, CD30+, CD20−), which represents the archetypical immunophenotype of classical HL (CHL) was the most common type (60.6%). The number of CD15 negative CHL was 35.8% and CD20 positive CHL was 17.5%. CD15 negativity with CD20 positivity was seen in 5% CHL. One out of seven CD20 positive CHL patients showed relapse. Conclusion: In this paper, we have discussed in detail about various clinical and histopathological parameters of HL and their relative frequency in various histological subtypes. This paper is being presented as it is a rather large study from India taking into consideration the clinical, pathologic, and immunophenotypic profile of the patients. PMID:27051160

  10. T cell-intrinsic S1PR1 regulates endogenous effector T-cell egress dynamics from lymph nodes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Benechet, Alexandre P.; Menon, Manisha; Xu, Daqi; Samji, Tasleem; Maher, Leigh; Murooka, Thomas T.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Lemoine, Francois M.; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral clearance requires effector T-cell egress from the draining lymph node (dLN). The mechanisms that regulate the complex process of effector T-cell egress from the dLN after infection are poorly understood. Here, we visualized endogenous pathogen-specific effector T-cell migration within, and from, the dLN. We used an inducible mouse model with a temporally disrupted sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) gene specifically in endogenous effector T cells. Early after infection, WT and S1PR1−/− effector T cells localized exclusively within the paracortex. This localization in the paracortex by CD8 T cells was followed by intranodal migration by both WT and S1PR1−/− T cells to positions adjacent to both cortical and medullary lymphatic sinuses where the T cells exhibited intense probing behavior. However, in contrast to WT, S1PR1−/− effector T cells failed to enter the sinuses. We demonstrate that, even when LN retention signals such as CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) are down-regulated, T cell intrinsic S1PR1 is the master regulator of effector T-cell emigration from the dLN. PMID:26862175

  11. The Fusarium oxysporum effector Six6 contributes to virulence and suppresses I-2-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Gawehns, F; Houterman, P M; Ichou, F Ait; Michielse, C B; Hijdra, M; Cornelissen, B J C; Rep, M; Takken, F L W

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate their host and facilitate colonization. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Upon infection, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici secretes numerous small proteins into the xylem sap (Six proteins). Most Six proteins are unique to F. oxysporum, but Six6 is an exception; a homolog is also present in two Colletotrichum spp. SIX6 expression was found to require living host cells and a knockout of SIX6 in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici compromised virulence, classifying it as a genuine effector. Heterologous expression of SIX6 did not affect growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana toward Verticillium dahliae, Pseudomonas syringae, or F. oxysporum, suggesting a specific function for F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Six6 in the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici- tomato pathosystem. Remarkably, Six6 was found to specifically suppress I-2-mediated cell death (I2CD) upon transient expression in N. benthamiana, whereas it did not compromise the activity of other cell-death-inducing genes. Still, this I2CD suppressing activity of Six6 does not allow the fungus to overcome I-2 resistance in tomato, suggesting that I-2-mediated resistance is independent from cell death. PMID:24313955

  12. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  13. A Translocated Effector Required for Bartonella Dissemination from Derma to Blood Safeguards Migratory Host Cells from Damage by Co-translocated Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Okujava, Rusudan; Guye, Patrick; Lu, Yun-Yueh; Mistl, Claudia; Polus, Florine; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Halin, Cornelia; Rolink, Antonius G.; Dehio, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens secrete multiple effectors to modulate host cellular functions. These effectors may interfere with each other to efficiently control the infection process. Bartonellae are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria using a VirB type IV secretion system to translocate a cocktail of Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) into host cells. Based on in vitro infection models we demonstrate here that BepE protects infected migratory cells from injurious effects triggered by BepC and is required for in vivo dissemination of bacteria from the dermal site of inoculation to blood. Human endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with a ΔbepE mutant of B. henselae (Bhe) displayed a cell fragmentation phenotype resulting from Bep-dependent disturbance of rear edge detachment during migration. A ΔbepCE mutant did not show cell fragmentation, indicating that BepC is critical for triggering this deleterious phenotype. Complementation of ΔbepE with BepEBhe or its homologues from other Bartonella species abolished cell fragmentation. This cyto-protective activity is confined to the C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID) domain of BepEBhe (BID2.EBhe). Ectopic expression of BID2.EBhe impeded the disruption of actin stress fibers by Rho Inhibitor 1, indicating that BepE restores normal cell migration via the RhoA signaling pathway, a major regulator of rear edge retraction. An intradermal (i.d.) model for B. tribocorum (Btr) infection in the rat reservoir host mimicking the natural route of infection by blood sucking arthropods allowed demonstrating a vital role for BepE in bacterial dissemination from derma to blood. While the Btr mutant ΔbepDE was abacteremic following i.d. inoculation, complementation with BepEBtr, BepEBhe or BIDs.EBhe restored bacteremia. Given that we observed a similar protective effect of BepEBhe on infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells migrating through a monolayer of lymphatic endothelial cells we propose that

  14. Effectors of root sedentary nematodes target diverse plant cell compartments to manipulate plant functions and promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Jaouannet, Maëlle; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-01-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes maintain a biotrophic relationship with their hosts over a period of several weeks and induce the differentiation of root cells into specialized feeding cells. Nematode effectors, which are synthesized in the esophageal glands and injected into the plant tissue through the syringe-like stylet, play a central role in these processes. Previous work on nematode effectors has shown that the apoplasm is targeted during invasion of the host while the cytoplasm is targeted during the induction and the maintenance of the feeding site. A large number of candidate effectors potentially secreted by the nematode into the plant tissues to promote infection have now been identified. This work has shown that the targeting and the role of effectors are more complex than previously thought. This review will not cover the prolific recent findings in nematode effector function but will instead focus on recent selected examples that illustrate the variety of plant cell compartments that effectors are addressed to in order reach their plant targets. PMID:23857349

  15. Obstacles and opportunities for targeting the effector T cell response in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Jane H; Nepom, Gerald T

    2016-07-01

    Autoreactive lymphocytes display a programmed set of characteristic effector functions and phenotypic markers that, in combination with antigen-specific profiling, provide a detailed picture of the adaptive immune response in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). The CD4+ T cell effector compartment (referred to as "Teff" in this article) has been extensively analyzed, particularly because the HLA genes most strongly associated with T1D are MHC class II alleles that form restriction elements for CD4+ T cell recognition. This "guilt by association" can now be revisited in terms of specific immune mechanisms and specific forms of T cell recognition that are displayed by Teff found in subjects with T1D. In this review, we describe properties of Teff that correlate with T1D, and discuss several characteristics that advance our understanding of disease persistence and progression. Focusing on functional disease-associated immunological pathways within these Teff suggests a rationale for next-generation clinical trials with targeted interventions. Indeed, immune modulation therapies in T1D that do not address these properties of Teff are unlikely to achieve durable clinical response. PMID:26948997

  16. Viral MHC class I-like molecule allows evasion of NK cell effector responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pyzik, Michal; Dumaine, Anne; Dumaine, Anne A; Charbonneau, Benoît; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Jonjic, Stipan; Vidal, Silvia M

    2014-12-15

    The outcome of mouse CMV (MCMV) infection varies among different inbred mouse strains depending on NK cell effector functions governed through recognition receptor triggering. NK cells from different mouse strains possess diverse repertoires of activating or inhibitory Ly49 receptors, which share some of their polymorphic MHC class I (MHC-I) ligands. By examining the NK cell response to MCMV infection in novel BALB substrains congenic for different MHC (or H-2 in mice) haplotypes, we show that recognition of viral MHC-I-like protein m157 by inhibitory Ly49C receptor allows escape from NK cell control of viral replication. Dominant inhibition by Ly49C bound to self-H-2(b) encoded MHC-I molecules masks this effect, which only becomes apparent in distinct H-2 haplotypes, such as H-2(f). The recognition of m157-expressing cells by Ly49C resulted in both decreased NK cell killing in vitro and reduced rejection in vivo. Further, control of infection with m157-deletant (Δm157) MCMV was improved in mice carrying H-2 molecules unrecognized by Ly49C but allowing expansion of NK cell effectors expressing activating Ly49L receptors. Hence, our study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that MHC-I mimicry strategies used by MCMV to avoid NK cell control are biologically relevant during in vivo viral infection. Of value for human studies is that only a few genetic assortments conditional on the repertoires of viral MHC-I-like proteins/host NK receptors/MHC haplotypes should allow efficient protection against CMV infection. PMID:25392524

  17. Ndfip-mediated degradation of Jak1 tunes cytokine signalling to limit expansion of CD4+ effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Claire E.; Riling, Christopher R.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Ding, Hua; Kumar, Suresh; Deng, Guoping; Liu, Yuhong; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Oliver, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    Nedd4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to restrict T-cell function and impact T-cell differentiation. We show here that Ndfip1 and Ndfip2, activators of Nedd4 family ligases, together limit accumulation and function of effector CD4+ T cells. Using a three-part proteomics approach in primary T cells, we identify stabilization of Jak1 in Ndfip1/2-deficient T cells stimulated through the TCR. Jak1 degradation is aborted in activated T cells that lack Ndfips. In wild-type cells, Jak1 degradation lessens CD4+ cell sensitivity to cytokines during TCR stimulation, while in Ndfip-deficient cells cytokine responsiveness persists, promoting increased expansion and survival of pathogenic effector T cells. Thus, Ndfip1/Ndfip2 regulate the cross talk between the T-cell receptor and cytokine signalling pathways to limit inappropriate T-cell responses. PMID:27088444

  18. Antigen-specific CD4{sup +} effector T cells: Analysis of factors regulating clonal expansion and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Yuri; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Watanabe, Shiho; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kotani, Motoko; Kozono, Haruo; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2009-03-20

    In order to fully understand T cell-mediated immunity, the mechanisms that regulate clonal expansion and cytokine production by CD4{sup +} antigen-specific effector T cells in response to a wide range of antigenic stimulation needs clarification. For this purpose, panels of antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cell clones with different thresholds for antigen-induced proliferation were generated by repeated stimulation with high- or low-dose antigen. Differences in antigen sensitivities did not correlate with expression of TCR, CD4, adhesion or costimulatory molecules. There was no significant difference in antigen-dependent cytokine production by TG40 cells transfected with TCR obtained from either high- or low-dose-responding T cell clones, suggesting that the affinity of TCRs for their ligands is not primary determinant of T cell antigen reactivity. The proliferative responses of all T cell clones to both peptide stimulation and to TCR{beta} crosslinking revealed parallel dose-response curves. These results suggest that the TCR signal strength of effector T cells and threshold of antigen reactivity is determined by an intrinsic property, such as the TCR signalosome and/or intracellular signaling machinery. Finally, the antigen responses of high- and low-peptide-responding T cell clones reveal that clonal expansion and cytokine production of effector T cells occur independently of antigen concentration. Based on these results, the mechanisms underlying selection of high 'avidity' effector and memory T cells in response to pathogen are discussed.

  19. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  20. Enhanced effector responses in activated CD8+ T cells deficient in diacylglycerol kinases.

    PubMed

    Riese, Matthew J; Wang, Liang-Chuan S; Moon, Edmund K; Joshi, Rohan P; Ranganathan, Anjana; June, Carl H; Koretzky, Gary A; Albelda, Steven M

    2013-06-15

    Recent clinical trials have shown promise in the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells; however, augmentation of their activity may broaden their clinical use and improve their efficacy. We hypothesized that because CAR action requires proteins essential for T-cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction, deletion of negative regulators of these signaling pathways would enhance CAR signaling and effector T-cell function. We tested CAR activity and function in T cells that lacked one or both isoforms of diacylglycerol kinase (dgk) expressed highly in T cells, dgkα and dgkζ, enzymes that metabolize the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) and limit Ras/ERK activation. We found that primary murine T cells transduced with CARs specific for the human tumor antigen mesothelin showed greatly enhanced cytokine production and cytotoxicity when cocultured with a murine mesothelioma line that stably expresses mesothelin. In addition, we found that dgk-deficient CAR-transduced T cells were more effective in limiting the growth of implanted tumors, both concurrent with and after establishment of tumor. Consistent with our studies in mice, pharmacologic inhibition of dgks also augments function of primary human T cells transduced with CARs. These results suggest that deletion of negative regulators of TCR signaling enhances the activity and function of CAR-expressing T cells and identify dgks as potential targets for improving the clinical potential of CARs. PMID:23576561

  1. Daydreamer, a Ras effector and GSK-3 substrate, is important for directional sensing and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, Verena; Shen, Zhouxin; Lee, Susan; Plak, Katarzyna; Lotfi, Pouya; Chang, Jessica; Charest, Pascale G.; Romero, Jesus Lacal; Jeon, Taeck J.; Kortholt, Arjan; Briggs, Steven P.; Firtel, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    How independent signaling pathways are integrated to holistically control a biological process is not well understood. We have identified Daydreamer (DydA), a new member of the Mig10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) family of adaptor proteins that localizes to the leading edge of the cell. DydA is a putative Ras effector that is required for cell polarization and directional movement during chemotaxis. dydA− cells exhibit elevated F-actin and assembled myosin II (MyoII), increased and extended phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and extended phosphorylation of the activation loop of PKB and PKBR1, suggesting that DydA is involved in the negative regulation of these pathways. DydA is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), which is required for some, but not all, of DydA's functions, including the proper regulation of PKB and PKBR1 and MyoII assembly. gskA− cells exhibit very strong chemotactic phenotypes, as previously described, but exhibit an increased rate of random motility. gskA− cells have a reduced MyoII response and a reduced level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate production, but a highly extended recruitment of PI3K to the plasma membrane and highly extended kinetics of PKB and PKBR1 activation. Our results demonstrate that GSK-3 function is essential for chemotaxis, regulating multiple substrates, and that one of these effectors, DydA, plays a key function in the dynamic regulation of chemotaxis. PMID:23135995

  2. miR-23∼27∼24 clusters control effector T cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunglim; Wu, Cheng-Jang; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Cruz, Leilani O; Khan, Aly Azeem; Lin, Ling-Li; Nguyen, Duc T; Miller, Marina; Lee, Hyang-Mi; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Broide, David H; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Lu, Li-Fan

    2016-02-01

    Coordinated repression of gene expression by evolutionarily conserved microRNA (miRNA) clusters and paralogs ensures that miRNAs efficiently exert their biological impact. Combining both loss- and gain-of-function genetic approaches, we show that the miR-23∼27∼24 clusters regulate multiple aspects of T cell biology, particularly helper T (Th) 2 immunity. Low expression of this miRNA family confers proper effector T cell function at both physiological and pathological settings. Further studies in T cells with exaggerated regulation by individual members of the miR-23∼27∼24 clusters revealed that miR-24 and miR-27 collaboratively limit Th2 responses through targeting IL-4 and GATA3 in both direct and indirect manners. Intriguingly, although overexpression of the entire miR-23 cluster also negatively impacts other Th lineages, enforced expression of miR-24, in contrast to miR-23 and miR-27, actually promotes the differentiation of Th1, Th17, and induced regulatory T cells, implying that under certain conditions, miRNA families can fine tune the biological effects of their regulation by having individual members antagonize rather than cooperate with each other. Together, our results identify a miRNA family with important immunological roles and suggest that tight regulation of miR-23∼27∼24 clusters in T cells is required to maintain optimal effector function and to prevent aberrant immune responses. PMID:26834155

  3. Killing of targets by effector CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action

    SciTech Connect

    Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with antibody-based vaccines, it has been difficult to measure the efficacy of T cell-based vaccines and to correlate the efficacy of CD8 T cell responses with protection again viral infections. In part, this difficulty is due to poor understanding of the in vivo efficacy of CD8 T cells produced by vaccination. Using a: recently developed experimental method of in vivo cytotoxicity we have investigated quantitative aspects of killing of peptide-pulsed targets by effector and memory CD8 T cells, specific to three epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), in the mouse spleen. By analyzing data on killing of targets with varying number of epitope-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells, we find that killing of targets by effectors follows the law of mass-action, that is the death rate of peptide-pulsed targets is proportional to the frequency of CTLs in the spleen. In contrast, killing of targets by memory CD8 T cells does not follow the mass action law because the death rate of targets saturates at high frequencies of memory CD8 T cells. For both effector and memory cells, we also find little support for the killing term that includes the decrease of the death rate of targets with target cell density. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that at low CD8 T cell frequencies, memory CD8 T cells on the per capita basis are more efficient at killing peptide-pulsed targets than effectors, but at high frequencies, effectors are more efficient killers than memory T cells. Comparison of the estimated killing efficacy of effector T cells with the value that is predicted from theoretical physics and based on motility of T cells in lymphoid tissues, suggests that limiting step in the killing of peptide-pulsed targets is delivering the lethal hit and not finding the target. Our results thus form a basis for quantitative understanding of the process of killing of virus-infected cells by T cell responses in tissues and can be used to correlate the

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulator XBP-1 Contributes to Effector CD8+ T Cell Differentiation during Acute Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor X-box-binding protein-1 (XBP-1) plays an essential role in activating the unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcribed XBP-1 mRNA is converted to its active form by unconventional cytoplasmic splicing mediated by inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE-1) upon ER stress. We report activation of the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway in effector CD8+ T cells during the response to acute infection. Transcription of unspliced XBP-1 mRNA is up-regulated by IL-2 signals, while its splicing is induced after TCR ligation. Splicing of XBP-1 mRNA was evident during the expansion of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells in response to viral or bacterial infection. An XBP-1 splicing reporter revealed that splicing activity was enriched in terminal effector cells expressing high levels of killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1). Overexpression of the spliced form of XBP-1 in CD8+ T cells enhanced KLRG1 expression during infection, whereas XBP-1−/− CD8+ T cells or cells expressing a dominant-negative form of XBP-1 showed a decreased proportion of KLRG1high effector cells. These results suggest that, in the response to pathogen, activation of ER stress sensors and XBP-1 splicing contribute to the differentiation of end-stage effector CD8+ T cells. PMID:18832700

  5. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  6. IQGAP1 is a novel phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate effector in regulation of directional cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suyong; Thapa, Narendra; Hedman, Andrew C; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B; Anderson, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key lipid messenger for regulation of cell migration. PIP2 modulates many effectors, but the specificity of PIP2 signalling can be defined by interactions of PIP2-generating enzymes with PIP2 effectors. Here, we show that type Iγ phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIPKIγ) interacts with the cytoskeleton regulator, IQGAP1, and modulates IQGAP1 function in migration. We reveal that PIPKIγ is required for IQGAP1 recruitment to the leading edge membrane in response to integrin or growth factor receptor activation. Moreover, IQGAP1 is a PIP2 effector that directly binds PIP2 through a polybasic motif and PIP2 binding activates IQGAP1, facilitating actin polymerization. IQGAP1 mutants that lack PIPKIγ or PIP2 binding lose the ability to control directional cell migration. Collectively, these data reveal a synergy between PIPKIγ and IQGAP1 in the control of cell migration. PMID:23982733

  7. Antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) with antibody-coated effectors: rat and human effectors versus tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Jones, J F; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1981-06-01

    We have previously described techniques that cause antibody molecules to remain bound to P388D1 cells for at least 18 hr, and enable these cells to lyse hapten-coated erythrocytes not sensitized with antibody. These methods collectively are called "franking." In this study, we have determined that these methods are applicable to other systems. We franked rat splenocytes and human peripheral blood leukocytes with rabbit anti-TNP antibody, and showed that they were capable of lysing TNP-tumor and erythrocyte targets (not coated with antibody) in a hapten-specific, antibody-dependent fashion. Both the mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte fractions of the human cells were capable of mediating lysis. Additionally, human leukocytes franked with rabbit antibody were stained with fluorescent goat anti-rabbit IgG Fab, and were analyzed for fluorescence by flow microfluorometry. Nearly all of the PMN cells and about one-half of the mononuclear cells had IgG on their surfaces after franking. Clearly, not all cells can be franked, but those that can retain significant numbers of antibody molecules (approximately 5 X 10(4), in the case of PMN cells) on their surfaces. PMID:7014718

  8. Serine Protease Inhibitor-6 Differentially Affects the Survival of Effector and Memory Alloreactive CD8-T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, J.; Ohori, S.; Ting, C.; Uehara, M.; Abdoli, R.; Smith, B. D.; Safa, K.; Solhjou, Z.; Lukyanchykov, P.; Patel, J.; McGrath, M.; Abdi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal expansion of effector T cells and subsequent generation of memory T cells are critical in determining the outcome of transplantation. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes induce direct cytolysis of target cells through secretion of Granzyme-B (GrB), they also express cytoplasmic serine protease inhibitor-6 (Spi6) to protect themselves from GrB that has leaked from granules. Here, we studied the role of GrB/Spi6 axis in determining clonal expansion of alloreactive CD8-T cells and subsequent generation of memory CD8-T cells in transplantation. CD8-T cells from Spi6−/− mice underwent more GrB mediated apoptosis upon alloantigen stimulation in vitro and in vivo following adoptive transfer into an allogeneic host. Interestingly, while OT1.Spi6−/− CD8 T cells showed significantly lower clonal expansion following skin transplants from OVA mice, there was no difference in the size of the effector memory CD8-T cells long after transplantation. Furthermore, lack of Spi6 resulted in a decrease of short-lived-effector-CD8-cells but did not impact the pool of memory-precursor-effector-CD8-cells. Similar results were found in heart transplant models. Our findings suggest that the final alloreactive CD8-memory-pool-size is independent from the initial clonal-proliferation as memory precursors express low levels of GrB and therefore are independent of Spi6 for survival. These data advance our understanding of memory T cells generation in transplantation and provide basis for Spi6 based strategies to target effector T cells. PMID:25534448

  9. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. PMID:27401342

  10. Effector T-cell trafficking between the leptomeninges and the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Körner, Henrike; Krueger, Martin; Vidoli, Stefano; Haberl, Michael; Mielke, Dorothee; Brylla, Elke; Issekutz, Thomas; Cabañas, Carlos; Nelson, Peter J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Rohde, Veit; Bechmann, Ingo; Lodygin, Dmitri; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    In multiple sclerosis, brain-reactive T cells invade the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a self-destructive inflammatory process. T-cell infiltrates are not only found within the parenchyma and the meninges, but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes the entire CNS tissue. How the T cells reach the CSF, their functionality, and whether they traffic between the CSF and other CNS compartments remains hypothetical. Here we show that effector T cells enter the CSF from the leptomeninges during Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. While moving through the three-dimensional leptomeningeal network of collagen fibres in a random Brownian walk, T cells were flushed from the surface by the flow of the CSF. The detached cells displayed significantly lower activation levels compared to T cells from the leptomeninges and CNS parenchyma. However, they did not represent a specialized non-pathogenic cellular sub-fraction, as their gene expression profile strongly resembled that of tissue-derived T cells and they fully retained their encephalitogenic potential. T-cell detachment from the leptomeninges was counteracted by integrins VLA-4 and LFA-1 binding to their respective ligands produced by resident macrophages. Chemokine signalling via CCR5/CXCR3 and antigenic stimulation of T cells in contact with the leptomeningeal macrophages enforced their adhesiveness. T cells floating in the CSF were able to reattach to the leptomeninges through steps reminiscent of vascular adhesion in CNS blood vessels, and invade the parenchyma. The molecular/cellular conditions for T-cell reattachment were the same as the requirements for detachment from the leptomeningeal milieu. Our data indicate that the leptomeninges represent a checkpoint at which activated T cells are licensed to enter the CNS parenchyma and non-activated T cells are preferentially released into the CSF, from where they can reach areas of antigen

  11. Frequencies of HCV-specific effector CD4+ T cells by flow cytometry: correlation with clinical disease stages.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Hugo R; Miner, Camette; Sasaki, Anna W; Lewinsohn, David M; Conrad, Andrew J; Bakke, Antony; Bouwer, H G Archie; Hinrichs, David J

    2002-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis, affecting approximately 2% of the world's population. The immune mechanisms responsible for the highly variable natural history in a given individual are unknown. We used a multiparameter flow cytometric technique to functionally and phenotypically characterize HCV-specific effector T cells in the peripheral blood of 32 individuals with different stages of hepatitis C disease (resolved, mild chronic, advanced chronic) and normal controls. We found the highest frequencies of virus-specific effector cells with an activated memory phenotype (CD45RO+CD69+) in subjects who had resolved HCV infection, either spontaneously or with antiviral therapy. Effector cells from patients with resolved infection produced Th1 type cytokines following stimulation with nonstructural antigens (NS3 and NS4), whereas effector cells from chronically infected patients produced Th1 type cytokines predominantly following stimulation with the HCV core antigen. Stimulation with superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEB) induced the same levels of cytokine production in the different patient groups. Among the HCV-seropositive patients, viral load inversely correlated with the Th1 effector cell response to NS3. Interleukin (IL)-4 was produced only in response to the control antigens, but not in response to the HCV recombinant proteins. Taken together, these findings suggest that a vigorous HCV-specific CD4+ Th1 response, particularly against the nonstructural proteins of the virus, may be associated with viral clearance and protection from disease progression. Prospective studies using this new flow cytometric assay will be required to determine whether antiviral therapy modifies the frequency, specificity, and function of these virus-specific effector cells. PMID:11786976

  12. Piceatannol inhibits effector T cell functions by suppressing TcR signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Gab; Park, Hong-Jai; Lee, Jung-Ah; Kim, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Je-Min

    2015-04-01

    Piceatannol, a metabolite of resveratrol found in red wine and grapes, displays a wide spectrum of biological activity. Although the anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumorigenesis activity of piceatannol has been extensively studied, its role in the adaptive immune response has received less attention. Here we investigated the role of piceatannol, a well-known Syk inhibitor, in T cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation using isolated murine splenic T cells from C57BL/6 mice. Piceatannol treatment inhibited surface expression of CD4 and CD8 T cell activation markers CD25 and CD69, reduced production of cytokines IFNγ, IL-2, and IL-17, and suppressed proliferation of activated T cells. Moreover, piceatannol treatment significantly inhibited differentiation of CD4(+)CD25(-)CD62L(+) naïve CD4 T cells into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells, presumably due to inhibition of TcR signaling through p-Erk, p-Akt, and p-p38. Piceatannol appears to be a useful nutritional or pharmacological biomolecule that regulates effector T cell functions such as cytokine production, differentiation, and proliferation. PMID:25676533

  13. Effector, Memory, and Dysfunctional CD8+ T Cell Fates in the Antitumor Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune system plays a pivotal role in the host's ability to mount an effective, antigen-specific immune response against tumors. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) mediate tumor rejection through recognition of tumor antigens and direct killing of transformed cells. In growing tumors, TILs are often functionally impaired as a result of interaction with, or signals from, transformed cells and the tumor microenvironment. These interactions and signals can lead to transcriptional, functional, and phenotypic changes in TILs that diminish the host's ability to eradicate the tumor. In addition to effector and memory CD8+ T cells, populations described as exhausted, anergic, senescent, and regulatory CD8+ T cells have been observed in clinical and basic studies of antitumor immune responses. In the context of antitumor immunity, these CD8+ T cell subsets remain poorly characterized in terms of fate-specific biomarkers and transcription factor profiles. Here we discuss the current characterization of CD8+ T cell fates in antitumor immune responses and discuss recent insights into how signals in the tumor microenvironment influence TIL transcriptional networks to promote CD8+ T cell dysfunction. PMID:27314056

  14. Programmed death 1 regulates memory phenotype CD4 T cell accumulation, inhibits expansion of the effector memory phenotype subset and modulates production of effector cytokines.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Joanna J; Tsoukatou, Debbie; Mamalaki, Clio; Chatzidakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Memory phenotype CD4 T cells are found in normal mice and arise through response to environmental antigens or homeostatic mechanisms. The factors that regulate the homeostasis of memory phenotype CD4 cells are not clear. In the present study we demonstrate that there is a marked accumulation of memory phenotype CD4 cells, specifically of the effector memory (T(EM)) phenotype, in lymphoid organs and tissues of mice deficient for the negative co-stimulatory receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1). This can be correlated with decreased apoptosis but not with enhanced homeostatic turnover potential of these cells. PD-1 ablation increased the frequency of memory phenotype CD4 IFN-γ producers but decreased the respective frequency of IL-17A-producing cells. In particular, IFN-γ producers were more abundant but IL-17A producing cells were more scarce among PD-1 KO T(EM)-phenotype cells relative to WT. Transfer of peripheral naïve CD4 T cells suggested that accumulated PD-1 KO T(EM)-phenotype cells are of peripheral and not of thymic origin. This accumulation effect was mediated by CD4 cell-intrinsic mechanisms as shown by mixed bone marrow chimera experiments. Naïve PD-1 KO CD4 T cells gave rise to higher numbers of TEM-phenotype lymphopenia-induced proliferation memory cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PD-1 has an important role in determining the composition and functional aspects of memory phenotype CD4 T cell pool. PMID:25803808

  15. iNKT cells require TSC1 for terminal maturation and effector lineage fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhong; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongxia; Gorentla, Balachandra; Shin, Jinwook; Qiu, Yurong; Que, Loretta G.; Foster, W. Michael; Xia, Zhenwei; Chi, Hongbo; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Terminal maturation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells from stage 2 (CD44+NK1.1–) to stage 3 (CD44+NK1.1+) is accompanied by a functional acquisition of a predominant IFN-γ–producing (iNKT-1) phenotype; however, some cells develop into IL-17–producing iNKT (iNKT-17) cells. iNKT-17 cells are rare and restricted to a CD44+NK1.1– lineage. It is unclear how iNKT terminal maturation is regulated and what factors mediate the predominance of iNKT-1 compared with iNKT-17. The tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1) is an important negative regulator of mTOR signaling, which regulates T cell differentiation, function, and trafficking. Here, we determined that mice lacking TSC1 exhibit a developmental block of iNKT differentiation at stage 2 and skew from a predominantly iNKT-1 population toward a predominantly iNKT-17 population, leading to enhanced airway hypersensitivity. Evaluation of purified iNKT cells revealed that TSC1 promotes T-bet, which regulates iNKT maturation, but downregulates ICOS expression in iNKT cells by inhibiting mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, mice lacking T-bet exhibited both a terminal maturation defect of iNKT cells and a predominance of iNKT-17 cells, and increased ICOS expression was required for the predominance of iNKT-17 cells in the population of TSC1-deficient iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TSC1-dependent control of mTORC1 is crucial for terminal iNKT maturation and effector lineage decisions, resulting in the predominance of iNKT-1 cells. PMID:24614103

  16. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity. PMID:26391810

  17. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity against Candida albicans induced by cyclophosphamide: nature of the in vitro cytotoxic effector.

    PubMed Central

    Baccarini, M; Bistoni, F; Puccetti, P; Garaci, E

    1983-01-01

    We have recently reported the in vivo modulation of resistance to experimental Candida albicans infection by cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and have shown that increased resistance to the microbial challenge occurs 12 to 21 days after treatment with the drug (Bistoni et al., Infect. Immun. 40: 46-55, 1983). The event is accompanied by the appearance of a highly candidacidal cell population in the spleen and the activation of a subpopulation of natural cytotoxic effectors reactive in vitro against YAC-1 tumor cells. We now provide evidence that these anti-YAC-1 cytotoxic effectors are clearly distinct from the cyclophosphamide-induced candidacidal effectors, which seem to belong to a macrophage-monocyte lineage. The enhanced cytotoxic activity induced by cyclophosphamide was not restricted to C. albicans but was also exerted against a panel of Candida strains. PMID:6352489

  18. Fine-tuning of CD8(+) T-cell effector functions by targeting the 2B4-CD48 interaction.

    PubMed

    Lissina, Anna; Ambrozak, David R; Boswell, Kristin L; Yang, Wenjing; Boritz, Eli; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Iglesias, Maria C; Hashimoto, Masao; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Haddad, Elias; Douek, Daniel C; Zhu, Jun; Koup, Richard A; Yamamoto, Takuya; Appay, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Polyfunctionality and cytotoxic activity dictate CD8(+) T-cell efficacy in the eradication of infected and malignant cells. The induction of these effector functions depends on the specific interaction between the T-cell receptor (TCR) and its cognate peptide-MHC class I complex, in addition to signals provided by co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory receptors, which can further regulate these functions. Among these receptors, the role of 2B4 is contested, as it has been described as either co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory in modulating T-cell functions. We therefore combined functional, transcriptional and epigenetic approaches to further characterize the impact of disrupting the interaction of 2B4 with its ligand CD48, on the activity of human effector CD8(+) T-cell clones. In this setting, we show that the 2B4-CD48 axis is involved in the fine-tuning of CD8(+) T-cell effector function upon antigenic stimulation. Blocking this interaction resulted in reduced CD8(+) T-cell clone-mediated cytolytic activity, together with a subtle drop in the expression of genes involved in effector function regulation. Our results also imply a variable contribution of the 2B4-CD48 interaction to the modulation of CD8(+) T-cell functional properties, potentially linked to intrinsic levels of T-bet expression and TCR avidity. The present study thus provides further insights into the role of the 2B4-CD48 interaction in the fine regulation of CD8(+) T-cell effector function upon antigenic stimulation. PMID:26860368

  19. Immunophenotypic characterisation of acute leukaemia after polycythemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, J M; Orfao, A; González, M; Cuesta, B; López-Berges, M C; Cañizo, M C; Ciudad, J; San Miguel, J F

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To analyze the immunophenotype of blast cells in patients with acute leukaemia after polycythemia vera, together with the most relevant clinical and haematological disease characteristics. METHODS--The immunophenotype was analysed in nine patients by immunofluorescence flow cytometry using a panel of 15 monoclonal antibodies. The DNA content of blast cells was determined using Vindelov's technique. RESULTS--The most relevant clinical and haematological disease characteristics included: the presence of enlarged spleen and liver by 56% and 67%, respectively; a moderate degree of leucocytosis with thrombocytopenia while haemoglobin was normal in 50% of patients. All patients received alkylating agents or hydroxyurea, or both. Interestingly, the chronic phase in patients receiving this latter drug was shorter. All cases showed a myeloid phenotype, four of them reactive only to early myeloid antigens (CD13/33); in the remaining cases the blast cells displayed granulomonocytic (CD14+, CD15+), erythroid (CD71 ), or megakaryocytic (CD61+, CD41+) markers. Coexpression of lymphoid related antigens (CD7, TdT, or CD19) was also detected. The morphological assessment of blast cells agreed with the immunophenotyping in five out of the nine cases. Blast cells from all six patients analysed displayed a diploid DNA content and the proportion of S-phase cells ranged from 0.4% to 4%. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest a pluripotential stem cell with myeloid commitment as the target cell of acute leukaemia after polycythemia vera. PMID:8157758

  20. In vivo inhibition of human CD19 targeted effector T cells by natural T regulatory cells in a xenotransplant murine model of B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Hayman, Erik; Pegram, Hollie; Santos, Elmer; Heller, Glen; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2011-01-01

    Human T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specific to the B cell tumor antigen CD19 can successfully eradicate systemic human CD19+ tumors in immunocompromised SCID-Beige mice. However, in the clinical setting, CD4+ CD25hi T regulatory cells (Tregs) present within the tumor microenvironment are potent suppressors of tumor-targeted effector T cells. In order to assess the impact of Tregs on CAR-modified T cells in the SCID-Beige xenotransplant model, we isolated, genetically targeted and expanded natural T regulatory cells (nTregs). In vitro, nTregs, modified to express CD19 targeted CARs efficiently inhibited the proliferation of activated human T cells, as well as the capacity of CD19-targeted 19-28z+ effector T cells to lyse CD19+ Raji tumor cells. Intravenous infusion of CD19-targeted nTregs into SCID-Beige mice with systemic Raji tumors traffic to sites of tumor and recapitulate a clinically relevant hostile tumor microenvironment. Anti-tumor efficacy of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells was fully abrogated as assessed by long-term survival of treated mice. Optimal suppression by genetically targeted nTregs was dependent on nTreg to effector T cell ratios and in vivo nTreg activation. Prior infusion of cyclophosphamide in the setting of this nTreg-mediated hostile microenvironment was able to restore the anti-tumor activity of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells through the eradication of tumor targeted nTregs. These findings have significant implications on the design of future clinical trials utilizing CAR-based adoptive T cell therapies of cancer. PMID:21487038

  1. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuhong; Huang, Yuju; Liang, Yin; Ho, Yuchin; Wang, Yichen; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC) activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm) cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications. PMID:19660111

  2. Smad4 represses the generation of memory-precursor effector T cells but is required for the differentiation of central memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J; Zhang, X; Wang, Q; Qiu, G; Hou, C; Wang, J; Cheng, Q; Lan, Y; Han, H; Shen, H; Zhang, Y; Yang, X; Shen, B; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation underlying the differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cells remains elusive. Here, we show that 18-month-old mice lacking the transcription factor Smad4 (homolog 4 of mothers against decapentaplegic, Drosophila), a key intracellular signaling effector for the TGF-β superfamily, in T cells exhibited lower percentages of CD44hiCD8+ T cells. To explore the role of Smad4 in the activation/memory of CD8+ T cells, 6- to 8-week-old mice with or without Smad4 in T cells were challenged with Listeria monocytogenes. Smad4 deficiency did not affect antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell expansion but led to partially impaired cytotoxic function. Less short-lived effector T cells but more memory-precursor effector T cells were generated in the absence of Smad4. Despite that, Smad4 deficiency led to reduced memory CD8+ T-cell responses. Further exploration revealed that the generation of central memory T cells was impaired in the absence of Smad4 and the cells showed survival issue. In mechanism, Smad4 deficiency led to aberrant transcriptional programs in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrated an essential role of Smad4 in the control of effector and memory CD8+ T-cell responses to infection. PMID:26583325

  3. Analyzing the Functions of Rab11-Effector Proteins During Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    Recycling endosomes recently have emerged as major regulators of cytokinesis and abscission steps of cell division. Rab11-endosomes in particular were shown to transport proteins to the mitotic ingression furrow and play a key role in establishing the abscission site. Rab11 GTPase function by binding and activations various effector proteins, such as Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). FIPs appear to be at the core of many Rab11 functions, with FIP3 playing a role in targeting of the Rab11-endosomes during mitosis. Here we summarize the newest finding regarding the roles and regulation of FIP3 and Rab11 complex, as well as describe the methods developed to analyze membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during abscission step of cytokinesis. PMID:26360025

  4. Analyzing the functions of Rab11-effector proteins during cell division.

    PubMed

    Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    Recycling endosomes recently have emerged as major regulators of cytokinesis and abscission steps of cell division. Rab11-endosomes in particular were shown to transport proteins to the mitotic ingression furrow and play a key role in establishing the abscission site. Rab11 GTPase functions by binding and activating various effector proteins, such as Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). FIPs appear to be at the core of many Rab11 functions, with FIP3 playing a role in targeting of the Rab11-endosomes during mitosis. Here we summarize the newest finding regarding the roles and regulation of FIP3 and Rab11 complex, as well as describe the methods developed to analyze membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during abscission step of cytokinesis. PMID:26360025

  5. Defect in recruiting effector memory CD8+ T-cells in malignant pleural effusions compared to normal pleural fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are a common and fatal complication in cancers including lung or breast cancers, or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MPE animal models and immunotherapy trials in MPM patients previously suggested defects of the cellular immunity in MPE. However only few observational studies of the immune response were done in MPM patients, using questionable control groups (transudate…). Methods We compared T cell populations evaluated by flow cytometry from blood and pleural effusion of untreated patients with MPM (n = 58), pleural metastasis of adenocarcinoma (n = 30) or with benign pleural lesions associated with asbestos exposure (n = 23). Blood and pleural fluid were also obtained from healthy subjects, providing normal values for T cell populations. Results Blood CD4+ or CD8+ T cells percentages were similar in all groups of patients or healthy subjects. Whereas pleural fluid from healthy controls contained mainly CD8+ T cells, benign or malignant pleural effusions included mainly CD4+ T cells. Effector memory T cells were the main T cell subpopulation in pleural fluid from healthy subjects. In contrast, there was a striking and selective recruitment of central memory CD4+ T cells in MPE, but not of effector cells CD8+ T cells or NK cells in the pleural fluid as one would expect in order to obtain an efficient immune response. Conclusions Comparing for the first time MPE to pleural fluid from healthy subjects, we found a local defect in recruiting effector CD8+ T cells, which may be involved in the escape of tumor cells from immune response. Further studies are needed to characterize which subtypes of effector CD8+ T cells are involved, opening prospects for cell therapy in MPE and MPM. PMID:23816056

  6. Flow cytometric determination of quantitative immunophenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redelman, Douglas; Ensign, Wayne; Roberts, Don

    2001-05-01

    Immunofluorescent flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood leucocytes is most commonly used to identify and enumerate cells defined by one or more clusters of differentiation (CD) antigens. Although less widely employed, quantitative tests that measure the amounts of CD antigens expressed per cell are used in some situations such as the characterization of lymphomas and leukocytes or the measurement of CD38 on CD3plu8pluT cells in HIV infected individuals. The CD antigens used to identify leukocyte populations are functionally important molecules and it is known that under- or over-expression of some CD antigens can affect cellular responses. For example, high or low expression of CD19 on B cells is associated with autoimmune conditions or depressed antibody responses, respectively. In the current studies, the quantitative expression of CD antigens on T cells, B cells and monocytes was determined in a group of age and sex-matched Marines at several times before and after training exercises. There was substantial variation among these individuals in the quantitative expression of CD antigens and in the number of cells in various populations. However, there was relatively little variation within individuals during the two months they were examined. Thus, the number of cells in leukocyte sub-populations and the amount of CD antigens expressed per cell appear to comprise a characteristic quantitative immunophenotype.

  7. Intracellular translocation and localization of Edwardsiella tarda type III secretion system effector EseG in host cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shan; Zhang, Lingzhi; Lou, Ying; Yang, Dahai; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, an important fish pathogenic bacterium, could utilize type III secretion system (T3SS) to transfer multiple effector proteins into host cells during infection. EseG was identified to be an E. tarda T3SS effector, which could be injected by T3SS into non-phagocytic cells. Since E. tarda is a facultative intracellular pathogen that resides and replicates in macrophage, it is interesting to expand our knowledge about EseG translocation and localization within phagocytic cells. Here utilizing murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 as the cell model, we demonstrated that EseG could be transported into J774A.1 via T3SS only after E. tarda was internalized into macrophage cells, indicating that extracellular E. tarda could not inject EseG into host cells. Subcellular fractionation analysis gave the evidence that EseG was specifically localized in the membrane fraction of infected host cells. Furthermore, immunofluorescence detection indicated that EseG specifically targeted the E. tarda-containing vacuoles (ECVs) within macrophage cells. Finally the unique features for EseG were also confirmed in non-phagocytic cells. In summarize, this work illuminates internalization-depending translocation and ECV-targeting localization of E. tarda T3SS effector in both non-phagocytic and phagocytic cells, which might be important to interpret the interaction of EseG with host cells upon infection. PMID:27208750

  8. PKC-Theta in Regulatory and Effector T-cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Brezar, Vedran; Tu, Wen Juan; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teffs) or regulatory (Tregs) T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) to the immunological synapse (IS) is instrumental for the formation of signaling complexes, which ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the IS where its formation induces altered signaling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance. This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs. PMID:26528291

  9. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Superoxide Provides a Third Signal for CD4 T Cell Effector Responses.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Tse, Hubert M

    2016-09-01

    Originally recognized for their direct induced toxicity as a component of the innate immune response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can profoundly modulate T cell adaptive immune responses. Efficient T cell activation requires: signal 1, consisting of an antigenic peptide-MHC complex binding with the TCR; signal 2, the interaction of costimulatory molecules on T cells and APCs; and signal 3, the generation of innate immune-derived ROS and proinflammatory cytokines. This third signal, in particular, has proven essential in generating productive and long-lasting immune responses. Our laboratory previously demonstrated profound Ag-specific hyporesponsiveness in the absence of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. To further examine the consequences of ROS deficiency on Ag-specific T cell responses, our laboratory generated the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse, possessing superoxide-deficient T cells recognizing the nominal Ag OVA323-339 In this study, we demonstrate that OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells displayed a severe reduction in Th1 T cell responses, in addition to blunted IL-12R expression and severely attenuated proinflammatory chemokine ligands. Conversely, IFN-γ synthesis and IL-12R synthesis were rescued by the addition of exogenous superoxide via the paramagnetic superoxide donor potassium dioxide or superoxide-sufficient dendritic cells. Ultimately, these data highlight the importance of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in providing a third signal for adaptive immune maturation by modulating the IL-12/IL-12R pathway and the novelty of the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse model to determine the role of redox-dependent signaling on effector responses. Thus, targeting ROS represents a promising therapeutic strategy in dampening Ag-specific T cell responses and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:27474077

  10. The Immune-Metabolic Basis of Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Function under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dimeloe, Sarah; Mehling, Matthias; Frick, Corina; Loeliger, Jordan; Bantug, Glenn R; Sauder, Ursula; Fischer, Marco; Belle, Réka; Develioglu, Leyla; Tay, Savaş; Langenkamp, Anja; Hess, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Effector memory (EM) CD4(+) T cells recirculate between normoxic blood and hypoxic tissues to screen for cognate Ag. How mitochondria of these cells, shuttling between normoxia and hypoxia, maintain bioenergetic efficiency and stably uphold antiapoptotic features is unknown. In this study, we found that human EM CD4(+) T cells had greater spare respiratory capacity (SRC) than did naive counterparts, which was immediately accessed under hypoxia. Consequently, hypoxic EM cells maintained ATP levels, survived and migrated better than did hypoxic naive cells, and hypoxia did not impair their capacity to produce IFN-γ. EM CD4(+) T cells also had more abundant cytosolic GAPDH and increased glycolytic reserve. In contrast to SRC, glycolytic reserve was not tapped under hypoxic conditions, and, under hypoxia, glucose metabolism contributed similarly to ATP production in naive and EM cells. However, both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, glucose was critical for EM CD4(+) T cell survival. Mechanistically, in the absence of glycolysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of EM cells declined and intrinsic apoptosis was triggered. Restoring pyruvate levels, the end product of glycolysis, preserved ΔΨm and prevented apoptosis. Furthermore, reconstitution of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whose production depends on ΔΨm, also rescued viability, whereas scavenging mitochondrial ROS exacerbated apoptosis. Rapid access of SRC in hypoxia, linked with built-in, oxygen-resistant glycolytic reserve that functionally insulates ΔΨm and mitochondrial ROS production from oxygen tension changes, provides an immune-metabolic basis supporting survival, migration, and function of EM CD4(+) T cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:26621861

  11. Lineage-Specific Effector Signatures of Invariant NKT Cells Are Shared amongst γδ T, Innate Lymphoid, and Th Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jeong; Starrett, Gabriel J; Lee, Seungeun Thera; Yang, Rendong; Henzler, Christine M; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2016-08-15

    Invariant NKT cells differentiate into three predominant effector lineages in the steady state. To understand these lineages, we sorted undifferentiated invariant NK T progenitor cells and each effector population and analyzed their transcriptional profiles by RNAseq. Bioinformatic comparisons were made to effector subsets among other lymphocytes, specifically Th cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), and γδ T cells. Myc-associated signature genes were enriched in NKT progenitors, like in other hematopoietic progenitors. Only NKT1 cells, but not NKT2 and NKT17 cells, had transcriptome similarity to NK cells and were also similar to other IFN-γ-producing lineages such as Th1, ILC1, and intraepithelial γδ T cells. NKT2 and NKT17 cells were similar to their analogous subsets of γδ T cells and ILCs, but surprisingly, not to Th2 and Th17 cells. We identified a set of genes common to each effector lineage regardless of Ag receptor specificity, suggesting the use of conserved regulatory cores for effector function. PMID:27385777

  12. Pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase CaALDH1 interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrBsT and promotes effector-triggered cell death and defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-06-01

    Xanthomonas type III effector AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death and defence responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Nicotiana benthamiana. Little is known about the host factors that interact with AvrBsT. Here, we identified pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (CaALDH1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between CaALDH1 and AvrBsT in planta. CaALDH1:smGFP fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. CaALDH1 expression in pepper was rapidly and strongly induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transient co-expression of CaALDH1 with avrBsT significantly enhanced avrBsT-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was higher in leaves transiently expressing CaALDH1, suggesting that CaALDH1 acts as a cell death enhancer, independently of AvrBsT. CaALDH1 silencing disrupted phenolic compound accumulation, H2O2 production, defence response gene expression, and cell death during avirulent Xcv Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CaALDH1 exhibited enhanced defence response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. These results indicate that cytoplasmic CaALDH1 interacts with AvrBsT and promotes plant cell death and defence responses. PMID:25873668

  13. Isolation of whole esophageal gland cells from plant-parasitic nematodes for transcriptome analyses and effector identification.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tom R; Hewezi, Tarek; Peng, Jiqing; Baum, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal glands of plant-parasitic nematodes are highly specialized cells whose gene expression products include secreted effector proteins, which govern nematode parasitism of host plants. Therefore, elucidating the transcriptomes of esophageal glands with the goal of identifying nematode effectors is a promising avenue to understanding nematode parasitism and its evolutionary origins as well as to devising nematode control strategies. We have developed a method to separate and isolate individual esophageal gland cells from multiple species of plant-parasitic nematodes while preserving RNA quality. We have used such isolated gland cells for transcriptome analysis via high-throughput DNA sequencing. This method relies on the differential histochemical staining of the gland cells after homogenization of phytonematode tissues. Total RNA was extracted from whole gland cells isolated from eight different plant-parasitic nematode species. To validate this approach, the isolated RNA from three plant-parasitic nematode species-Globodera rostochiensis, Pratylenchus penetrans, and Radopholus similis-was amplified, gel purified, and used for 454 sequencing. We obtained 456,801 total reads with an average read length of 409 bp. Sequence analyses revealed the presence of homologs of previously known nematode effectors in these libraries, thus validating our approach. These data provide compelling evidence that this technical advance can be used to relatively easily and expediently discover effector repertoires of plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:22876962

  14. An extrafollicular pathway for the generation of effector CD8(+) T cells driven by the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-12.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suhagi; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Rivera, Amariliz; Yap, George S

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-12 drives the generation of terminally differentiated KLRG1(+) effector CD8(+) T cells. Using a Toxoplasma vaccination model, we delineate the sequence of events that naïve CD8(+) T cells undergo to become terminal effectors and the differentiation steps controlled by IL-12. We demonstrate that direct IL-12 signaling on CD8(+) T cells is essential for the induction of KLRG1 and IFN-γ, but the subsequent downregulation of CXCR3 is controlled by IL-12 indirectly through the actions of IFN-γ and IFN-γ-inducible chemokines. Differentiation of nascent effectors occurs in an extrafollicular splenic compartment and is driven by late IL-12 production by DCs distinct from the classical CD8α(+) DC. Unexpectedly, we also found extensive proliferation of both KLRG1(-) and KLRG1(+) CD8(+) T cells in the marginal zone and red pulp, which ceases prior to the final KLRG1(Hi) CXCR3(Lo) stage. Our findings highlight the notion of an extrafollicular pathway for effector T cell generation. PMID:26244629

  15. Effect of Zidovudine on the Primary Cytolytic T-Lymphocyte Response and T-Cell Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Sabine; Orosz, Charles G.; Hayes, Kathleen A.; Mathes, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Azidothymidine (AZT) and other nucleoside analogues, used to treat AIDS, can cause severe clinical side effects and are suspected of suppressing immune cell proliferation and effector immune cell function. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively measure the effects of AZT on cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) priming and to determine if the major histocompatibility complex-restricted CTL killing was affected by AZT exposure. For this purpose, we employed a murine alloantigen model and limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) to estimate cytotoxic effector cell frequencies of alloreactive splenocytes treated with drug during antigen sensitization. This noninfectious model was chosen to avoid analysis of a virus-compromised immune system. Exposure of splenocytes to therapeutic concentrations of AZT (2 to 10 μM) caused a two- to threefold dose-dependent reduction in CLT precursor frequency. This reduction was caused by decreased proliferation of alloantigen-specific CTLs rather than loss of function, because full cytolytic function could be restored by adjusting the AZT-treated effector/target cell ratios to that of untreated cells. In addition, when AZT was added to the assay system at various times during antigen sensitization there was a time-related loss of the suppressive effect on the generation of cytolytic effector function, suggesting that functional CTLs are not affected by even high doses of AZT. Taken together, the data indicate that the reduction of CTL function associated with AZT treatment is due to a quantitative decrease of effector cell precursor frequency rather than to direct drug cytotoxicity or interference with mediation of cytolysis. Furthermore, antigen-naive immune cells were most sensitive to this effect during the first few days following antigen encounter. PMID:10858351

  16. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, Jeffrey O.; You, Dahui; Michaud, Danielle R.; Guzmán Pruneda, Francisco A.; Leiva Juarez, Miguel M.; Zhang, Jiexin; Weill, Patrick M.; Adachi, Roberto; Gong, Lei; Moghaddam, Seyed; Poynter, Matthew E.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are a leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs’ intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of Toll-like receptor signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  17. Milk-derived GM(3) and GD(3) differentially inhibit dendritic cell maturation and effector functionalities.

    PubMed

    Brønnum, H; Seested, T; Hellgren, L I; Brix, S; Frøkiaer, H

    2005-06-01

    Gangliosides are complex glycosphingolipids, which exert immune-modulating effects on various cell types. Ganglioside GD(3) and GM(3) are the predominant gangliosides of human breast milk but during the early phase of lactation, the content of GD(3) decreases while GM(3) increases. The biological value of gangliosides in breast milk has yet to be elucidated but when milk is ingested, dietary gangliosides might conceptually affect immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we address the in vitro effect of GD(3) and GM(3) on DC effector functionalities. Treatment of bone marrow-derived DCs with GD(3) before lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation decreased the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha as well as reduced the alloreactivity in mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). In contrast, only IL-10 and IL-12 productions were significantly inhibited by GM(3,) and the potency of DCs to activate CD4(+) cells in MLR was unaffected by GM(3). However, both gangliosides suppressed expression of CD40, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II on DCs. Because GD(3) overall inhibits DC functionalities more than GM(3), the immune modulating effect of the ganglioside fraction of breast milk might be more prominent in the commencement of lactation during which the milk contains the most GD(3). PMID:15963050

  18. Functional involvement of Noc2, a Rab27 effector, in rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akane; Yoshie, Sumio; Nashida, Tomoko; Shimomura, Hiromi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2006-11-15

    Noc2 has recently been proposed to regulate exocytosis in both endocrine and exocrine cells; however, protein expression, subcellular localization and function of Noc2 in exocrine cells have never been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether Noc2, a Rab27 effector, is involved in isoproterenol (IPR)-stimulated amylase release from acinar cells. Rab27 was detected in the apical plasma membrane (APM) and secretory granule membrane (SGM) fractions, and was translocated to the APM after IPR stimulation for 5 min, but was detected at lower levels in the APM after 30 min. In contrast, although Noc2 was expressed in SGM bound to Rab27, Noc2 was not translocated to APM and the Noc2/Rab27 complex was disrupted after stimulation with IPR for short time. In addition, the anti-Noc2-Rab-binding-domain antibody inhibited IPR-stimulated amylase release from streptolysin O-permeabilized parotid acinar cells. Our results suggest that the Noc2/Rab27 complex is an important constituent of the early stages of IPR-stimulated amylase release. PMID:17067543

  19. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, J O; You, D; Michaud, D R; Pruneda, F A Guzmán; Juarez, M M Leiva; Zhang, J; Weill, P M; Adachi, R; Gong, L; Moghaddam, S J; Poynter, M E; Tuvim, M J; Evans, S E

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are the leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs' intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild-type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of TLR signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  20. Standardizing Flow Cytometry Immunophenotyping Analysis from the Human ImmunoPhenotyping Consortium.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; Langweiler, Marc; Jaimes, Maria; Malek, Mehrnoush; Taghiyar, Jafar; Korin, Yael; Raddassi, Khadir; Devine, Lesley; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Pekalski, Marcin L; Pontikos, Nikolas; Diaz, Alain; Heck, Susanne; Villanova, Federica; Terrazzini, Nadia; Kern, Florian; Qian, Yu; Stanton, Rick; Wang, Kui; Brandes, Aaron; Ramey, John; Aghaeepour, Nima; Mosmann, Tim; Scheuermann, Richard H; Reed, Elaine; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Nestle, Frank; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Brinkman, Ryan Remy; Gottardo, Raphael; Maecker, Holden; McCoy, J Philip

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of immunophenotyping requires careful attention to reagents, sample handling, instrument setup, and data analysis, and is essential for successful cross-study and cross-center comparison of data. Experts developed five standardized, eight-color panels for identification of major immune cell subsets in peripheral blood. These were produced as pre-configured, lyophilized, reagents in 96-well plates. We present the results of a coordinated analysis of samples across nine laboratories using these panels with standardized operating procedures (SOPs). Manual gating was performed by each site and by a central site. Automated gating algorithms were developed and tested by the FlowCAP consortium. Centralized manual gating can reduce cross-center variability, and we sought to determine whether automated methods could streamline and standardize the analysis. Within-site variability was low in all experiments, but cross-site variability was lower when central analysis was performed in comparison with site-specific analysis. It was also lower for clearly defined cell subsets than those based on dim markers and for rare populations. Automated gating was able to match the performance of central manual analysis for all tested panels, exhibiting little to no bias and comparable variability. Standardized staining, data collection, and automated gating can increase power, reduce variability, and streamline analysis for immunophenotyping. PMID:26861911

  1. Standardizing Flow Cytometry Immunophenotyping Analysis from the Human ImmunoPhenotyping Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Finak, Greg; Langweiler, Marc; Jaimes, Maria; Malek, Mehrnoush; Taghiyar, Jafar; Korin, Yael; Raddassi, Khadir; Devine, Lesley; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Pontikos, Nikolas; Diaz, Alain; Heck, Susanne; Villanova, Federica; Terrazzini, Nadia; Kern, Florian; Qian, Yu; Stanton, Rick; Wang, Kui; Brandes, Aaron; Ramey, John; Aghaeepour, Nima; Mosmann, Tim; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Reed, Elaine; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia; Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Nestle, Frank; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Brinkman, Ryan Remy; Gottardo, Raphael; Maecker, Holden; McCoy, J Philip

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of immunophenotyping requires careful attention to reagents, sample handling, instrument setup, and data analysis, and is essential for successful cross-study and cross-center comparison of data. Experts developed five standardized, eight-color panels for identification of major immune cell subsets in peripheral blood. These were produced as pre-configured, lyophilized, reagents in 96-well plates. We present the results of a coordinated analysis of samples across nine laboratories using these panels with standardized operating procedures (SOPs). Manual gating was performed by each site and by a central site. Automated gating algorithms were developed and tested by the FlowCAP consortium. Centralized manual gating can reduce cross-center variability, and we sought to determine whether automated methods could streamline and standardize the analysis. Within-site variability was low in all experiments, but cross-site variability was lower when central analysis was performed in comparison with site-specific analysis. It was also lower for clearly defined cell subsets than those based on dim markers and for rare populations. Automated gating was able to match the performance of central manual analysis for all tested panels, exhibiting little to no bias and comparable variability. Standardized staining, data collection, and automated gating can increase power, reduce variability, and streamline analysis for immunophenotyping. PMID:26861911

  2. Instant recall: a key role for effector-phenotype CD8⁺ memory T cells in immune protection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew A

    2013-06-27

    In this issue of Immunity, Olson et al. (2013) demonstrate that circulating CD8⁺ memory T cells with an effector-like phenotype, previously thought to be mostly senescent, provide robust protection from a secondary pathogen challenge despite their poor secondary proliferative response. PMID:23809159

  3. IER3 Promotes Expansion of Adipose Progenitor Cells in Response to Changes in Distinct Microenvironmental Effectors.

    PubMed

    Ravaud, Christophe; Esteve, David; Villageois, Phi; Bouloumie, Anne; Dani, Christian; Ladoux, Annie

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue expansion is well-orchestrated to fulfill the energy demand. It results from adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia due to adipose progenitor cell (APC) expansion and differentiation. Chronic low grade inflammation and hypoxia take place in obese adipose tissue microenvironment. Both of these events were shown to impact the APC pool by promoting increased self-renewal along with a decrease in the APC differentiation potential. However, no common target has been identified so far. Here we show that the immediate early response 3 gene (IER3) is preferentially expressed in APCs and is essential for APC proliferation and self-renewal. Experiments based on RNA interference revealed that impairing IER3 expression altered cell proliferation through ERK1/2 phosphorylation and clonogenicity. IER3 expression was induced by Activin A, which plays a crucial role in adipocyte differentiation as well as by a decrease in oxygen tension through HIF1-induced transcriptional activation. Interestingly, high levels of IER3 were detected in native APCs (CD34+/CD31- cells) isolated from obese patients and conditioned media from obese adipose tissue-macrophages stimulated its expression. Overall, these results indicate that IER3 is a key player in expanding the pool of APC while highlighting the role of distinct effectors found in an obese microenvironment in this process. PMID:25827082

  4. A direct inhibitory role for the Rab3-specific effector, Noc2, in Ca2+-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Haynes, L P; Evans, G J; Morgan, A; Burgoyne, R D

    2001-03-30

    Rab proteins comprise a family of GTPases, conserved from yeast to mammals, which are integral components of membrane trafficking pathways. Rab3A is a neural/neuroendocrine-specific member of the Rab family involved in Ca(2+) -regulated exocytosis, where it functions in an inhibitory capacity controlling recruitment of secretory vesicles into a releasable pool at the plasma membrane. The effector by which Rab3A exerts its inhibitory effect is unclear as the Rab3A effectors Rabphilin and RIM have been excluded from for this role. One putative Rab3A effector in dense-core granule exocytosis is the cytosolic zinc finger protein, Noc2. We have established that overexpression of Noc2 in PC12 cells has a direct inhibitory effect upon Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis in permeabilized cells. We demonstrate specific nucleotide-dependent binding of Noc2 to Rab3A and show that the inhibition of exocytosis is dependent upon this interaction since Rab3A binding-deficient mutants of Noc2 do not inhibit exocytosis. We propose that Noc2 may be a negative effector for Rab3A in regulated exocytosis of dense-core granules from endocrine cells. PMID:11134008

  5. Specificity and Dynamics of Effector and Memory CD8 T Cell Responses in Human Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Pakalniene, Jolita; Dailidyte, Laura; Béziat, Vivien; Lampen, Margit H.; Klingström, Jonas; Lagerqvist, Nina; Kjerstadius, Torbjörn; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Lindquist, Lars; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Sandberg, Johan K.; Mickiene, Aukse; Gredmark-Russ, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is transferred to humans by ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) with symptoms such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. About one third of the patients suffer from long-lasting sequelae after clearance of the infection. Studies of the immune response during TBEV-infection are essential to the understanding of host responses to TBEV-infection and for the development of therapeutics. Here, we studied in detail the primary CD8 T cell response to TBEV in patients with acute TBE. Peripheral blood CD8 T cells mounted a considerable response to TBEV-infection as assessed by Ki67 and CD38 co-expression. These activated cells showed a CD45RA-CCR7-CD127- phenotype at day 7 after hospitalization, phenotypically defining them as effector cells. An immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted TBEV epitope was identified and utilized to study the characteristics and temporal dynamics of the antigen-specific response. The functional profile of TBEV-specific CD8 T cells was dominated by variants of mono-functional cells as the effector response matured. Antigen-specific CD8 T cells predominantly displayed a distinct Eomes+Ki67+T-bet+ effector phenotype at the peak of the response, which transitioned to an Eomes-Ki67-T-bet+ phenotype as the infection resolved and memory was established. These transcription factors thus characterize and discriminate stages of the antigen-specific T cell response during acute TBEV-infection. Altogether, CD8 T cells responded strongly to acute TBEV infection and passed through an effector phase, prior to gradual differentiation into memory cells with distinct transcription factor expression-patterns throughout the different phases. PMID:25611738

  6. Single-cell quantification of IL-2 response by effector and regulatory T cells reveals critical plasticity in immune response

    PubMed Central

    Feinerman, Ofer; Jentsch, Garrit; Tkach, Karen E; Coward, Jesse W; Hathorn, Matthew M; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry; Smith, Kendall A; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how the immune system decides between tolerance and activation by antigens requires addressing cytokine regulation as a highly dynamic process. We quantified the dynamics of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in a population of T cells during an immune response by combining in silico modeling and single-cell measurements in vitro. We demonstrate that IL-2 receptor expression levels vary widely among T cells creating a large variability in the ability of the individual cells to consume, produce and participate in IL-2 signaling within the population. Our model reveals that at the population level, these heterogeneous cells are engaged in a tug-of-war for IL-2 between regulatory (Treg) and effector (Teff) T cells, whereby access to IL-2 can either increase the survival of Teff cells or the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. This tug-of-war is the mechanism enforcing, at the systems level, a core function of Treg cells, namely the specific suppression of survival signals for weakly activated Teff cells but not for strongly activated cells. Our integrated model yields quantitative, experimentally validated predictions for the manipulation of Treg suppression. PMID:21119631

  7. MicroRNA-181a/b-1 Is Not Required for Innate γδ NKT Effector Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Inga; Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Oberdörfer, Linda; Witzlau, Katrin; Krueger, Andreas; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Thymic development of αβ T lymphocytes into invariant natural killer (NK) T cells depends on their selection via agonistic lipid antigen presented by CD1d. If successful, newly selected NKT cells gain effector functions already in the thymus. Some γδ T cell subsets also acquire effector functions in the thymus. However, it is not clear whether agonistic TCR stimulation is involved in thymic γδ T cell selection and development. Here we combine two genetic models to address this question. MiR-181a/b-1-/-mice, which show impaired agonistic T cell selection of invariant αβ NKT cells, were crossed to Tcrd-H2BeGFP reporter mice to monitor selection, intra-thymic expansion and differentiation of γδ T cells. We found that miR-181a/b-1-deficiency had no effect on numbers of thymic γδ T cell or on their differentiation towards an IL-17- or IFN-γ-producing effector phenotype. Also, the composition of peripheral lymph node γδ T cells was not affected by miR-181a/b-1-deficiency. Dendritic epidermal γδ T cells were normally present in knock-out animals. However, we observed elevated frequencies and numbers of γδ NKT cells in the liver, possibly because γδ NKT cells can expand and replace missing αβ NKT cells in peripheral niches. In summary, we investigated the role of miR-181a/b-1 for selection, intrathymic development and homeostasis of γδ T cells. We conclude that miR-181a/b-1-dependent modulation of T cell selection is not critically required for innate development of γδ NKT cells or of any other γδ T cell subtypes. PMID:26673421

  8. MicroRNA-181a/b-1 Is Not Required for Innate γδ NKT Effector Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Inga; Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Oberdörfer, Linda; Witzlau, Katrin; Krueger, Andreas; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Thymic development of αβ T lymphocytes into invariant natural killer (NK) T cells depends on their selection via agonistic lipid antigen presented by CD1d. If successful, newly selected NKT cells gain effector functions already in the thymus. Some γδ T cell subsets also acquire effector functions in the thymus. However, it is not clear whether agonistic TCR stimulation is involved in thymic γδ T cell selection and development. Here we combine two genetic models to address this question. MiR-181a/b-1–/–mice, which show impaired agonistic T cell selection of invariant αβ NKT cells, were crossed to Tcrd-H2BeGFP reporter mice to monitor selection, intra-thymic expansion and differentiation of γδ T cells. We found that miR-181a/b-1-deficiency had no effect on numbers of thymic γδ T cell or on their differentiation towards an IL-17- or IFN-γ-producing effector phenotype. Also, the composition of peripheral lymph node γδ T cells was not affected by miR-181a/b-1-deficiency. Dendritic epidermal γδ T cells were normally present in knock-out animals. However, we observed elevated frequencies and numbers of γδ NKT cells in the liver, possibly because γδ NKT cells can expand and replace missing αβ NKT cells in peripheral niches. In summary, we investigated the role of miR-181a/b-1 for selection, intrathymic development and homeostasis of γδ T cells. We conclude that miR-181a/b-1-dependent modulation of T cell selection is not critically required for innate development of γδ NKT cells or of any other γδ T cell subtypes. PMID:26673421

  9. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  10. Transcriptional repressor ZEB2 promotes terminal differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cell populations during infection

    PubMed Central

    Omilusik, Kyla D.; Best, J. Adam; Yu, Bingfei; Goossens, Steven; Weidemann, Alexander; Nguyen, Jessica V.; Seuntjens, Eve; Stryjewska, Agata; Zweier, Christiane; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Gattinoni, Luca; Bird, Lynne M.; Higashi, Yujiro; Kondoh, Hisato; Huylebroeck, Danny; Haigh, Jody

    2015-01-01

    ZEB2 is a multi-zinc-finger transcription factor known to play a significant role in early neurogenesis and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition–dependent tumor metastasis. Although the function of ZEB2 in T lymphocytes is unknown, activity of the closely related family member ZEB1 has been implicated in lymphocyte development. Here, we find that ZEB2 expression is up-regulated by activated T cells, specifically in the KLRG1hi effector CD8+ T cell subset. Loss of ZEB2 expression results in a significant loss of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells after primary and secondary infection with a severe impairment in the generation of the KLRG1hi effector memory cell population. We show that ZEB2, which can bind DNA at tandem, consensus E-box sites, regulates gene expression of several E-protein targets and may directly repress Il7r and Il2 in CD8+ T cells responding to infection. Furthermore, we find that T-bet binds to highly conserved T-box sites in the Zeb2 gene and that T-bet and ZEB2 regulate similar gene expression programs in effector T cells, suggesting that T-bet acts upstream and through regulation of ZEB2. Collectively, we place ZEB2 in a larger transcriptional network that is responsible for the balance between terminal differentiation and formation of memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26503445

  11. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-08-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1-4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1-4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  12. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1–4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1–4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  13. Cytomegalovirus infection impairs immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effector functions of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Roland; Heseler, Kathrin; Nau, Julia; Schmidt, Silvia Kathrin; Leineweber, Margret; Pudelko, Sabine; Wenning, Johannes; Zimmermann, Albert; Hengel, Hartmut; Sinzger, Christian; Degistirici, Özer; Sorg, Rüdiger Volker; Däubener, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) possess immunosuppressive and antimicrobial effects that are partly mediated by the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Therefore MSC represent a promising novel cellular immunosuppressant which has the potential to control steroid-refractory acute graft versus host disease (GvHD). In addition, MSC are capable of reducing the risk of infection in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HST). Recent data indicate that signals from the microenvironment including those from microbes may modulate MSC effector functions. As Cytomegalovirus (CMV) represents a prominent pathogen in immunocompromised hosts, especially in patients following HST, we investigated the impact of CMV infection on MSC-mediated effects on the immune system. We demonstrate that CMV-infected MSC lose their cytokine-induced immunosuppressive capacity and are no longer able to restrict microbial growth. IDO expression is substantially impaired following CMV infection of MSC and this interaction critically depends on intact virus and the number of MSC as well as the viral load. Since overt CMV infection may undermine the clinical efficacy of MSC in the treatment of GvHD in transplant patients, we recommend that patients scheduled for MSC therapy should undergo thorough evaluation for an active CMV infection and receive CMV-directed antiviral therapy prior to the administration of MSC. PMID:24782599

  14. MIWI2 as an Effector of DNA Methylation and Gene Silencing in Embryonic Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima-Kita, Kanako; Kuramochi-Miyagawa, Satomi; Nagamori, Ippei; Ogonuki, Narumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Akazawa, Takashi; Inoue, Norimitsu; Nakano, Toru

    2016-09-13

    During the development of mammalian embryonic germ cells, global demethylation and de novo DNA methylation take place. In mouse embryonic germ cells, two PIWI family proteins, MILI and MIWI2, are essential for the de novo DNA methylation of retrotransposons, presumably through PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Although piRNA-associated MIWI2 has been reported to play critical roles in the process, its molecular mechanisms have remained unclear. To identify the mechanism, transgenic mice were produced; they contained a fusion protein of MIWI2 and a zinc finger (ZF) that recognized the promoter region of a type A LINE-1 gene. The ZF-MIWI2 fusion protein brought about DNA methylation, suppression of the type A LINE-1 gene, and a partial rescue of the impaired spermatogenesis of MILI-null mice. In addition, ZF-MIWI2 was associated with the proteins involved in DNA methylation. These data indicate that MIWI2 functions as an effector of de novo DNA methylation of the retrotransposon. PMID:27626653

  15. Acquisition of CD30 and CD15 accompanied with simultaneous loss of all pan-T-cell antigens in a case of histological transformation of mycosis fungoides with involvement of regional lymph node: an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Deepti M; Sebastian, Siby; Wang, Endi

    2015-03-01

    : Acquired expression of CD30 is frequently noted in histological transformation of mycosis fungoides (MF), but simultaneous gain of CD15 accompanied with loss of pan-T-cell antigens are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of transformed MF with such an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient was an 81-year-old male with MF, who was initially treated with topical steroids and phototherapy. Despite the initial response, the patient developed a tumor-like skin lesion that was confirmed to be CD30-positive large T-cell lymphoma and was subsequently found to have a regional lymph node involvement by pleomorphic large cell lymphoma. Besides CD30, pleomorphic large cells were positive for CD15 but negative for all B cell- and T cell-specific antigens. Epstein-Barr virus was negative. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor gamma gene but detected no B-cell clone. The mechanism and clinical significance of this phenotypic conversion remains to be elucidated. PMID:23612034

  16. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: II--Is diabetes a central or peripheral disorder of effector and regulatory cells?

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-02-01

    Two competing hypotheses aiming to explain the onset of autoimmune reactions are discussed in the context of genetic and environmental predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The first hypothesis has evolved along characterization of the mechanisms of self-discrimination and attributes diabetic autoimmunity to escape of reactive T cells from central regulation in the thymus. The second considers frequent occurrence of autoimmune reactions within the immune homunculus, which are adequately suppressed by regulatory T cells originating from the thymus, and occasionally, insufficient suppression results in autoimmunity. Besides thymic dysfunction, deregulation of both effector and suppressor cells can in fact result from homeostatic aberrations at the peripheral level during initial stages of evolution of adaptive immunity. Pathogenic cells sensitized in the islets are efficiently expanded in the target tissue and pancreatic lymph nodes of lymphopenic neonates. In parallel, the same mechanisms of peripheral sensitization contribute to tolerization through education of naïve/effector T cells and expansion of regulatory T cells. Experimental evidence presented for each individual mechanism implies that T1D may result from a primary effector or suppressor immune abnormality. Disturbed self-tolerance leading to T1D may well result from peripheral deregulation of innate and adaptive immunity, with variable contribution of central thymic dysfunction. PMID:26482052

  17. CELL BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Imaging the organization and trafficking of lipolytic effectors in adipocytes1,2

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, J. G.; Kimler, V. A.; Moore, H.-P. H.

    2013-01-01

    The storage and mobilization of lipid energy are central functions of adipocytes. Lipid energy is stored as triglyceride in lipid droplet structures that are now recognized as bona fide organelles and whose functions are greatly influenced by members of the perilipin family of lipid droplet scaffolds. Recent work indicates that the signaling events underlying fatty acid mobilization involve protein trafficking to a specialized subset of lipid droplets. Furthermore, the core lipolytic machinery is composed of evolutionarily conserved proteins whose functions are conserved in avian and mammalian production species. Lipolysis affects many aspects of animal nutrition and physiology, which can have an important influence on growth efficiency, lactation, and meat quality. This review focuses on recent research that addresses the organization and trafficking of key players in hormone-stimulated lipolysis, and the central role of perilipin1A in adipocyte lipolysis. The review emphasizes recent work from the laboratories of the authors that utilizes imaging techniques to explore the organization and interactions among lipolytic effectors in live cells during lipolytic activation. A mechanistic understanding of lipolysis may lead to new strategies for promoting human and animal health. PMID:20852075

  18. Immunization with genetically attenuated P52-deficient Plasmodium berghei sporozoites induces a long-lasting effector memory CD8+ T cell response in the liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The induction of sterile immunity and long lasting protection against malaria has been effectively achieved by immunization with sporozoites attenuated by gamma-irradiation or through deletion of genes. For mice immunized with radiation attenuated sporozoites (RAS) it has been shown that intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells are critical for protection. Recent studies have shown that immunization with genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) in mice is also conferred by liver effector memory CD8+ T cells. Findings In this study we analysed effector memory cell responses after immunization of GAP that lack the P52 protein. We demonstrate that immunization with p52-GAP sporozoites also results in a strong increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells, even 6 months after immunization, whereas no specific CD4+ effector T cells response could be detected. In addition, we show that the increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells is specific for the liver and not for the spleen or lymph nodes. Conclusions These results indicate that immunization of mice with P. berghei p52-GAP results in immune responses that are comparable to those induced by RAS or GAP lacking expression of UIS3 or UIS4, with an important role implicated for intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells. The knowledge of the mediators of protective immunity after immunization with different GAP is important for the further development of vaccines consisting of genetically attenuated sporozoites. PMID:22004696

  19. Toxicity and immunomodulatory activity of liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids toward immune effector cells.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-23

    Liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids (cationic liposomes) and fusogenic dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have potential for modulating the immune system by delivering gene or antisense oligonucleotide inside immune cells. The toxicity and the immunoadjuvant activity of cationic liposomes containing nucleic acids toward immune effector cells has not been investigated in detail. In this report, we have evaluated the toxicity of liposomes formulated with various cationic lipids towards murine macrophages and T lymphocytes and the human monocyte-like U937 cell line. The effect of these cationic liposomes on the synthesis of two immunomodulators produced by activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), has also been determined. We have found that liposomes formulated from DOPE and cationic lipids based on diacyltrimethylammonium propane (dioleoyl-, dimyristoyl-, dipalmitoyl-, disteroyl-: DOTAP, DMTAP, DPTAP, DSTAP) or dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) are highly toxic in vitro toward phagocytic cells (macrophages and U937 cells), but not towards non-phagocytic T lymphocytes. The rank order of toxicity was DOPE/DDAB > DOPE/DOTAP > DOPE/DMTAP > DOPE/DPTAP > DOPE/DSTAP. The ED50's for macrophage toxicity were < 10 nmol/ml for DOPE/DDAB, 12 nmol/ml for DOPE/DOTAP, 50 nmol/ml for DOPE/DMTAP, 400 nmol/ml for DOPE/DPTAP and > 1000 nmol/ml for DOPE/DSTAP. The incorporation of DNA (antisense oligonucleotide or plasmid vector) into the cationic liposomes marginally reduced their toxicity towards macrophages. Although toxicity was observed with cationic lipids alone, it was clearly enhanced by the presence of DOPE. The replacement of DOPE by dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) significantly reduced liposome toxicity towards macrophages, and the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-PEG2000 (DPPE-PEG2000: 10 mol%) in the liposomes completely abolished this toxicity. Cationic liposomes, irrespective of

  20. Neonatal susceptibility to MHV3 infection in mice. II. Role of natural effector marrow cells in transfer of resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Tardieu, M.; H'ery, C.; Dupuy, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Protection of newborn mice against MHV3 infection requires the transfer of several cell populations originating from adult syngeneic donors: adherent spleen cells, T lymphocytes, and a third population present in the nonadherent spleen cell fraction, in peritoneal exudates, and in bone marrow cells (M cells). M cells were found to be sensitive to short-term incubation at 37 degrees C and to preincubation with anti-bone marrow antiserum, mitomycin C, puromycin, and aggregated Ig, the latter suggesting the presence of Fc receptors. They were resistant to silica particles but were sensitive to irradiation with x-rays as well as with 89Strontium. Nonadherent spleen cells, however, behaved differently from M cells toward x-irradiation since they were radio-resistant, suggesting that M cells are precursors that require further differentiation or division to participate in MHV3 resistance. Effector M cells responsible for MHV3 resistance display, therefore, some similarities with natural killing cells. They might belong to a group of effector cells operative in regulatory processes or anti-tumor surveillance but also may be defense mechanisms against infectious diseases.

  1. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27215229

  2. The T6SSs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1 and Their Effectors: Beyond Bacterial-Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Thibault G.; Berni, Benjamin; Bleves, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for many diseases such as chronic lung colonization in cystic fibrosis patients and acute infections in hospitals. The capacity of P. aeruginosa to be pathogenic toward several hosts is notably due to different secretion systems. Amongst them, P. aeruginosa encodes three Type Six Secretion Systems (T6SS), named H1- to H3-T6SS, that act against either prokaryotes and/or eukaryotic cells. They are independent from each other and inject diverse toxins that interact with different components in the host cell. Here we summarize the roles of these T6SSs in the PAO1 strain, as well as the toxins injected and their targets. While H1-T6SS is only involved in antiprokaryotic activity through at least seven different toxins, H2-T6SS and H3-T6SS are also able to target prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic cells. Moreover, recent studies proposed that H2- and H3-T6SS have a role in epithelial cells invasion by injecting at least three different toxins. The diversity of T6SS effectors is astounding and other effectors still remain to be discovered. In this review, we present a table with other putative P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 T6SS-dependent effectors. Altogether, the T6SSs of P. aeruginosa are important systems that help fight other bacteria for their ecological niche, and are important in the pathogenicity process. PMID:27376031

  3. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  4. Interleukin-15 Dendritic Cells Harness NK Cell Cytotoxic Effector Function in a Contact- and IL-15-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan; Willemen, Yannick; Goossens, Herman; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.; Smits, Evelien L.; Berneman, Zwi N.; Lion, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of natural killer (NK) cells to the treatment efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines is being increasingly recognized. Much current efforts to optimize this form of immunotherapy are therefore geared towards harnessing the NK cell-stimulatory ability of DCs. In this study, we investigated whether generation of human monocyte-derived DCs with interleukin (IL)-15 followed by activation with a Toll-like receptor stimulus endows these DCs, commonly referred to as “IL-15 DCs”, with the capacity to stimulate NK cells. In a head-to-head comparison with “IL-4 DCs” used routinely for clinical studies, IL-15 DCs were found to induce a more activated, cytotoxic effector phenotype in NK cells, in particular in the CD56bright NK cell subset. With the exception of GM-CSF, no significant enhancement of cytokine/chemokine secretion was observed following co-culture of NK cells with IL-15 DCs. IL-15 DCs, but not IL-4 DCs, promoted NK cell tumoricidal activity towards both NK-sensitive and NK-resistant targets. This effect was found to require cell-to-cell contact and to be mediated by DC surface-bound IL-15. This study shows that DCs can express a membrane-bound form of IL-15 through which they enhance NK cell cytotoxic function. The observed lack of membrane-bound IL-15 on “gold-standard” IL-4 DCs and their consequent inability to effectively promote NK cell cytotoxicity may have important implications for the future design of DC-based cancer vaccine studies. PMID:25951230

  5. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  6. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  7. Signal 3 determines tolerance versus full activation of naive CD8 T cells: dissociating proliferation and development of effector function.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, Julie M; Lins, Debra C; Mescher, Matthew F

    2003-05-01

    Activation of naive CD8 T cells to undergo clonal expansion and develop effector function requires three signals: (a) Ag, (b) costimulation, and (c) IL-12 or adjuvant. The requirement for the third signal to stimulate Ag-dependent proliferation is variable, making the greatest contribution when Ag levels are low. At high Ag levels, extensive proliferation can occur in vitro or in vivo in the absence of a third signal. However, despite having undergone the same number of divisions, cells that expand in the absence of a third signal fail to develop cytolytic effector function. Thus, proliferation and development of cytolytic function can be fully uncoupled. Furthermore, these cells are rendered functionally tolerant in vivo, in that subsequent restimulation with a potent stimulus results in limited clonal expansion, impaired IFN-gamma production, and no cytolytic function. Thus, the presence or absence of the third signal appears to be a critical variable in determining whether stimulation by Ag results in tolerance versus development of effector function and establishment of a responsive memory population. PMID:12732656

  8. ICOS Promotes the Function of CD4+ Effector T Cells during Anti-OX40-Mediated Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Todd C; Long, Hua; Potluri, Shobha; Pertel, Thomas; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L; Lin, John C; Fu, Tihui; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Feldman, Reid M R

    2016-07-01

    ICOS is a T-cell coregulatory receptor that provides a costimulatory signal to T cells during antigen-mediated activation. Antitumor immunity can be improved by ICOS-targeting therapies, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we define the role of ICOS signaling in antitumor immunity using a blocking, nondepleting antibody against ICOS ligand (ICOS-L). ICOS signaling provided critical support for the effector function of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells during anti-OX40-driven tumor immune responses. By itself, ICOS-L blockade reduced accumulation of intratumoral T regulatory cells (Treg), but it was insufficient to substantially inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it did not impede antitumor responses mediated by anti-4-1BB-driven CD8(+) T cells. We found that anti-OX40 efficacy, which is based on Treg depletion and to a large degree on CD4(+) effector T cell (Teff) responses, was impaired with ICOS-L blockade. In contrast, the provision of additional ICOS signaling through direct ICOS-L expression by tumor cells enhanced tumor rejection and survival when administered along with anti-OX40 therapy. Taken together, our results showed that ICOS signaling during antitumor responses acts on both Teff and Treg cells, which have opposing roles in promoting immune activation. Thus, effective therapies targeting the ICOS pathway should seek to promote ICOS signaling specifically in effector CD4(+) T cells by combining ICOS agonism and Treg depletion. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3684-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197182

  9. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cassandra C; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C; Abrams, Zachary B; Lee, Robert J; Carson, William E

    2016-08-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is overexpressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is overexpressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and a negative control, respectively. FR-positive and FR-negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G in the presence or absence of cytokines to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells increased following treatment with F-IgG compared with control immunoglobulin G at all effector : target (E : T) ratios (P<0.01). This trend further increased by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12. NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was also significantly increased in response to costimulation with interleukin-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells compared with controls (P<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells, which can be further increased by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  10. The regulatory T cell effector soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 induces tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zitong; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Long; Zhao, Tian; Hu, Linkun; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-02-01

    Acute rejection (AR) hinders renal allograft survival. Tubular epithelial cell (TEC) apoptosis contributes to premature graft loss in AR, while the mechanism remains unclear. Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sFGL2), a novel effector of regulatory T cells (Treg), induces apoptosis to mediate tissue injury. We previously found that serum sFGL2 significantly increased in renal allograft rejection patients. In this study, the role of sFGL2 in AR was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. The serum level of sFGL2 and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg in the peripheral blood were measured in renal allograft recipients with AR or stable renal function (n = 30 per group). The human TEC was stimulated with sFGL2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or phosphate buffered saline and investigated for apoptosis in vitro. Apoptosis-associated genes expression in TEC was further assessed. Approval for this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Fudan University. Our results showed that the serum level of sFGL2, correlated with Treg in the peripheral blood, was significantly increased in the AR patients. In vitro, sFGL2 remarkably induced TEC apoptosis, with a significant up-regulation of proapoptotic genes, including CASP-3, CASP-8, CASP-9, CASP-10, TRADD, TNFSF10, FADD, FAS, FASLG, BAK1, BAD, BAX, and NF-KB1. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression of antiapoptotic genes, including CARD-18, NAIP, BCL2, IKBKB, and TBK1. Therefore, sFGL2, an effector of Treg, induces TEC apoptosis. Our study suggests that sFGL2 is a potential mediator in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection and provides novel insights into the role of Treg in AR. PMID:24414480

  11. Immunogenic, but Not Steady-State, Antigen Presentation Permits Regulatory T-Cells To Control CD8+ T-Cell Effector Differentiation by IL-2 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Alice; McNally, Michael; Galea, Ryan; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of IL-2 is one proposed mechanism of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Direct in vivo experimental evidence for this has recently been obtained. While modulation of IL-2 bioavailability controls CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation under strongly immunogenic conditions it is not known whether Treg modulate CD8+ T cell responses through this mechanism under steady-state conditions. Here we assess this using a mouse model in which dendritic cells (DC) are manipulated to present cognate antigen to CD8+ T cells either in the steady-state or after activation. Our observations show that Treg exert a check on expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells under strongly immunogenic conditions associated with TLR ligand activation of DC, and this is mediated by limiting IL-2 availability. In contrast, when DC remain unactivated, depletion of Treg has little apparent effect on effector differentiation or IL-2 homeostasis. We conclude that while modulation of IL-2 homeostasis is an important mechanism through which Treg control CD8+ effector differentiation under immunogenic conditions, this mechanism plays little role in modulating CD8+ T-cell differentiation under steady-state conditions. PMID:24454872

  12. CD4 T cells with effector memory phenotype and function develop in the sterile environment of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Mozeleski, Brian; Lemoine, Sebastien; Dériaud, Edith; Lim, Annick; Zhivaki, Dania; Azria, Elie; Le Ray, Camille; Roguet, Gwenaelle; Launay, Odile; Vanet, Anne; Leclerc, Claude; Lo-Man, Richard

    2014-05-28

    The T cell compartment is considered to be naïve and dedicated to the development of tolerance during fetal development. We have identified and characterized a population of fetally developed CD4 T cells with an effector memory phenotype (TEM), which are present in cord blood. This population is polyclonal and has phenotypic features similar to those of conventional adult memory T cells, such as CD45RO expression. These cells express low levels of CD25 but are distinct from regulatory T cells because they lack Foxp3 expression. After T cell receptor activation, neonatal TEM cells readily produced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We also detected interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T helper 1 (TH1) cells and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/IL-13-producing TH2-like cells, but not IL-17-producing cells. We used chemokine receptor expression patterns to divide this TEM population into different subsets and identified distinct transcriptional programs using whole-genome microarray analysis. IFN-γ was found in CXCR3(+) TEM cells, whereas IL-4 was found in both CXCR3(+) TEM cells and CCR4(+) TEM cells. CCR6(+) TEM cells displayed a genetic signature that corresponded to TH17 cells but failed to produce IL-17A. However, the TH17 function of TEM cells was observed in the presence of IL-1β and IL-23. In summary, in the absence of reported pathology or any major infectious history, T cells with a memory-like phenotype develop in an environment thought to be sterile during fetal development and display a large variety of inflammatory effector functions associated with CD4 TH cells at birth. PMID:24871133

  13. Developmental Progression and Interrelationship of Central and Effector Regulatory T Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Kevin H; Yuan, Xiaomei; Yang, Jing; Dee, Michael J; Yu, Aixin; Malek, Thomas R

    2016-05-01

    Resting central Tregs (cTregs) and activated effector Tregs (eTregs) are required for self-tolerance, but the heterogeneity and relationships within and between phenotypically distinct subsets of cTregs and eTregs are poorly understood. By extensive immune profiling and deep sequencing of TCR-β V regions, two subsets of cTregs, based on expression of Ly-6C, and three subsets of eTregs, based on distinctive expression of CD62L, CD69, and CD103, were identified. Ly-6C(+) cTregs exhibited lower basal activation, expressed on average lower affinity TCRs, and less efficiently developed into eTregs when compared with Ly-6C(-) cTregs. The dominant TCR Vβs of Ly-6C(+) cTregs were shared by eTregs at a low frequency. A single TCR clonotype was also identified that was largely restricted to Ly-6C(+) cTregs, even under conditions that promoted the development of eTregs. Collectively, these findings indicate that some Ly-6C(+) cTregs may persist as a lymphoid-specific subset, with minimal potential to develop into highly activated eTregs, whereas other cTregs readily develop into eTregs. In contrast, subsets of CD62L(lo) eTregs showed higher clonal expansion and were more highly interrelated than cTreg subsets based on their TCR-β repertoires, but exhibited varied immune profiles. The CD62L(lo) CD69(-) CD103(-) eTreg subset displayed properties of a transitional intermediate between cTregs and more activated eTreg subsets. Thus, eTreg subsets appear to exhibit substantial flexibility, most likely in response to environmental cues, to adopt defined immune profiles that are expected to optimize suppression of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27009492

  14. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-01-01

    Background CCR10 and CCL27 are the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate migration and/or maintenance of skin T cells and suggested as therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. Objective We sought to determine expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Methods Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10-knockout/EGFP-knockin mice, we assessed expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens and auto-reactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10-knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. Results CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10-knockout mice, the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmamia infection in the skin. Conclusion CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:24767879

  15. An algorithm for leukaemia immunophenotype pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Petrovecki, M; Marusić, M; Dezelić, G

    1993-01-01

    Since leukaemia-specific leucocyte antigen has not been identified to date, the immunological diagnosis of leukaemia is achieved through the application of a wide set of monoclonal antibodies specific for surface markers on leukaemic cells. Thus, the interpretation of leukaemia immunophenotype seems to be a mathematically determined comparison of 'what we found' and 'what we know' about it. The objective of this study was to establish an algorithm for transformation of empirical rules into mathematical values to achieve proper decisions. Recognition of leukaemia phenotype was performed by comparison of phenotyping data with reference data, followed by scoring of such comparisons. Systematic scoring resulted in the formation of new numerical variables allocated to each state, whereas a most significant variable was described as a complex measure of compatibility. A system of recognized states was described by mathematical variables measuring the confidence of information systems, i.e. maximal, total and relative entropy. The entire algorithm was derived by matrix algebra and coded in a high-level program language. The list of the states recognized appeared to be especially helpful in differential diagnosis, occasionally pointing to states that had not been in the scientist's mind at the start of the analysis. PMID:8366688

  16. The Rab27 effector Rabphilin, unlike Granuphilin and Noc2, rapidly exchanges between secretory granules and cytosol in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Handley, Mark T W; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2008-08-22

    Rab proteins are GTPases that transit between GTP- and GDP-bound states. In the GTP-bound form they can recruit specific effector to membrane domains. It is possible that the exchange of Rab effectors between membranes and cytosol would be determined by the exchange of the particular Rab partner. We have compared the cycling of three Rab3/27 effectors, Granuphilin, Noc2, and Rabphilin, in PC12 cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of EGFP-tagged proteins. All three effectors become localised to secretory granules. Granuphilin and Noc2 showed little or no exchange between secretory granules and cytosol whereas Rabphilin showed rapid and complete exchange. Both Noc2 and Rabphilin were found to be recruited to granules by Rab27 but the data suggest that Rabphilin did not form stable complexes with Rab27 on secretory granules and so Rab effector cycling between membranes and cytosol can be independent of that of the Rab protein. PMID:18573236

  17. T Cell Receptor Sequencing Reveals the Clonal Diversity and Overlap of Colonic Effector and FOXP3+ T Cells in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lord, James; Chen, Janice; Thirlby, Richard C.; Sherwood, Anna M.; Carlson, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Tregs) prevent inflammation, but are paradoxically increased in ulcerative colitis (UC). Local T cell activation has been hypothesized to account for increased FOXP3 expression in colon lamina propria (LP) T cells. Methods To see if human FOXP3+ LP T cells are an activated fraction of otherwise FOXP3− effector T cells (Teff) and explore their clonal diversity in health and disease, we deep sequenced clonally unique T cell receptor (TCR) hypervariable regions of FOXP3+ and FOXP3− CD4+ T cell subpopulations from inflamed versus non-inflamed colon LP or mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of patients with or without UC. Results The clonal diversity of each LP T cell population was no different between patients with versus without UC. Repertoire overlap was only seen between a minority of FOXP3+ and FOXP3− cells, including recently activated CD38+ cells and Th17-like CD161+ Teff, but this repertoire overlap was no different between patients with versus without UC, and was no larger than the overlap between Helios− and Helios+ FOXP3+ cells. Conclusions Thus, at steady state, only a minority of FOXP3+, and particularly Helios+, T cells share a TCR sequence with FOXP3− effector populations in the colon LP, even in UC, revealing distinct clonal origins for LP Tregs and effector T cells in humans. PMID:25437819

  18. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1+ and Vδ3+ γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated. PMID:25617367

  19. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES NATURAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL FUNCTION: EFFECTS ON MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of MnCl2 in mice caused an increase in macrophage functional activity. Spleen cell antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against both chicken erythrocytes and P815 tumor cell targets was enhanced 24 hours following a single injection...

  20. Absence of CD4(+) T cell help generates corrupt CD8(+) effector T cells in sarcoma-bearing Swiss mice treated with NLGP vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Biswas, Jaydip; Mallick, Atanu; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-07-01

    One of the prime objectives of cancer immunology and immunotherapy is to study the issues related to rescue and/or maintenance of the optimum effector CD8(+) T cell functions by minimizing tumor-induced negative factors. In this regard the influence of host intrinsic CD4(+) helper T cells towards generation and maintenance of CD8(+) effector T cells appears controversial in different experimental settings. Therefore, the present study was aimed to re-analyze the influence of CD4(+) helper T cells towards effector T cells during neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP)-vaccine-mediated tumor growth restriction. CD4 depletion (mAb; Clone GK1.5) surprisingly resulted in significant increase in CD8(+) T cells in different immune organs from NLGP-treated sarcoma-bearing mice. However, such CD8 surge could not restrict the sarcoma growth in NLGP-treated CD4-depleted mice. Furthermore, CD4 depletion in early phase hinders CD8(+) T cell activation and terminal differentiation by targeting crucial transcription factor Runx3. CD4 depletion decreases accumulation of CD8α(+) dendritic cells within tumor draining lymph node, hampers antigen cross priming and CD86-CD28 interactions for optimum CD8(+) T cell functions. In order to search the mechanism of CD4(+) T cell help on NLGP-mediated CD8 effector functions, the role of CD4(+) helper T cell-derived IL-2 on optimization of CD8 functions was found using STAT5 signaling, but complete response requires physical contact of CD4(+) helper T cells with its CD8 counterpart. In conclusion, it was found that CD4(+) T cell help is not required to generate CD8(+) T cells but was found to be an integral phenomenon in maintenance of its anti-tumor functions even in NLGP-vaccine-mediated sarcoma growth restriction. PMID:27178306

  1. Identification and characterization of Noc2 as a potential Rab3B effector protein in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Shinji; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuyo; Kitamura, Hiroko; Morimoto, Shinya; Imai, Mayu; Nagahiro, Shinji; Seino, Susumu; Sasaki, Takuya

    2004-03-26

    The Rab3 family small G proteins (Rab3A-D) are involved in the regulated secretory pathway of brain and secretory tissues. Among Rab3-interacting proteins, Rabphilin-3, Rim, and Noc2, all of which contain a conserved Rab3-binding domain (RBD3), are generally recognized Rab3 effector proteins in neurons and secretory cells. Although Rab3B was also detected in epithelial cells, its function remained unknown. We isolated cDNA sequences from human epithelial Caco2-cell mRNA by degenerate RT-PCR based on the conserved amino acid sequence of RBD3. Multiple cDNA clones were identified as encoding Noc2. Northern blot analysis revealed that Noc2 mRNA was expressed not only in secretory tissues but also in epithelial tissues and cell lines. A pull-down assay demonstrated that Noc2 bound to Rab3B in a GTP-dependent manner. When Noc2 was co-expressed with the GTP-bound form of Rab3B, it was recruited from the cytosol to perinuclear membranes. Furthermore, overexpression of Noc2 inhibited the cell-surface transport of basolateral vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. These results suggest that Noc2 functions as a potential Rab3B effector protein in epithelial cells. PMID:15003533

  2. IL-21 is a central memory T cell-associated cytokine that inhibits the generation of pathogenic Th1/17 effector cells.

    PubMed

    Kastirr, Ilko; Maglie, Stefano; Paroni, Moira; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Nizzoli, Giulia; Sugliano, Elisa; Crosti, Maria-Cristina; Moro, Monica; Steckel, Bodo; Steinfelder, Svenja; Stölzel, Katharina; Romagnani, Chiara; Botti, Fiorenzo; Caprioli, Flavio; Pagani, Massimilliano; Abrignani, Sergio; Geginat, Jens

    2014-10-01

    IL-21 promotes Th17 differentiation, and Th17 cells that upregulate T-bet, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF drive experimental autoimmune diseases in mice. Anti-IL-21 treatment of autoimmune patients is therefore a therapeutic option, but the role of IL-21 in human T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. IL-21 was produced at high levels by human CD4(+) central memory T cells, suggesting that it is associated with early T cell differentiation. Consistently, it was inhibited by forced expression of T-bet or RORC2, the lineage-defining transcription factors of Th1 and Th17 effector cells, respectively. Although IL-21 was efficiently induced by IL-12 in naive CD4(+) T cells, it inhibited the generation of Th1 effector cells in a negative feedback loop. IL-21 was also induced by IL-6 and promoted Th17 differentiation, but it was not absolutely required. Importantly, however, IL-21 promoted IL-10 secretion but inhibited IFN-γ and GM-CSF production in developing Th17 cells, and consequently prevented the generation of polyfunctional Th1/17 effector cells. Moreover, in Th17 memory cells, IL-21 selectively inhibited T-bet upregulation and GM-CSF production. In summary, IL-21 is a central memory T cell-associated cytokine that promotes Th17 differentiation and IL-10 production, but inhibits the generation of potentially pathogenic Th1/17 effector cells. These findings shed new light on the role of IL-21 in T cell differentiation, and have relevant implications for anti-IL-21 therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25172491

  3. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  4. CD4 on CD8+ T cells directly enhances effector function and is a target for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Jones, Nicole R.; Laforge, Stuart; Whitmire, Jason K.; Vu, Bien-Aimee; Galic, Zoran; Brooks, David G.; Brown, Stephen J.; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2004-06-01

    Costimulation of purified CD8+ T lymphocytes induces de novo expression of CD4, suggesting a previously unrecognized function for this molecule in the immune response. Here, we report that the CD4 molecule plays a direct role in CD8+ T cell function by modulating expression of IFN- and Fas ligand, two important CD8+ T cell effector molecules. CD4 expression also allows infection of CD8 cells by HIV, which results in down-regulation of the CD4 molecule and impairs the induction of IFN-, Fas ligand, and the cytotoxic responses of activated CD8+ T cells. Thus, the CD4 molecule plays a direct role in CD8 T cell function, and infection of these cells by HIV provides an additional reservoir for the virus and also may contribute to the immunodeficiency seen in HIV disease.

  5. Foxp3(+) T cells expressing RORγt represent a stable regulatory T-cell effector lineage with enhanced suppressive capacity during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, B-H; Hagemann, S; Mamareli, P; Lauer, U; Hoffmann, U; Beckstette, M; Föhse, L; Prinz, I; Pezoldt, J; Suerbaum, S; Sparwasser, T; Hamann, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Lochner, M

    2016-03-01

    Foxp3 (forkhead box P3 transcription factor)-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for immunological tolerance, best illustrated by uncontrolled effector T-cell responses and autoimmunity upon loss of Foxp3 expression. Tregs can adopt specific effector phenotypes upon activation, reflecting the diversity of functional demands in the different tissues of the body. Here, we report that Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells coexpressing retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt), the master transcription factor for T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, represent a stable effector Treg lineage. Transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling revealed that Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells display signatures of both Tregs and Th17 cells, although the degree of similarity was higher to Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs than to Foxp3(-)RORγt(+) T cells. Importantly, Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells were significantly demethylated at Treg-specific epigenetic signature genes such as Foxp3, Ctla-4, Gitr, Eos, and Helios, suggesting that these cells have a stable regulatory rather than inflammatory function. Indeed, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells in the T-cell transfer colitis model confirmed their Treg function and lineage stability in vivo, and revealed an enhanced suppressive capacity as compared with Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs. Thus, our data suggest that RORγt expression in Tregs contributes to an optimal suppressive capacity during gut-specific immune responses, rendering Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells as an important effector Treg subset in the intestinal system. PMID:26307665

  6. Compartment resolved reference proteome map from highly purified naïve, activated, effector, and memory CD8⁺ murine immune cells.

    PubMed

    Zanker, Damien; Otto, Wolfgang; Chen, Weisan; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2015-06-01

    Differentiation of CD8(+) T lymphocytes into effector and memory cells is key for an adequate immune response and relies on complex interplay of pathways that convey signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. In this study, we investigated the proteome of four cytotoxic T-cell subtypes; naïve, recently activated effector, effector, and memory cells. Cells were fractionated into membrane, cytosol, soluble nuclear, chromatin-bound, and cytoskeletal compartments. Following LC-MS/MS analysis, identified peptides were analyzed via MaxQuant. Compartment fractionation and gel-LC-MS separation resulted in 2399 proteins identified in total. Comparison between the different subsets resulted in 146 significantly regulated proteins for naïve and effector cells, followed by 116 for activated, and 55 for memory cells. Besides Granzyme B signaling (for activated and/ or effector cells vs. naïve cells), the most prominent changes occurred in the TCA cycle and aspartate degradation. These changes suggest that correct balancing of metabolism is key for differentiation processes. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001065 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001065). PMID:25643623

  7. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Plays a Critical Role in Naive and Effector Murine T Cells but Not Natural Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramadan A; Camick, Christina; Wiles, Katherine; Walseth, Timothy F; Slama, James T; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Giovannucci, David R; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-02-26

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger discovered to date, has been implicated in Ca(2+) signaling in some lymphomas and T cell clones. In contrast, the role of NAADP in Ca(2+) signaling or the identity of the Ca(2+) stores targeted by NAADP in conventional naive T cells is less clear. In the current study, we demonstrate the importance of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals in murine naive T cells. Combining live-cell imaging methods and a pharmacological approach using the NAADP antagonist Ned-19, we addressed the involvement of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals evoked by TCR stimulation and the role of this signal in downstream physiological end points such as proliferation, cytokine production, and other responses to stimulation. We demonstrated that acidic compartments in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum were the Ca(2+) stores that were sensitive to NAADP in naive T cells. NAADP was shown to evoke functionally relevant Ca(2+) signals in both naive CD4 and naive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, we examined the role of this signal in the activation, proliferation, and secretion of effector cytokines by Th1, Th2, Th17, and CD8 effector T cells. Overall, NAADP exhibited a similar profile in mediating Ca(2+) release in effector T cells as in their counterpart naive T cells and seemed to be equally important for the function of these different subsets of effector T cells. This profile was not observed for natural T regulatory cells. PMID:26728458

  8. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  9. Estrogen receptor alpha mediates epithelial to mesenchymal transition, expression of specific matrix effectors and functional properties of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S; Piperigkou, Zoi; Afratis, Nikos; Karamanou, Konstantina; Aletras, Alexios J; Moustakas, Aristidis; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2015-04-01

    The 17β-estradiol (E2)/estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways in hormone-dependent breast cancer. E2 plays pivotal roles in cancer cell growth, survival, and architecture as well as in gene expression regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we established stably transfected MCF-7 cells by knocking down the ERα gene (designated as MCF-7/SP10+ cells), using specific shRNA lentiviral particles, and compared them with the control cells (MCF-7/c). Interestingly, ERα silencing in MCF-7 cells strongly induced cellular phenotypic changes accompanied by significant changes in gene and protein expression of several markers typical of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Notably, these cells exhibited enhanced cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, ERα suppression strongly affected the gene and protein expression of EGFR and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinases, and various extracellular matrix (ECM) effectors, including matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors (MMPs/TIMPs) and components of the plasminogen activation system. The action caused by E2 in MCF-7/c cells in the expression of HER2, MT1-MMP, MMP1, MMP9, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 was abolished in MCF-7/SP10+ cells lacking ERα. These data suggested a regulatory role for the E2/ERα pathway in respect to the composition and activity of the extracellular proteolytic molecular network. Notably, loss of ERα promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion by inducing changes in the expression levels of certain matrix macromolecules (especially uPA, tPA, PAI-1) through the EGFR-ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, loss of ERα in breast cancer cells results in a potent EMT characterized by striking changes in the expression profile of specific matrix macromolecules highlighting the potential nodal role of matrix effectors in breast cancer endocrine resistance. PMID:25728938

  10. Increased Numbers of Circulating CD8 Effector Memory T Cells before Transplantation Enhance the Risk of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    San Segundo, David; Ballesteros, María Ángeles; Naranjo, Sara; Zurbano, Felipe; Miñambres, Eduardo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations involved in the development of acute rejection episodes in lung transplantation remain to be elucidated. Twenty-seven lung transplant candidates were prospectively monitored before transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation. Regulatory, Th17, memory and naïve T cells were measured in peripheral blood of lung transplant recipients by flow cytometry. No association of acute rejection with number of peripheral regulatory T cells and Th17 cells was found. However, effector memory subsets in acute rejection patients were increased during the first two months post-transplant. Interestingly, patients waiting for lung transplant with levels of CD8+ effector memory T cells over 185 cells/mm3 had a significant increased risk of rejection [OR: 5.62 (95% CI: 1.08-29.37), p=0.04]. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender the odds ratio for rejection was: OR: 5.89 (95% CI: 1.08-32.24), p=0.04. These data suggest a correlation between acute rejection and effector memory T cells in lung transplant recipients. The measurement of peripheral blood CD8+ effector memory T cells prior to lung transplant may define patients at high risk of acute lung rejection. PMID:24236187

  11. Characterization of Effector and Memory T Cell Subsets in the Immune Response to Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm) responses with humans; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly characterized in cattle. Vaccine-elicited cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. However, whether this assay measures cattle Tcm responses or not is uncertain. The objective of the present study was to characterize the relative contribution of Tcm (CCR7+, CD62Lhi, CD45RO+), T effector memory (Tem, defined as: CCR7-, CD62Llow/int, CD45RO+), and T effector cells (CCR7-, CD62L-/low, CD45RO-), in the immune response to Mycobacterium bovis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected cattle were stimulated with a cocktail of M. bovis purified protein derivative, rTb10.4 and rAg85A for 13 days with periodic addition of fresh media and rIL-2. On day 13, cultured PBMC were re-stimulated with medium alone, rESAT-6:CFP10 or PPDb with fresh autologous adherent cells for antigen presentation. Cultured cells (13 days) or fresh PBMCs (ex vivo response) from the same calves were analyzed for IFN-γ production, proliferation, and CD4, CD45RO, CD62L, CD44, and CCR7 expression via flow cytometry after overnight stimulation. In response to mycobacterial antigens, ~75% of CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells in long-term cultures expressed a Tcm phenotype while less than 10% of the ex vivo response consisted of Tcm cells. Upon re-exposure to antigen, long-term cultured cells were highly proliferative, a distinctive characteristic of Tcm, and the predominant phenotype within the long-term cultures switched from Tcm to Tem. These findings suggest that proliferative responses of Tcm cells to some extent occurs simultaneously with reversion to effector phenotypes (mostly Tem). The present study characterizes Tcm cells of cattle and their participation in the response to M. bovis infection. PMID:25879774

  12. A case of t(14; 18)-negative follicular lymphoma with atypical immunophenotype: usefulness of immunoarchitecture of Ki67, CD79a and follicular dendritic cell meshwork in making the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yin- Ping; Abdul-Rahman, Faridah; Samsudin, Aamad Toha; Masir, Noraidah

    2014-08-01

    Follicular lymphoma is characterised by the t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation causing BCL2 protein overexpression. A proportion of follicular lymphomas do not carry the t(14;18) translocation and lacked BCL2 protein expression. We describe a case of a BCL2 protein- and t(14;18)-negative follicular lymphoma that caused diagnostic difficulty. The usefulness of several immunomarkers including Ki67, CD79a and CD21 in aiding the diagnosis is discussed. The patient is a 51-year-old male who presented with gradually enlarging lymphadenopathy. Histopathological examination of the lymph node showed complete architectural effacement by neoplastic follicles containing expanded CD21-positive follicular dendritic cell meshwork. The neoplastic cells expressed pan-B cell markers (CD20, CD79a) and germinal centre marker (BCL6) but not BCL2 and CD10. Of interest are the staining patterns of Ki67 and CD79a. We observed that the Ki67- positive proliferating cells were evenly distributed within the neoplastic follicles without zonation. In addition, CD79a was homogeneously strong within the neoplastic follicles. These staining patterns were distinctly different from that observed in reactive lymphoid follicles. Fluorescent insitu hybridisation (FISH) analysis however showed absence of BCL2 gene rearrangement. Despite the atypical immunophenotype and lack of BCL2 gene rearrangement, the diagnosis of follicular lymphoma was made based on careful observation of the morphology as well as immunoarchitecture of the Ki67, CD79a and CD21 markers. PMID:25194535

  13. Enhanced lysis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected mouse cell lines by NC and NK effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; Lopez, C.

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously cytotoxic murine lymphocytes lysed certain cell types infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) better than uninfected cells. Although HSV-1 adsorbed to the surface of all the target cells, those in which the virus replicated more efficiently were lysed to a greater extent. As targets, the authors used cell lines that, when uninfected, were spontaneously lysed by NK cells (YAC-1) or by NC cells (WEHI-164). They also used a fibroblastoid cell line (M50) and a monocytic tumor line (PU51R), which were not spontaneously killed. NK cells lysed HSV-1-infected YAC cells better than uninfected cells, and an NC-like activity selectively lysed HSV-1-infected WEHI cells. These findings were consistent with the results of experiments performed to define the role of interferon in induction of virus-augmented cytolysis. Increased lysis of YAC-HSV and PU51R-HSV was entirely due to interferon activation and was completely abolished by performing the /sup 51/Cr-release assay in the presence of anti-interferon serum. The data show that HSV-1 infection of NK/NC targets induces increased cytotoxity, but the effector cell responsible for lysis is determined by the uninfected target, or by an interaction between the virus and target cell, rather than by a viral determinant alone.

  14. Peripheral Tissue Homing Receptor Control of Naïve, Effector, and Memory CD8 T Cell Localization in Lymphoid and Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Peske, J. David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  15. Peripheral tissue homing receptor control of naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cell localization in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, C Colin; Peske, J David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  16. WO3/Pt nanoparticles are NADPH oxidase biomimetics that mimic effector cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Andrea J.; Coury, Emma L.; Meilhac, Alexandra M.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-02-01

    To provide a means of delivering an artificial immune effector cell-like attack on tumor cells, we report the tumoricidal ability of inorganic WO3/Pt nanoparticles that mimic a leukocyte’s functional abilities. These nanoparticles route electrons from organic structures and electron carriers to form hydroxyl radicals within tumor cells. During visible light exposure, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture hydroxyl radicals, degrade organic compounds, use NADPH, trigger lipid peroxidation, promote lysosomal membrane disruption, promote the loss of reduced glutathione, and activate apoptosis. In a model of advanced breast cancer metastasis to the eye’s anterior chamber, we show that WO3/Pt nanoparticles prolong the survival of 4T1 tumor-bearing Balb/c mice. This new generation of inorganic photosensitizers do not photobleach, and therefore should provide an important therapeutic advance in photodynamic therapy. As biomimetic nanoparticles destroy targeted cells, they may be useful in treating ocular and other forms of cancer.

  17. Cell surface Glut1 levels distinguish human CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets with distinct effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cretenet, Gaspard; Clerc, Isabelle; Matias, Maria; Loisel, Severine; Craveiro, Marco; Oburoglu, Leal; Kinet, Sandrina; Mongellaz, Cédric; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte activation requires the generation of sufficient energy to support new biosynthetic demands. Following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement, these requirements are met by an increased glycolysis, due, at least in part, to induction of the Glut1 glucose transporter. As Glut1 is upregulated on tumor cells in response to hypoxia, we assessed whether surface Glut1 levels regulate the antigen responsiveness of human T lymphocytes in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen conditions. Notably, Glut1 upregulation in response to TCR stimulation was significantly higher in T lymphocytes activated under hypoxic as compared to atmospheric oxygen conditions. Furthermore, TCR-stimulated human T lymphocytes sorted on the basis of Glut1-Lo and Glut1-Hi profiles maintained distinct characteristics, irrespective of the oxygen tension. While T cells activated in hypoxia divided less than those activated in atmospheric oxygen, Glut1-Hi lymphocytes exhibited increased effector phenotype acquisition, augmented proliferation, and an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio in both oxygen conditions. Moreover, Glut1-Hi T lymphocytes exhibited a significantly enhanced ability to produce IFN-γ and this secretion potential was completely dependent on continued glycolysis. Thus, Glut1 surface levels identify human T lymphocytes with distinct effector functions in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen tensions. PMID:27067254

  18. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus-Induced NKG2Chi CD57hi Natural Killer Cells Are Effectors Dependent on Humoral Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Sinzger, Christian; Frascaroli, Giada; Reichel, Johanna; Bayer, Carina; Wang, Li; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that expansion of NKG2C-positive natural killer (NK) cells is associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, their activity in response to HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. We show that NKG2Chi CD57hi NK cells gated on CD3neg CD56dim cells can be phenotypically identified as HCMV-induced NK cells that can be activated by HCMV-infected cells. Using HCMV-infected autologous macrophages as targets, we were able to show that these NKG2Chi CD57hi NK cells are highly responsive to HCMV-infected macrophages only in the presence of HCMV-specific antibodies, whereas they are functionally poor effectors of natural cytotoxicity. We further demonstrate that NKG2Chi CD57hi NK cells are intrinsically responsive to signaling through CD16 cross-linking. Our findings show that the activity of pathogen-induced innate immune cells can be enhanced by adaptive humoral immunity. Understanding the activity of NKG2Chi CD57hi NK cells against HCMV-infected cells will be of relevance for the further development of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:23637420

  20. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J.; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L.; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4+ Foxp3− effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2−/− mice into Rag 1−/− recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  1. Expansion of dysfunctional Tim-3-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells during simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Chew, Glen M; Reed, Jason S; Pathak, Reesab; Seger, Elizabeth; Clayton, Kiera L; Rini, James M; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ishii, Naoto; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C

    2014-12-01

    The T cell Ig- and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) negative immune checkpoint receptor demarcates functionally exhausted CD8(+) T cells arising from chronic stimulation in viral infections like HIV. Tim-3 blockade leads to improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses in vitro and, therefore, represents a novel intervention strategy to restore T cell function in vivo and protect from disease progression. However, the Tim-3 pathway in the physiologically relevant rhesus macaque SIV model of AIDS remains uncharacterized. We report that Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cell frequencies are significantly increased in lymph nodes, but not in peripheral blood, in SIV-infected animals. Tim-3(+)PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells are similarly increased during SIV infection and positively correlate with SIV plasma viremia. Tim-3 expression was found primarily on effector memory CD8(+) T cells in all tissues examined. Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cells have lower Ki-67 content and minimal cytokine responses to SIV compared with Tim-3(-)CD8(+) T cells. During acute-phase SIV replication, Tim-3 expression peaked on SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells by 2 wk postinfection and then rapidly diminished, irrespective of mutational escape of cognate Ag, suggesting non-TCR-driven mechanisms for Tim-3 expression. Thus, rhesus Tim-3 in SIV infection partially mimics human Tim-3 in HIV infection and may serve as a novel model for targeted studies focused on rejuvenating HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:25348621

  2. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4(+) Foxp3(-) effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2(-/-) mice into Rag 1(-/-) recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  3. Development of an optimum end-effector with a nano-scale uneven surface for non-adhesion cell manipulation using a micro-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horade, M.; Kojima, M.; Kamiyama, K.; Kurata, T.; Mae, Y.; Arai, T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to realize effective micro-manipulation using a micro-manipulator system, an optimum end-effector is proposed. Cell-manipulation experiments using mouse fibroblast cells are conducted, and the usability of the proposed end-effector is confirmed. A key advantage of the micro-manipulator is high-accuracy, high-speed 3D micro- and nano-scale positioning. Micro-manipulation has often been used in research involving biological cells. However, there are two important concerns with the micro-manipulator system: gripping efficiency and the release of gripped objects. When it is not possible to grip a micro-object, such as a cell, near its center, the object may be dropped during manipulation. Since the acquisition of exact position information for a micro-object in the vertical direction is difficult using a microscope, the gripping efficiency of the end-effector should be improved. Therefore, technical skill or operational support is required. Since, on the micro-scale, surface forces such as the adsorption force are greater than body forces, such as the gravitational force, the adhesion force between the end-effector and the object is strong. Therefore, manipulation techniques without adhesion are required for placed an object at an arbitrary position. In the present study, we consider direct physical contact between the end-effector and objects. First, the design and materials of the end-effector for micro-scale manipulation were optimized, and an end-effector with an optimum shape to increase the grip force was fabricated. Second, the surface of the end-effector tip was made uneven, and the adhesion force from increasing on the micro-scale was prevented. When an end-effector with an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 85.0% of the time. On the other hand, when an end-effector without an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 6.25% of the time. Therefore, the superiority of a structure with an uneven

  4. A New Anti-CXCR4 Antibody That Blocks the CXCR4/SDF-1 Axis and Mobilizes Effector Cells.

    PubMed

    Broussas, Matthieu; Boute, Nicolas; Akla, Barbara; Berger, Sven; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Champion, Thierry; Robert, Alain; Beck, Alain; Haeuw, Jean-François; Goetsch, Liliane; Bailly, Christian; Dumontet, Charles; Matthes, Thomas; Corvaia, Nathalie; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The type IV C-X-C-motif chemokine receptor (CXCR4) is expressed in a large variety of human cancers, including hematologic malignancies, and this receptor and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), play a crucial role in cancer progression. We generated a humanized immunoglobulin G1 mAb, hz515H7, which binds human CXCR4, efficiently competes for SDF-1 binding, and induces a conformational change in CXCR4 homodimers. Furthermore, it inhibits both CXCR4 receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin-2 recruitment following CXCR4 activation. The binding of the hz515H7 antibody to CXCR4 inhibits the SDF-1-induced signaling pathway, resulting in reduced phosphorylation of downstream effectors, such as Akt, Erk1/2, p38, and GSK3β. Hz515H7 also strongly inhibits cell migration and proliferation and, while preserving normal blood cells, induces both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against neoplastic cells. In mouse xenograft models, hz515H7 displays antitumor activities with multiple hematologic tumor cell lines, with its Fc-mediated effector functions proving essential in this context. Furthermore, hz515H7 binds to primary tumor cells from acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma patients. Collectively, our results demonstrate two major mechanisms of action, making hz515H7 unique in this regard. Its potential as a best-in-class molecule is currently under investigation in a phase I clinical trial. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1890-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297868

  5. Cutting Edge: Self-antigen controls the balance between effector and regulatory T cells in peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Maurano, Megan M.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Truong, Hong-An; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Abbas, Abul K.

    2014-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in peripheral tissues is achieved by maintaining a balance between pathogenic effector T cells (Teff) and protective Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Using a mouse model of an inducible tissue-antigen we demonstrate that antigen (Ag) persistence is a major determinant of the relative frequencies of Teff and Treg cells. Encounter of transferred naïve CD4+ T cells with transiently expressed tissue-Ag leads to generation of cytokine-producing Teff cells and peripheral Treg cells. Persistent expression of Ag, a mimic of self Ag, leads to functional inactivation and loss of the Teff cells with preservation of Treg in the target tissue. The inactivation of Teff cells by persistent Ag is associated with reduced ERK phosphorylation (pERK), whereas Treg cells show less reduction in pERK and are relatively resistant to ERK inhibition. Our studies reveal a crucial role for Ag in maintaining appropriate ratios of Ag-specific Teff to Treg cells in tissues. PMID:24442443

  6. Priming of qualitatively superior human effector CD8+ T cells using TLR8 ligand combined with FLT3L1

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Georgia; Larsen, Martin; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Mallone, Roberto; Appay, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The quality of antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses is central to immune efficacy in infectious and malignant settings. Inducing effector CD8+ T cells with potent functional properties is therefore a priority of immunotherapy. However, the optimal assessment of new therapeutic molecules or strategies in humans is limited by the models currently used. Here, we introduce an original model of in vitro CD8+ T cell priming, based on an accelerated dendritic cell coculture system, which uses unfractionated human PBMCs as the starting material. This approach allows for a rapid study of adjuvant effects on the functional properties of human CD8+ T cells, primed from antigen-specific naïve precursors. We demonstrate that a selective TLR8 agonist, in combination with FLT3L, primes high-quality CD8+ T cell responses. TLR8L/FLT3L primed CD8+ T cells displayed enhanced cytolytic activity, polyfunctionality and antigen sensitivity. The acquisition of this superior functional profile was associated with increased T-bet expression in T cells induced via an IL-12-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data validate an expedited route to vaccine delivery or optimal T cell expansion for adoptive cell transfer. PMID:26608912

  7. Cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression on human effector B cells depends on the site and on the nature of antigen encounter.

    PubMed

    Kantele, Anu; Savilahti, Erkki; Tiimonen, Heidi; Iikkanen, Katja; Autio, Soile; Kantele, Jussi M

    2003-12-01

    In contrast to T cells, information on skin-homing B cells expressing the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) is sparse. CLA expression on human B cells was investigated among circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells (ISC) and among antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) elicited by parenteral, oral or rectal primary immunization, or by parenteral or oral secondary immunization with Salmonella typhi Ty21a. CLA expression was examined by combining cell sorting with an enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Among all ISC, the proportion of CLA(+) cells was 13-21%. Parenteral immunization induced antigen-specific ASC of which 13% were CLA(+), while oral and rectal immunizations were followed by only 1% of CLA(+) ASC (p<0.001). Oral re-immunization was followed by an up-regulation of CLA (34-48%) regardless of the route of priming. Parenteral re-immunization elicited ASC of which 9-14% were CLA(+). In conclusion, the expression of CLA on human effector B cells depends on the site of antigen encounter: intestinal stimulation elicits cells with no CLA, while parenteral encounter elicits significant numbers of CLA(+) cells. Even though primary antigen encounter in the intestine failed to stimulate CLA expression, up-regulation of CLA was found upon intestinal antigen re-encounter. These findings may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of some cutaneous disorders. PMID:14635035

  8. Dynamic regulation of effector IFN-γ-producing and IL-17-producing T cell subsets in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Ruan, Suhong; Yin, Lingling; Zhao, Dongmei; Chen, Chong; Pan, Bin; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Xu, Kailin

    2016-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as the predominant complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains to be fully understood. It is known that the cytokines produced by allogeneic reactive effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are involved in GVHD. However, the regulation and coordination of IFN-γ-producing and IL-17-producing effector T cells remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic changes of alloantigen-specific effector CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell subsets by flow cytometry, which produce inflammatory cytokines involved in the multistep GVHD pathogenesis progress. The results demonstrated that IL-17-producing CD8+ T (Tc17) cells and IFN-γ+CD8+ T (Tc1) cells were detected in the early stage of GVHD. The differentiation of CD4+ T cells into Th1 cell (IFN-γ+CD4+ T) and Th17 (IL-17+CD4+ T) cells was later than that of the Tc1 and Tc17 cells. The effector CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell subsets either became exhausted or became memory cells, exhibiting a CD62L-CD44+ phenotype following marked expansion during GVHD. Furthermore, T cell-associated type I (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and type II (IL-4 and IL-10) classical cytokines exhibited coordinated dynamic regulation. It was concluded that the differentiation of cytokine-producing Tc1 and Tc17 cells may be the key step in the initiation of GVHD, whereas CD4+ effector Th1 and Th17 cells are considered to be pathophysiological factors leading to the continuous aggravation of GVHD. PMID:26647759

  9. EffectorP: predicting fungal effector proteins from secretomes using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Dodds, Peter N; Tini, Francesco; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic filamentous plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that modulate the host cell to facilitate infection. Computational effector candidate identification and subsequent functional characterization delivers valuable insights into plant-pathogen interactions. However, effector prediction in fungi has been challenging due to a lack of unifying sequence features such as conserved N-terminal sequence motifs. Fungal effectors are commonly predicted from secretomes based on criteria such as small size and cysteine-rich, which suffers from poor accuracy. We present EffectorP which pioneers the application of machine learning to fungal effector prediction. EffectorP improves fungal effector prediction from secretomes based on a robust signal of sequence-derived properties, achieving sensitivity and specificity of over 80%. Features that discriminate fungal effectors from secreted noneffectors are predominantly sequence length, molecular weight and protein net charge, as well as cysteine, serine and tryptophan content. We demonstrate that EffectorP is powerful when combined with in planta expression data for predicting high-priority effector candidates. EffectorP is the first prediction program for fungal effectors based on machine learning. Our findings will facilitate functional fungal effector studies and improve our understanding of effectors in plant-pathogen interactions. EffectorP is available at http://effectorp.csiro.au. PMID:26680733

  10. MHC class I target recognition, immunophenotypes and proteomic profiles of natural killer cells within the spleens of day-14 chick embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken natural killer (NK) cells are not well defined, so little is known about the molecular interactions controlling their activity. At day 14 of embryonic development, chick spleens are a rich source of T-cellfree CD8aa+, CD3_ cells with natural killing activity. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay...

  11. Effector and regulatory T cell subsets in diabetes-associated inflammation. Is there a connection with ST2/IL-33 axis? Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Myśliwska, Jolanta

    2014-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which when progresses leads to the development of late vascular complications. The disease involves impairments in regulatory and effector subsets of T lymphocytes, which suppress and maintain inflammatory response, respectively. ST2/IL-33 pathway is involved in T-cell-mediated immune response and might regulate the inflammatory process in several diseases. This review presents the latest research findings regarding effector and regulatory T cell subsets in the context of inflammation accompanying DM1 with particular focus on the ST2/IL-33 network and its possible association with T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:24547981

  12. Bone marrow contains melanoma-reactive CD8+ effector T cells and, compared with peripheral blood, enriched numbers of melanoma-reactive CD8+ memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich; Assfalg, Geraldine; Mailänder, Volker; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2003-09-01

    Circulating melanoma-specific T cells can be frequently detected in patients with melanoma. Effective T-cell immunity and tumor surveillance, however, requires the presence of specific T cells in tissues populated by tumor cells. The bone marrow (BM) is a compartment frequently harboring micrometastatic tumor cells. Here, we compared directly ex vivo in peripheral blood (PB) and BM frequencies and differentiation phenotypes of T cells reactive with the melanoma-associated antigen tyrosinase and with autologous melanoma cells. Using intracellular cytokine and tetramer staining, we detected tyrosinase- and melanoma-reactive CD3+CD8+ T cells in the BM in similar or enhanced frequencies as in PB. Additional characterization of the differentiation subset using CD45RA and CCR7 revealed the presence of specific effector and memory T cells in the BM in all five patients analyzed. Remarkably, the frequency of tyrosinase- and melanoma-specific memory T cells was significantly increased in BM compared with PB. Thus, the BM may be an important compartment for tumor surveillance harboring a tumor-specific memory T-cell pool in addition to effector T cells. PMID:14500398

  13. Human CD4+ effector T lymphocytes generated upon TCR engagement with self-peptides respond defectively to IL-7 in their transition to memory cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Gabriela; Segovia, Norma C; Rivas-Carvalho, Amaranta; Reyes, Diana P; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio; Aguilar-Ruiz, Sergio R; Irles, Claudine; Soldevila, Gloria; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral repertoire of CD4+ T lymphocytes contains autoreactive cells that remain tolerant through several mechanisms. However, nonspecific CD4+ T cells can be activated in physiological conditions as in the course of an ongoing immune response, and their outcome is not yet fully understood. Here, we investigate the fate of human naive CD4+ lymphocytes activated by dendritic cells (DCs) presenting endogenous self-peptides in comparison with lymphocytes involved in alloresponses. We generated memory cells (Tmem) from primary effectors activated with mature autologous DCs plus interleukin (IL)-2 (Tmauto), simulating the circumstances of an active immune response, or allogeneic DCs (Tmallo). Tmem were generated from effector cells that were rested in the absence of antigenic stimuli, with or without IL-7. Tmem were less activated than effectors (demonstrated by CD25 downregulation) particularly with IL-7, suggesting that this cytokine may favour the transition to quiescence. Tmauto and Tmallo showed an effector memory phenotype, and responded similarly to polyclonal and antigen-specific stimuli. Biochemically, IL-7-treated Tmallo were closely related to conventional memory lymphocytes based on Erk-1/2 activation, whereas Tmauto were more similar to effectors. Autologous effectors exhibited lower responses to IL-7 than allogeneic cells, which were reflected in their reduced proliferation and higher cell death. This was not related to IL-7 receptor expression but rather to signalling deficiencies, according to STAT5 activation These results suggest that ineffective responses to IL-7 could impair the transition to memory cells of naive CD4+ T lymphocytes recognizing self-peptides in the setting of strong costimulation. PMID:23454917

  14. Instant effect of soluble antigen on effector T cells in peripheral immune organs during immunotherapy of autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Odoardi, Francesca; Kawakami, Naoto; Li, Zhaoxia; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Streyl, Kristina; Nosov, Mikhail; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Ellwart, Joachim W.; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Wekerle, Hartmut; Flügel, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    i.v. infusion of native autoantigen or its altered peptide variants is an important therapeutic option for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, because it selectively targets the disease-inducing T cells. To learn more about the mechanisms and kinetics of this approach, we visualized the crucial initial effects of i.v. infusion of peptides or intact protein on GFP-tagged autoaggressive CD4+ effector T cells using live-video and two-photon in situ imaging of spleens in living animals. We found that the time interval between i.v. injection of intact protein to first changes in T cell behavior was extremely short; within 10 min after protein application, the motility of the T cells changed drastically. They slowed down and became tethered to local sessile stromal cells. A part of the cells aggregated to form clusters. Within the following 20 min, IFN-γ mRNA was massively (>100-fold) up-regulated; surface IL-2 receptor and OX-40 (CD 134) increased 1.5 h later. These processes depleted autoimmune T cells in the blood circulation, trapping the cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs and thus preventing them from invading the CNS. This specific blockage almost completely abrogated CNS inflammation and clinical disease. These findings highlight the speed and efficiency of antigen recognition in vivo and add to our understanding of T cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:17213317

  15. Generalized Lévy walks and the role of chemokines in migration of effector CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Tajie H.; Banigan, Edward J.; Christian, David A.; Konradt, Christoph; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Norose, Kazumi; Wilson, Emma H.; John, Beena; Weninger, Wolfgang; Luster, Andrew D.; Liu, Andrea J.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines play a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells1-3, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. Here we track T cells using multi-photon microscopy to demonstrate that the chemokine CXCL10 enhances the ability of CD8+ T cells to control the pathogen T. gondii in the brains of chronically infected mice. This chemokine boosts T cell function in two different ways: it maintains the effector T cell population in the brain and speeds up the average migration speed without changing the nature of the walk statistics. Remarkably, these statistics are not Brownian; rather, CD8+ T cell motility in the brain is well described by a generalized Lévy walk. According to our model, this surprising feature enables T cells to find rare targets with more than an order of magnitude more efficiency than Brownian random walkers. Thus, CD8+ T cell behavior is similar to Lévy strategies reported in organisms ranging from mussels to marine predators and monkeys4-10, and CXCL10 aids T cells in shortening the average time to find rare targets. PMID:22722867

  16. Clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma of the kidney not associated with end-stage renal disease: clinicopathologic correlation with expanded immunophenotypic and molecular characterization of a large cohort with emphasis on relationship with renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor.

    PubMed

    Aron, Manju; Chang, Elena; Herrera, Loren; Hes, Ondrej; Hirsch, Michelle S; Comperat, Eva; Camparo, Philippe; Rao, Priya; Picken, Maria; Michal, Michal; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tamboli, Pheroze; Monzon, Federico; Amin, Mahul B

    2015-07-01

    Clear cell-papillary renal cell carcinoma (CC-Pap RCC) is a recently described renal tumor initially reported in the setting of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It has unique morphologic and immunohistochemical features that differentiate it from the more common clear cell RCC and papillary RCC. Recently, these tumors have also been described in a sporadic setting. We studied 64 cases of CC-Pap RCC not associated with ESRD (57 CC-Pap RCCs and 7 cases with features of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumors [RAT] including 5 initially diagnosed as such). The morphologic features of all cases and the immunohistochemical profile of 59 cases were studied along with the clinical and molecular features of 30 and 12 cases, respectively. All the tumors were well circumscribed with a mean tumor size of 2.6 cm and showed a wide array of architectural patterns, usually mixed, including tubular (77%), papillary (62%), tubulocystic (52%), and compact nested (21%). Seventy-three percent of the cases showed areas in which the tumor nuclei had a distinct orientation away from the basement membrane. Ninety-two percent of the cases had a low Fuhrman nuclear grade (nuclear grade 2%-86%, and nuclear grade 1%-6%); however, 8% cases showed foci of Fuhrman nuclear grade 3. In 4 cases, epithelial tumor comprised <5% of the tumor; >95% of the tumor was cystic or hyalinized. The stroma varied from being minimal to occasionally prominent myxoid to hyalinized and rarely with organized amianthoid fibers or well-defined smooth muscle bundles. Pathologic stage was reliably assigned in 60 cases, of which 93.3% (56 cases) were pT1, 3.3% (2 cases) were pT2, and 3.3% (2 cases) were pT3a with extension into the perinephric fat. One case had coagulative necrosis; sarcomatoid change and vascular invasion was not identified. The tumors showed a fairly typical immunoprofile characterized by positivity for CK7 (100%), HMCK (96%), CAIX (94%), and vimentin (100%) with negativity for AMACR, RCC, and TFE3; CD10 was

  17. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  18. A diametric role for OX40 in the response of effector/memory CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells to alloantigen

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, Gillian; Wood, Kathryn J.; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Jones, Nick D.

    2013-01-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNFR superfamily that has potent costimulatory properties. Although the impact of blockade of the OX40-OX40L pathway has been well documented in models of autoimmune disease, its effect on the rejection of allografts is less well defined. Here we show that the alloantigen-mediated activation of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells results in the induction of OX40 expression and that blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions prevents skin allograft rejection mediated by either subset of T cells. Moreover, a blocking anti-OX40 was found to have no effect on the activation and proliferation of T cells, but rather effector T cells failed to accumulate in peripheral lymph nodes and subsequently migrate to skin allografts. This was found to be the result of an enhanced degree of cell death amongst proliferating effector cells. In clear contrast, blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions at the time of exposure to alloantigen enhanced the ability of regulatory T cells to suppress T cell responses to alloantigen by supporting rather than diminishing regulatory T cell survival. These data show that OX40-OX40L signalling contributes to the evolution of the adaptive immune response to an allograft via the differential control of alloreactive effector and regulatory T cell survival. Moreover, these data serve to further highlight OX40 and OX40L as therapeutic targets to assist the induction of tolerance to allografts and self-antigens. PMID:23817421

  19. Effector and Central Memory Poly-Functional CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells are Boosted upon ZOSTAVAX® Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Cox, Kara S.; Dubey, Sheri A.; Antonello, Joseph M.; Krah, David L.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Vora, Kalpit A.

    2015-01-01

    ZOSTAVAX® is a live attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine that is licensed for the protection of individuals ≥50 years against shingles and its most common complication, postherpetic neuralgia. While IFNγ responses increase upon vaccination, the quality of the T cell response has not been elucidated. By using polychromatic flow cytometry, we characterized the breadth, magnitude, and quality of ex vivo CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses induced 3–4 weeks after ZOSTAVAX vaccination of healthy adults. We show, for the first time that the highest frequencies of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells were poly-functional CD154+IFNγ+IL-2+TNFα+ cells, which were boosted upon vaccination. The CD4+ T cells were broadly reactive to several VZV proteins, with immediate early (IE) 63 ranking the highest among them in the fold rise of poly-functional cells, followed by IE62, gB, open reading frame (ORF) 9, and gE. We identified a novel poly-functional ORF9-specific CD8+ T cell population in 62% of the subjects, and these were boosted upon vaccination. Poly-functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells produced significantly higher levels of IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα compared to mono-functional cells. After vaccination, a boost in the expression of IFNγ by poly-functional IE63- and ORF9-specific CD4+ T cells and IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα by ORF9-specific poly-functional CD8+ T cells was observed. Responding poly-functional T cells exhibited both effector (CCR7−CD45RA−CD45RO+), and central (CCR7+CD45RA−CD45RO+) memory phenotypes, which expressed comparable levels of cytokines. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that a boost in memory poly-functional CD4+ T cells and ORF9-specific CD8+ T cells may contribute toward ZOSTAVAX efficacy. PMID:26579128

  20. Expansions of NK-like αβT cells with chronologic aging: novel lymphocyte effectors that compensate for functional deficits of conventional NK cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Abbe N; Mueller, Robert G; Hamel, David L; Way, Amanda; Dvergsten, Jeffrey A; Griffin, Patricia; Newman, Anne B

    2011-07-01

    As the repertoire of αβT cell receptors (TCR) contracts with advancing age, there is an associated age-dependent accumulation of oligoclonal T cells expressing of a variety of receptors (NKR), normally expressed on natural killer (NK) cells. Evidences for differential regulation of expression of particular NKRs between T cells and NK cells suggest that NKR expression on T cells is physiologically programmed rather than a random event of the aging process. Experimental studies show NKRs on aged αβT cells may function either as independent receptors, and/or as costimulatory receptors to the TCR. Considering the reported deficits of conventional αβTCR-driven activation and also functional deficits of classical NK cells, NKR(+) αβT cells likely represent novel immune effectors that are capable of combining innate and adaptive functions. Inasmuch as immunity is a determinant of individual fitness, the type and density of NKRs could be important contributing factors to the wide heterogeneity of health characteristics of older adults, ranging from institutionalized frail elders who are unable to mount immune responses to functionally independent community-dwelling elders who exhibit protective immunity. Understanding the biology of NKR(+) αβT cells could lead to new avenues for age-specific intervention to improve protective immunity. PMID:20932941

  1. Rapid, effective and user-friendly immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma using a personal flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread use of flow cytometry for immunophenotyping in clinical veterinary medicine is limited by cost and requirement for considerable laboratory space, staff time, and expertise. The Guava EasyCyte Plus (Guava Technologies, Hayward, CA, US) is the first, personal, bench-top flow cytometer designed to address these limitations. Objective The aim of this study was to adapt the immunohistochemical protocol used for immunophenotyping of canine lymphoma to the personal flow cytometer for rapid, effective and user-friendly application to the diagnosis and prognosis of canine lymphoma and to demonstrate its practicality for widespread veterinary application. Performance of the personal flow cytometer for immunophenotyping T and B lymphocytes in blood and lymph nodes from normal dogs and dogs with lymphoproliferative disease, was assessed using only two monoclonal antibodies (against CD3 and CD21), and by comparison with analysis using two conventional flow cytometers. Methods 26 dogs with lymphoproliferative disease (23 with lymphoma, 3 with lymphocytic leukaemia) were studied along with 15 controls (2 non-lymphoma lymph nodes and 13 non-leukemic bloods. Lymphocytes were immunostained with fluorescent-labeled, monoclonal antibodies against CD3 and CD21. To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discrimination between T and B cell immunophenotypes, T and B cell counts for half the samples (14 blood and 11 lymph node) were also determined using the same method and conventional flow cytometers (FACSCalibur, Cyan Dako). To assess the effectiveness of the personal flow cytometer in discriminating between leukocyte types, lymphocyte differential counts were determined for 21 blood samples and compared with those from automated hematology analyzers (CELL-DYN 3500, n=11 and ADVIA 2120, n=10). Quality and sub-cellular distribution of immunostaining was assessed using fluorescence microscopy. Results The protocol for immunophenotyping took 2 to 3

  2. IL-10-producing regulatory B-cells suppressed effector T-cells but enhanced regulatory T-cells in chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Cheng, Li-Sha; Wu, Sheng-di; Wang, Si-Qi; Li, Lei; She, Wei-Min; Li, Jing; Wang, Ji-Yao; Jiang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Non-specific immune responses to antigens have been demonstrated as being enhanced during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Here, we evaluated the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B-cells (Bregs) in the pathogenesis of HBV-related liver fibrosis (HBV-LF) and assessed their immunoregulatory effects. Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were enrolled in this study. Numbers and frequencies of peripheral B-cells (memory CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) cells, immature/transitional CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) cells, mature CD19(+)CD24(int)CD38(int) cells) were tested and analysed. Flow cytometry-sorted CD4(+)T cells were cultured with autologous Bregs to elucidate the effects of Bregs on CD4(+)T cells, including effector T and regulatory T-cells (Tregs). The potential immunoregulatory mechanism of Bregs was also investigated. The numbers of total B-cells and Bregs were enriched in CHB patients. The frequency of Bregs was negatively correlated with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and histological inflammation grades (G), but positively correlated with advanced histological fibrosis stages (S) and enhanced HBV replication. The phenotype of Bregs was predominantly characterized as CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) In co-culture with Bregs, CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells from CHB patients produced less interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 but more IL-4 than CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells alone, whereas their conversions into Tregs and IL-10(+)T cells were enhanced. In addition, Breg depletion in CHB samples dramatically decreased Treg numbers and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, the observed regulatory effect was partly dependent on IL-10 release and cell-to-cell contact. Elevated Bregs can suppress effector T but enhance Treg functions, which might influence immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection. PMID:26980345

  3. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  4. The hippo pathway effector YAP regulates motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to the level in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of YAP activated androgen receptor signaling and was sufficient to promote LNCaP cells from an androgen-sensitive state to an androgen-insensitive state in vitro, and YAP conferred castration resistance in vivo. Accordingly, YAP knockdown greatly reduced the rates of migration and invasion of LNCaP-C4-2 cells and under androgen deprivation conditions largely blocked cell division in LNCaP-C4-2 cells. Mechanistically, we found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal s6 kinase signaling was downstream of YAP for cell survival, migration, and invasion in androgen-insensitive cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry showed significant upregulation and hyperactivation of YAP in castration-resistant prostate tumors compared to their levels in hormone-responsive prostate tumors. Together, our results identify YAP to be a novel regulator in prostate cancer cell motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth and as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). PMID:25645929

  5. Targeting Effector Memory T Cells with the Small Molecule Kv1.3 Blocker PAP-1 Suppresses Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Philippe; Sankaranarayanan, Ananthakrishnan; Homerick, Daniel; Griffey, Stephen; Wulff, Heike

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 has been recently identified as a molecular target that allows for selective pharmacological suppression of effector memory T (TEM) cells without affecting the function of naïve and central memory T cells. We here investigated whether PAP-1, a small molecule Kv1.3 blocker (EC50 = 2nM), could suppress allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In a rat model of ACD, we first confirmed that the infiltrating cells in the elicitation phase are indeed CD8+ CD45RC− memory T cells with high Kv1.3 expression. In accordance with its selective effect on TEM cells, PAP-1 did not impair sensitization, but potently suppressed oxazolone-induced inflammation by inhibiting the infiltration of CD8+ T cells and reducing the production of the inflammatory cytokines IFN- γ, IL-2, and IL-17 when administered intraperitoneally or orally during the elicitation phase. PAP-1 was equally effective when applied topically, demonstrating that it effectively penetrates skin. We further show that PAP-1 is not a sensitizer or an irritant and exhibits no toxicity in a 28-day toxicity study. Based on these results we propose that PAP-1 could potentially be developed into a drug for the topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. PMID:17273162

  6. Redirected cellular cytotoxicity by infection of effector cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding a tumor-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Bizouarne, N; Dott, K; Ruet, L; Dufour, P; Acres, R B; Kieny, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cytotoxicity is an important function of the immune system that results in the destruction of cellular targets by humoral and/or cellular mechanisms. We wanted to assess the possibility of targeting the lytic function of immune cells toward cancer cells, which express the gene coding for a known tumor antigen (Ag) (GA733-2/epithelial cell adhesion molecule), using a viral vector encoding a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for said tumor Ag (CO17-1A). To this end, we have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the sequences corresponding to mAb CO17-1A, which recognizes a specific Ag (GA733-2) that is present on the surface of most gastrointestinal carcinomas. The recombinant vectors encoding either a secreted or membrane-anchored form of CO17-1A mAb were used to infect effector cells, which were subsequently assessed for their cytotoxic activity. The recombinant viruses were able to infect both granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human macrophages and Ag-stimulated murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Infected granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated macrophages were found to be able to kill GA733-2-expressing tumor cells. Likewise, infected cytotoxic T lymphocytes, although conserving their original alloreactivity, gained the capability of killing GA733-2-expressing cancer cells. PMID:10811480

  7. Sympathetic neural signaling via the β2-adrenergic receptor suppresses T-cell receptor-mediated human and mouse CD8(+) T-cell effector function.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Leonardo D; Ağaç, Didem; Farrar, J David

    2016-08-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervate secondary lymphoid organs and secrete norepinephrine (NE) as the primary neurotransmitter. NE binds and signals through five distinct members of the adrenergic receptor family. In this study, we show elevated expression of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) on primary human CD8(+) effector memory T cells. Treatment of both human and murine CD8(+) T cells with NE decreased IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion and suppressed their cytolytic capacity in response to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. The effects of NE were specifically reversed by β2-specific antagonists. Adrb2(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were completely resistant to the effects of NE. Further, the ADRB2-specific pharmacological ligand, albuterol, significantly suppressed effector functions in both human and mouse CD8(+) T cells. While both TCR activation and stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18 were able to induce inflammatory cytokine secretion, NE failed to suppress IFN-γ secretion in response to IL-12 + IL18. Finally, the long-acting ADRB2-specific agonist, salmeterol, markedly reduced the cytokine secretion capacity of CD8(+) T cells in response to infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. This study reveals a novel intrinsic role for ADRB2 signaling in CD8(+) T-cell function and underscores the novel role this pathway plays in adaptive T-cell responses to infection. PMID:27222010

  8. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation. PMID:26851529

  9. Antitumor activities of interferon alpha, beta, and gamma and their combinations on human melanoma cells in vitro: changes of proliferation, melanin synthesis, and immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Garbe, C; Krasagakis, K; Zouboulis, C C; Schröder, K; Krüger, S; Stadler, R; Orfanos, C E

    1990-12-01

    The antitumor activities of human interferon (IFN) alpha, beta, and gamma alone or in combination were studied on four human melanoma cell lines (StML-11, StML-12, StML-14, and SKMel-28) in various concentrations (1-50,000 IU/ml IFN alpha, 0.1-1000 IU/ml IFN beta, 1-10,000 IU/ml IFN gamma) in vitro. In all experiments IFN beta exhibited the most potent antiproliferative effect of all IFN tested. After 3 d of incubation a 50% growth inhibition was achieved with 20-40 IU/ml for natural IFN beta and with 600-1200 U/ml for recombinant IFN gamma. Substantially higher doses (7,000 to more than 50,000 IU/ml) of recombinant IFN alpha 2a were required to achieve a 50% growth inhibition. A strong synergistic antiproliferative activity resulted from the combination of IFN alpha with IFN gamma and IFN beta with IFN gamma. None of the IFN tested induced terminal differentiation of melanoma cells in vitro. The formation of dendrites was inhibited, and the portion of differentiated cells in vitro was reduced after treatment with IFN in comparison to the untreated controls (untreated controls: 100%; portion of differentiated cells after treatment with IFN alpha: 58%-74%, IFN beta: 48%-96%, IFN gamma: 10%-33%). The melanin synthesis was slightly elevated after treatment with IFN alpha (untreated controls: 100%; after treatment with IFN alpha: 103%-157%, ns.) and decreased significantly after treatment with IFN beta (49%-71%, p less than 0.05) as well as with IFN gamma (80%-88%, ns.). Cell surface markers were modulated varyingly by the IFN: HLA-I antigens were enhanced by all IFN, with IFN beta emerging as the most potent inducer. Only IFN gamma, however, induced a de novo expression of HLA-DR and -DQ antigens and increased the expression of the ICAM-1 molecule and of the melanoma progression marker A.1.43. Possibly, these findings indicate a biologically more aggressive phenotype of melanoma cells. PMID:2124247

  10. Myelodysplasia-associated immunophenotypic alterations of bone marrow cells in myeloma: are they present at diagnosis or are they induced by lenalidomide?

    PubMed Central

    Matarraz, Sergio; Paiva, Bruno; Diez-Campelo, María; Corral, Lucia-López; Pérez, Estefanía; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Giraldo, Pilar; Hernández, Miguel T.; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes following treatment has been reported in multiple myeloma, but whether dysplastic features are already present at diagnosis remains to be investigated. Using multiparameter flow cytometry, we analyzed the distribution and phenotype of bone marrow hematopoietic cells from 47 multiple myeloma patients (15 symptomatic and 32 high-risk smoldering). From the 32 smoldering myeloma patients, 18 were studied at baseline and 22 after nine cycles of lenalidomide/dexamethasone treatment following the QUIREDEX trial (including 8 from baseline). Phenotypic alterations of bone marrow cells of 7 (47%) symptomatic and 6 (33%) smoldering myeloma patients were detected at baseline; there was no difference in the frequency and extent of phenotypic alterations between symptomatic versus smoldering cases. Likewise, no difference was seen between smoldering myeloma patients studied at baseline versus after lenalidomide/dexamethasone treatment. Our results suggest that phenotypic alterations of bone marrow hematopoietic cells are often present in newly diagnosed symptomatic and smoldering multiple myeloma patients. QUIREDEX trial (NCT00480363) PMID:22511492

  11. Distinct APC Subtypes Drive Spatially Segregated CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Effector Activity during Skin Infection with HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Bethany L.; Bedoui, Sammy; Hor, Jyh Liang; Mueller, Scott N.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Hollett, Natasha A.; Heath, William R.; Tscharke, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient infection control requires potent T-cell responses at sites of pathogen replication. However, the regulation of T-cell effector function in situ remains poorly understood. Here, we show key differences in the regulation of effector activity between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells during skin infection with HSV-1. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells disseminated widely throughout the skin and draining lymph nodes (LN), clearly exceeding the epithelial distribution of infectious virus. By contrast, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were only found within the infected epidermal layer of the skin and associated hair follicles. Mechanistically, while various subsets of lymphoid- and skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) elicited IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells responded exclusively to infected epidermal cells directly presenting viral antigen. Notably, uninfected cross-presenting DCs from both skin and LNs failed to trigger IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we describe a previously unappreciated complexity in the regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity that is subset-specific, microanatomically distinct and involves largely non-overlapping types of antigen-presenting cells (APC). PMID:25121482

  12. Medroxyprogesterone acetate inhibits CD8+ T cell viral specific effector function and induces herpes simplex virus type 1 reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Cherpes, Thomas L.; Busch, James L.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Harvey, Stephen A. K.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical research suggests hormonal contraceptive use is associated with increased frequencies of herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation and shedding. We examined the effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the compound most commonly used for injectable hormonal contraception, on HSV-1 reactivation and CD8+ T cell function in murine trigeminal ganglia (TG). In ex vivo TG cultures, MPA dramatically inhibited canonical CD8+ T cell effector functions, including IFN-γ production and lytic granule release, and increased HSV-1 reactivation from latency. In vivo, MPA treatment of latently infected ovariectomized mice inhibited IFN-γ production and lytic granule release by TG resident CD8+ T cells stimulated directly ex vivo. RNA specific for the essential immediate early viral gene ICP4 as well as viral genome DNA copy number were increased in mice that received MPA during latency, suggesting that treatment increased in vivo reactivation. The increase in HSV-1 copy number appeared to be the result of a two-tine effect, as MPA induced higher reactivation frequencies from latently infected explanted TG neurons in the presence or absence of CD45+ cells. Our data suggest hormonal contraceptives that contain MPA may promote increased frequency of HSV reactivation from latency through the combinatory effects of inhibiting protective CD8+ T cell responses and by a leukocyte-independent effect on infected neurons. PMID:18606648

  13. Induction of Murine Intestinal Inflammation by Adoptive Transfer of Effector CD4+CD45RBhigh T Cells into Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Erin C.; Gipson, Gregory R.; Sheikh, Shehzad Z.

    2015-01-01

    There are many different animal models available for studying the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), each with its own advantages and disadvantages. We describe here an experimental colitis model that is initiated by adoptive transfer of syngeneic splenic CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells into T and B cell deficient recipient mice. The CD4+CD45RBhigh T cell population that largely consists of naïve effector cells is capable of inducing chronic intestinal inflammation, closely resembling key aspects of human IBD. This method can be manipulated to study aspects of disease onset and progression. Additionally it can be used to study the function of innate, adaptive, and regulatory immune cell populations, and the role of environmental exposures, i.e., the microbiota, in intestinal inflammation. In this article we illustrate the methodology for inducing colitis with a step-by-step protocol. This includes a video demonstration of key technical aspects required to successfully develop this murine model of experimental colitis for research purposes. PMID:25938395

  14. Mechanisms of corticosteroid action on lymphocyte subpopulations. III. Differential effects of dexamethasone administration on subpopulations of effector cells mediating cellular cytotoxicity in man

    PubMed Central

    Parrillo, J. E.; Fauci, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) administration on different populations of mononuclear cells and neutrophils mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against different target cells. Mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes) and neutrophils were obtained from twenty-seven normal volunteers at 0, 4, 24 and 48 hr after oral administration of 21 mg of DEX. ADCC was determined utilizing the following targets: human red blood cells (HRBC), Chang liver cells (Ch) and human heart cells (HHC). The predominant mononuclear effector in HRBC killing was shown to be a monocyte and in Ch and HHC killing, a K cell. As previously shown, DEX produced a profound monocytopenia and lymphocytopenia at 4 hr with a return of lymphocyte counts to normal and monocyte counts to supra-normal at 24 hr. At the point of maximal monocytopenia, monocyte-mediated HRBC killing decreased from a geometric mean of 14 to 4 lytic units per 108 effector cells (P<0·05) and rebounded at 24 hr to a mean of 39 lytic units (P<0·02) with the rebound monocytosis. At the point of absolute lymphopenia (4 hr), there was a relative enrichment in the proportion of lymphocytes bearing an Fc receptor (K cells, P<0·01). Concomitant with this was an increase in ADCC against Ch and HHC from geometric means of 1121 to 7172 lytic units and 939 to 7354 lytic units (P<0·001) respectively. Thus, a major action of DEX administration on mononuclear ADCC was to differentially enrich or deplete different effector cells to and from the circulation, causing changes in cytotoxicity. Since the cytotoxicity paralleled the proportion of effector cells, the cells remaining in the circulation following DEX administration retained normal antibody-dependent cytotoxic capabilities. Neutrophil-mediated ADCC against HRBC significantly increased at 4 hr from a geometric mean of 3785 to 20142 lytic units (P<0·02) concomitant with the blood neutrophilia and remained elevated for 72 hr

  15. Protection against HPV-16-Associated Tumors Requires the Activation of CD8+ Effector Memory T Cells and the Control of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Mariana O; Sales, Natiely S; Silva, Jamile R; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2016-08-01

    Active anticancer immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to induce cellular or humoral immune responses in patients, but, thus far, the observed outcomes did not ensure their recommendation for clinical use. The induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, although required for the clearance of most solid tumors, was shown to be insufficient for the development of a successful immunotherapeutic approach. The suppressive immune environment triggered by tumors, including the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), is detrimental to the development of antitumor immune responses and precludes the generation of more promising clinical outcomes. In this work, we characterized the CD8(+) T-cell population specifically involved in the control of tumor growth and the role of MDSCs after administration of an antitumor therapeutic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated tumors. Activation of cytotoxic high-avidity CD8(+) T cells with an effector memory phenotype was found in mice grafted with tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. In addition, MDSC antibody depletion further enhanced the immunotherapeutic effects of the vaccine, resulting in the complete eradication of tumor cells. Collectively, the current results indicate that the simultaneous control of MDSCs and activation of high-avidity tumor-specific effector memory CD8(+) T cells are key features for tumor protection by immunotherapeutic approaches and deserve further testing under clinical conditions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1920-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27222537

  16. Individual Vγ2-Jγ1.2+ T cells respond to both isopentenylpyrophosphate and Daudi cell stimulation: Generating tumor effectors with low molecular weight phosphoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Cairo, Cristiana; Cummings, Jean-Saville; Pauza, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells exhibit T cell receptor-dependent, MHC-unrestricted recognition of antigen and play important roles in tumor and pathogen immunity. To characterize antigen recognition by the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR, we used the combined approach of spectratyping and CDR3 sequence analysis that measures changes in the TCR repertoire before and after stimulation with a phosphoantigen (isopentenyl pyrophosphate) or an irradiated tumor cell line (Daudi B lymphoma). Here we describe common Vγ2 chains that are substantially involved in the response to both phosphoantigens and tumor cells. The recognition properties of common Vγ2 chains explains the observation that Vγ2Vδ2 T cells expanded by phosphoantigen stimulation specifically recognize and kill some but not all tumor cell lines. Our studies further justify efforts to stimulate tumor immunity by administering low molecular weight phosphoantigens and boosting the frequency and tumor effector functions of circulating Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. PMID:17131122

  17. Propanil Exposure Induces Delayed but Sustained Abrogation of Cell-Mediated Immunity through Direct Interference with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, James M.; Frankenberry, Marc A.; Schell, Todd D.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The postemergent herbicide propanil (PRN; also known as 3,4-dichloropropionanilide) is used on rice and wheat crops and has well-known immunotoxic effects on various compartments of the immune system, including T-helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages. It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1°) effectors of cell-mediated immunity. In this study we examined both the direct and indirect effects of PRN exposure on CTL activation and effector cell function to gauge its likely impact on cell-mediated immunity. Initial experiments addressed whether PRN alters the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway for antigen processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), thereby indirectly affecting effector function. These experiments demonstrated that PRN does not impair the activation of CTLs by PRN-treated APCs. Subsequent experiments addressed whether PRN treatment of CTLs directly inhibits their activation and revealed that 1° alloreactive CTLs exposed to PRN are unimpaired in their proliferative response and only marginally inhibited in their lytic activity. Surprisingly, secondary stimulation of these alloreactive CTL effectors, however, even in the absence of further PRN exposure, resulted in complete abrogation of CTL lytic function and a delayed but significant long-term effect on CTL responsiveness. These findings may have important implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of anomalies of cell-mediated immunity resulting from environmental exposure to various herbicides and other pesticides. PMID:16835059

  18. Immunophenotyping by slide-based cytometry and by flow cytometry are comparable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Andreas O.; Laffers, Wiebke; Mittag, Anja; Daehnert, Ingo; Lenz, Domnik; Bootz, Friedrich; Bocsi, Jozsef; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-03-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) is performed by flow cytometry (FCM) as the golden standard. Slide based cytometry systems for example laser scanning cytometer (LSC) can give additional information (repeated staining and scanning, morphology). In order to adequately judge on the clinical usefulness of immunophenotyping by LSC it is obligatory to compare it with the long established FCM assays. We performed this study to systematically compare the two methods, FCM and LSC for immunophenotyping and to test the correlation of the results. Leucocytes were stained with directly labeled monoclonal antibodies with whole blood staining method. Aliquots of the same paraformaldehyde fixed specimens were analyzed in a FACScan (BD-Biosciences) using standard protocols and parallel with LSC (CompuCyte) after placing to glass slide, drying and fixation by aceton and 7-AAD staining. Calculating the percentage distribution of PBLs obtained by LSC and by FCM shows very good correlation with regression coefficients close to 1.0 for the major populations (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes), as well as for the lymphocyte sub-populations (T-helper-, T-cytotoxic-, B-, NK-cells). LSC can be recommended for immunophenotyping of PBLs especially in cases where only very limited sample volumes are available or where additional analysis of the cells" morphology is important. There are limitations in the detection of rare leucocytes or weak antigens where appropriate amplification steps for immunofluorescence should be engaged.

  19. A Context-Dependent Role for IL-21 in Modulating the Differentiation, Distribution, and Abundance of Effector and Memory CD8 T Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Cox, Maureen A; Kahan, Shannon M; Ingram, Jennifer T; Bakshi, Rakesh K; Zajac, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    The activation of naive CD8 T cells typically results in the formation of effector cells (TE) as well as phenotypically distinct memory cells that are retained over time. Memory CD8 T cells can be further subdivided into central memory, effector memory (TEM), and tissue-resident memory (TRM) subsets, which cooperate to confer immunological protection. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras and adoptive transfer studies in which CD8 T cells either do or do not express IL-21R, we discovered that under homeostatic or lymphopenic conditions IL-21 acts directly on CD8 T cells to favor the accumulation of TE/TEM populations. The inability to perceive IL-21 signals under competitive conditions also resulted in lower levels of TRM phenotype cells and reduced expression of granzyme B in the small intestine. IL-21 differentially promoted the expression of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and the integrin α4β7 on CD8 T cells primed in vitro and on circulating CD8 T cells in the mixed bone marrow chimeras. The requirement for IL-21 to establish CD8 TE/TEM and TRM subsets was overcome by acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection; nevertheless, memory virus-specific CD8 T cells remained dependent on IL-21 for optimal accumulation in lymphopenic environments. Overall, this study reveals a context-dependent role for IL-21 in sustaining effector phenotype CD8 T cells and influencing their migratory properties, accumulation, and functions. PMID:26826252

  20. Leptin directly promotes T-cell glycolytic metabolism to drive effector T-cell differentiation in a mouse model of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Danzaki, Keiko; Kishton, Rigel J; Eisner, William; Nichols, Amanda G; Saucillo, Donte C; Shinohara, Mari L; MacIver, Nancie J

    2016-08-01

    Upon activation, T cells require energy for growth, proliferation, and function. Effector T (Teff) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, utilize high levels of glycolytic metabolism to fuel proliferation and function. In contrast, Treg cells require oxidative metabolism to fuel suppressive function. It remains unknown how Teff/Treg-cell metabolism is altered when nutrients are limited and leptin levels are low. We therefore examined the role of malnutrition and associated hypoleptinemia on Teff versus Treg cells. We found that both malnutrition-associated hypoleptinemia and T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout suppressed Teff-cell number, function, and glucose metabolism, but did not alter Treg-cell metabolism or suppressive function. Using the autoimmune mouse model EAE, we confirmed that fasting-induced hypoleptinemia altered Teff-cell, but not Treg-cell, glucose metabolism, and function in vivo, leading to decreased disease severity. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined HIF-1α, a key regulator of Th17 differentiation and Teff-cell glucose metabolism, and found HIF-1α expression was decreased in T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout Th17 cells, and in Teff cells from fasted EAE mice, but was unchanged in Treg cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate a selective, cell-intrinsic requirement for leptin to upregulate glucose metabolism and maintain function in Teff, but not Treg cells. PMID:27222115

  1. Clinicopathologic study of 62 acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas: insights into the morphology and immunophenotype and search for prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Adsay, Volkan; Albarello, Luca; Asioli, Sofia; Casnedi, Selenia; Franzi, Francesca; Marando, Alessandro; Notohara, Kenji; Sessa, Fausto; Vanoli, Alessandro; Zhang, Lizhi; Capella, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the pancreas is a very rare tumor that has various morphologic features, which may give rise to diagnostic difficulties. Because of its rarity, many clinicopathologic characteristics remain to be further elucidated, and prognostic factors are yet to be well established. With the aim of better characterizing this carcinoma and searching for prognostic indicators, we collected 62 ACCs and investigated the following parameters: site, size, local infiltration, node and distant metastases, architectural pattern, nuclear atypia, presence of necrosis, lymphovascular and perineural invasion, proliferation, BCL10, trypsin, carboxyl ester lipase, amylase, lipase, PDX1, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), CK7, p53, and β-catenin expression. Twelve cases showing >30% of endocrine cells were reclassified as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinomas, whereas 1 tumor was reclassified as a mixed ductal-acinar carcinoma and was excluded from the statistical prognostic evaluations. BCL10 and trypsin were the most reliable immunohistochemical markers, whereas amylase and lipase were not. Surgery was statistically correlated with a better prognosis (P=0.0008). Among resected tumors there was no difference in survival between ACCs and mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinomas, and factors that significantly correlated with poor prognosis were size >6.5 cm (P=0.004), lymph node (P=0.0039) and distant (P=0.008) metastases, and UICC stage (P=0.009). Stage was the only independent prognostic factor at multivariable analysis, and the best prognostic discrimination was observed on grouping together stages I and II and grouping together stages III and IV, suggesting a simplification of the UICC staging for such cancers. In addition, vascular and perineural invasion and CK19 and p53 expression showed a trend for poor prognosis, not reaching statistical significance. PMID:23026929

  2. Polarized granzyme release is required for antigen-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Thomas D.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2014-01-01

    Human effector memory (EM) CD4 T cells may transmigrate across endothelial cell (EC) monolayers either in response to inflammatory chemokines or in response to TCR recognition of antigen presented on the surface of the EC. The kinetics, morphologic manifestations, and molecular requirements of chemokine- and TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM) differ significantly. Here we report that while the MTOC and cytosolic granules follow the nucleus across the endothelium in a uropod during chemokine-driven TEM, MTOC reorientation to the contact region between the T cell and the EC, accompanied by dynein-driven transport of granzyme-containing granules to and exocytosis at the contact region, are early events in TCR-driven but not chemokine-driven TEM. Inhibitors of either granule function or of granzyme proteolytic activity can arrest TCR-driven TEM, implying a requirement for granule discharge in the process. In the final stages of TCR-driven TEM, the MTOC precedes, rather than follows, the nucleus across the endothelium. Thus TCR-driven TEM of EM CD4 T cells appears to be a novel process that more closely resembles immune synapse formation than it does conventional chemotaxis. PMID:25367116

  3. CTLA4-Ig (abatacept) therapy modulates T cell effector functions in autoantibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a strong MHC class II component and where many patients develop characteristic autoantibodies towards the noncoding amino acid citrulline. Such anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) have recently been put forward as an independent predictive factor for treatment response by co-stimulation blockade by CTLA4-Ig (abatacept). We have performed a mechanism of action study to dissect T cell functionality in RA patients with long-standing disease undergoing abatacept treatment and the influence of ACPA status. Results Peripheral blood samples were collected from RA patients as they started CTLA4-Ig treatment and 3 and 6 months later. A general decrease of regulatory T cell subsets was observed in the cohort. Additionally within the ACPA-positive group significant down-regulation of all key T cell effector subsets including Th1, Th2, and Th17 was observed by analyzing cytokines by intracellular flow cytometry and in cell culture supernatants. RA synovial fluid samples were cultured in vitro in the presence or absence of CTLA4-Ig (abatacept). T cell cytokine production was diminished, but without increasing the functional capacity of CD4+CD25hi regulatory T cells as previously demonstrated in the context of TNF-blockade and anti-IL6R therapy. Conclusions Our immunological study of T cell functionality in RA patients, both ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative, starting biological therapy with the co-stimulation blockade abatacept (CTLA4-Ig) supports the recently published registry study implicating ACPA seropositivity as an independent predictive factor to treatment response as we observed the most striking effect on T cell subset modulation in ACPA-positive patients. These data further support the notion of RA as a disease with several sub-entities, where the ACPA-positive fraction represents a classical HLA-associated autoimmune disorder while ACPA-negative patients may have other driving forces apart

  4. In B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia chromosome 17 abnormalities and not trisomy 12 are the single most important cytogenetic abnormalities for the prognosis: a cytogenetic and immunophenotypic study of 480 unselected newly diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Geisler, C H; Philip, P; Christensen, B E; Hou-Jensen, K; Pedersen, N T; Jensen, O M; Thorling, K; Andersen, E; Birgens, H S; Drivsholm, A; Ellegaard, J; Larsen, J K; Plesner, T; Brown, P; Andersen, P K; Hansen, M M

    1997-01-01

    Of 560 consecutive, newly diagnosed untreated patients with B CLL submitted for chromosome study, G-banded karyotypes could be obtained in 480 cases (86%). Of these, 345 (72%) had normal karyotypes and 135 (28%) had clonal chromosome abnormalities: trisomy 12 (+12) was found in 40 cases, 20 as +12 alone (+12single), 20 as +12 with additional abnormalities (+12complex). Other frequent findings included abnormalities of 14q, chromosome 17, 13q and 6q. The immunophenotype was typical for CLL in 358 patients (CD5+, Slg(weak), mainly FMC7-) and atypical for CLL in 122 patients (25%) (CD5-, or Slg(strong) or FMC7+). Chromosome abnormalities were found significantly more often in patients with atypical (48%) than in patients with typical CLL phenotype (22%) (P < 0.00005). Also +12complex, 14q+, del6q, and abnormalities of chromosome 17 were significantly more frequent in patients with atypical CLL phenotype, whereas +12single was found equally often in patients with typical and atypical CLL phenotype. The cytomorphology of most of the +12 patients was that of classical CLL irrespective of phenotype. In univariate survival analysis the following cytogenetic findings were significantly correlated to a poor prognosis: chromosome 17 abnormalities, 14q+, an abnormal karyotype, +12complex, more than one cytogenetic event, and the relative number of abnormal mitoses. In multivariate survival analysis chromosome 17 abnormalities were the only cytogenetic findings with independent prognostic value irrespective of immunophenotype. We conclude that in patients with typical CLL immunophenotype, chromosome abnormalities are somewhat less frequent at the time of diagnosis than hitherto believed. +12single is compatible with classical CLL, and has no prognostic influence whereas chromosome 17 abnormalities signify a poor prognosis. In patients with an atypical CLL immunophenotype, chromosome abnormalities including +12complex, 14q+, del 6q and chromosome 17 are found in about 50% of the

  5. Role of HIV Vpr as a regulator of apoptosis and an effector on bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho Suck; Yang, Joo-Sung

    2006-02-28

    The major event in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the death of many cells related to host immune response. The demise of these cells is normally explained by cell suicide mechanism, apoptosis. Interestingly, the decrease in the number of immune cells, such as non-CD4(+) cells as well as CD4(+) T cells, in HIV infection usually occurs in uninfected bystander cells, not in directly infected cells. It has, therefore, been suggested that several soluble factors, including viral protein R (Vpr), are released from the infected cells and induce the death of bystander cells. Some studies show that Vpr interacts directly with adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) to induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). The MMP results in release of some apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome-c (cyt-c) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Vpr also has indirect effect on mitochondria through enhancing the level of caspase-9 transcription and suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB). The involvement of p53 in Vpr-induced apoptosis remains to be studied. On the other hand, low level of Vpr expression has anti-apoptotic effect, whereas it's high level of expression induces apoptosis. Extracellular Vpr also exhibits cytotoxicity to uninfected bystander cells through apoptotic or necrotic mechanism. The facts that Vpr has cytotoxic effect on both infected cells and bystander cells, and that it exhibits both pro- and anti-apoptotic activity may explain its role in viral survival and disease progression. PMID:16511342

  6. Type I interferons induced by radiation therapy mediate recruitment and effector function of CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joanne Y H; Gerber, Scott A; Murphy, Shawn P; Lord, Edith M

    2014-03-01

    The need for an intact immune system for cancer radiation therapy to be effective suggests that radiation not only acts directly on the tumor but also indirectly, through the activation of host immune components. Recent studies demonstrated that endogenous type I interferons (type I IFNs) play a role in radiation-mediated anti-tumor immunity by enhancing the ability of dendritic cells to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells. However, it is still unclear to what extent endogenous type I IFNs contribute to the recruitment and function of CD8(+) T cells. Little is also known about the effects of type I IFNs on myeloid cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that type I and type II IFNs (IFN-γ) are both required for the increased production of CXCL10 (IP-10) chemokine by myeloid cells within the tumor after radiation treatment. Radiation-induced intratumoral IP-10 levels in turn correlate with tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cell numbers. Moreover, type I IFNs promote potent tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells by directly affecting the phenotype, effector molecule production, and enhancing cytolytic activity. Using a unique inducible expression system to increase local levels of IFN-α exogenously, we show here that the capacity of radiation therapy to result in tumor control can be enhanced. Our preclinical approach to study the effects of local increase in IFN-α levels can be used to further optimize the combination therapy strategy in terms of dosing and scheduling, which may lead to better clinical outcome. PMID:24357146

  7. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai; Wu, Weihui; Terada, Naohiro; Jin, Shouguang

    2015-08-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. PMID:26062981

  8. Chronic Parasitic Infection Maintains High Frequencies of Short-Lived Ly6C+CD4+ Effector T Cells That Are Required for Protection against Re-infection

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nathan C.; Pagán, Antonio J.; Lawyer, Phillip G.; Hand, Timothy W.; Henrique Roma, Eric; Stamper, Lisa W.; Romano, Audrey; Sacks, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the ability of long-lived CD8+ memory T cells to mediate protection against systemic viral infections, the relationship between CD4+ T cell memory and acquired resistance against infectious pathogens remains poorly defined. This is especially true for T helper 1 (Th1) concomitant immunity, in which protection against reinfection coincides with a persisting primary infection. In these situations, pre-existing effector CD4 T cells generated by ongoing chronic infection, not memory cells, may be essential for protection against reinfection. We present a systematic study of the tissue homing properties, functionality, and life span of subsets of memory and effector CD4 T cells activated in the setting of chronic Leishmania major infection in resistant C57Bl/6 mice. We found that pre-existing, CD44+CD62L−T-bet+Ly6C+ effector (TEFF) cells that are short-lived in the absence of infection and are not derived from memory cells reactivated by secondary challenge, mediate concomitant immunity. Upon adoptive transfer and challenge, non-dividing Ly6C+ TEFF cells preferentially homed to the skin, released IFN-γ, and conferred protection as compared to CD44+CD62L−Ly6C− effector memory or CD44+CD62L+Ly6C− central memory cells. During chronic infection, Ly6C+ TEFF cells were maintained at high frequencies via reactivation of TCM and the TEFF themselves. The lack of effective vaccines for many chronic diseases may be because protection against infectious challenge requires the maintenance of pre-existing TEFF cells, and is therefore not amenable to conventional, memory inducing, vaccination strategies. PMID:25473946

  9. High-resolution immunophenotyping of subcellular compartments in tissue microarrays by enzyme metallography.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Raymond; Pettay, James; Powell, Richard; Hicks, David G; Roche, Patrick; Powell, William; Grogan, Thomas; Hainfeld, James F

    2005-12-01

    Ultrasensitive bright field in situ hybridization assays using enzyme metallography (EnzMet) have been developed and validated, but little is known regarding the applicability of EnzMet for immunophenotypic detection of protein via IHC. Superior resolution via discrete metallographic deposits offers the potential for enhancing high-resolution immunophenotyping. Using high-complexity tissue microarrays (TMAs), 88 common solid tumors were evaluated by automated EnzMet (Nanoprobes and Ventana). Targets were chosen to assess the ability of EnzMet to specifically localize encoded antigens in the nucleus (estrogen receptor), cytoplasm (cytokeratins), and cytoplasmic membrane (HER2) in TMAs. Results were compared with conventional IHC diaminobenzidine (DAB) immunostaining. There was full concordance between the EnzMet and conventional IHC results. Furthermore, the EnzMet reaction products did not appreciably diffuse, were dense and sharply defined, and provided excellent high-resolution differentiation of cellular compartments in paraffin sections for the nuclear, cytoplasmic, and cell membrane-localized antigens evaluated. The higher density of elemental silver deposited during enzyme metallography permitted evaluation of core immunophenotypes at a relatively low magnification, allowing more tissue to be screened in an efficient manner. This preliminary study shows the utility of using enzyme metallography for high-resolution immunophenotyping in TMAs. PMID:16280669

  10. Lactate Regulates Metabolic and Pro-inflammatory Circuits in Control of T Cell Migration and Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Robert; Smith, Joanne; Rocher-Ros, Vidalba; Nadkarni, Suchita; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Bland, Elliot J.; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered a “waste” by-product of cell metabolism, and it accumulates at sites of inflammation. Recent findings have identified lactate as an active metabolite in cell signalling, although its effects on immune cells during inflammation are largely unexplored. Here we ask whether lactate is responsible for T cells remaining entrapped in inflammatory sites, where they perpetuate the chronic inflammatory process. We show that lactate accumulates in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Extracellular sodium lactate and lactic acid inhibit the motility of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. This selective control of T cell motility is mediated via subtype-specific transporters (Slc5a12 and Slc16a1) that we find selectively expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, respectively. We further show both in vitro and in vivo that the sodium lactate-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T cell motility is due to an interference with glycolysis activated upon engagement of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 with the chemokine CXCL10. In contrast, we find the lactic acid effect on CD8+ T cell motility to be independent of glycolysis control. In CD4+ T helper cells, sodium lactate also induces a switch towards the Th17 subset that produces large amounts of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17, whereas in CD8+ T cells, lactic acid causes the loss of their cytolytic function. We further show that the expression of lactate transporters correlates with the clinical T cell score in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Finally, pharmacological or antibody-mediated blockade of subtype-specific lactate transporters on T cells results in their release from the inflammatory site in an in vivo model of peritonitis. By establishing a novel role of lactate in control of proinflammatory T cell motility and effector functions, our findings provide a potential molecular mechanism for T cell entrapment and functional changes in inflammatory sites that drive chronic

  11. A ThPOK-LRF transcriptional node maintains the integrity and effector potential of post-thymic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacchio, Melanie S.; Wang, Lie; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Carpenter, Andrea C.; Xiong, Yumei; Williams, Linus C.; Wohlfert, Elizabeth; Song, Ki-Duk; Belkaid, Yasmine; Love, Paul E.; Bosselut, Rémy

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor ThPOK promotes CD4+ T cell differentiation in the thymus. Here, using a mouse strain that allows post-thymic gene deletion, we show that ThPOK maintains CD4+ T lineage integrity and couples effector differentiation to environmental cues after antigenic stimulation. ThPOK preserved the integrity and amplitude of effector responses, and was required for proper TH1 and TH2 differentiation in vivo by restraining the expression and function of the transcriptional regulator of cytotoxic T cell differentiation, Runx3. The transcription factor LRF contributed in a redundant manner with ThPOK to prevent the trans-differentiation of mature CD4+ T cells into CD8+ T cells. As such, the ThPOK-LRF transcriptional module was essential for CD4+ T cell integrity and responses. PMID:25129370

  12. Common and contrasting themes in host cell-targeted effectors from bacterial, fungal, oomycete and nematode plant symbionts described using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Collmer, Candace W; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Bird, David; Collmer, Alan; Tyler, Brett M

    2009-01-01

    A wide diversity of plant-associated symbionts, including microbes, produce proteins that can enter host cells, or are injected into host cells in order to modify the physiology of the host to promote colonization. These molecules, termed effectors, commonly target the host defense signaling pathways in order to suppress the defense response. Others target the gene expression machinery or trigger specific modifications to host morphology or physiology that promote the nutrition and proliferation of the symbiont. When recognized by the host's surveillance machinery, which includes cognate resistance (R) gene products, defense responses are engaged to restrict pathogen proliferation. Effectors from diverse symbionts may be delivered into plant cells via varied mechanisms, including whole organism cellular entry (viruses, some bacteria and fungi), type III and IV secretion (in bacteria), physical injection (nematodes and insects) and protein translocation signal sequences (oomycetes and fungi). This mini-review will summarize both similarities and differences in effectors and effector delivery systems found in diverse plant-associated symbionts as well as how these are described with Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO) terms. PMID:19278551

  13. The Salmonella SPI2 Effector SseI Mediates Long-Term Systemic Infection by Modulating Host Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Christiane; Gopinath, Smita; Peng, Kaitian; Laidlaw, Grace; Chien, Yueh-Hsiu; Jeong, Ha-Won; Li, Zhigang; Brown, Matthew D.; Sacks, David B.; Monack, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Host-adapted strains of Salmonella enterica cause systemic infections and have the ability to persist systemically for long periods of time despite the presence of a robust immune response. Chronically infected hosts are asymptomatic and transmit disease to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria, thereby serving as a critical reservoir for disease. We show that the bacterial effector protein SseI (also called SrfH), which is translocated into host cells by the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) type III secretion system (T3SS), is required for Salmonella typhimurium to maintain a long-term chronic systemic infection in mice. SseI inhibits normal cell migration of primary macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro, and such inhibition requires the host factor IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), an important regulator of cell migration. SseI binds directly to IQGAP1 and co-localizes with this factor at the cell periphery. The C-terminal domain of SseI is similar to PMT/ToxA, a bacterial toxin that contains a cysteine residue (C1165) that is critical for activity. Mutation of the corresponding residue in SseI (C178A) eliminates SseI function in vitro and in vivo, but not binding to IQGAP1. In addition, infection with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium suppressed DC migration to the spleen in vivo in an SseI-dependent manner. Correspondingly, examination of spleens from mice infected with WT S. typhimurium revealed fewer DC and CD4+ T lymphocytes compared to mice infected with ΔsseI S. typhimurium. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SseI inhibits normal host cell migration, which ultimately counteracts the ability of the host to clear systemic bacteria. PMID:19956712

  14. Microbial infection-induced expansion of effector T cells overcomes the suppressive effects of regulatory T cells via an IL-2 deprivation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alicia; Murray, Sean; Divakar, Prashanthi; Burnaevskiy, Nikolay; Pifer, Reed; Forman, James; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2012-01-15

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are a critical cell population that suppresses T cell activation in response to microbial and viral pathogens. We identify a cell-intrinsic mechanism by which effector CD4(+) T cells overcome the suppressive effects of Treg cells in the context of three distinct infections: Toxoplasma gondii, Listeria monocytogenes, and vaccinia virus. The acute responses to the parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens resulted in a transient reduction in frequency and absolute number of Treg cells. The infection-induced partial loss of Treg cells was essential for the initiation of potent Th1 responses and host protection against the pathogens. The observed disappearance of Treg cells was a result of insufficiency in IL-2 caused by the expansion of pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells with a limited capacity of IL-2 production. Exogenous IL-2 treatment during the parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections completely prevented the loss of Treg cells, but restoration of Treg cells resulted in a greatly enhanced susceptibility to the pathogens. These results demonstrate that the transient reduction in Treg cells induced by pathogens via IL-2 deprivation is essential for optimal T cell responses and host resistance to microbial and viral pathogens. PMID:22147768

  15. CD20+ T cells have a predominantly Tc1 effector memory phenotype and are expanded in the ascites of patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wiersma, Valerie R; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Klip, Harry G; Helfrich, Wijnand; Nijman, Hans W; Eggleton, Paul; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a small subset of T cells that expresses the B cell marker CD20 has been identified in healthy volunteers and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The origin of these CD20-positive T cells as well as their relevance in human disease remains unclear. Here, we identified that after functional B cell/T cell interaction CD20 molecules are transferred to the cell surface of T cells by trogocytosis together with the established trogocytosis marker HLA-DR. Further, the presence of CD20 on isolated CD20+ T cells remained stable for up to 48h of ex vivo culture. These CD20+ T cells almost exclusively produced IFNγ (∼70% vs. ∼20% in the CD20− T cell population) and were predominantly (CD8+) effector memory T cells (∼60–70%). This IFNγ producing and effector memory phenotype was also determined for CD20+ T cells as detected in the peripheral blood and ascitic fluids of ovarian cancer (OC) patients. In the latter, the percentage of CD20+ T cells was further strongly increased (from ∼6% in peripheral blood to 23% in ascitic fluid). Taken together, the data presented here indicate that CD20 is transferred to T cells upon intimate T cell/B cell interaction. Further, CD20+ T cells are of memory and IFNγ producing phenotype and are present in increased amounts in ascitic fluid of OC patients. PMID:26137418

  16. Controlling the fire--tissue-specific mechanisms of effector regulatory T-cell homing.

    PubMed

    Chow, Zachary; Banerjee, Ashish; Hickey, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have essential roles in regulating immune responses and limiting inappropriate inflammation. Evidence now indicates that to achieve this function, regulatory T cells must be able to migrate to the most appropriate locations within both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. This function is achieved via the spatiotemporally controlled expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, varying according to the developmental stage of the regulatory T cell and the location and environment where they undergo activation. In this Review, we summarise information on the roles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors in mediating regulatory T-cell migration and function throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In addition, we review recent studies that have used in vivo imaging to examine the actions of regulatory T cells in vivo, in lymph nodes, in the microvasculature and in the interstitium of peripheral organs. These studies reveal that the capacity of regulatory T cells to undergo selective migration serves a critical role in their ability to suppress immune responses. As such, the cellular and molecular requirements of regulatory T-cell migration need to be completely understood to enable the most effective use of these cells in clinical settings. PMID:25582339

  17. TRP channels and STIM/ORAI proteins: sensors and effectors of cancer and stroma cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, N; Lindemann, O; Schwab, A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are strongly influenced by host cells within the tumour stroma and vice versa. This leads to the development of a tumour microenvironment with distinct physical and chemical properties that are permissive for tumour progression. The ability to migrate plays a central role in this mutual interaction. Migration of cancer cells is considered as a prerequisite for tumour metastasis and the migration of host stromal cells is required for reaching the tumour site. Increasing evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and STIM/ORAI proteins affect key calcium-dependent mechanisms implicated in both cancer and stroma cell migration. These include, among others, cytoskeletal remodelling, growth factor/cytokine signalling and production, and adaptation to tumour microenvironmental properties such as hypoxia and oxidative stress. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding TRP channels and STIM/ORAI proteins in cancer and stroma cell migration. We focus on how TRP channel or STIM/ORAI-mediated Ca2+ signalling directly or indirectly influences cancer and stroma cell migration by affecting the above listed mechanisms. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cytoskeleton, Extracellular Matrix, Cell Migration, Wound Healing and Related Topics. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-24 PMID:24724725

  18. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are used to access T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT response correlates with protection; how...

  19. Detection of the GD2+/CD56+/CD45- immunophenotype by flow cytometry in cerebrospinal fluids from a patient with retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongqiang; Tang, Yongmin; Xu, Xiaojun; Tang, Hongfeng

    2013-02-01

    Triple-color flow cytometry with a panel of antibodies comprising GD2, CD56, and CD45 was performed to analyze cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) from a patient with retinoblastoma who was suspicious of meningeal metastasis based on clinical presentation. Our results showed that the cells in CSF demonstrated the immunophenotype positive for GD2 and CD56 but negative for CD45 antigen, which suggested the presence of CSF metastasis of retinoblastoma. At the end of eight cycles of intrathecal chemotherapy, CSF specimen was analyzed with Flow cytometry immunophenotyping (FCI) again and the result showed no detectable malignant cells with the same immunophenotype. Our conclusion is that FCI can be a quick and reliable method for the diagnosis of CSF metastasis of retinoblastoma and the immunophenotype (GD2+, CD56+, and CD45-) can be used to recognize residual retinoblastoma cells in CSF. PMID:23126274

  20. Cell Death-Inducing DFFA-Like Effector b Is Required for Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xianfang; Lee, Emily M.; Hammack, Christy; Robotham, Jason M.; Basu, Mausumi; Lang, Jianshe; Brinton, Margo A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanism of the hepatic tropism of hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains incompletely defined. In vitro hepatic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells produces hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) permissive for HCV infection, providing an opportunity for studying liver development and host determinants of HCV susceptibility. We previously identified the transition stage of HCV permissiveness and now investigate whether a host protein whose expression is induced during this transition stage is important for HCV infection. We suppressed the expression of a liver-specific protein, cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector b (CIDEB), and performed hepatocyte function and HCV infection assays. We also used a variety of cell-based assays to dissect the specific step of the HCV life cycle that potentially requires CIDEB function. We found CIDEB to be an essential cofactor for HCV entry into hepatocytes. Genetic interference with CIDEB in stem cells followed by hepatic differentiation leads to HLCs that are refractory to HCV infection, and infection time course experiments revealed that CIDEB functions in a late step of HCV entry, possibly to facilitate membrane fusion. The role of CIDEB in mediating HCV entry is distinct from those of the well-established receptors, as it is not required for HCV pseudoparticle entry. Finally, HCV infection effectively downregulates CIDEB protein through a posttranscriptional mechanism. IMPORTANCE This study identifies a hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry cofactor that is required for HCV infection of hepatocytes and potentially facilitates membrane fusion between viral and host membranes. CIDEB and its interaction with HCV may open up new avenues of investigation of lipid droplets and viral entry. PMID:24829338

  1. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  2. Intracellular Complement Activation Sustains T Cell Homeostasis and Mediates Effector Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G.; Fara, Antonella F.; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C.; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T. Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While “tonic” intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  3. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  4. Memory and effector CD8 T-cell responses after nanoparticle vaccination of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel E; Schwarz, Katrin; Baumgaertner, Petra; Manolova, Vania; Devevre, Estelle; Sterry, Wolfram; Walden, Peter; Zippelius, Alfred; Conzett, Katrin Baumann; Senti, Gabriela; Voelter, Verena; Cerottini, Jean-Philippe; Guggisberg, David; Willers, Jörg; Geldhof, Christine; Romero, Pedro; Kündig, Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Dummer, Reinhard; Trefzer, Uwe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2010-10-01

    Induction of cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses is enhanced by the exclusive presentation of antigen through dendritic cells, and by innate stimuli, such as toll-like receptor ligands. On the basis of these 2 principles, we designed a vaccine against melanoma. Specifically, we linked the melanoma-specific Melan-A/Mart-1 peptide to virus-like nanoparticles loaded with A-type CpG, a ligand for toll-like receptor 9. Melan-A/Mart-1 peptide was cross-presented, as shown in vitro with human dendritic cells and in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. A phase I/II study in stage II-IV melanoma patients showed that the vaccine was well tolerated, and that 14/22 patients generated ex vivo detectable T-cell responses, with in part multifunctional T cells capable to degranulate and produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. No significant influence of the route of immunization (subcutaneous versus intradermal) nor dosing regimen (weekly versus daily clusters) could be observed. It is interesting to note that, relatively large fractions of responding specific T cells exhibited a central memory phenotype, more than what is achieved by other nonlive vaccines. We conclude that vaccination with CpG loaded virus-like nanoparticles is associated with a human CD8 T-cell response with properties of a potential long-term immune protection from the disease. PMID:20842051

  5. Distinct Kinetics of Effector CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cells after Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in Naïve or Vaccinated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of effector CD8+-T-cell responses to specific Trypanosoma cruzi epitopes was investigated after challenge. Our results suggest that the delayed kinetics differs from that observed in other microbial infections and facilitates the establishment of the disease in naïve mice. In contrast, in vaccinated mice, the swift CD8+-T-cell response helps host survival after challenge. PMID:16552083

  6. Shaping the repertoire of tumor-infiltrating effector and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Peter A.; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Malchow, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many tumors express antigens that can be specifically or selectively recognized by T lymphocytes, suggesting that T cell-mediated immunity may be harnessed for the immunotherapy of cancer. However, since tumors originate from normal cells and evolve within the context of self tissues, the immune mechanisms that prevent the autoimmune attack of normal tissues function in parallel to restrict anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the purging of autoreactive T cells and the development of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to be major barriers impeding anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we discuss current understanding regarding the antigens recognized by tumor-infiltrating T cell populations, the mechanisms that shape the repertoire of these cells, and the role of the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (Aire) in these processes. Further elucidation of these principles is likely to be critical for optimizing emerging cancer immunotherapies, and for the rational design of novel therapies exhibiting robust anti-tumor activity with limited toxicity. PMID:24712470

  7. Proteome characterization of sea star coelomocytes--the innate immune effector cells of echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Franco, Catarina F; Santos, Romana; Coelho, Ana V

    2011-09-01

    Sea star coelomic fluid is in contact with all internal organs, carrying signaling molecules and a large population of circulating cells, the coelomocytes. These cells, also known as echinoderm blood cells, are responsible for the innate immune responses and are also known to have an important role in the first stage of regeneration, i.e. wound closure, necessary to prevent disruption of the body fluid balance and to limit the invasion of pathogens. This study focuses on the proteome characterization of these multifunctional cells. The identification of 358 proteins was achieved using a combination of two techniques for protein separation (1-D SDS-PAGE followed by nanoLC and 2-D SDS-PAGE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. To our knowledge, the present report represents the first comprehensive list of sea star coelomocyte proteins, constituting an important database to validate many echinoderm-predicted proteins. Evidence for new pathways in these particular echinoderm cells are also described, and thus representing a valuable resource to stimulate future studies aiming to unravel the homology with vertebrate immune cells and particularly the origins of the immune system itself. PMID:21751360

  8. Interleukin-13 Pathway Alterations Impair Invariant Natural Killer T-Cell-Mediated Regulation of Effector T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Usero, Lorena; Sánchez, Ana; Pizarro, Eduarda; Xufré, Cristina; Martí, Mercè; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Roura-Mir, Carme

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have shown that human natural killer T (NKT) cells can promote immunity to pathogens, but their regulatory function is still being investigated. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells have been shown to be effective in preventing type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. Activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, modulation of B-cell responses, and immune deviation were proposed to be responsible for the suppressive effect of iNKT cells. We studied the regulatory capacity of human iNKT cells from control subjects and patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at disease clinical onset. We demonstrate that control iNKT cells suppress the proliferation of effector T cells (Teffs) through a cell contact-independent mechanism. Of note, suppression depended on the secretion of interleukin-13 (IL-13) by iNKT cells because an antibody blocking this cytokine resulted from the abrogation of Teff suppression; however, T1D-derived iNKT cells showed impaired regulation that could be attributed to the decrease in IL-13 secretion. Thus, alteration of the IL-13 pathway at disease onset may lead to the progression of the autoimmune response in T1D. Advances in the study of iNKT cells and the selection of agonists potentiating IL-13 secretion should permit new therapeutic strategies to prevent the development of T1D. PMID:27207542

  9. chinmo is a functional effector of the JAK/STAT pathway that regulates eye development, tumor formation and stem cell self-renewal in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Salis, Pauline; Evans, Cory J.; Ekas, Laura A.; Marouf, Amine; Zavadil, Jiri; Banerjee, Utpal; Bach, Erika A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Drosophila STAT transcription factor Stat92E regulates diverse functions, including organ development and stem cell self-renewal. However, the Stat92E functional effectors that mediate these processes are largely unknown. Here we show that chinmo is a cell-autonomous, downstream mediator of Stat92E that shares numerous functions with this protein. Loss of either gene results in malformed eyes and head capsules due to defects in eye progenitor cells. Hyperactivation of Stat92E or misexpression of Chinmo results in blood cell tumors. Both proteins are expressed in germline (GSCs) and cyst stem cells (CySCs) in the testis. While Stat92E is required for the self-renewal of both populations, chinmo is only required in CySCs, indicating that Stat92E regulates self-renewal in different stem cells through independent effectors. Like hyperactivated Stat92E, Chinmo misexpression in CySCs is sufficient to maintain GSCs non-autonomously. Chinmo is therefore a key effector of JAK/STAT signaling in a variety of developmental and pathological contexts. PMID:20412771

  10. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in the small intestinal lamina propria show an effector/memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zijin; Jang, Myoung Ho; Otani, Kazuhiro; Bai, Zhongbin; Umemoto, Eiji; Matsumoto, Masanori; Nishiyama, Mika; Yamasaki, Mikako; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Hirata, Takako; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been implicated in the suppression of pathogenic responses to both self- and non-self-antigens in the intestine. However, their precise properties and functions in the gut, as well as the molecular basis of their recruitment to the gut, are poorly understood. Here, we found that most of the CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells in the small intestinal lamina propria (LP) express Foxp3 and exhibit an 'effector/memory' phenotype, CD44(hi)CD45RB(lo)CD62L(-), whereas only a minority of the Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes showed this phenotype. The Tregs in the small intestinal LP (LP-Tregs) expressed higher levels of CCR4 and CCR9 and a substantially lower level of CCR7 than the Tregs in the spleen. In vitro, the LP-Tregs showed chemotaxis to CCL25/thymus-expressed chemokine. In addition, they showed efficient chemotaxis to the CCR4 ligands, CCL17/thymus and activation-regulated chemokine and CCL22/macrophage-derived chemokine, which are abundantly expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) in the small intestinal LP. In vivo, approximately 50% of the LP-Tregs were closely associated or in direct contact with LP-DCs. These findings demonstrate that LP-Tregs are phenotypically and functionally unique and raise the possibility that they are retained in the small intestinal LP through the action of CCL17 and CCL22, which are locally produced by LP-DCs. PMID:18184698

  11. Shigella enterotoxin-2 is a type III effector that participates in Shigella-induced interleukin 8 secretion by epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farfán, Mauricio J.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Barry, Eileen M.; Nataro, James P.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously described a protein termed Shigella enterotoxin 2 (ShET-2), which induces rises in short circuit current in rabbit ileum mounted in the Ussing chamber. Published reports have postulated that ShET-2 may be secreted by the Shigella type III secretion system (T3SS). In this study we show that ShET-2 secretion into the extracellular space requires the T3SS in S. flexneri 2a strain 2457T and a ShET-2-TEM fusion was translocated into epithelial cells in a T3SS-dependent manner. The ShET-2 gene, sen, is encoded downstream of the ospC1 gene of S. flexneri, and we show that sen is co-transcribed with this T3SS-secreted product. Considering that T3SS effectors have diverse roles in Shigella infection and that vaccine constructs lacking ShET-2 are attenuated in volunteers, we asked whether ShET-2 has a function other than its enterotoxic activity. We constructed a ShET-2 mutant in 2457T and tested its effect on epithelial cell invasion, plaque formation, guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis and interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion from infected monolayers. Though other phenotypes were not different compared to the wild-type parent, we found that HEp-2 and T84 cells infected with the ShET-2 mutant exhibited significantly reduced IL-8 secretion into the basolateral compartment, suggesting that ShET-2 might participate in the Shigella-induced inflammation of epithelial cells. PMID:21219446

  12. Effector CD8^+ T cells migrate via chemokine-enhanced generalized L'evy walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Harris, Tajie; Christian, David; Liu, Andrea; Hunter, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Chemokines play a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. In order to understand the role of the chemokine CXCL10 during chronic infection by the parasite T. gondii, we analyze tracks of migrating CD8^+ T cells in brain tissue. Surprisingly, we find that T cell motility is not described by a Brownian walk, but instead is consistent with a generalized L'evy walk consisting of L'evy-distributed runs alternating with pauses of L'evy-distributed durations. According to our model, this enables T cells to find rare targets more than an order of magnitude more efficiently than Brownian random walkers. The chemokine CXCL10 increases the migration speed without changing the character of the walk statistics. Thus, CD8^+ T cells use an efficient search strategy to facilitate an effective immune response, and CXCL10 aids them in shortening the average time to find rare targets.

  13. Bacterial cell wall recycling provides cytosolic muropeptides as effectors for beta-lactamase induction.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, C; Huang, L J; Bartowsky, E; Normark, S; Park, J T

    1994-01-01

    A mechanism for bacteria to monitor the status of their vital cell wall peptidoglycan is suggested by the convergence of two phenomena: peptidoglycan recycling and beta-lactamase induction. ampG and ampD, genes essential for beta-lactamase regulation, are here shown to be required for recycling as well. Cells lacking either AmpG or AmpD lose up to 40% of their peptidoglycan per generation, whereas Escherichia coli normally suffers minimal losses and instead recycles 40 or 50% of the tripeptide, L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid, from its peptidoglycan each generation. The ampG mutant releases peptidoglycan-derived material into the medium. In contrast, the ampD mutant accumulates a novel cell wall muropeptide, 1,6-anhydro N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (anhMurNAc-tripeptide), in its cytoplasm. This work suggests that AmpG is the permease for a large muropeptide and AmpD is a novel cytosolic N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase that cleaves anhMurNAc-tripeptide to release tripeptide, which is then recycled. These results also suggest that the phenomenon of beta-lactamase induction is regulated by the level of muropeptide(s) in the cytoplasm, since an ampD mutation that results in beta-lactamase expression even in the absence of a beta-lactamase inducer coincides with accumulation of anhMurNAc-tripeptide. The transcriptional regulator AmpR is presumably converted into an activator for beta-lactamase production by sensing the higher level of muropeptide(s). This may be an example of a general mechanism for signaling the progress of external events such as cell wall maturation, cell division or cell wall damage. PMID:7925310

  14. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Novel Functions of Salmonella enterica SPI2-T3SS Effector Proteins in Remodeling of the Host Cell Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, Roopa; Liebl, David; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Salmonella enterica induce a massive remodeling of the endosomal system in infected host cells. One dramatic consequence of this interference is the induction of various extensive tubular aggregations of membrane vesicles, and tubules positive for late endosomal/lysosomal markers are referred to as Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. SIF are highly dynamic in nature with extension and collapse velocities of 0.4–0.5 µm x sec−1. The induction of SIF depends on the function of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and a subset of effector proteins. In this study, we applied live cell imaging and electron microscopy to analyze the role of individual effector proteins in SIF morphology and dynamic properties of SIF. SIF in cells infected with sifB, sseJ, sseK1, sseK2, sseI, sseL, sspH1, sspH2, slrP, steC, gogB or pipB mutant strains showed a morphology and dynamics comparable to SIF induced by WT Salmonella. SIF were absent in cells infected with the sifA-deficient strain and live cell analyses allowed tracking of the loss of the SCV membrane of intracellular sifA Salmonella. In contrast to analyses in fixed cells, in living host cells SIF induced by sseF- or sseG-deficient strains were not discontinuous, but rather continuous and thinner in diameter. A very dramatic phenotype was observed for the pipB2-deficient strain that induced very bulky, non-dynamic aggregations of membrane vesicles. Our study underlines the requirement of the study of Salmonella-host interaction in living systems and reveals new phenotypes due to the intracellular activities of Salmonella. PMID:25522146

  15. Chronic prolymphocytoid leukaemia with an unusual immature immunophenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Lima, M; Coutinho, J; Orfão, A; Macedo, A L; San Miguel, J F; Justiça, B

    1994-01-01

    A case of a 58 year old woman with a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of unusual clinical presentation, disease course, and immunophenotype is presented. At diagnosis she had severe anaemia, moderate lymphocytosis with some cells having prolymphocytoid features and a normal platelet count. A clinical examination yielded negative results. Only anaemia related symptoms were found and the patient became blood transfusion dependent. Both the lymphocytosis and the proportion of prolymphocytoid cells rose insidiously and thrombocytopenia developed later during the course of the disease. Three years later, the patient had a white cell count of 269 x 10(9)/l almost exclusively of prolymphocytoid cells and the bone marrow was diffusely infiltrated. She was refractory to chemotherapy and the anaemia did not improve after treatment with cyclosporine. Lymphoid cells were positive for cytoplasmatic CD3, HLA-Dr, CD34, CD38, CD7, CD56, CD13, CD33 and CD65. Membrane alpha beta and gamma delta T cell receptors (TCRs) were not expressed and the beta chain TCR gene was in germline configuration. Other membrane T, B, natural killer, and myelomonocytic markers were negative. Karyotype analysis was tried several times but metaphases were not obtained, even after stimulation with T cell mitogens. Images PMID:8027401

  16. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14d) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of PBMC are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited Tcm responses correlate with protection against experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection. The objective ...

  17. Propofol Increases Host Susceptibility to Microbial Infection by Reducing Subpopulations of Mature Immune Effector Cells at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Xayarath, Bobbi; Weinberg, Guy; Shilling, Rebecca A.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics are known to modulate host immune responses, but separating the variables of surgery from anesthesia when analyzing hospital acquired infections is often difficult. Here, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used to assess the impact of the common anesthetic propofol on host susceptibility to infection. Brief sedation of mice with physiologically relevant concentrations of propofol increased bacterial burdens in target organs by more than 10,000-fold relative to infected control animals. The adverse effects of propofol sedation on immune clearance of Lm persisted after recovery from sedation, as animals given the drug remained susceptible to infection for days following anesthesia. In contrast to propofol, sedation with alternative anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine or pentobarbital did not increase susceptibility to systemic Lm infection. Propofol altered systemic cytokine and chemokine expression during infection, and prevented effective bacterial clearance by inhibiting the recruitment and/or activity of immune effector cells at sites of infection. Propofol exposure induced a marked reduction in marginal zone macrophages in the spleens of Lm infected mice, resulting in bacterial dissemination into deep tissue. Propofol also significantly increased mouse kidney abscess formation following infection with the common nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these data indicate that even brief exposure to propofol severely compromises host resistance to microbial infection for days after recovery from sedation. PMID:26381144

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  19. Human intrahepatic regulatory T cells are functional, require IL‐2 from effector cells for survival, and are susceptible to Fas ligand‐mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung‐Yi; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Hunter, Stuart; Bhogal, Ricky; Birtwistle, Jane; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Roberts, Sheree; Ming, Mikaela; Hannah, Jack; Thomas, Clare; Adali, Gupse; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Syn, Wing‐Kin; Afford, Simon; Lalor, Patricia F.; Adams, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress T effector cell proliferation and maintain immune homeostasis. Autoimmune liver diseases persist despite high frequencies of Treg in the liver, suggesting that the local hepatic microenvironment might affect Treg stability, survival, and function. We hypothesized that interactions between Treg and endothelial cells during recruitment and then with epithelial cells within the liver affect Treg stability, survival, and function. To model this, we explored the function of Treg after migration through human hepatic sinusoidal‐endothelium (postendothelial migrated Treg [PEM Treg]) and the effect of subsequent interactions with cholangiocytes and local proinflammatory cytokines on survival and stability of Treg. Our findings suggest that the intrahepatic microenvironment is highly enriched with proinflammatory cytokines but deficient in the Treg survival cytokine interleukin (IL)‐2. Migration through endothelium into a model mimicking the inflamed liver microenvironment did not affect Treg stability; however, functional capacity was reduced. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous IL‐2 enhanced PEM Treg phosphorylated STAT5 signaling compared with PEMCD8. CD4 and CD8 T cells are the main source of IL‐2 in the inflamed liver. Liver‐infiltrating Treg reside close to bile ducts and coculture with cholangiocytes or their supernatants induced preferential apoptosis of Treg compared with CD8 effector cells. Treg from diseased livers expressed high levels of CD95, and their apoptosis was inhibited by IL‐2 or blockade of CD95. Conclusion: Recruitment through endothelium does not impair Treg stability, but a proinflammatory microenvironment deficient in IL‐2 leads to impaired function and increased susceptibility of Treg to epithelial cell‐induced Fas‐mediated apoptosis. These results provide a mechanism to explain Treg dysfunction in inflamed tissues and suggest that IL‐2 supplementation, particularly if used in conjunction

  20. γδ T Cells from Tolerized αβ T Cell Receptor (TCR)–deficient Mice Inhibit Contact Sensitivity-Effector T Cells In Vivo, and Their Interferon-γ Production In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanik, Marian; Anderson, Laurel R.; Ushio, Hiroko; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Owen, Michael J.; Hayday, Adrian C.; Askenase, Philip W.

    1996-01-01

    Contact sensitivity (CS) responses to reactive hapten Ag, such as picryl chloride (PCl) or oxazolone (OX), are classical examples of T cell–mediated immune responses in vivo that are clearly subject to multifaceted regulation. There is abundant evidence that downregulation of CS may be mediated by T cells exposed to high doses of Ag. This is termed high dose Ag tolerance. To clarify the T cell types that effect CS responses and mediate their downregulation, we have undertaken studies of CS in mice congenitally deficient in specific subsets of lymphocytes. The first such studies, using αβ T cell–deficient (TCRα−/−) mice, are presented here. The results clearly show that TCRα−/− mice cannot mount CS, implicating αβ T cells as the critical CS-effector cells. However, TCRα−/− mice can, after high dose tolerance, downregulate α+/+ CS-effector T cells adoptively transferred into them. By mixing ex vivo and then adoptive cell transfers in vivo, the active downregulatory cells in tolerized α−/− mice are shown to include γδ TCR+ cells that also can downregulate interferon-γ production by the targeted CS-effector cells in vitro. Downregulation by γδ cells showed specificity for hapten, but was not restricted by the MHC. Together, these findings establish that γδ T cells cannot fulfill CS-effector functions performed by αβ T cells, but may fulfill an Ag-specific downregulatory role that may be directly comparable to reports of Ag-specific downregulation of IgE antibody responses by γδ T cells. Comparisons are likewise considered with downregulation by γδ T cells occurring in immune responses to pathogens, tumors, and allografts, and in systemic autoimmunity. PMID:8976169

  1. Effector Glycosyltransferases in Legionella

    PubMed Central

    Belyi, Yury; Jank, Thomas; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Legionella causes severe pneumonia in humans. The pathogen produces an array of effectors, which interfere with host cell functions. Among them are the glucosyltransferases Lgt1, Lgt2 and Lgt3 from L. pneumophila. Lgt1 and Lgt2 are produced predominately in the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth, while synthesis of Lgt3 is induced mainly in the lag-phase before intracellular replication of bacteria starts. Lgt glucosyltransferases are structurally similar to clostridial glucosylating toxins. The enzymes use UDP–glucose as a donor substrate and modify eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A at serine-53. This modification results in inhibition of protein synthesis and death of target cells.In addition to Lgts, Legionella genomes disclose several genes, coding for effector proteins likely to possess glycosyltransferase activities, including SetA (subversion of eukaryotic vesicle trafficking A), which influences vesicular trafficking in the yeast model system and displays tropism for late endosomal/lysosomal compartments of mammalian cells. This review mainly discusses recent results on the structure–function relationship of Lgt glucosyltransferases. PMID:21833323

  2. Limited Density of an Antigen Presented by RMA-S Cells Requires B7-1/CD28 Signaling to Enhance T-Cell Immunity at the Effector Phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Lin; Sluijter, Marjolein; Doorduijn, Elien M.; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yan; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Yao, Xin; Du, Fengkun; Gu, Baihan; Hoang, Kim; Nguyen, Yen H.; Taylor, Nichelle; Stephens, Chelsea R.; van Hall, Thorbald; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The association of B7-1/CD28 between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T-cells provides a second signal to proliferate and activate T-cell immunity at the induction phase. Many reports indicate that tumor cells transfected with B7-1 induced augmented antitumor immunity at the induction phase by mimicking APC function; however, the function of B7-1 on antitumor immunity at the effector phase is unknown. Here, we report direct evidence of enhanced T-cell antitumor immunity at the effector phase by the B7-1 molecule. Our experiments in vivo and in vitro indicated that reactivity of antigen-specific monoclonal and polyclonal T-cell effectors against a Lass5 epitope presented by RMA-S cells is increased when the cells expressed B7-1. Use of either anti-B7-1 or anti-CD28 antibodies to block the B7-1/CD28 association reduced reactivity of the T effectors against B7-1 positive RMA-S cells. Transfection of Lass5 cDNA into or pulse of Lass5 peptide onto B7-1 positive RMA-S cells overcomes the requirement of the B7-1/CD28 signal for T effector response. To our knowledge, the data offers, for the first time, strong evidence that supports the requirement of B7-1/CD28 secondary signal at the effector phase of antitumor T-cell immunity being dependent on the density of an antigenic peptide. PMID:25383875

  3. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  4. Vaccine-Induced Antibody Isotypes Are Skewed by Impaired CD4 T Cell and Invariant NKT Cell Effector Responses in MyD88-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Iweala, Onyinye I.; Smith, Donald W.; Matharu, Kabir S.; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Nguyen, Deanna D.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Umetsu, Dale T.; Behar, Samuel M.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for TLR signaling in the initiation of an Ag-specific Ab response is controversial. In this report we show that a novel OVA-expressing recombinant Salmonella vaccine (Salmonella-OVA) elicits a Th1-biased cell-mediated and serum Ab response upon oral or i.p. immunization of C57BL/6 mice. In MyD88−/−mice, Th1-dependent Ab responses are greatly reduced while Th2-dependent Ab isotypes are elevated in response to oral and i.p., but not s.c. footpad, immunization. When the T effector response to oral vaccination is examined we find that activated, adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4+ T cells accumulate in the draining lymph nodes, but fail to produce IFN-γ, in MyD88−/− mice. Moreover, CD1d tetramer staining shows that invariant NKT cells are activated in response to oral Salmonella-OVA vaccination in wild-type, but not MyD88−/−, mice. Treatment with neutralizing Ab to CD1d reduces the OVA-specific Ab response only in MyD88-sufficient wild-type mice, suggesting that both Ag-specific CD4 T cell and invariant NKT cell effector responses to Salmonella-OVA vaccination are MyD88 dependent. Taken together, our data indicate that the type of adaptive immune response generated to this live attenuated vaccine is regulated by both the presence of MyD88-mediated signals and vaccination route, which may have important implications for future vaccine design. PMID:19620295

  5. Primary and Chronic HIV Infection Differently Modulates Mucosal Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-Cells Differentiation Profile and Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cimini, Eleonora; Agrati, Chiara; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Vlassi, Chrysoula; Casetti, Rita; Sacchi, Alessandra; Lionetti, Raffaella; Bordoni, Veronica; Tumino, Nicola; Scognamiglio, Paola; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Gut-associated immune system has been identified as a major battlefield during the early phases of HIV infection. γδ T-cells, deeply affected in number and function after HIV infection, are able to act as a first line of defence against invading pathogens by producing antiviral soluble factors and by killing infected cells. Despite the relevant role in mucosal immunity, few data are available on gut-associated γδ T-cells during HIV infection. Aim of this work was to evaluate how primary (P-HIV) and chronic (C-HIV) HIV infection affects differentiation profile and functionality of circulating and gut-associated Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-cells. In particular, circulating and mucosal cells were isolated from respectively whole blood and residual gut samples from HIV-infected subjects with primary and chronic infection and from healthy donors (HD). Differentiation profile and functionality were analyzed by multiparametric flow cytometry. P-HIV and C-HIV were characterized by an increase in the frequency of effector Vδ1-T cells both in circulating and mucosal compartments. Moreover, during P-HIV mucosal Vδ1 T-cells expressed high levels of CD107a, suggesting a good effector cytotoxic capability of these cells in the early phase of infection that was lost in C-HIV. P-HIV induced an increase in circulating effector Vδ2 T-cells in comparison to C-HIV and HD. Notably, P-HIV as well as HD were characterized by the ability of mucosal Vδ2 T-cells to spontaneously produce IFN-γ that was lost in C-HIV. Altogether, our data showed for the first time a functional capability of mucosal Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-cells during P-HIV that was lost in C-HIV, suggesting exhaustion mechanisms induced by persistent stimulation. PMID:26086523

  6. Primary and Chronic HIV Infection Differently Modulates Mucosal Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-Cells Differentiation Profile and Effector Functions.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Eleonora; Agrati, Chiara; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Vlassi, Chrysoula; Casetti, Rita; Sacchi, Alessandra; Lionetti, Raffaella; Bordoni, Veronica; Tumino, Nicola; Scognamiglio, Paola; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Gut-associated immune system has been identified as a major battlefield during the early phases of HIV infection. γδ T-cells, deeply affected in number and function after HIV infection, are able to act as a first line of defence against invading pathogens by producing antiviral soluble factors and by killing infected cells. Despite the relevant role in mucosal immunity, few data are available on gut-associated γδ T-cells during HIV infection. Aim of this work was to evaluate how primary (P-HIV) and chronic (C-HIV) HIV infection affects differentiation profile and functionality of circulating and gut-associated Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-cells. In particular, circulating and mucosal cells were isolated from respectively whole blood and residual gut samples from HIV-infected subjects with primary and chronic infection and from healthy donors (HD). Differentiation profile and functionality were analyzed by multiparametric flow cytometry. P-HIV and C-HIV were characterized by an increase in the frequency of effector Vδ1-T cells both in circulating and mucosal compartments. Moreover, during P-HIV mucosal Vδ1 T-cells expressed high levels of CD107a, suggesting a good effector cytotoxic capability of these cells in the early phase of infection that was lost in C-HIV. P-HIV induced an increase in circulating effector Vδ2 T-cells in comparison to C-HIV and HD. Notably, P-HIV as well as HD were characterized by the ability of mucosal Vδ2 T-cells to spontaneously produce IFN-γ that was lost in C-HIV. Altogether, our data showed for the first time a functional capability of mucosal Vδ1 and Vδ2 T-cells during P-HIV that was lost in C-HIV, suggesting exhaustion mechanisms induced by persistent stimulation. PMID:26086523

  7. Phenotypic analysis of nylon-wool-adherent suppressor cells that inhibit the effector process of tumour cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Fukao, K

    1994-01-01

    The causes of down-regulation of cytotoxic immune responses in cancer patients have not been fully evaluated. We previously demonstrated that T-cell-growth-factor-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with the surface phenotype CD8+ CD11b-, from patients with widespread metastasis of gastric carcinoma, inhibited the effector process of lymphokine-activated-killer(LAK)-cell-mediated cytolysis. In this study, we examined suppressor cell activity in freshly prepared PBL from 18 patients with advanced gastric carcinoma, and 10 normal healthy individuals. The suppressor cell activity was assayed by recording whether or not PBL inhibited directly the effector process of LAK cell cytotoxicity. Most of the PBL suspensions from cancer patients showed that they contained a population of cells that can directly inhibit the effector phase of tumor cell lysis of the cytotoxic cells. To analyze further the PBL responsible for the suppression, the cells were passed over a nylon-wool column. Nylon-wool-adherent cells significantly augmented the suppression, while the cells passing through abrogated the suppressive effect. Most nylon-wool-adherent cells from 10 normal healthy controls did not inhibit the cytotoxic reaction. To determine further the suppressor-effector population in nylon-wool-adherent cells, negative-selection studies using CD8-, CD4- or CD11b-coated magnetic beads, and positive-selection studies using CD8- or CD4-coated magnetic beads were performed. Finally the results suggest that the suppressor-effector cells comprise at least two different surface phenotypes: CD8+ T and CD8-CD11b+ cells. The possible role of CD4+ T cells and HLA-DR+ LeuM3+ macrophages as suppressor cells was ruled out in nylon-wool-adherent cells. CD8+ T and possibly CD8-CD11b+ cells apparently suppressed the efferent limb of the antitumor immunity. The selective immune suppression mediated by these cells may partly be concerned with escape mechanisms of gastric carcinoma from the host

  8. Nano-particle vaccination combined with TLR-7 and -9 ligands triggers memory and effector CD8⁺ T-cell responses in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Goldinger, Simone M; Dummer, Reinhard; Baumgaertner, Petra; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Schwarz, Katrin; Hammann-Haenni, Anya; Willers, Joerg; Geldhof, Christine; Prior, John O; Kündig, Thomas M; Michielin, Olivier; Bachmann, Martin F; Speiser, Daniel E

    2012-11-01

    Optimal vaccine strategies must be identified for improving T-cell vaccination against infectious and malignant diseases. MelQbG10 is a virus-like nano-particle loaded with A-type CpG-oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) and coupled to peptide(16-35) derived from Melan-A/MART-1. In this phase IIa clinical study, four groups of stage III-IV melanoma patients were vaccinated with MelQbG10, given (i) with IFA (Montanide) s.c.; (ii) with IFA s.c. and topical Imiquimod; (iii) i.d. with topical Imiquimod; or (iv) as intralymph node injection. In total, 16/21 (76%) patients generated ex vivo detectable Melan-A/MART-1-specific T-cell responses. T-cell frequencies were significantly higher when IFA was used as adjuvant, resulting in detectable T-cell responses in all (11/11) patients, with predominant generation of effector-memory-phenotype cells. In turn, Imiquimod induced higher proportions of central-memory-phenotype cells and increased percentages of CD127(+) (IL-7R) T cells. Direct injection of MelQbG10 into lymph nodes resulted in lower T-cell frequencies, associated with lower proportions of memory and effector-phenotype T cells. Swelling of vaccine site draining lymph nodes, and increased glucose uptake at PET/CT was observed in 13/15 (87%) of evaluable patients, reflecting vaccine triggered immune reactions in lymph nodes. We conclude that the simultaneous use of both Imiquimod and CpG-ODN induced combined memory and effector CD8(+) T-cell responses. PMID:22806397

  9. A c-di-GMP Effector System Controls Cell Adhesion by Inside-Out Signaling and Surface Protein Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Sondermann, Holger; O'Toole, George A.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit—from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger. PMID:21304920

  10. A novel SIV gag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clone suppresses SIVmac239 replication in CD4(+)T cells revealing the interplay between antiviral effector cells and their infected targets.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Coren, Lori V; Jain, Sumiti; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-06-01

    To study CD4(+)T-cell suppression of AIDS virus replication, we isolated nine rhesus macaque SIVGag-specific CD4(+)T-cell clones. One responding clone, Gag68, produced a typical cytotoxic CD8(+)T-cell response: induction of intracellular IFN-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and CD107a degranulation. Gag68 effectively suppressed the spread of SIVmac239 in CD4(+)T cells with a corresponding reduction of infected Gag68 effector cells, suggesting that CD4(+)effectors need to suppress their own infection in addition to their targets to be effective. Gag68 TCR cloning and gene transfer into CD4(+)T cells enabled additional experiments with this unique specificity after the original clone senesced. Our data supports the idea that CD4(+)T cells can directly limit AIDS virus spread in T cells. Furthermore, Gag68 TCR transfer into CD4(+)T-cell clones with differing properties holds promise to better understand the suppressive effector mechanisms used by this important component of the antiviral response using the rhesus macaque model. PMID:27017056

  11. An inter-laboratory retrospective analysis of immunotoxicological endpoints in non-human primates: flow cytometry immunophenotyping.

    PubMed

    Krejsa, Cecile M; Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Polissar, Nayak L; Cox, Nick; Clark, Darcey; Cowan, Laine; Bussiere, Jeanine; Lebrec, Herve

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates may be the only relevant species for pharmacology or toxicology studies of certain biologics, due to lack of activity in other species. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping is often included as a minimally invasive adjunct to standard toxicity testing. A retrospective inter-laboratory analysis was conducted to assess counts and variability of the main cell types monitored in toxicity studies, and to provide guidance for conduct and interpretation of immunophenotyping assessments in cynomolgus monkeys. Univariate and multivariate models were developed. Study design factors influencing cell counts and variability were identified and a power analysis was performed. Pre-study and on-study counts were generally similar; longitudinal analysis showed little drift in mean counts or within-animal variability over time. Within-animal variability was lower than inter-animal variability. Gender was associated with small but significant differences in mean counts and variability. Age was associated with significant differences in variability. Immunophenotype definitions were associated with significant differences in mean counts and within-animal variability for most cell types. Power analysis for groups of 6-8 animals showed that differences of ≈50% in counts of T-cells, T-cell subsets, and B-cells compared to pre-treatment values may be detected; for NK cells and monocytes, differences of ≈60-90% may be detected. This review yields some general points to consider for immunophenotyping studies, i.e. (a) analysis of log-transformed cell count data and comparisons using each animal as its own reference will improve ability to detect changes, (b) the magnitude of change detectable given study group size should be considered, (c) multiplication of sampling timepoints during a study seems unnecessary, (d) consideration should be given to using only one gender, when applicable, to increase power while minimizing animal usage, and (e) the choice of immunophenotype

  12. CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells Exhibit Impaired Ability to Suppress Effector T Cell Proliferation in Patients with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Hang-Rae; Lee, Jeong Seon; Jung, Hae Woon; Kim, Hwa Young; Lee, Gyung Min; Lee, Jieun; Sim, Ji Hyun; Oh, Sae Jin; Chung, Doo Hyun; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether the frequency, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are altered in young TS patients with the 45,X karyotype compared to age-matched controls. Design and Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from young TS patients (n = 24, 17.4–35.9 years) and healthy controls (n = 16) were stained with various Treg markers to characterize their phenotypes. Based on the presence of thyroid autoimmunity, patients were categorized into TS (–) (n = 7) and TS (+) (n = 17). Tregs sorted for CD4+CD25bright were co-cultured with autologous CD4+CD25− target cells in the presence of anti-CD3 and -CD28 antibodies to assess their suppressive function. Results Despite a lower frequency of CD4+ T cells in the TS (-) and TS (+) patients (mean 30.8% and 31.7%, vs. 41.2%; P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively), both groups exhibited a higher frequency of FOXP3+ Tregs among CD4+ T cells compared with controls (means 1.99% and 2.05%, vs. 1.33%; P = 0.029 and P = 0.004, respectively). There were no differences in the expression of CTLA-4 and the frequency of Tregs expressing CXCR3+, and CCR4+CCR6+ among the three groups. However, the ability of Tregs to suppress the in vitro proliferation of autologous CD4+CD25− T cells was significantly impaired in the TS (–) and TS (+) patients compared to controls (P = 0.003 and P = 0.041). Meanwhile, both the TS (–) and TS (+) groups had lower frequencies of naïve cells (P = 0.001 for both) but higher frequencies of effector memory cells (P = 0.004 and P = 0.002) than did the healthy control group. Conclusions The Tregs of the TS patients could not efficiently suppress the proliferation of autologous effector T cells, despite their increased frequency in peripheral CD4+ T cells. PMID:26709833

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase prevents elicitation of Th1 cell response via interleukin 10 and downregulates Th1 effector cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Díaz, Pablo; Mucci, Juan; Meira, María Ana; Bogliotti, Yanina; Musikant, Daniel; Leguizamón, María Susana; Campetella, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    The trans-sialidases (TSs) from Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, are virulence factors shed to the bloodstream that induce strong alterations in the immune system. Here, we report that both enzymatically active TS (aTS) and its lectinlike isoform (iTS) disturb CD4 T cell physiology, inducing downregulation of Th1 cell functionality and in vivo cell expansion. By using ovalbumin-specific DO11.10 cells as tracers of clones developing the Th1 phenotype, we found that the infection induced significant amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) but low levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and increased IL-4 production in vivo, in agreement with a mixed T helper response. The production of cytokines associated with the Th2 phenotype was prevented by passive transfer of anti-TS neutralizing antibodies. TSs also reduced the T cell receptor signaling as assayed by Zap-70 phosphorylation. TSs also reduced IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion, with a concomitant increase in IL-4 production and then an unbalancing of the CD4 T cell response toward the Th2 phenotype. This effect was prevented by using anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibodies or IL-10(-/-) antigen-presenting cells, supporting the subversion of this regulatory pathway. In support, TSs stimulated IL-10 secretion by antigen-presenting cells during their interaction with CD4 T cells. When polarized cells were stimulated in the presence of TSs, the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ was strongly downregulated in Th1 cells, while IL-2 production was upregulated in Th2 cells. Although the Th1 response is associated with host survival, it may simultaneously induce extensive damage to infected tissues. Thus, by delaying the elicitation of the Th1 response and limiting its effector properties, TSs restrain the cell response, supporting T. cruzi colonization and persistence while favoring host survival. PMID:25754197

  14. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  15. Malignant and Tuberculous Pleural Effusions: Immunophenotypic Cellular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, Lucia Maria Zanatta; Antonangelo, Leila; Vargas, Francisco S.; Zerbini, Maria Cláudia Nogueira; Sales, Maria Mirtes; Uip, David E.; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES Tuberculosis and cancer are the main causes of pleural effusion. Pleural involvement is associated with migration of immune cells to the pleural cavity. We sought to characterize the immunophenotype of leukocytes in the pleural effusion and peripheral blood of patients with tuberculosis or malignancy. METHODS Thirty patients with tuberculosis (14) or malignancy (16) were studied. A control group included 20 healthy blood donors. RESULTS Malignant phycoerythrin pleural effusions showed higher percentages of CD3, CD4, CD3CD45RO, and CD20CD25 lymphocytes and lower percentages of CD3CD25 and CD20HLA-DR when compared to PB lymphocytes. Compared to PB, tuberculous effusions had a higher percentage of lymphocytes that co-expressed CD3, CD4, CD3CD45RO, CD3TCRαβ, CD3CD28, and CD20 and a lower percentage of CD14, CD8 and CD3TCRγδ-positive lymphocytes. Malignant effusions presented higher expression of CD14 whereas tuberculous effusions had higher expression of CD3 and CD3CD95L. Peripheral blood cells from tuberculosis patients showed higher expression of CD14, CD20CD25 and CD3CD95L. Compared with the control cells, tuberculosis and cancer peripheral blood cells presented a lower percentage of CD3CD4 and CD3CD28-positive cells as well as a higher percentage of CD3CD8, CD3CD25 and CD3CD80-positive cells. CONCLUSIONS Tuberculous and malignant peripheral blood is enriched with lymphocytes with a helper/inducer T cell phenotype, which are mainly of memory cells. CD14-positive cells were more frequently found in malignant effusions, while CD3-positive cells expressing Fas ligand were more frequently found in tuberculous effusions. PMID:18925324

  16. Novel Tools to Analyze the Function of Salmonella Effectors Show That SvpB Ectopic Expression Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    In order to further characterize its role in pathogenesis and to establish whether its overproduction can lead to eukaryotic tumor cell death, Salmonella strains able to express its virulence factor SpvB (an ADP-ribosyl transferase enzyme) in a salicylate-inducible way have been constructed and analyzed in different eukaryotic tumor cell lines. To do so, the bacterial strains bearing the expression system have been constructed in a ∆purD background, which allows control of bacterial proliferation inside the eukaryotic cell. In the absence of bacterial proliferation, salicylate-induced SpvB production resulted in activation of caspases 3 and 7 and apoptotic cell death. The results clearly indicated that controlled SpvB production leads to F-actin depolimerization and either G1/S or G2/M phase arrest in all cell lines tested, thus shedding light on the function of SpvB in Salmonella pathogenesis. In the first place, the combined control of protein production by salicylate regulated vectors and bacterial growth by adenine concentration offers the possibility to study the role of Salmonella effectors during eukaryotic cells infection. In the second place, the salicylate-controlled expression of SpvB by the bacterium provides a way to evaluate the potential of other homologous or heterologous proteins as antitumor agents, and, eventually to construct novel potential tools for cancer therapy, given that Salmonella preferentially proliferates in tumors. PMID:24205236

  17. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  18. The role of the effector caspases drICE and dcp-1 for cell death and corpse clearance in the developing optic lobe in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Hiromi; Hara, Yusuke; Togane, Yu; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Hiraoka, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2015-08-15

    In the developing Drosophila optic lobe, cell death occurs via apoptosis and in a distinctive spatio-temporal pattern of dying cell clusters. We analyzed the role of effector caspases drICE and dcp-1 in optic lobe cell death and subsequent corpse clearance using mutants. Neurons in many clusters required either drICE or dcp-1 and each one is sufficient. This suggests that drICE and dcp-1 function in cell death redundantly. However, dying neurons in a few clusters strictly required drICE but not dcp-1, but required drICE and dcp-1 when drICE activity was reduced via hypomorphic mutation. In addition, analysis of the mutants suggests an important role of effecter caspases in corpse clearance. In both null and hypomorphic drICE mutants, greater number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed than in wild type, and many TUNEL-positive cells remained until later stages. Lysotracker staining showed that there was a defect in corpse clearance in these mutants. All the results suggested that drICE plays an important role in activating corpse clearance in dying cells, and that an additional function of effector caspases is required for the activation of corpse clearance as well as that for carrying out cell death. PMID:26022392

  19. Shigella Effector OspB Activates mTORC1 in a Manner That Depends on IQGAP1 and Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, Heather D.; Fu, Yang; Bloom, Alexander; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Shigella infects and spreads through the human intestinal epithelium. Effector proteins delivered by Shigella into cells promote infection by modulating diverse host functions. We demonstrate that the effector protein OspB interacts directly with the scaffolding protein IQGAP1, and that the absence of either OspB or IQGAP1 during infection leads to larger areas of S. flexneri spread through cell monolayers. We show that the effect on the area of bacterial spread is due to OspB triggering increased cell proliferation at the periphery of infected foci, thereby replacing some of the cells that die within infected foci and restricting the area of bacterial spread. We demonstrate that OspB enhancement of cell proliferation results from activation of mTORC1, a master regulator of cell growth, and is blocked by the mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin. OspB activation of mTORC1, and its effects on cell proliferation and bacterial spread, depends on IQGAP1. Our results identify OspB as a regulator of mTORC1 and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation early during S. flexneri infection and establish a role for IQGAP1 in mTORC1 signaling. They also raise the possibility that IQGAP1 serves as a scaffold for the assembly of an OspB-mTORC1 signaling complex. PMID:26473364

  20. Early and long-lasting alteration of effector CD45RA(-)Foxp3(high) regulatory T-cell homeostasis during HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta, Federico; Lecuroux, Camille; Girault, Isabelle; Goujard, Cécile; Sinet, Martine; Lambotte, Olivier; Venet, Alain; Bourgeois, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) quantification in HIV infection remains ill defined due to the lack of reliable specific markers to identify human Treg and the diversity of clinical stages of HIV infection. Employing a recently described Treg identification strategy based on CD45RA and FOXP3 expression, we performed here an extensive quantification of total, naïve (CD45RA+ Foxp3low) and effector (CD45RA− Foxp3hi) Treg in different contexts of HIV infection: primary HIV infection, long term viremic patients, HAART treated aviremic patients and HIV controllers. We showed that, whereas total Treg percentages were mildly affected by HIV infection, Treg absolute numbers were significantly reduced in all groups studied. We demonstrated that whereas naïve Treg numbers were essentially preserved, effector Treg were consistently affected during HIV infection. Finally we demonstrated that effector but not total or naïve Treg numbers negatively correlated with the magnitude of HIV specific CD8 T cell responses. PMID:22457280

  1. Infectious mononucleosis mimicking lymphoma: distinguishing morphological and immunophenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Louissaint, Abner; Ferry, Judith A; Soupir, Chad P; Hasserjian, Robert P; Harris, Nancy L; Zukerberg, Lawrence R

    2012-08-01

    The diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis (acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection) is usually made on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. However, an atypical clinical presentation occasionally results in a lymph node or tonsillar biopsy. The morphological features of EBV-infected lymphoid tissue can easily mimic lymphoma. Furthermore, the immunophenotype of the immunoblasts has not been well characterized. To assess the morphological spectrum of acute EBV infection and the utility of immunohistochemistry in diagnosing difficult cases that resemble lymphoma, we reviewed 18 cases of acute EBV infection submitted in consultation to our institution with an initial diagnosis of/or suspicion for lymphoma. Patients included nine male and nine female individuals with a median age of 18 years (range 9-69). Biopsies were obtained from lymph nodes (3/18) or Waldeyer's ring (15/18). Infectious mononucleosis was confirmed by monospot or serological assays in 72% of cases (13/18). All cases featured architectural distortion by a polymorphous infiltrate with an immunoblastic proliferation, sometimes forming sheets. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 8/18 (44%) of the cases. Infiltrates were often accompanied by necrosis (10/18) and mucosal ulceration (6/15). The majority of immunoblasts in all cases were CD20+ B cells with a post-germinal center immunophenotype (strongly positive for MUM1/IRF4 (18/18), CD10- (18/18 negative) and BCL-6- (16/18 negative; 2/18 faint BCL-6 expression in <10% of immunoblasts)). Immunoblasts showed variable weak expression of BCL-2 and polyclonal expression of κ and λ immunoglobulin light chains in 81% cases. Reed-Sternberg-like cells in 8/8 cases were CD30+, CD15-, BOB.1+ and OCT-2+. In conclusion, an atypical lymphoid infiltrate with numerous MUM1+, CD10-, BCL-6- immunoblasts should raise the suspicion of a reactive process, such as infectious mononucleosis, and warrants additional consideration before a diagnosis of lymphoma

  2. Characterization of CD8(+) effector T cell responses in volunteers immunized with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty21a typhoid vaccine.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosângela; Pasetti, Marcela F; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2002-08-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) strain Ty21a remains the only licensed attenuated typhoid vaccine. Despite years of research, the identity of the protective immunological mechanisms elicited by immunization with the Ty21a typhoid vaccine remains elusive. The present study was designed to characterize effector T cell responses in volunteers immunized with S. typhi strain Ty21a typhoid vaccine. We determined whether immunization with Ty21a induced specific CTL able to lyse S. typhi-infected cells and secrete IFN-gamma, a key effector molecule against intracellular pathogens. We measured the functional activity of these CTL by a (51)Cr-release assay using 8-day restimulated PBMC from Ty21a vaccinees as effector cells and S. Typhi-infected autologous PHA-activated PBMC as target cells. Most vaccinees exhibited consistently increased CD8-mediated lysis of targets by postimmunization PBMC when compared with preimmunization levels. We also developed an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay to quantify the frequency of IFN-gamma spot-forming cells (SFC) in PBMC from Ty21a vaccinees using an ex vivo system. Significant increases in the frequency of IFN-gamma SFC following immunization (mean +/- SD, 393 +/- 172; range 185-548 SFC/10(6) PBMC; p = 0.010), as compared with preimmunization levels, were observed. IFN-gamma was secreted predominantly by CD8(+) T cells. A strong correlation was recorded between the cytolytic activity of CTL lines and the frequency of IFN-gamma SFC (r(2) = 0.910, p < 0.001). In conclusion, this work constitutes the first evidence that immunization of volunteers with Ty21a elicits specific CD8(+) CTL and provides an estimate of the frequency of CD8(+) IFN-gamma-secreting cells induced by vaccination. PMID:12165550

  3. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine mediates selective suppression of alloreactive human T cells but preserves pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific effectors

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Anoma; Liu, Bianling; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Li, Lequn

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor T cells, remains the primary cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches are required. Cdk2 is a critical node of signal integration and programming of T cell responses towards immunity versus anergy but is dispensable for hematopoiesis and thymocyte development. We examined the effects of pharmacologic Cdk2 inhibition on alloreactive human T cells. Inhibition of Cdk2 blocked expansion of alloreactive T cells upon culture with HLA-mismatched dendritic cells and prevented generation of IFN-γ-producing alloantigen-specific effectors. In contrast, Cdk2 inhibition preserved effectors specific for Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) leukemia antigen and for CMV as determined by WT1-specific and CMV-specific pentamers. Cdk2 inhibition preserved Treg cells, which have the ability to prevent GvHD while maintaining GvL. Thus, Cdk inhibitors may improve allogeneic HSCT by reducing alloreactivity and GvHD without loss of pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific immunity. PMID:24631965

  4. The cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine mediates selective suppression of alloreactive human T cells but preserves pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific effectors.

    PubMed

    Nellore, Anoma; Liu, Bianling; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A; Li, Lequn

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), mediated by donor T cells, remains the primary cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and novel therapeutic approaches are required. Cdk2 is a critical node of signal integration and programming of T cell responses towards immunity versus anergy but is dispensable for hematopoiesis and thymocyte development. We examined the effects of pharmacologic Cdk2 inhibition on alloreactive human T cells. Inhibition of Cdk2 blocked expansion of alloreactive T cells upon culture with HLA-mismatched dendritic cells and prevented generation of IFN-γ-producing alloantigen-specific effectors. In contrast, Cdk2 inhibition preserved effectors specific for Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) leukemia antigen and for CMV as determined by WT1-specific and CMV-specific pentamers. Cdk2 inhibition preserved Treg cells, which have the ability to prevent GvHD while maintaining GvL. Thus, Cdk inhibitors may improve allogeneic HSCT by reducing alloreactivity and GvHD without loss of pathogen-specific and leukemia-specific immunity. PMID:24631965

  5. Naïve CD8(+) T cell derived tumor-specific cytotoxic effectors as a potential remedy for overcoming TGF-β immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Therasa; Song, Sang Yun; Park, Somang; Cho, Hyang Hee; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hee-Ok; Cho, Jae-Ho; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Despite of the potential implications for cancer immunotherapy, conventional approaches using in vitro expanded CD8(+) T cells have suboptimal outcomes, mostly due to loss of functionality from cellular exhaustion. We therefore investigated the phenotypic and functional differences among in vitro activated CD8(+) T cells of three different sources, namely naïve (NTeff), memory (MTeff) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILeff) from human and mice, to better understand mechanisms behind potent effector functions and potential for overcoming current limitations. In line with the greater proliferation activity and longer telomere lengths of NTeff populations, cells of naïve origin exhibited significantly less amounts of T cell exhaustion markers than those of MTeff and TILeff, and moreover, acquired distinct expression patterns of memory-promoting transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, induced in a rapid and sustainable manner. NTeff cells appeared to have lower expression of Foxp1 and were refractory to apoptosis upon TGF-β conditioning, implying better survival potential and resistance to tumor-induced immune suppression. Of CD8(+) T cell pools activated to tumor-specific CTLs, naïve cell generated effectors possessed the most potent cytotoxic activity, validating implications for use in rational design of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27306834

  6. Interrupting CD28 costimulation before antigen rechallenge affects CD8(+) T-cell expansion and effector functions during secondary response in mice.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Monika; Gogishvili, Tea; Langenhorst, Daniela; Lühder, Fred; Hünig, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The role of CD28-mediated costimulation in secondary CD8(+) T-cell responses remains controversial. Here, we have used two tools - blocking mouse anti-mouse CD28-specific antibodies and inducible CD28-deleting mice - to obtain definitive answers in mice infected with ovalbumin-secreting Listeria monocytogenes. We report that both blockade and global deletion of CD28 reveal its requirement for full clonal expansion and effector functions such as degranulation and IFN-γ production during the secondary immune response. In contrast, cell-intrinsic deletion of CD28 in transferred TCR-transgenic CD8(+) T cells before primary infection leads to impaired clonal expansion but an increase in cells able to express effector functions in both primary and secondary responses. We suggest that the proliferation-impaired CD8(+) T cells respond to CD28-dependent help from their environment by enhanced functional differentiation. Finally, we report that cell-intrinsic deletion of CD28 after the peak of the primary response does not affect the establishment, maintenance, or recall of long-term memory. Thus, if given sufficient time, the progeny of primed CD8(+) T cells adapt to the absence of this costimulator. PMID:27122236

  7. Naïve CD8+ T cell derived tumor-specific cytotoxic effectors as a potential remedy for overcoming TGF-β immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Therasa; Song, Sang Yun; Park, Somang; Cho, Hyang Hee; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hee-Ok; Cho, Jae-Ho; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Despite of the potential implications for cancer immunotherapy, conventional approaches using in vitro expanded CD8+ T cells have suboptimal outcomes, mostly due to loss of functionality from cellular exhaustion. We therefore investigated the phenotypic and functional differences among in vitro activated CD8+ T cells of three different sources, namely naïve (NTeff), memory (MTeff) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILeff) from human and mice, to better understand mechanisms behind potent effector functions and potential for overcoming current limitations. In line with the greater proliferation activity and longer telomere lengths of NTeff populations, cells of naïve origin exhibited significantly less amounts of T cell exhaustion markers than those of MTeff and TILeff, and moreover, acquired distinct expression patterns of memory-promoting transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, induced in a rapid and sustainable manner. NTeff cells appeared to have lower expression of Foxp1 and were refractory to apoptosis upon TGF-β conditioning, implying better survival potential and resistance to tumor-induced immune suppression. Of CD8+ T cell pools activated to tumor-specific CTLs, naïve cell generated effectors possessed the most potent cytotoxic activity, validating implications for use in rational design of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27306834

  8. PLZF confers effector functions to donor T cells that preserve graft-versus-tumor effects while attenuating graft-versus-host-disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Holland, Amanda M.; Dogan, Yildirim; Yim, Nury L.; Rao, Uttam K.; Young, Lauren F.; West, Mallory L.; Singer, Natalie V.; Lee, Hae; Na, Il-Kang; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Jenq, Robert R.; Penack, Olaf; Hanash, Alan M.; Lezcano, Cecilia; Murphy, George; Liu, Chen; Sadelain, Michel; Sauer, Martin G.; Sant’Angelo, Derek; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to limit graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) mediated by alloreactive donor T cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) are limited by a concomitant decrease in graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity and increased possibilities of tumor relapse. Using a novel approach, we adoptively transferred conventional T cells expressing the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), which confers effector properties resembling invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells), such as copious production of cytokines under suboptimal stimulation. PLZF expression in T cell allografts attenuates expansion of alloreactive T cells, leading to lower GVHD. Intact alloreactivity-driven antitumor cytokine responses result in preserved GVT effects leading to improved survival. Our findings suggest that therapy with PLZF-overexpressing T cells would result in overall improved outcomes due to less GVHD and intact GVT effects. PMID:23733752

  9. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate modulates differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into specific lineage effector cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4+ T helper (Th) subsets Th1, Th9, and Th17 cells are implicated in inducing autoimmunity whereas regulatory T cells (Treg) have a protective effect. We previously showed that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and altered CD4+ T cell subpo...

  10. Silymarin inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced immune suppression through DNA repair-dependent activation of dendritic cells and stimulation of effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Elmets, Craig A; Xu, Hui; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2013-04-15

    Silymarin inhibits UVB-induced immunosuppression in mouse skin. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, we used an adoptive transfer approach in which dendritic cells (DCs) from the draining lymph nodes of donor mice that had been UVB-exposed and sensitized to 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) were transferred into naïve recipient mice. The contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response of the recipient mice to DNFB was then measured. When DCs were obtained from UVB-exposed donor mice that were not treated with silymarin, the CHS response was suppressed confirming the role of DCs in the UVB-induced immunosuppression. Silymarin treatment of UVB-exposed donor mice relieved this suppression of the CHS response in the recipients. Silymarin treatment was associated with rapid repair of UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DCs and silymarin treatment did not prevent UV-induced immunosuppression in XPA-deficient mice which are unable to repair UV-induced DNA damage. The CHS response in mice receiving DCs from silymarin-treated UV-exposed donor mice also was associated with enhanced secretion of Th1-type cytokines and stimulation of T cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells revealed that transfer of either CD8(+) or CD4(+) cells from silymarin-treated, UVB-exposed donors resulted in enhancement of the CHS response. Cell culture study showed enhanced secretion of IL-2 and IFNγ by CD8(+) T cells, and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines by CD4(+) T cells, obtained from silymarin-treated UVB-exposed mice. These data suggest that DNA repair-dependent functional activation of DCs, a reduction in CD4(+) regulatory T-cell activity, and stimulation of CD8(+) effector T cells contribute to silymarin-mediated inhibition of UVB-induced immunosuppression. PMID:23395695

  11. Multicolor immunophenotyping of tissue sections by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Lenz, Dominik; Osmancik, Pavel; Schneider, Peter; Trumpfheller, Christine; Racz, Pal; Tenner-Racz, Klara

    2002-05-01

    In lymphatic organs the quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of leukocytes would give relevant information about alterations during diseases (leukemia, HIV, AIDS) and their therapeutic regimen. Analysis of them in solid tissues is difficult to perform but would yield important data in a variety of clinical and experimental settings. We have developed an automated analysis method for LSC suitable for archived or fresh biopsy material of human lymph nodes and tonsils. Sections are stained with PI for DNA and up to three antigens using direct or indirect immunofluorescence staining. Measurement is triggered on DNA-fluorescence (Argon Laser). Due to the heterogeneity in cell density measurements are repeatedly performed at different threshold levels (low threshold: regions of low cellular density, germinal centers; high threshold: dense regions, mantle zone). Data are acquired by single- (Ar) or dual-laser excitation (Ar-HeNe) in order to determine data from single- (FITC), up to triple-staining (FITC/PE-Cy5/APC). Percentage and cellular density of cell-subsets is quantified in different structural regions of the specimen. Comparison with manual analysis of identical specimens showed very good correlation. With LSC a semi-automated operator-independent and immunophenotyping of lymphatic tissues with simultaneously up to four antibodies is possible. This technique should yield new insight into processes during diseases and should help to quantify the success of therapeutic interventions.

  12. The Salmonella effector SopB prevents ROS-induced apoptosis of epithelial cells by retarding TRAF6 recruitment to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Haihua; Zhang, Zhen; Tian, Li; Wang, Suying; Hu, Shuangyan; Qiao, Jian-Jun

    2016-09-16

    Microbial pathogens enter host cells by injecting effector proteins of the Type III secretion system (T3SS), which facilitate pathogen translocation across the host cell membrane. These effector proteins exert their effects by modulating a variety of host innate immune responses, thereby facilitating bacterial replication and systemic infection. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S.typhimurium) is a clinically important pathogen that causes food poisoning and gastroenteritis. The SopB effector protein of S. typhimurium, encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 T3SS, protects host epithelial cells from infection-induced apoptosis. However, how SopB influences apoptosis induction remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism of SopB action in host cells. We found that SopB inhibits infection-induced apoptosis by attenuating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria, the crucial organelles for apoptosis initiation. Further investigation revealed that SopB binds to cytosolic tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and forms a trap preventing the mitochondrial recruitment of TRAF6, an essential event for ROS generation within mitochondria. By studying the response of Traf6(+/+) and Traf6(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts to S. typhimurium infection, we found that TRAF6 promoted apoptosis by increasing ROS accumulation, which led to increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, Bax recruitment to mitochondrial membrane, and release of Cyt c into the cytoplasm. These findings show that SopB suppresses host cell apoptosis by binding to TRAF6 and preventing mitochondrial ROS generation. PMID:27473656

  13. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase in inflammatory mediator release from human inflammatory effector cells (platelets, granulocytes, and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    König, B; Jaeger, K E; Sage, A E; Vasil, M L; König, W

    1996-01-01

    and LTB4 generation was diminished by 50 to 100%. Our results suggest that the simultaneous secretion of lipase and PLC by P. aeruginosa residing in an infected host may result in severe pathological effects which cannot be explained by the sole action of the individual virulence factor on inflammatory effector cells. PMID:8757861

  14. Cross-validation of IFN-γ Elispot assay for measuring alloreactive memory/effector T cell responses in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bestard, O; Crespo, E; Stein, M; Lúcia, M; Roelen, D L; de Vaal, Y J; Hernandez-Fuentes, M P; Chatenoud, L; Wood, K J; Claas, F H; Cruzado, J M; Grinyó, J M; Volk, H D; Reinke, P

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of donor-specific alloreactive memory/effector T cell responses using an IFN-γ Elispot assay has been suggested to be a novel immune-monitoring tool for evaluating the cellular immune risk in renal transplantation. Here, we report the cross-validation data of the IFN-γ Elispot assay performed within different European laboratories taking part of the EU RISET consortium. For this purpose, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), comparisons of lectures of IFN-γ plates assessing intra- and interlaboratory assay variability of allogeneic or peptide stimuli in both healthy and kidney transplant individuals have been the main objectives. We show that the use of a same SOP and count-settings of the Elispot bioreader allow low coefficient variation between laboratories. Frozen and shipped samples display slightly lower detectable IFN-γ frequencies than fresh samples. Importantly, a close correlation between different laboratories is obtained when measuring high frequencies of antigen-specific primed/memory T cell alloresponses. Interestingly, significant high donor-specific alloreactive T cell responses can be similarly detected among different laboratories in kidney transplant patients displaying histological patterns of acute T cell mediated rejection. In conclusion, assessment of circulating alloreactive memory/effector T cells using an INF-γ Elispot assay can be accurately achieved using the same SOP, Elispot bioreader and experienced technicians in kidney transplantation. PMID:23763435

  15. Targeting immune effector molecules to human tumor cells through genetic delivery of 5T4-specific scFv fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin A; Ryan, Matthew G; Stern, Peter L; Shaw, David M; Embleton, M Jim; Kingsman, Susan M; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-11-01

    Although several clinical trials have shown beneficial effects by targeting tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with monoclonal antibodies, a number of issues, including poor penetration of the tumor mass and human antimouse antibody responses, remain. The use of recombinant single-chain Fv (scFv) fragments has the potential to address these and other issues while allowing the addition of different effector functions. To develop therapeutic strategies that recruit both humoral and cellular arms of the immune response, we have constructed chimeric proteins linking either the human IgG1 Fc domain or the extracellular domain of murine B7.1 to a scFv specific for the oncofetal glycoprotein, 5T4. This TAA is expressed by a wide variety of carcinomas and is associated with metastasis and poorer clinical outcome. We have engineered retroviral constructs that produce fusion proteins able to interact simultaneously with both 5T4-positive cells and with the receptor/ligands of the immune effector moieties. Genetic delivery through a murine leukemia virus vector to 5T4-positive tumor cells results in the secreted scFv fusion protein binding to the cell surface. Furthermore, the scFv-HIgG1 fusion protein is able to direct lysis of 5T4-expressing human tumor cell lines through antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, indicating its potential as a gene therapy for human cancers. PMID:12386827

  16. Tumor infiltration by Tbet+ effector T cells and CD20+ B cells is associated with survival in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hennequin, Audrey; Derangère, Valentin; Boidot, Romain; Apetoh, Lionel; Vincent, Julie; Orry, David; Fraisse, Jean; Causeret, Sylvain; Martin, François; Arnould, Laurent; Beltjens, Françoise; Ghiringhelli, François; Ladoire, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating T and B lymphocytes could have the potential to affect cancer prognosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of tumor infiltration by CD8 and CD4 T cells, and B lymphocytes in patients with localized gastric cancer. In a retrospective cohort of 82 patients with localized gastric cancer and treated by surgery we quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry on surgical specimen, immune infiltrates of IL-17+, CD8+, Foxp3+, Tbet+ T cells and CD20+ B cells both in the tumor core and at the invasive margin via immunohistochemical analyses of surgical specimens. We observed that CD8+ and IL17+ T-cell densities were not significantly associated with gastric cancer prognosis. In contrast, high infiltration of Tbet+ T cells, high numbers of CD20+ B-cell follicles, and low infiltration of Foxp3+ T cells, were associated with better relapse-free survival. Interestingly, treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy or histological tumor type (diffuse versus intestinal) did not influence type and density of immune infiltrates or their prognostic value. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gastric cancer stromal microenvironment revealed organized T and B cell aggregates, with strong structural analogies to normal secondary lymphoid organs and which could be considered as tertiary lymphoid structures. Using transcriptomic data from an independent cohort of 365 localized gastric cancer, we confirmed that a coordinated Th1, and B cell stromal gene signature is associated with better outcome. Altogether, these data suggest that tumor infiltration by B and Th1 T cells could affect gastric cancer prognosis and may be used to better define the outcome of patients with localized gastric cancer. PMID:27057426

  17. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  18. Antitumor Efficacy of Radiation plus Immunotherapy Depends upon Dendritic Cell Activation of Effector CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Dovedi, Simon J; Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Beers, Stephen A; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Mu, Lijun; Glennie, Martin J; Illidge, Timothy M; Honeychurch, Jamie

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells dying after cytotoxic therapy are a potential source of antigen for T-cell priming. Antigen-presenting cells (APC) can cross-present MHC I-restricted peptides after the uptake of dying cells. Depending on the nature of the surrounding environmental signals, APCs then orchestrate a spectrum of responses ranging from immune activation to inhibition. Previously, we had demonstrated that combining radiation with either agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD40 or a systemically administered TLR7 agonist could enhance CD8 T-cell-dependent protection against syngeneic murine lymphoma models. However, it remains unknown how individual APC populations affect this antitumor immune response. Using APC depletion models, we now show that dendritic cells (DC), but not macrophages or B cells, were responsible for the generation of long-term immunologic protection following combination therapy with radiotherapy and either agonistic CD40 mAb or systemic TLR7 agonist therapy. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches that augment antigen uptake and presentation by DCs may further enhance the generation of therapeutic antitumor immune responses, leading to improved outcomes after radiotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 621-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27241845

  19. CD28 co-stimulation via tumour-specific chimaeric receptors induces an incomplete activation response in Epstein-Barr virus-specific effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Altvater, B; Pscherer, S; Landmeier, S; Niggemeier, V; Juergens, H; Vormoor, J; Rossig, C

    2006-06-01

    Expression of tumour antigen-specific chimaeric receptors in T lymphocytes can redirect their effector functions towards tumour cells. Integration of the signalling domains of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 into chRec enhances antigen-specific proliferation of polyclonal human T cell populations. While CD28 plays an essential role in the priming of naive CD4(+) T cells, its contribution to effector memory T cell responses is controversial. We compared the function of the chRec with and without the CD28 co-stimulatory domain, expressing it in peripheral blood T cells or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cell lines. The chimaeric T cell receptors contain an extracellular single-chain antibody domain, to give specificity against the tumour ganglioside antigen G(D2). The transduced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) maintained their specificity for autologous EBV targets and their capacity to proliferate after stimulation with EBV-infected B cells. Intracellular cytokine staining demonstrated efficient and comparable antigen-specific interferon (IFN)-gamma secretion by CTL following engagement of both the native and the chimaeric receptor, independent of chimaeric CD28 signalling. Furthermore, tumour targets were lysed in an antigen-specific manner by both chRec. However, while antigen engagement by CD28 zeta chRec efficiently induced expansion of polyclonal peripheral blood lymphocytes in an antigen-dependent manner, CD28 signalling did not induce proliferation of EBV-CTL in response to antigen-expressing tumour cells. Thus, the co-stimulatory requirement for the efficient activation response of antigen-specific memory cells cannot be mimicked simply by combining CD28 and zeta signalling. The full potential of this highly cytolytic T cell population for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer requires further exploration of their co-stimulatory requirements. PMID:16734614

  20. Tremelimumab (anti-CTLA4) mediates immune responses mainly by direct activation of T effector cells rather than by affecting T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Burt, Deborah J; Ralph, Christy; Thistlethwaite, Fiona C; Hawkins, Robert E; Elkord, Eyad

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) blockade has shown antitumor activity against common cancers. However, the exact mechanism of immune mediation by anti-CTLA4 remains to be elucidated. Further understanding of how CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab mediates immune responses may allow a more effective selection of responsive patients. Our results show that tremelimumab enhanced the proliferative response of T effector cells (Teff) upon TCR stimulation, and abrogated Treg suppressive ability. In the presence of tremelimumab, frequencies of IL-2-secreting CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were increased in response to polyclonal activation and tumor antigens. Importantly, Treg frequency was not reduced in the presence of tremelimumab, and expanded Tregs in cancer patients treated with tremelimumab expressed FoxP3 with no IL-2 release, confirming them as bona fide Tregs. Taken together, this data indicates that tremelimumab induces immune responses mainly by direct activation of Teff rather than by affecting Tregs. PMID:21056008

  1. WtsE, an AvrE-family type III effector protein of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, causes cell death in non-host plants.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris; Ewert, Sophie; Sreerekha, Mysore-Venkatarau; Mackey, David; Coplin, David

    2008-09-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss) causes Stewart's bacterial wilt of sweet corn and leaf blight of maize. The pathogenicity of Pnss depends on synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide and an Hrp type III secretion system. WtsE, a type III secreted effector protein, is essential for the virulence of Pnss on corn. It belongs to the AvrE family of effectors, which includes DspA/E from Erwinia amylovora and AvrE1 from Pseudomonas syringae. Previously, WtsE was shown to cause disease-associated cell death in its host plant, sweet corn. Here, we examine the biological activity of WtsE in several non-host plants. WtsE induced cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco, beet and Arabidopsis thaliana when it was transiently produced in plant cells following agroinfiltration or translocated into plant cells from Pnss, Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph). WtsE-induced cell death in N. benthamiana, tobacco and beet resembled a hypersensitive response and in N. benthamiana it was delayed by cycloheximide. Interestingly, WtsE strongly promoted the growth of Pnss in N. benthamiana prior to the onset of cell death. Deletion derivatives of WtsE that failed to induce cell death in N. benthamiana and tobacco also did not complement wtsE mutants of Pnss for virulence in sweet corn, indicating a correlation between the two activities. WtsE also induced cell death in A. thaliana, where it suppressed basal defences induced by Pph. Thus, WtsE has growth-promoting, defence-suppressing and cell death-inducing activities in non-host plants. Expression of WtsE also prevented the growth of yeast, possibly due to an innate toxicity to eukaryotic cells. PMID:19018993

  2. Transcriptomics-based screen for genes induced by flagellin and repressed by pathogen effectors identifies a cell wall-associated kinase involved in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbe-associated molecular patterns, such as those present in bacterial flagellin, are powerful inducers of the innate immune response in plants. Successful pathogens deliver virulence proteins, termed effectors, into the plant cell where they can interfere with the immune response and promote disease. Engineering the plant immune system to enhance disease resistance requires a thorough understanding of its components. Results We describe a high-throughput screen, using RNA sequencing and virus-induced gene silencing, to identify tomato genes whose expression is enhanced by the flagellin microbe-associated molecular pattern flgII-28, but reduced by activities of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) type III effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Gene ontology terms for this category of Flagellin-induced repressed by effectors (FIRE) genes showed enrichment for genes encoding certain subfamilies of protein kinases and transcription factors. At least 25 of the FIRE genes have been implicated previously in plant immunity. Of the 92 protein kinase-encoding FIRE genes, 33 were subjected to virus-induced gene silencing and their involvement in pattern-triggered immunity was tested with a leaf-based assay. Silencing of one FIRE gene, which encodes the cell wall-associated kinase SlWAK1, compromised the plant immune response resulting in increased growth of Pst and enhanced disease symptoms. Conclusions Our transcriptomic approach identifies FIRE genes that represent a pathogen-defined core set of immune-related genes. The analysis of this set of candidate genes led to the discovery of a cell wall-associated kinase that participates in plant defense. The FIRE genes will be useful for further elucidation of the plant immune system. PMID:24359686

  3. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate modulates differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ T cells into specific lineage effector cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Pae, Munkyong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Wu, Dayong

    2013-04-01

    CD4(+) T helper (Th) subsets Th1, Th9, and Th17 cells are implicated in inducing autoimmunity whereas regulatory T cells (Treg) have a protective effect. We and others have previously shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and alters CD4(+) T cell subpopulations. In this study, we investigated how EGCG impacts differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into different effector lineages and report that EGCG impeded Th1, Th9, and Th17 differentiation and prevented IL-6-induced suppression of Treg development. We further showed that EGCG inhibited T-bet, PU.1, and RORγt, the specific transcription factors for Th1, Th9, and Th17 differentiation, respectively. These effects, in turn, may be mediated by EGCG-induced downregulation of transducers p-STAT1 and p-STAT4 for Th1, and p-STAT3 for Th17. EGCG-induced change in Th17/Treg balance may be mediated by its inhibition of IL-6 signaling because EGCG inhibited soluble IL-6R, membrane gp130, and IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. This notion was further supported by the in vivo results showing inhibited IL-6 and soluble IL-6R but increased soluble gp130 levels in plasma from EAE mice fed EGCG. Together, our results suggest that EGCG modulates development of CD4(+) T cell lineages through impacting their respective and interactive regulatory networks ultimately leading to an attenuated autoimmune response. PMID:23064699

  4. Autocrine IL-10 induces hallmarks of alternative activation in macrophages and suppresses anti-tuberculosis effector mechanisms without compromising T cell immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Tanja; Ehlers, Stefan; Heitmann, Lisa; Rausch, Alexandra; Mages, Jörg; Murray, Peter J.; Lang, Roland; Hölscher, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Elevated IL-10 has been implicated in reactivation tuberculosis (TB). Since macrophages rather than T cells were reported to be the major source of IL-10 in TB, we analyzed the consequences of a macrophage-specific overexpression of IL-10 in transgenic mice (macIL-10-transgenic) after aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MacIL-10-transgenic mice were more susceptible to chronic Mtb infection than non-transgenic littermates, exhibiting higher bacterial loads in the lung after 12 weeks of infection and dying significantly earlier than controls. The differentiation, recruitment and activation of TH1 cells as well as the induction of IFN-gamma-dependent effector genes against Mtb were not affected by macrophage-derived IL-10. However, microarray analysis of pulmonary gene expression revealed patterns characteristic of alternative macrophage activation that were overrepresented in Mtb-infected macIL-10-transgenic mice. Importantly, arginase-1 gene expression and activity were strikingly enhanced in transgenic mice accompanied by a reduced production of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Moreover, IL-10-dependent arginase-1 induction diminished anti-mycobacterial effector mechanisms in macrophages. Together, macrophage-derived IL-10 triggers aspects of alternative macrophage activation and promotes Mtb recrudescence independent of overt effects on anti-TB T cell immunity. PMID:19561100

  5. Pepper Heat Shock Protein 70a Interacts with the Type III Effector AvrBsT and Triggers Plant Cell Death and Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones and are essential for the maintenance and/or restoration of protein homeostasis. The genus Xanthomonas type III effector protein AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we report the identification of the pepper CaHSP70a as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirm the specific interaction between CaHSP70a and AvrBsT in planta. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain is essential for its interaction with AvrBsT. Heat stress (37°C) and Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection distinctly induce CaHSP70a in pepper leaves. Cytoplasmic CaHSP70a proteins significantly accumulate in pepper leaves to induce the hypersensitive cell death response by Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient CaHSP70a overexpression induces hypersensitive cell death under heat stress, which is accompanied by strong induction of defense- and cell death-related genes. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain and ATPase-binding domain are required to trigger cell death under heat stress. Transient coexpression of CaHSP70a and avrBsT leads to cytoplasmic localization of the CaHSP70a-AvrBsT complex and significantly enhances avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CaHSP70a silencing in pepper enhances Xcv growth but disrupts the reactive oxygen species burst and cell death response during Xcv infection. Expression of some defense marker genes is significantly reduced in CaHSP70a-silenced leaves, with lower levels of the defense hormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Together, these results suggest that CaHSP70a interacts with the type III effector AvrBsT and is required for cell death and immunity in plants. PMID:25491184

  6. Natural killer group 2D and CD28 receptors differentially activate mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin to alter murine effector CD8+ T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Bryan; Trace, Kelsey; Whitman, Emily; Bedsworth, Taylor; Barber, Amorette

    2016-03-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are an essential component of anti-tumour and anti-viral immunity. Activation of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in regulating the differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, the mechanisms that control mTOR activity during immunity to tumours and infections are not well known. Activation of co-stimulatory receptors, including CD28 and natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and subsequently may activate the mTOR pathway in CD8+ T cells. This study compared the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway after co-stimulation through CD28 or NKG2D receptors in murine effector CD8+ T cells. Compared with CD28 co-stimulation, activation through CD3 and NKG2D receptors had weaker activation of mTORc1, as shown by decreased phosphorylation of mTORc1 targets S6K1, ribosomal protein S6 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1. NKG2D co-stimulation also showed increased gene expression of tuberous sclerosis protein 2, a negative regulator of mTORc1, whereas CD28 co-stimulation increased gene expression of Ras homologue enriched in brain, an activator of mTORc1, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-α, pro-angiogenic factors downstream of mTORc1. Strong mTORc1 activation in CD28-co-stimulated cells also increased expression of transcription factors that support effector cell differentiation, namely T-bet, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (BLIMP-1), interferon regulatory factor 4, and inhibitor of DNA binding 2, whereas low levels of mTORc1 activation allowed for the expression of Eomes, B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and inhibitor of DNA binding 3 during NKG2D stimulation, and increased expression of memory markers CD62 ligand and CD127. These data show that compared with CD28, co-stimulation through the NKG2D receptor leads to the differential activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and potentially supports

  7. Analysis of Cytokine Production by Peanut-Reactive T Cells Identifies Residual Th2 Effectors in Highly Allergic Children Who Received Peanut Oral Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Julia A.; Commins, Scott P.; Agrawal, Rachana; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Yu, Mingxi D.; Cronin, Julia; Heymann, Peter W.; Pomes, Anna; Platts-Mills, Thomas; Workman, Lisa; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Only limited evidence is available regarding the cytokine repertoire of effector T cells associated with peanut allergy, and how these responses relate to IgE antibodies to peanut components. Objective To interrogate T-cell effector cytokine populations induced by Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 among peanut allergic (PA) children in the context of IgE, and to evaluate their modulation during oral immunotherapy (OIT). Methods Peanut-reactive effector T cells were analyzed in conjunction with specific IgE profiles in PA children using intracellular staining and multiplex assay. Cytokine-expressing T cell subpopulations were visualized using SPICE. Results Ara h 2 dominated the antibody response to peanut as judged by prevalence and quantity among a cohort of children with IgE to peanut. High IgE (>15 kUA/L) was almost exclusively associated with dual sensitization to Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and was age-independent. Among PA children, IL-4-biased responses to both major allergens were induced, regardless of whether IgE antibodies to Ara h 1 were present. Among subjects receiving OIT in whom high IgE was maintained, Th2 reactivity to peanut components persisted despite clinical desensitization and modulation of allergen-specific immune parameters including augmented specific IgG4 antibodies, Th1 skewing and enhanced IL-10. The complexity of cytokine-positive subpopulations within peanut-reactive IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ T cells was similar to that observed in those who received no OIT, but was modified with extended therapy. Nonetheless, high Foxp3 expression was a distinguishing feature of peanut-reactive IL-4+ T cells irrespective of OIT, and a correlate of their ability to secrete type 2 cytokines. Conclusion Though total numbers of peanut-reactive IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ T cells are modulated by OIT in highly allergic children, complex T-cell populations with pathogenic potential persist in the presence of recognized immune markers of successful immunotherapy. [Clinical

  8. The effects of 5-azacytidine on the function and number of regulatory T cells and T-effectors in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Benedetta; Kordasti, Shahram Y; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Jiang, Jie; Seidl, Thomas; Abellan, Pilar Perez; Mohamedali, Azim; Thomas, Nicolas Shaun B; Farzaneh, Farzin; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-08-01

    Expansion of regulatory T cells occurs in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and correlates with a poor prognosis. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, particularly 5-azacytidine, have been shown to increase the survival of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. It is not entirely clear whether this improvement in patients' survival is related to the effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors on the immune system and/or the direct effect of these drugs on the dysplastic clone. In this study we investigated the effect of 5-azacytidine on the function and proliferation capability of regulatory T cells and T-helper cells. The number and function of CD4(+) T-cell subsets in 68 patients with intermediate-2/high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome were serially assessed at diagnosis and following treatment. The in-vitro effects of 5-azacytidine on CD4(+) T-cell subsets isolated from both healthy donors and patients with myelodysplastic syndrome were also investigated. The number of peripheral blood regulatory T cells was significantly higher in myelodysplastic syndrome patients than in healthy donors and responders to treatment (P=0.01). The absolute numbers of T-helper 1 and T-helper 2, but not T-helper 17, cells were significantly reduced following 12 months of treatment (P=0.03, P=0.03). The in vitro addition of 5-azacytidine to CD4(+) T cells reduced the proliferative capacity of regulatory T cells (P=0.03). In addition, the 5-azacytidine-treated regulatory T cells had reduced suppressive function and produced larger amounts of interleukin-17. The FOXP3 expression in 5-azacyti-dine-treated T-effectors was also increased. Interestingly, these FOXP3(+)/interleukin-17(+) cells originated mainly from effector T cells rather than regulatory T cells. Our data suggest that 5-azacytidine has profound effects on CD4(+) T cells, which correlate with disease status after treatment. Furthermore, despite the demethylation of the FOXP3 promoter and increased FOXP3 expression

  9. The effects of 5-azacytidine on the function and number of regulatory T cells and T-effectors in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Benedetta; Kordasti, Shahram Y.; Kulasekararaj, Austin G.; Jiang, Jie; Seidl, Thomas; Abellan, Pilar Perez; Mohamedali, Azim; Thomas, Nicolas Shaun B.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Mufti, Ghulam J.

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of regulatory T cells occurs in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and correlates with a poor prognosis. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, particularly 5-azacytidine, have been shown to increase the survival of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. It is not entirely clear whether this improvement in patients’ survival is related to the effects of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors on the immune system and/or the direct effect of these drugs on the dysplastic clone. In this study we investigated the effect of 5-azacytidine on the function and proliferation capability of regulatory T cells and T-helper cells. The number and function of CD4+ T-cell subsets in 68 patients with intermediate-2/high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome were serially assessed at diagnosis and following treatment. The in-vitro effects of 5-azacytidine on CD4+ T-cell subsets isolated from both healthy donors and patients with myelodysplastic syndrome were also investigated. The number of peripheral blood regulatory T cells was significantly higher in myelodysplastic syndrome patients than in healthy donors and responders to treatment (P=0.01). The absolute numbers of T-helper 1 and T-helper 2, but not T-helper 17, cells were significantly reduced following 12 months of treatment (P=0.03, P=0.03). The in vitro addition of 5-azacytidine to CD4+ T cells reduced the proliferative capacity of regulatory T cells (P=0.03). In addition, the 5-azacytidine-treated regulatory T cells had reduced suppressive function and produced larger amounts of interleukin-17. The FOXP3 expression in 5-azacyti-dine-treated T-effectors was also increased. Interestingly, these FOXP3+/interleukin-17+ cells originated mainly from effector T cells rather than regulatory T cells. Our data suggest that 5-azacytidine has profound effects on CD4+ T cells, which correlate with disease status after treatment. Furthermore, despite the demethylation of the FOXP3 promoter and increased FOXP3 expression following 5

  10. Regulatory and effector functions of gamma-delta (γδ) T cells and their therapeutic potential in adoptive cellular therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sourav; Lal, Girdhari

    2016-09-01

    γδ T cells are an important innate immune component of the tumor microenvironment and are known to affect the immune response in a wide variety of tumors. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells are capable of spontaneous secretion of IL-17A and IFN-γ without undergoing clonal expansion. Although γδ T cells do not require self-MHC-restricted priming, they can distinguish "foreign" or transformed cells from healthy self-cells by using activating and inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors. γδ T cells were used in several clinical trials to treat cancer patient due to their MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, ability to distinguish transformed cells from normal cells, the capacity to secrete inflammatory cytokines and also their ability to enhance the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell response. In this review, we discuss the effector and regulatory function of γδ T cells in the tumor microenvironment with special emphasis on the potential for their use in adoptive cellular immunotherapy. PMID:27012367

  11. bIgG time for large eaters: monocytes and macrophages as effector and target cells of antibody-mediated immune activation and repression.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Sina; Biburger, Markus; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-11-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system consists of a great variety of cell subsets localized throughout the body in immunological and non-immunological tissues. While one of their prime tasks is to detect, phagocytose, and kill intruding microorganisms, they are also involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune tolerance toward self through removal of dying cells. Furthermore, monocytes and macrophages have been recognized to play a critical role for mediating immunoglobulin G (IgG)-dependent effector functions, including target cell depletion, tissue inflammation, and immunomodulation. For this, monocyte and macrophage populations are equipped with a complex set of Fc-receptors, enabling them to directly interact with pro- or anti-inflammatory IgG preparations. In this review, we will summarize the most recent findings, supporting a central role of monocytes and macrophages for pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activity. PMID:26497512

  12. Immunophenotype Discovery, Hierarchical Organization, and Template-Based Classification of Flow Cytometry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Ariful; Rajwa, Bartek; Pothen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We describe algorithms for discovering immunophenotypes from large collections of flow cytometry samples and using them to organize the samples into a hierarchy based on phenotypic similarity. The hierarchical organization is helpful for effective and robust cytometry data mining, including the creation of collections of cell populations’ characteristic of different classes of samples, robust classification, and anomaly detection. We summarize a set of samples belonging to a biological class or category with a statistically derived template for the class. Whereas individual samples are represented in terms of their cell populations (clusters), a template consists of generic meta-populations (a group of homogeneous cell populations obtained from the samples in a class) that describe key phenotypes shared among all those samples. We organize an FC data collection in a hierarchical data structure that supports the identification of immunophenotypes relevant to clinical diagnosis. A robust template-based classification scheme is also developed, but our primary focus is in the discovery of phenotypic signatures and inter-sample relationships in an FC data collection. This collective analysis approach is more efficient and robust since templates describe phenotypic signatures common to cell populations in several samples while ignoring noise and small sample-specific variations. We have applied the template-based scheme to analyze several datasets, including one representing a healthy immune system and one of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. The last task is challenging due to the phenotypic heterogeneity of the several subtypes of AML. However, we identified thirteen immunophenotypes corresponding to subtypes of AML and were able to distinguish acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) samples with the markers provided. Clinically, this is helpful since APL has a different treatment regimen from other subtypes of AML. Core algorithms used in our data analysis are

  13. Panel development for multicolor flow-cytometry testing of proliferation and immunophenotype in hMSCs.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Jolene A; Clarke, Scott T

    2011-01-01

    Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are rare fibroblast-like cells capable of differentiation into a variety of cell tissues which include bone, cartilage, muscle, ligament, tendon, and adipose. Normal adult bone marrow and adipose tissue are the most common sources of these cells. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has proposed a set of standards to define hMSC for laboratory investigations and preclinical studies: adherence to plastic in standard culture conditions; in vitro differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondroblasts; and specific surface antigen expression. Direct measurement of proliferation combined with simultaneous detection of the ISCT-consensus immunophenotypic profile provides data that is used to determine the differentiation status and health of the cells. Flow cytometry provides a powerful technology that is routinely used to simultaneously and rapidly measure multiple parameters in a single sample. This chapter describes a flow cytometric panel for the simultaneous detection of immunophenotypic profile, proliferative capacity, and DNA content measurement in hMSC. Because a relatively small number of cells are needed with this approach, measurements can be made with minimal impact on expansion potential. The ability to assess antigen expression and proliferative status enables the investigator to make informed decisions on expansion and harvesting. PMID:21431532

  14. Increased Frequency of EBV-Specific Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells Correlates with Higher Viral Load in Rheumatoid Arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    Lünemann, Jan D.; Frey, Oliver; Eidner, Thorsten; Baier, Michael; Roberts, Susanne; Sashihara, Junji; Volkmer, Rudolf; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Hein, Gert; Kamradt, Thomas; Münz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    EBV is a candidate trigger of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We determined both EBV-specific T cell and B cell responses and cell-associated EBV DNA copies in patients with RA and demographically matched healthy virus carriers. Patients with RA showed increased and broadened IgG responses to lytic and latent EBV-encoded Ags and 7-fold higher levels of EBV copy numbers in circulating blood cells. Additionally, patients with RA exhibited substantial expansions of CD8+ T cells specific for pooled EBV Ags expressed during both B cell transformation and productive viral replication and the frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for these Ags correlated with cellular EBV copy numbers. In contrast, CD4+ T cell responses to EBV and T cell responses to human CMV Ags were unchanged, altogether arguing against a defective control of latent EBV infection in RA. Our data show that the regulation of EBV infection is perturbed in RA and suggest that increased EBV-specific effector T cell and Ab responses are driven by an elevated EBV load in RA. PMID:18606650

  15. [Immunophenotype. Clinical and laboratory features of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Chile. Study of 500 children and 131 adults].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M E; Labra, S; Ugarte, S; Matutes, E; Greaves, M F

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical features and immunophenotype of 500 children and 131 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), diagnosed between 1984 and 1993. Cases were classified, according to immunophenotype in B-cell ALL with three subtypes (pro-B or null, common and B) and T-cell ALL. Among children, common ALL accounted for 74% of cases and pro-B all was more common in children of less than one year (14%). B ALL was observed in 2% of children. Ten percent of children, mostly males, had T-cell ALL. The third part of these children had high leukocyte counts and a mediastinal mass. Children from Mapuche origin, compared with Caucasian children had a lower proportion of common ALL (36 and 74% respectively) and a higher proportions of T-cell ALL (41 and 10% respectively). Among adults common ALL was the most common phenotype (72%) followed by T-cell ALL (15%), pro-B ALL (11%) and B-cell ALL (2%). There was a lower incidence of children with common ALL with positive cytoplasmic immunoglobulin compared to North American or European studies (2 and 15-33% respectively) and a higher proportion of adults with common ALL compared with pro-B cell ALL, in contrast to European studies that show a higher proportion of patients with pro-B cell ALL. No other immunophenotypic, clinical or laboratory differences were observed with ALL from developed countries. It is concluded that the immunophenotyping of ALL allows a more precise diagnosis of this disease. PMID:9008940

  16. Redirecting immune cells against bone metastases: Immunotherapy of prostate cancer metastases using genetically programmed immune effector cells.

    PubMed

    Eshhar, Zelig; Waks, Tova; Pinthus, Jehonathan

    2005-06-01

    Extract: Metastasis of the bone is common in two of the major gender-specific malignancies -- breast and prostate cancers. Although both primary breast and prostate cancer are manageable by "classical" therapies such as surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy, when metastases (secondary cancers) disseminate to the bones these diseases are, by and large, incurable. Metastasis to the bone is implicated in around 70% of prostate and breast cancer deaths. The idea of harnessing the immune system to fight disseminated cancer has proven to be effective in experimental animal models against transplanted tumors. Here, both arms of the immune system, namely, the humoral one characterized by anti-tumor antibodies and the cellular one composed of a type of white blood cell, specifically the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), were found to cause tumor rejection either following immunization of the experimental mice before the tumor inoculations (active-vaccination) or after adoptive transfer of cancer-specific antibodies or CTLs into tumor-bearing mice (passive-vaccination). Encouraged by these results, scientists and clinicians have joined forces in extensive efforts to apply both active and passive vaccination for the immunotherapy of cancer patients. These attempts have flourished over the last fifteen years following the discovery of the first human tumor antigens in melanoma patients. PMID:20704885

  17. Broadly Conserved Fungal Effector BEC1019 Suppresses Host Cell Death and Enhances Pathogen Virulence in Powdery Mildew of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Whigham, Ehren; Qi, Shan; Mistry, Divya; Surana, Priyanka; Xu, Ruo; Fuerst, Gregory; Pliego, Clara; Bindschedler, Laurence V; Spanu, Pietro D; Dickerson, Julie A; Innes, Roger W; Nettleton, Dan; Bogdanove, Adam J; Wise, Roger P

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of barley, Hordeum vulgare L., with the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is a well-developed model to investigate resistance and susceptibility to obligate biotrophic pathogens. The 130-Mb Blumeria genome encodes approximately 540 predicted effectors that are hypothesized to suppress or induce host processes to promote colonization. Blumeria effector candidate (BEC)1019, a single-copy gene encoding a putative, secreted metalloprotease, is expressed in haustorial feeding structures, and host-induced gene silencing of BEC1019 restricts haustorial development in compatible interactions. Here, we show that Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing of BEC1019 significantly reduces fungal colonization of barley epidermal cells, demonstrating that BEC1019 plays a central role in virulence. In addition, delivery of BEC1019 to the host cytoplasm via Xanthomonas type III secretion suppresses cultivar nonspecific hypersensitive reaction (HR) induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, as well as cultivar-specific HR induced by AvrPphB from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. BEC1019 homologs are present in 96 of 241 sequenced fungal genomes, including plant pathogens, human pathogens, and free-living nonpathogens. Comparative analysis revealed variation at several amino acid positions that correlate with fungal lifestyle and several highly conserved, noncorrelated motifs. Site-directed mutagenesis of one of these, ETVIC, compromises the HR-suppressing activity of BEC1019. We postulate that BEC1019 represents an ancient, broadly important fungal protein family, members of which have evolved to function as effectors in plant and animal hosts. PMID:25938194

  18. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  19. Immunotherapy with MVA-BN®-HER2 induces HER-2-specific Th1 immunity and alters the intratumoral balance of effector and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Stefanie J; Rountree, Ryan B; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Steigerwald, Robin; Giffon, Thierry; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2012-01-01

    MVA-BN®-HER2 is a new candidate immunotherapy designed for the treatment of HER-2-positive breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that a single treatment with MVA-BN®-HER2 exerts potent anti-tumor efficacy in a murine model of experimental pulmonary metastasis. This anti-tumor efficacy occurred despite a strong tumor-mediated immunosuppressive environment characterized by a high frequency of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) in the lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Immunogenicity studies showed that treatment with MVA-BN®-HER2 induced strongly Th1-dominated HER-2-specific antibody and T-cell responses. MVA-BN®-HER2-induced anti-tumor activity was characterized by an increased infiltration of lungs with highly activated, HER-2-specific, CD8+CD11c+ T cells accompanied by a decrease in the frequency of T(reg) cells in the lung, resulting in a significantly increased ratio of effector T cells to T(reg) cells. In contrast, administration of HER2 protein formulated in Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced a strongly Th2-biased immune response to HER-2. However, this did not lead to significant infiltration of the tumor-bearing lungs by CD8+ T cells or the decrease in the frequency of T(reg) cells nor did it result in anti-tumor efficacy. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells confirmed that CD8 T cells were required for the anti-tumor activity of MVA-BN®-HER2. Furthermore, depletion of CD4+ or CD25+ cells demonstrated that tumor-induced T(reg) cells promoted tumor growth and that CD4 effector cells also contribute to MVA-BN®-HER2-mediated anti-tumor efficacy. Taken together, our data demonstrate that treatment with MVA-BN®-HER2 controls tumor growth through mechanisms including the induction of Th1-biased HER-2-specific immune responses and the control of tumor-mediated immunosuppression. PMID:21822917

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita; Azogui, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  2. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  3. T cells expressing CD123-specific chimeric antigen receptors exhibit specific cytolytic effector functions and antitumor effects against human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mardiros, Armen; Dos Santos, Cedric; McDonald, Tinisha; Brown, Christine E.; Wang, Xiuli; Budde, L. Elizabeth; Hoffman, Lauren; Aguilar, Brenda; Chang, Wen-Chung; Bretzlaff, William; Chang, Brenda; Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Starr, Renate; Ostberg, Julie R.; Jensen, Michael C.; Bhatia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Induction treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have remained largely unchanged for nearly 50 years, and AML remains a disease of poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can achieve cures in select patients and highlights the susceptibility of AML to donor-derived immunotherapy. The interleukin-3 receptor α chain (CD123) has been identified as a potential immunotherapeutic target because it is overexpressed in AML compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, we developed 2 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) containing a CD123-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with a CD28 costimulatory domain and CD3-ζ signaling domain, targeting different epitopes on CD123. CD123-CAR–redirected T cells mediated potent effector activity against CD123+ cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples. CD123 CAR T cells did not eliminate granulocyte/macrophage and erythroid colony formation in vitro. Additionally, T cells obtained from patients with active AML can be modified to express CD123 CARs and are able to lyse autologous AML blasts in vitro. Finally, CD123 CAR T cells exhibited antileukemic activity in vivo against a xenogeneic model of disseminated AML. These results suggest that CD123 CAR T cells are a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of high-risk AML. PMID:24030378

  4. Association between the Interaction of Key Genes Involved in Effector T-Cell Pathways and Susceptibility to Developallergic Rhinitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that interaction between key genes mediating signaling and transcriptional networks involving effector T-cell responses may influence an individual’s susceptibility to develop allergic rhinitis(AR). Objective The aim of this study was todetermine whether specific interactions between key genes involved in effector T-cell pathways are associated with an individual’s susceptibility to develop AR in Han Chinese subjects. Method A cohort of 489 patients with AR and 421 healthy controls was enrolled from the Han Chinese population in Beijing, China. AR was established by questionnaire and clinical examination, and peripheral blood was drawn from all subjects for DNA extraction. A total of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 reprehensive candidate genes involved in T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17, Th9 and T regulatory cell pathways were selected from the International Haplotype Mappingdatabase for Han Chinese in Beijing (CHB) population, and IlluminaGoldenGate assay was conducted for SNP genotyping. The PLINK software package was used to perform statistical analyses. Results Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis using logistic regression showed SNP rs8193036 in IL17A gene, rs2569254 in IL-12 and rs1898413 in RORα weresignificantlyassociatedwith AR.Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis with genetic models demonstrated thatrs2569254 in IL-12, rs1031508 in STAT4, and rs3741809 in IL-26 were likely to be recessive, rs8193036 in IL17A allelic, rs897200in STAT4 genotypic, and rs1898413 in RORα dominant. Epistasis analyses exhibited that 83 SNPs in 23 genes were significantly interactive; of which 59 interactions/SNP pairs demonstrated OR values higher than 2 or lower than 0.5, and 12 interactions/SNP pairs OR values higher than 4 or lower than 0.25. STAT3, RORα and IL-26, involved in Th17 pathway,were the mostfrequentlyinteractive genes. Conclusion This study suggests that interactions between several SNPs in key genes

  5. A comparative study of frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry for immunophenotypic analysis of lymph node biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Biesemier, K W; Dent, G A; Pryzwansky, K B; Folds, J D