Science.gov

Sample records for impact instrument calibration

  1. Invited Article: Deep Impact instrument calibration.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, Kenneth P; A'Hearn, Michael F; Baca, Michael; Delamere, Alan; Desnoyer, Mark; Farnham, Tony; Groussin, Olivier; Hampton, Donald; Ipatov, Sergei; Li, Jianyang; Lisse, Carey; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; McLaughlin, Stephanie; Sunshine, Jessica; Thomas, Peter; Wellnitz, Dennis

    2008-09-01

    Calibration of NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft instruments allows reliable scientific interpretation of the images and spectra returned from comet Tempel 1. Calibrations of the four onboard remote sensing imaging instruments have been performed in the areas of geometric calibration, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and radiometric response. Error sources such as noise (random, coherent, encoding, data compression), detector readout artifacts, scattered light, and radiation interactions have been quantified. The point spread functions (PSFs) of the medium resolution instrument and its twin impactor targeting sensor are near the theoretical minimum [ approximately 1.7 pixels full width at half maximum (FWHM)]. However, the high resolution instrument camera was found to be out of focus with a PSF FWHM of approximately 9 pixels. The charge coupled device (CCD) read noise is approximately 1 DN. Electrical cross-talk between the CCD detector quadrants is correctable to <2 DN. The IR spectrometer response nonlinearity is correctable to approximately 1%. Spectrometer read noise is approximately 2 DN. The variation in zero-exposure signal level with time and spectrometer temperature is not fully characterized; currently corrections are good to approximately 10 DN at best. Wavelength mapping onto the detector is known within 1 pixel; spectral lines have a FWHM of approximately 2 pixels. About 1% of the IR detector pixels behave badly and remain uncalibrated. The spectrometer exhibits a faint ghost image from reflection off a beamsplitter. Instrument absolute radiometric calibration accuracies were determined generally to <10% using star imaging. Flat-field calibration reduces pixel-to-pixel response differences to approximately 0.5% for the cameras and <2% for the spectrometer. A standard calibration image processing pipeline is used to produce archival image files for analysis by researchers. PMID:19044397

  2. Test and Calibration of The Impact Sensor Experiment For The Giada Instrument Aboard The Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; della Corte, V.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; International Giada Team

    The Impact Sensor is a device for the measurement of the momentum of grains ejected from a cometary nucleus and impinging over its sensitive surface. It is a square di- aphragm (124 x 124 x 0.5) mm^3 equipped with five piezoelectric sensors placed beneath the centre and each corner of the diaphragm. Momenta of impinging particles turn out to be proportional to the maximum amplitude of the principal flexural wave which propagates along the diaphragm after a collision event. When this perturbation reaches the sensors, they respond with a proportional voltage. So, after the calibra- tion procedure, the sensors response can be linked to the particles momentum. The IS flight model has been completely calibrated and released to ESA. The dinamical range of detectable momenta is 7.5 E-11 - 5 E-4 Ns. Here we present the results of the calibration tests.

  3. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  4. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin

    2013-12-16

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (∼10{sup −9} - 10{sup −8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  5. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (˜10-9 - 10-8 Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  6. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2011-03-29

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  7. Spacecraft instrument calibration and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Feldman, P.; Hudson, R.; Lean, J.; Madden, R.; Mcmaster, L.; Mount, G.; Rottman, G.; Simon, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    The following topics are covered: instrument degradation; the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) Experiment; the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS); the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 1 (SAGE-1) and SAGE-2 instruments; the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV ozone and near infrared airglow instruments; and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS).

  8. MODIS Instrument Operation and Calibration Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Madhavan, S.; Link, D.; Geng, X.; Wenny, B.; Wu, A.; Chen, H.; Salomonson, V.

    2014-01-01

    Terra and Aqua MODIS have successfully operated for over 14 and 12 years since their respective launches in 1999 and 2002. The MODIS on-orbit calibration is performed using a set of on-board calibrators, which include a solar diffuser for calibrating the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). On-orbit changes in the sensor responses as well as key performance parameters are monitored using the measurements of these on-board calibrators. This paper provides an overview of MODIS on-orbit operation and calibration activities, and instrument long-term performance. It presents a brief summary of the calibration enhancements made in the latest MODIS data collection 6 (C6). Future improvements in the MODIS calibration and their potential applications to the S-NPP VIIRS are also discussed.

  9. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  10. Uncertainty Analysis of Instrument Calibration and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping

    1999-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic researchers require estimated precision and bias uncertainties of measured physical quantities, typically at 95 percent confidence levels. Uncertainties of final computed aerodynamic parameters are obtained by propagation of individual measurement uncertainties through the defining functional expressions. In this paper, rigorous mathematical techniques are extended to determine precision and bias uncertainties of any instrument-sensor system. Through this analysis, instrument uncertainties determined through calibration are now expressed as functions of the corresponding measurement for linear and nonlinear univariate and multivariate processes. Treatment of correlated measurement precision error is developed. During laboratory calibration, calibration standard uncertainties are assumed to be an order of magnitude less than those of the instrument being calibrated. Often calibration standards do not satisfy this assumption. This paper applies rigorous statistical methods for inclusion of calibration standard uncertainty and covariance due to the order of their application. The effects of mathematical modeling error on calibration bias uncertainty are quantified. The effects of experimental design on uncertainty are analyzed. The importance of replication is emphasized, techniques for estimation of both bias and precision uncertainties using replication are developed. Statistical tests for stationarity of calibration parameters over time are obtained.

  11. The PREMOS/PICARD instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, André; Hülsen, Gregor; Meindl, Peter; Winkler, Rainer; Thuillier, Gérard; Blattner, Peter; Buisson, François; Egorova, Tatiana; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Fox, Nigel; Gröbner, Julian; Hochedez, Jean-François; Koller, Silvio; Meftah, Mustapha; Meisonnier, Mireille; Nyeki, Stephan; Pfiffner, Daniel; Roth, Hansjörg; Rozanov, Eugene; Spescha, Marcel; Wehrli, Christoph; Werner, Lutz; Wyss, Jules U.

    2009-08-01

    PREMOS is a space experiment scheduled to fly on the French solar mission PICARD. The experiment comprises filter radiometers and absolute radiometers to measure the spectral and total solar irradiance. The aim of PREMOS is to contribute to the long term monitoring of the total solar irradiance, to use irradiance observations for 'nowcasting' the state of the terrestrial middle atmosphere and to provide long term sensitivity calibration for the solar imaging instrument SODISM on PICARD. In this paper we describe the calibration of the instruments. The filter radiometer channels in the visible and near IR were characterized at PMOD/WRC and the UV channels were calibrated at PTB Berlin. The absolute radiometers were compared with the World Radiometric Reference at PMOD/WRC and a power calibration relative to a primary cryogenic radiometer standard was performed in vacuum and air at NPL.

  12. Postlaunch calibration of spacecraft attitude instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W.; Hashmall, J.; Garrick, J.; Harman, R.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of both onboard and ground attitude determination can be significantly enhanced by calibrating spacecraft attitude instruments (sensors) after launch. Although attitude sensors are accurately calibrated before launch, the stresses of launch and the space environment inevitably cause changes in sensor parameters. During the mission, these parameters may continue to drift requiring repeated on-orbit calibrations. The goal of attitude sensor calibration is to reduce the systematic errors in the measurement models. There are two stages at which systematic errors may enter. The first occurs in the conversion of sensor output into an observation vector in the sensor frame. The second occurs in the transformation of the vector from the sensor frame to the spacecraft attitude reference frame. This paper presents postlaunch alignment and transfer function calibration of the attitude sensors for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE).

  13. NASA airborne satellite instrumentation calibrator (NASIC) technical reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, John L.; Mcintire, Gerry

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Satellite Instrumentation Calibrator (NASIC) is a visible and near-infrared spectrometer used to calibrate various satellite instruments by underflying those instruments in a NASA ER-2 aircraft. The calibration instrument's hardware and software are documented. The design, operation, and function of an Ebert-Fastie monochronomator, which by means of a moveable diffraction grating, becomes a visible and near-infrared spectrometer used to calibrate satellite-borne instruments by high altitude underflights in the NASA ER-2.

  14. USE OF THE SDO POINTING CONTROLLERS FOR INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION MANEUVERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vess, Melissa F.; Starin, Scott R.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    During the science phase of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the three science instruments require periodic instrument calibration maneuvers with a frequency of up to once per month. The command sequences for these maneuvers vary in length from a handful of steps to over 200 steps, and individual steps vary in size from 5 arcsec per step to 22.5 degrees per step. Early in the calibration maneuver development, it was determined that the original attitude sensor complement could not meet the knowledge requirements for the instrument calibration maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. Because the mission must be single fault tolerant, an attitude determination trade study was undertaken to determine the impact of adding an additional attitude sensor versus developing alternative, potentially complex, methods of performing the maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. To limit the impact to the science data capture budget, these instrument calibration maneuvers must be performed as quickly as possible while maintaining the tight pointing and knowledge required to obtain valid data during the calibration. To this end, the decision was made to adapt a linear pointing controller by adjusting gains and adding an attitude limiter so that it would be able to slew quickly and still achieve steady pointing once on target. During the analysis of this controller, questions arose about the stability of the controller during slewing maneuvers due to the combination of the integral gain, attitude limit, and actuator saturation. Analysis was performed and a method for disabling the integral action while slewing was incorporated to ensure stability. A high fidelity simulation is used to simulate the various instrument calibration maneuvers.

  15. 10 CFR 35.61 - Calibration of survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 35.61 Calibration of survey instruments. (a) A licensee shall calibrate the survey instruments used to show compliance with this part and 10 CFR Part 20 before first use, annually, and following a... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration of survey instruments. 35.61 Section...

  16. On-orbit instrument calibration of CALET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, Amir; Calet Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment which will be placed on the International Space Station in 2015. Primary goals of CALET are measurement of cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). As CALET is going to work in the ISS orbit space environment, it needs to be calibrated while it is in orbit. Penetrating non-showering protons and helium nuclei are prime candidates for instrument calibration, as they provide a known energy signal for calibrating the detector response. In the present paper, we discuss estimation of CALET's detector efficiency to protons and helium nuclei. Included is a discussion of different galactic cosmic ray and trapped proton models used for flux calculation and simulations performed for detector geometric area and trigger rate calculation. This paper also discusses the importance of the albedo proton flux for the CALET detector calibration. This research was supported by NASA at Louisiana State University under Grant Number NNX11AE01G.

  17. Optimal calibration of instrumented treadmills using an instrumented pole.

    PubMed

    Sloot, L H; Houdijk, H; van der Krogt, M M; Harlaar, J

    2016-08-01

    Calibration of instrumented treadmills is imperative for accurate measurement of ground reaction forces and center of pressure (COP). A protocol using an instrumented pole has been shown to considerably increase force and COP accuracy. This study examined how this protocol can be further optimized to maximize accuracy, by varying the measurement time and number of spots, using nonlinear approaches to calculate the calibration matrix and by correcting for potential inhomogeneity in the distribution of COP errors across the treadmill's surface. The accuracy increased with addition of spots and correction for the inhomogeneous distribution across the belt surface, decreased with reduction of measurement time, and did not improve by including nonlinear terms. Most of these methods improved the overall accuracy only to a limited extent, suggesting that the maximal accuracy is approached given the treadmill's inherent mechanical limitations. However, both correction for position dependence of the accuracy as well as its optimization within the walking area are found to be valuable additions to the standard calibration process. PMID:27180211

  18. Portable calibration instrument of hemodialysis unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang-bing; Li, Dong-sheng; Chen, Ai-jun

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of meeting the rapid development of blood purification in China, improve the level of blood purification treatment, and get rid of the plight of the foreign technology monopolization to promise patients' medical safety, a parameter-calibrator for the hemodialysis unit, which can detect simultaneously multi-parameter, is designed. The instrument includes a loop, which connects to the hemodialysis unit. Sensors are in the loop in series, so that the dialysis can flow through this loop and the sensors can acquisitive data of various parameters. In order to facilitate detection and carrying, the integrated circuit part modularly based on the ultralow-power microcontrollers,TI MSP430 is designed. High-performance and small-packaged components are used to establish a modular, high-precision, multi-functional, portable system. The functions and the key technical indexes of the instrument have reached the level of products abroad.

  19. HESP: Instrument control, calibration and pipeline development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantha, Ch.; Roy, Jayashree; Mahesh, P. K.; Parihar, P. S.; Sangal, A. K.; Sriram, S.; Anand, M. N.; Anupama, G. C.; Giridhar, S.; Prabhu, T. P.; Sivarani, T.; Sundararajan, M. S.

    Hanle Echelle SPectrograph (HESP) is a fibre-fed, high resolution (R = 30,000 and 60,000) spectrograph being developed for the 2m HCT telescope at IAO, Hanle. The major components of the instrument are a) Cassegrain unit b) Spectrometer instrument. An instrument control system interacting with a guiding unit at Cassegrain interface as well as handling spectrograph functions is being developed. An on-axis auto-guiding using the spill-over angular ring around the input pinhole is also being developed. The stellar light from the Cassegrain unit is taken to the spectrograph using an optical fiber which is being characterized for spectral transmission, focal ratio degradation and scrambling properties. The design of the thermal enclosure and thermal control for the spectrograph housing is presented. A data pipeline for the entire Echelle spectral reduction is being developed. We also plan to implement an instrument physical model based calibration into the main data pipeline and in the maintenance and quality control operations.

  20. New instrument calibration facility for the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, W.H.; Polz, E.J.

    1993-12-31

    A new laboratory facility is being designed, constructed, and equipped at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a fiscal year 1992 line item project. This facility will provide space and equipment for test, evaluation, repair, maintenance, and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation. The project will replace an obsolete facility and will allow implementation of program upgrades necessary to meet ANSI N323 requirements and National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) criteria for accreditation of federally owned secondary calibration laboratories. An outline of the project is presented including description, scope, cost, management organization, chronology, and current status. Selected design criteria and their impacts on the project are discussed. The upgraded SRS calibration program is described, and important features of the new facility and equipment that will accommodate this program are listed. The floor plan for the facility is shown, and equipment summaries and functional descriptions for each area are provided.

  1. Comparison of two methodologies for calibrating satellite instruments in the visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith R.; Guenther, Bruce; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James J.

    2010-10-01

    Traditionally, satellite instruments that measure Earth-reflected solar radiation in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions have been calibrated for radiance response in a two-step method. In the first step, the spectral response of the instrument is determined using a nearly monochromatic light source, such as a lamp-illuminated monochromator. Such sources only provide a relative spectral response (RSR) for the instrument, since they do not act as calibrated sources of light nor do they typically fill the field-of-view of the instrument. In the second step, the instrument views a calibrated source of broadband light, such as a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere. In the traditional method, the RSR and the sphere spectral radiance are combined and, with the instrument's response, determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the instrument. More recently, an absolute calibration system using widely tunable monochromatic laser systems has been developed. Using these sources, the absolute spectral responsivity (ASR) of an instrument can be determined on a wavelength-by-wavelength basis. From these monochromatic ASRs, the responses of the instrument bands to broadband radiance sources can be calculated directly, eliminating the need for calibrated broadband light sources such as integrating spheres. Here we describe the laser-based calibration and the traditional broad-band sourcebased calibration of the NPP VIIRS sensor, and compare the derived calibration coefficients for the instrument. Finally, we evaluate the impact of the new calibration approach on the on-orbit performance of the sensor.

  2. Comparison of Two Methodologies for Calibrating Satellite Instruments in the Visible and Near Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith R.; Guenther, Bruce; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack); Butler, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, satellite instruments that measure Earth-reflected solar radiation in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions have been calibrated for radiance response in a two-step method. In the first step, the spectral response of the instrument is determined using a nearly monochromatic light source, such a lamp-illuminated monochromator. Such sources only provide a relative spectral response (RSR) for the instrument, since they do not act as calibrated sources of light nor do they typically fill the field-of-view of the instrument. In the second step, the instrument views a calibrated source of broadband light, such as lamp-illuminated integrating sphere. In the traditional method, the RSR and the sphere spectral radiance are combined and, with the instrument's response, determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the instrument. More recently, an absolute calibration system using widely tunable monochromatic laser systems has been developed, Using these sources, the absolute spectral responsivity (ASR) of an instrument can be determined on a wavelength-hy-wavelength basis. From these monochromatic ASRs. the responses of the instrument bands to broadband radiance sources can be calculated directly, eliminating the need for calibrated broadband light sources such as integrating spheres. Here we describe the laser-based calibration and the traditional broad-band source-based calibration of the NPP VIIRS sensor, and compare the derived calibration coefficients for the instrument. Finally, we evaluate the impact of the new calibration approach on the on-orbit performance of the sensor.

  3. Impact dynamics instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormck, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    One of the tasks specified in the NASA Langley controlled impact demonstration (CID) work package was to furnish dynamic instrumentation sensors. The types of instrumentation sensors required were accelerometers for aircraft structural loads measurements, seat belt load cells to measure anthropomorphic dummy responses to the aircraft impact, and strain gage bending bridges to measure the aircraft fuselage and wing bending during impact. The objective in the selection of dynamic instrumentation for the CID was to provide 352 of the highest quality transducers and remain within budget allocation. The transducers that were selected for the CID evaluation process were each subjected to rigorous laboratory acceptance tests and to aircraft fuselage section drop tests at the LaRC Impact Dynamics Research Facility. Data compiled from this series of tests showed the selected transducers to be best suited for the CID mission requirement. The transducers installation technique on the airframe proved successful. The transducer quality assurance was guaranteed through rigorous acceptance testing. Data acquired was 97.0%.

  4. Onboard calibration status of the ASTER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Fumihiro; Kikuchi, Masakuni; Inada, Hitomi; Akagi, Shigeki; Ono, Hidehiko

    2012-11-01

    The ASTER Instrument is one of the five sensors on the NASA's Terra satellite on orbit since December 1999. ASTER consists of three radiometers, VNIR, SWIR and TIR whose spatial resolutions are 15 m, 30 m and 90 m, respectively. Unfortunately SWIR stopped taking images since May 2008 due to the offset rise caused by the detector temperature rise, but VNIR and TIR are taking Earth images of good quality. VNIR and TIR experienced responsivity degradation while SWIR showed little change. Band 1 (0.56 μm) decreased most among three VNIR bands and 30 % in twelve years. Band 12 (9.1 μm) decreased 40 % and most among five TIR bands. There are some discussions of the causes of the responsivity degradation of VNIR and TIR. Possible causes are contamination accretion by silicone outgas, thruster plume and plasma interaction. We marked hydrazine which comes out unburned in the thruster plume during the inclination adjust maneuver (IAM). Hydrazine has the absorption spectra corresponding to the TIR responsivity degradation in the infrared region. We studied the IAM effect on the ASTER by allocating the additional onboard calibration activities just before and after the IAM while the normal onboard calibration activity is operated once in 49 days. This experiment was carried out three times in fiscal year 2011.

  5. Instrument calibration architecture of Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, T.; Bhan, R.; Putrevu, D.; Mehrotra, P.; Nandy, P. S.; Shukla, S. D.; Rao, C. V. N.; Dave, D. B.; Desai, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) payload system is configured to perform self-calibration of transmit and receive paths before and after imaging sessions through a special instrument calibration technique. Instrument calibration architecture of RISAT-1 supported ground verification and validation of payload including active array antenna. During on-ground validation of 126 beams of active array antenna which needed precise calibration of boresight pointing, a unique method called "collimation coefficient error estimation" was utilized. This method of antenna calibration was supported by special hardware and software calibration architecture of RISAT-1. This paper concentrates on RISAT-1 hardware and software architecture which supports in-orbit and on-ground instrument calibration. Efforts are also put here to highlight use of special calibration scheme of RISAT-1 instrument to evaluate system response during ground verification and validation.

  6. Calibration and postlaunch performance of the Meteor 3/TOMS instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Jaross, G.; Krueger, A.; Cebula, R.P.; Seftor, C.; Hartmann, U.; Haring, R.; Burchfield, D. ||

    1995-02-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration results for the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are presented here. Ozone amounts are retrieved from measurements of Earth albedo in the 312- to 380-nm range. The accuracy of albedo measurements is primarily tied to knowledge of the reflective properties of diffusers used in the calibrations and to the instrument`s wavelength selection. These and other important prelaunch calibrations are presented. Their estimated accuracies are within the bounds necessary to determine column ozone to better than 1%. However, postlaunch validation results indicate some prelaunch calibration uncertainties may be larger than originally estimated. Instrument calibrations have been maintained postlaunch to within a corresponding 1% error in retrieved ozone. Onboard calibrations, including wavelength monitoring and a three-diffuser solar measurement system, are described and specific results are presented. Other issues, such as the effects of orbital precession on calibration and recent chopper wheel malfunctions, are also discussed.

  7. Pressure instrument calibration reaps SPC benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    Calibration laboratories are faced with the need to become accredited or registered to one or more quality standards. One requirement common to all of these standards is the need to have in place a measurement assurance program. What is a measurement assurance program? Brian Belanger, in Measurement Assurance Programs: Part 1, describes it as a {open_quotes}quality assurance program for a measurement process that quantifies the total uncertainty of the measurements (both random and systematic components of error) with respect to national or designated standards and demonstrates that the total uncertainty is sufficiently small to meet the user`s requirements.{close_quotes} Rolf Schumacher is more specific in Measurement Assurance in Your Own Laboratory. He states, {open_quotes}Measurement assurance is the application of broad quality control principles to measurements of calibrations.{close_quotes} Here, the focus is on one important part of any measurement assurance program: implementation of statistical process control (SPC). Paraphrasing Juran`s Quality Control Handbook, a process is in statistical control if the only observed variations are those that can be attributed to random causes. Conversely, a process that exhibits variations due to assignable causes is not in a state of statistical control. Finally, Carrol Croarkin states, {open_quotes}In the measurement assurance context the measurement algorithm including instrumentation, reference standards and operator interactions is the process that is to be controlled, and its direct product is the measurement per se. The measurements are assumed to be valid if the measurement algorithm is operating in a state of control.{close_quotes} Implicit in this statement is the important fact that an out-of-control process cannot produce valid measurements. 7 figs.

  8. Calibrating coastal GNSS-R instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger; Hobiger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, a GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry) instrument for local sea level observations is operated at the Onsala Space Observatory (Löfgren et al., 2011). The Onsala Space Observatory is the Swedish geodetic fundamental station, located at the Swedish West Coast, and contributes to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) by a variety of geodetic and geophysical observations. The Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation consists of two GNSS antennas that are mounted back-to-back on a bar at the coastline extending over the open sea in southward direction. One of the antennas is upward oriented and receives the direct satellite signals, while the other antenna is downward oriented and receives the satellite signals that reflect off the sea surface. The antennas are connected to a commercial GNSS receiver each and data are recorded with sampling rate of up to 20 Hz. Satellite signals of several GNSS are received and are analysed with various different analysis strategies to provide sea level results with different temporal resolution and precision (Larson et al., 2013; Löfgren and Haas, 2014). Since the instrumentation uses GNSS signals, it is possible to derive both local sea level, i.e. relative to the coast, and absolute sea level, i.e. relative to the geocentre as realised by the GNSS. The bar carrying the two antennas can be placed in 10 different vertical positions covering a height difference of 2.5 m between the highest and lowest position. We present results from a calibration campaign of the Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation performed in 2014. During this several weeks long campaign the antennas were placed at different vertical positions for several days at each position. The recorded data are analysed with the different analysis strategies, and the results are compared to the results derived from the co-located tide gauge equipment. References - Löfgren J, Haas R, Scherneck H-G (2011). Three months of local sea-level derived from

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  10. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    PubMed

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper. PMID:19724540

  11. Evaluation, comparison and calibration of oceanographic instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews oceanographic instrumentation. The parameters for which instrumentation is reviewed are limited to those where continuous monitoring is possible. The discussion is also limited to parameters of interest to physical oceanography and ocean engineering. Specific instruments reviewed include: meterological sensors and instruments; wave sensors; ocean current sensors; pressure sensors; and CTD sensors. Various types of oceanographic measurements are also evaluated.

  12. Status of Terra and Aqua MODIS Instrument Operation and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Wenny, B. N.; Sun, J.; Angal, A.; Salomonson, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    Terra and Aqua MODIS have successfully operated for more than 13 and 11 years since their respective launches in 1999 and 2002. Nearly 40 data products, developed for studies of the earth's land, ocean, and atmosphere, have been routinely generated from calibrated and geo-located MODIS observations and widely distributed to the science and user community. MODIS on-orbit calibration is performed by a set of on-board calibrators, which include a solar diffuser for the reflective solar bands calibration and a blackbody for the thermal emissive bands calibration. MODIS on-board calibrators are regularly operated to monitor on-orbit changes in sensor responses and key performance parameters, such as radiometric calibration coefficients. Since launch, extensive instrument calibration and characterization activities have been scheduled and executed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST). This presentation provides an overview of both Terra and Aqua MODIS instrument status, their on-orbit operation and calibration activities, and overall long-term performance. It reports calibration improvements (algorithms and look-up tables) made in the latest MODIS data collection (C6). Lessons learned from both Terra and Aqua MODIS and their applications to the S-NPP VIIRS on-orbit calibration are also discussed.

  13. Physical calibration of instruments for the detection of transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedrenne, G.; Zenchenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Niel, M.; Hurley, K.; Chambon, G.; Estulin, I. V.

    The present study describes the ground calibration of the Sneg-2MP (Prognoz 6) and Sneg-2MZ (Venera 11 and 12) instruments for the detection of gamma-ray transients. The basic calibration characteristics are examined including the precision of the time scale of the instrument and the determination of the energy spectrum of events. The construction of the matrix of transition to the electron spectrum is considered along with the calculation of the photon spectrum.

  14. IOT Overview: Calibrations of the VLTI Instruments (MIDI and AMBER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, S.; Rantakyrö, F.; Rivinius, T.; Stefl, S.; Hummel, C.; Brillant, S.; Schöller, M.; Percheron, I.; Wittkowski, M.; Richichi, A.; Ballester, P.

    We present here a short review of the calibration processes that are currently applied to the instruments AMBER and MIDI of the VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) at Paranal. We first introduce the general principles to calibrate the raw data (the "visibilities") that have been measured by long-baseline optical interferometry. Then, we focus on the specific case of the scientific operation of the VLTI instruments. We explain the criteria that have been used to select calibrator stars for the observations with the VLTI instruments, as well as the routine internal calibration techniques. Among these techniques, the "P2VM" (Pixel-to-Visibility Matrix) in the case of AMBER is explained. Also, the daily monitoring of AMBER and MIDI, that has recently been implemented, is shortly introduced.

  15. Calibration procedure for the polarimetric instrument for Solar Eclipse-98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, David F.; Card, G. L.; Lecinski, A. R.; Lites, Bruce W.; Streander, Kim V.; Tomczyk, Steven

    2000-12-01

    We describe a ground-based eclipse instrument for measuring solar coronal polarization brightness and intensity, and the calibration procedures for this instrument. We present coronal measurements from the February 26, 1998 total solar eclipse observed at Curacao, N.A.. The instrument employs a liquid crystal variable retarder for analysis of coronal broad band linear polarization and collects data on an array detector spanning a 6.5 solar radius field of view. Polarization calibration of the liquid crystal variable retarder utilizes the tangential orientation of coronal polarization to calculate retardance values.

  16. Planck-LFI: Instrument Design and Ground Calibration Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersanelli, M.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Balasini, M.; Baldan, G.; Battaglia, P.; Bernardino, T.; Bhandari, P.; Blackhurst, E.; Boschini, L.; Bowman, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cavaliere, F.; Colombo, F.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R.; Dupac, X.; Edgeley, J.; D'Arcangelo, O.; de La Fuente, L.; de Rosa, A.; Ferrari, F.; Figini, L.; Fogliani, S.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Jukkala, P.; Gaier, T.; Galtress, A.; Garavaglia, S.; Gomez-Renasco, F.; Guzzi, P.; Herreros, J. M.; Hoyland, R.; Huges, N.; Kettle, D.; Kilpel, V. H.; Laaninen, M.; Lapolla, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Lawson, D.; Leonardi, R.; Leutenegger, P.; Levin, S.; Lilje, P. B.; Lubin, P. M.; Maino, D.; Malaspina, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Mari, G.; Maris, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Mediavilla, A.; Meinhold, P.; Mennella, A.; Miccolis, M.; Morgante, G.; Nash, A.; Nesti, R.; Pagan, L.; Paine, C.; Pascual, J. P.; Pasian, F.; Pecora, M.; Pezzati, S.; Pospieszalski, M.; Platania, P.; Prina, M.; Rebolo, R.; Roddis, N.; Sabatini, N.; Sandri, M.; Salmon, M. J.; Seiffert, M.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Sozzi, C.; Stringhetti, L.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.; Wilkinson, A.; Winder, F.; Zacchei, A.

    2005-09-01

    The ESA Planck satellite is designed to achieve precision imaging of the Cosmic Microwave Background with an unprecedented combination of angular resolution, sensitivity, spectral range and sky coverage. The Low Frequency Instrument is one of two complementary instruments, and covers 30, 44, and 70 GHz with an array of wideband pseudo-correlation, cryogenic radiometers. Advanced qualification models of the radiometer chains and of the instrument electronics have been manufactured, tested and integrated into the LFI Qualification Model. The main radiometer calibration, RF tuning and performance characterization is carried out at a single radiometer chain level, and then verified at instrument integrated level in dedicated cryofacilities. Here we describe the main requirements and instrument design, and we summarize the radiometer calibration strategy optimised during the qualification activity in view of the LFI Flight Model campaign.

  17. Comparison of two methodologies for calibrating satellite instruments in the visible and near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Robert A; Brown, Steven W; Lykke, Keith R; Guenther, Bruce; Butler, James J; Schwarting, Thomas; Turpie, Kevin; Moyer, David; DeLuccia, Frank; Moeller, Christopher

    2015-12-10

    Traditionally, satellite instruments that measure Earth-reflected solar radiation in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions have been calibrated for radiance responsivity in a two-step method. In the first step, the relative spectral response (RSR) of the instrument is determined using a nearly monochromatic light source such as a lamp-illuminated monochromator. These sources do not typically fill the field of view of the instrument nor act as calibrated sources of light. Consequently, they only provide a relative (not absolute) spectral response for the instrument. In the second step, the instrument views a calibrated source of broadband light, such as a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere. The RSR and the sphere's absolute spectral radiance are combined to determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity (ASR) of the instrument. More recently, a full-aperture absolute calibration approach using widely tunable monochromatic lasers has been developed. Using these sources, the ASR of an instrument can be determined in a single step on a wavelength-by-wavelength basis. From these monochromatic ASRs, the responses of the instrument bands to broadband radiance sources can be calculated directly, eliminating the need for calibrated broadband light sources such as lamp-illuminated integrating spheres. In this work, the traditional broadband source-based calibration of the Suomi National Preparatory Project Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite sensor is compared with the laser-based calibration of the sensor. Finally, the impact of the new full-aperture laser-based calibration approach on the on-orbit performance of the sensor is considered. PMID:26836861

  18. Status of MODIS Instruments and Future Calibration Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Wu, A.; Salomonson, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    MODIS is one of the key instruments currently operated on two major missions for the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) program: Terra and Aqua launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. Nearly 40 data products have been routinely generated from both Terra and Aqua MODIS observations and widely distributed to the science community and users worldwide for their studies of the earth's system and changes in its geophysical properties. To date, each MODIS instrument operation remains nominal and its on-board calibrators (OBC) continue to function satisfactorily. On a regular basis, MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB) calibration is performed by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). For the thermal emissive bands (TEB), an on-board blackbody (BB) provides a scan-by-scan calibration reference. Since launch, extensive calibration and characterization activities have been scheduled and implemented by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) to produce and update calibration look-up tables (LUT). This presentation provides an overview of both Terra and Aqua MODIS instrument status, their on-orbit operation and calibration activities, and radiometric, spectral, and spatial performance. It describes calibration changes (algorithms and look-up tables) made for the MODIS Level 1B (L1B) data collection 6 (C6) and discusses remaining challenging issues and ongoing effort for future improvements. As expected, lessons from both Terra and Aqua MODIS have benefitted and will continue to help the S-NPP and JPSS VIIRS instruments in terms of on-orbit operation strategies and calibration enhancements.

  19. Evaluation of two gas-dilution methods for instrument calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Two gas dilution methods were evaluated for use in the calibration of analytical instruments used in air pollution studies. A dual isotope fluorescence carbon monoxide analyzer was used as the transfer standard. The methods are not new but some modifications are described. The rotary injection gas dilution method was found to be more accurate than the closed loop method. Results by the two methods differed by 5 percent. This could not be accounted for by the random errors in the measurements. The methods avoid the problems associated with pressurized cylinders. Both methods have merit and have found a place in instrument calibration work.

  20. Impact of instrument response variations on health physics measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1984-10-01

    Uncertainties in estimating the potential health impact of a given radiation exposure include instrument measurement error in determining exposure and difficulty in relating this exposure to an effective dose value. Instrument error can be due to design or manufacturing deficiencies, limitations of the sensing element used, and calibration and maintenance of the instrument. This paper evaluates the errors which can be introduced by design deficiencies and limitations of the sensing element for a wide variety of commonly used survey instruments. The results indicate little difference among sensing element choice for general survey work, with variations among specific instrument designs being the major factor. Ion chamber instruments tend to be the best for all around use, while scintillator-based units should not be used where accurate measurements are required. The need to properly calibrate and maintain an instrument appears to be the most important factor in instrument accuracy. 8 references, 6 tables.

  1. Accuracies of Incoming Radiation: Calibrations of Total Solar Irradiance Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Harber, D.; Heuerman, K.

    2009-04-01

    All of the energy tracked by the GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment and the driving energy for Earth climate is incident at the top of the Earth's atmosphere as solar radiation. The total solar irradiance (TSI) has been monitored continually for over 30 years from space. Continuity of these measurements has enabled the creation of composite time series from which the radiative forcing inputs to climate models are derived and solar forcing sensitivities are determined. None of the ten spaceborne TSI instruments contributing to the solar climate data record have been calibrated or validated end-to-end for irradiance accuracy under flight-like conditions, and calibration inaccuracies contribute to seemingly large offsets between the TSI values reported by each instrument. The newest of the flight TSI instruments, the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), measures lower solar irradiance than prior instruments. I will review the accuracies of flight TSI instruments, discuss possible causes for the offsets between them, and describe a recently built calibration facility to improve the accuracies of future TSI instruments. The TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) enables end-to-end comparisons of TSI instruments to a NIST-calibrated cryogenic radiometer. For the first time, TSI instruments can be validated directly against a cryogenic radiometer under flight-like conditions for measuring irradiance (rather than merely optical power) at solar power levels while under vacuum. The TRF not only validates TSI instrument accuracy, but also can help diagnose the causes of offsets between different instruments. This facility recently validated the accuracy of the TIM to be launched this year on NASA's Glory mission, establishing a baseline that can link the Glory/TIM to future TSI instruments via this ground-based comparison. Similar tests on the TRF with a ground-based SORCE/TIM support the lower TSI values measured by the SORCE flight unit. These

  2. Traceable Micro-Force Sensor for Instrumented Indentation Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D T; Shaw, G A; Seugling, R M; Xiang, D; Pratt, J R

    2007-04-02

    Instrumented indentation testing (IIT), commonly referred to as nanoindentation when small forces are used, is a popular technique for determining the mechanical properties of small volumes of material. Sample preparation is relatively easy, usually requiring only that a smooth surface of the material to be tested be accessible to a contact probe, and instruments that combine sophisticated automation with straightforward user interfaces are available commercially from several manufacturers. In addition, documentary standards are now becoming available from both the International Standards Organization (ISO 14577) and ASTM International (E28 WK382) that define test methods and standard practices for IIT, and will allow the technique to be used to produce material property data that can be used in product specifications. These standards also define the required level of accuracy of the force data produced by IIT instruments, as well as methods to verify that accuracy. For forces below 10 mN, these requirements can be difficult to meet, particularly for instrument owners who need to verify the performance of their instrument as it is installed at their site. In this paper, we describe the development, performance and application of an SI-traceable force sensor system for potential use in the field calibration of commercial IIT instruments. The force sensor itself, based on an elastically deforming capacitance gauge, is small enough to mount in a commercial instrument as if it were a test specimen, and is used in conjunction with an ultra-high accuracy capacitance bridge. The sensor system is calibrated with NIST-traceable masses over the range 5.0 {micro}N through 5.0 mN. We will present data on its accuracy and precision, as well its potential application to the verification of force in commercial instrumented indentation instruments.

  3. Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Instrument Calibration Summary. Version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kimberly Ennico; Colaprete, Anthony; Shirley, Mark H.; Wooden, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the calibration of the LCROSS instruments. It will be released to the public via the Planetary Data System. We need a quick review, if possible, because the data has been delivered to the PDS, and this document is needed to interpret the LCROSS impact data fully. [My mistake [shirley) in not realizing this needed to be treated as a normal publication.] The LCROSS instruments are commercially available units except for one designed and built at Ames. The commercially available instruments don't seem to me to present ITAR issues (Sony video camera, thermal camera from England, and so on.) Also, the internal design details of the instruments are not included in this report, only the process of calibrating them against standard targets. Only very high-level descriptions of the spacecraft are included, comparable to the level of detail included in the public web pages on nasa.gov.

  4. Instrument Calibration plan of the Technical Support Department

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, K.L.; Duncan, D.M.; McIntyre, T.J.; Millet, A.J.; Swabe, T.E.; Vines, R.A.

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the management of the Calibration Program of the Instrumentation and Controls Division`s Technical Support Department (ISD). The implementation of the program is the responsibility of ISD; however, the decision as to whether or not equipment is calibrated is the responsibility of the end user. It is imperative that all parties maintain timely and effective dialogue to ensure that the process is adequate to meet the needs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program is a planned, systematic schedule of actions necessary to provide confidence that equipment used to make measurements or quality judgments conforms to established technical requirements and is traceable to nationally recognized standards. It is especially important to place this guidance in the context for which it is intended. ORNL instrumentation support at the shop and facility level is the primary application. Energy Systems and site policy provide the umbrella guidance needed for overall measuring and test equipment support.

  5. The Gemini Planet Imager Calibration Wavefront Sensor Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick S.; Bartos, Randall D.; Trinh, Thang Q.; Pueyo, Laurent A.; Fregoso, Santos F.; Angione, John R.; Shelton, J. Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is an extreme adaptive optics system that will employ an apodized-pupil coronagraph to make direct detections of faint companions of nearby stars to a contrast level of the 10(exp -7) within a few lambda/D of the parent star. Such high contrasts from the ground require exquisite wavefront sensing and control both for the AO system as well as for the coronagraph. Un-sensed non-common path phase and amplitude errors after the wavefront sensor dichroic but before the coronagraph would lead to speckles which would ultimately limit the contrast. The calibration wavefront system for GPI will measure the complex wavefront at the system pupil before the apodizer and provide slow phase corrections to the AO system to mitigate errors that would cause a loss in contrast. The calibration wavefront sensor instrument for GPI has been built. We will describe the instrument and its performance.

  6. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  7. Automatic calibration and correction for intelligent measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Gao; Yang, Shunian; Li, Zhu

    1993-09-01

    A microprocessor-controlled measuring system model is described in this paper . This system which consists of a sliding guide with a linear motion slide plate a linear inductosyn the signal processing circuit and the microprocessor system can be used on some machine tools such as the lathe the milling machine the drilling machine etc. to take measurements of the absolute displacement of slide plates in process. In order to maintain the expectant accuracy in measurement over a long time it is necessary for the measuring system to be calibrated and corrected periodically . The mathematical models used to approximate the error curve are developed. By utilizing the computing ability of microprocessor the automatic calibration and correction for intelligent instruments can be realized conveniently and an expectant accuracy can be maintained in the period between two successive auto-calibrations.

  8. Precision Spectrophotometric Calibration System for Dark Energy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, Michael S.

    2015-06-30

    For this research we build a precision calibration system and carried out measurements to demonstrate the precision that can be achieved with a high precision spectrometric calibration system. It was shown that the system is capable of providing a complete spectrophotometric calibration at the sub-pixel level. The calibration system uses a fast, high precision monochromator that can quickly and efficiently scan over an instrument’s entire spectral range with a spectral line width of less than 0.01 nm corresponding to a fraction of a pixel on the CCD. The system was extensively evaluated in the laboratory. Our research showed that a complete spectrophotometric calibration standard for spectroscopic survey instruments such as DESI is possible. The monochromator precision and repeatability to a small fraction of the DESI spectrograph LSF was demonstrated with re-initialization on every scan and thermal drift compensation by locking to multiple external line sources. A projector system that mimics telescope aperture for point source at infinity was demonstrated.

  9. The CHEOPS instrument on-ground calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, F. P.; Chazelas, B.; Deline, A.; Sordet, M.; Sarajlic, M.

    2015-09-01

    The CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) is a joint ESA-Switzerland space mission dedicated to the search for exoplanet photometric transits. Its launch readiness is expected at the end of 2017. The CHEOPS instrument will be the first space telescope dedicated to search for transits on bright stars already known to host planets. By being able to point at nearly any location on the sky, it will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for a subset of those planets for which the mass has already been estimated from ground-based spectroscopic surveys. To reach its goals CHEOPS will measure photometric signals with a precision of 20 ppm in 6 hours of integration time for a 9th magnitude star. This corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 for a transit of an Earth-sized planet orbiting a solar-sized star. Achieving the precision goal requires thorough post-processing of the data acquired by the CHEOPS' instrument system (CIS) in order to remove as much as possible the instrument's signature. To this purpose, a rigorous calibration campaign will be conducted after the CIS tests in order to measure, its behavior under the different environmental conditions. The main tool of this calibration campaign is a custom-made calibration system that will inject a stimulus beam in the CIS and measure its response to the variation of electrical and environmental parameters. These variations will be compiled in a correction model. Ultimately, the CIS photometric performance will be measured on an artificial star, applying the correction model This paper addresses the requirements applicable to the calibration system, its design and its design performance.

  10. 10 CFR 35.2061 - Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. 35... § 35.2061 Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. A licensee shall maintain a record of radiation survey instrument calibrations required by § 35.61 for 3 years. The record must include the...

  11. 10 CFR 35.2061 - Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. 35.2061 Section 35.2061 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2061 Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. A licensee shall maintain a record of radiation survey instrument calibrations...

  12. 10 CFR 35.2061 - Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. 35... § 35.2061 Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. A licensee shall maintain a record of radiation survey instrument calibrations required by § 35.61 for 3 years. The record must include the...

  13. 10 CFR 35.2061 - Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. 35... § 35.2061 Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. A licensee shall maintain a record of radiation survey instrument calibrations required by § 35.61 for 3 years. The record must include the...

  14. 10 CFR 35.2061 - Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. 35... § 35.2061 Records of radiation survey instrument calibrations. A licensee shall maintain a record of radiation survey instrument calibrations required by § 35.61 for 3 years. The record must include the...

  15. Aquarius Instrument Science Calibration During the Risk Reduction Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    This final report presents the results of work performed under NASA Grant NAG512726 during the period 15 January 2003 through 30 June 2004. An analysis was performed of a possible vicarious calibration method for use by Aquarius to monitor and stabilize the absolute and relative calibration of its microwave radiometer. Stationary statistical properties of the brightness temperature (T(sub B)) measured by a low Earth orbiting radiometer operating at 1.4135 GHz are considered as a means of validating its absolute calibration. The global minimum, maximum, and average T(sub B) are considered, together with a vicarious cold reference method that detects the presence of a sharp lower bound on naturally occurring values for T(sub B). Of particular interest is the reliability with which these statistics can be extracted from a realistic distribution of T(sub B) measurements that would be observed by a typical sensor. Simulations of measurements are performed that include the effects of instrument noise and variable environmental factors such as the global water vapor and ocean surface temperature, salinity and wind distributions. Global minima can vary widely due to instrument noise and are not a reliable calibration reference. Global maxima are strongly influenced by several environmental factors as well as instrument noise and are even less stationary. Global averages are largely insensitive to instrument noise and, in most cases, to environmental conditions as well. The global average T(sub B) varies at only the 0.1 K RMS level except in cases of anomalously high winds, when it can increase considerably more. The vicarious cold reference is similarly insensitive to instrument effects and most environmental factors. It is not significantly affected by high wind conditions. The stability of the vicarious reference is, however, found to be somewhat sensitive (at the several tenths of Kelvins level) to variations in the background cold space brightness, T(sub c). The global

  16. Integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a low-energy ion facility for development and calibration of thermal ion instrumentation is examined. A directly heated cathode provides the electrons used to produce ions by impact ionization and an applied magnetic field increases the path length followed by the electrons. The electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration in the ion source is studied. The procedures for the charge neutralization of the beam and the configuration and function of the 1.4-m drift tube are analyzed. A microcomputer is utilized to control and monitor the beam energy and composition, and the mass- and angle-dependent response of the instrument under testing. The facility produces a high-quality ion beam with an adjustable range of energies up to 150 eV; the angular divergence and uniformity of the beam is obtained from two independent retarding potential analyzers. The procedures for calibrating the instrument being developed are described.

  17. GMI Instrument Spin Balance Method, Optimization, Calibration and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayari, Laoucet; Kubitschek, Michael; Ashton, Gunnar; Johnston, Steve; Debevec, Dave; Newell, David; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument must spin at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3-year mission life. Therefore, GMI must be very precisely balanced about the spin axis and center of gravity (CG) to maintain stable scan pointing and to minimize disturbances imparted to the spacecraft and attitude control on-orbit. The GMI instrument is part of the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and is used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The GMI design has to meet a challenging set of spin balance requirements and had to be brought into simultaneous static and dynamic spin balance after the entire instrument was already assembled and before environmental tests began. The focus of this contribution is on the analytical and test activities undertaken to meet the challenging spin balance requirements of the GMI instrument. The novel process of measuring the residual static and dynamic imbalances with a very high level of accuracy and precision is presented together with the prediction of the optimal balance masses and their locations.

  18. GMI Instrument Spin Balance Method, Optimization, Calibration, and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayari, Laoucet; Kubitschek, Michael; Ashton, Gunnar; Johnston, Steve; Debevec, Dave; Newell, David; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument must spin at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3 year mission life. Therefore, GMI must be very precisely balanced about the spin axis and CG to maintain stable scan pointing and to minimize disturbances imparted to the spacecraft and attitude control on-orbit. The GMI instrument is part of the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and is used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The GMI design has to meet a challenging set of spin balance requirements and had to be brought into simultaneous static and dynamic spin balance after the entire instrument was already assembled and before environmental tests began. The focus of this contribution is on the analytical and test activities undertaken to meet the challenging spin balance requirements of the GMI instrument. The novel process of measuring the residual static and dynamic imbalances with a very high level of accuracy and precision is presented together with the prediction of the optimal balance masses and their locations.

  19. Calibration and testing of the Planck-LFI QM instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennella, A.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Balasini, M.; Baldan, G.; Battaglia, P.; Bernardino, T.; Bersanelli, M.; Blackhurst, E.; Boschini, L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Colombo, F.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Donzelli, S.; Davis, R.; De La Fuente, L.; Ferrari, F.; Figini, L.; Fogliani, S.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T.; Galeotta, S.; Garavaglia, S.; Gregorio, A.; Guerrini, M.; Hoyland, R.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Laaninen, M.; Lapolla, P. M.; Lawson, D.; Leonardi, R.; Leutenegger, P.; Mari, G.; Meinhold, P.; Miccolis, M.; Maino, D.; Malaspina, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Morgante, G.; Pagan, L.; Pasian, F.; Platania, P.; Pecora, M.; Pezzati, S.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pospieszalski, M.; Roddis, N.; Salmon, M.; Sandri, M.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Stringhetti, L.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Villa, F.; Wilkinson, A.; Winder, F.; Zacchei, A.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we present the test results of the qualification model (QM) of the LFI instrument, which is being developed as part of the ESA Planck satellite. In particular we discuss the calibration plan which has defined the main requirements of the radiometric tests and of the experimental setups. Then we describe how these requirements have been implemented in the custom-developed cryo-facilities and present the main results. We conclude with a discussion of the lessons learned for the testing of the LFI Flight Model (FM).

  20. Integrated imaging instrument for self-calibrated fluorescence protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, A. P.; Monroe, M. R.; Ünlü, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Protein microarrays, or multiplexed and high-throughput assays, monitor multiple protein binding events to facilitate the understanding of disease progression and cell physiology. Fluorescence imaging is a popular method to detect proteins captured by immobilized probes with high sensitivity and specificity. Reliability of fluorescence assays depends on achieving minimal inter- and intra-assay probe immobilization variation, an ongoing challenge for protein microarrays. Therefore, it is desirable to establish a label-free method to quantify the probe density prior to target incubation to calibrate the fluorescence readout. Previously, a silicon oxide on silicon chip design was introduced to enhance the fluorescence signal and enable interferometric imaging to self-calibrate the signal with the immobilized probe density. In this paper, an integrated interferometric reflectance imaging sensor and wide-field fluorescence instrument is introduced for sensitive and calibrated microarray measurements. This platform is able to analyze a 2.5 mm × 3.4 mm area, or 200 spots (100 μm diameter with 200 μm pitch), in a single field-of-view.

  1. Monocrystalline test structures, and use for calibrating instruments

    DOEpatents

    Cresswell, Michael W.; Ghoshtagore, R. N.; Linholm, Loren W.; Allen, Richard A.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved test structure for measurement of width of conductive lines formed on substrates as performed in semiconductor fabrication, and for calibrating instruments for such measurements, is formed from a monocrystalline starting material, having an insulative layer formed beneath its surface by ion implantation or the equivalent, leaving a monocrystalline layer on the surface. The monocrystalline surface layer is then processed by preferential etching to accurately define components of the test structure. The substrate can be removed from the rear side of the insulative layer to form a transparent window, such that the test structure can be inspected by transmissive-optical techniques. Measurements made using electrical and optical techniques can be correlated with other measurements, including measurements made using scanning probe microscopy.

  2. Instrument calibration and data processing systems of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Pons, J.; Torra, J.; Fabricius, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Gaia mission will provide unprecedented positional and velocity measurements of about one billion stars in our Galaxy and throughout the local group. The data processing system is an integral and critical part of the mission. We are developing the Initial Data Treatment system, which will process the raw data arriving from the satellite in near-real-time. It will provide a first estimation of the satellite attitude, the image parameters, and a first cross-match with the Gaia catalogue. We are also developing the Intermediate Data Updating system, which calibrates the instrument response and refines image parameters and cross-match by running on the complete set of raw data, once or twice a year during the mission. Such massive re-processing needs a super-computer such as MareNostrum, where it is planned to run the system. In this paper we describe these data processing systems and the preliminary tests and results obtained with simulated data.

  3. Results of the use of an automated electrical measuring instrument calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Pierre

    A system for calibrating digital multimeter and stimulus generators was developed. Software was written for fully automated machines, nonautomated instruments with digital output, and entirely manual machines. The advantages in terms of calibration quality, productivity, and operator motivation are stressed.

  4. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Gorecki, Alexia; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  5. Comparison of Spectral Radiance Calibration Techniques Used for Backscatter Ultraviolet Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew G.; Janz, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methods for determining the absolute radiometric calibration sensitivities of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration errors. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV (SSBUV), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based sensitivities agree to within three percent [k equals 2] relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary radiance calibration method for BUV instruments. The uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to be 4 percent at 250nm [k equals 2] when using a single traceable calibration standard. Significant reduction in the uncertainty of nearly 1 percent is demonstrated when multiple calibration standards are used.

  6. Cross-Calibration of the GOES-R SUVI with On-Orbit Solar EUV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnel, Jonathan; Seaton, Daniel B.

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining the calibration of on-orbit instruments has always been a challenge, but one which is crucial for the accuracy of the data record. This challenge is magnified for solar Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) instruments. Absolute calibration is out of the question as stable and known sources of EUV irradiance are not practical in on-orbit environments. This leaves relative calibration against other solar EUV instruments whose calibration has been well tracked. The need for such cross-calibration efforts is especially acute for an instrument like the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), which will fly on the GOES-R spacecraft later this year and is expected to provide two decades of solar observation between four identical instruments. Not only must calibration between the four instruments in the SUVI line be maintained, but the relative calibration between SUVI and both present day imagers like SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP and future instruments yet to be developed must be established as well. We present the methodology developed using current on-orbit solar EUV instruments in order to maintain the calibration of the SUVI instruments.

  7. 10 CFR 35.61 - Calibration of survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to show compliance with this part and 10 CFR Part 20 before first use, annually, and following a repair that affects the calibration. A licensee shall— (1) Calibrate all scales with readings up to 10 mSv (1000 mrem) per hour with a radiation source; (2) Calibrate two separated readings on each...

  8. 10 CFR 35.61 - Calibration of survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to show compliance with this part and 10 CFR part 20 before first use, annually, and following a repair that affects the calibration. A licensee shall— (1) Calibrate all scales with readings up to 10 mSv (1000 mrem) per hour with a radiation source; (2) Calibrate two separated readings on each...

  9. 10 CFR 35.61 - Calibration of survey instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to show compliance with this part and 10 CFR Part 20 before first use, annually, and following a repair that affects the calibration. A licensee shall— (1) Calibrate all scales with readings up to 10 mSv (1000 mrem) per hour with a radiation source; (2) Calibrate two separated readings on each...

  10. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The method consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.

  11. Calibration Interval Adjustment of a Measuring Instrument in Industries During Long-term Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalinova, N.; Ilina, N.; Frantcuzskaia, E.

    2016-06-01

    Calibration interval adjustment of measuring instruments is one of the urgent tasks in industries. The article represents the calibration interval calculation of the potentiometer PCB-4P according to the verifications for the 4 year period of the Metrological Department in the aviation plant. The calibration interval is shown to be increased according to the calculation of its reliability and stability of metrological characteristics.

  12. Validation of smart sensor technologies for instrument calibration reduction in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H M; Mitchell, D W; Petersen, K M; Shell, C S

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of a research and development project on the validation of new techniques for on-line testing of calibration drift of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. These techniques generally involve a computer-based data acquisition and data analysis system to trend the output of a large number of instrument channels and identify the channels that have drifted out of tolerance. This helps limit the calibration effort to those channels which need the calibration, as opposed to the current nuclear industry practice of calibrating essentially all the safety-related instrument channels at every refueling outage.

  13. Comparison of spectral radiance responsivity calibration techniques used for backscatter ultraviolet satellite instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Methods of absolute radiometric calibration of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration uncertainties. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Ozone Mapping Instrument, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based spectral responsivities agree to within the derived combined standard uncertainty of 1.87% relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary spectral radiance responsivity calibration method for BUV instruments. The combined standard uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to less than 2% at 250 nm when using a single traceable calibration standard.

  14. Radiometric calibration stability and inter-calibration of solar-band instruments in orbit using the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on monitoring the Earth's climate from space, more stringent calibration requirements are being placed on the data products from remote sensing satellite instruments. Among these are stability over decade-length time scales and consistency across sensors and platforms. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (visible to shortwave infrared), maintaining calibration on orbit is difficult due to the lack of absolute radiometric standards suitable for flight use. The Moon presents a luminous source that can be viewed by all instruments in Earth orbit. Considered as a solar diffuser, the lunar surface is exceedingly stable. The chief difficulty with using the Moon is the strong variations in the Moon's brightness with illumination and viewing geometry. This mandates the use of a photometric model to compare lunar observations, either over time by the same instrument or between instruments. The U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, under NASA sponsorship, has developed a model for the lunar spectral irradiance that explicitly accounts for the effects of phase, the lunar librations, and the lunar surface reflectance properties. The model predicts variations in the Moon's brightness with precision ???1% over a continuous phase range from eclipse to the quarter lunar phases. Given a time series of Moon observations taken by an instrument, the geometric prediction capability of the lunar irradiance model enables sensor calibration stability with sub-percent per year precision. Cross-calibration of instruments with similar passbands can be achieved with precision comparable to the model precision. Although the Moon observations used for intercomparison can be widely separated in phase angle and/or time, SeaWiFS and MODIS have acquired lunar views closely spaced in time. These data provide an example to assess inter-calibration biases between these two instruments.

  15. Positioning system for single or multi-axis sensitive instrument calibration and calibration system for use therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D. (Inventor); Parker, Peter A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A positioning and calibration system are provided for use in calibrating a single or multi axis sensitive instrument, such as an inclinometer. The positioning system includes a positioner that defines six planes of tangential contact. A mounting region within the six planes is adapted to have an inclinometer coupled thereto. The positioning system also includes means for defining first and second flat surfaces that are approximately perpendicular to one another with the first surface adapted to be oriented relative to a local or induced reference field of interest to the instrument being calibrated, such as a gravitational vector. The positioner is positioned such that one of its six planes tangentially rests on the first flat surface and another of its six planes tangentially contacts the second flat surface. A calibration system is formed when the positioning system is used with a data collector and processor.

  16. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todrita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar back-ground-sevents impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  17. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments - Solar Ultra Violet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  18. Post-launch calibration and testing of space weather instruments on GOES-R satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments -- Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  19. Improving RR Lyrae Distance Indicators Through Instrumentation, Observation, and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Christopher Robert

    Due to technological limitations and peculiarities of Nature, classes of astronomical distance indicators are applicable only in specific distance ranges. The Cosmic Distance Ladder is the framework by which we link together distance indicators, climbing from one rung to the next, in order to measure physical distance on an absolute scale. The object of this dissertation is one category of distance indicators, called RR Lyrae pulsating variable stars, which has commanded substantial scientific study for more than a century. RR Lyrae stars are low mass (M ≈ 0.7 Msol), old (age > 1010 yr) Population II objects that are found mixed in with any stellar population of requisite age. They are unstable to radial harmonic oscillations (pulsations) because of their specific mass, metallicity content, and interior composition. It has been empirically determined, and theoretically justified, that the pulsation periods of individual RR Lyrae stars are correlated with their intrinsic luminosity; hereafter referred to as the RR Lyrae period--luminosity relation. Thus, if one can measure the period of a star (a relatively straightforward task given sufficient observations), then one can use that star as a standard candle and infer its distance. The work in this dissertation is aimed at improving our understanding of the period--luminosity relation of RR Lyrae stars, and particularly at improving the precision of RR Lyrae distance measurements. By leveraging (and advancing) new observational facilities, gathering an abundance of new classical observations, and developing new statistical methods to combine a wealth of multi-wavelength data, this goal has been accomplished. In this dissertation I describe the involved methodology and report distances to a calibration sample of 134 RR Lyrae stars with a median fractional distance error of 0.66 per cent. In the following chapters I describe the arc of this research. First, I present an instrumentation development project that

  20. Transfer of Calibration for barley quality from dispersive intrument to fourier transform near-infrared instrument

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study deals with transferring the near-infrared (NIR) calibration models for quality assessment of barley between two instruments with different resolutions and number of data points, a Fourier transform instrument (master) and a dispersive instrument (slave). A file of spectra from 206 ground ...

  1. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation...

  2. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation...

  3. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation...

  4. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation...

  5. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Gas meter or flow instrumentation... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation...

  6. Improvement of MODIS RSB calibration by minimizing the Earthshine impact on solar diffuser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Xiong, X.; Wolfe, R.; Lyapustin, A.

    2006-08-01

    The MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroraiometer (MODIS) reflective solar bands (RSB) are calibrated on-orbit using solar illuminations reflected from its onboard solar diffuser (SD) plate. The specified calibration uncertainty requirements for MODIS RSB are +/-2% in reflectance and +/-5% in radiance at their typical top of atmosphere (TOA) radiances. The onboard SD bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) was characterized pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable to NIST reflectance standard. The SD on-orbit degradation is monitored using a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). One of contributors to the RSB calibration uncertainty is the earthshine (ES) illumination on the SD plate during SD calibration. This effect was estimated pre-launch by the instrument vendor to be of 0.5% for all RSB bands. Analyses of on-orbit observations show that some of the SD calibration data sets have indeed been contaminated due to extra ES illumination and the degree of ES impact on the SD calibration is spectrally dependent and varies with geo-location and atmospheric conditions (ground surface type and cloudiness). This paper illustrates the observed ES impacts on the MODIS RSB calibration quality and compare them with the effects derived from an ES model based on the viewing geometry of MODIS SD aperture door and likelihood atmospheric conditions. It also describes an approach developed to minimize the ES impact on MODIS RSB calibration.

  7. Use of rotating pinholes and reticles for calibration of cloud droplet instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Hirleman, E. Dan

    1991-01-01

    Calibration devices for the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) and the Optical Array Probe (OAP) were developed. The device used with the FSSP is a rotating pinhole calibrator. It utilizes light diffracted by a pinhole of a known diameter to simulate scattered light from a water droplet. This device can be used to calibrate the FSSP, measure the FSSP's optical collection angles and for instrument alignment and troubleshooting. The device used with the OAP is a rotating reticle calibrator. Chrome disks of a known diameter on the reticle are used for calibration of the OAP and for determining the OAP's response to out-of-focus particles in the probe volume.

  8. On-ground calibration of the BEPICOLOMBO/SIMBIO-SYS at instrument level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ferreira, J.; Poulet, F.; Eng, P.; Longval, Y.; Dassas, K.; Arondel, A.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Palumbo, P.; Cremonese, G.; Dami, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Mercury Planetary Orbiter/BepiColombo carries an integrated suite of instruments, the Spectrometer and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo-Integrated Observatory SYStem (SIMBIO-SYS). SIMBIO-SYS has 3 channels: a stereo imaging system (STC), a high-resolution imager (HRIC) and a visible-near-infrared imaging spectrometer (VIHI). SIMBIO-SYS will scan the surface of Mercury with these three channels and determine the physical, morphological and compositional properties of the entire planet. Before integration on the S/C, an on-ground calibration at the channels and at the instrument levels will be performed so as to describe the instrumental responses as a function of various parameters that might evolve while the instruments will be operating [1]. The Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) is responsible for the on-ground instrument calibration at the instrument level. During the 4 weeks of calibration campaign planned for June 2012, the instrument will be maintained in a mechanical and thermal environment simulating the space conditions. Four Optical stimuli (QTH lamp, Integrating Sphere, BlackBody with variable temperature from 50 to 1200°C and Monochromator), are placed over an optical bench to illuminate the four channels so as to make the radiometric calibration, straylight monitoring, as well as spectral proofing based on laboratory mineral samples. The instrument will be mounted on a hexapod placed inside a thermal vacuum chamber during the calibration campaign. The hexapod will move the channels within the well-characterized incoming beam. We will present the key activities of the preparation of this calibration: the derivation of the instrument radiometric model, the implementation of the optical, mechanical and software interfaces of the calibration assembly, the characterization of the optical bench and the definition of the calibration procedures.

  9. Planck pre-launch status: Low Frequency Instrument calibration and expected scientific performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davis, R. J.; Frailis, M.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lowe, S. R.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Meinhold, P.; Mendes, L.; Morgante, G.; Sandri, M.; Stringhetti, L.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valenziano, L.; Villa, F.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Balasini, M.; Franceschet, C.; Battaglia, P.; Lapolla, P. M.; Leutenegger, P.; Miccolis, M.; Pagan, L.; Silvestri, R.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Baldan, G.; Bastia, P.; Bernardino, T.; Boschini, L.; Cafagna, G.; Cappellini, B.; Cavaliere, F.; Colombo, F.; de La Fuente, L.; Edgeley, J.; Falvella, M. C.; Ferrari, F.; Fogliani, S.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T.; Gomez, F.; Herreros, J. M.; Hildebrandt, S.; Hoyland, R.; Hughes, N.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Laaninen, M.; Lawson, D.; Leahy, P.; Levin, S.; Lilje, P. B.; Maino, D.; Malaspina, M.; Manzato, P.; Marti-Canales, J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Mediavilla, A.; Pasian, F.; Pascual, J. P.; Pecora, M.; Peres-Cuevas, L.; Platania, P.; Pospieszalsky, M.; Poutanen, T.; Rebolo, R.; Roddis, N.; Salmon, M.; Seiffert, M.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tauber, J.; Tuovinen, J.; Varis, J.; Wilkinson, A.; Winder, F.

    2010-09-01

    We present the calibration and scientific performance parameters of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) measured during the ground cryogenic test campaign. These parameters characterise the instrument response and constitute our optimal pre-launch knowledge of the LFI scientific performance. The LFI shows excellent 1/f stability and rejection of instrumental systematic effects; its measured noise performance shows that LFI is the most sensitive instrument of its kind. The calibration parameters will be updated during flight operations until the end of the mission.

  10. The GEMS X-Ray Polarlimeter: Instrument Concpet and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presented. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  11. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART III: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains complete documentation for the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear ...

  12. Laser Calibration of an Impact Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip T.; Jones, W. Linwood

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach to developing an operational low-cost disdrometer hinges on implementing an effective in situ adaptive calibration strategy. This calibration strategy lowers the cost of the device and provides a method to guarantee continued automatic calibration. In previous work, a collocated tipping bucket rain gauge was utilized to provide a calibration signal to the disdrometer's digital signal processing software. Rainfall rate is proportional to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (a 7/2 moment can also be assumed, depending on the choice of terminal velocity relationship). In the previous case, the disdrometer calibration was characterized and weighted to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (DSD). Optical extinction by rainfall is proportional to the 2nd moment of the DSD. Using visible laser light as a means to focus and generate an auxiliary calibration signal, the adaptive calibration processing is significantly improved.

  13. Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogler, Raymond D.; Pilny, Miroslav J.

    1950-01-01

    Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,

  14. Development of NIR calibration for determining quality of barley as a fuel ethanol source and calibration transfer between instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently there has been growing interest in using barley as a feedstock for fuel ethanol in the U.S. This study focused on potential of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for quality evaluation of barley as a rapid and non-destructive analytical method and calibration transfer between two instrument...

  15. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The methodmore » consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.« less

  16. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  17. NASA-6 atmospheric measuring station. [calibration, functional checks, and operation of measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Information required to calibrate, functionally check, and operate the Instrumentation Branch equipment on the NASA-6 aircraft is provided. All procedures required for preflight checks and in-flight operation of the NASA-6 atmospheric measuring station are given. The calibration section is intended for only that portion of the system maintained and calibrated by IN-MSD-12 Systems Operation contractor personnel. Maintenance is not included.

  18. On-line calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    An on-line instrumentation monitoring system was developed and validated for use in nuclear power plants. This system continuously monitors the calibration status of instrument channels and determines whether or not they require manual calibrations. This is accomplished by comparing the output of each instrument channel to an estimate of the process it is monitoring. If the deviation of the instrument channel from the process estimate is greater than an allowable limit, then the instrument is said to be {open_quotes}out of calibration{close_quotes} and manual adjustments are made to correct the calibration. The success of the on-line monitoring system depends on the accuracy of the process estimation. The system described in this paper incorporates both simple intercomparison techniques as well as analytical approaches in the form of data-driven empirical modeling to estimate the process. On-line testing of the calibration of process instrumentation channels will reduce the number of manual calibrations currently performed, thereby reducing both costs to utilities and radiation exposure to plant personnel.

  19. Absolute calibration of Landsat instruments using the moon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Wildey, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A lunar observation by Landsat could provide improved radiometric and geometric calibration of both the Thematic Mapper and the Multispectral Scanner in terms of absolute radiometry, determination of the modulation transfer function, and sensitivity to scattered light. A pitch of the spacecraft would be required. -Authors

  20. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration After 6 Years in Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, R.

    2015-12-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for over 6 years, and its Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) in two dimensions keeps working well. The data for this whole period has been recently reprocessed with the new fully polarimetric version (v620) of the Level-1 processor which also includes refined calibration schema for the antenna losses. This reprocessing has allowed the assessment of an improved performance benchmark. The long term drift exhibited by the previous processor version has been significantly mitigated thanks to a better calibration of the antenna losses and the use of only the most accurate Noise Injection Radiometer. These improvements have also reduced the orbital and seasonal variations, although residual drifts still remain, in particular during the satellite eclipse season. The spatial tilt existing in the images produced with the previous version of the Level-1 processor has been considerably decreased, removing the negative trend at low incidence angles and reducing the overall standard deviation of the spatial ripples. The expected improvement in the 3rd and 4th Stokes, after correcting the use of the cross-polar antenna patterns, has been confirmed, enabling accurate retrieval of the Faraday rotation angle. Finally, a better Sun and RFI flagging strategy has been implemented, allowing for the removal of the corrupted data. A problem which still persist in the new Level-1 data is the land-sea contamination. However, recent progress in the calibration investigations has shed new light on the origin of the land-sea contamination, linking it to visibility amplitude calibration errors. Thus, future versions of the Level-1 processor will have very much reduced land-sea contamination. An overview of the results and the progress achieved in both calibration and image reconstruction will be presented in this contribution.

  1. Peak exposures in aluminium potrooms: instrument development and field calibration.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephanie R; Seixas, Noah S; Thompson, Mary Lou; Yost, Michael G

    2004-11-01

    Aluminium smelter potrooms are unique in that workplace exposures to hydrogen fluoride (HF), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particulate matter occur simultaneously for some tasks. The peak exposures to these contaminants are of increasing interest in discovering the etiology of respiratory health effects. While a variety of direct-reading instruments are available for sulfur dioxide and particulate matter, only a few exist for hydrogen fluoride. The sensors in these HF instruments have a cross-sensitivity to sulfur dioxide making it difficult to monitor HF in an environment that also contains SO2. To overcome this problem, we assessed the simultaneous use of two electrochemical instruments: one with a SO2 sensor that does not respond to HF and the second with a hydrogen fluoride sensor that responds to both HF and SO2 in a 1 : 1 ratio, termed 'total acid gas'. The difference in the response between the two instruments should indicate the HF concentration: [HF + SO2] minus SO2 equals HF. The performance characteristics of this sampling train were evaluated in the laboratory through the generation of both HF and SO2 with permeation tubes. The response and recovery times for the SO2 only instrument were acceptable (6 and 15 s, respectively), but the "total acid gas" instrument exhibited both slow response and slow recovery approaching three and six min. The association between the traditional integrated filter sampling method and the direct-reading instrument for SO2 is 0.80 (Spearman's rho). The use of the digital filter strengthens the association between the HF direct-reading instrument and the integrated samples from 0.41 to 0.68. PMID:15536509

  2. A Sr-90/Y-90 field calibrator for performance testing of beta-gamma survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsher, R.H.; Haynie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    ANSI and regulatory agency guidelines prescribe periodic performance tests for radiation protection instrumentation. Reference readings should be obtained for one point on each scale or decade normally used. A small and lightweight calibrator has been developed that facilitates field testing of beta-gamma survey instruments. The calibrator uses a 45 microcurie Sr-90/Y-90 beta source with a filter wheel to generate variable dose rates in the range from 4 to 400 mrad/hr. Thus, several ranges may be checked by dialing in appropriate filters. The design, use, and typical applications of the calibrator are described.

  3. The Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit: An instrument for the characterization of bearings used in gimbal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandura, Louise

    1991-01-01

    The Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit (DTCU), an instrument for the characterization of duplex ball bearing pairs used in gimbal applications, was designed and built. The design and operation of the unit are described. Preliminary data from the instrument are presented to illustrate the kinds of experiments that can be performed with the DTCU.

  4. Automatic calibration system for analog instruments based on DSP and CCD sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jinhui; Wei, Xiangqin; Bai, Zhenlong

    2008-12-01

    Currently, the calibration work of analog measurement instruments is mainly completed by manual and there are many problems waiting for being solved. In this paper, an automatic calibration system (ACS) based on Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and Charge Coupled Device (CCD) sensor is developed and a real-time calibration algorithm is presented. In the ACS, TI DM643 DSP processes the data received by CCD sensor and the outcome is displayed on Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen. For the algorithm, pointer region is firstly extracted for improving calibration speed. And then a math model of the pointer is built to thin the pointer and determine the instrument's reading. Through numbers of experiments, the time of once reading is no more than 20 milliseconds while it needs several seconds if it is done manually. At the same time, the error of the instrument's reading satisfies the request of the instruments. It is proven that the automatic calibration system can effectively accomplish the calibration work of the analog measurement instruments.

  5. An Altitude Chamber for the Study and Calibration of Aeronautical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J E; Kirchner, Otto E

    1925-01-01

    The design and construction of an altitude chamber, in which both pressure and temperature can be varied independently, was carried out by the NACA at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the purpose of studying the effects of temperature and pressure on aeronautical research instruments. Temperatures from +20c to -50c are obtained by the expansion of CO2from standard containers. The chamber can be used for the calibration of research instruments under altitude conditions simulating those up to 45,000 feet. Results obtained with this chamber have a direct application in the design and calibration of instruments used in free flight research.

  6. Preparation of a new autonomous instrumented radiometric calibration site: Gobabeb, Namib Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, Claire; Bialek, Agnieszka; Marks, Amelia; Woolliams, Emma; Berthelot, Béatrice; Meygret, Aimé; Marcq, Sébastien; Bouvet, Marc; Fox, Nigel

    2015-10-01

    A new permanently instrumented radiometric calibration site for high/medium resolution imaging satellite sensors is currently under development, focussing on the visible and near infra-red parts of the spectrum. The site will become a European contribution to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) initiative RadCalNet (Radiometric Calibration Network). The exact location of the permanent monitoring instrumentation will be defined following the initial site characterisation. The new ESA/CNES RadCalNet site will have a robust uncertainty budget and its data fully SI traceable through detailed characterisation and calibration by NPL of the instruments and artefacts to be used on the site. This includes a CIMEL sun photometer (the permanent instrumentation) an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer, Gonio Radiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS), and reference reflectance standards.

  7. S-NPP VIIRS instrument telemetry and calibration data trend study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, ZiPing; De Luccia, Frank J.; Cardema, Jason C.; Moy, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    The Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) employs a large number of temperature and voltage sensors (telemetry points) to monitor instrument health and performance. We have collected data and built tools to study telemetry and calibration parameters trends. The telemetry points are organized into groups based on locations and functionalities. Examples of the groups are: telescope motor, focal plane array (FPA), scan cavity bulkhead, radiators, solar diffuser and Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM). We have performed daily monitoring and long-term trending studies. Daily monitoring processes are automated with alarms built into the software to indicate if pre-defined limits are exceeded. Long-term trending studies focus on instrument performance and sensitivities of Sensor Data Record (SDR) products and calibration look-up tables (LUTs) to instrument temperature and voltage variations. VIIRS uses a DC Restore (DCR) process to periodically correct the analog offsets of each detector of each spectral band to ensure that the FPA output signals are always within the dynamic range of the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). The offset values are updated based on observations of the On-Board Calibrator Blackbody source. We have performed a long-term trend study of DCR offsets and calibration parameters to explore connections of the DCR offsets with onboard calibrators. The study also shows how the instrument and calibration parameters respond to the VIIRS Petulant Mode, spacecraft (SC) anomalies and flight software (FSW) updates. We have also shown that trending studies of telemetry and calibration parameters may help to improve the instrument calibration processes and SDR Quality Flags.

  8. CheMin Instrument Performance and Calibration on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Morookian, J. M.; Yen, A. S.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Achilles, C. N.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Treiman, A. H.; Anderson, R. C.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.; Wilson, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity uses a CCD detector and a Co-anode X-ray tube source to acquire both mineralogy (from the pattern of Co diffraction) and chemical information (from energies of fluoresced X-rays). A key component of the CheMin instrument is the ability to move grains within sample cells during analysis, providing multiple, random grain orientations that disperse diffracted X-ray photons along Debye rings rather than producing discrete Laue spots. This movement is accomplished by piezoelectric vibration of the sample cells. A cryocooler is used to maintain the CCD at a temperature at about -50 C in order to obtain energy resolution better than 250 eV, allowing discrimination of diffracted Co K X-rays from Fe K and other fluorescent X-rays. A detailed description of CheMin is provided in [1]. The CheMin flight model (FM) is mounted within the body of Curiosity and has been operating on Mars since August 6, 2012. An essentially identical sister instrument, the CheMin demonstration model (DM), is operated in a Mars environment chamber at JPL.

  9. Calibration of impact ionization dust detectors with porous or fluffy dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Hillier, J. K.; Bugiel, S.; Srama, R.; Armes, S. P.; Fielding; L. A.; Lovett, J. R.; Grün, E.

    2013-07-01

    Impact ionization instruments like the ones flying on Cassini, Galileo, Helios and Ulysses have been calibrated using compact particles made of conductive materials like iron, or of minerals (like Olivine, Orthopyroxene, Magnetite, Pyrite) coated with a thin layer of conductive material. These calibrations were performed by shooting cosmic dust analogues with hypervelocity speeds from 1 to 80 km/s onto the flight spares of these instruments, using the Van de Graaff dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg. Here, we perform first measurements with Cassini CDA of the influence of the density of these dust particles on the resulting signal by, for a given impact speed, comparing signals from micron-sized particles made of compact PPy-coated silica to those from (PPy-coated) hollow silica spheres. The degree of impact ionization depends on the ratio of the densities of the target material and the impactor material and hence, different signals may result from impacts with diffe! rent density or porosity.

  10. Earth observation sensor calibration using a global instrumented and automated network of test sites (GIANTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Phil M.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Fox, Nigel P.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.

    2001-12-01

    Calibration is critical for useful long-term data records, as well as independent data quality control. However, in the context of Earth observation sensors, post-launch calibration and the associated quality assurance perspective are far from operational. This paper explores the possibility of establishing a global instrumented and automated network of test sites (GIANTS) for post-launch radiometric calibration of Earth observation sensors. It is proposed that a small number of well-instrumented benchmark test sites and data sets for calibration be supported. A core set of sensors, measurements, and protocols would be standardized across all participating test sites and the measurement data sets would undergo identical processing at a central secretariat. The network would provide calibration information to supplement or substitute for on-board calibration, would reduce the effort required by individual agencies, and would provide consistency for cross-platform studies. Central to the GIANTS concept is the use of automation, communication, coordination, visibility, and education, all of which can be facilitated by greater use of advanced in-situ sensor and telecommunication technologies. The goal is to help ensure that the resources devoted to remote sensing calibration benefit the intended user community and facilitate the development of new calibration methodologies (research and development) and future specialists (education and training).

  11. Long-term analysis of GOME in-flight calibration parameters and instrument degradation.

    PubMed

    Coldewey-Egbers, Melanie; Slijkhuis, Sander; Aberle, Bernd; Loyola, Diego

    2008-09-10

    Since 1995, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) has measured solar and backscattered spectra in the ultraviolet and visible wavelength range. Now, the extensive data set of the most important calibration parameters has been investigated thoroughly in order to analyze the long-term stability and performance of the instrument. This study focuses on GOME in-flight calibration and degradation for the solar path. Monitoring the sensor degradation yields an intensity decrease of 70% to 90% in 240-316 nm and 35% to 65% in 311-415 nm. The spectral calibration is very stable over the whole period, although a very complex interaction between predisperser temperature and wavelength was found. The leakage current and the pixel-to-pixel gain increased significantly during the mission, which requires an accurate correction of the measured radiance and irradiance signals using proper calibration parameters. Finally, several outliers in the data sets can be directly assigned to instrument and satellite anomalies. PMID:18784780

  12. Design Through Integration of On-Board Calibration Device with Imaging Spectroscopy Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stange, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) project is to "identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures." The project designs, builds, and tests various imaging spectroscopy instruments that use On-Board Calibration devices (OBC) to check the accuracy of the data collected by the spectrometers. The imaging instrument records the spectral signatures of light collected during flight. To verify the data is correct, the OBC shines light which is collected by the imaging spectrometer and compared against previous calibration data to track spectral response changes in the instrument. The spectral data has the calibration applied to it based on the readings from the OBC data in order to ensure accuracy.

  13. Droplet sizing instrumentation used for icing research: Operation, calibration, and accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) is determined using laboratory tests, wind tunnel comparisons, and computer simulations. Operation in an icing environment is discussed and a new calibration device for the FSSP (the rotating pinhole) is demonstrated to be a valuable tool. Operation of the Optical Array Probe is also presented along with a calibration device (the rotating reticle) which is suitable for performing detailed analysis of that instrument.

  14. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  15. Windowless Far-Ultraviolet Electron Impact Calibration Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R.

    2002-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a windowless calibration lamp for determining wavelength solutions and detector flat-fielding at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. This lamp produces free electrons from a filament, accelerating them toward a tungsten target by an applied voltage ( 200 - 2000 V). An emission line spectrum is produced by electrons impacting the residual gas molecules present and continuous emission is produced by bremsstrahlung as the electrons collide with the target. The emission line spectrum can be modified to provide a rich wavelength coverage by introducing different species, and spectra of H2, N2, O2, CO2, HD, and Ar have been measured at modest spectral resolution (1 Å) across the far-UV bandpass (900 - 1400 Å). The long wavelength tail of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum falling in this bandpass can be used to make detector flat-field measurements. The lamp is robust and compact, housed in a mini-conflat cube and operates at the ambient vacuum compatible with microchannel plate operation. It is scheduled to be tested on an upcoming sounding rocket flight. We present initial results of both electron impact and bremsstrahlung spectra and adaptability to space-based instrumentation. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG5-5315 to The Johns Hopkins University.

  16. Inter-calibration and validation of observations from SAPHIR and ATMS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, I.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of evaluating observations from microwave instruments aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP, ATMS instrument) and Megha-Tropiques (SAPHIR instrument) satellites. The study includes inter-comparison and inter-calibration of observations of similar channels from the two instruments, evaluation of the satellite data using high-quality radiosonde data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and GPS Radio Occultaion Observations from COSMIC mission, as well as geolocation error correction. The results of this study are valuable for generating climate data records from these instruments as well as for extending current climate data records from similar instruments such as AMSU-B and MHS to the ATMS and SAPHIR instruments. Reference: Moradi et al., Intercalibration and Validation of Observations From ATMS and SAPHIR Microwave Sounders. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 01/2015; DOI: 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2427165

  17. Calibration and intercomparison of water vapor instrumentation used on the NSF/NCAR HIAPER aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, D.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F.; Jensen, J.; Wang, J.; Cole, H.; Korn, E.; Lauritsen, D.; Kraemer, M.

    2007-12-01

    Subject of the study is the characterization of a Kahn DCS-80 water vapor calibration system and the calibration of two water vapor sensors used on research aircraft, namely a Buck Instruments B-1001 chilled mirror sensor and a MayComm Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Hygrometer. A series of Vaisala drop sondes were also characterized and compared to the aircraft instruments. In an effort to assess the precision of the water vapor sensors that are being used on board the NSF/NACR GV aircraft (HIAPER), the instruments were tested at ambient pressure (800 mbar) inside an environmental chamber to simulate temperature conditions during flight. Tested dewpoints ranged from -70 to +20 degrees Celsius. The TDL - hygrometer was calibrated in preparation for an international water vapor measurement intercomparison campaign at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. We will present the detailed calibration and characterization procedure, the laboratory setup for the different sensors, results from the calibrations of all instruments, assess their precision and useful operating range, and present some preliminary results from the international intercomparison campaign.

  18. Updated Global Data from the Guvi Instrument: New Products, Updated Calibration, and a New Web Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Romeo, G.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    With it's high inclination orbit, GUVI provides global coverage of the ionosphere/thermosphere system, revisiting each polar region 15 times a day. The GUVI instrument has long been a resource for the ITM community with a panoply of data products available from the GUVI website (http://guvi.jhuapl.edu). GUVI is in a high inclination orbit and so provides coverage of both hemispheres. With the release last year of the data products from the DMSO/SSUSI instrument, particularly more detailed auroral zone products (Q, E0, Hemispheric Power, discrete auroral arcs, proton precipitation regions), new equatorial ionospheric products (3D electron densities, bubbles), a whole new set of UV data products has become available. SSUSI are available from http://ssusi.jhuapl.edu. To leverage the experience and knowledge gained from running all of these instruments we have adapted the SSUSI products so they can be made from GUVI telemetry. There are now updated versions of GUVI legacy products as well as brand new products. In addition, better on-orbit calibration techniques developed for SSUSI have now been applied to the GUVI instrument calibration - there is now a common set of software for calibrating both instruments. With a common data format, calibration, and product definition, the data from all SSUSI and GUVI instruments can now be easily combined to get multiple instruments to cover the hemispheres to do a variety of global studies. In addition, the GUVI spectrographic mode data provides great detail about spectrographic features (e.g. O/N2 ratios, NO band emission) that are important for understanding dynamical processes in the thermosphere. A new version of the GUVI website (with the same interface as the SSUSI website) has been launched from guvi.jhuapl.edu to showcase the legacy products made with the new calibration and also highlight the newly developed products for the GUVI imaging and spectrographic modes.

  19. Development of Long-term Datasets from Satellite BUV Instruments: The "Soft" Calibration Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.; Taylor, Steven; Jaross, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The first BUV instrument was launched in April 1970 on NASA's Nimbus4 satellite. More than a dozen instruments, broadly based on the same principle, but using very different technologies, have been launched in the last 35 years on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and European satellites. In this paper we describe the basic principles of the "soft" calibration approach that we have successfully applied to the data from many of these instruments to produce a consistent long-term record of total ozone, ozone profile and aerosols. This approach is based on using accurate radiative transfer models and assumed/known properties of the atmosphere in ultraviolet to derive calibration parameters. Although the accuracy of the results inevitably depends upon how well the assumed atmospheric properties are known, the technique has several built-in cross- checks that improve the robustness of the method. To develop further confidence in the data the soft calibration technique can be combined with data collected from few well- calibrated ground-based instruments. We will use examples from past and present BUV instruments to show how the method works.

  20. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  1. Status of Aqua MODIS Instrument On-Orbit Operation and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Jack; Angal, Amit; Madhaven, Sri; Choi, Jason; Wenny, Brian; Sun, Junqiang; Wu, Aisheng; Chen, Hongda; Salomonson, Vincent; Barnes, William

    2011-01-01

    The Aqua MOderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has successfully operated for nearly a decade, since its launch in May 2002. MODIS was developed and designed with improvements over its heritage sensors in terms of its overall spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics, and with more stringent calibration requirements. MODIS carries a set of on-board calibrators that can be used to track and monitor its on-orbit radiometric, spectral, and spatial performance. Since launch, extensive instrument calibration and characterization activities have been scheduled and executed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST). These efforts are made to assure the quality of instrument calibration and L 1B data products, as well as support all science disciplines (land, ocean, and atmospheric) for continuous improvements of science data product quality. MODIS observations from both Terra and Aqua have significantly contributed to the science and user community over a wide range of research activities and applications. This paper provides an overview of Aqua MODIS on-orbit operation and calibration activities, instrument health status, and on-board calibrators (OBC) performance. On-orbit changes of key sensor parameters, such as spectral band radiometric responses, center wavelengths, and bandwidth, are illustrated and compared with those derived from its predecessor, Terra MODIS. Lessons and challenges identified from Aqua MODIS performance are also discussed in this paper. These lessons are not only critical to future improvements of Aqua MODIS on-orbit operation and calibration but also beneficial to its follow-on instrument, the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to be launched on NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) spacecraft.

  2. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements. PMID:22319320

  3. The GEMS X-Ray Polarimeter: Instrument Concept and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presente d. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  4. Calibration sources for the soft x-ray spectrometer instrument on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, C. P.; Lowes, P.; den Herder, J. W.; Aarts, H.; Haas, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Gendreau, K.

    2012-09-01

    The SXS instrument is the Soft X-ray micro-calorimeter Spectrometer planned for the Japanese ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2014. In this paper we describe the X-ray calibration sources used in this instrument. These sources use light sensitive photo-cathodes to generate electrons, which in turn generate the X-rays. This design has the unique property to allow for fast discrete pulsations of the generated X-rays. This enables the energy scale calibration of the instrument simultaneously with astronomical observations, without adding to the background in the astronomical data. Flight-model sources have been made, and a number of them have been operating in the past several months to monitor their behaviour. Here we report on the characterisation and performance of these sources. In addition, we will elaborate on the nature and expected accuracy of the energy calibration, in relation to the expected stability of the instrument, given the calibration source strength and its mode of operation.

  5. Calibration of the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Trainer, M. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Stern, J. C.; Harpold, D.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Lyness, E.

    2011-01-01

    The SAM suite of instruments on the "Curiosity" Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to provide chemical and isotopic analysis of organic and inorganic volatiles for both atmospheric and solid samples. The mission of the MSL investigations is to advance beyond the successful search for aqueous transformation in surface environments at Mars toward a quantitative assessment of habitability and preservation through a series of chemical and geological measurements. The SAM suite was delivered in December 2010 (Figure 1) to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for integration into the Curiosity Rover. We previously outlined the range of SAM solid and gas calibrations implemented or planned and here we discuss a specific set of calibration experiments to establish the response of the SAM Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) to the four most abundant gases in the Martian atmosphere CO2, N2, Ar, and O2, A full SAM instrument description and calibration report is presently in preparation.

  6. Inter-calibrating, Multi-instrument Microwave Ocean Data Records over Three Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Wentz, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite microwave radiometers have been in continuous operation since 1987. When inter-calibrated and consistently processed, the data from a series of DMSP SSM/I and SSMIS sensors, TRMM TMI, Coriolis WindSat, Aqua AMSR-E, GCOM-W1 AMSR2, and GPM GMI collectively result in a long-term high-quality ocean data set of surface winds, atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water content, rain rate, and for some instruments, sea surface temperature and wind direction. Slight variations in frequencies, design and satellite orbits stress the need for carefully implementing an inter-calibration method, so as not to introduce trends or jumps when new instruments begin or when old instruments drift and/or die. The authors have developed a robust inter-calibration method using a published, well-developed and validated radiative transfer model (RTM) as the calibration standard. Most of the sensor data for this nearly 30-year period are available as the Version-7 RTM standard. The GMI sensor, recently launched in 2014, has strict calibration accuracy requirements and was built to have greater precision than any previous microwave sensor. We have utilized the dual calibration and non-linearity-measurement systems built into GMI to improve the RTM, which is now Version-8. In this talk we will present an overview of our calibration procedures and outline the steps required to produce climate quality earth data records. We also intend to present the latest validation results and provide information on recent changes in distribution, format, and availability for these already-popular data products.

  7. GIADA - Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator - Onboard Rosetta spacecraft: Extended calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Fulle, M.; Mazzotta-Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Morales, R.; Cosi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long tradition of dust instruments flown on-board space mission, the largest number of these can be considered unique as they used different detection techniques. GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator), is one of the dust instruments on-board the Rosetta spacecraft and is devoted to measure the dust dynamical parameters in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It couples two different techniques to measure the mass and speed of individual dust particles. We report here the results of an extended calibration activity carried-out, during the hibernation phase of the Rosetta mission, on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM) operative in a clean room in our laboratory. The main aims of an additional calibration campaign are: to verify the algorithms and procedures for data calibration developed before Rosetta launch; to improve the comprehension of GIADA response after the increased knowledge on cometary dust, e.g. the composition of dust particles after Stardust mission. These calibration improvements implied a final step, which consisted in defining transfer functions to correlate the new calibration curves obtained for the GIADA PFM to those to be used for GIADA onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. The extended calibration activity allowed us to analyze GIADA data acquired in the 67P/C-G coma permitting to infer additional information on cometary dust particles, e.g. density and tensile strength.

  8. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  9. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the... MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  10. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the... MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the... MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  12. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the... MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  13. 10 CFR 35.2060 - Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the... MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2060 Records of calibrations of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  16. The GOME-2 instrument on the Metop series of satellites: instrument design, calibration, and level 1 data processing - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Rüdiger; Klaes, Dieter; Poli, Gabriele; Retscher, Christian; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Huckle, Roger; Lacan, Antoine; Grzegorski, Michael; Holdak, Andriy; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Livschitz, Jakob; Eisinger, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) flies on the Metop series of satellites, the space component of the EUMETSAT Polar System. In this paper we will provide an overview of the instrument design, the on-ground calibration and characterization activities, in-flight calibration, and level 0 to 1 data processing. The current status of the level 1 data is presented and points of specific relevance to users are highlighted. Long-term level 1 data consistency is also discussed and plans for future work are outlined. The information contained in this paper summarizes a large number of technical reports and related documents containing information that is not currently available in the published literature. These reports and documents are however made available on the EUMETSAT web pages and readers requiring more details than can be provided in this overview paper will find appropriate references at relevant points in the text.

  17. The GOME-2 instrument on the Metop series of satellites: instrument design, calibration, and level 1 data processing - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, R.; Lang, R.; Klaes, D.; Poli, G.; Retscher, C.; Lindstrot, R.; Huckle, R.; Lacan, A.; Grzegorski, M.; Holdak, A.; Kokhanovsky, A.; Livschitz, J.; Eisinger, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) flies on the Metop series of satellites, the space component of the EUMETSAT Polar System. In this paper we will provide an overview of the instrument design, the on-ground calibration and characterisation activities, in-flight calibration, and level 0 to 1 data processing. The quality of the level 1 data is presented and points of specific relevance to users are highlighted. Long-term level 1 data consistency is also discussed and plans for future work are outlined. The information contained in this paper summarises a large number of technical reports and related documents containing information that is not currently available in the published literature. These reports and documents are however made available on the EUMETSAT web pages (http://www.eumetsat.int) and readers requiring more details than can be provided in this overview paper will find appropriate references at relevant points in the text.

  18. Detailed Calibration of SphinX instrument at the Palermo XACT facility of INAF-OAPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymon, Gburek; Collura, Alfonso; Barbera, Marco; Reale, Fabio; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Plocieniak, Stefan; Podgorski, Piotr; Trzebinski, Witold; Varisco, Salvatore

    The Solar photometer in X-rays (SphinX) experiment is scheduled for launch late summer 2008 on-board the Russian CORONAS-Photon satellite. SphinX will use three silicon PIN diode detectors with selected effective areas in order to record solar spectra in the X-ray energy range 0.3-15 keV with unprecedented temporal and medium energy resolution. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the SphinX instrument will give for the first time possibility of observing solar soft X-ray variability from the weakest levels, ten times below present thresholds, to the largest X20+ flares. We present the results of the ground X-ray calibrations of the SphinX instrument performed at the X-ray Astronomy Calibration and Testing (XACT) facility of INAF-OAPA. The calibrations were essential for determination of SphinX detector energy resolution and efficiency. We describe the ground tests instrumental set-up, adopted measurement techniques and present results of the calibration data analysis.

  19. An instrument for gravimetric calibration of flow devices with corrosive gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenyik, Carl J.; Hylton, James O.

    An instrument was developed for the calibration of mass flow controllers primarily used in the production of semiconductor wafers. Almost all other types of such calibrators require measurement of temperature, pressure, and volume. This instrument measures the weight of gas collected in a container and makes measuring those thermodynamic variables unnecessary. The need to measure the weight of the gas container is eliminated by submerging it in a liquid (presently water) and balancing its weight with the force of buoyancy. The accuracy of this gravimetric calibrator is unaffected by the pressure and temperature of the gas. The calibrator can also measure reactive, corrosive, and nonideal gases. The container remains connected to the process by a torsion capillary, and a load cell measures the changing gas weight continuously throughout the measuring process. A prototype was designed for gas flows ranging from 1 sccm of hydrogen to 10,000 sccm of tungsten hexafluoride, constructed, tested, and used to calibrate flow devices. Experience with the prototype and results are presented, and plans for further developments are discussed. Design of a version for the flow range from 0.1 sccm to 100 sccm is in progress.

  20. Instrument calibration.

    PubMed

    Padden, Harvey

    2002-05-01

    The main thing to remember is that measurement uncertainty must encompass everything from NIST to the final laboratory result. Every source of error along the way must be accounted for. Our vendors do much of it for us, but we must make sure they are doing their job properly. We must make certain our vendors have performed rigorous uncertainty analyses and are performing in accordance with them. ISO 9001-2000 and 17,025 accreditations can eventually help offer us assurance in this area. PMID:12037906

  1. Radiometric calibration and performance trends of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Mohan; Priestley, Kory; Smith, Nathaniel; Smith, Nitchie; Thomas, Susan; Walikainen, Dale

    2015-10-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments help to study the impact of clouds on the earth's radiation budget. There are currently five instruments- two each on board Aqua and Terra spacecraft and one on the Suomi NPP spacecraft to measure the earth's reflected shortwave and emitted longwave energy, which represent two components of the earth's radiation energy budget. Flight Models (FM) 1 and 2 are on Terra, FM 3 and 4 are on Aqua, and FM5 is on Suomi NPP. The measurements are made by three sensors on each instrument: a shortwave sensor that measures the 0.3-5 microns wavelength band, a window sensor that measures the water vapor window between 8-12 microns, and a total sensor that measures all incident energy (0.3- >100 microns). The required accuracy of CERES measurements of 0.5% in the longwave and 1% in the shortwave is achieved through an extensive pre-launch ground calibration campaign as well as on-orbit calibration and validation activities. Onorbit calibration is carried out using the Internal Calibration Module (ICM) that consists of a tungsten lamp, blackbodies, and a solar diffuser known as the Mirror Attenuator Mosaic (MAM). The ICM calibration provides information about the stability of the sensors' broadband radiometric gains on-orbit. Several validation studies are conducted in order to monitor the behavior of the instruments in various spectral bands. The CERES Edition-4 data products for the FM1-FM4 instruments incorporate the latest calibration methodologies to improve on the Edition-3 data products. In this paper, we discuss the updated calibration methodology and present some validation studies to demonstrate the improvement in the trends using the CERES Edition-4 data products for all four instruments.

  2. The measurement of linear and angular displacements in prototype aircraft - Instrumentation, calibration and operational accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm van Leeuwen, Sam

    The design and development of angular displacement transducers for flight test instrumentation systems are considered. Calibration tools, developed to meet the accuracy requirements, allowed in situ calibration with short turn around times. The design of the control surface deflection measurement channels for the Fokker 100 prototype aircraft is discussed in detail. It is demonstrated that a bellows coupling provides accurate results, and that the levers and push-pull rod drive mechanisms perform well. The results suggest that a complex mechanical drive mechanism reduces the system accuracy.

  3. Instrumentation report 1: specification, design, calibration, and installation of instrumentation for an experimental, high-level, nuclear waste storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brough, W.G.; Patrick, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is being conducted 420 m underground at the Nevada Test Site under the auspices of the US Department of Energy. The test facility houses 11 spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor and numerous other thermal sources used to simulate the near-field effects of a large repository. We developed a large-scale instrumentation plan to ensure that a sufficient quality and quantity of data were acquired during the three- to five-year test. These data help satisfy scientific, operational, and radiation safety objectives. Over 800 data channels are being scanned to measure temperature, electrical power, radiation, air flow, dew point, stress, displacement, and equipment operation status (on/off). This document details the criteria, design, specifications, installation, calibration, and current performance of the entire instrumentation package.

  4. On-line testing of calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1995-11-01

    The nuclear industry is interested in automating the calibration of process instrumentation channels; this report provides key results of one of the sponsored projects to determine the validity of automated calibrations. Conclusion is that the normal outputs of instrument channels in nuclear plants can be monitored over a fuel cycle while the plant is operating to determine calibration drift in the field sensors and associated signal conversion and signal conditioning equipment. The procedure for on-line calibration tests involving calculating the deviation of each instrument channel from the best estimate of the process parameter that the instrument is measuring. Methods were evaluated for determining the best estimate. Deviation of each signal from the best estimate is updated frequently while the plant is operating and plotted vs time for entire fuel cycle, thereby providing time history plots that can reveal channel drift and other anomalies. Any instrument channel that exceeds allowable drift or channel accuracy band is then scheduled for calibration during a refueling outage or sooner. This provides calibration test results at the process operating point, one of the most critical points of the channel operation. This should suffice for most narrow-range instruments, although the calibration of some instruments can be verified at other points throughout their range. It should be pointed out that the calibration of some process signals such as the high pressure coolant injection flow in BWRs, which are normally off- scale during plant operation, can not be tested on-line.

  5. Inter-Calibration and Concatenation of Climate Quality Infrared Cloudy Radiances from Multiple Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrangi, Ali; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2013-01-01

    A change in climate is not likely captured from any single instrument, since no single instrument can span decades of time. Therefore, to detect signals of global climate change, observations from many instruments on different platforms have to be concatenated. This requires careful and detailed consideration of instrumental differences such as footprint size, diurnal cycle of observations, and relative biases in the spectral brightness temperatures. Furthermore, a common basic assumption is that the data quality is independent of the observed scene and therefore can be determined using clear scene data. However, as will be demonstrated, this is not necessarily a valid assumption as the globe is mostly cloudy. In this study we highlight challenges in inter-calibration and concatenation of infrared radiances from multiple instruments by focusing on the analysis of deep convective or anvil clouds. TRMM/VIRS is potentially useful instrument to make correction for observational differences in the local time and foot print sizes, and thus could be applied retroactively to vintage instruments such as AIRS, IASI, IRIS, AVHRR, and HIRS. As the first step, in this study, we investigate and discuss to what extent AIRS and VIRS agree in capturing deep cloudy radiances at the same local time. The analysis also includes comparisons with one year observations from CrIS. It was found that the instruments show calibration differences of about 1K under deep cloudy scenes that can vary as a function of land type and local time of observation. The sensitivity of footprint size, view angle, and spectral band-pass differences cannot fully explain the observed differences. The observed discrepancies can be considered as a measure of the magnitude of issues which will arise in the comparison of legacy data with current data.

  6. The MICROSCOPE space mission and the inflight calibration approach for its instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, A.; Touboul, P.; Rodrigues, M.; Métris, G.; Robert, A.

    2010-12-01

    MICROSCOPE is a fundamental physics space mission which aims at testing the Equivalence Principle (EP) with an accuracy of 10-15. The gravitational signal is measured precisely by a differential electrostatic accelerometer which includes two cylindrical test masses made of different materials. The accelerometer is on-board a drag-free micro-satellite which is controlled either Earth pointing or rotating about the normal to the orbital plane with a very stable angular velocity.The expected accuracy of the EP test could be limited by the inaccurate a priori knowledge of the instrument physical parameters associated to the instrument environment on-board the satellite. These parameters are partially measured or estimated by means of ground tests or during the integration of the instrument on the satellite. However, these evaluations are not sufficient and an in-orbit calibration is therefore needed to finely characterize the instrument and to correct the measurements.After the overall presentation of the MICROSCOPE mission and its scientific goal, this paper will focus on the accelerometer and will describe the specific procedures proposed for the in-flight instrument calibration.

  7. On-Orbit Cross-Calibration of AM Satellite Remote Sensing Instruments using the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Barnes, Robert A.; Stone, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    On April 14,2003, three Earth remote sensing spacecraft were maneuvered enabling six satellite instruments operating in the visible through shortwave infrared wavelength region to view the Moon for purposes of on-orbit cross-calibration. These instruments included the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft, the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion instrument on Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on the SeaStar spacecraft. Observations of the Moon were compared using a spectral photometric mode for lunar irradiance developed by the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project located at the United States Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona. The ROLO model effectively accounts for variations in lunar irradiance corresponding to lunar phase and libration angles, allowing intercomparison of observations made by instruments on different spacecraft under different time and location conditions. The spacecraft maneuvers necessary to view the Moon are briefly described and results of using the lunar irradiance model in comparing the radiometric calibration scales of the six satellite instruments are presented here.

  8. The 1997 HST Calibration Workshop with a New Generation of Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casertano, S. (Editor); Jedrzejewski, R. (Editor); Keyes, T. (Editor); Stevens, M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The Second Servicing mission in early 1997 has brought major changes to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Two of the original instruments, Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), were taken out, and replaced by completely new instruments, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrograph (NICMOS). Two new types of detectors were installed, and for the first time, HST gained infrared capabilities. A new Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) was installed, with an alignment mechanism that could improve substantially both guiding and astrometric capabilities. With all these changes come new challenges. The characterization of the new instruments has required a major effort, both by their respective Investigation Definition Teams and at the Space Telescope Science Institute. All necessary final calibrations for the retired spectrographs needed to be carried out, and their properties definitively characterized. At the same time, work has continued to improve our understanding of the instruments that have remained on board. The results of these activities were discussed in the 1997 HST (Hubble Space Telescope) Calibration Workshop. The main focus of the Workshop was to provide users with the tools and the understanding they need to use HST's instruments and archival data to the best of their possibilities. This book contains the written record of the Workshop. As such, it should provide a valuable tool to all interested in using existing HST data or in proposing for new observations.

  9. A method for automating calibration and records management for instrumentation and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.M. Jr.; Rushton, R.O.; Burns, R.E. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Current industry requirements are becoming more stringent on quality assurance records and documentation for calibration of instruments and dosimetry. A novel method is presented here that will allow a progressive automation scheme to be used in pursuit of that goal. This concept is based on computer-controlled irradiators that can act as stand-alone devices or be interfaced to other components via a computer local area network. In this way, complete systems can be built with modules to create a records management system to meet the needs of small laboratories or large multi-building calibration groups. Different database engines or formats can be used simply by replacing a module. Modules for temperature and pressure monitoring or shipping and receiving can be added, as well as equipment modules for direct IEEE-488 interface to electrometers and other instrumentation.

  10. In-flight calibration and verification of the Planck-LFI instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Maris, M.; Meinhold, P.; Sandri, M.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Villa, F.; Frailis, M.; Morgante, G.; Pearson, D.; Zacchei, A.; Battaglia, P.; Butler, R. C.; Davis, R.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Leonardi, R.; Lowe, S.; Mandolesi, N.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Stassi, P.; Stringhetti, L.; Tavagnacco, D.; Zonca, A.; Wilkinson, A.; Wilson, P.; Charra, M.; Maciaszek, T.; Foley, S.; Watson, C. J.; Casale, M.; Laureijs, R.; Tauber, J.; Texier, D.; Baker, M.; Perez Cuevas, L.; Krassenburg, M.; Rihet, P.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we discuss the Planck-LFI in-flight calibration campaign. After a brief overview of the ground test campaigns, we describe in detail the calibration and performance verification (CPV) phase, carried out in space during and just after the cool-down of LFI. We discuss in detail the functionality verification, the tuning of the front-end and warm electronics, the preliminary performance assessment and the thermal susceptibility tests. The logic, sequence, goals and results of the in-flight tests are discussed. All the calibration activities were successfully carried out and the instrument response was comparable to the one observed on ground. For some channels the in-flight tuning activity allowed us to improve significantly the noise performance.

  11. Prelaunch Photogrammetric Calibration of Russian Satellite Elektro-L Imagery Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gektin, U. M.; Egoshkin, N. A.; Eremeev, V. V.; Kuznetcov, A. E.; Kochergin, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    Technology of prelaunch geometric calibration of multispectral imagery instruments of Russian geostationary satellites "Elektro-L" No.1 and No.2 is considered. Circular control points are used as a test field. Its geometrical model is developed to take distortions in the collimator optical system into account. Multiple observations of a test field at different angles is used to cover the full visual field of a geostationary sensor. New algorithm of circular control point detection is developed and adapted to complex geometry of geostationary imagery. It is capable of processing images formed as a set of separate scans. Under calibration, sensor design parameters and also the law of scanning mirror motion are specified. The paper contains results of the technology approval under prelaunch calibration of MSU-GS sensors for geostationary operational meteorological satellites (GOMS) "Elektro-L" No.1 and No.2.

  12. Calibrating system errors of large scale three-dimensional profile measurement instruments by subaperture stitching method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Su, Jingshi; Wu, Hengyu; Tam, Hon-Yuen

    2015-07-01

    This study presents a subaperture stitching method to calibrate system errors of several ∼2  m large scale 3D profile measurement instruments (PMIs). The calibration process was carried out by measuring a Φ460  mm standard flat sample multiple times at different sites of the PMI with a length gauge; then the subaperture data were stitched together using a sequential or simultaneous stitching algorithm that minimizes the inconsistency (i.e., difference) of the discrete data in the overlapped areas. The system error can be used to compensate the measurement results of not only large flats, but also spheres and aspheres. The feasibility of the calibration was validated by measuring a Φ1070  mm aspheric mirror, which can raise the measurement accuracy of PMIs and provide more reliable 3D surface profiles for guiding grinding, lapping, and even initial polishing processes. PMID:26193139

  13. Automatic releveling of calibration stands for wind tunnel force and moment measurement instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perazza, Manuel Rodriguez

    1995-01-01

    Wind tunnel force and moment measuring instrumentation at NASA LaRC are calibrated by applying NIST certified dead loads, to generate forces and moments in three orthogonal axes, in twenty five percent increments, up to full-load and down to no-load in a nine point continuous procedure, using specially built calibration stands. The measuring instruments deflect upon the application of loads. These deflections must be cancelled to minimize loading interactions. The older calibration stands, integrated with AC induction motors, or DC motors, have provisions for manually releveling the loading point after each load. A newer stand, with integrated DC stepper motors, relevels automatically under software control. It was proposed to extend automation to the old stands. An algorithm to control the unwieldy induction motors to relevel a calibration stand, to within two arcseconds of horizontal direction automatically, was developed. The system developed uses coasting prediction and load adaptation in a general type robust stability control configuration with noncoincidental feedback. Automatic releveling cuts the releveling time to approximately half of the time required to do it manually. The principal constraint for shorter times is the time constant of the angular position feedback transducer.

  14. Optical Comb from a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator for Spectroscopy and Astronomy Instruments Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nam; Thompson, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The most accurate astronomical data is available from space-based observations that are not impeded by the Earth's atmosphere. Such measurements may require spectral samples taken as long as decades apart, with the 1 cm/s velocity precision integrated over a broad wavelength range. This raises the requirements specifically for instruments used in astrophysics research missions -- their stringent wavelength resolution and accuracy must be maintained over years and possibly decades. Therefore, a stable and broadband optical calibration technique compatible with spaceflights becomes essential. The space-based spectroscopic instruments need to be calibrated in situ, which puts forth specific requirements to the calibration sources, mainly concerned with their mass, power consumption, and reliability. A high-precision, high-resolution reference wavelength comb source for astronomical and astrophysics spectroscopic observations has been developed that is deployable in space. The optical comb will be used for wavelength calibrations of spectrographs and will enable Doppler measurements to better than 10 cm/s precision, one hundred times better than the current state-of-the- art.

  15. Multi-Dimensional Calibration of Impact Dynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley, under the Subsonic Rotary Wing Program, recently completed two helicopter tests in support of an in-house effort to study crashworthiness. As part of this effort, work is on-going to investigate model calibration approaches and calibration metrics for impact dynamics models. Model calibration of impact dynamics problems has traditionally assessed model adequacy by comparing time histories from analytical predictions to test at only a few critical locations. Although this approach provides for a direct measure of the model predictive capability, overall system behavior is only qualitatively assessed using full vehicle animations. In order to understand the spatial and temporal relationships of impact loads as they migrate throughout the structure, a more quantitative approach is needed. In this work impact shapes derived from simulated time history data are used to recommend sensor placement and to assess model adequacy using time based metrics and orthogonality multi-dimensional metrics. An approach for model calibration is presented that includes metric definitions, uncertainty bounds, parameter sensitivity, and numerical optimization to estimate parameters to reconcile test with analysis. The process is illustrated using simulated experiment data.

  16. Preparation of calibrated test packages for particle impact noise detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A standard calibration method for any particle impact noise detection (PIND) test system used to detect loose particles responsible for failures in hybrid circuits was developed along with a procedure for preparing PIND standard test devices. Hybrid packages were seeded with a single gold ball, hermetically sealed, leak tested, and PIND tested. Conclusions are presented.

  17. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability.

  18. Assessment of variation in Elekta plastic spherical-calibration phantom and its impact on the Leksell Gamma Knife calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Johansson, Jonas; Bednarz, Greg; Ma, Lijun; Saiful Huq, M.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Traditionally, the dose-rate calibration (output) of the Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) unit is performed using a 160 mm diameter plastic spherical phantom provided by the vendor of the LGK, Elekta Instrument AB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variations in the Elekta spherical phantom and to assess its impact and use for the LGK calibration. Methods: Altogether, 13 phantoms from six different centers were acquired, 10 of these phantoms were manufactured within the past 10 years and the last 3 approximately 15-20 years ago. To assess variation in phantoms, the diameter and mass densities were measured. To assess the impact on LGK calibration, the output of two models of LGK (LGK Perfexion and LGK 4C) were measured under identical irradiation conditions using all 13 phantoms for each LGK model. Results: The mean measured deviation in diameter from expected nominal 160 mm for 13 phantoms was 0.51 mm (range of 0.09-1.51 mm). The mean measured phantom mass density for 13 phantoms was 1.066{+-}0.019 g/cm{sup 3} (range of 1.046-1.102 g/cm{sup 3}). The percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.37% to 0.55% for LGK Perfexion. Similarly, the percentage deviation of output for individual phantom from mean of 13 phantom outputs ranged from -0.72% to 0.47% for LGK 4C. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that small variations in terms of phantom size and mass density of the phantom material do not have a significant impact on dose-rate measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife. Also, date of manufacture of the phantom did not show up to be a significant factor in this study.

  19. Impact of data quality and quantity and the calibration procedure on crop growth model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Crop growth models are a commonly used tool for impact assessment of climate variability and climate change on crop yields and water use. Process-based crop models rely on algorithms that approximate the main physiological plant processes by a set of equations containing several calibration parameters as well as basic underlying assumptions. It is well recognized that model calibration is essential to improve the accuracy and reliability of model predictions. However, model calibration and validation is often hindered by a limited quantity and quality of available data. Recent studies suggest that crop model parameters can only be derived from field experiments in which plant growth and development processes have been measured. To be able to achieve a reliable prediction of crop growth under irrigation or drought stress, the correct characterization of the whole soil-plant-atmosphere system is essential. In this context is the accurate simulation of crop development, yield and the soil water dynamics plays an important role. In this study we aim to investigate the importance of a site and cultivar-specific model calibration based on experimental data using the SVAT model Daisy. We investigate to which extent different data sets and different parameter estimation procedures affect particularly yield estimates, irrigation water demand and the soil water dynamics. The comprehensive experimental data has been derived from an experiment conducted in Germany where five irrigation regimes were imposed on cabbage. Data collection included continuous measurements of soil tension and soil water content in two plots at three depths, weekly measurements of LAI, plant heights, leaf-N-content, stomatal conductivity, biomass partitioning, rooting depth as well as harvested yields and duration of growing period. Three crop growth calibration strategies were compared: (1) manual calibration based on yield and duration of growing period, (2) manual calibration based on yield

  20. Analysis of the Cyclotron Facility Calibration and Aircraft Results Obtained by LIULIN-3M Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dachev, T. P.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.; Matviichuk, Y. N.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Petrov, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The LIULIN-3M instrument is a further development of the LIULIN dosimeter-radiometer, which has been used on the NffR space station in the 1988-1994 time period, The LIULIN-3M is designed for continuous monitoring of the radiation environment during the BION-12 satellite flight in 1999. A semiconductor detector with 1 mm thickness and 1 cm(exp 2) area is used in the instrument. Pulse high analysis technique is used for measurement of the energy losses in the detector. The final data sets from the instrument are the flux and the dose rate for the exposition time and 256 channels of LET spectra if a non-nal coincidence of the particles to the detector is considered. The LIULIN-3M instrument was calibrated by proton fluxes with different energies at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility in June 1997 and was used for space radiation measurements during commercial aircraft flights. Obtained calibration and flight results are analyzed in the paper.

  1. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  2. TES-based microcalorimeter for future X-ray astronomy missions. Software development for instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga-Encinas, R.; Cobo, B.; Ceballos, M.; Schuurmans, J.; van der Kuur, J.; Carrera, F.; Barcons, X.

    2013-05-01

    The XMS (X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer) is an instrument prototype with imaging capability in X-rays and high-spectral resolution. This instrument is a microcalorimeter based on transition edge sensors. As part of the Spanish contribution to the advancement of the XMS, we present the work carried out by the X-ray astronomy group at the Instituto de Física de Cantabria in collaboration with The Netherlands Institute for Space Research. The main work hereby presented includes the development and testing of software for this prototype with the purpose of instrument calibration and characterization, X-ray pulse detection and energy resolution calculations (Bergmann 2004, Tekst. Proefschrift Universiteit Utrecht; Boyce et al. 1999, Proc SPIE 3765; Den Herder et al. 2011, SRON-XMS-RP-2011-033; ATHENA Assessment Study Report, ESA/SRE(2011)17)

  3. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried out to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.

  4. Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties on Calculated Spent Fuel Nuclide Inventories and Advanced NDA Instrument Response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jianwei; Gauld, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI-SF project, this work was carried outmore » to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.« less

  5. Planck pre-launch status: Calibration of the Low Frequency Instrument flight model radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Terenzi, L.; Sandri, M.; Meinhold, P.; Poutanen, T.; Battaglia, P.; Franceschet, C.; Hughes, N.; Laaninen, M.; Lapolla, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Leonardi, R.; Lowe, S. R.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Morgante, G.; Stringhetti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valenziano, L.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Balasini, M.; Bernardino, T.; Blackhurst, E.; Boschini, L.; Cappellini, B.; Cavaliere, F.; Colin, A.; Colombo, F.; Davis, R. J.; de La Fuente, L.; Edgeley, J.; Gaier, T.; Galtress, A.; Hoyland, R.; Jukkala, P.; Kettle, D.; Kilpia, V.-H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Lawson, D.; Leahy, J. P.; Leutenegger, P.; Levin, S.; Maino, D.; Malaspina, M.; Mediavilla, A.; Miccolis, M.; Pagan, L.; Pascual, J. P.; Pasian, F.; Pecora, M.; Pospieszalski, M.; Roddis, N.; Salmon, M. J.; Seiffert, M.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Sjoman, P.; Sozzi, C.; Tuovinen, J.; Varis, J.; Wilkinson, A.; Winder, F.

    2010-09-01

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) on-board the ESA Planck satellite carries eleven radiometer subsystems, called radiometer chain assemblies (RCAs), each composed of a pair of pseudo-correlation receivers. We describe the on-ground calibration campaign performed to qualify the flight model RCAs and to measure their pre-launch performances. Each RCA was calibrated in a dedicated flight-like cryogenic environment with the radiometer front-end cooled to 20 K and the back-end at 300 K, and with an external input load cooled to 4 K. A matched load simulating a blackbody at different temperatures was placed in front of the sky horn to derive basic radiometer properties such as noise temperature, gain, and noise performance, e.g. 1/f noise. The spectral response of each detector was measured as was their susceptibility to thermal variation. All eleven LFI RCAs were calibrated. Instrumental parameters measured in these tests, such as noise temperature, bandwidth, radiometer isolation, and linearity, provide essential inputs to the Planck-LFI data analysis.

  6. Solar Probe Plus: Motor Controllers Design for Manipulator for Calibration Purposes of SPAN-A and SPAN-B Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juache Aguilar, K.

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the 2018 launch of Solar Probe Plus, and for the pre-flight tests of the SWEAP package, the instrument manipulator has been updated and modernized. Calibration of the Electrostatic Analyzers (ESA) is the critical last stop before launching instruments into space. The current method of controlling the instrument manipulator requires a dedicated computer, operating system, and power supplies. A novel solution integrates the power supplies, data acquisition, motor controller, and commanding microcontroller into one small enclosure. The system will also include software integration that communicates via Ethernet with electrical ground support equipment (EGSE) for full scripting automation during instrument calibration.

  7. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkuri, J.; Rantanen, A.; Manninen, J.; Esala, V.-P.; Lassila, A.

    2012-09-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm.

  8. Laboratory calibrations of the PP-SESAME instrument on Philae for measuring the cometary surface permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, M.; Le Gall, A.; Caujolle-Bert, S.; Schmidt, W.; Grard, R.; Laasko, H.; Ciarletti, V.; Seidensticker, K.

    2013-09-01

    The complex permittivity of terrestrial and planetary grounds can be derived from Mutual Impedance (MI) measurements using a four-electrode array [1]; the system is working at a fixed frequency with the electrodes not necessarily in contact with the ground and with a dedicated electronic system. This concept was used to build the Permittivity Probe (PP) as part of the SESAME experiment of the Philae Rosetta cometary lander. However severe constraints due to the payload facilities and to the particular environment lead to the actual design of the instrument. Unfortunately it was not possible to perform calibrations of the full system before lauch and the ground model consists of several parts used by various instruments. Here we report the results of basic calibration tests performed with a model of the Philae Landing Gear built in DLR. These tests involve only the three feet electrodes and a mockup of the the Philae body with very simple and well defined targets for characterizing the instrument. Further measurements on natural targets would be the next step.

  9. Improvements in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Products Based on Instrument Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. M.; Priestley, K.; Loeb, N. G.; Thomas, S.; Shankar, M.; Walikainen, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) mission is instrumental in providing highly accurate radiance measurements that are critical for monitoring the Earth's radiation budget. Two identical CERES instruments are deployed aboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua. Each CERES instrument consists of scanning thermistor bolometer sensors that measure broadband radiances in the shortwave (0.3 to 5 micron), total (0.3 to < 100 micron) and water vapor window (8 to 12 micron) regions. CERES instruments have the capability of scanning in either the cross-track or rotating azimuth plane (RAP) scan mode. Cross-track scanning, the primary mode of CERES operation, allows for the geographical mapping of the radiation fields while RAP scanning enables the acquisition of data over a more extensive combination of viewing configurations, needed for developing vastly improved angular distribution models used in radiance to flux conversion. To evaluate, achieve and maintain radiometric stability, a rigorous and comprehensive radiometric calibration and validation protocol is implemented. Calibrations and validation studies have indicated spectral changes in the reflected solar spectral regions of the shortwave and total sensors. Spectral darkening is detected in the shortwave channel optics, which is more prominent while the instrument operates in RAP mode. In the absence of a climatological explanation for this darkening, this likely occurs during part of the RAP scan cycle when the scan plane is aligned with the direction of motion, making the optics more susceptible to increased UV exposure and molecular contamination. Additionally, systematic daytime-nighttime longwave top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux inconsistency was also detected during validation, which highlights the changes in the shortwave region of the total sensor. This paper briefly describes the strategy to correct for the sensor response changes and presents the improvements in

  10. The Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS): Instrument description, calibration and data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.; Menzel, W. P.; Atkinson, R.; Wilson, G. S.; Arvesen, J.

    1986-01-01

    A new instrument has been developed to produce high resolution imagery in eight visible and three infared spectral bands from an aircraft platform. An analysis of the data and calibration procedures has shown that useful data can be obtained at up to 50 m resolution with a 2.5 milliradian aperture. Single sample standard errors for the measurements are 0.5, 0.2, and 0.9 K for the 6.5, 11.1, and 12.3 micron spectral bands, respectively. These errors are halved when a 5.0 milliradian aperture is used to obtain 100 m resolution data. Intercomparisons with VAS and AVHRR measurements show good relative calibration. MAMS development is part of a larger program to develop multispectral Earth imaging capabilities from space platforms during the 1990s.

  11. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. 86.120-94 Section 86.120-94 Protection of... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  12. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. 86.120-94 Section 86.120-94 Protection of... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  13. Inter-instrument calibration using magnetic field data from Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the Flux-Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 nT and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ~ 0.6 nT was observed between July and October 2003. Using multi-point multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  14. A Comparison of Radiometric Calibration Techniques for Lunar Impact Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R.

    2016-01-01

    Video observations of lunar impact flashes have been made by a number of researchers since the late 1990's and the problem of determination of the impact energies has been approached in different ways (Bellot Rubio, et al., 2000 [1], Bouley, et al., 2012.[2], Suggs, et al. 2014 [3], Rembold and Ryan 2015 [4], Ortiz, et al. 2015 [5]). The wide spectral response of the unfiltered video cameras in use for all published measurements necessitates color correction for the standard filter magnitudes available for the comparison stars. An estimate of the color of the impact flash is also needed to correct it to the chosen passband. Magnitudes corrected to standard filters are then used to determine the luminous energy in the filter passband according to the stellar atmosphere calibrations of Bessell et al., 1998 [6]. Figure 1 illustrates the problem. The camera pass band is the wide black curve and the blue, green, red, and magenta curves show the band passes of the Johnson-Cousins B, V, R, and I filters for which we have calibration star magnitudes. The blackbody curve of an impact flash of temperature 2800K (Nemtchinov, et al., 1998 [7]) is the dashed line. This paper compares the various photometric calibration techniques and how they address the color corrections necessary for the calculation of luminous energy (radiometry) of impact flashes. This issue has significant implications for determination of luminous efficiency, predictions of impact crater sizes for observed flashes, and the flux of meteoroids in the 10s of grams to kilogram size range.

  15. Unit-specific calibration of Actigraph accelerometers in a mechanical setup – Is it worth the effort? The effect on random output variation caused by technical inter-instrument variability in the laboratory and in the field

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Niels C; Korsholm, Lars; Kristensen, Peter L; Andersen, Lars B; Wedderkopp, Niels; Froberg, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Background Potentially, unit-specific in-vitro calibration of accelerometers could increase field data quality and study power. However, reduced inter-unit variability would only be important if random instrument variability contributes considerably to the total variation in field data. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to calculate and apply unit-specific calibration factors in multiple accelerometers in order to examine the impact on random output variation caused by inter-instrument variability. Methods Instrument-specific calibration factors were estimated in 25 MTI- and 53 CSA accelerometers in a mechanical setup using four different settings varying in frequencies and/or amplitudes. Calibration effect was analysed by comparing raw and calibrated data after applying unit-specific calibration factors to data obtained during quality checks in a mechanical setup and to data collected during free living conditions. Results Calibration reduced inter-instrument variability considerably in the mechanical setup, both in the MTI instruments (raw SDbetween units = 195 counts*min-1 vs. calibrated SDbetween units = 65 counts*min-1) and in the CSA instruments (raw SDbetween units = 343 counts*min-1 vs. calibrated SDbetween units = 67 counts*min-1). However, the effect of applying the derived calibration to children's and adolescents' free living physical activity data did not alter the coefficient of variation (CV) (children: CVraw = 30.2% vs. CVcalibrated = 30.4%, adolescents: CVraw = 36.3% vs. CVcalibrated = 35.7%). High correlations (r = 0.99 & r = 0.98, respectively) were observed between raw and calibrated field data, and the proportion of the total variation caused by the MTI- and CSA monitor was estimated to be only 1.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Compared to the CSA instruments, a significantly increased (9.95%) mean acceleration response was observed post hoc in the batch of MTI instruments, in which a significantly reduced inter-instrumental reliability

  16. An integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A system was developed for the calibration and development of thermal ion instrumentation. The system provides an extended beam with usable current rates, approx. 1 pA/sq cm, at beam energies as low as 1 eV, with much higher values available with increasing energy. A tandem electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration within the ion source optimizes the use of the ionizing electrons. The system is integrated under microcomputer control to allow automatic control and monitoring of the beam energy and composition and the mass and angle-dependent response of the instrument under test. The system is pumped by a combination of carbon vane and cryogenic sorption roughing pumps and ion and liquid helium operating pumps.

  17. The Calibration of a Large Number of Scientific Instruments for the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Sub-Orbital Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, A.; Miller, J.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Swenson, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission to be launched in the early January 2015 time frame from the Poker Flat Research Range. The primary scientific objective of this mission is to determine the contribution of small spatial and temporal scale fluctuations of the electric fields to the larger-scale processes during active aurora. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of six small payloads ejected at high velocity from a sounding rocket. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow images) observations.Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of electric field double-probe sensors, a three-axis magnetometer, and a Langmuir probe. In total there are eight of each instrument type requireing calibration. Since the instruments need to be calibrated over temperature a full calibration of a single instrument is very time-consuming. The decision was made to automate the calibration process. Measurements were taken using a relay switch-box connecting the instruments to test sources. Calibration data were saved into a database. Using post-processing scripts on these databases a calibration for each instrument at each temperature point was made. This approach is a prototype process that might be used for calibrating a large constellation of CubeSats with similar instruments. In this poster we review the ASSP science and mission, and the results of the pre-flight calibration of the science instruments.

  18. Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) for Advanced Life Detection Instrumentation Development and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel; Brinkerhoff, Will; Dworkin, Jason; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul; Stern, Jen; Blake, Daid; Sandford, Scott; Fries, marc; Steele, Andrew; Amashukeli, Xenia; Fisher, Anita; Grunthaner, Frank; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeff; Chiesl, Tom; Stockton, Amanda; Mathies, Rich

    2008-01-01

    Scientific ground-truth measurements for near-term Mars missions, such as the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, are essential for validating current in situ flight instrumentation and for the development of advanced instrumentation technologies for life-detection missions over the next decade. The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) has recently funded a consortium of researchers called the Astrobiology Sample Analysis Program (ASAP) to analyze an identical set of homogenized martian analog materials in a "round-robin" style using both state-of-the-art laboratory techniques as well as in-situ flight instrumentation including the SAM gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and CHEMIN X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instruments on MSL and the Urey and MOMA organic analyzer instruments under development for the 2013 ExoMars missions. The analog samples studied included an Atacama Desert soil from Chile, the Murchison meteorite, a gypsum sample from the 2007 AMASE Mars analog site, jarosite from Panoche Valley, CA, a hydrothermal sample from Rio Tinto, Spain, and a "blind" sample collected during the 2007 MSL slow-motion field test in New Mexico. Each sample was distributed to the team for analysis to: (1) determine the nature and inventory of organic compounds, (2) measure the bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition, (3) investigate elemental abundances, mineralogy and matrix, and (4) search for biological activity. The experimental results obtained from the ASAP Mars analog research consortium will be used to build a framework for understanding the biogeochemistry of martian analogs, help calibrate current spaceflight instrumentation, and enhance the scientific return from upcoming missions.

  19. Characterization and Calibration of the CheMin Mineralogical Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Achilles, Cherie; Anderson, Robert; Bish, David; Bristow, Tom; Chen, Curtis; Chipera, Steve; Crisp, Joy; Des Marais, David; Downs, Robert T.; Farmer, Jack; Feldman, Sabrina; Fonda, Mark; Gailhanou, Marc; Ma, Hongwei; Ming, Doug W.; Morris, Richard V.; Sarrazin, Philippe; Stolper, Ed; Treiman, Allan; Yen, Albert

    2012-09-01

    A principal goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is to identify and characterize past habitable environments on Mars. Determination of the mineralogical and chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils constrains their formation and alteration pathways, providing information on climate and habitability through time. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument on MSL will return accurate mineralogical identifications and quantitative phase abundances for scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale Crater during Curiosity's 1-Mars-year nominal mission. The instrument has a Co X-ray source and a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) detector arranged in transmission geometry with the sample. CheMin's angular range of 5∘ to 50∘ 2 θ with <0.35∘ 2 θ resolution is sufficient to identify and quantify virtually all minerals. CheMin's XRF requirement was descoped for technical and budgetary reasons. However, X-ray energy discrimination is still required to separate Co K α from Co K β and Fe K α photons. The X-ray energy-dispersive histograms (EDH) returned along with XRD for instrument evaluation should be useful in identifying elements Z>13 that are contained in the sample. The CheMin XRD is equipped with internal chemical and mineralogical standards and 27 reusable sample cells with either Mylar® or Kapton® windows to accommodate acidic-to-basic environmental conditions. The CheMin flight model (FM) instrument will be calibrated utilizing analyses of common samples against a demonstration-model (DM) instrument and CheMin-like laboratory instruments. The samples include phyllosilicate and sulfate minerals that are expected at Gale crater on the basis of remote sensing observations.

  20. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  1. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  2. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  3. 10 CFR 35.60 - Possession, use, and calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.60 Section 35.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. (a) For direct measurements performed in accordance with § 35.63, a licensee shall possess and use instrumentation to...

  4. 10 CFR 35.60 - Possession, use, and calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.60 Section 35.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. (a) For direct measurements performed in accordance with § 35.63, a licensee shall possess and use instrumentation to...

  5. 10 CFR 35.60 - Possession, use, and calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.60 Section 35.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. (a) For direct measurements performed in accordance with § 35.63, a licensee shall possess and use instrumentation to...

  6. 10 CFR 35.60 - Possession, use, and calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.60 Section 35.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. (a) For direct measurements performed in accordance with § 35.63, a licensee shall possess and use instrumentation to...

  7. 10 CFR 35.60 - Possession, use, and calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. 35.60 Section 35.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... calibration of instruments used to measure the activity of unsealed byproduct material. (a) For direct measurements performed in accordance with § 35.63, a licensee shall possess and use instrumentation to...

  8. The pre-flight calibration setup of the instrument SIMBIO-SYS onboard the mission BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Rodriguez-Ferreira, J.; Arondel, A.; Dassas, K.; Eng, P.; Lami, P.; Langevin, Y.; Longval, Y.; Pradel, P.; Dami, M.

    2015-11-01

    BepiColombo, an European Space Agency (ESA) mission being conducted in cooperation with the Japan space agency, will explore Mercury with a set of eleven instruments onboard the spacecraft Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Among them, SIMBIO-SYS (Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory SYStem) is a complex instrument that will provide images and spectra in the 400-2000 nm wavelength range of the entire surface of Mercury. Pre-flight calibration of the SYMBIO-SYS instrument is mandatory for reliable scientific interpretation of images and spectra returned from the planet Mercury. This paper presents the calibration device designed and implemented for the specific requirements of this instrument. It mainly consists of a thermal vacuum chamber simulating the space environment, an optical bench collecting calibration sources and optical elements that simulate the conditions of Mercury observations, mechanical interfaces used for positioning the three channels inside the vacuum chamber, thermal interfaces to explore the operating temperatures, computer interfaces that allow to communicate with both the instrument and the calibration elements and synchronize the calibrations sequences with the status of the calibration device. As the major goal is the characterization of the radiometric performances of the three channels of SIMBIO-SYS, radiometric performances of the test setup evaluated by simulations and measurements are emphasized.

  9. Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures for DESDynI-Class Radar Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Peral, Eva; Veilluex, Louise; Perkovic, Dragana; Shaffer, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable SweepSAR architectures such as that of the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI). SweepSAR promises significant increases in instrument capability for solid earth and biomass remote sensing, while reducing mission mass and cost. This new instrument concept requires new methods for calibrating the multiple channels, which must be combined on-board, in real-time. We are developing new methods for digitally calibrating digital beamforming arrays to reduce development time, risk and cost of precision calibrated TR modules for array architectures by accurately tracking modules' characteristics through closed-loop Digital Calibration, thus tracking systematic changes regardless of temperature

  10. Self-calibrating power angle instrument: Volume 1, A functional overview: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Demcko, J.A.; Chrysty, J.P.

    1989-08-01

    This report provides functional documentation of the development of a second generation electronic power angle instrument (PAI) for synchronous machines. The first generation device, also developed by EPRI funded research, proved the viability of the measurement concept but required human intervention for recalibration each time an input quantity was removed or the instrument power supply was lost. Loss of input intelligence also occurs each time a synchronous motor or generator is removed from service, thereby forcing additional recalibrations. The self-calibrating PAI automatically recalibrates itself for any contingency and as its predecessor, provides accurate low cost steady state and transient power angle measurements for both synchronous motors and generators. The report covering EPRI sponsored research project RP2591-1 includes a detailed PAI functional block diagram description as well as autocal PAI performance specification as measured in the lab. Several ancillary equipments were developed in support of the autocal project. These include an infrared optoprobe which replaces toothed wheel PAI input, an optoelectronic probe and tooth wheel test bed, and an electronic turbine generator simulator for PAI functional test and calibration. 24 figs.

  11. Flux-gate magnetometer spin axis offset calibration using the electron drift instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Nakamura, Rumi; Leinweber, Hannes K.; Chutter, Mark; Vaith, Hans; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Steller, Manfred; Magnes, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Spin-stabilization of spacecraft immensely supports the in-flight calibration of on-board flux-gate magnetometers (FGMs). From 12 calibration parameters in total, 8 can be easily obtained by spectral analysis. From the remaining 4, the spin axis offset is known to be particularly variable. It is usually determined by analysis of Alfvénic fluctuations that are embedded in the solar wind. In the absence of solar wind observations, the spin axis offset may be obtained by comparison of FGM and electron drift instrument (EDI) measurements. The aim of our study is to develop methods that are readily usable for routine FGM spin axis offset calibration with EDI. This paper represents a major step forward in this direction. We improve an existing method to determine FGM spin axis offsets from EDI time-of-flight measurements by providing it with a comprehensive error analysis. In addition, we introduce a new, complementary method that uses EDI beam direction data instead of time-of-flight data. Using Cluster data, we show that both methods yield similarly accurate results, which are comparable yet more stable than those from a commonly used solar wind-based method.

  12. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming; Van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete; Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li E-mail: yamingy@ics.uci.edu E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: meng@stat.harvard.edu

    2014-10-20

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  13. Infrared calibration for climate: a perspective on present and future high-spectral resolution instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Anderson, James G.; Best, Fred A.; Tobin, David C.; Knuteson, Robert O.; LaPorte, Daniel D.; Taylor, Joe K.

    2006-12-01

    The new era of high spectral resolution infrared instruments for atmospheric sounding offers great opportunities for climate change applications. A major issue with most of our existing IR observations from space is spectral sampling uncertainty and the lack of standardization in spectral sampling. The new ultra resolution observing capabilities from the AIRS grating spectrometer on the NASA Aqua platform and from new operational FTS instruments (IASI on Metop, CrIS for NPP/NPOESS, and the GIFTS for a GOES demonstration) will go a long way toward improving this situation. These new observations offer the following improvements: 1. Absolute accuracy, moving from issues of order 1 K to <0.2-0.4 K brightness temperature, 2. More complete spectral coverage, with Nyquist sampling for scale standardization, and 3. Capabilities for unifying IR calibration among different instruments and platforms. However, more needs to be done to meet the immediate needs for climate and to effectively leverage these new operational weather systems, including 1. Place special emphasis on making new instruments as accurate as they can be to realize the potential of technological investments already made, 2. Maintain a careful validation program for establishing the best possible direct radiance check of long-term accuracy--specifically, continuing to use aircraft-or balloon-borne instruments that are periodically checked directly with NIST, and 3. Commit to a simple, new IR mission that will provide an ongoing backbone for the climate observing system. The new mission would make use of Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurements to fill in spectral and diurnal sampling gaps of the operational systems and provide a benchmark with better than 0.1K 3-sigma accuracy based on standards that are verifiable in-flight.

  14. Application of Allan Deviation to Assessing Uncertainties of Continuous-measurement Instruments, and Optimizing Calibration Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Gloria; Rella, Chris; Farinas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Technological advancement of instrumentation in atmospheric and other geoscience disciplines over the past decade has lead to a shift from discrete sample analysis to continuous, in-situ monitoring. Standard error analysis used for discrete measurements is not sufficient to assess and compare the error contribution of noise and drift from continuous-measurement instruments, and a different statistical analysis approach should be applied. The Allan standard deviation analysis technique developed for atomic clock stability assessment by David W. Allan [1] can be effectively and gainfully applied to continuous measurement instruments. As an example, P. Werle et al has applied these techniques to look at signal averaging for atmospheric monitoring by Tunable Diode-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) [2]. This presentation will build on, and translate prior foundational publications to provide contextual definitions and guidelines for the practical application of this analysis technique to continuous scientific measurements. The specific example of a Picarro G2401 Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer used for continuous, atmospheric monitoring of CO2, CH4 and CO will be used to define the basics features the Allan deviation, assess factors affecting the analysis, and explore the time-series to Allan deviation plot translation for different types of instrument noise (white noise, linear drift, and interpolated data). In addition, the useful application of using an Allan deviation to optimize and predict the performance of different calibration schemes will be presented. Even though this presentation will use the specific example of the Picarro G2401 CRDS Analyzer for atmospheric monitoring, the objective is to present the information such that it can be successfully applied to other instrument sets and disciplines. [1] D.W. Allan, "Statistics of Atomic Frequency Standards," Proc, IEEE, vol. 54, pp 221-230, Feb 1966 [2] P. Werle, R. Miicke, F. Slemr, "The Limits

  15. VIRTIS-H: an infrared spectrometer for the ROSETTA mission - instrumental simulator and calibration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederique Jacquinod, Sophie; Reess, Jean-Michel; Erard, Stéphane; Leyrat, Cédric; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Drossart, Pierre; Henry, Florence; Semery, Alain

    2015-08-01

    Virtis-H is the high spectral resolution channel of the VIRTIS Imaging Spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft, devoted to the in-orbit remote sensing study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The Virtis-H channel is a cross-dispersion spectrometer in the spectral range 2-5µm with a resolution between 1200 and 3000. Its design consists in an afocal telescope-collimator off-axis parabola mirrors, a prism-grating system performing the cross-dispersion, and a three-lens objective imaging the entrance slit on a 438 x 270 HgCdTe array from Raytheon / IRCOE. Temperature control of the instrument is ensured by a radiator, to keep the spectrometer temperature at around 130 K, and by cryocoolers to lower the infrared detectors focal planes down to 80 K. At each recorded image, a full spectrum of the observed scene is reconstructed allowing the study of the fine spectral details of the coma and the cometary nucleus. The instrument technical specifications have been verified in the laboratory at channel level. A simulator of the Virtis-H channel has been developed to verify the compliance of the instrument performances. Furthermore, this simulator is used to prepare the comet observations and to estimate upper-limit detection of minor gaseous species and signal to noise ratio.The VIRTIS-H data are processed through the so-called pipeline CALIBROS, which uses a dual approach based on on-ground calibration data and Cruise flight observations of the asteroid 21 Lutetia. The calibrated spectra are produced in radiance (W/m2/sr/µm). Another part of the pipeline is devoted to geometric computations and projection of the field of view on the target, based on the SPICE library (NAIF) and ESA trajectory kernels. The pipeline products are directly stored in PDS format to be ingested in ESA / PSA public archive for long-term preservation and distribution.The comparison between the calibrated spectra and the simulated spectra shows a good compliance and allows being confident in

  16. Using Lunar Observations to Validate In-Flight Calibrations of Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Janet L.; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The validation of in-orbit instrument performance requires stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method of validation using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. Unlike internal calibrations, the Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models-1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance parameters which can be gleaned are detector gain, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function validation. Lunar observations are used to examine the stability of all three detectors on each of these instruments from 2006 to present. This validation method has yielded results showing trends per CERES data channel of 1.2% per decade or less.

  17. Application of the Langley plot method to the calibration of the solar backscattered ultraviolet instrument on the Nimbus 7 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Taylor, S.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Wellemeyer, C.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of the well-known Langley plot technique, used for the calibration of ground-based instruments, has been generalized for application to satellite instruments. In polar regions, near summer solstice, the solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument on the Nimbus 7 satellite samples the same ozone field at widely different solar zenith angles. These measurements are compared to assess the long-term drift in the instrument calibration. Although the technique provides only a relative wavelength-to-wavelength calibration, it can be combined with existing techniques to determine the drift of the instrument at any wavelength. Using this technique, we have generated a 12-year data set of ozone vertical profiles from SBUV with an estimated accuracy of +/- 5% at 1 mbar and +/- 2% at 10 mbar (95% confidence) over 12 years. Since the method is insensitive to true changes in the atmospheric ozone profile, it can also be used to compare the calibrations of similar SBUV instruments launched without temporal overlap.

  18. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  19. Jefferson Lab Hall A Beamline Instrumentation and Calibration for GMP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Thir Narayan

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon electromagnetic form factors characterize the distributions of electric charge and magnetization current inside the nucleon and thus reflect the internal structure determined by Quantum Chromodynamics. The GMp experiment is a first experiment run in Hall A at Jefferson Lab after the upgrade to double the beam energy with the goal to precisely measure electron-proton elastic cross section in the Q2 range of 7 to 17 GeV2 with an accuracy of better than 2%; several time better than existing data at the highest Q2. In order to achieve this accuracy, a determination of the accumulated beam charge of better than 0.5% is required. The new 12 GeV beamline was commissioned during the spring of 2015, with the main instrumentation consisting of beam charge and position monitors. In this talk, the procedures and the results of the calibrations of these beamline components will be presented.

  20. An automated calibration laboratory for flight research instrumentation: Requirements and a proposed design approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill-Rood, Nora; Glover, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden), operates a diverse fleet of research aircraft which are heavily instrumented to provide both real time data for in-flight monitoring and recorded data for postflight analysis. Ames-Dryden's existing automated calibration (AUTOCAL) laboratory is a computerized facility which tests aircraft sensors to certify accuracy for anticipated harsh flight environments. Recently, a major AUTOCAL lab upgrade was initiated; the goal of this modernization is to enhance productivity and improve configuration management for both software and test data. The new system will have multiple testing stations employing distributed processing linked by a local area network to a centralized database. The baseline requirements for the new AUTOCAL lab and the design approach being taken for its mechanization are described.

  1. Contributions of the SDR Task Network tool to Calibration and Validation of the NPOESS Preparatory Project instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, J.; Zajic, J.; Metcalf, A.; Baucom, T.

    2009-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) team is planning post-launch activities to calibrate the NPP sensors and validate Sensor Data Records (SDRs). The IPO has developed a web-based data collection and visualization tool in order to effectively collect, coordinate, and manage the calibration and validation tasks for the OMPS, ATMS, CrIS, and VIIRS instruments. This tool is accessible to the multi-institutional Cal/Val teams consisting of the Prime Contractor and Government Cal/Val leads along with the NASA NPP Mission team, and is used for mission planning and identification/resolution of conflicts between sensor activities. Visualization techniques aid in displaying task dependencies, including prerequisites and exit criteria, allowing for the identification of a critical path. This presentation will highlight how the information is collected, displayed, and used to coordinate the diverse instrument calibration/validation teams.

  2. Calibration measurements on the DEPFET Detectors for the MIXS instrument on BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, P.; Aschauer, F.; Aschauer, S.; Bähr, A.; Bergbauer, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Laubis, C.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Scholze, F.; Soltau, H.; Stefanescu, A.; Strüder, L.; Treis, J.

    2014-11-01

    The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) will be launched on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. The two channel instrument MIXS is dedicated to the exploration of the elemental composition of the mercurian surface by imaging x-ray spectroscopy of the elemental fluorescence lines. One of the main scientific goals of MIXS is to provide spatially resolved elemental abundance maps of key rock-forming elements. MIXS will be the successor of the XRS instrument, which is currently orbiting Mercury on board of NASAs satellite MESSENGER. MIXS will provide unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution due to its innovative detector and optics concepts. The MIXS target energy band ranges from 0.5 to 7 keV and allows to directly access the Fe-L line at 0.7 keV, which was not accessible to previous missions. In addition, the high spectroscopic resolution of FWHM ≤ 200 eV at the reference energy of 1 keV after one year in Mercury orbit, allows to separate the x-ray fluorescence emission lines of important elements like Mg (1.25 keV) and Al (1.49 keV) without the need for any filter. The detectors for the energy and spatially resolved detection of x-rays for both channels are identical DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel FET) active pixel detectors. We report on the calibration of the MIXS flight and flight spare detector modules at the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) beamlines at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Each detector was calibrated at least at 10 discrete energies in the energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV. The excellent spectroscopic performance of all three detector modules was verified.

  3. Direct liquid deposition calibration method for trace cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine using thermal desorption instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; Lubrano, Adam L; Rogers, Duane A; Giordano, Braden C; Collins, Greg E

    2013-03-22

    A simple method for establishing calibration curves with sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes has been demonstrated for nitroaromatic and nitramine vapor samples using a thermal desorption system with a cooled inlet system (TDS-CIS), which was coupled to a gas chromatograph (GC) with an electron capture detector (ECD). The method relies upon the direct liquid deposition of standard solutions onto the glass frit at the head of sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes. Linear calibration results and ideal system conditions for the TDS-CIS-GC-ECD were established for mixtures containing both cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, a.k.a. RDX, and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Because of the chemical characteristics of RDX, a higher TDS-CIS flow rate relative to the optimized approach for TNT was required for efficient RDX desorption. Simultaneous quantitation of TNT and RDX using the direct liquid deposition method with optimized instrumentation parameters for RDX were compared to results from a standard split/splitless GC inlet and a CIS. PMID:23415141

  4. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  5. Calibration activities on the BepiColombo High-Resolution Channel (HRIC) of SIMBIO-SYS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Zusi, M.; Palumbo, P.; Baroni, M.; Ficai Veltroni, I.; Flamini, E.; Mugnuolo, R.

    2015-10-01

    HRIC (High Resolution Imaging Channel) is the high resolution channel of the SIMBIO-SYS instrument on- board the ESA BepiColombo Mission. Calibration activities were performed at SelexES premises in spring- summer 2014 in order to check for Channel performances (radiometric performances, quality image and geometrical performances) and to obtain data necessary to setup a calibration pipeline necessary to process the raw images acquired by the channel when in operative scenario.

  6. Scientific calibration and analysis of calibration data for the CaSSIS instrument of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, V.; Gambicorti, L.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2015-10-01

    The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) is a camera, the development of which is led by the University of Bern (CH), with hardware contributions from the University of Padova (I) and the Space Research Center of Warsaw (Pl). It will take high resolution stereo images in 4 colours of the Martian surface, from on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. Our calibration facility stands ready to perform the required measurements. We are currently testing the procedures on a dummy system and we will report on calibration results of the CaSSIS instrument.

  7. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  8. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Park, H K; Yun, G S; Nam, Y B; Choe, G H; Lee, W; Jardin, S

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis. PMID:26827320

  9. Overview of Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite Instrument Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite carries five instruments on board including ATMS, CrIS, VIIRS, OMPS and CERES. During the SNPP intensive calval, ATMS was pitched over to observe the cold space radiation. This unique data set was used for diagnostics of the ATMS scan-angle dependent bias and a scan-to-scan variation. A new algorithm is proposed to correct the ATMS scan angle dependent bias related to the reflector emission. ATMS radiometric calibration is also revised in IDPS with the full radiance processing (FRP). CrIS is the first Fourier transform Michelson interferometer and measures three infrared spectral bands from 650 to 1095, 1210 to 1750 and 2155 to 2550 cm-1 with spectral resolutions of 0.625 cm-1, respectively. Its spectral calibration is with an accuracy of better than 2 ppm and its noise is also well characterized with the Allan variance. Since CrIS was switched to the transmission of full spectral resolution (FSR) of RDR data to the ground in January 2015. The CrIS FSR SDR data are also produced offline at NOAA STAR. VIIRS has 22 spectral bands covering the spectrum between 0.412 μm and 12.01 μm, including 16 moderate resolution bands (M-bands) with a spatial resolution of 750 m at nadir, five imaging resolution bands (I-bands) with a spatial resolution of 375 m at nadir, and one day-night band (DNB) with a nearly-constant 750 m spatial resolution throughout the scan. The calibration of VIIRS reflective solar bands (RSB) requires a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). Using the SNPP yaw maneuver data, SDSM screen transmission function can be updated to better capture the fine structures of the vignetting function. For OMPS nadir mapper (NM) and nadir profiler (NP), the detector signal-to-noise ratio, and sensor signal-to-noise ratio meet the system requirement. Detector gain and bias performance trends are generally stable. System linearity performance is stable and highly consistent with

  10. Debris Impact Detection Instrument for Crewed Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opiela, J.; Corsaro, R.; Giovanes, F.; Lio, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    When micrometeoroid or debris impacts occur on a space habitat, crew members need to be quickly informed of the likely extent of damage, and be directed to the impact location for possible repairs. This is especially important because the outer walls of pressurized volumes are often not easily accessible, blocked by racks or cabinets. The goal of the Habitat Particle Impact Monitoring System (HIMS) is to develop a fully automated, end-to-end particle impact detection system for crewed space exploration modules. The HIMS uses multiple passive, thin film piezo-polymer vibration sensors to detect impacts on a surface, and computer processing of the acoustical signals to characterize the impacts. Development and demonstration of the HIMS is proceeding in concert with NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Project. The HDU Project is designed to develop and test various technologies, configurations, and operational concepts for exploration habitats. This paper describes the HIMS development, initial testing, and HDU integration efforts. Initial tests of the system on the HDU were conducted at NASA s 2010 and 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (Desert-RATS or D-RATS). The HDU lab module, as seen from above, has an open circular floorplan divided into eight wedge-shaped Segments. The side wall of the module -- the surface used for this technology demonstration -- is a hard fiberglass composite covered with a layer of sprayed-on foam insulation. Four sensor locations were assigned near the corners of a rectangular pattern on the wall of one segment of the HDU lab module. The flat, self-adhesive sensors were applied to the module during its initial outfitting. To study the influence of the wall s construction (thickness and materials), three sets of four sensors were installed at different layer depths: on the interior of the module s wall, on the exterior of the same wall, and on the exterior of the foam insulation. The signal produced when a vibration passes

  11. Pressure dependent calibration of the OH and HOx channels of a FAGE HOx instrument using the Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiberg, F. A. F.; Smith, S. C.; Bejan, I.; Brumby, C. A.; Ingham, T.; Malkin, T. L.; Orr, S. C.; Heard, D. E.; Seakins, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The calibration of field instruments used to measure concentrations of OH and HO2 worldwide have traditionally relied on a single method utilising the photolysis of water vapour in air in a flow tube at atmospheric pressure. Here the calibration of two FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gaseous Expansion) apparatuses designed for HOx (OH and HO2) measurements have been investigated as a function of external pressure and temperature, using two different laser systems. The conventional method of generating known concentrations of HOx from H2O vapour photolysis in a turbulent flowtube impinging just outside the FAGE sample inlet has been used to study instrument sensitivity as a function of internal fluorescence cell pressure (1.8-3.8 mbar). An increase in the calibration constants COH and CHO2 with pressure was observed and an empirical linear regression of the data was used to describe the trends, with ΔCOH = (17 ± 11)% and ΔCHO2 = (31.6 ± 4.4)% increase per mbar air (uncertainties quoted to 2σ). Presented here are the first direct measurements of the FAGE calibration constants as a function of external pressure (440-1000 mbar) in a controlled environment using the University of Leeds HIRAC chamber (Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry). Two methods were used: the temporal decay of hydrocarbons for calibration of OH, and the kinetics of the second-order recombination of HO2 for HO2 calibrations. Over comparable conditions for the FAGE cell, the two alternative methods are in good agreement with the conventional method, with the average ratio of calibration factors (conventional : alternative) across the entire pressure range COH(conv)/COH(alt) = 1.19 ± 0.26 and CHO2(conv)/CHO2(alt) = 0.96 ± 0.18 (2σ). These alternative calibration methods currently have comparable systematic uncertainties than the conventional method: ~28% and ~41% for the alternative OH and HO2 calibration methods respectively compared to 35% for the H2O vapour photolysis method

  12. Pressure-dependent calibration of the OH and HO2 channels of a FAGE HOx instrument using the Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiberg, F. A. F.; Smith, S. C.; Bejan, I.; Brumby, C. A.; Ingham, T.; Malkin, T. L.; Orr, S. C.; Heard, D. E.; Seakins, P. W.

    2015-02-01

    The calibration of field instruments used to measure concentrations of OH and HO2 worldwide has traditionally relied on a single method utilising the photolysis of water vapour in air in a flow tube at atmospheric pressure. Here the calibration of two FAGE (fluorescence assay by gaseous expansion) apparatuses designed for HOx (OH and HO2) measurements have been investigated as a function of external pressure using two different laser systems. The conventional method of generating known concentrations of HOx from H2O vapour photolysis in a turbulent flow tube impinging just outside the FAGE sample inlet has been used to study instrument sensitivity as a function of internal fluorescence cell pressure (1.8-3.8 mbar). An increase in the calibration constants CHO and CHO2 with pressure was observed, and an empirical linear regression of the data was used to describe the trends, with ΔCHO = (17 ± 11) % and ΔCHO2 = (31.6 ± 4.4)% increase per millibar air (uncertainties quoted to 2σ). Presented here are the first direct measurements of the FAGE calibration constants as a function of external pressure (440-1000 mbar) in a controlled environment using the University of Leeds HIRAC chamber (Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry). Two methods were used: the temporal decay of hydrocarbons for calibration of OH, and the kinetics of the second-order recombination of HO2 for HO2 calibrations. Over comparable conditions for the FAGE cell, the two alternative methods are in good agreement with the conventional method, with the average ratio of calibration factors (conventional : alternative) across the entire pressure range, COH(conv)/COH(alt) = 1.19 ± 0.26 and CHO2(conv)/CHO2(alt) = 0.96 ± 0.18 (2σ). These alternative calibration methods currently have comparable systematic uncertainties to the conventional method: ~ 28% and ~ 41% for the alternative OH and HO2 calibration methods respectively compared to 35% for the H2O vapour photolysis method; ways in

  13. The Calibration of the DSCOVR EPIC Multiple Visible Channel Instrument Using MODIS and VIIRS as a Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, Conor; Doeling, David; Minnis, Patrick; Bhatt, Rajendra; Scarino, Benjamin; Gopalan, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), launched on 11 February 2015, is a satellite positioned near the Lagrange-1 (L1) point, carrying several instruments that monitor space weather, and Earth-view sensors designed for climate studies. The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard DSCOVR continuously views the sun-illuminated portion of the Earth with spectral coverage in the UV, VIS, and NIR bands. Although the EPIC instrument does not have any onboard calibration abilities, its constant view of the sunlit Earth disk provides a unique opportunity for simultaneous viewing with several other satellite instruments. This arrangement allows the EPIC sensor to be inter-calibrated using other well-characterized satellite instrument reference standards. Two such instruments with onboard calibration are MODIS, flown on Aqua and Terra, and VIIRS, onboard Suomi-NPP. The MODIS and VIIRS reference calibrations will be transferred to the EPIC instrument using both all-sky ocean and deep convective clouds (DCC) ray-matched EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS radiance pairs. An automated navigation correction routine was developed to more accurately align the EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS granules. The automated navigation correction routine dramatically reduced the uncertainty of the resulting calibration gain based on the EPIC and MODIS/VIIRS radiance pairs. The SCIAMACHY-based spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) applied to the MODIS/ VIIRS radiances were found to successfully adjust the reference radiances to the spectral response of the specific EPIC channel for over-lapping spectral channels. The SBAF was also found to be effective for the non-overlapping EPIC channel 10. Lastly, both ray-matching techniques found no discernable trends for EPIC channel 7 over the year of publically released EPIC data.

  14. Roller compaction process development and scale up using Johanson model calibrated with instrumented roll data.

    PubMed

    Nesarikar, Vishwas V; Patel, Chandrakant; Early, William; Vatsaraj, Nipa; Sprockel, Omar; Jerzweski, Robert

    2012-10-15

    and calibrated using a subset of placebo run data obtained on WP120. The roll force values were calculated using vendor supplied equation. The nip angle was expressed as a function of gap and RFU. The nip angle, gap and RFU were used in a new roll force equation to estimate normal stress P2 at the center of the ribbon. Using ratios P1/P2 and P3/P2 from the calibration data set, P1 and P2 were estimated. The ribbon width over which P1, P2, and P3 are effective was determined by minimizing sum square error between the model predicted vs. experimental ribbon densities of the calibration set. The model predicted ribbon densities of the placebo runs compared well with the experimental data. The placebo model also predicted with reasonable accuracy the ribbon densities of active A, B, and C blends prepared at various combinations of process parameters. The placebo model was then used to calculate scale up parameters from WP120 to WP200 roller compactor. While WP120 has a single screw speed, WP200 is equipped with a twin feed screw system. A limited number of roller compaction runs on WP200 was used as a calibration set to determine normal stress profile across ribbon width. The nip angle equation derived from instrumented roll data collected on WP120 was applied to estimate nip angles on WP200 at various processing conditions. The roll force values calculated from vendor supplied equation and the nip angle values were used in roll force equation to estimate normal stress P2 at the tip of the feed screws. Based on feed screw design, it was assumed that the normal stress at the center of the ribbon was equal to those calculated at the tip of the feed screws. The ratio of normal stress at the edge of the ribbon Pe to the normal stress P2 at the feed screw tip was optimized to minimize sum square error between model predicted vs. experimental ribbon densities of the calibration set. The model predicted ribbon densities of the batches prepared on WP200 compared well with the

  15. Best Practice Guidelines for Pre-Launch Characterization and Calibration of Instruments for Passive Optical Remote Sensing1

    PubMed Central

    Datla, R. U.; Rice, J. P.; Lykke, K. R.; Johnson, B. C.; Butler, J. J.; Xiong, X.

    2011-01-01

    The pre-launch characterization and calibration of remote sensing instruments should be planned and carried out in conjunction with their design and development to meet the mission requirements. The onboard calibrators such as blackbodies and the sensors such as spectral radiometers should be characterized and calibrated using SI traceable standards. In the case of earth remote sensing, this allows inter-comparison and intercalibration of different sensors in space to create global time series of climate records of high accuracy where some inevitable data gaps can be easily bridged. The recommended best practice guidelines for this pre-launch effort is presented based on experience gained at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs over the past two decades. The currently available radiometric standards and calibration facilities at NIST serving the remote sensing community are described. Examples of best practice calibrations and intercomparisons to build SI (international System of Units) traceable uncertainty budget in the instrumentation used for preflight satellite sensor calibration and validation are presented. PMID:26989588

  16. Best Practice Guidelines for Pre-Launch Characterization and Calibration of Instruments for Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Datla, R U; Rice, J P; Lykke, K R; Johnson, B C; Butler, J J; Xiong, X

    2011-01-01

    The pre-launch characterization and calibration of remote sensing instruments should be planned and carried out in conjunction with their design and development to meet the mission requirements. The onboard calibrators such as blackbodies and the sensors such as spectral radiometers should be characterized and calibrated using SI traceable standards. In the case of earth remote sensing, this allows inter-comparison and intercalibration of different sensors in space to create global time series of climate records of high accuracy where some inevitable data gaps can be easily bridged. The recommended best practice guidelines for this pre-launch effort is presented based on experience gained at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs over the past two decades. The currently available radiometric standards and calibration facilities at NIST serving the remote sensing community are described. Examples of best practice calibrations and intercomparisons to build SI (international System of Units) traceable uncertainty budget in the instrumentation used for preflight satellite sensor calibration and validation are presented. PMID:26989588

  17. Calibration of the MSL/ChemCam/LIBS Remote Sensing Composition Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Maurice S.; Bender, S.; Barraclough, B. L.; Cousin, A.; Forni, O.; Ollila, A.; Newsom, H.; Vaniman, D.; Clegg, S.; Lasue, J. A.; Blaney, D.; DeFlores, L.; Morris, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite on board the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity, will provide remote-sensing composition information for rock and soil samples within seven meters of the rover using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system, and will provide context imaging with a resolution of 0.10 mradians using the remote micro-imager (RMI) camera. The high resolution is needed to image the small analysis footprint of the LIBS system, at 0.2-0.6 mm diameter. This fine scale analytical capability will enable remote probing of stratigraphic layers or other small features the size of "blueberries" or smaller. ChemCam is intended for rapid survey analyses within 7 m of the rover, with each measurement taking less than 6 minutes. Repeated laser pulses remove dust coatings and provide depth profiles through weathering layers, allowing detailed investigation of rock varnish features as well as analysis of the underlying pristine rock composition. The LIBS technique uses brief laser pulses greater than 10 MW/square mm to ablate and electrically excite material from the sample of interest. The plasma emits photons with wavelengths characteristic of the elements present in the material, permitting detection and quantification of nearly all elements, including the light elements H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O. ChemCam LIBS projects 14 mJ of 1067 nm photons on target and covers a spectral range of 240-850 nm with resolutions between 0.15 and 0.60 nm FWHM. The Nd:KGW laser is passively cooled and is tuned to provide maximum power output from -10 to 0 C, though it can operate at 20% degraded energy output at room temperature. Preliminary calibrations were carried out on the flight model (FM) in 2008. However, the detectors were replaced in 2009, and final calibrations occurred in April-June, 2010. This presentation describes the LIBS calibration and characterization procedures and results, and details plans for final analyses during rover system thermal testing

  18. Addressing the Photometric Calibration Challenge: Explicit Determination of the Instrumental Response and Atmospheric Response Functions, and Tying it All Together.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the dominant source of systematic uncertainty in exploiting type Ia supernovae to determine the nature of the dark energy. We review our ongoing program to address this calibration challenge by performing measurements of both the instrumental response function and the optical transmission function of the atmosphere. A key aspect of this approach is to complement standard star observations by using NIST-calibrated photodiodes as a metrology foundation for optical flux measurements. We present our first attempt to assess photometric consistency between synthetic photometry and observations, by comparing predictions based on a NIST-diode-based determination of the PanSTARRS-1 instrumental response and empirical atmospheric transmission measurements, with fluxes we obtained from observing spectrophotometric standards.

  19. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  20. The Calibration Target for the Mars 2020 SHERLOC Instrument: Multiple Science Roles for Future Manned and Unmanned Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Bhartia, R.; Beegle, L.; Burton, A.; Ross, A.; Shahar, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument is a deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman/fluorescence instrument selected as part of the Mars 2020 rover instrument suite. SHERLOC will be mounted on the rover arm and its primary role is to identify carbonaceous species in martian samples, which may be selected for inclusion into a returnable sample cache. The SHERLOC instrument will require the use of a calibration target, and by design, multiple science roles will be addressed in the design of the target. Samples of materials used in NASA Extravehicular Mobility unit (EMU, or "space suit") manufacture have been included in the target to serve as both solid polymer calibration targets for SHERLOC instrument function, as well as for testing the resiliency of those materials under martian ambient conditions. A martian meteorite will also be included in the target to serve as a well-characterized example of a martian rock that contains trace carbonaceous material. This rock will be the first rock that we know of that has completed a round trip between planets and will therefore serve an EPO role to attract public attention to science and planetary exploration. The SHERLOC calibration target will address a wide range of NASA goals to include basic science of interest to both the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD).

  1. RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  2. Calibration of the San Marco airglow-solar spectrometer instrument in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, John; Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Tai, Hongsheng; Doll, Harry G.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1996-02-01

    The San Marco 5 carried the airglow-solar spectrometer instrument (ASSI). This 18-channel spectrometer measured the solar and terrestrial radiation in the wavelength region between 20 and 700 nm for 9 months in 1988. The ASSI extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels showed significant sensitivity changes during the mission. The sensitivity changes of the EUV channels are quantified by comparing ASSI solar EUV irradiance measurements to the solar EUV irradiance derived from a solar proxy model. A sensitivity change model is developed that shows that exponential curves can adequately describe the sensitivity changes of the ASSI optics and detectors. The November 10 calibration parameters and the sensitivity change model can be used to derive the EUV terrestrial airglow brightness for the time period of the ASSI mission. Analysis of the solar Lyman-(alpha) irradiance measured by the ASSI, the solar mesospheric explorer (SME), and the upper atmosphere research satellite has led to a revised Lyman-(alpha) irradiance for the San Marco mission. For example, the ASSI November 10, 1988, Lyman-(alpha) measurement is 5.3 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1 versus the reported SME measurement of 3.35 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1.

  3. A New Radiometric Calibration Paradigm for the OMPS Nadir Total Column and Profile Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Donald; Georgiew, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    A fused silica Mie Scattering Diffuser (MSD) has been developed at Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. that has measured characteristics which could be used to increase the accuracy of the spectral albedo calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir ozone total column and profile instrument by almost an order of magnitude. Measurements have been made of the optical characteristics on both natural and synthetic forms of fused silica MSDs. Preliminary measurements suggest that MSDs are useable in the solar reflective wavelength region from 250 nm to 3.7 m. To date synthetic and natural MSDs have been irradiated for 60 hours of UV radiation from a solar simulator, and synthetic MSDs have been irradiated with increasing doses of Co-60 gamma rays at 30, 500 krads up to 1.5 Mrads, and 30 krads of 200 MeV protons. The principal effects have been small loses in transmittance at wavelengths < 350 nm. The high energy particle irradiation measurements were provided by Neal Nickles and Dean Spieth.

  4. RadBallTM Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Harpring, Larry J.; Gordon, John R.; Blessing, Ronald; Rusty Coleman, J.; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

    2010-11-01

    The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBallTM, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  5. RadBall Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Foley, Trevor Q; Jannik, G Timothy; Harpring, Larry J; Gordon, John R; Blessing, Ronald; Coleman, J Rusty; Holmes, Christopher J; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall(™), consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall(™) technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL). PMID:21617738

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Calibration and Verification of High-Accuracy Instrumentation to Measure Heat Flow in Cryogenic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comber, Brian; Glazer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an upcoming flagship observatory mission scheduled to be launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. The requirement for multiple thermal zoned results in the instruments being thermally connected to five external radiators via individual high purity aluminum heat straps. Thermal-vacuum and thermal balance testing of the flight instruments at the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element level will take place within a newly constructed shroud cooled by gaseous helium inside Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Space environment Simulator (SES). The flight external radiators are not available during ISIM-level thermal vacuum/thermal testing, so they will be replaced in test with stable and adjustable thermal boundaries with identical physical interfaces to the flight radiators. Those boundaries are provided by specially designed test hardware which also measures the heat flow within each of the five heat straps to an accuracy of less than 2 mW, which is less than 5% of the minimum predicted heat flow values. Measurement of the heat loads to this accuracy is essential to ISIM thermal model correlation, since thermal models are more accurately correlated when temperature data is supplemented by accurate knowledge of heat flows. It also provides direct verification by test of several high-level thermal requirements. Devices that measure heat flow in this manner have historically been referred to a "Q-meters". Perhaps the most important feature of the design of the JWST Q-meters is that it does not depend on the absolute accuracy of its temperature sensors, but rather on knowledge of precise heater power required to maintain a constant temperature difference between sensors on two stages, for which a table is empirically developed during a

  7. Pressure Dependent OH and HO2 Calibration of the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) Instrument Using the Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiberg, F.; Smith, S. C.; Seakins, P.

    2012-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radical are very important tropospheric radical species. The balance between OH and HO2 (the HOx cycle) can give understanding of localised atmospheric composition. OH and HO2 is measured in both ground and aircraft based campaigns using FAGE. Calibration of this non-absolute fluorescence technique is traditionally achieved by H2O photolysis. Operation of FAGE at varying pressure can affect the instrument sensitivity to HOx due to internal fluorescence cell pressure changes. These are traditionally accounted by varying the inlet pinhole size of the instrument, however this may alter the gas expansion and hence the instrument sensitivity to OH and HO2 (COH and CHO2 respectively). Presented here are the initial results from independent OH and HO2 pressure dependent calibration methods using the stainless steel HIRAC chamber, which can operate at various pressures (0.1 - 1 bar). The OH calibration method uses the loss rate of a well characterised hydrocarbon upon reaction with OH to infer the OH concentration measured by FAGE in the HIRAC chamber. A photolytic OH source ((CH3)3COOH) was used and all reactants were measured using calibrated GC-FID and FTIR. For HO2 calibrations, formaldehyde, HCHO, is photolysed (λ < 300 nm) in the presence of O2 to form 2HO2 to steady state, and the post-photolysis HO2 decay is monitored using FAGE. The decay is a function of the second order HO2 self-reaction, for which the rate is well known. As [HO2] = SHO2 x CHO2 (where SHO2 is the FAGE HO2 signal), the second order rate equation can be rearranged and a plot of 1/SHO2 vs. time yields CHO2. Preliminary experiments for the OH calibration method show discrepancies between traditional and hydrocarbon decay techniques. This is thought to be due to as yet unknown OH loss processes and conditioning of the HIRAC chamber. For the HO2 pressure dependent calibrations were in good agreement with traditional methods validating the widely used

  8. Laboratory Simulation of Impacts upon Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Spacecraft: Calibration of Dust Particle Size from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, F.; Cole, M. J.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic aluminium alloy foils exposed on the forward, comet-facing surface of the aerogel tray on the Stardust spacecraft are likely to have been impacted by the same cometary particle population as the dedicated impact sensors and the aerogel collector. The ability of soft aluminium alloy to record hypervelocity impacts as bowl-shaped craters offers an opportunistic substrate for recognition of impacts by particles of a wide potential size range. In contrast to impact surveys conducted on samples from low Earth orbit, the simple encounter geometry for Stardust and Wild 2, with a known and constant spacecraft-particle relative velocity and effective surface-perpendicular impact trajectories, permits closely comparable simulation in laboratory experiments. For a detailed calibration programme we have selected a suite of spherical glass projectiles of uniform density and hardness characteristics, with well-documented particle size range from 10 microns to nearly 100 microns. Light gas gun buckshot firings of these particles at approximately 6km s)exp -1) onto samples of the same foil as employed on Stardust have yielded large numbers of craters. Scanning electron microscopy of both projectiles and impact features has allowed construction of a calibration plot, showing a linear relationship between impacting particle size and impact crater diameter. The close match between our experimental conditions and the Stardust mission encounter parameters should provide another opportunity to measure particle size distributions and fluxes close to the nucleus of Wild 2, independent of the active impact detector instruments aboard the Stardust spacecraft.

  9. Capabilities, Calibration, and Impact of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitgab, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In the current NASA crew radiation health risk assessment framework, estimates for the neutron contributions to crew radiation exposure largely rely on simulated data with sizeable uncertainties due to the lack of experimental measurements inside the ISS. Integrated in the ISS-RAD instrument, the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND) will deploy to the ISS on one of the next cargo supply missions. Together with the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector, the FND will perform, for the first time, routine and precise direct neutron measurements inside the ISS between 0.5 and 80 MeV. The measurements will close the NASA Medical Operations Requirement to monitor neutrons inside the ISS and impact crew radiation health risk assessments by reducing uncertainties on the neutron contribution to crew exposure, enabling more efficient mission planning. The presentation will focus on the FND detection mechanism, calibration results and expectations about the FND's interaction with the mixed radiation field inside the ISS.

  10. Calibration of an instrumented treadmill using a precision-controlled device with artificial neural network-based error corrections.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hong-Jung; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Chen, Ting-Yi; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Instrumented treadmills (ITs) are used to measure reaction forces (RF) and center of pressure (COP) movements for gait and balance assessment. Regular in situ calibration is essential to ensure their accuracy and to identify conditions when a factory re-calibration is needed. The current study aimed to develop and calibrate in situ an IT using a portable, precision-controlled calibration device with an artificial neural network (ANN)-based correction method. The calibration device was used to apply static and dynamic calibrating loads to the surface of the IT at 189 and 25 grid-points, respectively, at four belt speeds (0, 4, 6 and 8 km/h) without the need of a preset template. Part of the applied and measured RF and COP were used to train a threelayered, back-propagation ANN model while the rest of the data were used to evaluate the performance of the ANN. The percent errors of Fz and errors of the Px and Py were significantly decreased from a maximum of -1.15%, -1.64 mm and -0.73 mm to 0.02%, 0.02 mm and 0.03 mm during static calibration, respectively. During dynamic calibration, the corresponding values were decreasing from -3.65%, 2.58 mm and -4.92 mm to 0.30%, -0.14 mm and -0.47 mm, respectively. The results suggest that the calibration device and associated ANN will be useful for correcting measurement errors in vertical loads and COP for ITs. PMID:26979909

  11. Smos Instrument Performance and Calibration after 4 Years and 6 Months in Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Khazaal, Ali; Anterrieu, Eric; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Freitas, Sofia; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Díez-García, Raul; Fauste, Jorge; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2014-05-01

    cancellation algorithms, including or not the limited set of Sun acquisition responses which are available. The reduction of the spatial ripple and the residual land-sea contamination will require further understanding of fundamental image reconstruction issues as well as more elaborated ways to compute and apply the Ocean Target Transformation. Finally, the mitigation of the temporal variations will be attempted using a more sophisticated model of the front-end losses of the receivers, applied to the current instrument configuration as well as to the so called ALL-LICEF mode. An overview of the results of the second mission reprocessing at Level-1 and the progress achieved in both calibration and image reconstruction by April 2014, as anticipated above, will be presented in this contribution.

  12. Calibration and instrumental line shape characterization of a set of portable FTIR spectrometers for detecting greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Groß, J.; Kiel, M.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Schäfer, K.; Sha, M. K.; Orphal, J.

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive calibration procedure for mobile, low-resolution, solar-absorption FTIR spectrometers, used for greenhouse gases observations, is developed. These instruments commend themselves for campaign use and deployment at remote sites. The instrumental line shape (ILS) of each spectrometer has been thoroughly characterized by analyzing the shape of H2O signatures in open path spectra. A setup for the external source is suggested and the invariance of derived ILS parameters with regard to chosen path length is demonstrated. The instrumental line shape characteristics of all spectrometers were found to be close to nominal. Side-by-side solar observations before and after a campaign, which involved shipping of all spectrometers to a selected target site and back, are applied for verifying the temporal invariability of instrumental characteristics and for deriving intercalibration factors for XCO2 and XCH4, which take into account residual differences of instrumental characteristics. An excellent level of agreement and stability was found between the different spectrometers: the uncorrected biases in XCO2 and XCH4 are smaller than 0.01 and 0.15 %, respectively, and the drifts are smaller than 0.005 and 0.035 %. As an additional sensitive demonstration of the instrumental performance we show the excellent agreement of ground pressure values obtained from the total column measurements of O2 and barometric records. We find a calibration factor of 0.9700 for the spectroscopic measurements in comparison to the barometric records and a very small scatter between the individual spectrometers (0.02 %). As a final calibration step, using a co-located TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observation Network) spectrometer as a reference, a common scaling factor has been derived for the XCO2 and XCH4 products, which ensures that the records are traceable to the WMO in situ scale.

  13. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Melvin D.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  14. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  15. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B.

    1997-11-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Test Plan for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Daw, Adrian; Jennings, Donald; Rabin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. One of the major objectives of CLARREO is to advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths. This advance is required to reach the on-orbit absolute accuracy required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps while remaining sufficiently accurate to observe climate change to within the uncertainty of the limit of natural variability. While these capabilities exist at NIST in the laboratory, there is a need to demonstrate that it can move successfully from NIST to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the test plan for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches , alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The end result of efforts with the SOLARIS CDS will be an SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climate-quality data collections. The CLARREO mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration. The current work describes the test plan for the SOLARIS which is the calibration demonstration

  17. Error budget for a calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument for the climate absolute radiance and refractivity observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  18. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  19. Impact of MODIS SWIR band calibration improvements on Level-3 atmospheric products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Andrew; Levy, Robert C.; Angal, Amit; Geng, Xu; Xiong, Jack; Hoffman, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    The spectral reflectance measured by the MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB) is used for retrieving many atmospheric science products. The accuracy of these products depends on the accuracy of the calibration of the RSB. To this end, the RSB of the MODIS instruments are primarily calibrated on-orbit using regular solar diffuser (SD) observations. For λ <0.94 μm the SD's on-orbit bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) change is tracked using solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) observations. For λ <0.94 μm, the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) developed, in MODIS Collection 6 (C6), a time-dependent correction using observations from pseudo-invariant earth-scene targets. This correction has been implemented in C6 for the Terra MODIS 1.24 μm band over the entire mission, and for the 1.38 μm band in the forward processing. As the instruments continue to operate beyond their design lifetime of six years, a similar correction is planned for other short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands as well. MODIS SWIR bands are used in deriving atmosphere products, including aerosol optical thickness, atmospheric total column water vapor, cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. The SD degradation correction in Terra bands 5 and 26 impact the spectral radiance and therefore the retrieval of these atmosphere products. Here, we describe the corrections to Bands 5 (1.24 μm) and 26 (1.38 μm), and produce three sets (B5, B26 correction = on/on, on/off, and off/off) of Terra-MODIS Level 1B (calibrated radiance product) data. By comparing products derived from these corrected and uncorrected Terra MODIS Level 1B (L1B) calibrations, dozens of L3 atmosphere products are surveyed for changes caused by the corrections, and representative results are presented. Aerosol and water vapor products show only small local changes, while some cloud products can change locally by >10%, which is a large change.

  20. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  1. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  2. XMM-Newton and Chandra cross-calibration using HIFLUGCS galaxy clusters . Systematic temperature differences and cosmological impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, G.; Reiprich, T. H.; Lovisari, L.; Nevalainen, J.; David, L.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Robust X-ray temperature measurements of the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters require an accurate energy-dependent effective area calibration. Since the hot gas X-ray emission of galaxy clusters does not vary on relevant timescales, they are excellent cross-calibration targets. Moreover, cosmological constraints from clusters rely on accurate gravitational mass estimates, which in X-rays strongly depend on cluster gas temperature measurements. Therefore, systematic calibration differences may result in biased, instrument-dependent cosmological constraints. This is of special interest in light of the tension between the Planck results of the primary temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-plus-X-ray cluster-count analyses. Aims: We quantify in detail the systematics and uncertainties of the cross-calibration of the effective area between five X-ray instruments, EPIC-MOS1/MOS2/PN onboard XMM-Newton and ACIS-I/S onboard Chandra, and the influence on temperature measurements. Furthermore, we assess the impact of the cross-calibration uncertainties on cosmology. Methods: Using the HIFLUGCS sample, consisting of the 64 X-ray brightest galaxy clusters, we constrain the ICM temperatures through spectral fitting in the same, mostly isothermal regions and compare the different instruments. We use the stacked residual ratio method to evaluate the cross-calibration uncertainties between the instruments as a function of energy. Our work is an extension to a previous one using X-ray clusters by the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC) and is carried out in the context of IACHEC. Results: Performing spectral fitting in the full energy band, (0.7-7) keV, as is typical of the analysis of cluster spectra, we find that best-fit temperatures determined with XMM-Newton/EPIC are significantly lower than Chandra/ACIS temperatures. This confirms the previous IACHEC results obtained

  3. Auxiliary instruments for the absolute calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Maria C.; Segreto, Alberto; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Russo, Francesco; Sottile, Giuseppe; Gargano, Carmelo; Biondo, Benedetto; Fiorini, Mauro; Incorvaia, Salvatore; Toso, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope under development by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, INAF, proposed for the investigation of the highest-energy gamma-ray band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype will be installed in Italy at the INAF station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna during Fall 2014. The calibration and scientific validation phase will start soon after. The calibration of a Cherenkov telescope includes several items and tools. The ASTRI SST- 2M camera is equipped with an internal fiber illumination system that allows to perform the relative calibration through monitoring of gain and efficiency variations of each pixel. The absolute calibration of the overall system, including optics, will take advantage from auxiliary instrumentation, namely UVscope and UVSiPM, two small-aperture multi-pixels photon detectors NIST calibrated in lab. During commissioning phase, to measure the main features of ASTRI SST-2M, as its overall spectral response, the main telescope and the auxiliary UVscope-UVSiPM will be illuminated simultaneously by a spatially uniform flux generated by a ground-based light source, named Illuminator, placed at a distance of few hundreds meters. Periodically, during clear nights, the flux profiles of a reference star tracked simultaneously by ASTRI SST-2M and UVscope-UVSiPM will allow to evaluate the total atmospheric attenuation and the absolute calibration constant of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype. In this contribution we describe the auxiliary UVscope-UVSiPM and Illuminator sub-system together with an overview of the end-to-end calibration procedure foreseen for the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype.

  4. Instrumental correction of the uneven PMT aging effect on the calibration constant of a water vapor Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Valentin; Fastig, Shlomo; Haefele, Alexander; Martucci, Giovanni; Calpini, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    The water vapor profile derived from Raman lidar measurements is obtained from the ratio of water vapor to nitrogen Raman-shifted returns. The proportionality factor converting the signal ratio to water vapor/air mixing ratio is referred to as lidar calibration constant. The calibration constant is a function of the water vapor and nitrogen Raman cross sections and the efficiencies of the respective Raman channels including the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) efficiencies. Unequal, gradual changes in the water vapor and nitrogen channels PMT efficiencies due to aging effects lead to steady alteration of the calibration constant. This effect has been observed during the seven- year continuous operation of the RAman Lidar for Meteorological Observations (RALMO)1. A more detailed research2, has shown that the calibration constant change is more pronounced during summer time, which is explained by the higher daylight exposure of the PMTs during this period. Periodical recalibration of the lidar with radiosonde measurements is used to correct the calibration constant. This approach, however, induces additional systematic errors due to the nature of the calibration procedure and because of sonde-to-sonde accuracy variations. The systematic errors could induce artefacts leading to an incorrect interpretation of certain data points in the framework of climatological studies. To resolve this problem we developed a new, instrumental method for automated correction of the lidar calibration constant. By this method, the change in the water vapor and the nitrogen PMTs efficiencies are estimated from the PMTs responses measured when they are illuminated simultaneously by a single stabilized LED light source. A correction factor is deduced from the ratio of the signals of the two photomultipliers. The correction measurements are taken automatically once daily before midnight. The correction is applied when the correction factor exceeds a predefined threshold for several days. The

  5. Calibration of speleothem δ18O records against hydroclimate instrumental records in Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moquet, J. S.; Cruz, F. W.; Novello, V. F.; Stríkis, N. M.; Deininger, M.; Karmann, I.; Santos, R. Ventura; Millo, C.; Apaestegui, J.; Guyot, J.-L.; Siffedine, A.; Vuille, M.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Santini, W.

    2016-04-01

    δ18O in speleothems is a powerful proxy for reconstruction of precipitation patterns in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The aim of this study is to calibrate the δ18O record of speleothems against historical precipitation and river discharge data in central Brazil, a region directly influenced by the Southern Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), a major feature of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS). The present work is based on a sub-annual resolution speleothem record covering the last 141 years (the period between the years 1870 and 2011) from a cave in central Brazil. The comparison of this record with instrumental hydroclimate records since 1921 allows defining a strong relationship between precipitation variability and stable oxygen isotope ratios from speleothems. The results from a monitoring program of climatic parameters and isotopic composition of rainfall and cave seepage waters performed in the same cave, show that the rain δ18O variability is dominated by the amount effect in this region, while δ18O drip water remains almost constant over the monitored period (1.5 years). The δ18O of modern calcite, on the other hand, shows clear seasonal variations, with more negative values observed during the rainy season, which implies that other factors also influence the isotopic composition of carbonate. However, the relationship between δ18O of carbonate deposits and rainwater is supported by the results from the comparison between speleothem δ18O records and historical hydroclimate records. A significant correlation between speleothem δ18O and monsoon rainfall variability is observed on sub-decadal time scales, especially for the monsoon period (DJFM and NDJFM), once the rainfall record have been smoothed with a 7-9 years running mean. This study confirms that speleothem δ18O is directly associated with monsoon rainfall variability in central Brazil. The relationship between speleothem δ18O records and hydroclimatic historical records allows

  6. An Instrument for In Situ Measuring the Volume Scattering Function of Water: Design, Calibration and Primary Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai; Cao, Wenxi; Yu, Jing; Ke, Tiancun; Lu, Guixin; Yang, Yuezhong; Guo, Chaoying

    2012-01-01

    The optical volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater is a fundamental property used in the calculation of radiative transfer for applications in the study of the upper-ocean heat balance, the photosynthetic productivity of the ocean, and the chemical transformation of photoreactive compounds. A new instrument to simultaneously measure the VSF in seven directions between 20° to 160°, the attenuation coefficient, and the depth of water is presented. The instrument is self-contained and can be automatically controlled by the depth under water. The self-contained data can be easily downloaded by an ultra-short-wave communication system. A calibration test was performed in the laboratory based on precise estimation of the scattering volume and optical radiometric calibration of the detectors. The measurement error of the VSF measurement instrument has been estimated in the laboratory based on the Mie theory, and the average error is less than 12%. The instrument was used to measure and analyze the variation characteristics of the VSF with angle, depth and water quality in Daya Bay for the first time. From these in situ data, we have found that the phase functions proposed by Fournier-Forand, measured by Petzold in San Diego Harbor and Sokolov in Black Sea do not fit with our measurements in Daya. These discrepancies could manly due to high proportion of suspended calcium carbonate mineral-like particles with high refractive index in Daya Bay. PMID:22666043

  7. Design and Ground Calibration of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; Scherrer, P. H.; Bush, R. I.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Bogart, R. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Duvall, T. L.; Akin, D. J.; Allard, B. A.; Miles, J. W.; Rairden, R.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Wolfson, C. J.; Elmore, D. F.; Norton, A. A.; Tomczyk, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) investigation ( Solar Phys. doi:10.1007/s11207-011-9834-2, 2011) will study the solar interior using helioseismic techniques as well as the magnetic field near the solar surface. The HMI instrument is part of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) that was launched on 11 February 2010. The instrument is designed to measure the Doppler shift, intensity, and vector magnetic field at the solar photosphere using the 6173 Å Fe i absorption line. The instrument consists of a front-window filter, a telescope, a set of waveplates for polarimetry, an image-stabilization system, a blocking filter, a five-stage Lyot filter with one tunable element, two wide-field tunable Michelson interferometers, a pair of 40962 pixel cameras with independent shutters, and associated electronics. Each camera takes a full-disk image roughly every 3.75 seconds giving an overall cadence of 45 seconds for the Doppler, intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic-field measurements and a slower cadence for the full vector magnetic field. This article describes the design of the HMI instrument and provides an overview of the pre-launch calibration efforts. Overviews of the investigation, details of the calibrations, data handling, and the science analysis are provided in accompanying articles.

  8. Design and Ground Calibration of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schou, J.; Scherrer, P. H.; Bush, R. I.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Bogart, R. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Akin, D. J.; Allard, B. A.; Miles, J. W.; Rairden, R.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Wolfson, C. J.; Elmore, D. F.; Norton, A. A..; Tomczyk, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) investigation will study the solar interior using helioseismic techniques as well as the magnetic field near the solar surface. The HMI instrument is part of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) that was launched on 11 February 2010. The instrument is designed to measure the Doppler shift, intensity, and vector magnetic field at the solar photosphere using the 6173 Fe I absorption line. The instrument consists of a front-window filter, a telescope, a set of wave plates for polarimetry, an image-stabilization system, a blocking filter, a five-stage Lyot filter with one tunable element, two wide-field tunable Michelson interferometers, a pair of 4096(exo 2) pixel cameras with independent shutters, and associated electronics. Each camera takes a full-disk image roughly every 3.75 seconds giving an overall cadence of 45 seconds for the Doppler, intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic-field measurements and a slower cadence for the full vector magnetic field. This article describes the design of the HMI instrument and provides an overview of the pre-launch calibration efforts. Overviews of the investigation, details of the calibrations, data handling, and the science analysis are provided in accompanying articles.

  9. Calibration of erythemally weighted broadband instruments: A comparison between PMOD/WRC and MSL

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Neil; Nield, Kathryn; Hamlin, John; Huelsen, Gregor; Groebner, Julian

    2013-05-10

    A Yankee Environmental Systems (YES) UVB-1 ultraviolet pyranometer, designed to measure erythemally weighted total solar irradiance, was calibrated by the Measurement Standards Laboratory (MSL) in Lower Hutt, New Zealand during August 2010. The calibration was then repeated during July and August 2011 by the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Obervatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) located in Davos, Switzerland. Calibration results show that measurements of the relative spectral and angular response functions at the two institutes are in excellent agreement, thus providing a good degree of confidence in these measurement facilities. However, measurements to convert the relative spectral response into an absolute calibration disagree significantly depending on whether an FEL lamp or solar spectra are used to perform this scaling. This is the first serious comparison of these scaling methods to formally explore the potential systematic errors which could explain the discrepancy.

  10. Impact of length of calibration period on the APEX model water quantity and quality simulation performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Availability of continuous long-term measured data for model calibration and validation is limited due to time and resources constraints. As a result, hydrologic and water quality models are calibrated and, if possible, validated when measured data is available. Past work reported on the impact of t...

  11. Impact of model development, calibration and validation decisions on hydrological simulations in West Lake Erie Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed simulation models are used extensively to investigate hydrologic processes, landuse and climate change impacts, pollutant load assessments and best management practices (BMPs). Developing, calibrating and validating these models require a number of critical decisions that will influence t...

  12. Calibration of Nu-Instruments Noblesse multicollector mass spectrometers for argon isotopic measurements using a newly developed reference gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coble, M.A.; Grove, M.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    The greatest challenge limiting 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements is the availability of appropriate standard gasses to intercalibrate detectors. In particular, use of zoom lens ion-optics to steer and focus ion beams into a fixed detector array (i.e., Nu Instruments Noblesse) makes intercalibration of multiple detectors challenging because different ion-optic tuning conditions are required for optimal peak shape and sensitivity at different mass stations. We have found that detector efficiency and mass discrimination are affected by changes in ion-optic tuning parameters. Reliance upon an atmospheric Ar standard to calibrate the Noblesse is problematic because there is no straightforward way to relate atmospheric 40Ar and 36Ar to measurements of 40Ar and 39Ar if they are measured on separate detectors. After exploring alternative calibration approaches, we have concluded that calibration of the Noblesse is best performed using exactly the same source, detector, and ion-optic tuning settings as those used in routine 40Ar/39Ar analysis. To accomplish this, we have developed synthetic reference gasses containing 40Ar, 39Ar and 38Ar produced by mixing gasses derived from neutron-irradiated sanidine with an enriched 38Ar spike. We present a new method for calibrating the Noblesse based on use of both atmospheric Ar and the synthetic reference gasses. By combining atmospheric Ar and synthetic reference gas in different ways, we can directly measure 40Ar/39Ar, 38Ar/39Ar, and 36Ar/39Ar correction factors over ratios that vary from 0.5 to 460. These correction factors are reproducible to better than ??0.5??? (2?? standard error) over intervals spanning ~24h but can vary systematically by ~4% over 2weeks of continuous use when electron multiplier settings are held constant. Monitoring this variation requires daily calibration of the instrument. Application of the calibration method to 40Ar/39Ar multicollection measurements of widely used sanidine reference materials

  13. Calibration between color camera and 3D LIDAR instruments with a polygonal planar board.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonsu; Yun, Seokmin; Won, Chee Sun; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Sim, Sungdae

    2014-01-01

    Calibration between color camera and 3D Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) equipment is an essential process for data fusion. The goal of this paper is to improve the calibration accuracy between a camera and a 3D LIDAR. In particular, we are interested in calibrating a low resolution 3D LIDAR with a relatively small number of vertical sensors. Our goal is achieved by employing a new methodology for the calibration board, which exploits 2D-3D correspondences. The 3D corresponding points are estimated from the scanned laser points on the polygonal planar board with adjacent sides. Since the lengths of adjacent sides are known, we can estimate the vertices of the board as a meeting point of two projected sides of the polygonal board. The estimated vertices from the range data and those detected from the color image serve as the corresponding points for the calibration. Experiments using a low-resolution LIDAR with 32 sensors show robust results. PMID:24643005

  14. Calibration between Color Camera and 3D LIDAR Instruments with a Polygonal Planar Board

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonsu; Yun, Seokmin; Won, Chee Sun; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Sim, Sungdae

    2014-01-01

    Calibration between color camera and 3D Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) equipment is an essential process for data fusion. The goal of this paper is to improve the calibration accuracy between a camera and a 3D LIDAR. In particular, we are interested in calibrating a low resolution 3D LIDAR with a relatively small number of vertical sensors. Our goal is achieved by employing a new methodology for the calibration board, which exploits 2D-3D correspondences. The 3D corresponding points are estimated from the scanned laser points on the polygonal planar board with adjacent sides. Since the lengths of adjacent sides are known, we can estimate the vertices of the board as a meeting point of two projected sides of the polygonal board. The estimated vertices from the range data and those detected from the color image serve as the corresponding points for the calibration. Experiments using a low-resolution LIDAR with 32 sensors show robust results. PMID:24643005

  15. Design concept of the electrical ground support equipment for the AIV and calibration of the Euclid NISP instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, Massimo; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Butler, Chris. R.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Conforti, Vito; Corcione, Leonardo; Franceschi, Enrico; Gianotti, Fulvio; Ligori, Sebastiano; Maciaszek, Thierry; Morgante, Gianluca; Muñoz, Jacinto; Nicastro, Luciano; Prieto, Eric; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Riva, Mario; Spano, Paolo; Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Valenziano, Luca; Villó, Isidro; Zerbi, Filippo Maria

    2012-09-01

    The Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer (NISP) on board the Euclid ESA mission will be developed and tested at various levels of integration using various test equipment which shall be designed and procured through a collaborative and coordinated effort. In this paper we describe the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) which shall be required to support the assembly, integration, verification and testing (AIV/AIT) and calibration activities at instrument level before delivery to ESA, and at satellite level, when the NISP instrument is mounted on the spacecraft. We present the EGSE conceptual design as defined in order to be compliant with the AIV/AIT and calibration requirements. The proposed concept is aimed at maximizing the re-use in the EGSE configuration of the Test Equipment developed for subsystem level activities, as well as, at allowing a smooth transition from instrument level to satellite level, and, possibly, at Ground Segment level. This paper mainly reports the technical status at the end of the Definition phase and it is presented on behalf of the Euclid Consortium.

  16. Filters and calibration sources for the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) instrument on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, C. P.; den Herder, J. W.; Costantini, E.; Aarts, H.; Lowes, P.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kelley, R.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Koenecke, R.; Haas, D.; Paltani, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The SXS instrument is the Soft X-ray micro-calorimeter Spectrometer planned for the Japanese ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2014. In this paper, the trade off and modelling for the X-ray absorption and optical blocking filters will be described. The X-ray absorption filter will optimize the efficiency for high spectral resolution observations for bright sources at higher energies (notably around the Fe-K line at 6.4 KeV), given the characteristics of the instrument while the optical blocking filter allows X-ray observations of optically bright sources. For this mission a novel type of on-off-switchable X-ray calibration source, using light sensitive photo-cathodes, is being developed, which will be used for gain calibration and contamination monitoring. These sources will be used by both the SXS and SXI (Soft X-ray Imager) instruments and have the capability to be pulsed at millisecond intervals. Details of these sources will also be discussed.

  17. Theoretical model atmosphere spectra used for the calibration of infrared instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.

    2007-09-01

    Context: One of the key ingredients in establishing the relation between input signal and output flux from a spectrometer is accurate determination of the spectrophotometric calibration. In the case of spectrometers onboard satellites, the accuracy of this part of the calibration pedigree is ultimately linked to the accuracy of the set of reference spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that the spectrophotometric calibration is built on. Aims: In this paper, we deal with the spectrophotometric calibration of infrared (IR) spectrometers onboard satellites in the 2 to 200 μm wavelength range. We aim at comparing the different reference SEDs used for the IR spectrophotometric calibration. The emphasis is on the reference SEDs of stellar standards with spectral type later than A0, with special focus on the theoretical model atmosphere spectra. Methods: Using the MARCS model atmosphere code, spectral reference SEDs were constructed for a set of IR stellar standards (A dwarfs, solar analogs, G9-M0 giants). A detailed error analysis was performed to estimate proper uncertainties on the predicted flux values. Results: It is shown that the uncertainty on the predicted fluxes can be as high as 10%, but in case high-resolution observational optical or near-IR data are available, and IR excess can be excluded, the uncertainty on medium-resolution SEDs can be reduced to 1-2% in the near-IR, to ~3% in the mid-IR, and to ~5% in the far-IR. Moreover, it is argued that theoretical stellar atmosphere spectra are at the moment the best representations for the IR fluxes of cool stellar standards. Conclusions: When aiming at a determination of the spectrophotometric calibration of IR spectrometers better than 3%, effort should be put into constructing an appropriate set of stellar reference SEDs based on theoretical atmosphere spectra for some 15 standard stars with spectral types between A0 V and M0 III.

  18. Borehole strainmeter measurements spanning the 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa Earthquake, California: The effect from instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, John

    2015-10-01

    The 24 August 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa, California earthquake produced significant offsets on 12 borehole strainmeters in the San Francisco Bay area. These strainmeters are located between 24 and 80 km from the source, and the observed offsets ranged up to 400 parts per billion (ppb), which exceeds their nominal precision by a factor of 100. However, the observed offsets of tidally calibrated strains differ by up to 130 ppb from predictions based on a moment tensor derived from seismic data. The large misfit can be attributed to a combination of poor instrument calibration and better modeling of the strain field from the earthquake. Borehole strainmeters require in situ calibration, which historically has been accomplished by comparing their measurements of Earth tides with the strain tides predicted by a model. Although the borehole strainmeter accurately measures the deformation within the borehole, the long-wavelength strain signals from tides or other tectonic processes recorded in the borehole are modified by the presence of the borehole and the elastic properties of the grout and the instrument. Previous analyses of surface-mounted, strainmeter data and their relationship with the predicted tides suggest that tidal models could be in error by 30%. The poor fit of the borehole strainmeter data from this earthquake can be improved by simultaneously varying the components of the model tides up to 30% and making small adjustments to the point source model of the earthquake, which reduces the RMS misfit from 130 ppb to 18 ppb. This suggests that relying on tidal models to calibrate borehole strainmeters significantly reduces their accuracy.

  19. Borehole strainmeter measurements spanning the 2014, Mw6.0 South Napa Earthquake, California: The effect from instrument calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John O.

    2015-01-01

    The 24 August 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa, California earthquake produced significant offsets on 12 borehole strainmeters in the San Francisco Bay area. These strainmeters are located between 24 and 80 km from the source and the observed offsets ranged up to 400 parts-per-billion (ppb), which exceeds their nominal precision by a factor of 100. However, the observed offsets of tidally calibrated strains differ by up to 130 ppb from predictions based on a moment tensor derived from seismic data. The large misfit can be attributed to a combination of poor instrument calibration and better modeling of the strain fit from the earthquake. Borehole strainmeters require in-situ calibration, which historically has been accomplished by comparing their measurements of Earth tides with the strain-tides predicted by a model. Although the borehole strainmeter accurately measure the deformation within the borehole, the long-wavelength strain signals from tides or other tectonic processes recorded in the borehole are modified by the presence of the borehole and the elastic properties of the grout and the instrument. Previous analyses of surface-mounted, strainmeter data and their relationship with the predicted tides suggest that tidal models could be in error by 30%. The poor fit of the borehole strainmeter data from this earthquake can be improved by simultaneously varying the components of the model tides up to 30% and making small adjustments to the point-source model of the earthquake, which reduces the RMS misfit from 130 ppb to 18 ppb. This suggests that relying on tidal models to calibrate borehole strainmeters significantly reduces their accuracy.

  20. IMPACT OF CHANDRA CALIBRATION UNCERTAINTIES ON GALAXY CLUSTER TEMPERATURES: APPLICATION TO THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Erik D.; Kawahara, Hajime; Suto, Yasushi; Kitayama, Tetsu; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin

    2010-09-20

    We perform a uniform, systematic X-ray spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 38 galaxy clusters with three different Chandra calibrations. The temperatures change systematically between calibrations. Cluster temperatures change on average by roughly {approx}6% for the smallest changes and roughly {approx}13% for the more extreme changes between calibrations. We explore the effects of the Chandra calibration on cluster spectral properties and the implications on Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray determinations of the Hubble constant. The Hubble parameter changes by +10% and -13% between the current calibration and two previous Chandra calibrations, indicating that changes in the cluster temperature basically explain the entire change in H{sub 0}. Although this work focuses on the difference in spectral properties and resultant Hubble parameters between the calibrations, it is intriguing to note that the newer calibrations favor a lower value of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0} {approx} 60 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, typical of results from SZE/X-ray distances. Both galaxy clusters themselves and the details of the instruments must be known precisely to enable reliable precision cosmology with clusters, which will be feasible with combined efforts from ongoing observations and planned missions and observatories covering a wide range of wavelengths.

  1. The slant path atmospheric refraction calibrator - An instrument to measure the microwave propagation delays induced by atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Bender, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    The water vapor-induced propagation delay experienced by a radio signal traversing the atmosphere is characterized by the Slant Path Atmospheric Refraction Calibrator (SPARC), which measures the difference in the travel times between an optical and a microwave signal propagating along the same atmospheric path with an accuracy of 15 picosec or better. Attention is given to the theoretical and experimental issues involved in measuring the delay induced by water vapor; SPARC measurements conducted along a 13.35-km ground-based path are presented, illustrating the instrument's stability, precision, and accuracy.

  2. Kinematic analyses of instrumentation cubes in vehicle impact experiments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaeho; Untaroiu, Costin D; Kerrigan, Jason R; Forman, Jason L; Crandall, Jeff R

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematics of body targets are frequently tracked during vehicle impact tests using instrumented cubes. While the components of linear acceleration and angular velocity are recorded in a cube local coordinate system, transformation to a global coordinate system is required to reconstruct the whole body motions. This paper presents a methodology for local-to-global kinematic transformations using a finite element cube model mounted on heads with local measurements. This methodology was used to reconstruct the head kinematics during occupant and pedestrian impact tests and shown to produce similar displacement, velocity, and acceleration results to those obtained by the Euler parameter method. In addition, the possible measurement errors of the local frame orientation were simulated and the proportional displacements and velocities were observed in simulation outputs: the maximum differences are 6.5 % of a global displacement and 9.1 % of a global velocity at applying a 10 degree rotated measurement error in the initial local frame. PMID:19141896

  3. Instrument development and field application of the in situ pH Calibrator at the Ocean Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    A novel, self-calibrating instrument for in-situ measurement of pH in deep sea environments up to 4000 m has recently been developed. The device utilizes a compact fluid delivery system to perform measurement and two-point calibration of the solid state pH sensor array (Ir|IrOx| Ag|AgCl), which is sealed in a flow cell to enhance response time. The fluid delivery system is composed of a metering pump and valves, which periodically deliver seawater samples into the flow cell to perform measurements. Similarly, pH buffer solutions can be delivered into the flow cell to calibrate the electrodes under operational conditions. Sensor signals are acquired and processed by a high resolution (0.25 mV) datalogger circuit with a size of 114 mm×31 mm×25 mm. Eight input channels are available: two high impedance sensor input channels, two low impedance sensor input channel, two thermocouple input channels and two thermistor input channels. These eight channels provide adequate measurement flexibility to enhance applications in deep sea environments. The two high impedance channels of the datalogger are especially designed with the input impedance of 1016 Ω for YSZ (yittria-stabilized zirconia) ceramic electrodes characterized by the extremely low input bias current and high resistance. Field tests have been performed in 2008 by ROV at the depth up to 3200 m. Using the continuous power supply and TCP/IP network capability of the Monterey Accelerated Research System (MARS) ocean observatory, the so-called "pH Calibrator" has the capability of long term operation up to six months. In the observatory mode, the electronics are configured with DC-DC power converter modules and Ethernet to serial module to gain access to the science port of seafloor junction box. The pH Calibrator will be deployed at the ocean observatory in October and the in situ data will be on line on the internet. The pH Calibrator presents real time pH data at high pressures and variable temperatures, while

  4. Precise astronomical flux calibration and its impact on studying the nature of the dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Christopher W.; Brown, Yorke J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the luminosity of Type Ia supernovae versus redshift provided the original evidence for the accelerating expansion of the Universe and the existence of dark energy. Despite substantial improvements in survey methodology, systematic uncertainty in flux calibration dominates the error budget for this technique, exceeding both statistics and other systematic uncertainties. Consequently, any further collection of Type Ia supernova data will fail to refine the constraints on the nature of dark energy unless we also improve the state of the art in astronomical flux calibration to the order of 1%. We describe how these systematic errors arise from calibration of instrumental sensitivity, atmospheric transmission and Galactic extinction, and discuss ongoing efforts to meet the 1% precision challenge using white dwarf stars as celestial standards, exquisitely calibrated detectors as fundamental metrologic standards, and real-time atmospheric monitoring.

  5. Guide for establishing and maintaining a calibration-constancy intercomparison system for microwave-oven-compliance survey instruments (revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Public Law 90-602, the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968 (the Act), directs the Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate production-testing and quality-control programs carried out by the industry to assure adequacy of safeguards against hazardous electronic-product radiation and to assure that the products comply with performance standards. Under the Act, manufacturers of microwave ovens, a product listed under 21 CFR 1002.61, are required to certify that their microwave ovens are in compliance with all of the applicable provisions of the Federal Performance Standard for Microwave Ovens, 21 CFR 1030.10. In order to comply with microwave-emission-level provisions of the performance standard, manufacturers must use properly calibrated microwave-leakage measurement instruments in their production and quality control testing programs. This document was prepared in order to assist the microwave oven manufacturers in establishing and maintaining a calibration-constancy intercomparison system for compliance survey instruments and replaces guidance previously issued by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (the Center).

  6. In-flight calibration of the spin axis offset of a fluxgate magnetometer with an electron drift instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinweber, H. K.; Russell, C. T.; Torkar, K.

    2012-10-01

    We show that the spin axis offset of a fluxgate magnetometer can be calibrated with an electron drift instrument (EDI) and that the required input time interval is relatively short. For missions such as Cluster or the upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission the spin axis offset of a fluxgate magnetometer could be determined on an orbital basis. An improvement of existing methods for finding spin axis offsets via comparison of accurate measurements of the field magnitude is presented, that additionally matches the gains of the two instruments that are being compared. The technique has been applied to EDI data from the Cluster Active Archive and fluxgate magnetometer data processed with calibration files also from the Cluster Active Archive. The method could prove to be valuable for the MMS mission because the four MMS spacecraft will only be inside the interplanetary field (where spin axis offsets can be calculated from Alfvénic fluctuations) for short periods of time and during unusual solar wind conditions.

  7. A Repeated Impact Method and Instrument to Evaluate the Impact Fatigue Property of Drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Qiang; Sun, Yongxing; Zhu, Hongjun; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Juan; Shi, Taihe

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that drillpipe failures are a pendent problem in drilling engineering. Most of drillpipe failures are low amplitude-repeated impact fatigue failures. The traditional method is using Charpy impact test to describe the fracture property of drillpipe, but it cannot veritably characterize the impact fatigue property of drillpipe under low amplitude-repeated impact. Based on the Charpy impact and other methods, a repeated impact method and instrument have been proposed to simulate the low amplitude-repeated impact of downhole conditions for drillpipe. Then, a series of tests have been performed using this instrument. Test results demonstrate the drillpipe upset transition area nonhomogeneity is more severe than drillpipe body, which is the key factor that leads to washout and fracture frequently of it. As the one time impact energy increases, the repeated impact times decrease exponentially, therefore, the rotational speed has a great effect on the fatigue life of drillpipe, and it is vital to select a suitable rotational speed for drilling jobs. In addition, based on SEM fractographs we found that the fracture surface of repeated impact is similar to the fatigue fracture, and there are many low cycle fatigue characteristic features on fracture surface that reveal very good agreement with the features of drillpipe fatigue failures in the field.

  8. Calibrating the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for carbonate minerals on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Nina L.; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Humphries, Seth D.; Newsom, Horton E.; Barefield, James E.

    2010-05-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite onboard the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover includes the first laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment to better understand the LIBS signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between different types of carbonate materials on Mars.

  9. The Fermi Large Area Telescope on Orbit: Event Classification, Instrument Response Functions, and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Celik, Q.; Cobet, R.; Davis, D. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy -ray telescope, covering the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. During the first years of the mission the LAT team has gained considerable insight into the in-flight performance of the instrument. Accordingly, we have updated the analysis used to reduce LAT data for public release as well as the Instrument Response Functions (IRFs), the description of the instrument performance provided for data analysis. In this paper we describe the effects that motivated these updates. Furthermore, we discuss how we originally derived IRFs from Monte Carlo simulations and later corrected those IRFs for discrepancies observed between flight and simulated data. We also give details of the validations performed using flight data and quantify the residual uncertainties in the IRFs. Finally, we describe techniques the LAT team has developed to propagate those uncertainties into estimates of the systematic errors on common measurements such as fluxes and spectra of astrophysical sources.

  10. Nanobeacon: A low cost time calibration instrument for the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, David [IFIC. Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each one a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main goal of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. Due to the high volume to be covered by KM3NeT, a cost reduction of the different systems is a priority. To this end a very low price calibration device, the so called Nanobeacon, has been designed and developed. At present one of such devices has already been integrated successfully at the KM3NeT telescope and eight of them in the Nemo Tower Phase II. In this article the main properties and operation of this device are described.

  11. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  12. Calibration of the instrumental polarization of the Domeless Solar Telescope at the Hida Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Junko; Ueno, Satoru; Kitai, Reizaburo; Kurokawa, Hiroki; Makita, Mitsugu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2004-09-01

    A new spectropolarimeter is developed at the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) in Hida Observatory. It consists of a rotating waveplate, Wollaston prisms, and a high-dispersion spectrograph which is vertically installed at the focus of the DST. In order to realize a high-precision measurement, it is inevitable to compensate the instrumental polarization due to the DST. We observed the quiet region of the Sun, which is considered to be highly unpolarized, with and without a sheet linear polarizer or circular polarizer set at the entrance window of the telescope. The theoretical model which represents the total instrumental polarization of the DST with some characteristic parameters was calculated and compared with the observation. The model that two flat mirrors have different properties can explain the observation in 0.5% accuracy for the unpolarized light, and in 7% for the polarized light.

  13. Development of a Pattern Recognition Methodology for Determining Operationally Optimal Heat Balance Instrumentation Calibration Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Beran; John Christenson; Dragos Nica; Kenny Gross

    2002-12-15

    The goal of the project is to enable plant operators to detect with high sensitivity and reliability the onset of decalibration drifts in all of the instrumentation used as input to the reactor heat balance calculations. To achieve this objective, the collaborators developed and implemented at DBNPS an extension of the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) pattern recognition methodology pioneered by ANAL. The extension was implemented during the second phase of the project and fully achieved the project goal.

  14. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Corwin, W.R.; Owings, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 {times} 5.0 {times} 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 {times} 3.33 {times} 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at {minus}40{degrees}C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  15. Shielding calculations and verifications for the new Radiation Instrument Calibration Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    George, G. L.; Olsher, R. H.; Seagraves, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    MCNP-4C1 was used to perform the shielding design for the new Central Health Physics Calibration Facility (CHPCF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The problem of shielding the facility was subdivided into three separate components: (1) Transmission; (2) Skyshine; and (3) Maze Streaming/ Transmission. When possible, actual measurements were taken to verify calculation results. The comparison of calculation versus measurement results shows excellent agreement for neutron calculations. For photon comparisons, calculations resulted in conservative estimates of the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) compared to measured results. This disagreement in the photon measurements versus calculations is most likely due to several conservative assumptions regarding shield density and composition. For example, reinforcing steel bars (Rebar) in the concrete shield walls were not included in the shield model.

  16. Calibration of a Hydrologic Model Considering Input Uncertainty in Assessing Climate Change Impact on Streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolisetti, T.; Datta, A. R.; Balachandar, R.

    2009-05-01

    Studies on impact assessment and the corresponding uncertainties in hydrologic regime predictions is of paramount in developing water resources management plans under climate change scenarios,. The variability in hydrologic model parameters is one of the major sources of uncertainties associated with climate change impact on streamflow. Uncertainty in hydrologic model parameters may arise from the choice of model calibration technique, model calibration period, model structure and response variables. The recent studies show that consideration of uncertainties in input variables (precipitation, evapotranspiration etc.) during calibration of a hydrologic model has resulted in decrease in prediction uncertainty. The present study has examined the significance of input uncertainty in hydrologic model calibration for climate change impact studies. A physically distributed hydrologic model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), is calibrated considering uncertainties in (i) model parameters only, and (ii) both model parameters and precipitation input. The Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to estimate the posterior probability density function of hydrologic model parameters. The observed daily precipitation and streamflow data of the Canard River watershed of Essex region, Ontario, Canada are used as input and output variables, respectively, during calibration. The parameter sets of the 100 most skillful hydrologic model simulations obtained from each calibration technique are used for predicting streamflow by 2070s under climate change conditions. In each run, the climate predictions of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) for SRES scenario A2 are used as input to the hydrologic model for streamflow prediction. The paper presents the results of uncertainty in seasonal and annual streamflow prediction. The outcome of the study is expected to contribute to the assessment of uncertainty in climate change impact studies and better management of available

  17. Regression calibration with instrumental variables for longitudinal models with interaction terms, and application to air pollution studies

    PubMed Central

    Strand, M; Sillau, S; Grunwald, G K; Rabinovitch, N

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we derive forms of estimators and associated variances for regression calibration with instrumental variables in longitudinal models that include interaction terms between two unobservable predictors and interactions between these predictors and covariates not measured with error; the inclusion of the latter interactions generalize results we previously reported. The methods are applied to air pollution and health data collected on children with asthma. The new methods allow for the examination of how the relationship between health outcome leukotriene E4 (LTE4, a biomarker of inflammation) and two unobservable pollutant exposures and their interaction are modified by the presence or absence of upper respiratory infections. The pollutant variables include secondhand smoke and ambient (outdoor) fine particulate matter. Simulations verify the accuracy of the proposed methods under various conditions. PMID:26640396

  18. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhifeng; Yang, ShaoChen; Xu, Wenjing

    2016-06-01

    Visibility is one of the most important parameters for meteorological observation and numerical weather prediction (NWP).It is also an important factor in everyday life, mainly for surface and air traffic especially in the Aeronautical Meteorology. The visibility decides the taking off and landing of aircraft. If the airport visibility is lower than requirement for aircraft taking off stipulated by International Civil Aviation Administration, then the aircraft must be parked at the airport. So the accurate measurement of visibility is very important. Nowadays, many devices can be measured the visibility or meteorological optical range (MOR) such as Scatterometers, Transmissometers and visibility lidar. But there is not effective way to verify the accuracy of these devices expect the artificial visual method. We have developed a visibility testing system that can be calibration and verification these devices. The system consists of laser transmitter, optical chopper, phase-locking amplifier, the moving optic receiving system, signal detection and data acquisition system, atmospheric aerosol simulation chamber. All of them were placed in the atmosphere aerosol simulation chamber with uniform aerosol concentration. The Continuous wave laser, wavelength 550nm, has been transmitted into the collimation system then the laser beam expanded into 40mm diameter for compressing the laser divergence angle before modulated by optical chopper. The expanding beam transmitting in the atmosphere aerosol cabin received by the optic receiving system moving in the 50m length precision guide with 100mm optical aperture. The data of laser signal has been acquired by phase-locking amplifier every 5 meter range. So the 10 data points can be detected in the 50 meters guide once. The slope of the fitting curve can be obtained by linear fitting these data using the least square method. The laser extinction coefficient was calculated from the slope using the Koschmieder formula, then it been

  19. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) imaging spectrometer for lunar science: Instrument description, calibration, on-orbit measurements, science data calibration and on-orbit validation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, R.O.; Pieters, C.; Mouroulis, P.; Eastwood, M.; Boardman, J.; Glavich, T.; Isaacson, P.; Annadurai, M.; Besse, S.; Barr, D.; Buratti, B.; Cate, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Clark, R.; Cheek, L.; Combe, J.; Dhingra, D.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Goswami, J.N.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Head, J.; Hovland, L.; Hyman, S.; Klima, R.; Koch, T.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, A.S.K.; Lee, Kenneth; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T.; McLaughlin, S.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Rodriquez, J.; Runyon, C.; Sellar, G.; Smith, C.; Sobel, H.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.; Thaisen, K.; Tompkins, S.; Tseng, H.; Vane, G.; Varanasi, P.; White, M.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Discovery Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was selected to pursue a wide range of science objectives requiring measurement of composition at fine spatial scales over the full lunar surface. To pursue these objectives, a broad spectral range imaging spectrometer with high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio capable of measuring compositionally diagnostic spectral absorption features from a wide variety of known and possible lunar materials was required. For this purpose the Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was designed and developed that measures the spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm with 10 nm spectral sampling through a 24 degree field of view with 0.7 milliradian spatial sampling. The instrument has a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 400 for the specified equatorial reference radiance and greater than 100 for the polar reference radiance. The spectral cross-track uniformity is >90% and spectral instantaneous field-of-view uniformity is >90%. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was launched on Chandrayaan-1 on the 22nd of October. On the 18th of November 2008 the Moon Mineralogy Mapper was turned on and collected a first light data set within 24 h. During this early checkout period and throughout the mission the spacecraft thermal environment and orbital parameters varied more than expected and placed operational and data quality constraints on the measurements. On the 29th of August 2009, spacecraft communication was lost. Over the course of the flight mission 1542 downlinked data sets were acquired that provide coverage of more than 95% of the lunar surface. An end-to-end science data calibration system was developed and all measurements have been passed through this system and delivered to the Planetary Data System (PDS.NASA.GOV). An extensive effort has been undertaken by the science team to validate the Moon Mineralogy Mapper science measurements in the context of the mission objectives. A focused spectral, radiometric

  20. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M. Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  1. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  2. JPSS-1 VIIRS DNB nonlinearity and its impact on SDR calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shihyan; Wang, Wenhui; Cao, Changyong

    2015-09-01

    During JPSS-1 VIIRS testing at Raytheon El Segundo, a larger than expected radiometric response nonlinearity was discovered in Day-Nigh Band (DNB). In addition, the DNB nonlinearity is aggregation mode dependent, where the most severe non-linear behavior are the aggregation modes used at high scan angles (<~50 degree). The DNB aggregation strategy was subsequently modified to remove modes with the most significant non-linearity. We characterized the DNB radiometric response using pre-launch tests with the modified aggregation strategy. The test data show the DNB non-linearity varies at each gain stages, detectors and aggregation modes. The non-linearity is most significant in the Low Gain Stage (LGS) and could vary from sample-to-sample. The non-linearity is also more significant in EV than in calibration view samples. The HGS nonlinearity is difficult to quantify due to the higher uncertainty in determining source radiance. Since the radiometric response non-linearity is most significant at low dn ranges, it presents challenge in DNB cross-stage calibration, an critical path to calibration DNB's High Gain Stage (HGS) for nighttime imagery. Based on the radiometric characterization, we estimated the DNB on-orbit calibration accuracy and compared the expected DNB calibration accuracy using operational calibration approaches. The analysis showed the non-linearity will result in cross-stage gain ratio bias, and have the most significant impact on HGS. The HGS calibration accuracy can be improved when either SD data or only the more linearly behaved EV pixels are used in cross-stage calibration. Due to constrain in test data, we were not able to achieve a satisfactory accuracy and uniformity for the JPSS-1 DNB nighttime imagery quality. The JPSS-1 DNB nonlinearity is a challenging calibration issue which will likely require special attention after JPSS-1 launch.

  3. Daily calibration of seasonal forecasts to derive impact-relevant climate indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhend, Jonas; Spirig, Christoph; Mahlstein, Irina; Liniger, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Climate information indices (CIIs) are impact-relevant quantities derived from basic meteorological variables such as rainfall or temperature. The computation of CIIs often involves absolute thresholds such as for the number of frost days per seasons or seasonal degree days. The dependence on absolute thresholds poses challenges in a forecasting context where such indices have to be derived from daily time series of forecasting systems with sometimes considerable systematic, time and location dependent biases. In order to reduce the effect of such biases on the skill of CII forecasts, the daily time series need to be calibrated before computing the CIIs. Here we analyze the performance and the effect of several bias correction and calibration methods on the skill of seasonal CII forecasts derived from the calibrated daily series. We use seasonal forecasts from the European Centre of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts' (ECMWF) System 4 for the period 1981-2012, with a focus on the winter season. The forecasts are verified against CIIs derived from the ERA-INTERIM reanalysis. We find that bias correction and calibration approaches have a positive effect on the skill of CII forecasts. For CIIs involving a moderate non-linearity (e.g. seasonal heating degree days), all correction and calibration methods result in similar skill. For CIIs with pronounced threshold dependency (e.g. seasonal frost days), skill is more sensitive to the choice of calibration method. However, the analyzed daily correction and calibration methods do not achieve to produce reliable forecasts of seasonally aggregated CIIs. Hence, an additional re-calibration of the CII forecasts is necessary to get well calibrated CII forecasts.

  4. Obtaining the Transfer Function of optical instruments using large calibrated reference objects.

    PubMed

    Henning, A J; Huntley, J M; Giusca, C L

    2015-06-29

    It has been suggested recently that the Transfer Function of instruments such as Coherence Scanning Interferometers could be measured via a single measurement of a large spherical artefact [Appl. Opt.53(8), 1554-1563 (2014)]. In the current paper we present analytical solutions for the Fourier transform of the 'foil' model used in this technique, which thus avoids the artefacts resulting from the numerical approach used earlier. The Fourier transform of a partial spherical shell is found to contain points of zero amplitude for spatial frequencies that lie within the Transfer Function. This implies that the Transfer Function is unmeasurable at these points when a single spherical artefact is used, in situations where the foil model is a valid representation of the physical system. We propose extensions to the method to address this issue. PMID:26191674

  5. Instrument calibration and aerosol optical depth validation of the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Huizheng; Zhang, Xiaoye; Chen, Hongbin; Damiri, Bahaiddin; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yao; Zhou, Huaigang; Dong, Fan; Li, Deping; Zhou, Tianming

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduced the calibration of the CE-318 sunphotometer of the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the validation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) by AOD module of ASTPWin software compared with the simultaneous measurements of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)/Photométrie pour le Traitement Opérationnel de Normalization Satellitaire (PHOTONS) and PREDE skyradiometer. The results show that the CARSNET AOD measurements have the same accuracy as the AERONET/PHOTONS. On the basis of a comparison between CARSNET and AERONET, the AODs from CARSNET at 1020, 870, 670, and 440 nm are about 0.03, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.01 larger than those from AERONET, respectively. The aerosol optical properties over Beijing acquired through the CE-318 sunphotometers of one AERONET/PHOTONS site and two CARSNET sites were analyzed on the basis of 4-year measurements. It was obvious that the AOD of the Shangdianzi site (rural site) was lower than that of the two urban sites (the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) site (north urban site) and the Beijing Meteorological Observatory (BJO) site (south urban site)). The AOD of BJO was about 0.05, 0.04, 0.05, and 0.06 larger than that of IAP at 1020, 870, 670, and 440 nm, respectively, indicating that there is more local pollution in the south part of Beijing. The highest AOD was found in summer because of the stagnation planetary boundary layer and transport of pollutants from large pollution centers south of Beijing. The high temperature and relative humidity in summer also favor the production of aerosol precursor and the hygroscopic growth of the existing particles locally, which results in high AOD. In contrast, the lowest AOD at the two urban sites and one rural site in Beijing occurred in winter as the frequent cold air masses help pollutants diffuse easily.

  6. Controlled Impact Demonstration instrumented test dummies installed in plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In this photograph are seen some of dummies in the passenger cabin of the B-720 aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center instrumented a large portion of the aircraft and the dummies for loads in a crashworthiness research program. In 1984 NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and the Federal Aviation Adimistration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID). The test involved crashing a Boeing 720 aircraft with four JT3C-7 engines burning a mixture of standard fuel with an additive called Anti-misting Kerosene (AMK) designed to supress fire. In a typical aircraft crash, fuel spilled from ruptured fuel tanks forms a fine mist that can be ignited by a number of sources at the crash site. In 1984 the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994 a full-fledged Center again) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), to test crash a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with an additive designed to supress fire. The additive, FM-9, a high-molecular-weight long-chain polymer, when blended with Jet-A fuel had demonstrated the capability to inhibit ignition and flame propagation of the released fuel in simulated crash tests. This anti-misting kerosene (AMK) cannot be introduced directly into a gas turbine engine due to several possible problems such as clogging of filters. The AMK must be restored to almost Jet-A before being introduced into the engine for burning. This restoration is called 'degradation' and was accomplished on the B-720 using a device called a 'degrader.' Each of the four Pratt & Whitney JT3C-7 engines had a 'degrader' built and installed by General Electric (GE) to break down and return the AMK to near Jet-A quality. In addition to the AMK research the NASA Langley Research Center was involved in a structural loads measurement experiment, which included having instrumented dummies filling the seats in the

  7. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  8. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  9. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  10. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  11. Interinstrument calibration using magnetic field data from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin-axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ∼ 0.6 nT was observed for Cluster 1 between July and October 2003. Using multipoint multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  12. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  13. Hydrological processes and model representation: Impact of soft data on calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrologic and water quality models are increasingly used to determine the environmental impacts of climate variability and land management. Due to differing model objectives and differences in monitored data, there are currently no universally accepted procedures for calibration and validation in ...

  14. The Calibration and Characterization of Earth Remote Sensing and Environmental Monitoring Instruments. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Johnson, B. Carol; Barnes, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The use of remote sensing instruments on orbiting satellite platforms in the study of Earth Science and environmental monitoring was officially inaugurated with the April 1, 1960 launch of the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) [1]. The first TIROS accommodated two television cameras and operated for only 78 days. However, the TIROS program, in providing in excess of 22,000 pictures of the Earth, achieved its primary goal of providing Earth images from a satellite platform to aid in identifying and monitoring meteorological processes. This marked the beginning of what is now over four decades of Earth observations from satellite platforms. reflected and emitted radiation from the Earth using instruments on satellite platforms. These measurements are input to climate models, and the model results are analyzed in an effort to detect short and long-term changes and trends in the Earth's climate and environment, to identify the cause of those changes, and to predict or influence future changes. Examples of short-term climate change events include the periodic appearance of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropical Pacific Ocean [2] and the spectacular eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the Philippine island of Luzon in 1991. Examples of long term climate change events, which are more subtle to detect, include the destruction of coral reefs, the disappearance of glaciers, and global warming. Climatic variability can be both large and small scale and can be caused by natural or anthropogenic processes. The periodic El Nino event is an example of a natural process which induces significant climatic variability over a wide range of the Earth. A classic example of a large scale anthropogenic influence on climate is the well-documented rapid increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide occurring since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution [3]. An example of the study of a small-scale anthropogenic influence in climate variability is the Atlanta Land

  15. Calibration and Validation of Images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Color Imager (MARCI) and Context Camera (CTX) Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek; Bell, J. F., III; Malin, M.; Caplinger, M.; Calvin, W. M.; Cantor, B.; Clancy, R. T.; Haberle, R. M.; James, P. B.; Lee, S.; Thomas, P.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-09-01

    The MRO CTX instrument is a monochrome (611±189; nm), linear array CCD pushbroom camera with a nominal surface resolution of 6 m/pixel. The MARCI instrument is a 2-D CCD framing camera with 5 visible (420, 550, 600, 650, and 720 nm) and 2 UV (260 and 320 nm) filters, a 180° field of view, and a nominal resolution of about 1 km/pixel at nadir. Following Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI) in March 2006, CTX and MARCI images were acquired for initial instrument checkouts and validation of the pre-flight and in-flight calibration pipeline. CTX in-flight bias and dark current levels are derived from masked pixels at the edges of the array. A dark current model derived during pre-flight calibration is applied if the masked pixels exhibit a gradient across the field or noise above an acceptable threshold. The CTX flatfield removes residual pixel non-uniformities and a subtle ''jail bar'' effect caused by the CCD's alternating register readout. Radiances are derived from bias, dark, and flat-corrected images using pre-flight scaling factors. Dividing the average radiances by the solar spectral radiance convolved over the CTX filter transmission and applying a Minnaert phase angle correction yields an average I/F level in the CTX post-MOI Mars images near an expected value of 0.2. Bias and dark current subtraction of the MARCI images uses either a pre-flight model or dark sky data from the far left or far right parts of the field (nominally off the Mars limb). The preflight flatfield data were modified based on in-flight performance to remove residual non-pixel uniformities. Some residual pixel-dependent bias nonuniformities were also corrected using in-flight data. Bias, dark, and flat-corrected images were converted to radiance using pre-flight scaling factors. Phase-corrected 7-filter I/F values for the region of Mars imaged during the post-MOI campaign are consistent with previous data.

  16. Explosive reaction of cased charges generated by impacts of. 30 calibre bullets

    SciTech Connect

    Honodel, C A

    1981-07-22

    Several high explosive formulations have recently been compared in a series of impact tests where samples of each composition were encased in a test fixture designed in flat geometry mocking an HE loaded artillery projectile. The purpose of the ongoing test series is to determine the relative rate of chemical energy release or explosiveness of several standard and research insensitive high explosive (IHE) main charge compositions. The triggering stimulus is the impact of .30 calibre ball bullets fired at normal muzzle velocity.

  17. Evaluating the Impacts of Unexpected Forest Disturbances on Paired Catchment Calibrations of Sediment Yield and Turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlein, K.; Silins, U.; Williams, C.; Wagner, M. J.; Martens, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The paired catchment approach of studying the impacts of disturbance on catchment hydrology remains as perhaps the most powerful approach for direct verification of catchment scale impacts from disturbance. However, paired catchment studies are also dependent on the stability of the relationships between treated and reference catchments during calibration and evaluation periods. A long-term paired catchment study of forest harvest impacts on sediment yield and turbidity in the Rocky Mountains of southwestern Alberta, Canada has a robust 11-year pre-treatment data record. The study intends to evaluate three alternative logging practices: clear-cutting, strip-shelterwood, and partial cutting. 3 sub-catchments in Star Creek (1035 ha) underwent harvest treatments while North York Creek (865 Ha) serves as the reference. The objective of this particular study was to explore the potential effects of unplanned and unanticipated watershed changes in two watersheds during an 11-year calibration. Sediment yield (kg ha-1 d-1) and turbidity (NTU) were monitored throughout the calibration period (2004-2014) prior to the 2015 harvest in Star Creek. Two unanticipated disturbances including backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (2010) followed by a >100 year storm event in both watersheds in June 2013 may have affected the sediment yield and turbidity calibration relationships. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to evaluate the effects of this trail rehabilitation and flooding by comparing the calibration relationships before and after these disturbances. Despite qualitative field observations of periodically affected sediment regimes, no impact on pre- or post- calibration relationships was observed. Backcountry trail rehabilitation in North York (p=0.904 and 0.416 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) or flooding in both watersheds (p=0.364 and 0.204 for sediment yield and turbidity, respectively) did not produce significant changes to the calibrations

  18. Mass spectra of organic and inorganic dust particles measured by an impact ionization mass analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, J. G.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Kempf, S.; Armes, S. P.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Westphal, A.

    2009-12-01

    The composition of individual cosmic dust particles can be measured in-situ using existing techniques and instrumentations. The dust particle impacting on a solid surface with hypervelocity (> 1 km/s) is vaporized and partially ionized. The generated ions are extracted and analyzed using time-of-flight methods. Laboratory calibration measurements are possible at the dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg, Germany. The accelerator is limited to using conductive dust that was limited in the past to Fe, Al or graphite samples. In the recent years, however, dust samples of organic materials and inorganic minerals of cosmic interest were developed that are suitable for application in the accelerator. This is achieved by coating micron and submicron sized dust particles by conductive polymers. Here we present the comparison of spectra measured using organic and inorganic dust samples (polystyrene, poly-[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulphide], Phyrotite). The particles were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km/s. Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 Daltons. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds.

  19. Laboratory Instrumentation: An Exploration of the Impact of Instrumentation on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Don L.; Brown, Eric C.; Shadle, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs generally work to make their laboratory curriculum both as instrumentation rich and up to date as possible. However, little is known about the relationship between the use of instrumentation in the curriculum and student learning. As part of our department's ongoing assessment efforts, a project was designed to probe this…

  20. First calibration results and antenna placement studies of the RPW ANT instrument on Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, M.; Oswald, T. H.; Rucker, H. O.; Plettemeier, D.; Maksimovic, M.; Macher, W.

    2010-12-01

    We report our analyses of the Radio and Plasma Wave Analyzer (RPW ANT) onboard the Solar Orbiter spacecraft with a focus on the high-frequency electric antennas. The aim of the Solar Orbiter mission is to determine in-situ properties and dynamics of solarwind plasma, electric and magnetic fields in the near-Sun heliosphere. The mission is planned to be launched in 2017 with a spacecraft trajectory of, for the first time, partial co-rotation with the Sun, providing a full suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments from as close as 0.25 AU. The RPW ANT high-frequency electric sensors, consist of three cylindrical antennas mounted on appendant booms extruded from the central body of the spacecraft. Due to the parasitic effects of the conducting spacecraft body and solar panels the true antenna properties (effective axes and length; capacitances) do not coincide with their physical representations. In order to analyze the antenna system we applied a numerical method. The current distribution on the spacecraft body and the effective length vector was calculated, by solving the underlying field equations using electromagnetic codes. In the applied method the spacecraft is modelled as a patch-grid. The numerical analysis of the reception properties, including several placement options of these antennas, is presented. Since the Solar Orbiter spacecraft body and antennas are not yet finally specified, the results can be used to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensors. In particular, goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis, direction finding and ray tracing depend crucially on the effective axes and the therefore the corresponding data analysis significantly improves. Software model (patch-grid) of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft

  1. Impacts of Hydraulic Variables on Groundwater Model Calibration for Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesebrough, E. G.; Gorokhovich, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest source of readily available freshwater on our planet. Aquifers are vulnerable to climate change and require new groundwater management plans to account for changing precipitation patterns and sea level rise, among other factors. Building a three dimensional groundwater model as framework for evaluating these changes is fundamental. Ultimately this model will be coupled with the output from several Global Circulation Models and used as a predictive model to determine the impact of climate change on Long Island, New York. This research looks at the process of modeling the physical elements of the groundwater hydrology of Long Island, New York. The model accounts for the unconfined and confined aquifers, as well as the confining zones. Calibration of the model includes visual comparisons with HA-709, a groundwater model built by the USGS in 1989, to illustrate similarities in the model foundation. The model is then calibrated by calculating the root mean square error between historic USGS groundwater data to the models simulated groundwater heads. Looking at how changes in the model impact the calibration process provides insight into model accuracy and modelers' choices. In this research we show how various combinations of model cell sizes, horizontal hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and drains impact model calibration, and ultimately the model that will be used during the research process.

  2. The Use of Transfer Radiometers in Validating the Visible through Shortwave Infrared Calibrations of Radiance Sources Used by Instruments in NASA's Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Barnes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The detection and study of climate change over a time frame of decades requires successive generations of satellite, airborne, and ground-based instrumentation carefully calibrated against a common radiance scale. In NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) program, the pre-launch radiometric calibration of these instruments in the wavelength region from 400 nm to 2500 nm is accomplished using internally illuminated integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance panels illuminated by irradiance standard lamps. Since 1995, the EOS Calibration Program operating within the EOS Project Science Office (PSO) has enlisted the expertise of national standards laboratories and government and university metrology laboratories in an effort to validate the radiance scales assigned to sphere and panel radiance sources by EOS instrument calibration facilities. This state-of-the-art program has been accomplished using ultra-stable transfer radiometers independently calibrated by the above participating institutions. In ten comparisons since February 1995, the agreement between the radiance measurements of the transfer radiometers is plus or minus 1.80% at 411 nm, plus or minus 1.31% at 552.5 nm, plus or minus 1.32% at 868.0 nm, plus or minus 2.54% at 1622nm, and plus or minus 2.81% at 2200nm (sigma =1).

  3. INSTRUMENTAL and OPERATIONAL IMPACTS on SPECTROPHOTOMETER COLOR MEASUREMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color measurements for the classing of U.S. cottons have been performed on the Uster® High Volume Instrumentation (HVI) instrument for several years. Two color parameters specific to cotton—Rd (reflectance) and +b (yellowness)—are used to express the color of cotton. Since Rd and +b do not readily...

  4. Field observations of particle impacts by debris flows and debris floods on instrumented rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdell, B. W.; Hsu, L.; Fritschi, B.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Bedrock incision and sediment entrainment by debris flows are important processes in torrent channels. As part of our effort to gain a better understanding of these processes, we installed instrumented rock samples in the bed of the Illgraben channel. Three rock samples, 0.4 m long (in the flow direction), 0.3 m wide, and 0.2 m thick, were installed in steel frames which were mounted on the upslope side of a concrete check dam, with the surface of the stones flush with the channel bed. Accelerometer sensors were installed on the bottom of one rock sample, with a range of up to 500 g (vertical) and 200 g (horizontal, parallel to the channel axis), where g is the acceleration due to gravity. Elastomer elements, typically used in the field as overload protection for load sensors, were placed between the rock samples and the steel frames. Data were sampled at 2 kHz and stored on a computer outside of the channel. The sensors provided data for 4 debris floods and part of one debris flow. For all of the events, the vertical acceleration data indicate a large background noise in the range of ±10 g, punctuated by very short duration impulses of up to several hundred g. The large accelerations are interpreted to represent hard impacts of cobbles or boulders in the flow with the rock tablet. Using a value of >20 g to define the occurrence of a large particle impact, it is possible to differentiate between debris floods (which have on the order of 0.1 impact per second) and the debris flow (on the order of 1 impact per second). The frequency of the sampling is too small to resolve details about the impacts, so it is not possible to precisely determine the maximum accelerations. However the peak recorded values are larger for debris flows, with values up to the measurement limit of the sensors, whereas for floods the maximum accelerations are typically less than 100 g. The results for the accelerometer which measures accelerations in the downstream direction generally mirror

  5. Estimating the Health Impact of Climate Change with Calibrated Climate Model Output

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingwen; Chang, Howard H.; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the health impacts of climate change routinely use climate model output as future exposure projection. Uncertainty quantification, usually in the form of sensitivity analysis, has focused predominantly on the variability arise from different emission scenarios or multi-model ensembles. This paper describes a Bayesian spatial quantile regression approach to calibrate climate model output for examining to the risks of future temperature on adverse health outcomes. Specifically, we first estimate the spatial quantile process for climate model output using nonlinear monotonic regression during a historical period. The quantile process is then calibrated using the quantile functions estimated from the observed monitoring data. Our model also down-scales the gridded climate model output to the point-level for projecting future exposure over a specific geographical region. The quantile regression approach is motivated by the need to better characterize the tails of future temperature distribution where the greatest health impacts are likely to occur. We applied the methodology to calibrate temperature projections from a regional climate model for the period 2041 to 2050. Accounting for calibration uncertainty, we calculated the number of of excess deaths attributed to future temperature for three cities in the US state of Alabama. PMID:24039385

  6. Impact of Smoke Exposure on Digital Instrumentation and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tina J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard T.; Antonescu, Christina E.

    2003-08-15

    Smoke can cause interruptions and upsets in active electronics. Because nuclear power plants are replacing analog with digital instrumentation and control systems, qualification guidelines for new systems are being reviewed for severe environments such as smoke and electromagnetic interference. Active digital systems, individual components, and active circuits have been exposed to smoke in a program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The circuits and systems were all monitored during the smoke exposure, indicating any immediate effects of the smoke. The results of previous smoke exposure studies have been reported in various publications. The major immediate effect of smoke has been to increase leakage currents and to cause momentary upsets and failures in digital systems. This paper presents new results from conformal coatings, memory chips, and hard drive tests.The best conformal coatings were found to be polyurethane, parylene, and acrylic (when applied by dipping). Conformal coatings can reduce smoke-induced leakage currents and protect against metal loss through corrosion. However conformal coatings are typically flammable, so they do increase material flammability. Some of the low-voltage biased memory chips failed during a combination of high smoke and high humidity. Typically, smoke along with heat and humidity is expected during fire, rather than smoke alone. Thus, due to high sensitivity of digital circuits to heat and humidity, it is hypothesized that the impact of smoke may be secondary.Low-voltage (3.3-V) static random-access memory (SRAMs) were found to be the most vulnerable to smoke. Higher bias voltages decrease the likelihood of failure. Erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROMs) and nonvolatile SRAMs were very smoke tolerant. Failures of the SRAMs occurred when two conditions were present: high density of smoke and high humidity. As the high humidity was present for only part of the test, the failures were intermittent. All

  7. RadBall™ Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site’s Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Harpring, Larry J.; Gordon, John R.; Blessing, Ronald; Coleman, J. Rusty; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall™, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall™ technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL). PMID:21617738

  8. High precision tilt stage as a key element to a universal test mirror for characterization and calibration of slope measuring instruments.

    PubMed

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Artemiev, Nikolay A; Centers, Gary; Chaubard, Arthur; Geckeler, Ralf D; Lacey, Ian; Marth, Harry; McKinney, Wayne R; Noll, Tino; Siewert, Frank; Winter, Mathias; Zeschke, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The ultimate performance of surface slope metrology instrumentation, such as long trace profilers and auto-collimator based deflectometers, is limited by systematic errors that are increased when the entire angular range is used for metrology of significantly curved optics. At the ALS X-Ray Optics Laboratory, in collaboration with the HZB/BESSY-II and PTB (Germany) metrology teams, we are working on a calibration method for deflectometers, based on a concept of a universal test mirror (UTM) [V. V. Yashchuk et al., Proc. SPIE 6704, 67040A (2007)]. Potentially, the UTM method provides high performance calibration and accounts for peculiarities of the optics under test (e.g., slope distribution) and the experimental arrangement (e.g., the distance between the sensor and the optic under test). At the same time, the UTM calibration method is inherently universal, applicable to a variety of optics and experimental arrangements. In this work, we present the results of tests with a key component of the UTM system, a custom high precision tilt stage, which has been recently developed in collaboration with Physik Instrumente, GmbH. The tests have demonstrated high performance of the stage and its capability (after additional calibration) to provide angular calibration of surface slope measuring profilers over the entire instrumental dynamic range with absolute accuracy better than 30 nrad. The details of the stage design and tests are presented. We also discuss the foundation of the UTM method and calibration algorithm, as well as the possible design of a full scale UTM system. PMID:27250376

  9. Impact of Land Model Calibration on Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Ken; Zhou, Shujia

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry and wet land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through calibration of the Noah land surface model using the new optimization and uncertainty estimation subsystem in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT/UE). The impact of the calibration on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) the simulated heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF simulations is then assessed. Changes in ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling are evaluated along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Results indicate that the offline calibration leads to systematic improvements in land-PBL fluxes and near-surface temperature and humidity, and in the process provide guidance on the questions of what, how, and when to calibrate land surface models for coupled model prediction.

  10. Impact of the calibration period on the conceptual rainfall-runoff model parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, Andrijana; Plavsic, Jasna

    2015-04-01

    . Correlation coefficients among optimised model parameters and total precipitation P, mean temperature T and mean flow Q are calculated to give an insight into parameter dependence on the hydrometeorological drivers. The results reveal high sensitivity of almost all model parameters towards calibration period. The highest variability is displayed by the refreezing coefficient, water holding capacity, and temperature gradient. The only statistically significant (decreasing) trend is detected in the evapotranspiration reduction threshold. Statistically significant correlation is detected between the precipitation gradient and precipitation depth, and between the time-area histogram base and flows. All other correlations are not statistically significant, implying that changes in optimised parameters cannot generally be linked to the changes in P, T or Q. As for the model performance, the model reproduces the observed runoff satisfactorily, though the runoff is slightly overestimated in wet periods. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE) ranges from 0.44 to 0.79. Higher NSE values are obtained over wetter periods, what is supported by statistically significant correlation between NSE and flows. Overall, no systematic variations in parameters or in model performance are detected. Parameter variability may therefore rather be attributed to errors in data or inadequacies in the model structure. Further research is required to examine the impact of the calibration strategy or model structure on the variability in optimised parameters in time.

  11. Calibration studies on mollusc shells in the Peru-Chile coastal region submitted to ENSO impacts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortlieb, L.; Guzman, N.; El Jouhari, L.; Carré, M.

    2003-04-01

    Mollusc shells have an exceptional potential for high resolution paleoclimatic records and, unlike corals, ice cores and even tree rings, have the advantage to be widely distributed along the world coastlines. For the reconstruction of seasonal or intra annual climate variability, this kind of fast-growing biogenic material is particularly suitable. Several preliminary studies involving stable isotope variations within modern, as well as Early and Middle Holocene, bivalve shells from Peru and northern Chile showed relatively short-lived excursions which depict thermal anomalies linked to regional ENSO impacts. The Eastern Pacific region (30^oS-1^oS) which is actually the area where the strongest SST signal of ENSO is obtained, and where abundant archaeological shell deposits and fossiliferous marine terrace units are preserved, thus offers a great opportunity to develop a new proxy for paleo-ENSO studies. Oxygen isotope data were classically obtained through series of sub-samples along the major growth axis of marine molluscs. However this traditional approach only provides a rough evidence for the record of anomalous conditions during weeks or months. Recent technical developments allowing a much higher resolution in the geochemical measurements and in the microstructural observations of the sampled material, associated to a better understanding of the biomineralisation processes, renewed significantly the modality of the calibration studies. The CONCHAS project involves coupled measurements of seawater parameters and variations of geochemical and isotopic composition at a daily, or subdaily, scale. The studies bear upon half a dozen species of molluscs (bivalves and one gastropod) and include inter-specific comparisons on individuals growing in a given environment (natural or controlled artificially). The first results indicate clearly that all the factors that control the growth rate of the carbonate skeleton and the precise timing of the biomineral deposition

  12. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  13. Impact of new instrumentation on advanced turbine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of an orderly test program that progresses from the simplest stationary geometry to the more complex, three dimensional, rotating turbine stage. The instrumentation requirements for this evolution of testing are described. The heat transfer instrumentation is emphasized. Recent progress made in devising new measurement techniques has greatly improved the development and confirmation of more accurate analytical methods for the prediction of turbine performance and heat transfer. However, there remain challenging requirements for novel measurement techniques that could advance the future research to be done in rotating blade rows of turbomachines.

  14. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  15. Identifying influential data points in hydrological model calibration and their impact on streamflow predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David; Thyer, Mark; Westra, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Highly influential data points are those that have a disproportionately large impact on model performance, parameters and predictions. However, in current hydrological modelling practice the relative influence of individual data points on hydrological model calibration is not commonly evaluated. This presentation illustrates and evaluates several influence diagnostics tools that hydrological modellers can use to assess the relative influence of data. The feasibility and importance of including influence detection diagnostics as a standard tool in hydrological model calibration is discussed. Two classes of influence diagnostics are evaluated: (1) computationally demanding numerical "case deletion" diagnostics; and (2) computationally efficient analytical diagnostics, based on Cook's distance. These diagnostics are compared against hydrologically orientated diagnostics that describe changes in the model parameters (measured through the Mahalanobis distance), performance (objective function displacement) and predictions (mean and maximum streamflow). These influence diagnostics are applied to two case studies: a stage/discharge rating curve model, and a conceptual rainfall-runoff model (GR4J). Removing a single data point from the calibration resulted in differences to mean flow predictions of up to 6% for the rating curve model, and differences to mean and maximum flow predictions of up to 10% and 17%, respectively, for the hydrological model. When using the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency in calibration, the computationally cheaper Cook's distance metrics produce similar results to the case-deletion metrics at a fraction of the computational cost. However, Cooks distance is adapted from linear regression with inherit assumptions on the data and is therefore less flexible than case deletion. Influential point detection diagnostics show great potential to improve current hydrological modelling practices by identifying highly influential data points. The findings of this

  16. Calibration of relative sensitivity factors for impact ionization detectors with high-velocity silicate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, Katherina; Trieloff, Mario; Hillier, Jon K.; Guglielmino, Massimo; Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Kempf, Sascha; Blum, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Impact ionization mass spectrometers, e.g., the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft can quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of impacting particles, if the ionization efficiencies of the elements to be quantified are appropriately calibrated. Although silicates are an abundant dust species inside and outside the Solar System, an experimental calibration was not available for elements typically found in silicates. We performed such a calibration by accelerating orthopyroxene dust of known composition with a modified Van de Graaff accelerator to velocities of up to 37.9 km s-1 and subsequent analyses by a high resolution impact ionization mass spectrometer, the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA). The orthopyroxene dust, prepared from a natural rock sample, contains ∼90% orthopyroxene and ∼10% additional mineral species, such as clinopyroxene, spinel, amphibole, olivine and glasses, which are present as impurities within the orthopyroxene, due to inclusion or intergrowth. Hence, the dust material can be regarded as a multi-mineral mixture. After analyses, we find that most particle data cluster at a composition ascribed to pure orthopyroxene. Some data scatter is caused by stochastic effects, other data scatter is caused by the chemically different mineral impurities. Our data indicate that these minor mineral phases can be recognized within a multi-mineral mixture. Here, for the first time, we present experimentally derived relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for impact ionization mass spectroscopy of silicates, enabling the quantitative determination of the composition of cosmic dust grains. Orthopyroxene data were used to infer RSFs for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and K, for particles with radii ranging from 0.04 μm to 0.2 μm and velocities between 19 and 37.9 km s-1, impacting on a Rh-target.

  17. Calibration of the Fluorine, Chlorine and Hydrogen Content of Apatites With the ChemCam LIBS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Cicutto, L.; Forni, O.; Drouet, C.; Rapin, W.; Nachon, M.; Cousin, A.; Blank, J. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Gasnault, O.; Newsom, H.; Mangold, N.; Schroeder, S.; Sautter, V.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of apatites is important to understand the behavior of volatiles during planetary differentiation. Apatite is an ubiquitous magmatic mineral in the SNC meteorites. It is a significant reservoir of halogens in these meteorites and has been used to estimate the halogen budget of Mars. Apatites have been identified in sandstones and pebbles at Gale crater by ChemCam, a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscometer (LIBS) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover. Their presence was inferred from correlations between calcium, fluorine (using the CaF molecular band centered near 603 nm, whose detection limit is much lower that atomic or ionic lines and, in some cases, phosphorus (whose detection limit is much larger). An initial quantification of fluorine, based on fluorite (CaF2)/basalt mixtures and obtained at the LANL laboratory, indicated that the excess of F/Ca (compared to the stoichiometry of pure fluorapatites) found on Mars in some cases could be explained by the presence of fluorite. Chlorine was not detected in these targets, at least above a detection limit of 0.6 wt% estimated from. Fluorapatite was later also detected by X-ray diffraction (with CheMin) at a level of approx.1wt% in the Windjana drill sample (Kimberley area), and several points analyzed by ChemCam in this area also revealed a correlation between Ca and F. The in situ detection of F-rich, Cl-poor apatites contrasts with the Cl-rich, F-poor compositions of apatites found in basaltic shergottites and in gabbroic clasts from the martian meteorite NWA 7034, which were also found to be more Cl-rich than apatites from basalts on Earth, the Moon, or Vesta. The in situ observations could call into question one of the few possible explanations brought forward to explain the SNC results, namely that Mars may be highly depleted in fluorine. The purpose of the present study is to refine the calibration of the F, Cl, OH and P signals measured by the ChemCam LIBS instrument, initiated

  18. GOES-R Space Environment In-Situ Suite: instruments overview, calibration results, and data processing algorithms, and expected on-orbit performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galica, G. E.; Dichter, B. K.; Tsui, S.; Golightly, M. J.; Lopate, C.; Connell, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    The space weather instruments (Space Environment In-Situ Suite - SEISS) on the soon to be launched, NOAA GOES-R series spacecraft offer significant space weather measurement performance advances over the previous GOES N-P series instruments. The specifications require that the instruments ensure proper operation under the most stressful high flux conditions corresponding to the largest solar particle event expected during the program, while maintaining high sensitivity at low flux levels. Since the performance of remote sensing instruments is sensitive to local space weather conditions, the SEISS data will be of be of use to a broad community of users. The SEISS suite comprises five individual sensors and a data processing unit: Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-Low (0.03-30 keV electrons and ions), Magnetospheric Particle Sensor-High (0.05-4 MeV electrons, 0.08-12 MeV protons), two Solar And Galactic Proton Sensors (1 to >500 MeV protons), and the Energetic Heavy ion Sensor (10-200 MeV for H, H to Fe with single element resolution). We present comparisons between the enhanced GOES-R instruments and the current GOES space weather measurement capabilities. We provide an overview of the sensor configurations and performance. Results of extensive sensor modeling with GEANT, FLUKA and SIMION are compared with calibration data measured over nearly the entire energy range of the instruments. Combination of the calibration results and model are used to calculate the geometric factors of the various energy channels. The calibrated geometric factors and typical and extreme space weather environments are used to calculate the expected on-orbit performance.

  19. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport.

    PubMed

    Patton, Declan A

    2016-01-01

    Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion. PMID:27594780

  20. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion. PMID:27594780

  1. Cross-calibration of the CCD Instruments onboard the Chandra, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton Observatories using 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Foster, Adam; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric; Pollock, Andrew; Sembay, Steve; Stuhlinger, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We report on our continuing efforts to compare the time-dependent calibrations of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the Chandra, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton observatories using the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, 1E 0102.2-7219 (hereafter E0102). This calibration is a function of time due to the effects of radiation damage on the CCDs and the accumulation of a contamination layer on the filters or CCDs. We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas in the 0.5-1.0 keV bandpass. The spectrum of E0102 has been well-characterized using the RGS grating instrument on XMM-Newton and the HETG grating instrument on Chandra. We have developed an empirical model for E0102 that includes Gaussians for the identified lines, two absorption components, and two continuum components with different temperatures. In our fits, the model is highly constrained in that only the normalizations of the four brightest line complexes (the O VII triplet, the O VIII Ly-alpha line, the Ne IX triplet, and the Ne X Ly-alpha line) and an overall normalization are allowed to vary. In our previous study, we found that based on observations early in the missions, most of the fitted line normalizations agreed to within +/- 10%. We have now expanded this study to include more recent data from these missions using the latest calibration updates and we will report on the current level of agreement amongst these instruments. This work is based on the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC).

  2. Development and Calibration of a System-Integrated Rotorcraft Finite Element Model for Impact Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber (DEA) under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. The presence of this energy absorbing device reduced the peak impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system-integrated finite element model of the test article developed in parallel with the test program. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests were conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components and subsystems, including new crush tubes and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined for the system-integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the full-scale crash test without the DEA. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods identified modeling deficiencies, evaluated parameter importance, and proposed required model changes. The multidimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were

  3. NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) instrument characterization and calibration, and products validation: an integrated strategy in preparation for NPOESS new generation of environmental satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Stephen A.; Murphy, Robert E.; Ouaidrari, Hassan; Menzel, W. Paul

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the strategy designed by the government team, IPO and NASA, for the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) instrument characterization and calibration, and product validation, in preparation for the NPOESS operational system. NPP is a risk reduction mission for NPOESS, managed by the IPO and NASA. NPP will carry three (3) instruments, VIIRS, CrIS and ATMS, and an Instrument of Opportunity to be announced soon. Responsibilities will be shared between government and industry participants to ensure high performance at all system levels. This will include provision of the sensor pre-launch characterization and post-launch calibration procedures, definition of validation approaches for all NPP products, and identification of the resources and assets required to achieve these activities. This calibration and validation plan will benefit greatly from the validation efforts and infrastructure of several existing programs at the national and international scale. The synergy between the SSPR system integrator and the government team, IPO and NASA, will build the foundation for interactions that will lead to better sensors, better algorithms, and better ground data systems.

  4. Radio metric errors due to mismatch and offset between a DSN antenna beam and the beam of a troposphere calibration instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.; Wilcox, J. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Two components of the error of a troposphere calibration measurement were quantified by theoretical calculations. The first component is a beam mismatch error, which occurs when the calibration instrument senses a conical volume different from the cylindrical volume sampled by a Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna. The second component is a beam offset error, which occurs if the calibration instrument is not mounted on the axis of the DSN antenna. These two error sources were calculated for both delay (e.g., VLBI) and delay rate (e.g., Doppler) measurements. The beam mismatch error for both delay and delay rate drops rapidly as the beamwidth of the troposphere calibration instrument (e.g., a water vapor radiometer or an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer) is reduced. At a 10-deg elevation angle, the instantaneous beam mismatch error is 1.0 mm for a 6-deg beamwidth and 0.09 mm for a 0.5-deg beam (these are the full angular widths of a circular beam with uniform gain out to a sharp cutoff). Time averaging for 60-100 sec will reduce these errors by factors of 1.2-2.2. At a 20-deg elevation angle, the lower limit for current Doppler observations, the beam-mismatch delay rate error is an Allan standard deviation over 100 sec of 1.1 x 10(exp -14) with a 4-deg beam and 1.3 x 10(exp -l5) for a 0.5-deg beam. A 50-m beam offset would result in a fairly modest (compared to other expected error sources) delay error (less than or equal to 0.3 mm for 60-sec integrations at any elevation angle is greater than or equal to 6 deg). However, the same offset would cause a large error in delay rate measurements (e.g., an Allan standard deviation of 1.2 x 10(exp -14) over 100 sec at a 20-deg elevation angle), which would dominate over other known error sources if the beamwidth is 2 deg or smaller. An on-axis location is essential for accurate troposphere calibration of delay rate measurements. A half-power beamwidth (for a beam with a tapered gain profile) of 1.2 deg or smaller is

  5. Restoration of Images of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 Taken with the Deep Impact High Resolution Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindler, D.; Busko, I.; A'Hearn, M. F.; White, R. L.

    2007-04-01

    In 2005 July, the NASA Deep Impact mission successfully completed a flyby of comet 9P/Tempel 1. A flaw in the prelaunch calibration system resulted in an inability to accurately focus the telescope's High Resolution Instrument, resulting in a significant loss of resolution. However, because of the nature of the blurring process, much of the high-frequency information is retained and can be recovered using deconvolution. We discuss the data-processing requirements and noise modeling needed prior to deconvolution and compare a few popular deconvolution algorithms. All of the algorithms give very similar results. More importantly, we find that none of the algorithms correctly handle the errors resulting from the data compression used on board the spacecraft to compress the 16 bit CCD data to 8 bits prior to transmission of the image to the ground. We present a modification to the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm that we have successfully used to account for these compression errors.

  6. Ice Particle Impact on Cloud Water Content Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward F.; Miller, Dean R.; Plaskon, Stephen R.; Strapp, Walter; Lillie, Lyle

    2004-01-01

    Determining the total amount of water contained in an icing cloud necessitates the measurement of both the liquid droplets and ice particles. One commonly accepted method for measuring cloud water content utilizes a hot wire sensing element, which is maintained at a constant temperature. In this approach, the cloud water content is equated with the power required to keep the sense element at a constant temperature. This method inherently assumes that impinging cloud particles remain on the sensing element surface long enough to be evaporated. In the case of ice particles, this assumption requires that the particles do not bounce off the surface after impact. Recent tests aimed at characterizing ice particle impact on a thermally heated wing section, have raised questions about the validity of this assumption. Ice particles were observed to bounce off the heated wing section a very high percentage of the time. This result could have implications for Total Water Content sensors which are designed to capture ice particles, and thus do not account for bouncing or breakup of ice particles. Based on these results, a test was conducted to investigate ice particle impact on the sensing elements of the following hot-wire cloud water content probes: (1) Nevzorov Total Water Content (TWC)/Liquid Water Content (LWC) probe, (2) Science Engineering Associates TWC probe, and (3) Particle Measuring Systems King probe. Close-up video imaging was used to study ice particle impact on the sensing element of each probe. The measured water content from each probe was also determined for each cloud condition. This paper will present results from this investigation and attempt to evaluate the significance of ice particle impact on hot-wire cloud water content measurements.

  7. Geometric Calibration and Radiometric Correction of LiDAR Data and Their Impact on the Quality of Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman F.; Kersting, Ana P.; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data. PMID:22164121

  8. Geometric calibration and radiometric correction of LiDAR data and their impact on the quality of derived products.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ayman F; Kersting, Ana P; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data. PMID:22164121

  9. Design, calibration and validation of a novel 3D printed instrumented spatial linkage that measures changes in the rotational axes of the tibiofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Daniel P; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2014-01-01

    An accurate axis-finding technique is required to measure any changes from normal caused by total knee arthroplasty in the flexion-extension (F-E) and longitudinal rotation (LR) axes of the tibiofemoral joint. In a previous paper, we computationally determined how best to design and use an instrumented spatial linkage (ISL) to locate the F-E and LR axes such that rotational and translational errors were minimized. However, the ISL was not built and consequently was not calibrated; thus the errors in locating these axes were not quantified on an actual ISL. Moreover, previous methods to calibrate an ISL used calibration devices with accuracies that were either undocumented or insufficient for the device to serve as a gold-standard. Accordingly, the objectives were to (1) construct an ISL using the previously established guidelines,(2) calibrate the ISL using an improved method, and (3) quantify the error in measuring changes in the F-E and LR axes. A 3D printed ISL was constructed and calibrated using a coordinate measuring machine, which served as a gold standard. Validation was performed using a fixture that represented the tibiofemoral joint with an adjustable F-E axis and the errors in measuring changes to the positions and orientations of the F-E and LR axes were quantified. The resulting root mean squared errors (RMSEs) of the calibration residuals using the new calibration method were 0.24, 0.33, and 0.15 mm for the anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and proximal-distal positions, respectively, and 0.11, 0.10, and 0.09 deg for varus-valgus, flexion-extension, and internal-external orientations, respectively. All RMSEs were below 0.29% of the respective full-scale range. When measuring changes to the F-E or LR axes, each orientation error was below 0.5 deg; when measuring changes in the F-E axis, each position error was below 1.0 mm. The largest position RMSE was when measuring a medial-lateral change in the LR axis (1.2 mm). Despite the large size

  10. The tabletting machine as an analytical instrument: qualification of the measurement devices for punch forces and validation of the calibration procedures.

    PubMed

    Belda, P M; Mielck, J B

    1998-11-01

    The quality of force measurement in an eccentric tabletting machine equipped with piezo-electric load washers mounted under pre-stress at the upper and lower punches, and the reliability of their calibration in situ and under working conditions were carefully investigated, since this tabletting machine is used as an 'analytical instrument' for the evaluation of the compression behaviour of pharmaceutical materials. For a quasistatic calibration procedure the repeatability under standard conditions and the robustness against variations in machine settings, installation conditions, equipment and handling were evaluated. Two differently constructed reference load cells equipped with strain gauges were used for the calibration of the upper punch sensor. The lower punch sensor was calibrated against the upper one. Except for a mechanical hysteresis, owing to uneven stress distribution over the piezo-electric sensors, the results of the quasistatic measurements are assessed to be satisfactory. In addition, dynamic calibrations were performed. One of the strain-gauged load cells was used in addition to two piezo-electric load washers installed without pre-stress. The dynamic behaviour of all the transducers used is deficient. While for the piezo-electric sensors a significant change in the slope of the calibration function with respect to the quasistatic behaviour was observed, for the strain-gauged load cell a pronounced hysteresis must be noted. Comparing the dynamic behaviour at different profiles of rates of force development generated by variations in machine speed and by maximum force setting, the variability in the sensitivity of the upper and lower punch piezo-electric load washers is comparatively small. PMID:9885312

  11. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  12. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION OF THE IRAC INSTRUMENT ON THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE USING HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FLUX STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Deustua, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Flanagan, K.; Kalirai, J.; Meixner, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Engelbracht, C.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ardila, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.

    2011-05-15

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al., i.e., in agreement within their estimated errors of {approx}2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the spectral energy distributions of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 {mu}m band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. are about 1.5% {+-} 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 {mu}m result.

  13. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1320-90 Gas meter or flow..., methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas meter or flow instrumentation... Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1320-90 Gas meter or flow..., methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  16. A New Self-Calibrated Procedure for Impact Detection and Location on Flat Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Somolinos, José A.; López, Amable; Morales, Rafael; Morón, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Many analyses of acoustic signals processing have been proposed for different applications over the last few years. When considering a bar-based structure, if the material through which the sound waves propagate is considered to be acoustically homogeneous and the sound speed is well known, then it is possible to determine the position and time of impact by a simple observation of the arrival times of the signals of all the transducers that are strategically disposed on the structure. This paper presents a generalized method for impact detection and location on a flat plate, together with a calibration procedure with which to obtain the sound speed from only one set of measurements. This propagation speed is not well known as a result of either imprecise material properties or the overlapping of longitudinal and transversal waves with different propagation velocities. The use of only three piezoelectric sensors allows the position and time of impact on the flat plate to be obtained when the sound speed is well known, while the use of additional sensors permits a larger detection area to be covered, helps to estimate the sound speed and/or avoids the wrong timing of difference measurements. Experimental results are presented using a robot with a specially designed knocking tool that produces impacts on a metallic flat plate. PMID:23722825

  17. Calibration of optimal execution of financial transactions in the presence of transient market impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busseti, Enzo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    Trading large volumes of a financial asset in order driven markets requires the use of algorithmic execution dividing the volume into many transactions in order to minimize costs due to market impact. A proper design of an optimal execution strategy strongly depends on a careful modeling of market impact, i.e. how the price reacts to trades. In this paper we consider a recently introduced market impact model (Bouchaud et al 2004 Quant. Finance, 4 176-90), which has the property of describing both the volume and the temporal dependence of price change due to trading. We show how this model can be used to describe price impact also in aggregated trade time or in real time. We then solve analytically and calibrate with real data the optimal execution problem both for risk neutral and for risk averse investors and we derive an efficient frontier of optimal execution. When we include spread costs the problem must be solved numerically and we show that the introduction of such costs regularizes the solution.

  18. A new self-calibrated procedure for impact detection and location on flat surfaces.

    PubMed

    Somolinos, José A; López, Amable; Morales, Rafael; Morón, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Many analyses of acoustic signals processing have been proposed for different applications over the last few years. When considering a bar-based structure, if the material through which the sound waves propagate is considered to be acoustically homogeneous and the sound speed is well known, then it is possible to determine the position and time of impact by a simple observation of the arrival times of the signals of all the transducers that are strategically disposed on the structure. This paper presents a generalized method for impact detection and location on a flat plate, together with a calibration procedure with which to obtain the sound speed from only one set of measurements. This propagation speed is not well known as a result of either imprecise material properties or the overlapping of longitudinal and transversal waves with different propagation velocities. The use of only three piezoelectric sensors allows the position and time of impact on the flat plate to be obtained when the sound speed is well known, while the use of additional sensors permits a larger detection area to be covered, helps to estimate the sound speed and/or avoids the wrong timing of difference measurements. Experimental results are presented using a robot with a specially designed knocking tool that produces impacts on a metallic flat plate. PMID:23722825

  19. The tabletting machine as an analytical instrument: qualification of the tabletting machine and the instrumentation with respect to the determination of punch separation and validation of the calibration procedures.

    PubMed

    Belda, P M; Mielck, J B

    1999-05-01

    The quality of the determination of punch separation in an eccentric tabletting machine equipped with two inductive displacement transducers was carefully investigated, since this tabletting machine is used as an 'analytical instrument' for the evaluation of the compression behaviour of pharmaceutical materials. For a quasistatic calibration procedure using gauge blocks, the repeatability under standard conditions and the robustness against variations in machine settings, installation conditions, equipment and methods were examined. The readings during calibration can be easily influenced by machine parameters as a result of deficiencies in the construction of the machine and in the mode of instrumentation. The poor plane-parallelism of the punch faces has a further negative effect on the accuracy of punch separation. In addition, the response at loading to lower and higher forces as during calibration was investigated. While at loading up to 100 N, the response of the system to the gauge blocks is systematically influenced by punch separation, for slow manually applied punch-to-punch loading up to 16.5 kN at a broad range of penetration depths, no significant effects were observed in the region of interest for tabletting. To get an indication of the transferability of the calibration and the determination of punch deformation to normal operating conditions, the lateral tilting of the punches during dynamic idle runs, punch-to-punch loading, and compression of microcrystalline cellulose was analyzed. A transfer of the response derived from punch-to-punch compression to tabletting conditions seems to be possible, although this must be questioned on grounds of theoretical considerations. From all the experiments performed, a total error of about +/- 30 microns must be assessed for the determination of punch separation. PMID:10382107

  20. The SNOOPY Angle of Repose Experiment: Calibration of an Instrument to Determine the Angle of Repose of Martian Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, L. E.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Marshall, J. R.; Towner, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    The present work calibrates the Student Nanoexperiments for Outreach and Observational Planetary Inquiry (SNOOPY) Angle of Repose experiment. Using particulate collection on small marbles, the measured angles of repose compare well to experimental data and theoretical predictions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Stacked Weak Lensing Mass Calibration: Estimators, Systematics, and Impact on Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wu, Hao-Yi; Schmidt, Fabian; /Caltech

    2011-11-04

    When extracting the weak lensing shear signal, one may employ either locally normalized or globally normalized shear estimators. The former is the standard approach when estimating cluster masses, while the latter is the more common method among peak finding efforts. While both approaches have identical signal-to-noise in the weak lensing limit, it is possible that higher order corrections or systematic considerations make one estimator preferable over the other. In this paper, we consider the efficacy of both estimators within the context of stacked weak lensing mass estimation in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We find that the two estimators have nearly identical statistical precision, even after including higher order corrections, but that these corrections must be incorporated into the analysis to avoid observationally relevant biases in the recovered masses. We also demonstrate that finite bin-width effects may be significant if not properly accounted for, and that the two estimators exhibit different systematics, particularly with respect to contamination of the source catalog by foreground galaxies. Thus, the two estimators may be employed as a systematic cross-check of each other. Stacked weak lensing in the DES should allow for the mean mass of galaxy clusters to be calibrated to {approx}2% precision (statistical only), which can improve the figure of merit of the DES cluster abundance experiment by a factor of {approx}3 relative to the self-calibration expectation. A companion paper investigates how the two types of estimators considered here impact weak lensing peak finding efforts.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of impact assessment instruments: Theorising the nature and implications of their political constitution

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Matthew; Richardson, Tim; Hilding-Ryedvik, Tuija; Emmelin, Lars

    2010-11-15

    The central role of impact assessment instruments globally in policy integration initiatives has been cemented in recent years. Associated with this trend, but also reflecting political emphasis on greater accountability in certain policy sectors and a renewed focus on economic competitiveness in Western countries, demand has increased for evidence that these instruments are effective (however defined). Resurgent interest in evaluation has not, however, been accompanied by the conceptual developments required to redress longstanding theoretical problems associated with such activities. In order to sharpen effectiveness evaluation theory for impact assessment instruments this article critically examines the neglected issue of their political constitution. Analytical examples are used to concretely explore the nature and significance of the politicisation of impact assessment. It is argued that raising awareness about the political character of impact assessment instruments, in itself, is a vital step in advancing effectiveness evaluation theory. Broader theoretical lessons on the framing of evaluation research are also drawn from the political analysis. We conclude that, at least within the contemporary research context, learning derived from analysing the meaning and implications of plural interpretations of effectiveness represents the most constructive strategy for advancing impact assessment and policy integration theory.

  3. Laboratory Calibration and Flight Validation of an Aircraft Based Instrument to Measure Water Isotopes in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, J. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    The relative abundance of the hydrogen isotopes of water, H2O and HDO, is a sensitive indicator of the condensation history of air in the near-tropopause region. The observations of the isotopes present a particular challenge because of the very high probability of sampling artifacts in the detection of water vapor itself and the certainty that the isotopes bear those same errors. We have developed a fluorescence-based instrument that has the sensitivity to measure the relative abundance of H2O and HDO without the sampling artifacts associated with large sampling volumes. The instrument combines a new water photolysis system with our pre-existing instrument for laser induced fluorescence detection of OH. Water is photolyzed with an excimer lamp source at 172;nm, producing ground state OH and OD radicals that are detected with state selective laser induced fluorescence at 287;nm. The experiment has three notable characteristics. The first is the high sensitivity afforded by laser induced fluorescence detection. At stratospheric mixing ratios of H2O (4;ppm at 50;mbar), the relative abundance of H2O and HDO can be measured with a S/N > 12 in a 16;s acquisition cycle. The second is a reduction in the exchange of water isotopes on surfaces within the instrument: the OH and OD radicals are removed with near unity efficiency after collisions with walls in the system and are not detected. The third is a rigorous laboratory evaluation of artifacts in the sampling of water vapor and its isotopes, and an empirical demonstration of the instrument's capabilities. The instrument layout and unique detection scheme virtually eliminates the possibility of contamination and resulting measurement hysteresis. These characteristics enable an independent validation of the absorption-based water isotope instruments in situ. Laboratory calibration will be discussed in depth, and data will be presented from recent test flights where the laser induced fluorescence instrument was flown

  4. Impact of different individual GNSS receiver antenna calibration models on geodetic positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baire, Q.; Pottiaux, E.; Bruyninx, C.; Defraigne, P.; Aerts, W.; Legrand, J.; Bergeot, N.; Chevalier, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Since April 2011, the igs08.atx antenna calibration model is used in the routine IGS (International GNSS Service) data analysis. The model includes mean robot calibrations to correct for the offset and phase center variations of the GNSS receiver antennas. These so-called "type" calibrations are means of the individual calibrations available for a specific antenna/radome combination. The GNSS data analysis performed within the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) aims at being as consistent as possible with the IGS analysis. This also applies to the receiver antenna calibrations. However, when available, individual antenna calibrations are used within the EPN analysis instead of the "type" calibration. When these individual calibrations are unavailable, then the EPN analysis falls back to (type) calibrations identical as the ones used within the IGS (igs08.atx). The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance of the offset caused by using different receiver antenna calibration models on the station position. Using the PPP (Precise Point Positioning) technique, we first investigate the differences in positioning obtained when switching between individual antenna calibrations and type calibrations. We analyze the observations of the 43 EPN stations equipped with receiver antenna individually calibrated over the period covering from 2003 to 2010 and we show that these differences can reach up to 4 mm in horizontal and 10 mm in vertical. Secondly, we study the accuracy of the individual calibrations models and we evaluate the effect of different sets of individual calibrations on the positioning. For that purpose, we use the data from 6 GNSS stations equipped with an antenna which has been individually calibrated at two calibration facilities recognized by the IGS: GEO++ and Bonn institute.

  5. Comparison of electrostatic fins with piezoelectric impact hammer techniques to extend impulse calibration range of a torsional thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Pancotti, Anthony P; Gilpin, Matthew; Hilario, Martin S

    2012-03-01

    With the progression of high-power electric propulsion and high thrust-to-power propulsions system, thrust stand diagnostics require high-fidelity calibration systems that are accurate over a large-range of thrust levels. Multi-mode and variable I(sp) propulsion devices also require that a single stand be capable of measuring thrust from 10's of uNs to 100's of mNs. While the torsional thrust stand mechanic and diagnostics are capable of operating over such a large range, current pulsed calibration schemes are typically limited to a few orders of magnitude of dynamic range. In order to develop a stand with enough dynamic range, two separate calibration methods have been examined and compared to create a combined system. Electrostatic fin (ESF) and piezoelectric impact hammer (PIH) calibration systems were simultaneously tested on a large scale torsional thrust stand system. The use of the these two methods allowed the stand to be calibrated over four orders of magnitude, from 0.01 mNs to 750 mNs. The ESF system produced linear results within 0.52% from 0.01 mNs to 20 mNs, while the PIH system extended this calibration range from 10 mNs to 750 mNs with an error of 0.99%. The two calibration methods agreed within 4.51% over their overlapping range of 10-20 mNs. PMID:22462962

  6. Microparticle impact calibration of the Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) onboard the solar power sail demonstrator IKAROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Takayuki; Cole, Michael J.; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwai, Takeo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Srama, Ralf; Yano, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    The Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) is an array of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based dust detectors aboard the solar power sail demonstrator named IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun). The total sensor area of ALADDIN (0.54 m2) is the world's largest among the past PVDF-based dust detectors. IKAROS was launched in May 2010 and then ALADDIN measured cosmic dust impacts for 16 months while orbiting around between 0.7 and 1.1 AU. The main scientific objective of ALADDIN is to reveal number density of ≥10-μm-sized dust in the zodiacal cloud with much higher time-space resolution than that achieved by any past in-situ measurements. The distribution of ≥10-μm-sized dust can be also observed mainly with the light scattering by optical instruments. This paper gives the scientific objectives, the instrumental description, and the results of microparticle impact calibration of ALADDIN conducted in ground laboratories. For the calibration tests we used Van de Graaf accelerators (VdG), two-stage light gas guns (LGG), and a nano-second pulsed Nd:YAG laser (nsPL). Through these experiments, we obtained depolarization charge signal caused by hypervelocity impacts or laser irradiation using the flight spare of 20-μm-thick PVDF sensor and the electronics box of ALADDIN. In the VdG experiment we accelerated iron, carbon, and silver microparticles at 1-30 km/s, while in the LGG experiment we performed to shoot 100's-μm-sized particles of soda-lime glass and stainless steel at 3-7 km/s as single projectile. For interpolation to ≥10-μm size, we irradiated infrared laser at the energy of 15-20 mJ directly onto the PVDF sensor. From the signal analysis, we developed a calibration law for estimation of masses of impacted dust particles. The dynamic range of ALADDIN corresponds from 9×10-14 kg to 2×10-10 kg (4-56 μm in diameter at density of 2.0 g/cm3) at the expected impact velocity of 10 km/s at 1 AU

  7. Calibration and validation of earthquake catastrophe models. Case study: Impact Forecasting Earthquake Model for Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Gaspa Rebull, O.; Ewing, C.; Podlaha, A.; Magee, B.

    2012-04-01

    Calibration and validation are crucial steps in the production of the catastrophe models for the insurance industry in order to assure the model's reliability and to quantify its uncertainty. Calibration is needed in all components of model development including hazard and vulnerability. Validation is required to ensure that the losses calculated by the model match those observed in past events and which could happen in future. Impact Forecasting, the catastrophe modelling development centre of excellence within Aon Benfield, has recently launched its earthquake model for Algeria as a part of the earthquake model for the Maghreb region. The earthquake model went through a detailed calibration process including: (1) the seismic intensity attenuation model by use of macroseismic observations and maps from past earthquakes in Algeria; (2) calculation of the country-specific vulnerability modifiers by use of past damage observations in the country. The use of Benouar, 1994 ground motion prediction relationship was proven as the most appropriate for our model. Calculation of the regional vulnerability modifiers for the country led to 10% to 40% larger vulnerability indexes for different building types compared to average European indexes. The country specific damage models also included aggregate damage models for residential, commercial and industrial properties considering the description of the buildings stock given by World Housing Encyclopaedia and the local rebuilding cost factors equal to 10% for damage grade 1, 20% for damage grade 2, 35% for damage grade 3, 75% for damage grade 4 and 100% for damage grade 5. The damage grades comply with the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-1998). The model was validated by use of "as-if" historical scenario simulations of three past earthquake events in Algeria M6.8 2003 Boumerdes, M7.3 1980 El-Asnam and M7.3 1856 Djidjelli earthquake. The calculated return periods of the losses for client market portfolio align with the

  8. Calibration of risk prediction models: impact on decision-analytic performance.

    PubMed

    Van Calster, Ben; Vickers, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Decision-analytic measures to assess clinical utility of prediction models and diagnostic tests incorporate the relative clinical consequences of true and false positives without the need for external information such as monetary costs. Net Benefit is a commonly used metric that weights the relative consequences in terms of the risk threshold at which a patient would opt for treatment. Theoretical results demonstrate that clinical utility is affected by a model';s calibration, the extent to which estimated risks correspond to observed event rates. We analyzed the effects of different types of miscalibration on Net Benefit and investigated whether and under what circumstances miscalibration can make a model clinically harmful. Clinical harm is defined as a lower Net Benefit compared with classifying all patients as positive or negative by default. We used simulated data to investigate the effect of overestimation, underestimation, overfitting (estimated risks too extreme), and underfitting (estimated risks too close to baseline risk) on Net Benefit for different choices of the risk threshold. In accordance with theory, we observed that miscalibration always reduced Net Benefit. Harm was sometimes observed when models underestimated risk at a threshold below the event rate (as in underestimation and overfitting) or overestimated risk at a threshold above event rate (as in overestimation and overfitting). Underfitting never resulted in a harmful model. The impact of miscalibration decreased with increasing discrimination. Net Benefit was less sensitive to miscalibration for risk thresholds close to the event rate than for other thresholds. We illustrate these findings with examples from the literature and with a case study on testicular cancer diagnosis. Our findings strengthen the importance of obtaining calibrated risk models. PMID:25155798

  9. Station to instrumented aircraft L-band telemetry system and RF signal controller for spacecraft simulations and station calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaffidi, C. A.; Stocklin, F. J.; Feldman, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    An L-band telemetry system designed to provide the capability of near-real-time processing of calibration data is described. The system also provides the capability of performing computerized spacecraft simulations, with the aircraft as a data source, and evaluating the network response. The salient characteristics of a telemetry analysis and simulation program (TASP) are discussed, together with the results of TASP testing. The results of the L-band system testing have successfully demonstrated the capability of near-real-time processing of telemetry test data, the control of the ground-received signal to within + or - 0.5 db, and the computer generation of test signals.

  10. Rigorous noise test and calibration check of strong-motion instrumentation at the Conrad Observatory in Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, R.; Costa, G.; Lenhardt, W.; Horn, N.; Suhadolc, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the European InterregIV Italy/Austria project: "HAREIA - Historical and Recent Earthquakes in Italy and Austria" the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) and Mathematic and Geosciences Department of University of Trieste (DMG) are upgrading the transfrontier seismic network of South-Eastern Alps with new 12 accelerometric stations to enhance the strong motion instrument density near the Austria/Italy border. Various public institutions of the provinces Alto Adige (Bolzano Province), Veneto (ARPAV) and Friuli Venezia Giulia (Regional Civil Defense) in Italy and in the Austrian province of Tyrol are involved in the project. The site selection was carried out to improve the present local network geometry thus meeting the needs of public Institutions in the involved regions. In Tyrol and Alto Adige some strategic buildings (hospitals and public buildings) have been selected, whereas in Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia the sites are in the free field, mainly located near villages. The instruments will be installed in an innovative box, designed by ZAMG, that provides electric and water isolation. The common choice regarding the instrument selection has been the new Kinemetrics Basalt ® accelerograph to guarantee homogeneity with the already installed instrumentation and compatibility with the software already in use at the different seismic institutions in the area. Prior to deployment the equipment was tested at the Conrad Observatory and a common set-up has been devised. The Conrad Observatory, seismically particularly quiet, permits to analyze both the sensor and the acquisition system noise. The instruments were connected to the network and the data sent in real-time to the ZAMG data center in Vienna and the DMG data center in Trieste. The data have been collected in the database and analyzed using signal processing modules PQLX and Matlab. The data analysis of the recordings at the ultra-quiet Conrad Observatory pointed out

  11. The impact of the long-term playing of musical instruments on the stomatognathic system - review.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Arleta; Matthews-Kozanecka, Maja; Kawala, Maciej; Kawala, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have made a review of the influence of playing musical instruments on the formation of malocclusion and TMJ disorders in musicians. Primary attention was paid to the effects of wind and stringed instruments. The aim of the article was the presentation of research and opinions about this problem in the last 25 years. It is reported that long-term and repetitive playing of musical instruments, particularly stringed (violin and viola) and wind instruments can cause dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system. The impact of wind instruments was assessed in terms of the type of mouthpiece. We studied the possibility of repositioning the front teeth and reducing the width of the upper dental arch and overbite. There were also reports on the use of a specific instrument to improve the child's occlusion. Studies have also been performed on the usefulness of relaxation plates in order to improve, and even prevent, dysfunction caused by the constant stress on the same parts of the stomatognathic system. The experiments were mainly based on interviews, dental cast analyses and cephalometric analyses. Additional methods were dynamometer tests and muscle tension palpation. PMID:24596017

  12. Impact of heart disease and calibration interval on accuracy of pulse transit time-based blood pressure estimation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yuanting; Tsang, Hon Ki

    2016-02-01

    Continuous blood pressure (BP) measurement without a cuff is advantageous for the early detection and prevention of hypertension. The pulse transit time (PTT) method has proven to be promising for continuous cuffless BP measurement. However, the problem of accuracy is one of the most challenging aspects before the large-scale clinical application of this method. Since PTT-based BP estimation relies primarily on the relationship between PTT and BP under certain assumptions, estimation accuracy will be affected by cardiovascular disorders that impair this relationship and by the calibration frequency, which may violate these assumptions. This study sought to examine the impact of heart disease and the calibration interval on the accuracy of PTT-based BP estimation. The accuracy of a PTT-BP algorithm was investigated in 37 healthy subjects and 48 patients with heart disease at different calibration intervals, namely 15 min, 2 weeks, and 1 month after initial calibration. The results showed that the overall accuracy of systolic BP estimation was significantly lower in subjects with heart disease than in healthy subjects, but diastolic BP estimation was more accurate in patients than in healthy subjects. The accuracy of systolic and diastolic BP estimation becomes less reliable with longer calibration intervals. These findings demonstrate that both heart disease and the calibration interval can influence the accuracy of PTT-based BP estimation and should be taken into consideration to improve estimation accuracy. PMID:26767518

  13. An 800-Year Record of Sediment-Derived, Instrumentally-Calibrated Foraminiferal Mg/Ca SST Estimates From the Tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. E.; Abahazi, M. A.; Thunell, R. C.; Tappa, E. J.

    2005-12-01

    Most geochemical paleoclimate proxies are calibrated to different climate variables using laboratory culture, surface sediment, or sediment trap experiments. The varved, high-deposition rate sediments of the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela) provide the nearly unique opportunity to compare and calibrate paleoceanographic proxy data directly against true oceanic historical instrumental climate records. Here we present one of the first sediment-derived foraminiferal-Mg/Ca to SST calibrations spanning A. D. 1870-1990. The record of Mg/Ca-estimated tropical North Atlantic SSTs is then extended back to approximately A. D. 1200. Box core PL07-73 BC, recovered from the northeastern slope of Cariaco Basin, was sampled at consecutive 1 mm increments and processed for foraminiferal population, stable isotope, and Mg/Ca (by ICP-AES) analyses. The age model for this core was established by correlating faunal population records from PL07-73 to a nearby very well-dated Cariaco Basin box core, PL07-71 BC. The resulting age model yields consecutive sample intervals of one to two years. Mg/Ca ratios measured on Globigerina bulloides in samples deposited between A. D. 1870 and 1990 were calibrated to monthly SSTs from the Met Office Hadley Centre's SST data set for the Cariaco Basin grid square. Annual correlations between G. bulloides Mg/Ca and instrumental SST were highest (r=0.6, p<.0001, n=120) for the months of March, April, and May, the time when sediment trap studies indicate G. bulloides is most abundant in the basin. The full-length Mg/Ca-estimated SST record is characterized by decadal- and centennial-scale variability. The tropical western North Atlantic does not appear to have experienced a pronounced Medieval Warm Period relative to the complete record. However, strong Little Ice Age cooling of as much as 3 ° C occurred between A. D. 1525 and 1625. Spring SSTs gradually rose between A. D. 1650 and 1900 followed by a 2.5 ° C warming over the 20th century.

  14. Impact of aberrations on the measurement of the solar diameter with the SODISM instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riguet, François; Meftah, Mustapha; Pradal, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    PICARD, a Sun observing satellite, has produced more than one million images during its 4-year mission. SODISM is one of three instruments on-board, whose main goal is to measure the solar limb and its spectral dependence from the middle ultraviolet to the near infrared. The very high accuracy (a few milli-arcseconds) needed to measure the solar limb with its spatial and temporal variations makes the instrument very sensitive to small aberrations. In this paper, we will present the impact of various parameters on the solar limb measurement, from simple displacements of mirrors to complex mirror deformations and thermal gradients. A complete scenario has been constructed from these simulations, leading to a model that describes the actual limbs obtained with SODISM. All these simulations will help improving future missions, by assessing the critical parameters affecting the measurement accuracies of such instruments.

  15. Measurement of driver calibration and the impact of feedback on drivers' estimates of performance.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Shannon C; Horrey, William J; Liang, Yulan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies focused on driver calibration show that drivers are often miscalibrated, either over confident or under confident, and the magnitude of this miscalibration changes under different conditions. Previous work has demonstrated behavioral and performance benefits of feedback, yet these studies have not explicitly examined the issue of calibration. The objective of this study was to examine driver calibration, i.e., the degree to which drivers are accurately aware of their performance, and determine whether feedback alters driver calibration. Twenty-four drivers completed a series of driving tasks (pace clocks, traffic light, speed maintenance, and traffic cones) on a test track. Drivers drove three different blocks around the test track: (1) baseline block, where no participants received feedback; (2) feedback block, where half of the participants received performance feedback while the other half received no feedback; (3) a no feedback block, where no participants received feedback. Results indicated that across two different calibration measures, drivers were sufficiently calibrated to the pace clocks, traffic light, and traffic cone tasks. Drivers were not accurately aware of their performance regarding speed maintenance, though receiving feedback on this task improved calibration. Proper and accurate measurements of driver calibration are needed before designing performance feedback to improve calibration as these feedback systems may not always yield the intended results. PMID:26771893

  16. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  17. Impact and management of physiological calibration in spectral analysis of blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Hintsala, Heidi; Hautala, Arto J; Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Jaakkola, Jouni J; Tiinanen, Suvi; Seppänen, Tapio; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2014-01-01

    Physiological calibration (Physiocal) improves the quality of continuous blood pressure (BP) signal from finger. However, the effects of Physiocal on spectral characteristics of systolic BP (SBP) variability are not well-known. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Physiocal may alter the results on SBP variability when compared with BP recording without Physiocal. Continuous BP was recorded simultaneously from fingers of both arms during 10-min standing by two Nexfin devices, one with (ON) and the other without (OFF) Physiocal (n = 19). Missing SBP values in ON signal were linearly interpolated over Physiocal sequences (ONinter). The OFF signal was analyzed without any corrections (OFFreference) and after linear interpolation of corresponding sequences when Physiocal appeared in the ON signal (OFFinter). Mean low frequency power of SBP oscillations (LFSBP, 0.04-0.15 Hz) did not differ between the OFFreference, OFFinter, and ONinter. However, LFSBP deviated more from OFFreference when analyzed from ONinter compared with the analysis from OFFinter [median (interquartile range): 14.7 (4.6-38.6) vs. 0.9 (0.5-1.8) %, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, the use of Physiocal had a significant effect on the spectral SBP variability that overwhelms the impact of linear interpolation of short data sequences. Therefore, caution is needed when comparing SBP variability between BP datasets acquired with and without Physiocal. PMID:25520670

  18. Impact and management of physiological calibration in spectral analysis of blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Hintsala, Heidi; Hautala, Arto J.; Ikäheimo, Tiina M.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.; Tiinanen, Suvi; Seppänen, Tapio; Tulppo, Mikko P.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological calibration (Physiocal) improves the quality of continuous blood pressure (BP) signal from finger. However, the effects of Physiocal on spectral characteristics of systolic BP (SBP) variability are not well-known. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Physiocal may alter the results on SBP variability when compared with BP recording without Physiocal. Continuous BP was recorded simultaneously from fingers of both arms during 10-min standing by two Nexfin devices, one with (ON) and the other without (OFF) Physiocal (n = 19). Missing SBP values in ON signal were linearly interpolated over Physiocal sequences (ONinter). The OFF signal was analyzed without any corrections (OFFreference) and after linear interpolation of corresponding sequences when Physiocal appeared in the ON signal (OFFinter). Mean low frequency power of SBP oscillations (LFSBP, 0.04–0.15 Hz) did not differ between the OFFreference, OFFinter, and ONinter. However, LFSBP deviated more from OFFreference when analyzed from ONinter compared with the analysis from OFFinter [median (interquartile range): 14.7 (4.6–38.6) vs. 0.9 (0.5–1.8) %, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, the use of Physiocal had a significant effect on the spectral SBP variability that overwhelms the impact of linear interpolation of short data sequences. Therefore, caution is needed when comparing SBP variability between BP datasets acquired with and without Physiocal. PMID:25520670

  19. Pre-flight calibration and initial data processing for the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, R.C.; Maurice, S.; Lasue, J.; Forni, O.; Anderson, R.B.; Clegg, S.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D.; Barraclough, B.L.; Cousin, A.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dyar, M.D.; Fabre, C.; Gasnault, O.; Lanza, N.; Mazoyer, J.; Melikechi, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Tokar, R.; Vaniman, D.

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is the first planetary science instrument to employ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine the compositions of geological samples on another planet. Pre-processing of the spectra involves subtracting the ambient light background, removing noise, removing the electron continuum, calibrating for the wavelength, correcting for the variable distance to the target, and applying a wavelength-dependent correction for the instrument response. Further processing of the data uses multivariate and univariate comparisons with a LIBS spectral library developed prior to launch as well as comparisons with several on-board standards post-landing. The level-2 data products include semi-quantitative abundances derived from partial least squares regression. A LIBS spectral library was developed using 69 rock standards in the form of pressed powder disks, glasses, and ceramics to minimize heterogeneity on the scale of the observation (350–550 μm dia.). The standards covered typical compositional ranges of igneous materials and also included sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates. The provenance and elemental and mineralogical compositions of these standards are described. Spectral characteristics of this data set are presented, including the size distribution and integrated irradiances of the plasmas, and a proxy for plasma temperature as a function of distance from the instrument. Two laboratory-based clones of ChemCam reside in Los Alamos and Toulouse for the purpose of adding new spectra to the database as the need arises. Sensitivity to differences in wavelength correlation to spectral channels and spectral resolution has been investigated, indicating that spectral registration needs to be within half a pixel and resolution needs to match within 1.5 to 2.6 pixels. Absolute errors are tabulated for derived compositions of each major element in each standard using PLS regression

  20. Pre-flight calibration and initial data processing for the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Lasue, J.; Forni, O.; Anderson, R. B.; Clegg, S.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D.; Barraclough, B. L.; Cousin, A.; Deflores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dyar, M. D.; Fabre, C.; Gasnault, O.; Lanza, N.; Mazoyer, J.; Melikechi, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Tokar, R. L.; Vaniman, D.

    2013-04-01

    The ChemCam instrument package on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is the first planetary science instrument to employ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine the compositions of geological samples on another planet. Pre-processing of the spectra involves subtracting the ambient light background, removing noise, removing the electron continuum, calibrating for the wavelength, correcting for the variable distance to the target, and applying a wavelength-dependent correction for the instrument response. Further processing of the data uses multivariate and univariate comparisons with a LIBS spectral library developed prior to launch as well as comparisons with several on-board standards post-landing. The level-2 data products include semi-quantitative abundances derived from partial least squares regression. A LIBS spectral library was developed using 69 rock standards in the form of pressed powder disks, glasses, and ceramics to minimize heterogeneity on the scale of the observation (350-550 μm dia.). The standards covered typical compositional ranges of igneous materials and also included sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates. The provenance and elemental and mineralogical compositions of these standards are described. Spectral characteristics of this data set are presented, including the size distribution and integrated irradiances of the plasmas, and a proxy for plasma temperature as a function of distance from the instrument. Two laboratory-based clones of ChemCam reside in Los Alamos and Toulouse for the purpose of adding new spectra to the database as the need arises. Sensitivity to differences in wavelength correlation to spectral channels and spectral resolution has been investigated, indicating that spectral registration needs to be within half a pixel and resolution needs to match within 1.5 to 2.6 pixels. Absolute errors are tabulated for derived compositions of each major element in each standard using PLS regression

  1. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  2. Evaluation of impact of length of calibration time period on the APEX model streamflow simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to resource constraints, continuous long-term measured data for model calibration and validation (C/V) are rare. As a result, most hydrologic and water quality models are calibrated and, if possible, validated using limited available measured data. However, little research has been carried out t...

  3. The impact of asynchronicity on event-flow estimation in basin-scale hydrologic model calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration of basin-scale hydrologic models consists of adjusting parameters such that simulated values closely match observed values. However, due to inevitable inaccuracies in models and model inputs, simulated response hydrographs for multi-year calibrations will not be perfectly synchroniz...

  4. Instrument study of the Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX) for a lunar lander mission II: Laboratory model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanwei; Strack, Heiko; Bugiel, Sebastian; Wu, Yiyong; Srama, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    A dust trajectory detector placed on the lunar surface is exposed to extend people's knowledge on the dust environment above the lunar surface. The new design of Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX) is well suited for lunar or asteroid landers with a broad range of particle charges (0.1-10 fC), speeds (few m s-1 to few km s-1) and sizes (0.1-10 μ m). The calibration of dust trajectory detector is important for the detector development. We do present experimental results to characterize the accuracy of the newly developed LDX laboratory model. Micron sized iron particles were accelerated to speed between 0.5 and 20 km s-1 with primary charges larger than 1 fC. The achieved accuracies of the detector are ± 5 % and ± 7 % for particle charge and speed, respectively. Dust trajectories can be determined with measurement accuracy better than ± 2°. A dust sensor of this type is suited for the exploration of the surface of small bodies without an atmosphere like the Earth's moon or asteroids in future, and the minisatellites are also suitable carriers for the study of interplanetary dust and manned debris on low Earth orbits.

  5. Investigation of the dynamic thermal infrared signatures of a calibration target instrumented with a network of 1-wire temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Gareth D.; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the temperature and thermal variations from a painted geometrical target (CUBI) fitted with a network of internally mounted 1-wire temperature sensors. The sensors, which were calibrated in a temperature-controlled oven, were recorded every 20 seconds over a period from May to December 2015. This amounts to an archive of approximately 180 days of near uninterrupted data. Two meteorological stations collocated with the CUBI on a roof test site, record relevant environmental parameters every few minutes. In this paper, we analyze the data for only one day, 2 October 2015, for which a wavelet analysis highlights the contribution of different temporal fluctuations to total signature. We selected this specific day since it represented simple environmental conditions, and additionally images from a 3-5 microns (MWIR) thermal imager were recorded. Finally, we demonstrate that a wavelet decomposition of the temperature signature to be a useful method to characterize dynamic temperature changes, and perhaps a method to verify prediction models for varying fluctuation scales.

  6. Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change. Report of a Workshop at the University of Maryland Inn and Conference Center, College Park, MD. , November 12-14, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohring, G.; Wielicki, B.; Spencer, R.; Emery, B.; Datla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. To address these problems and recommend directions for improvements in satellite instrument calibration some 75 scientists, including researchers who develop and analyze long-term data sets from satellites, experts in the field of satellite instrument calibration, and physicists working on state of the art calibration sources and standards met November 12 - 14, 2002 and discussed the issues. The workshop defined the absolute accuracies and long-term stabilities of global climate data sets that are needed to detect expected trends, translated these data set accuracies and stabilities to required satellite instrument accuracies and stabilities, and evaluated the ability of current observing systems to meet these requirements. The workshop's recommendations include a set of basic axioms or overarching principles that must guide high quality climate observations in general, and a roadmap for improving satellite instrument characterization, calibration, inter-calibration, and associated activities to meet the challenge of measuring global climate change. It is also recommended that a follow-up workshop be conducted to discuss implementation of the roadmap developed at this workshop.

  7. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  8. Definition of the limit of quantification in the presence of instrumental and non-instrumental errors. Comparison among various definitions applied to the calibration of zinc by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badocco, Denis; Lavagnini, Irma; Mondin, Andrea; Favaro, Gabriella; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The limit of quantification (LOQ) in the presence of instrumental and non-instrumental errors was proposed. It was theoretically defined combining the two-component variance regression and LOQ schemas already present in the literature and applied to the calibration of zinc by the ICP-MS technique. At low concentration levels, the two-component variance LOQ definition should be always used above all when a clean room is not available. Three LOQ definitions were accounted for. One of them in the concentration and two in the signal domain. The LOQ computed in the concentration domain, proposed by Currie, was completed by adding the third order terms in the Taylor expansion because they are of the same order of magnitude of the second ones so that they cannot be neglected. In this context, the error propagation was simplified by eliminating the correlation contributions by using independent random variables. Among the signal domain definitions, a particular attention was devoted to the recently proposed approach based on at least one significant digit in the measurement. The relative LOQ values resulted very large in preventing the quantitative analysis. It was found that the Currie schemas in the signal and concentration domains gave similar LOQ values but the former formulation is to be preferred as more easily computable.

  9. Nimbus-7 TOMS Version 7 Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellemeyer, C. G.; Taylor, S. L.; Jaross, G.; DeLand, M. T.; Seftor, C. J.; Labow, G.; Swissler, T. J.; Cebula, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an improved instrument characterization used for the Version 7 processing of the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data record. An improved internal calibration technique referred to as spectral discrimination is used to provide long-term calibration precision of +/- 1%/decade in total column ozone amount. A revised wavelength scale results in a day one calibration that agrees with other satellite and ground-based measurements of total ozone, while a wavelength independent adjustment of the initial radiometric calibration constants provides good agreement with surface reflectivity measured by other satellite-borne ultraviolet measurements. The impact of other aspects of the Nimbus-7 TOMS instrument performance are also discussed. The Version 7 data should be used in all future studies involving the Nimbus-7 TOMS measurements of ozone. The data are available through the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Distributive Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Laboratory Measurements on Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 Supporting the Calibration of Instruments for Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simõs, F.; Trautner, R.; Grard, R.; Hamelin, M.

    2004-04-01

    The concentration of water in the Martian regolith is an important parameter in many scientific domains. The abundance and distribution of water in the atmosphere and under the surface of Mars have fundamental significance for the geological, hydrological and climatic history of the planet. Furthermore, water is a fundamental ingredient of life and represents an important potential resource for future manned missions. Water possesses an electrical signature that allows the identification of its presence among other materials, even at very low concentrations. Not only the permittivity, but also the conductivity of permafrost and water-bearing rocks depends upon the presence of water. A laboratory facility has been set up to measure the complex permittivity of soil mixtures as a function of porosity, humidity, and temperature in the frequency range 10 Hz 10 kHz. The experimental technique is presented and the results obtained with the JSC Mars-1 soil simulant are discussed. A measurable gravimetric water content threshold is evaluated. The measurement of the dielectric properties of soil analogues allows estimating conductivity and permittivity of the Martian regolith, and supports the design of instruments for the detection of water and ice.

  11. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  12. An SLF magnetic antenna calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimin, Feng; Suihua, Zhou; Zhiyi, Chen; Hongxin, Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Calibrating the super low frequency (SLF) magnetic antenna in magnetic free space or an outdoor environment is difficult and complicated due to the large size calibration instruments and lots of measurement times. Aiming to calibrate the SLF magnetic antenna simply and efficiently, a calibration system comprised of a multi-frequency source, an AC constant-current source and a solenoid is proposed according to the characteristic of an SLF magnetic antenna. The static magnetic transfer coefficient of the designed solenoid is calibrated. The measurement of the frequency response characteristics suggests the transfer coefficient remains unchanged in the range of the SLF band and is unaffected by the magnetic antenna internally installed. The CORDIC algorithm implemented in an FPGA is realized to generate a linear evenly-spaced multi-frequency signal with equal energy at each frequency. An AC constant weak current source circuit is designed in order to avoid the impact on the magnetic induction intensity of a calibration system affected by impedance variation when frequency changing, linearity and the precision of the source are measured. The frequency characteristic of a magnetic antenna calibrated by the proposed calibration system agrees with the theoretical result and the standard Glass ring calibration result. The calibration precision satisfies the experimental requirement.

  13. Sex Differences and the Impact of Chronic Stress and Recovery on Instrumental Learning

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Angela L.; Fransen, Kathryn M. H.; Elliott, Kevin S.; Elghouche, Alhasan; Kostylev, Polina V.; O'Dea, Pamela K.; Garraghty, Preston E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that 21-day chronic restraint stress impacts instrumental learning, but overall few studies have examined sex differences on the impact of stress on learning. We further examined sex differences in response to extended 42-day chronic stress on instrumental learning, as well as recovery from chronic stress. Rats were tested in aversive training tasks with or without prior appetitive experience, and daily body weight data was collected as an index of stress. Relative to control animals, reduced body weight was maintained from day 22 through day 42 across the stress period for males, but not for females. Stressed males had increased response speed and lower learning efficiency during appetitive acquisition and aversive learning. Males overall showed slower escape shaping times and more shock exposure. In contrast, stressed females showed slower appetitive response speeds and higher appetitive and aversive efficiency but overall reduced avoidance rates during acquisition and maintenance for transfer animals and during maintenance for aversive-only animals. These tasks reveal important nuances on the effect of stress on goal-directed behavior and further highlight sexually divergent effects on appetitive versus aversive motivation. Furthermore, these data underscore that systems are temporally impacted by chronic stress in a sexually divergent pattern. PMID:26317113

  14. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  15. Design and Calibration of a Raman Spectrometer for use in a Laser Spectroscopy Instrument Intended to Analyze Martian Surface and Atmospheric Characteristics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, John F.; Hornef, James

    2016-01-01

    This project's goal is the design of a Raman spectroscopy instrument to be utilized by NASA in an integrated spectroscopy strategy that will include Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Induced Florescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for molecule and element identification on Mars Europa, and various asteroids. The instrument is to be down scaled from a dedicated rover mounted instrument into a compact unit with the same capabilities and accuracy as the larger instrument. The focus for this design is a spectrometer that utilizes Raman spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a calculated range of 218 nm wavelength spectrum with a resolution of 1.23 nm. To filter out the laser source wavelength of 532 nm the spectrometer design utilizes a 532 nm wavelength dichroic mirror and a 532 nm wavelength notch filter. The remaining scatter signal is concentrated by a 20 x microscopic objective through a 25-micron vertical slit into a 5mm diameter, 1cm focal length double concave focusing lens. The light is then diffracted by a 1600 Lines per Millimeter (L/mm) dual holographic transmission grating. This spectrum signal is captured by a 1-inch diameter double convex 3 cm focal length capture lens. An Intensified Charge Couple Device (ICCD) is placed within the initial focal cone of the capture lens and the Raman signal captured is to be analyzed through spectroscopy imaging software. This combination allows for accurate Raman spectroscopy to be achieved. The components for the spectrometer have been bench tested in a series of prototype developments based on theoretical calculations, alignment, and scaling strategies. The mounting platform is 2.5 cm wide by 8.8 cm long by 7 cm height. This platform has been tested and calibrated with various sources such as a neon light source and ruby crystal. This platform is intended to be enclosed in a ruggedized enclosure for mounting on a rover platform. The size and functionality of the Raman spectrometer allows for the rover to

  16. Assessing the impacts of precipitation bias on distributed hydrologic model calibration and prediction accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, Jonathan P.; Vieux, Baxter E.; Moreno, Maria A.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryPhysics-based distributed (PBD) hydrologic models predict runoff throughout a basin using the laws of conservation of mass and momentum, and benefit from more accurate and representative precipitation input. V flo™ is a gridded distributed hydrologic model that predicts runoff and continuously updates soil moisture. As a participating model in the second Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP2), V flo™ is applied to the Illinois and Blue River basins in Oklahoma. Model parameters are derived from geospatial data for initial setup, and then adjusted to reproduce the observed flow under continuous time-series simulations and on an event basis. Simulation results demonstrate that certain runoff events are governed by saturation excess processes, while in others, infiltration-rate excess processes dominate. Streamflow prediction accuracy is enhanced when multi-sensor precipitation estimates (MPE) are bias corrected through re-analysis of the MPE provided in the DMIP2 experiment, resulting in gauge-corrected precipitation estimates (GCPE). Model calibration identified a set of parameters that minimized objective functions for errors in runoff volume and instantaneous discharge. Simulated streamflow for the Blue and Illinois River basins, have Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients between 0.61 and 0.68, respectively, for the 1996-2002 period using GCPE. The streamflow prediction accuracy improves by 74% in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency when GCPE is used during the calibration period. Without model calibration, excellent agreement between hourly simulated and observed discharge is obtained for the Illinois, whereas in the Blue River, adjustment of parameters affecting both saturation and infiltration-rate excess processes were necessary. During the 1996-2002 period, GCPE input was more important than model calibration for the Blue River, while model calibration proved more important for the Illinois River. During the verification period (2002

  17. The Impact of a School Loaner-Instrument Program on the Attitudes and Achievement of Low-Income Music Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ester, Don; Turner, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a public school loaner-instrument program on the attitudes and achievement of low-income students in an urban environment. Socioeconomic Status (SES) and Instrument Status served as independent variables. Participants (N = 245) completed surveys at the beginning and end of the school year,…

  18. Scientific Impact of MODIS C5 Calibration Degradation and C6+ Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Xiong, X.; Meister, G.; Platnick, S.; Levy, R.; Franz, B.; Korkin, S.; Hilker, T.; Tucker, J.; Hall, F.; Sellers, P.; Wu, A.; Angal, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) land and atmosphere data sets are scheduled for release in 2014. C6 contains significant revisions of the calibration approach to account for sensor aging. This analysis documents the presence of systematic temporal trends in the visible and near-infrared (500 m) bands of the Collection 5 (C5) MODIS Terra and, to lesser extent, in MODIS Aqua geophysical data sets. Sensor degradation is largest in the blue band (B3) of the MODIS sensor on Terra and decreases with wavelength. Calibration degradation causes negative global trends in multiple MODIS C5 products including the dark target algorithm's aerosol optical depth over land and Ångstrom exponent over the ocean, global liquid water and ice cloud optical thickness, as well as surface reflectance and vegetation indices, including the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI). As the C5 production will be maintained for another year in parallel with C6, one objective of this paper is to raise awareness of the calibration-related trends for the broad MODIS user community. The new C6 calibration approach removes major calibrations trends in the Level 1B (L1B) data. This paper also introduces an enhanced C6C calibration of the MODIS data set which includes an additional polarization correction (PC) to compensate for the increased polarization sensitivity of MODIS Terra since about 2007, as well as detrending and Terra- Aqua cross-calibration over quasi-stable desert calibration sites. The PC algorithm, developed by the MODIS ocean biology processing group (OBPG), removes residual scan angle, mirror side and seasonal biases from aerosol and surface reflectance (SR) records along with spectral distortions of SR. Using the multiangle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm over deserts, we have also developed a detrending and cross-calibration method which removes residual decadal trends on

  19. Scientific impact of MODIS C5 calibration degradation and C6+ improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Xiong, X.; Meister, G.; Platnick, S.; Levy, R.; Franz, B.; Korkin, S.; Hilker, T.; Tucker, J.; Hall, F.; Sellers, P.; Wu, A.; Angal, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) land and atmosphere data sets are scheduled for release in 2014. C6 contains significant revisions of the calibration approach to account for sensor aging. This analysis documents the presence of systematic temporal trends in the visible and near-infrared (500 m) bands of the Collection 5 (C5) MODIS Terra and, to lesser extent, in MODIS Aqua geophysical data sets. Sensor degradation is largest in the blue band (B3) of the MODIS sensor on Terra and decreases with wavelength. Calibration degradation causes negative global trends in multiple MODIS C5 products including the dark target algorithm's aerosol optical depth over land and Ångström exponent over the ocean, global liquid water and ice cloud optical thickness, as well as surface reflectance and vegetation indices, including the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI). As the C5 production will be maintained for another year in parallel with C6, one objective of this paper is to raise awareness of the calibration-related trends for the broad MODIS user community. The new C6 calibration approach removes major calibrations trends in the Level 1B (L1B) data. This paper also introduces an enhanced C6+ calibration of the MODIS data set which includes an additional polarization correction (PC) to compensate for the increased polarization sensitivity of MODIS Terra since about 2007, as well as detrending and Terra-Aqua cross-calibration over quasi-stable desert calibration sites. The PC algorithm, developed by the MODIS ocean biology processing group (OBPG), removes residual scan angle, mirror side and seasonal biases from aerosol and surface reflectance (SR) records along with spectral distortions of SR. Using the multiangle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm over deserts, we have also developed a detrending and cross-calibration method which removes residual decadal trends on

  20. Science impact of MODIS C5 calibration degradation and C6+ improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Xiong, X.; Meister, G.; Platnick, S.; Levy, R.; Franz, B.; Korkin, S.; Hilker, T.; Tucker, J.; Hall, F.; Sellers, P.; Wu, A.; Angal, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Collection 6 (C6) MODIS land and atmosphere datasets are scheduled for release in 2014. C6 contains significant revisions of the calibration approach to account for sensor aging. This analysis documents the presence of systematic temporal trends in the visible and near-infrared (500 m) bands of the Collection 5 (C5) MODIS Terra, and to lesser extent, in MODIS Aqua geophysical datasets. Sensor degradation is largest in the Blue band (B3) of the MODIS sensor on Terra and decreases with wavelength. Calibration degradation causes negative global trends in multiple MODIS C5 products including the dark target algorithm's aerosol optical depth over land and Ångström Exponent over the ocean, global liquid water and ice cloud optical thickness, as well as surface reflectance and vegetation indices, including the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI). As the C5 production will be maintained for another year in parallel with C6, one objective of this paper is to raise awareness of the calibration-related trends for the broad MODIS user community. The new C6 calibration approach removes major calibrations trends in the Level 1B (L1B) data. This paper also introduces an enhanced C6+ calibration of the MODIS dataset which includes an additional polarization correction (PC) to compensate for the increased polarization sensitivity of MODIS Terra since about 2007, as well as de-trending and Terra-Aqua cross-calibration over quasi-stable desert calibration sites. The PC algorithm, developed by the MODIS ocean biology processing group (OBPG), removes residual scan angle, mirror side and seasonal biases from aerosol and surface reflectance (SR) records along with spectral distortions of SR. Using the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm over deserts, we have also developed a de-trending and cross-calibration method which removes residual decadal trends on the order of several tenths of one percent of

  1. Monitoring of Refractory Wall recession using high temperature impact echo instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    University of Dayton

    2004-04-30

    Regression of refractory linings of furnaces occurs due to a variety of mechanisms. The specific mechanism selected for investigation during this program is the regression of refractories which are in direct contact with a liquid corrodant. Examples include the melting of glass, the production of pig iron and steel, and the melting of aluminum. The rates of regression to a wall thickness which requires reline or extensive reconstruction vary widely, from less than a year to over ten years depending on the specific service environment. This program investigated the feasibility of measuring refractory wall thickness with an impact-echo method while at operating temperature (wall temperatures exceeding 500 C). The impact-echo method uses the impact of a small sphere with the surface of the test object to send a stress wave into the object. In a plate-like structure, the stress wave reflects back to the front surface, reverberating in the structure and causing a periodic surface displacement whose frequency is inversely proportional to the thickness of the test object. Impact-echo testing was chosen because it requires access to only one side of the test object and could be performed during the operation of a refractory structure. Commercially-available impact-echo instrumentation is available for room temperature use for a variety of tests on concrete. The enabling technology for this work was to use a high-temperature piezoelectric material, aluminum nitride, as the receiving sensor for the stress waves, allowing its use on refractories during furnace operation.

  2. Impacted canine extraction by ridge expansion using air scaler surgical instruments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agabiti, Ivo; Bernardello, Fabio; Nevins, Myron; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-01-01

    The presence of an impacted tooth interferes with ideal implant placement. In such cases, atraumatic extraction is recommended in order to avoid difficult and complex bone regeneration procedures. In the present case report, a novel surgical approach to extract a horizontally impacted canine using an edentulous ridge expansion (ERE) technique and air scaler surgical devices is described. A 74-year-old female patient had a maxillary left horizontally impacted canine. The tooth was extracted after elevating a partial-thickness flap and performing an ERE technique using air scaler surgical instruments. The impacted tooth was fragmented through the breach created in the expanded ridge, and the fragments were carefully removed. A suitably sized implant was placed at the time of surgery. The treated site healed without complication. The implant was integrated, successfully restored, and stable after a 3-year follow-up period. This case report demonstrates a novel surgical approach to extract an impacted canine through ridge expansion, using air scaler surgical devices that allow implant placement in an ideal position. PMID:25171039

  3. Spatial Patterns of Climate Impact from Anthropogenic Aerosols in the Early Instrumental Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollasina, M. A.; Undorf, S.; Hegerl, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols have emerged as an important player affecting global and regional climate with significant impacts on both the energy and water cycles. The early instrumental period (1850-1950), characterized by the increase of North American and especially European aerosol emissions concurrently with negligible Asian emissions and relatively low carbon dioxide concentrations, is an interesting case study to isolate the aerosol impact.Observations and historical experiments with state-of-the-art CMIP5 models are used to identify regions affected by aerosols. We compare the spatial and temporal patterns of climate variables such as surface temperature and precipitation with those of aerosol emissions and aerosol optical depth (AOD). In addition to regions showing the expected relationship between increasing sulfate emissions and decreasing surface temperatures, we see regions and decades with a more complex temperature response, and the first third of the twentieth century stands out as an especially interesting period. The contribution of atmospheric circulation changes is also pointed out.

  4. WFC3: UVIS Dark Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gunning, Heather C.; MacKenty, John W.

    2014-06-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), has exhibited excellent performance since its installation during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, is one of two channels available on WFC3 and is named for its ultraviolet and visible light sensitivity. We present the various procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which monitors the health and stability of the UVIS detector, provides characterization of hot pixels and dark current, and produces calibration files to be used as a correction for dark current in science images. We describe the long-term growth of hot pixels and the impacts that UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses, postflashing, and proximity to the readout amplifiers have on the population. We also discuss the evolution of the median dark current, which has been slowly increasing since the start of the mission and is currently ~6 e-/hr/pix, averaged across each chip. We outline the current algorithm for creating UVIS dark calibration files, which includes aggressive cosmic ray masking, image combination, and hot pixel flagging. Calibration products are available to the user community, typically 3-5 days after initial processing, through the Calibration Database System (CDBS). Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration and monitoring procedures. UVIS dark monitoring will continue throughout and beyond HST’s current proposal cycle.

  5. Environmental impact assessment (EIA): an overlooked instrument for sustainable development in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Rashid; Sattar, Ayesha; Iqbal, Zafar; Imran, Muhammad; Nadeem, Raziya

    2012-04-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a policy tool used for evaluating a project proposal from physical and socioeconomic environmental perspectives. Its aim is to reduce the impact of development on environment, hence, ensuring environmental sustainability. It is mandatory to submit an Environmental Impact Statement before starting a mega project as required by Environmental Protection Act of 1997 and Environmental Policy of Pakistan. Public consultation plays a key role in an EIA system, identifying the likely aspects and impacts of a development activity. This aspect has been ignored in effective enactment of environmental legislation in Pakistan. Sufficient legislative instruments are there to support EIA system in the country but the agencies responsible for the enforcement of environmental regulations have failed to do so. The current research gives an insight into the actual status of EIA system in Pakistan along with the feedback of EIA specialists and university teachers of the concerned departments. A new index has been devised on the basis of questionnaire response to work out the overall performance of EIA system in Pakistan or any other country. The weaknesses and deficiencies of each EIA stage have been worked out for Pakistan and elaborated with the help of the controversial Zero point Interchange Project in the capital city of Pakistan. PMID:21887481

  6. The impact of considering uncertainty in measured calibration/validation data during auto-calibration of hydrologic and water quality models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of uncertainty inherent in measured calibration/validation data is frequently stated in literature, but it is not often considered in calibrating and evaluating hydrologic and water quality models. This is due to the limited amount of data available to support relevant research and t...

  7. The impact of initial spread calibration on the RELO ensemble and its application to Lagrangian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Jacobs, G.; Rowley, C.; Barron, C. N.; Hogan, P.; Spence, P.; Smedstad, O. M.; Martin, P.; Muscarella, P.; Coelho, E.

    2013-09-01

    A number of real-time ocean model forecasts were carried out successfully at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to provide modeling support and numerical guidance to the CARTHE GLAD at-sea experiment during summer 2012. Two RELO ensembles and three single models using NCOM and HYCOM with different resolutions were carried out. A calibrated ensemble system with enhanced spread and reliability was developed to better support this experiment. The calibrated ensemble is found to outperform the un-calibrated ensemble in forecasting accuracy, skill, and reliability for all the variables and observation spaces evaluated. The metrics used in this paper include RMS error, anomaly correlation, PECA, Brier score, spread reliability, and Talagrand rank histogram. It is also found that even the un-calibrated ensemble outperforms the single forecast from the model with the same resolution. The advantages of the ensembles are further extended to the Lagrangian framework. In contrast to a single model forecast, the RELO ensemble provides not only the most likely Lagrangian trajectory for a particle in the ocean, but also an uncertainty estimate that directly reflects the complicated ocean dynamics, which is valuable for decision makers. The examples show that the calibrated ensemble with more reliability can capture trajectories in different, even opposite, directions, which would be missed by the un-calibrated ensemble. The ensembles are applied to compute the repelling and attracting Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs), and the uncertainties of the LCSs, which are hard to obtain from a single model forecast, are estimated. It is found that the spatial scales of the LCSs depend on the model resolution. The model with the highest resolution produces the finest, small-scale, LCS structures, while the model with lowest resolution generates only large-scale LCSs. The repelling and attracting LCSs are found to intersect at many locations and create complex mesoscale eddies. The fluid

  8. Outcome related to impact on daily living: preliminary validation of the ORIDL instrument

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, David; Mercer, Stewart W; Bikker, Annemieke P; Harrison, Tansy

    2007-01-01

    Background The challenge of finding practical, patient-rated outcome measures is a key issue in the evaluation of health care systems and interventions. The ORIDL (Outcome in Relation to Impact on Daily Living) instrument (formerly referred to as the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital Outcomes Scale or GHHOS) has been developed to measure patient's views of the outcome of their care by asking about change, and relating this to impact on daily life. The aim of the present paper is to describe the background and potential uses of the ORIDL, and to report on its preliminary validation in a series of three studies in secondary and primary care. Methods In the first study, 105 patients attending the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital (GHH) were followed-up at 12 months and changes in health status were measured by the EuroQol (EQOL) and the ORIDL. In the second study, 187 new patients at the GHH were followed-up at 3, 12, and 33 months, using the ORIDL, the Short Form 12 (SF-12), and the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP). In study three, 323 patients in primary care were followed for 1 month post-consultation using the ORIDL and MYMOP. In all 3 studies the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) was also used as an outcome measure. Results Study 1 showed substantial improvements in main complaint and well-being over 12 months using the ORIDL, with two-thirds of patients reporting improvements in daily living. These improvements were not significantly correlated with changes in serial measures of the EQOL between baseline and 12 months, but were correlated with the EQOL transitions measure. Study 2 showed step-wise improvements in ORIDL scores between 3 and 33 months, which were only weakly associated with similar changes in SF-12 scores. However, MYMOP change scores correlated well with ORIDL scores at all time points. Study 3 showed similar high correlations between ORIDL scores and MYMOP scores. In all 3 studies, ORIDL scores were also significantly correlated with

  9. Instrumented impact properties of zircaloy-oxygen and zircaloy-hydrogen alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1980-04-01

    Instrumented-impact tests were performed on subsize Charpy speciments of Zircaloy-2 and -4 with up to approx. 1.3 wt % oxygen and approx. 2500 wt ppM hydrogen at temperatures between 373 and 823/sup 0/K. Self-consistent criteria for the ductile-to-brittle transition, based upon a total absorbed energy of approx. 1.3 x 10/sup 4/ J/m/sup 2/, a dynamic fracture toughness of approx. 10 MPa.m/sup 1/2/, and a ductility index of approx. 0, were established relative to the temperature and oxygen concentration of the transformed BETA-phase material. The effect of hydrogen concentration and hydride morphology, produced by cooling Zircaloy-2 specimens through the temperature range of the BETA ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' = hydride phase transformation at approx. 0.3 and 3 K/s, on the impact properties was determined at temperatures between 373 and 673 K. On an atom fraction basis, oxygen has a greater effect than hydrogen on the impact properties of Zircaloy at temperatures between approx. 400 and 600 K. 34 figures.

  10. Calibration of PS09, PS10, and PS11 trans-Alaska pipeline system strong-motion instruments, with acceleration, velocity, and displacement records of the Denali fault earthquake, 03 November 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Jensen, E. Gray; Sell, Russell; Stephens, Christopher D.; Nyman, Douglas J.; Hamilton, Robert C.; Hager, William C.

    2006-01-01

    In September, 2003, the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (APSC) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) embarked on a joint effort to extract, test, and calibrate the accelerometers, amplifiers, and bandpass filters from the earthquake monitoring systems (EMS) at Pump Stations 09, 10, and 11 of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). These were the three closest strong-motion seismographs to the Denali fault when it ruptured in the MW 7.9 earthquake of 03 November 2002 (22:12:41 UTC). The surface rupture is only 3.0 km from PS10 and 55.5 km from PS09 but PS11 is 124.2 km away from a small rupture splay and 126.9 km from the main trace. Here we briefly describe precision calibration results for all three instruments. Included with this report is a link to the seismograms reprocessed using these new calibrations: http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/data_sets/20021103_2212_taps.html Calibration information in this paper applies at the time of the Denali fault earthquake (03 November 2002), but not necessarily at other times because equipment at these stations is changed by APSC personnel at irregular intervals. In particular, the equipment at PS09, PS10, and PS11 was changed by our joint crew in September, 2003, so that we could perform these calibrations. The equipment stayed the same from at least the time of the earthquake until that retrieval, and these calibrations apply for that interval.

  11. Impact of Calibrated Land Surface Model Parameters on the Accuracy and Uncertainty of Land-Atmosphere Coupling in WRF Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Ken; Zhou, Shujia

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  12. Impact of and correction for instrument sensitivity drift on nanoparticle size measurements by single-particle ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    El Hadri, Hind; Petersen, Elijah J; Winchester, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    The effect of ICP-MS instrument sensitivity drift on the accuracy of nanoparticle (NP) size measurements using single particle (sp)ICP-MS is investigated. Theoretical modeling and experimental measurements of the impact of instrument sensitivity drift are in agreement and indicate that drift can impact the measured size of spherical NPs by up to 25 %. Given this substantial bias in the measured size, a method was developed using an internal standard to correct for the impact of drift and was shown to accurately correct for a decrease in instrument sensitivity of up to 50 % for 30 and 60 nm gold nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract Correction of nanoparticle size measurement by spICP-MS using an internal standard. PMID:26894759

  13. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  14. Quantifying the impact of nitric oxide calibration gas mixture oxidation on reported nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Bryan P.; Quincey, Paul G.; Green, David; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    Chemiluminescent analysers for measuring nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air are generally calibrated with certified gas standard cylinders of NO in nitrogen. Verification of the NOx and NO amount fractions has been carried out on many such 'on-site' calibration cylinders at air quality monitoring stations. These measurements indicate that significant numbers of these gas mixtures have become somewhat degraded, with several percent of the NO oxidised to NO2. The effect of not compensating for this degradation on reported concentrations is discussed. If such degradation is not quantified and corrected for, there will be a systematic under-reporting of NO2 concentrations, which, due to the non-linearity of the effect, could reduce high reported NO2 concentrations at kerbside sites by around 20%. This could significantly reduce the number of reported exceedances of the NO2 limit value at such sites, compared to results obtained where there is no degradation of the NO cylinder.

  15. Should different impact assessment instruments be integrated? Evidence from English spatial planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Ryo; Fischer, Thomas B.

    2013-07-15

    This paper aims at providing empirical evidence to the question as to whether integration of different instruments is achieving its aim in supporting sustainable decision making, focusing on SEA inclusive sustainability appraisal (SA) and other impact assessments (IAs) currently used in English spatial planning. Usage of IAs in addition to SA is established and an analysis of the integration approach (in terms of process, output, and assessor) as well as its effectiveness is conducted. It is found that while integration enhances effectiveness to some extent, too much integration, especially in terms of the procedural element, appears to diminish the overall effectiveness of each IA in influencing decisions as they become captured by the balancing function of SA. -- Highlights: ► The usage of different impact assessments in English spatial planning is clarified. ► The relationship between integration approach and effectiveness is analyzed. ► Results suggest that integration does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. ► Careful consideration is recommended upon process integration.

  16. Spatial patterns of substantial climate impact from anthropogenic aerosols in the early instrumental period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Undorf, Sabine; Bollasina, Massimo; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    While many aspects of climate variation in the early instrumental period (1860-1950) are still unexplained, for instance the early twentieth-century warming from the 1910s to the 1940s, the role of anthropogenic aerosols in this period has been overlooked. Yet, the period is also an interesting case study to isolate aerosol impacts since it is characterised by the increase of North American and especially European aerosol emissions concurrently with negligible Asian emissions and relatively low carbon dioxide concentrations. We thus analyse the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol impact for this period in available observations (NOAA 20th-century reanalysis, etc.) and historical single-forcing and all-forcing experiments with state-of-the-art CMIP5 models. We make use of coupled empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) applied to surface temperature -the most reliable variable in observations- and different aerosol indicating variables such as aerosol optical depth and short-wave downward radiation, some of which include aerosol indirect effects. The principal components of the most important EOFs are then regressed onto sea level pressure, winds, and other variables to identify associated circulation patterns. A decomposition into multi-decadal and longer time scales is performed by filtering the data prior to the analysis. Our analysis reveals both statistically significant local and non-local aerosol impact and identifies circulation states associated with the temperature response. The results are consistent across different aerosol variables, and show a strong non-local response as well as specific differences between time scales. We find a distinctive circulation pattern which strongly resembles observations and might explain the observed early twentieth century warming in the Arctic.

  17. Improved Detection System Description and New Method for Accurate Calibration of Micro-Channel Plate Based Instruments and Its Use in the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliese, U.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Kujawski, J. T.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Chornay, D. J.; Cao, N. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Zeuch, M. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Jacques, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission employs 16 Dual Electron Spectrometers (DESs) and 16 Dual Ion Spectrometers (DISs) with 4 of each type on each of 4 spacecraft to enable fast (30 ms for electrons; 150 ms for ions) and spatially differentiated measurements of the full 3D particle velocity distributions. This approach presents a new and challenging aspect to the calibration and operation of these instruments on ground and in flight. The response uniformity, the reliability of their calibration and the approach to handling any temporal evolution of these calibrated characteristics all assume enhanced importance in this application, where we attempt to understand the meaning of particle distributions within the ion and electron diffusion regions of magnetically reconnecting plasmas. Traditionally, the micro-channel plate (MCP) based detection systems for electrostatic particle spectrometers have been calibrated using the plateau curve technique. In this, a fixed detection threshold is set. The detection system count rate is then measured as a function of MCP voltage to determine the MCP voltage that ensures the count rate has reached a constant value independent of further variation in the MCP voltage. This is achieved when most of the MCP pulse height distribution (PHD) is located at higher values (larger pulses) than the detection system discrimination threshold. This method is adequate in single-channel detection systems and in multi-channel detection systems with very low crosstalk between channels. However, in dense multi-channel systems, it can be inadequate. Furthermore, it fails to fully describe the behavior of the detection system and individually characterize each of its fundamental parameters. To improve this situation, we have developed a detailed phenomenological description of the detection system, its behavior and its signal, crosstalk and noise sources. Based on this, we have devised a new detection

  18. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  19. Neighborhood Poverty Impacts Children's Physical Health and Well-Being over Time: Evidence from the Early Development Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushon, Jennifer A.; Vu, Lan T. H.; Janzen, Bonnie L.; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to investigate how neighborhoods and neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage impact school readiness over time. School readiness was measured using the Early Development Instrument (EDI) for 3 populations of kindergartners in 2001, 2003, and 2005 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. EDI results…

  20. Data-Informed Decision Making on High-Impact Strategies: Developing and Validating an Instrument for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Cooley, Van E.; Ma, Xin; Reeves, Patricia L.; Burt, Walter L.; Rainey, J. Mark; Yuan, Wenhui

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors connect 3 streams of literature to develop an instrument for measuring the degree to which principals engage in data-informed decision making on high-impact strategies that are empirically associated with higher student achievement. The 3 literature streams are (a) the importance of data-informed decision making, (b) the…

  1. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  2. The impact of clinical use on the torsional behavior of Reciproc and WaveOne instruments

    PubMed Central

    de MAGALHÃES, Rafael Rodrigues Soares; BRAGA, Lígia Carolina Moreira; PEREIRA, Érika Sales Joviano; PEIXOTO, Isabella Faria da Cunha; BUONO, Vicente Tadeu Lopes; BAHIA, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Torsional overload is a fracture representative parameter for instruments in single-file techniques. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the influence of clinical use, in vivo, on the torsional behavior of Reciproc and WaveOne instruments considering the possibility that they degraded with use. Material and Methods Diameter at each millimeter, pitch length, and area at 3 mm from the tip were determined for both types of instruments. Twenty-four instruments, size 25, 0.08 taper, of each system were divided into two groups (n=12 each): Control Group (CG), in which new Reciproc (RC) and WaveOne Primary (WO) instruments were tested in torsion until rupture based on ISO 3630-1; and Experimental Group (EG), in which each new instrument was clinically used to clean and shape the root canals of one molar. After clinical use, the instruments were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and subsequently tested in torsion until fracture. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance at a=.05. Results WO instruments showed significantly higher mean values of cross-sectional area A3 (P=0.000) and smaller pitch lengths than RC instruments with no statistically significant differences in the diameter at D3 (P=0.521). No significant differences in torsional resistance between the RC and WO new instruments (P=0.134) were found. The clinical use resulted in a tendency of reduction in the maximum torque of the analyzed instruments but no statistically significant difference was observed between them (P=0.327). During the preparation of the root canals, two fractured RC instruments and longitudinal and transversal cracks in RC and WO instruments were observed through SEM analysis. Conclusion After clinical use, no statistically significant reduction in the torsional resistance was observed. PMID:27556200

  3. The Impact of Gait Disability on the Calibration of Accelerometer Output in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Accelerometer activity counts have been correlated with energy expenditure during treadmill walking among ambulatory adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the effects of gait disability on 1) the association between rates of energy expenditure and accelerometer output in overground walking and 2) the calibration of accelerometer output for quantifying time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in people with MS. The sample consisted of 24 individuals with MS, of whom 10 reported gait disability based on Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scores. The participants undertook three 6-minute periods of overground walking while wearing an accelerometer and a portable metabolic unit (K4b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). In the first period of walking, the participants walked at a self-selected, comfortable speed. In the two subsequent walking periods, participants walked at speeds above and below (±0.5 mph) the comfortable walking speed, respectively. Strong linear relationships were observed between rates of accelerometer activity counts and energy expenditure during walking in the overall sample (R2 = 0.90) and subsamples with (R2 = 0.88) and without gait disability (R2 = 0.91). The slope of the relationship was significantly steeper in the subsample with gait disability (β= 0.0049) than in the subsample without gait disability (β= 0.0026). The difference in slopes resulted in a significantly lower cut-point for MVPA (1886 vs. 2717 counts/min) in those with gait disability. These findings provide a metabolic cut-point for quantifying time spent in MVPA in people with MS, both with and without gait disability. PMID:24453722

  4. Aquarius Whole Range Calibration: Celestial Sky, Ocean, and Land Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Bindlish, Rajat; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius is a spaceborne instrument that uses L-band radiometers to monitor sea surface salinity globally. Other applications of its data over land and the cryosphere are being developed. Combining its measurements with existing and upcoming L-band sensors will allow for long term studies. For that purpose, the radiometers calibration is critical. Aquarius measurements are currently calibrated over the oceans. They have been found too cold at the low end (celestial sky) of the brightness temperature scale, and too warm at the warm end (land and ice). We assess the impact of the antenna pattern model on the biases and propose a correction. We re-calibrate Aquarius measurements using the corrected antenna pattern and measurements over the Sky and oceans. The performances of the new calibration are evaluated using measurements over well instrument land sites.

  5. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  6. Modeller subjectivity and calibration impacts on hydrological model applications: an event-based comparison for a road-adjacent catchment in south-east Norway.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Zahra; Lyon, Steve W; Jansson, Per-Erik; Stolte, Jannes; French, Helen K; Folkeson, Lennart; Sassner, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Identifying a 'best' performing hydrologic model in a practical sense is difficult due to the potential influences of modeller subjectivity on, for example, calibration procedure and parameter selection. This is especially true for model applications at the event scale where the prevailing catchment conditions can have a strong impact on apparent model performance and suitability. In this study, two lumped models (CoupModel and HBV) and two physically-based distributed models (LISEM and MIKE SHE) were applied to a small catchment upstream of a road in south-eastern Norway. All models were calibrated to a single event representing typical winter conditions in the region and then applied to various other winter events to investigate the potential impact of calibration period and methodology on model performance. Peak flow and event-based hydrographs were simulated differently by all models leading to differences in apparent model performance under this application. In this case-study, the lumped models appeared to be better suited for hydrological events that differed from the calibration event (i.e., events when runoff was generated from rain on non-frozen soils rather than from rain and snowmelt on frozen soil) while the more physical-based approaches appeared better suited during snowmelt and frozen soil conditions more consistent with the event-specific calibration. This was due to the combination of variations in subsurface conditions over the eight events considered, the subsequent ability of the models to represent the impact of the conditions (particularly when subsurface conditions varied greatly from the calibration event), and the different approaches adopted to calibrate the models. These results indicate that hydrologic models may not only need to be selected on a case-by-case basis but also have their performance evaluated on an application-by-application basis since how a model is applied can be equally important as inherent model structure. PMID

  7. Forecasting the impact of an 1859-calibre superstorm on satellite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenwald, Sten; Green, James; Taylor, William

    2006-01-01

    We have developed simple models to assess the economic impacts to the current satellite resource caused by the worst-case scenario of a hypothetical superstorm event occurring during the next sunspot cycle. Although the consequences may be severe, our worse-case scenario does not include the complete failure of the entire 937 operating satellites in the current population, which have a replacement value of ˜170-230 billion, and supporting a ˜90 billion/year industry. Our estimates suggest a potential economic loss of <70 billion for lost revenue (˜44 billion) and satellite replacement for GEO satellites (˜24 billion) caused by a 'once a century' single storm similar to the 1859 superstorm. We estimate that 80 satellites (LEO, MEO, and GEO) may be disabled as a consequence of a superstorm event. Additional impacts may include the failure of many of the GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo satellite systems in MEO. Approximately 97 LEO satellites, which normally would not have re-entered for many decades, may prematurely de-orbit by ca 2021 as a result of the temporarily increased atmospheric drag caused by a superstorm event occurring in ca. 2012. The 100 billion International Space Station may lose significant altitude, placing it in critical need for re-boosting by an amount potentially outside the range of typical Space Shuttle operations, which are in any case scheduled to end in 2010. Currently, the ability to forecast extreme particle events and coronal mass ejections, or predict their fluences and geoseverity in the 24-h prior to the event, appears to be no better than 50/50. Our analysis of economic impacts is a first attempt at estimation whose approach will suggest ways in which better estimates may eventually be obtained.

  8. Investigations of the Impacts of Instrumental and Operational Variables on Color Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color measurements for the classing of U.S. cottons have been performed on the Uster™ High Volume Instrumentation (HVI) instrument for several years. Two color parameters specific to cotton—Rd (reflectance) and +b (yellowness)—are used in the color measurement of cotton. Since Rd and +b do not rea...

  9. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  10. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  11. NASA 2014 The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) - Science Impact of Deploying Instruments on Separate Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turpie, Kevin; Veraverbeke, Sander; Wright, Robert; Anderson, Martha; Prakash, Anupma; Quattrochi, Dale

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission was recommended for implementation by the 2007 report from the U.S. National Research Council Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, also known as the Earth Science Decadal Survey. The HyspIRI mission is science driven and will address a set of science questions identified by the Decadal Survey and broader science community. The mission includes a visible shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer, a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) imager and an intelligent payload module (IPM). The IPM enables on-board processing and direct broadcast for those applications with short latency requirements. The science questions are organized as VSWIR-only, TIR-only and Combined science questions, the latter requiring data from both instruments. In order to prepare for the mission NASA is undertaking pre-phase A studies to determine the optimum mission implementation, in particular, cost and risk reduction activities. Each year the HyspIRI project is provided with feedback from NASA Headquarters on the pre-phase A activities in the form of a guidance letter which outlines the work that should be undertaken the subsequent year. The 2013 guidance letter included a recommendation to undertake a study to determine the science impact of deploying the instruments from separate spacecraft in sun synchronous orbits with various time separations and deploying both instruments on the International Space Station (ISS). This report summarizes the results from that study. The approach taken was to evaluate the impact on the combined science questions of time separations between the VSWIR and TIR data of <3 minutes, <1 week and a few months as well as deploying both instruments on the ISS. Note the impact was only evaluated for the combined science questions which require data from both instruments (VSWIR and TIR). The study concluded the impact of a separation of <3 minutes was

  12. Using DIRSIG to identify uniform sites and demonstrate the utility of the side-slither calibration technique for Landsat's new pushbroom instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, Aaron D.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.; Gartley, Michael G.

    2012-06-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) are two new sensors being developed by the joint USGS-NASA Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) that will extend nearly 40 years of archived Landsat data once it achieves orbit in January of 2013. Previous efforts focused on using the DIRSIG (Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation) tool to simulate all the phenomenology that can lead to non-uniformity variations in an LDCM image. This includes detector-to-detector and array-to-array non-uniformities due to variations in relative spectral response (RSR), gain, bias, and non-linearities. Synthetic images were generated to predict the LDCM performance pre-launch and to identify calibration concerns. In support of the calibration effort for LDCM, this work expands on an on-orbit calibration technique called side-slither. In this technique, a 90 degree yaw maneuver is performed over a uniform region in an effort to determine a flat-field correction. The first component of this research uses Landsat 5 radiance images as input to DIRSIG to evaluate potential sites for LDCM to perform side-slither once it achieves orbit. Relative gains are calculated and compared over desert regions, the Amazon, water bodies, and Antarctica in an effort to identify suitable sites for the maneuver. The second component of this work uses the DIRSIG tool to model all the non-uniformity variations from previous efforts and to perform the side-slither technique in an effort to calibrate the raw data. Synthetic image data is used and presented to measure the potential value of this calibration technique.

  13. Particle sizing calibration with refractive index correction for light scattering optical particle counters and impacts upon PCASP and CDP data collected during the Fennec campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, P. D.; Dean, A. R.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Minikin, A.; Pickering, M. A.; Petzold, A.

    2012-05-01

    Optical particle counters (OPCs) are used regularly for atmospheric research, measuring particle scattering cross sections to generate particle size distribution histograms. This manuscript presents two methods for calibrating OPCs with case studies based on a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP), both of which are operated on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft. A probability density function based method is provided for modification of the OPC bin boundaries when the scattering properties of measured particles are different to those of the calibration particles due to differences in refractive index or shape. This method provides mean diameters and widths for OPC bins based upon Mie-Lorenz theory or any other particle scattering theory, without the need for smoothing, despite the highly nonlinear and non-monotonic relationship between particle size and scattering cross section. By calibrating an OPC in terms of its scattering cross section the optical properties correction can be applied with minimal information loss, and performing correction in this manner provides traceable and transparent uncertainty propagation throughout the whole process. Analysis of multiple calibrations has shown that for the PCASP the bin centres differ by up to 30% from the manufacturer's nominal values and can change by up to approximately 20% when routine maintenance is performed. The CDP has been found to be less sensitive than the manufacturer's specification with differences in sizing of between 1.6 ± 0.8 μm and 4.7 ± 1.8 μm for one flight. Over the course of the Fennec project in the Sahara the variability of calibration was less than the calibration uncertainty in 6 out of 7 calibrations performed. As would be expected from Mie-Lorenz theory, the impact of the refractive index corrections has been found to be largest for absorbing materials and the impact on Saharan dust measurements made

  14. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion.We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs.Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53).In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients. PMID:27124040

  15. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion. We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs. Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53). In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients. PMID:27124040

  16. Forecasting the Impact of an 1859-calibre Superstorm on Satellite Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odenwald, Sten; Green, James; Taylor, William

    2005-01-01

    We have assembled a database of operational satellites in orbit as of 2004, and have developed a series of simple models to assess the economic impacts to this resource caused by various scenarios of superstorm events possible during the next sunspot cycle between 2010 and 2014. Despite the apparent robustness of our satellite assets against the kinds of storms we have encountered during the satellite era, our models suggest a potential economic loss exceeding $10(exp 11) for satellite replacement and lost profitability caused by a once a century single storm similar to the 1859 superstorm. From a combination of power system and attitude control system (the most vulnerable) failures, we estimate that 80 satellites (LEO, MEO, GEO) may be disabled as a consequence of a superstorm event. Additional consequences may include the failure of many of the GPS, GLONASS and Galileo satellite systems in MEO. Approximately 98 LEO satellites that normally would not have re-entered for many decades, may prematurely de-orbit in ca 2021 as a result of the temporarily increased atmospheric drag caused by the superstorm event occurring in 2012. The $10(exp 11) International Space Station may lose at least 15 kilometers of altitude, placing it in critical need for re-boosting by an amount that is potentially outside the range of typical Space Shuttle operations during the previous solar maximum in ca 2000, and at a time when NASA plans to decommission the Space Shuttle. Several LEO satellites will unexpectedly be placed on orbits that enter the ISS zone of avoidance, requiring some action by ground personnel and ISS astronauts to avoid close encounters. Radiation effects on astronauts have also been considered and could include a range of possibilities from acute radiation sickness for astronauts inside spacecraft, to near-lethal doses during EVAs. The specifics depends very sensitively on the spectral hardness of the accompanying SPE event. Currently, the ability to forecast extreme

  17. Theoretical impact of fast rotation on calibrating the surface brightness-color relation for early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Mourard, D.; Aroui, H.; Stee, P.; Delaa, O.; Graczyk, D.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The eclipsing binary method for determining distance in the local group is based on the surface brightness-color relation (SBCR), and early-type stars are preferred targets because of their intrinsic brightness. However, this type of star exhibits wind, mass-loss, pulsation, and rotation, which may generate bias on the angular diameter determination. An accurate calibration of the SBCR relation thus requires careful analysis. Aims: In this paper we aim to quantify the impact of stellar rotation on the SBCR when the calibration of the relation is based on interferometric measurements of angular diameters. Methods: Six stars with V - K color indices ranging between -1 and 0.5 were modeled using the code for high angular resolution of rotating objects in nature (CHARRON) with various rotational velocities (0, 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the critical rotational velocity) and inclination (0, 25, 50, 75, and 90 degrees). All these models have their equatorial axis aligned in an east-west orientation in the sky. We then simulated interferometric observations of these theoretical stars using three representative sets of the CHARA baseline configurations. The simulated data were then interpreted as if the stars were non-rotating to determine an angular diameter and estimate the surface-brightness relation. The V - K color of the rotating star was calculated directly from the CHARRON code. This provides an estimate of the intrinsic dispersion of the SBCR relation when the rotation effects of flattening and gravity darkening are not considered in the analysis of interferometric data. Results: We find a clear relation between the rotational velocity and (1) the shift in zero point (Δa0) of the SBCR (compared to the static relation) and (2) its dispersion (σ). When considering stars rotating at less than 50% of their critical velocity, Δa0 and σ have about 0.01 mag, while these quantities can reach 0.08 and 0.04 mag, respectively, when the rotation is larger than 75% of

  18. SAR calibration: A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Politis, D. T.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Various potential applications of amplitude-calibrated SAR systems are briefly described, along with an estimate of calibration performance requirements. A review of the basic SAR calibration problem is given. For background purposes and to establish consistent definition of terms, various conventional SAR performance parameters are reviewed along with three additional parameters which are directly related to calibrated SAR systems. Techniques for calibrating a SAR are described. Included in the results presented are: calibration philosophy and procedures; review of the calibration signal generator technology development with results describing both the development of instrumentation and internal calibration measurements for two SAR systems; summary of analysis and measurements required to determine optimum retroreflector design and configuration for use as a reference for the absolute calibration of a SAR system; and summary of techniques for in-flight measurements of SAR antenna response.

  19. Life History Traits and Niche Instability Impact Accuracy and Temporal Transferability for Historically Calibrated Distribution Models of North American Birds

    PubMed Central

    Wogan, Guinevere O. U.

    2016-01-01

    A primary assumption of environmental niche models (ENMs) is that models are both accurate and transferable across geography or time; however, recent work has shown that models may be accurate but not highly transferable. While some of this is due to modeling technique, individual species ecologies may also underlie this phenomenon. Life history traits certainly influence the accuracy of predictive ENMs, but their impact on model transferability is less understood. This study investigated how life history traits influence the predictive accuracy and transferability of ENMs using historically calibrated models for birds. In this study I used historical occurrence and climate data (1950-1990s) to build models for a sample of birds, and then projected them forward to the ‘future’ (1960-1990s). The models were then validated against models generated from occurrence data at that ‘future’ time. Internal and external validation metrics, as well as metrics assessing transferability, and Generalized Linear Models were used to identify life history traits that were significant predictors of accuracy and transferability. This study found that the predictive ability of ENMs differs with regard to life history characteristics such as range, migration, and habitat, and that the rarity versus commonness of a species affects the predicted stability and overlap and hence the transferability of projected models. Projected ENMs with both high accuracy and transferability scores, still sometimes suffered from over- or under- predicted species ranges. Life history traits certainly influenced the accuracy of predictive ENMs for birds, but while aspects of geographic range impact model transferability, the mechanisms underlying this are less understood. PMID:26959979

  20. ENVISAT-1 MWR: calibration targets and preflight calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Nigel C.; Bombaci, Ornella; L'Abbate, Michele; Ricketts, Marion

    1998-12-01

    ENVISAT Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is an instrument designed and developed as part of the Envisat-1 satellite scientific payload, with Alenia Aerospazio engaged in the phase C-D as instrument Prime Contractor, leading an industrial consortium of European and American companies. The Flight Model of the Instrument was delivered to ESA at the end of July 1997, after successful completion of design, test and calibration activities. An Engineering Model of the instrument was also developed and completed in March 1997. The MWR output products are of prime importance for wind/wave products of the Radar Altimeter (RA-2) Instrument, part of the Envisat-1 payload, providing correction of atmospheric propagation data. The products are also useful for direct evaluation of brightness temperature in order to characterize polar ice, land surface properties and sea surface temperature. In order to achieve the required accuracy and sensitivity performance, an in- flight two-point calibration concept is adopted, with hot and cold calibration reference points for each frequency channel. Periodically the measurements of earth scene radiation are interrupted to allow the measurement of an on-board calibration load and of the deep cold space. The overall ground calibration tasks were performed through an iterative sequence of measurement and relevant model corrections, with an extensive instrument calibration in a thermal-vacuum environment, to derive the final radiometer model coefficients and to verify its performance in the expected in-flight environment. To achieve the required instrument calibration accuracy, extremely accurate blackbody target sources were required, in order to simulate the Earth scene and the deep space (for cold calibration), as seen by the radiometer during its in-flight mission. The definition, development and characterization of such blackbody targets were key aspects to achieving the required stimulus accuracy for proper calibration of the instrument. These

  1. GIADA: extended calibration activity: . the Electrostatic Micromanipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator), one of the scientific instruments onboard Rosetta/ESA space mission, is devoted to study dynamical properties of dust particles ejected by the short period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In preparation for the scientific phase of the mission, we are performing laboratory calibration activities on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM), housed in a clean room in our laboratory. Aim of the calibration activity is to characterize the response curve of the GIADA measurement sub-systems. These curves are then correlated with the calibration curves obtained for the GIADA payload onboard the Rosetta S/C. The calibration activity involves two of three sub-systems constituting GIADA: Grain Detection System (GDS) and Impact Sensor (IS). To get reliable calibration curves, a statistically relevant number of grains have to be dropped or shot into the GIADA instrument. Particle composition, structure, size, optical properties and porosity have been selected in order to obtain realistic cometary dust analogues. For each selected type of grain, we estimated that at least one hundred of shots are needed to obtain a calibration curve. In order to manipulate such a large number of particles, we have designed and developed an innovative electrostatic system able to capture, manipulate and shoot particles with sizes in the range 20 - 500 μm. The electrostatic Micromanipulator (EM) is installed on a manual handling system composed by X-Y-Z micrometric slides with a 360o rotational stage along Z, and mounted on a optical bench. In the present work, we display the tests on EM using ten different materials with dimension in the range 50 - 500 μm: the experimental results are in compliance with the requirements.

  2. Fiber-matrix integrity, micromorphology and flexural strength of glass fiber posts: Evaluation of the impact of rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Lançanova, Mateus; Wandscher, Vinicius Felipe; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Limberger, Inácio; Özcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Several rotary instruments have been daily employed on clinic to promote cut aiming to adjust the length of fiber posts to the radicular conduct, but there is no information on the literature about the effects of the different rotary instruments and its impact on the micromorphology of surface and mechanical properties of the glass fiber post. This study aimed the impact of rotary instruments upon fiber-matrix integrity, micromorphology and flexural-strength of glass-fiber posts (GFP). GFP (N=110) were divided into 5 groups: Ctrl: as-received posts, DBc: coarse diamond-bur, DBff: extra-fine diamond-bur, CB: carbide-bur, DD: diamond-disc. Cutting procedures were performed under abundant irrigation. Posts exposed to rotary instruments were then subjected to 2-point inclined loading test (compression 45°) (n=10/group) and 3-point flexural-strength test (n=10/group). Fiber-matrix integrity and micromorphology at the cut surface were analyzed using a SEM (n=2/group). Cutting procedures did not significantly affect the 2-point (51.7±4.3-56.7±5.1 MPa) (p=0.0233) and 3-point flexural-strength (671.5±35.3-709.1±33.1 MPa) (p=0.0968) of the posts (One-way ANOVA and Tukey׳s test). Fiber detachment was observed only at the end point of the cut at the margins of the post. Cut surfaces of the CB group were smoother than those of the other groups. After 3-point flexural strength test, fiber-matrix separation was evident at the tensile side of the post. Rotary instruments tested with simultaneous water-cooling did not affect the resistance of the tested fiber posts but caused disintegration of the fibers from the matrix at the end of the cut, located at the margins. PMID:25955561

  3. Design and Lessons Learned on the Development of a Cryogenic Pupil Select Mechanism used in the Testing and Calibration of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Alissa; Capon, Thomas; Guzek, Jeffrey; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Koca, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Calibration and testing of the instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being performed by the use of a cryogenic, full-field, optical simulator that was constructed for this purpose. The Pupil Select Mechanism (PSM) assembly is one of several mechanisms and optical elements that compose the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator, or OSIM. The PSM allows for several optical elements to be inserted into the optical plane of OSIM, introducing a variety of aberrations, distortions, obscurations, and other calibration states into the pupil plane. The following discussion focuses on the details of the design evolution, analysis, build, and test of this mechanism along with the challenges associated with creating a sub arc-minute positioning mechanism operating in an extreme cryogenic environment. In addition, difficult challenges in the control system design will be discussed including the incorporation of closed-loop feedback control into a system that was designed to operate in an open-loop fashion.

  4. Design and Lessons Learned on the Development of a Cryogenic Pupil Select Mechanism Used in the Testing and Calibration of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Alissa; Capon, Thomas; Guzek, Jeffrey; Hakun, Claef; Haney, Paul; Koca, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Calibration and testing of the instruments on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being performed by the use of a cryogenic, full-field, optical simulator that was constructed for this purpose. The Pupil Select Mechanism (PSM) assembly is one of several mechanisms and optical elements that compose the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator, or OSIM. The PSM allows for several optical elements to be inserted into the optical plane of OSIM, introducing a variety of aberrations, distortions, obscurations, and other calibration states into the pupil plane. The following discussion focuses on the details of the design evolution, analysis, build, and test of this mechanism along with the challenges associated with creating a sub arc-minute positioning mechanism operating in an extreme cryogenic environment. In addition, difficult challenges in the control system design will be discussed including the incorporation of closed-loop feedback control into a system that was designed to operate in an open-loop fashion.

  5. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Keyes, C.; Kaiser, M.

    2007-12-01

    The COS calibration pipeline (CALCOS) includes three main components: basic calibration, wavelength calibration, and spectral extraction. Calibration of modes using the far ultraviolet (FUV) and near ultraviolet (NUV) detectors share a common structure, although the individual reference files differ and there are some additional steps for the FUV channel. The pipeline is designed to calibrate data acquired in either ACCUM or time-tag mode. The basic calibration includes pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. Wavelength calibration can be done either by using separate lamp exposures or by taking several short lamp exposures concurrently with a science exposure. For time-tag data, the latter mode ("tagflash") will allow better correction of potential drift of the spectrum on the detector. One-dimensional spectra will be extracted and saved in a FITS binary table. Separate columns will be used for the flux-calibrated spectrum, error estimate, and the associated wavelengths. CALCOS is written in Python, with some functions in C. It is similar in style to other HST pipeline code in that it uses an association table to specify which files to be included, and the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to use are specified by header keywords. Currently, in conjunction with the Instrument Definition Team (led by J. Green), the ground-based reference files are being refined, delivered, and tested with the pipeline.

  6. Space environment's effect on MODIS calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, J. L.; Wenny, B. N.; Chiang, K.; Xiong, X.

    2010-09-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer flies on board the Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua in a sun-synchronous orbit that crosses the equator at 10:30 AM and 2:30 PM, respectively, at a low earth orbit (LEO) altitude of 705 km. Terra was launched on December 18,1999 and Aqua was launched on May 4, 2002. As the MODIS instruments on board these satellites continue to operate beyond the design lifetime of six years, the cumulative effect of the space environment on MODIS and its calibration is of increasing importance. There are several aspects of the space environment that impact both the top of atmosphere (TOA) calibration and, therefore, the final science products of MODIS. The south Atlantic anomaly (SAA), spacecraft drag, extreme radiative and thermal environment, and the presence of orbital debris have the potential to significantly impact both MODIS and the spacecraft, either directly or indirectly, possibly resulting in data loss. Efforts from the Terra and Aqua Flight Operations Teams (FOT), the MODIS Instrument Operations Team (IOT), and the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) prevent or minimize external impact on the TOA calibrated data. This paper discusses specific effects of the space environment on MODIS and how they are minimized.

  7. Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-10-09

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  8. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to

  9. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  10. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  11. Improvements of VIIRS and MODIS solar diffuser and lunar calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Lei, Ning; Sun, Junqiang; Fulbright, Jon; Wang, Zhipeng; McIntire, Jeff; Angal, Amit

    2013-09-01

    Both VIIRS and MODIS instruments use solar diffuser (SD) and lunar observations to calibrate their reflective solar bands (RSB). A solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) is used to track the SD on-orbit degradation. On-orbit observations have shown similar wavelength-dependent SD degradation (larger at shorter VIS wavelengths) and SDSM detector response degradation (larger at longer NIR wavelengths) for both VIIRS and MODIS instruments. In general, the MODIS scan mirror has experienced more degradation in the VIS spectral region whereas the VIIRS rotating telescope assembly (RTA) mirrors have seen more degradation in the NIR and SWIR spectral region. Because of this wavelength dependent mirror degradation, the sensor's relative spectral response (RSR) needs to be modulated. Due to differences between the solar and lunar spectral irradiance, the modulated RSR could have different effects on the SD and lunar calibration. In this paper, we identify various factors that should be considered for the improvements of VIIRS and MODIS solar and lunar calibration and examine their potential impact. Specifically, we will characterize and assess the calibration impact due to SD and SDSM attenuation screen transmission (uncertainty), SD BRF uncertainty and onorbit degradation, SDSM detector response degradation, and modulated RSR resulting from the sensor's optics degradation. Also illustrated and discussed in this paper are the calibration strategies implemented in the VIIRS and MODIS SD and lunar calibrations and efforts that could be made for future improvements.

  12. Improvements of VIIRS and MODIS Solar Diffuser and Lunar Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James J.; Lei, Ning; Sun, Junqiang; Fulbright, Jon; Wang, Zhipeng; McIntire, Jeff; Angal, Amit Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Both VIIRS and MODIS instruments use solar diffuser (SD) and lunar observations to calibrate their reflective solar bands (RSB). A solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) is used to track the SD on-orbit degradation. On-orbit observations have shown similar wavelength-dependent SD degradation (larger at shorter VIS wavelengths) and SDSM detector response degradation (larger at longer NIR wavelengths) for both VIIRS and MODIS instruments. In general, the MODIS scan mirror has experienced more degradation in the VIS spectral region whereas the VIIRS rotating telescope assembly (RTA) mirrors have seen more degradation in the NIR and SWIR spectral region. Because of this wavelength dependent mirror degradation, the sensor's relative spectral response (RSR) needs to be modulated. Due to differences between the solar and lunar spectral irradiance, the modulated RSR could have different effects on the SD and lunar calibration. In this paper, we identify various factors that should be considered for the improvements of VIIRS and MODIS solar and lunar calibration and examine their potential impact. Specifically, we will characterize and assess the calibration impact due to SD and SDSM attenuation screen transmission (uncertainty), SD BRF uncertainty and onorbit degradation, SDSM detector response degradation, and modulated RSR resulting from the sensor's optics degradation. Also illustrated and discussed in this paper are the calibration strategies implemented in the VIIRS and MODIS SD and lunar calibrations and efforts that could be made for future improvements.

  13. Primer on multivariate calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.V. )

    1994-08-01

    In analytical chemistry, calibration is the procedure that relates instrumental measurements to an analyte of interest. Typically, instrumental measurements are obtained from specimens in which the amount (or level) of the analyte has been determined by some independent and inherently accurate assay (e.g., wet chemistry). Together, the instrumental measurements and results from the independent assays are used to construct a model that relates the analyte level to the instrumental measurements. The advent of high-speed digital computers has greatly increased data acquisition and analysis capabilities and has provided the analytical chemist with opportunities to use many measurements - perhaps hundreds - for calibrating an instrument (e.g., absorbances at multiple wave-lengths). To take advantage of this technology, however, new methods (i.e., multivariate calibration methods) were needed for analyzing and modeling the experimental data. The purpose of this report is to introduce several evolving multivariate calibration methods and to present some important issues regarding their use. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Flight and ground calibrations: TRMM and EOS-AM1 clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system (CERES) instrument zero radiance offsets determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Susan; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Lee, Robert B., III; Priestley, Kory J.; Bitting, Herbert C.; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Smith, G. Louis; Thornhill, K. L.; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-10-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument has scanning thermistor bolometers that measure broadband radiances in the shortwave, total and 8-12 micron water vapor window regions. On November 27, 1997, the CERES Protoflight model (PFM) instrument was launched aboard the Tropical Rainfall measuring Mission spacecraft. In December 1998, the CERES FLight models I and II instruments are scheduled for launch on the Earth Observing System-AM1 platform. The instrument generally operates in three scan modes; crosstrack normal, rotating azimuth normal and rotating azimuth short modes, while measuring the earth reflected and emitted radiances. The sensor measurements have shown a dependency on observation geometry during each of these scan modes of operation. At each elevation observation angle, the zero radiance offsets of the sensors were measured on the ground using end caps and a constant radiance reference source, consisting of a curved strip blackbody. On-orbit, offsets were determined from observations of cold space. This paper describes the procedures and facilities used to determine the zero radiance offsets. The offset values calculated from ground and in-flight data for TRMM sensors, as well as the ground measurements for the FM1 and FM2 sensors are presented.

  15. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  16. Motivations Impacting upon Music Instrument Teachers' Decisions to Teach and Perform in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Daniel, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore why highly trained musicians choose to teach in higher education. An international population from nine countries of music instrument teachers was sampled via online survey, to determine their reasons for teaching in higher education. Motivational constructs from the expectancy-value framework were used,…

  17. Student Evaluation Instruments: The Interactive Impact of Course Requirement, Student Level, Department and Anticipated Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Jennifer; Cadden, David

    2010-01-01

    The examination of Student Evaluation Instruments (SEI) has generated a considerable literature. Interestingly, this extensive literature provides no clear guidance on how to interpret SEI results in order to make comparative evaluations of instructors' performances. The research presented in this paper draws upon six semesters worth of SEI…

  18. Calibrating Single-Ended Fiber-Optic Raman Spectra Distributed Temperature Sensing Data

    PubMed Central

    Hausner, Mark B.; Suárez, Francisco; Glander, Kenneth E.; van de Giesen, Nick; Selker, John S.; Tyler, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic research is a very demanding application of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in terms of precision, accuracy and calibration. The physics behind the most frequently used DTS instruments are considered as they apply to four calibration methods for single-ended DTS installations. The new methods presented are more accurate than the instrument-calibrated data, achieving accuracies on the order of tenths of a degree root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias. Effects of localized non-uniformities that violate the assumptions of single-ended calibration data are explored and quantified. Experimental design considerations such as selection of integration times or selection of the length of the reference sections are discussed, and the impacts of these considerations on calibrated temperatures are explored in two case studies. PMID:22346676

  19. VIIRS on-orbit calibration methodology and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Chiang, Kwofu; Efremova, Boryana; Fulbright, Jon; Lei, Ning; McIntire, Jeff; Oudrari, Hassan; Sun, Junqiang; Wang, Zhipeng; Wu, Aisheng

    2014-05-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership spacecraft has successfully operated since its launch in October 2011. The VIIRS collects data in 22 spectral bands that are calibrated by a set of onboard calibrators (OBC). In addition, lunar observations are made to independently track VIIRS long-term calibration stability for the reflective solar bands (RSB). This paper provides an overview of VIIRS OBC functions as well as its on-orbit operation and calibration activities. It also describes sensor calibration methodologies and demonstrates VIIRS on-orbit performance from launch to present. Results reported in this paper include on-orbit changes in sensor spectral band responses, detector noise characterization, and key calibration parameters. Issues identified and their potential impacts on sensor calibration are also discussed. Since launch, the VIIRS instrument nominal operation temperature has been stable to within ±1.0 K. The cold focal plane temperatures have been well controlled, with variations of less than 20 mK over a period of 1.5 years. In general, changes in thermal emissive bands (TEB) detector responses have been less than 0.5%. Despite large response degradation in several near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands and large SD degradation at short visible wavelengths, the VIIRS sensor and OBC overall performance has been excellent postlaunch. The degradation caused by the telescope mirror coating contamination has been modeled and its impact addressed through the use of modulated relative spectral response in the improved calibration and the current sensor data record data production. Based on current instrument characteristics and performance, it is expected that the VIIRS calibration will continue to meet its design requirements, including RSB detector signal to noise ratio and TEB detector noise equivalent temperature difference, throughout its 7 year design lifetime.

  20. 13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL TO COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND BASEMENT, SHOWING HARD WIRE CONNECTION (INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Instrumented Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests for validating applicability of standard strength models to transient deformation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, D. E.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2006-10-01

    Instrumented Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests have been conducted on oxygen-free electronic copper to validate the accuracy of current strength models for predicting transient states during dynamic deformation events. The experiments coupled the use of high-speed digital photography to record the transient deformation states and laser interferometry to monitor the sample back (free surface) velocity as a measure of the elastic/plastic wave propagation through the sample length. Numerical continuum dynamics simulations of the impact and plastic wave propagation employing the Johnson-Cook [Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics, 1983, The Netherlands (Am. Def. Prep. Assoc. (ADPA)), pp. 541-547], Zerilli-Armstrong [J. Appl. Phys. C1, 1816 (1987)], and Steinberg-Guinan [J. Appl. Phys. 51, 1498 (1980)] constitutive equations were used to generate transient deformation profiles and the free surface velocity traces. While these simulations showed good correlation with the measured free surface velocity traces and the final deformed sample shape, varying degrees of deviations were observed between the photographed and calculated specimen profiles at intermediate deformation states. The results illustrate the usefulness of the instrumented Taylor anvil-on-rod impact technique for validating constitutive equations that can describe the path-dependent deformation response and can therefore predict the transient and final deformation states.

  2. VIIRS On-Orbit Calibration for Ocean Color Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Turpie, Kevin R.; Fireman, Gwyn F.; Meister, Gerhard; Stone, Thomas C.; Patt, Frederick S.; Franz, Bryan; Bailey, Sean W.; Robinson, Wayne D.; McClain, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA VIIRS Ocean Science Team (VOST) has the task of evaluating Suomi NPP VIIRS ocean color data for the continuity of the NASA ocean color climate data records. The generation of science quality ocean color data products requires an instrument calibration that is stable over time. Since the VIIRS NIR Degradation Anomaly directly impacts the bands used for atmospheric correction of the ocean color data (Bands M6 and M7), the VOST has adapted the VIIRS on-orbit calibration approach to meet the ocean science requirements. The solar diffuser calibration time series and the solar diffuser stability monitor time series have been used to derive changes in the instrument response and diffuser reflectance over time for bands M1-M11.

  3. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Deep Impact experiment: possible observable effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumov, Boris A.; Kim, V. V.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Sultanov, Valerii G.; Shutov, A. V.; Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2005-07-01

    A hypervelocity collision of a metal impactor and the nucleus of the Tempel 1 comet is to be carried out in July 2005 in the framework of the Deep Impact active experiment in space. This paper discusses certain observable consequences of this impact. Numerical simulation of the impact process made it possible to evaluate the diameter of the impact-produced crater as a function of the initial density and porosity of the cometary nucleus. A substantial part of the shockwave-compressed cometary material that is evaporated at the unloading stage may become heated to temperatures on the order of (1-2)×104 K. A change in the chemical composition of the hot vapor in the process of its expansion was computed using a model elemental composition of the cometary nucleus; this may prove useful for determining the parameters of the flash induced by the impact in the visible optical, UV, IR, and radio wavelength bands.

  4. The Impact of Scholastic Instrumental Music and Scholastic Chess Study on the Standardized Test Scores of Students in Grades Three, Four, and Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Edwin E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of instrumental music study and group chess lessons on the standardized test scores of suburban elementary public school students (grades three through five) in Levittown, New York. The study divides the students into the following groups and compares the standardized test scores of each: a) instrumental music…

  5. Procedures used in the calibration of AC calibrators

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.T.

    1991-02-01

    This report describes an automatic calibration system used in the calibration of all precision AC calibrators. The system includes an AC-DC Transfer Standard, a DC Voltage Standard, and a high-resolution digital multimeter, with an IBM-XT Personal Computer for data acquisition and analysis. Specialized instrumentation and measurement techniques make it possible to achieve high accuracy measurements with repeatability. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. The Impact of Instrument-Specific Musical Training on Rhythm Perception and Production

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Tomas E.; Thibodeau, Joseph N. L.; Gunther, Brian P.; Penhune, Virginia B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies comparing musicians and non-musicians have shown that musical training can improve rhythmic perception and production. These findings tell us that training can result in rhythm processing advantages, but they do not tell us whether practicing a particular instrument could lead to specific effects on rhythm perception or production. The current study used a battery of four rhythm perception and production tasks that were designed to test both higher- and lower-level aspects of rhythm processing. Four groups of musicians (drummers, singers, pianists, string players) and a control group of non-musicians were tested. Within-task differences in performance showed that factors such as meter, metrical complexity, tempo, and beat phase significantly affected the ability to perceive and synchronize taps to a rhythm or beat. Musicians showed better performance on all rhythm tasks compared to non-musicians. Interestingly, our results revealed no significant differences between musician groups for the vast majority of task measures. This was despite the fact that all musicians were selected to have the majority of their training on the target instrument, had on average more than 10 years of experience on their instrument, and were currently practicing. These results suggest that general musical experience is more important than specialized musical experience with regards to perception and production of rhythms. PMID:26869969

  7. Concept of ASTER calibration requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, A.

    1992-01-01

    The document of ASTER Calibration Requirement specifies the following items related to spectral and radiometric characteristics of the ASTER instrument: (1) characteristics whose knowledge is specified, (2) requirement for knowledge of the characteristics, (3) methodology for characteristics evaluation, and (4) supplementary information and data related with characteristics evaluation. This document is applicable to the document of the ASTER Instrument Specification on Observational Performances, and will be a part of the ASTER Calibration Plan. ASTER Calibration Requirement is scheduled to establish the concept and framework by March 1992 when the 5th Calibration and Data Validation Panel Meeting is held, and to determine details including requirement values and evaluation methodologies by October 1992 around which the Calibration Peer Review may be held. The ASTER Calibration Plan is planned to finish by the same time.

  8. Data reduction of digitized images processed from calibrated photographic and spectroscopic films obtained from terrestial, rocket and space shuttle telescopic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Microvax 2 computer, the basic software in VMS, and the Mitsubishi High Speed Disk were received and installed. The digital scanning tunneling microscope is fully installed and operational. A new technique was developed for pseudocolor analysis of the line plot images of a scanning tunneling microscope. Computer studies and mathematical modeling of the empirical data associated with many of the film calibration studies were presented. A gas can follow-up experiment which will be launched in September, on the Space Shuttle STS-50, was prepared and loaded. Papers were presented on the structure of the human hair strand using scanning electron microscopy and x ray analysis and updated research on the annual rings produced by the surf clam of the ocean estuaries of Maryland. Scanning electron microscopic work was conducted by the research team for the study of the Mossbauer and Magnetic Susceptibility Studies on NmNi(4.25)Fe(.85) and its Hydride.

  9. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-08-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments that are mounted on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and their spectral characterization. However, low spatial frequency differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few 10-6 at very small separations (<0.3'') from their host star. In our previous work, we proposed a wavefront sensor based on Zernike phase-contrast methods to circumvent this problem and measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing, and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we first performed measurements in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror. Our experimental results are consistent with the results in simulations, confirming the ability of our sensor to measure small aberrations (<50 nm rms) with nanometric accuracy. Following these results, we corrected the long-lived non-common path aberrations in SPHERE based on ZELDA measurements and estimated a contrast gain of 10 in the coronagraphic image at 0.2'', reaching the raw contrast limit set by the coronagraph in the instrument. In addition to this encouraging result, the simplicity of the design and its phase reconstruction algorithm makes ZELDA an excellent candidate for the online measurements of quasi-static aberrations during the observations. The implementation of a ZELDA-based sensing path on the current and future facilities (ELTs, future space missions) could facilitate the observation of cold gaseous

  10. A head impact detection system using SVM classification and proximity sensing in an instrumented mouthguard.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lyndia C; Zarnescu, Livia; Nangia, Vaibhav; Cam, Bruce; Camarillo, David B

    2014-11-01

    Injury from blunt head impacts causes acute neurological deficits and may lead to chronic neurodegeneration. A head impact detection device can serve both as a research tool for studying head injury mechanisms and a clinical tool for real-time trauma screening. The simplest approach is an acceleration thresholding algorithm, which may falsely detect high-acceleration spurious events such as manual manipulation of the device. We designed a head impact detection system that distinguishes head impacts from nonimpacts through two subsystems. First, we use infrared proximity sensing to determine if the mouthguard is worn on the teeth to filter out all off-teeth events. Second, on-teeth, nonimpact events are rejected using a support vector machine classifier trained on frequency domain features of linear acceleration and rotational velocity. The remaining events are classified as head impacts. In a controlled laboratory evaluation, the present system performed substantially better than a 10-g acceleration threshold in head impact detection (98% sensitivity, 99.99% specificity, 99% accuracy, and 99.98% precision, compared to 92% sensitivity, 58% specificity, 65% accuracy, and 37% precision). Once adapted for field deployment by training and validation with field data, this system has the potential to effectively detect head trauma in sports, military service, and other high-risk activities. PMID:24800918

  11. Improved absolute calibration of LOPES measurements and its impact on the comparison with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Fuchs, B.; Gemmeke, H.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hiller, R.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Morello, C.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Palmieri, N.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    LOPES was a digital antenna array detecting the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. The calibration of the absolute amplitude scale of the measurements was done using an external, commercial reference source, which emits a frequency comb with defined amplitudes. Recently, we obtained improved reference values by the manufacturer of the reference source, which significantly changed the absolute calibration of LOPES. We reanalyzed previously published LOPES measurements, studying the impact of the changed calibration. The main effect is an overall decrease of the LOPES amplitude scale by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.2, affecting all previously published values for measurements of the electric-field strength. This results in a major change in the conclusion of the paper 'Comparing LOPES measurements of air-shower radio emission with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations' published by Apel et al. (2013) : With the revised calibration, LOPES measurements now are compatible with CoREAS simulations, but in tension with REAS 3.11 simulations. Since CoREAS is the latest version of the simulation code incorporating the current state of knowledge on the radio emission of air showers, this new result indicates that the absolute amplitude prediction of current simulations now is in agreement with experimental data.

  12. Impact of Distortions on Fiber Position Location in the dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Doel, A. Peter; Brooks, David; Miller, Tim; Besuner, Robert; Silber, Joe; Liang, Ming; Sprayberry, David; Baltay, Charles; Rabinowitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, to be located at the prime focus of the Mayall telescope, includes a wide field corrector, a 5000 fiber positioner system, and a fiber view camera. The mapping of the sky to the focal plane, needed to position the fibers accurately, is described in detail. A major challenge is dealing with the large amount of distortion introduced by the optics (of order 10% scale change), including time-dependent non-axisymmetric distortions introduced by the atmospheric dispersion compensator. Solutions are presented to measure or mitigate these effects.

  13. Impact of Passive Safety on FHR Instrumentation Systems Design and Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) will rely more extensively on passive safety than earlier reactor classes. 10CFR50 Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, establishes minimum design requirements to provide reasonable assurance of adequate safety. 10CFR50.69, Risk-Informed Categorization and Treatment of Structures, Systems and Components for Nuclear Power Reactors, provides guidance on how the safety significance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) should be reflected in their regulatory treatment. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) has provided 10 CFR 50.69 SSC Categorization Guideline (NEI-00-04) that factors in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model insights, as well as deterministic insights, through an integrated decision-making panel. Employing the PRA to inform deterministic requirements enables an appropriately balanced, technically sound categorization to be established. No FHR currently has an adequate PRA or set of design basis accidents to enable establishing the safety classification of its SSCs. While all SSCs used to comply with the general design criteria (GDCs) will be safety related, the intent is to limit the instrumentation risk significance through effective design and reliance on inherent passive safety characteristics. For example, FHRs have no safety-significant temperature threshold phenomena, thus enabling the primary and reserve reactivity control systems required by GDC 26 to be passively, thermally triggered at temperatures well below those for which core or primary coolant boundary damage would occur. Moreover, the passive thermal triggering of the primary and reserve shutdown systems may relegate the control rod drive motors to the control system, substantially decreasing the amount of safety-significant wiring needed. Similarly, FHR decay heat removal systems are intended to be running continuously to minimize the amount of safety-significant instrumentation needed to initiate

  14. In Their Voice: Lower Secondary School Students' Beliefs about Playing Musical Instruments, and the Impact of the Instrument Lesson upon Those Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Many young West Australians learn musical instruments through school based elective programs. However, many students drop out from these programs, particularly in lower secondary school. This paper reports on a study I conducted into the motives of 48 lower secondary school students for playing a musical instrument, and the role of the instrument…

  15. Planck 2013 results. V. LFI calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the methods employed to photometrically calibrate the data acquired by the Low Frequency Instrument on Planck. Our calibration is based on a combination of the orbital dipole plus the solar dipole, caused respectively by the motion of the Planck spacecraft with respect to the Sun and by motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) rest frame. The latter provides a signal of a few mK with the same spectrum as the CMB anisotropies and is visible throughout the mission. In this data releasewe rely on the characterization of the solar dipole as measured by WMAP. We also present preliminary results (at 44 GHz only) on the study of the Orbital Dipole, which agree with the WMAP value of the solar system speed within our uncertainties. We compute the calibration constant for each radiometer roughly once per hour, in order to keep track of changes in the detectors' gain. Since non-idealities in the optical response of the beams proved to be important, we implemented a fast convolution algorithm which considers the full beam response in estimating the signal generated by the dipole. Moreover, in order to further reduce the impact of residual systematics due to sidelobes, we estimated time variations in the calibration constant of the 30 GHz radiometers (the ones with the largest sidelobes) using the signal of an internal reference load at 4 K instead of the CMB dipole. We have estimated the accuracy of the LFI calibration following two strategies: (1) we have run a set of simulations to assess the impact of statistical errors and systematic effects in the instrument and in the calibration procedure; and (2) we have performed a number of internal consistency checks on the data and on the brightness temperature of Jupiter. Errors in the calibration of this Planck/LFI data release are expected to be about 0.6% at 44 and 70 GHz, and 0.8% at 30 GHz. Both these preliminary results at low and high ℓ are consistent with WMAP results

  16. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  17. INSTRUMENTATION, RECORDING, AND PROCESSING OF METEOROLOGICAL DATA NEAR PORTAGE, WISCONSIN: WISCONSIN POWER PLANT IMPACT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the clima...

  18. New Instruments for Studying the Impacts of Science Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trygstad, Peggy J.; Banilower, Eric R.; Smith, P. Sean; Nelson, Courtney L.

    2014-01-01

    The logic model that implicitly drives most professional development (PD) efforts asserts that PD leads to changes in teacher knowledge and beliefs, which leads to improved classroom practice, and ultimately, better student outcomes. However, efforts to study the impacts of PD programs are often hampered by the scarcity of high-quality…

  19. The site-scale saturated zone flow model for Yucca Mountain: calibration of different conceptual models and their impact on flow paths.

    PubMed

    Zyvoloski, George; Kwicklis, Edward; Eddebbarh, Al Aziz; Arnold, Bill; Faunt, Claudia; Robinson, Bruce A

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents several different conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient (LHG) region north of Yucca Mountain and describes the impact of those models on groundwater flow near the potential high-level repository site. The results are based on a numerical model of site-scale saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain. This model is used for performance assessment predictions of radionuclide transport and to guide future data collection and modeling activities. The numerical model is calibrated by matching available water level measurements using parameter estimation techniques, along with more informal comparisons of the model to hydrologic and geochemical information. The model software (hydrologic simulation code FEHM and parameter estimation software PEST) and model setup allows for efficient calibration of multiple conceptual models. Until now, the Large Hydraulic Gradient has been simulated using a low-permeability, east-west oriented feature, even though direct evidence for this feature is lacking. In addition to this model, we investigate and calibrate three additional conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient, all of which are based on a presumed zone of hydrothermal chemical alteration north of Yucca Mountain. After examining the heads and permeabilities obtained from the calibrated models, we present particle pathways from the potential repository that record differences in the predicted groundwater flow regime. The results show that Large Hydraulic Gradient can be represented with the alternate conceptual models that include the hydrothermally altered zone. The predicted pathways are mildly sensitive to the choice of the conceptual model and more sensitive to the quality of calibration in the vicinity on the repository. These differences are most likely due to different degrees of fit of model to data, and do not represent important differences in hydrologic conditions for the different conceptual models. PMID:12714319

  20. Results and Insights on the Impact of Smoke on Digital Instrumentation and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. J.; Nowlen, S. P.

    2001-01-31

    Smoke can cause interruptions and upsets in active electronics. Because nuclear power plants are replacing analog with digital instrumentation and control systems, qualification guidelines for new systems are being reviewed for severe environments such as smoke and electromagnetic interference. Active digital systems, individual components, and active circuits have been exposed to smoke in a program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The circuits and systems were all monitored during the smoke exposure, indicating any immediate effects of the smoke. The major effect of smoke has been to increase leakage currents (through circuit bridging across contacts and leads) and to cause momentary upsets and failures in digital systems. This report summarizes two previous reports and presents new results from conformal coating, memory chip, and hard drive tests. The report describes practices for mitigation of smoke damage through digital system design, fire barriers, ventilation, fire suppressants, and post fire procedures.

  1. The impact patient-specific instrumentation has had on my practice in the last 5 years.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    I have performed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using patient- specific instrumentation (PSI) (TRUMATCH® Personalized Solutions, DePuy Synthes Joint Reconstruction, Warsaw, Indiana) since July 2009. Since that time, I have performed over 600 of these procedures, all at the same hospital and all using the same personnel I worked with before I began using PSI. I do not have a physician assistant, but I do have a surgical assistant who scrubs with and assists me on all TKAs. There are a number of reasons why a surgeon may decide to use PSI. This paper discusses the effect PSI has had on my practice in the last 5 years, including my experiences and conclusions. PMID:24911641

  2. The Impact II, a Very High-Resolution Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Instrument (QTOF) for Deep Shotgun Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Scarlet; Michalski, Annette; Raether, Oliver; Lubeck, Markus; Kaspar, Stephanie; Goedecke, Niels; Baessmann, Carsten; Hornburg, Daniel; Meier, Florian; Paron, Igor; Kulak, Nils A.; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry is one of the two major principles used in proteomics. Although based on simple fundamentals, it has over the last decades greatly evolved in terms of achievable resolution, mass accuracy, and dynamic range. The Bruker impact platform of QTOF instruments takes advantage of these developments and here we develop and evaluate the impact II for shotgun proteomics applications. Adaption of our heated liquid chromatography system achieved very narrow peptide elution peaks. The impact II is equipped with a new collision cell with both axial and radial ion ejection, more than doubling ion extraction at high tandem MS frequencies. The new reflectron and detector improve resolving power compared with the previous model up to 80%, i.e. to 40,000 at m/z 1222. We analyzed the ion current from the inlet capillary and found very high transmission (>80%) up to the collision cell. Simulation and measurement indicated 60% transfer into the flight tube. We adapted MaxQuant for QTOF data, improving absolute average mass deviations to better than 1.45 ppm. More than 4800 proteins can be identified in a single run of HeLa digest in a 90 min gradient. The workflow achieved high technical reproducibility (R2 > 0.99) and accurate fold change determination in spike-in experiments in complex mixtures. Using label-free quantification we rapidly quantified haploid against diploid yeast and characterized overall proteome differences in mouse cell lines originating from different tissues. Finally, after high pH reversed-phase fractionation we identified 9515 proteins in a triplicate measurement of HeLa peptide mixture and 11,257 proteins in single measurements of cerebellum—the highest proteome coverage reported with a QTOF instrument so far. PMID:25991688

  3. Calibration of GOME-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Albinana, Abelardo; Munro, Rosemary; Corpacciolli, E.; Eisinger, Michael; Callies, Joerg; Lefebvre, Alain; Hahne, Achim R.

    2002-12-01

    The GOME-2 spaceborne spectrometers will provide data for the ozone product chain of the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS), in charge of the monitoring of atmospheric ozone. The accuracy of any geophysical parameter retrieved from the GOME-2 measurements will ultimately be limited by the accuracy of the spectral and radiometric calibration of instrument data. This imposes strong accuracy and stability requirements on the instrument, the calibration activities and the ground processing. In this paper, the processing scheme for the spectral and radiometric calibration of GOME-2 data is presented.

  4. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  5. Impacts of Cross-Platform Vicarious Calibration on the Deep Blue Aerosol Retrievals for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aboard Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hsu, N. Christina; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Franz, Bryan A.; Meister, Gerhard; Salustro, Clare E.

    2012-01-01

    The retrieval of aerosol properties from spaceborne sensors requires highly accurate and precise radiometric measurements, thus placing stringent requirements on sensor calibration and characterization. For the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spedroradiometer (MODIS), the characteristics of the detectors of certain bands, particularly band 8 [(B8); 412 nm], have changed significantly over time, leading to increased calibration uncertainty. In this paper, we explore a possibility of utilizing a cross-calibration method developed for characterizing the Terral MODIS detectors in the ocean bands by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ocean Biology Processing Group to improve aerosol retrieval over bright land surfaces. We found that the Terra/MODIS B8 reflectance corrected using the cross calibration method resulted in significant improvements for the retrieved aerosol optical thickness when compared with that from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, Aqua/MODIS, and the Aerosol Robotic Network. The method reported in this paper is implemented for the operational processing of the Terra/MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products.

  6. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  7. Balloon-borne In-Situ Measurements of ClO and ClONO2 in the late 2010/2011 Arctic Polar Vortex: Instrument Calibration and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, F.; Heinecke, F.; Afchine, A.; Barthel, J.; Engel, A.; Grooß, J.; von Hobe, M.; Richter, A.; Schönfeld, A.; Suminska, O.; Tan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Since 1995 we have carried out balloon-borne in-situ measurements of ClO and BrO. Lately we have designed an upgraded balloon instrument to additionally measure the ClO dimer and the reservoir species ClONO2. The halogen oxide measurements are carried out employing the chemical conversion resonance fluorescence technique (Brune et al., 1989) in a fast flow through two parallel ducts generated by modified roots blowers. The inlet of one duct is equipped with a dedicated heating element enabling controlled air temperatures in excess of 550K at pressures lower than 50 hPa. This causes the ClO dimer to thermolyze forming two ClO molecules at around 380K as well as additional thermolysis of ClONO2 to ClO and NO2 at around 540K. The ClO generated within the thermolysis is then detected on top of the ambient ClO. Temperature cycling and intercomparisons with the first unheated duct allow the differentiation of the chlorine species. Details of the instrumental setup, instrument calibration, and performance will be discussed. Profiles for ClO and ClONO2 from a flight carried out from ESRANGE near Kiruna, Sweden, on April-01-2011 in the edge region of the degrading arctic vortex will be presented marking the first ClONO2 in-situ measurements above research aircraft altitudes (20km). Brune, W. H., et al., Insitu Observations Of ClO In The Antarctic - Er-2 Aircraft Results From 54-Degrees-S To 72-Degrees-S Latitude, Journal Of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 94, 16649-16663, 1989.

  8. Physicians' decision process for drug prescription and the impact of pharmaceutical marketing mix instruments.

    PubMed

    Campo, Katia; De Staebel, Odette; Gijsbrechts, Els; van Waterschoot, Walter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth, qualitative analysis of the physicians' decision process for drug prescription. Drugs in the considered therapeutic classes are mainly prescribed by specialists, treating patients with obligatory medical insurance, for a prolonged period of time. The research approach is specifically designed to capture the full complexity and sensitive nature of the physician's choice behavior, which appears to be more hybrid and less rational in nature than is often assumed in quantitative, model-based analyses of prescription behavior. Several interesting findings emerge from the analysis: (i) non-compensatory decision rules seem to dominate the decision process, (ii) consideration sets are typically small and change-resistant, (iii) drug cost is not a major issue for most physicians, (iv) detailing remains one of the most powerful pharmaceutical marketing instruments and is highly appreciated as a valuable and quick source of information, and (v) certain types of non-medical marketing incentives (such as free conference participation) may in some situations also influence drug choices. PMID:16597584

  9. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  10. Landsat TM and ETM+ Thermal Band Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Hook, Simon J.; Palluconi, Frank D.; Schott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2006-01-01

    Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) has been imaging the Earth since March 1984 and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) was added to the series of Landsat instruments in April 1999. The stability and calibration of the ETM+ has been monitored extensively since launch. Though not monitored for many years, TM now has a similar system in place to monitor stability and calibration. University teams have been evaluating the on-board calibration of the instruments through ground-based measurements since 1999. This paper considers the calibration efforts for the thermal band, Band 6, of both the Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 instruments.

  11. Urban traffic-related determinants of health questionnaire (UTDHQ): an instrument developed for health impact assessments

    PubMed Central

    Nadrian, Haidar; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traffic and transport is a substantial part of a range of economic, social and environmental factors distinguished to have impact on human health. This paper is a report on a preliminary section of a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) on urban traffic and transport initiatives, being conducted in Sanandaj, Iran. In this preliminary study, the psychometric properties of Urban Traffic related Determinants of Health Questionnaire (UTDHQ) were investigated. Methods: Multistage cluster sampling was employed to recruit 476 key informants in Sanandaj from April to June 2013 to participate in the study. The development of UTDHQ began with a comprehensive review of the literature. Then face, content and construct validity as well as reliability were determined. Results: Exploratory Factor Analysis showed optimal reduced solution including 40 items and 8 factors. Three of the factors identified were Physical Environment, Social Environment, Public Services Delivery and Accessibility. UTDHQ demonstrated an appropriate validity, reliability, functionality and simplicity. Conclusion: Despite the need for further studies on UTDHQ, this study showed that it can be a practical and useful tool for conducting HIAs in order to inform decision makers and stakeholders about the health influences of their decisions and measures. PMID:25664285

  12. [The impact of dental trauma on quality of life of children and adolescents: a critical review and measurement instruments].

    PubMed

    Antunes, Lívia Azeredo Alves; Leão, Anna Thereza; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2012-12-01

    Dental trauma constitutes a public health problem with a marked prevalence among Brazilian children and adolescents. Furthermore, it can lead to irreparable dental loss, which makes it important to evaluate this condition using instruments of oral health related to quality of life (OHRQoL). Based on this, a review of the literature sought to expose indices that may assess the evaluation of quality of life among Brazilians with dental trauma, as well as discuss the state of the art of publications about this condition on their OHRQoL followed by a discussion of the output encountered on the subject. With this in mind the articles published from 1980 to June/2011 located on databases (Pubmed, VHL, Google Scholar) or manually in the references of selected publications were prioritized. It was revealed that there is no specific instrument for dental trauma. It is therefore necessary to assess the OHRQoL in children and adolescents with indices found in the literature. Once this has been done, as yet unresolved questions about the impact of dental trauma on OHRQoL can be answered. PMID:23175417

  13. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  14. Impact of mixing height estimation on heterogeneous terrains with different algorithms and instruments on atmospheric transport models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biavati, G.; Kretschmer, R.; Gerbig, C.; Feist, D. G.

    2012-04-01

    The retrieval of mixing height [MH] is a common target of several scientific community all over the world. A strong effort is needed to the fact that modeling of MH generally fails introducing strong errors in the estimate of the concentrations of pollutants and green house gasses within the boundary layer. In Europe local meteorological services and international projects are implementing networks of instruments that can provide atmospheric profiles of different quantities. These networks will continuously provide data which could be used to constrain MH values. The current availability of atmospheric profiles of different nature, such as radiosondes, ground based lidar and ceilometers as well as satellites over Europe grant a spatial coverage that allow to estimate the impact of the knowledge of MH on transport models at synoptic scale of quantities as CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios. In this study we apply several algorithms to retrieve MH from different data sources: the ceilometers network installed by the German Weather Service; the data from CALIPSO satellite and all the WMO radio-soundings available over Europe during the IMECC (Infrastructure for Measurements of the European Carbon Cycle) in 2009. The values obtained from the optical instruments are validated using as reference the estimation retrieved by the virtual potential temperature profiles obtained by the radiosondes where co-location occurs and using statistical interpolation to evaluate the estimates from satellite and non co-located stations.. The impact of this estimates of MH on CO2 mixing ratios will be evaluated with the Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport model (STILT) driven by WRF meteorology in comparison with in-situ measurements.

  15. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  16. Impacts of depolarization calibration methods on cloud phase interpretation at Eureka during 2013 and 2014 CRL lidar measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Gamage, S. M.; Hopper, J.; Sica, R. J.; Duck, T.; Walker, K. A.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative behaviour of clouds is dependent on cloud particle phase. Water droplets can exist in temperatures well below 0° C for extended periods. Lidar depolarization measurements allow liquid and solid states to be differentiated in individual clouds at high spatial-temporal resolution. The 2012, 2013 and 2014 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaigns in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80°N, 86°W) provided an opportunity to make extensive depolarization measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) in the troposphere.To date, most calibration methods in the literature are applicable to lidars which do not have non-ideal polarizing optics upstream of the polarizing analyzers in the receiver. We demonstrate a more complete matrix algebra calibration of the CRL to take the extra optics from six upstream lidar channels into account.Differences in depolarization parameter from 2013 and 2014 measurements show the advantage of the more extensive calibration for this lidar compared to the simpler traditional approach. The largest differences are found for depolarization parameter values around d = 0.50 (corresponding to δ = 0.33). Depolarization ratio values of δ = 0.2 to 0.3 are generally taken to be the cutoff between interpretations of ice (higher δ) or water (lower δ), and many CRL measurements lie in this particularly diagnostic range. An uncertainty analysis becomes important when extending the depolarization parameters to interpretation of the clouds in the atmosphere above Eureka.

  17. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis for geochemical analyses of terrestrial impact structures: current analytical procedures at the university of vienna geochemistry activation analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-12-01

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory at the Department of Lithospheric Research, University of Vienna, has been upgraded in the year 2006. This paper describes the sample preparation, new instrumentation and data evaluation for hundreds of rock samples of two terrestrial impact structures. The measurement and data evaluation are done by using Genie 2000 and a custom-made batch software for the used analysis sequences. PMID:19481467

  18. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  19. Understanding human visual systems and its impact on our intelligent instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strojnik Scholl, Marija; Páez, Gonzalo; Scholl, Michelle K.

    2013-09-01

    We review the evolution of machine vision and comment on the cross-fertilization from the neural sciences onto flourishing fields of neural processing, parallel processing, and associative memory in optical sciences and computing. Then we examine how the intensive efforts in mapping the human brain have been influenced by concepts in computer sciences, control theory, and electronic circuits. We discuss two neural paths that employ the input from the vision sense to determine the navigational options and object recognition. They are ventral temporal pathway for object recognition (what?) and dorsal parietal pathway for navigation (where?), respectively. We describe the reflexive and conscious decision centers in cerebral cortex involved with visual attention and gaze control. Interestingly, these require return path though the midbrain for ocular muscle control. We find that the cognitive psychologists currently study human brain employing low-spatial-resolution fMRI with temporal response on the order of a second. In recent years, the life scientists have concentrated on insect brains to study neural processes. We discuss how reflexive and conscious gaze-control decisions are made in the frontal eye field and inferior parietal lobe, constituting the fronto-parietal attention network. We note that ethical and experiential learnings impact our conscious decisions.

  20. [Quality control dose calibrators].

    PubMed

    Montoza Aguado, M; Delgado García, A; Ramírez Navarro, A; Salgado García, C; Muros de Fuentes, M A; Ortega Lozano, S; Bellón Guardia, M E; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2004-01-01

    We have reviewed the legislation about the quality control of dose calibrator. The importance of verifying the correct work of these instruments, is fundamental in daily practice of radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine. The Spanish legislation establishes to include these controls as part of the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, and the program of quality assurance in nuclear medicine. We have reviewed guides and protocols from international eminent organizations, summarizing the recommended tests and periodicity of them. PMID:15625064

  1. Hydraulic Calibrator for Strain-Gauge Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelly, Kenneth; Ballard, John

    1987-01-01

    Instrument for calibrating strain-gauge balances uses hydraulic actuators and load cells. Eliminates effects of nonparallelism, nonperpendicularity, and changes of cable directions upon vector sums of applied forces. Errors due to cable stretching, pulley friction, and weight inaccuracy also eliminated. New instrument rugged and transportable. Set up quickly. Developed to apply known loads to wind-tunnel models with encapsulated strain-gauge balances, also adapted for use in calibrating dynamometers, load sensors on machinery and laboratory instruments.

  2. Metrology - Beyond the Calibration Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    We rely on data from measurements every day; a gas-pump, a speedometer, and a supermarket weight scale are just three examples of measurements we use to make decisions. We generally accept the data from these measurements as "valid." One reason we can accept the data is the "legal metrology" requirements established and regulated by the government in matters of commerce. The measurement data used by NASA, other government agencies, and industry can be critical to decisions which affect everything from economic viability, to mission success, to the security of the nation. Measurement data can even affect life and death decisions. Metrology requirements must adequately provide for risks associated with these decisions. To do this, metrology must be integrated into all aspects of an industry including research, design, testing, and product acceptance. Metrology, the science of measurement, has traditionally focused on the calibration of instruments, and although instrument calibration is vital, it is only a part of the process that assures quality in measurement data. For example, measurements made in research can influence the fundamental premises that establish the design parameters, which then flow down to the manufacturing processes, and eventually impact the final product. Because a breakdown can occur anywhere within this cycle, measurement quality assurance has to be integrated into every part of the life-cycle process starting with the basic research and ending with the final product inspection process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of metrology in the various phases of a product's life-cycle. For simplicity, the cycle will be divided in four broad phases, with discussions centering on metrology within NASA. .

  3. The use of a virtual reality simulator to explore and understand the impact of Linac mis-calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, Andrew W.; Ward, James W.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: In recent years there has been interest in using Computer Simulation within Medical training. The VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) system is a Flight Simulator for Radiation Oncology professionals, wherein fundamental concepts, techniques and problematic scenarios can be safely investigated. Methods: The system provides detailed simulations of several Linacs and the ability to display DICOM treatment plans. Patients can be mis-positioned with 'set-up errors' which can be explored visually, dosimetrically and using IGRT. Similarly, a variety of Linac calibration and configuration parameters can be altered manually or randomly via controlled errors in the simulated 3D Linac and its component parts. The implication of these can be investigated by following through a treatment scenario or using QC devices available within a Physics software module. Results: One resultant exercise is a systematic mis-calibration of 'lateral laser height' by 2mm. The offset in patient alignment is easily identified using IGRT and once corrected by reference to the 'in-room monitor'. The dosimetric implication is demonstrated to be 0.4% by setting a dosimetry phantom by the lasers (and ignoring TSD information). Finally, the need for recalibration can be shown by the Laser Alignment Phantom or by reference to the front pointer. Conclusions: The VERT system provides a realistic environment for training and enhancing understanding of radiotherapy concepts and techniques. Linac error conditions can be explored in this context and valuable experience gained in a controlled manner in a compressed period of time.

  4. Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is involved in two cooperative projects, with international participants, both of which involve Charpy V-notch impact tests with instrumented strikers of 2mm and 8mm radii. Two heats of A 533 grade B class I pressure vessel steel and a low upper-shelf (LUS) submerged-arc (SA) weld were tested on the same Charpy machine, while one heat of a Russian Cr-Mo-V forging steel and a high upper-shelf (HUS) SA weld were tested on two different machines. The number of replicate tests at any one temperature ranged from 2 to 46 specimens. Prior to testing with each striker, verification specimens at the low, high, and super high energy levels from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were tested. In the two series of verification tests, the tests with the 2mm striker met the requirements at the low and high energy levels but not at the super high energy. For one plate, the 2mm striker showed somewhat higher average absorbed energies than those for the 8-mm striker at all three test temperatures. For the second plate and the LUS weld, however, the 2mm striker showed somewhat lower energies at both test temperatures. For the Russian forging steel and the HUS weld, tests were conducted over a range of temperatures with tests at one laboratory using the 8mm striker and tests at a second laboratory using the 2mm striker. Lateral expansion was measured for all specimens and the results are compared with the absorbed energy results. The overall results showed generally good agreement (within one standard deviation) in energy measurements by the two strikers. Load-time traces from the instrumented strikers were also compared and used to estimate shear fracture percentage. Four different formulas from the European Structural Integrity Society draft standard for instrumented Charpy test are compared and a new formula is proposed for estimation of percent shear from the force-time trace.

  5. Operational Land Imager relative radiometric calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.

    2015-09-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI), on board the Landsat-8 satellite, is a pushbroom sensor with nearly 7000 detectors per band, divided between 14 separate modules. While rigorously characterized prior to launch, the shear number of individual detectors presents a challenge to maintaining the on-orbit relative calibration, such that stripes, bands and other artifacts are minimized in the final image products. On-orbit relative calibration of the OLI is primarily monitored and corrected by observing an on-board primary solar diffuser panel. The panel is the most uniform target available to the OLI, though as observed but the OLI, it has a slope across the field of view due to view angle effects. Just after launch, parameters were derived using the solar diffuser data, to correct for the angular effects across the 14 modules. The residual discontinuities between arrays and the detector-to-detector uniformity continue to be monitored on a weekly basis. The observed variations in the responses to the diffuser panel since launch are thought to be due to real instrument changes. Since launch, the Coastal/Aerosol (CA) and Blue bands have shown the most variation in relative calibration of the VNIR bands, with as much as 0.14% change (3-sigma) between consecutive relative gain estimates. The other VNIR bands (Green, Red and NIR) initially had detectors showing a slow drift of about 0.2% per year, though this stopped after an instrument power cycle about seven months after launch. The SWIR bands also exhibit variability between collects (0.11% 3-sigma) but the larger changes have been where individual detectors' responses change suddenly by as much as 1.5%. The mechanisms behind these changes are not well understood but in order to minimize impact to the users, the OLI relative calibration is updated on a quarterly basis in order to capture changes over time.

  6. Strain Gauge Balance Calibration and Data Reduction at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, A. T. Judy

    1999-01-01

    This paper will cover the standard force balance calibration and data reduction techniques used at Langley Research Center. It will cover balance axes definition, balance type, calibration instrumentation, traceability of standards to NIST, calibration loading procedures, balance calibration mathematical model, calibration data reduction techniques, balance accuracy reporting, and calibration frequency.

  7. Calibration method for radiometric and wavelength calibration of a spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Edward M.

    1998-12-01

    A new calibration target or Certified Reference Material (CRM) has been designed that uses violet, orange, green and cyan dyes ont cotton paper. This paper type was chosen because it has a relatively flat spectral response from 400 nm to 700 nm and good keeping properties. These specific dyes were chosen because the difference signal between the orange, cyan, green and purple dyes have certain characteristics that then a low the calibration of an instrument. The ratio between the difference readings is a direct function of the center wavelength of a given spectral band. Therefore, the radiometric and spectral calibration can be determined simultaneously from the physical properties of the reference materials.

  8. Calibration of radionuclide calibrators in Canadian hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Santry, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The major user of radioactive isotopes in Canada is the medical profession. Because of this a program has been initiated at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) to assist the nuclear medicine community to determine more accurately, the rather large amounts of radioactive materials administered to patients either for therapeutic or medical diagnostics. Since radiation exposure to the human body has deleterious effects, it is important for the patient that the correct amount of radioactive material is administered to minimize the induction of a fatal cancer at a later time. Hospitals in many other countries have a legal requirement to have their instruments routinely calibrated and have previously entered into intercomparisons with other hospitals or their national standards laboratories. In Canada, hospitals and clinics can participate on a voluntary basis to have the proper operation of measuring devices (radionuclide calibrators in particular) examined through intercomparisons. The program looks primarily at laboratory performance. This includes not only the instrument's performance but the performance of the individual doing the procedure and the technical procedure or method employed. In an effort to provide personal assistance to those having problems, it is essential that the comparisons should be pertinent to the daily work of the laboratory and that the most capable technologist not be selected to carry out the assay.

  9. An experimental VLT cryo-cooler instrumentation vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Gerd; Lizon, Jean-Louis

    2012-09-01

    Cryo-coolers are widely used to provide the required temperature levels of ESO's VLT instrumentation suite, mainly for infrared instruments and their detectors. Nevertheless, mechanical vibrations induced by these refrigerator systems became a serious issue over the last years. Especially for the extremely sensitive VLT-Interferometer even micro vibration levels can be critical. As a consequence ESO started some time ago a comprehensive vibration reduction program. Major tasks involved are the quantification of typical cryo-cooler instrument vibration levels and their impact on the VLT / VLT-I optical stability. This paper describes the design, construction and calibration of a dedicated VLT dummy instrument comprising six powerful state-of-the-art 2-stage cold heads and the subsequent comprehensive vibration measurement test campaign. As a result trendsetting cryo-cooler instrument design and operation recommendations are presented.

  10. Apollo 16/AS-511/LM-11 operational calibration curves. Volume 1: Calibration curves for command service module CSM 113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoss, J. F. (Compiler)

    1971-01-01

    Calibration curves for the Apollo 16 command service module pulse code modulation downlink and onboard display are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) measurement calibration curve format, (2) measurement identification, (3) multi-mode calibration data summary, (4) pulse code modulation bilevel events listing, and (5) calibration curves for instrumentation downlink and meter link.

  11. Review of Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumented indentation, also known as depth-sensing indentation or nanoindentation, is increasingly being used to probe the mechanical response of materials from metals and ceramics to polymeric and biological materials. The additional levels of control, sensitivity, and data acquisition offered by instrumented indentation systems have resulted in numerous advances in materials science, particularly regarding fundamental mechanisms of mechanical behavior at micrometer and even sub-micrometer length scales. Continued improvements of instrumented indentation testing towards absolute quantification of a wide range of material properties and behavior will require advances in instrument