Science.gov

Sample records for impact test characteristics

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Guessing and Its Interactions with Other Test Characteristics on Confidence Interval Procedures for Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paek, Insu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of guessing on the point estimate of coefficient alpha has been studied in the literature, but the impact of guessing and its interactions with other test characteristics on the interval estimators for coefficient alpha has not been fully investigated. This study examined the impact of guessing and its interactions with other test…

  2. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  3. The impact of job characteristics on work-to-family facilitation: testing a theory and distinguishing a construct.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Butler, Adam B

    2005-04-01

    This study used objective measures of job characteristics appended to the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), self-reported job characteristics, and an individual resource characteristic (orientation toward personal growth) to test a theory of work-family facilitation. Results indicated that resource-rich jobs enable work-to-family facilitation. A higher level of work-to-family facilitation was reported by individuals in jobs with more autonomy and variety and whose jobs required greater substantive complexity and social skill. There was no support for the hypotheses that these effects would be more pronounced for individuals with higher levels of personal growth. The authors found significant differences in the strength of the associations of job characteristics with work-to-family facilitation and work-tofamily conflict, suggesting they are different constructs with distinct antecedents. PMID:15826221

  4. Impact Tests for Woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Although it is well known that the strength of wood depends greatly upon the time the wood is under the load, little consideration has been given to this fact in testing materials for airplanes. Here, results are given of impact tests on clear, straight grained spruce. Transverse tests were conducted for comparison. Both Izod and Charpy impact tests were conducted. Results are given primarily in tabular and graphical form.

  5. HIV Testing Characteristics Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mindy; Malcolm, Lydia; Diaz-Albertini, Kristine; Klinoff, Vera A

    2016-02-01

    Hispanic adolescents are disproportionally impacted by HIV/AIDS. Among Hispanic people living with HIV, delayed testing and late entry into HIV care have been documented. The current study examined Hispanic adolescents' HIV testing characteristics and factors related to testing. Adolescents aged 13-16 (N = 223) completed a survey on HIV testing motivation, perceptions, and experience, sexual behavior, and substance use. Results indicate few adolescents (9%) had taken an HIV test. Among those who have not been tested, 32.5% expressed interest in testing. HIV testing was favorably perceived with 82.4% reported testing should be done with all youth or those are sexually active. Adolescents who had engaged in high risk behaviors (history of sexual intercourse, substance use) were more likely to have been tested or to express interest in testing. Given that HIV testing is positively perceived by Hispanic adolescents, prevention efforts should focus on minimizing barriers and enhancing accessibility to HIV screening. PMID:26093652

  6. Measuring space radiation impact on the characteristics of optical glasses; measurement results and recommendations from testing a selected set of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Michel; Gusarov, Andrei I.; Doyle, Dominic B.

    2002-09-01

    Radiation sensitivity of glass is a general concern for the designer of Space optical instruments. ASTRIUM, in cooperation with SCK-CEN, has conducted a study (under ESA sponsorship) to define the approach for the gathering of a comprehensive database to quantify these effects through the use of linear sensitivity coefficients (called "Dose Coefficients"). These "Dose coefficients" cover not only transmittance but also other characteristics such as refractive index. After having recalled the basics of the proposed approach, results of the first irradiation tests which have been run on a selected set of classical glasses nd their Radiation hardened Cerium doped analogs (including BK7, K5, LaK9 and other Schott glasses) will be discussed. PRotons and gamma radiation have been performed with the aim to demonstrate equivalence, thus allowing to further considering only gamma radiation for an extensive testing of available glasses. Relaxation impacts on some months period have been tentatively analyzed. All these measurements have been processed and the modeling approach of the radiations impacts has been derived, as shown in the publication from A. Gusarov at this conference. This will constitute the grounds for the building of a comprehensive "Dose Coefficients" data base, as expressed in the publication from D. Doyle also at this conference. From this, recommendations for a sound characterization of radiation impacts on refractive optical materials have been established and are the subject of this publication.

  7. Testing the Impact of Child Characteristics x Instruction Interactions on Third Graders' Reading Comprehension by Differentiating Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Fredrick J.; Fishman, Barry; Giuliani, Sarah; Luck, Melissa; Underwood, Phyllis S.; Bayraktar, Aysegul; Crowe, Elizabeth C.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating correlational evidence that the effect of specific types of reading instruction depends on children's initial language and literacy skills, called child characteristics x instruction (CxI) interactions. There is, however, no experimental evidence beyond first grade. This randomized control study examined whether CxI…

  8. Assessing the Impact of Characteristics of the Test, Common-Items, and Examinees on the Preservation of Equity Properties in Mixed-Format Test Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Raffaela

    2013-01-01

    Preservation of equity properties was examined using four equating methods--IRT True Score, IRT Observed Score, Frequency Estimation, and Chained Equipercentile--in a mixed-format test under a common-item nonequivalent groups (CINEG) design. Equating of mixed-format tests under a CINEG design can be influenced by factors such as attributes of the…

  9. Southern Impact Testing Alliance (SITA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, Whitney; Roebuck, Brian; Zwiener, Mark; Wells, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to form this Alliance began in 2008 to showcase the impact testing capabilities within the southern United States. Impact testing customers can utilize SITA partner capabilities to provide supporting data during all program phases-materials/component/ flight hardware design, development, and qualification. This approach would allow programs to reduce risk by providing low cost testing during early development to flush out possible problems before moving on to larger scale1 higher cost testing. Various SITA partners would participate in impact testing depending on program phase-materials characterization, component/subsystem characterization, full-scale system testing for qualification. SITA partners would collaborate with the customer to develop an integrated test approach during early program phases. Modeling and analysis validation can start with small-scale testing to ensure a level of confidence for the next step large or full-scale conclusive test shots. Impact Testing Facility (ITF) was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960's and played a malor role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As a result of return to flight testing after the loss of STS-107 (Columbia) MSFC ITF realized the need to expand their capabilities beyond meteoroid and space debris impact testing. MSFC partnered with the Department of Defense and academic institutions as collaborative efforts to gain and share knowledge that would benefit the Space Agency as well as the DoD. MSFC ITF current capabilities include: Hypervelocity impact testing, ballistic impact testing, and environmental impact testing.

  10. Nickel: Impact on horticultural characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge by practitioners regarding the potential impact of nickel nutritional physiology on pecan orchard profitability is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recogni...

  11. Survey of receiving-water environmental impacts associated with discharges from pulp mills; 1: Mill characteristics, receiving-water chemical profiles and lab toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.D. . Dept. of Environmental Biology); Carey, J.H. . Rivers Research Branch); Solomon, K.R. ); Smith, I.R. . Water Resources Branch); Servos, M.R.; Munkittrick, K.R. . Great Lakes Lab. for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    This survey examined the relationship between environmental responses at pulp mill sites and the pulping process, effluent treatment, and bleaching technology used by pulp mills. This manuscript is the first in a series of four; it reviews the location and operating characteristics of mills included in the survey and provides background information on water chemistry that is relevant to the other components of the survey. In addition, lab 7-d toxicity tests of receiving water were conducted using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia with water samples collected upstream and downstream of effluent discharges at 11 Canadian pulp and paper mills; these samples were collected at the same time as fish surveys were conducted. Survival of fathead minnow larvae was significantly reduced at four of the 11 downstream sites. Ceriodaphnia reproduction was significantly higher at six of the 11 downstream sites and significantly lower at two downstream sites. There were no significant effects on fathead minnow larva growth or adult Ceriodaphnia survival at any of the examined downstream sites. Negative effects in the toxicity tests were generally associated with the low dilution discharge of primary treated effluent with a previous history of acute toxicity. Fathead minnow and Ceriodaphnia tests were generally correlated with historical data on benthic macroinvertebrate community responses. Neither toxicity test predicted the physiological changes in wild fish that are presented in accompanying papers.

  12. Impacting device for testing insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An electro-mechanical impacting device for testing the bonding of foam insulation to metal is descirbed. The device lightly impacts foam insulation attached to metal to determine whether the insulation is properly bonded to the metal and to determine the quality of the bond. A force measuring device, preferably a load cell mounted on the impacting device, measures the force of the impact and the duration of the time the hammer head is actually in contact with the insulation. The impactor is designed in the form of a handgun having a driving spring which can propel a plunger forward to cause a hammer head to impact the insulation. The device utilizes a trigger mechanism which provides precise adjustements, allowing fireproof operation.

  13. Impact of human emotions on physiological characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partila, P.; Voznak, M.; Peterek, T.; Penhaker, M.; Novak, V.; Tovarek, J.; Mehic, Miralem; Vojtech, L.

    2014-05-01

    Emotional states of humans and their impact on physiological and neurological characteristics are discussed in this paper. This problem is the goal of many teams who have dealt with this topic. Nowadays, it is necessary to increase the accuracy of methods for obtaining information about correlations between emotional state and physiological changes. To be able to record these changes, we focused on two majority emotional states. Studied subjects were psychologically stimulated to neutral - calm and then to the stress state. Electrocardiography, Electroencephalography and blood pressure represented neurological and physiological samples that were collected during patient's stimulated conditions. Speech activity was recording during the patient was reading selected text. Feature extraction was calculated by speech processing operations. Classifier based on Gaussian Mixture Model was trained and tested using Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients extracted from the patient's speech. All measurements were performed in a chamber with electromagnetic compatibility. The article discusses a method for determining the influence of stress emotional state on the human and his physiological and neurological changes.

  14. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  15. The impact absorption characteristics of cricket batting helmets.

    PubMed

    Stretch, R A

    2000-12-01

    To determine whether the helmets currently used by cricket batsmen offer sufficient protection against impacts of a cricket ball, the impact absorption characteristics of six helmets were measured using the drop test at an impact velocity equivalent to a cricket ball with a release speed of 160 km x h(-1) (44.4 m x s(-1)). An accelerometer transducer attached to a 5.0 kg striker was dropped from a height of 3.14 m onto the batting helmets to measure the impact characteristics at the three different impact sites: right temple, forehead and back of the helmet. These data were further expressed as a percentage above (-) or below (+) the recommended safety standard of 300 g. The results indicate that the force absorption characteristics of the helmets showed inter- and intra-helmet variations, with 14 of the 18 impact sites (66.7%) assessed meeting the recommended safety standards. Helmets 1, 2 and 4 succeeded in meeting the safety standards at all impact sites; helmets 5 and 6 both failed at the back and forehead, while helmet 3 failed at all impact sites. These differences were due to the structure and composition of the inner protective layer of the helmets. The helmets that succeeded in meeting the standards were made with a moulded polystyrene insert, a heat-formed ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) insert, or EVA with a relatively high density that allows a minimal amount of movement of the helmet at ball impact. PMID:11138985

  16. Dynamic impact testing with servohydraulic testing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenheier, R.; Rogers, G.

    2006-08-01

    The design concept of “Crashworthiness” requires the information on material behaviour under dynamic impact loading in order to describe and predict the crash behaviour of structures. Especially the transport related industries, like car, railway or aircraft industry, pursue the concept of lightweight design for a while now. The materials' maximum constraint during loading is pushed to permanently increasing figures. This means in terms of crashworthiness that the process of energy absorption in structures and the mechanical behaviour of materials must well understood and can be described appropriately by material models. In close cooperation with experts from various industries and research institutes Instron has developed throughout the past years a new family of servohydraulic testing machines specifically designed to cope with the dynamics of high rate testing. Main development steps are reflected versus their experimental necessities.

  17. AXAF hypervelocity impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Cynthia L.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.

    1997-01-01

    Composite and honeycomb panels are commonly used for spacecraft structural components. The impact test results and analysis of six different composite and honeycomb combinations for use on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) are reported. The AXAF consists of an X-ray telescope and the associated detecting devices attached to an octagonal spacecraft with an internal propulsion system. The spacecraft's structural panels and optical bench are made of two different graphite fiber reinforced polyimides or composite panels bonded to either side of an aluminum honeycomb. The instrument is required to have at least a 0.92 probability of no failure of any of the critical elements due to meteoroids and debris. In relation to the no-failure probability determination in its low earth orbit environment, hypervelocity impact testing was performed to determine the ballistic limit range and the extent of damage due to impact. The test results for a power and signal cable bundle located behind a panel are presented. Tests planned for a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket and four types of cable bundles are discussed.

  18. Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo

    2013-09-15

    The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

  19. The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lisheng; Zhang Qingjie; Zhai Pengcheng; Cao Dongfeng

    2008-02-15

    The effect of ceramic/metal gradient armor's components characteristic on its impact-resistant characteristic has been investigated by a new modified Alekseevskii-Tate equation. The following researching work is done by the former model [1]: the effect of ceramic layer on the impact-resistant characteristic, the effect of gradient layer on the impact-resistant characteristic and the effect of metal layer on the impact-resistant characteristic.

  20. Auburn Micrometeoroid Impact Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrygo, Charles; Best, Steve; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview and summary of micrometeoroid impact testing performed by Auburn University and an analysis of the test results. The testing at Auburn utilized existing facilities at Auburn to generate hypervelocity impacts into multiple layers of thin Kapton films representative of the NASA concept for the NGST sunshield. The test data consists of impactor particle mass and velocity, and for each film layer, the number and size of holes generated by the initial impact and resulting impact debris. The analysis consists of combining the test data with existing impact effects models and the micrometeoroid environment at the L2 operating location of NGST to predict sunshield degradation.

  1. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  2. Hypervelocity impact testing of cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Adkinson, A. B.; English, J. E.; Linebaugh, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The physics and electrical results obtained from simulated micrometeoroid testing of certain Skylab cables are presented. The test procedure, electrical circuits, test equipment, and cable types utilized are also explained.

  3. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  4. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  5. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Impact test. 7.46 Section 7.46 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... individual cells. At the test temperature range of 65 °F -80 °F (18.3 °C-26.7 °C), apply a dynamic force...

  6. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  7. Reproducibility of liquid oxygen impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Results for 12,000 impacts on a wide range of materials were studied to determine the reproducibility of the liquid oxygen impact test method. Standard deviations representing the overall variability of results were in close agreement with the expected values for a binomial process. This indicates that the major source of variability is due to the go - no go nature of the test method and that variations due to sampling and testing operations were not significant.

  8. Water impact shock test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The basic objective was to design, manufacture, and install a shock test system which, in part, would have the ability to subject test articles weighing up to 1,000 pounds to both half sine and/or full sine pulses having peak levels of up to 50 G's with half sine pulse durations of 100 milliseconds or full sine period duration of 200 milliseconds. The tolerances associated with the aforementioned pulses were +20% and -10% for the peak levels and plus or minus 10% for the pulse durations. The subject shock test system was to be capable of accepting test article sizes of up to 4 feet by 4 feet mounting surface by 4 feet in length.

  9. Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A.

    1998-12-31

    The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

  10. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  11. Measurement Techniques for Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to classify the size and shape of individual orbital debris fragments provides a better understanding of the orbital debris environment as a whole. The characterization of breakup fragmentation debris has gradually evolved from a simplistic, spherical assumption towards that of describing debris in terms of size, material, and shape parameters. One of the goals of the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is to develop high-accuracy techniques to measure these parameters and apply them to orbital debris observations. Measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from groundbased, hypervelocity impact testing provides insight into the shapes and sizes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. Current techniques for measuring these ground-test fragments require determination of dimensions based upon visual judgment. This leads to reduced accuracy and provides little or no repeatability for the measurements. With the common goal of mitigating these error sources, allaying any misunderstandings, and moving forward in fragment shape determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently began using a computerized measurement system. The goal of using these new techniques is to improve knowledge of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The immediate objective is to scan a single fragment, measure its size and shape properties, and import the fragment into a program that renders a 3D model that adequately demonstrates how the object could appear in orbit. This information would then be used to aid optical methods in orbital debris shape determination. This paper provides a description of the measurement techniques used in this initiative and shows results of this work. The tradeoffs of the computerized methods are discussed, as well as the means of repeatability in the measurements of these fragments. This paper serves as a general description of methods for the measurement and shape analysis of

  12. Impact-absorbing characteristics by applying ultrasonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ueki, Eiichiro; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2012-05-01

    An impact-absorbing device that facilitates the application of ultrasonic vibrations was devised. Vibration distributions, springback characteristics, and impact-absorption characteristics were measured. We confirm that the springback amount decreases and the impact is absorbed upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations. When an aluminum alloy plate is crumpled, the maximum output voltage of the attached shock sensor decreases to 65% upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations as compared to when the ultrasonic vibrations are not applied.

  13. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... at 122 °F (50 °C) for a period of 48 hours. (2) Mount the covers on a battery box of the same design with which the covers are to be approved, including any support blocks, with the battery...

  14. 30 CFR 7.46 - Impact test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.46 Impact test. (a) Test... at 122 °F (50 °C) for a period of 48 hours. (2) Mount the covers on a battery box of the same design with which the covers are to be approved, including any support blocks, with the battery...

  15. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  16. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  17. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  18. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  19. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  20. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  1. Impact testing on composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  2. FOD impact testing of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  3. FOD impact testing of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of impact tests on large, fiber composite fan blades for aircraft turbofan engine applications are discussed. Solid composite blades of two different sizes and designs were tested. Both graphite/epoxy and boron/epoxy were evaluated. In addition, a spar-shell blade design was tested that had a boron/epoxy shell bonded to a titanium spar. All blades were tested one at a time in a rotating arm rig to simulate engine operating conditions. Impacting media included small gravel, two inch diameter ice balls, gelatin, and RTV foam-simulated birds, as well as starlings and pigeons. The results showed little difference in performance between the graphite and boron/epoxy blades. The results also indicate that composite blades may be able to tolerate ice ball and small bird impacts but need improvement to tolerate birds in the small duck and larger category.

  4. Mechanical Impact Testing: A Statistical Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    In the decades since the 1950s, when NASA first developed mechanical impact testing of materials, researchers have continued efforts to gain a better understanding of the chemical, mechanical, and thermodynamic nature of the phenomenon. The impact mechanism is a real combustion ignition mechanism that needs understanding in the design of an oxygen system. The use of test data from this test method has been questioned due to lack of a clear method of application of the data and variability found between tests, material batches, and facilities. This effort explores a large database that has accumulated over a number of years and explores its overall nature. Moreover, testing was performed to determine the statistical nature of the test procedure to help establish sample size guidelines for material characterization. The current method of determining a pass/fail criterion based on either light emission or sound report or material charring is questioned.

  5. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility canister impact testing

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.M.; Alzheimer, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes impact testing of seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high level waste canisters during FY 1988. Impact testing was conducted to demonstrate compliance of DWPF canisters with the drop test specification of the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specification. The prototypical stainless steel canisters were filled with simulated waste to about 85% capacity at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). They were received from SRL in April 1988. Each canister was approximately 300 cm (9 ft 10 in.) long, and 61 cm (2 ft) in diameter, and weighed about 2150 kg (4740 lb). Each canister was dropped twice from a height of 7 m (23 ft). The first drop was a vertical bottom impact where the bottom of the canister was oriented parallel to the impact pad. The second was a center-of-gravity-over-the-corner top impact. Procedures used to examine the canisters were the application and analysis of strain circles, helium leak testing, dye penetrant examination, and canister dimensional measurements. 39 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Impact testing of a Stirling convertor's linear alternator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and Stirling Technology Company, are currently developing a Stirling convertor for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). NASA Headquarters and DOE have identified the SRG for potential use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space and Mars surface missions. Low-level dynamic impact tests were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory as part of the development of this technology. The purpose of this test was to identify dynamic structural characteristics of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). This paper addresses the test setup, procedure and results of the impact testing conducted on the Stirling TDC in May 2001. .

  8. Impact Testing of a Stirling Converter's Linear Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and Stirling Technology Company, are currently developing a Stirling convertor for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). NASA Headquarters and DOE have identified the SRG for potential use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space and Mars surface missions. Low-level dynamic impact tests were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory as part of the development of this technology. The purpose of this test was to identify dynamic structural characteristics of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). This paper addresses the test setup, procedure, and results of the impact testing conducted on the Stirling TDC in May 2001.

  9. Paint spray tests for respirators: aerosol characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ackley, M W

    1980-05-01

    Liquid paint is sprayed from an atomizing nozzle to form an aerosol for testing paint spray respirators. The generated aerosol conditions are dependent upon liguid properties, spray-nozzle flow conditions and droplet evaporation. A technique was developed for controlling the aerosol concentrations reliably. Particle-size distributions of lacquer and enamel have been measured. The lacquer distribution was found to be multi-modal. Aerosol concentration dradients arise when the nozzle is not properly positioned. Filter loading resistance is significantly affected by these concentration variations. With regard to selection of standard aerosol test be improved by modifying the current NIOSH criteria to include a description of the particle-size distribution, a more precise definition of the paint and paint thinner chemical compositions, and a narrower concentration range. PMID:6932174

  10. Design of an impact abrasion testing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Beeley, P. R.; Baker, A. J.

    1994-04-01

    By using a cam-flat follower-impact shaft with a crank-flat rotating anvil system, the machine to be described can create various impact abrasion conditions to simulate a large range of industrial situations encountered in this field. The main features of the machine are the long working life of the flat rotating anvil, which works in the same way as that of the disk in a pin-on-disk wear tester, and the accurate control of both the impact energy delivered to the specimen and the total sliding distance of the specimen on the anvil. Statistical analysis of test results on the machine with EN24 steel and cast high manganese steel shows that the uncertainty of the population mean is within +/- 4.7% of the sample mean under a 95% confidence level of student distribution, which indicates a very good accuracy of test.

  11. Impact Landing Dynamics Facility Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    By 1972 the Lunar Landing Research Facility was no longer in use for its original purpose. The 400-foot high structure was swiftly modified to allow engineers to study the dynamics of aircraft crashes. 'The Impact Dynamics Research Facility is used to conduct crash testing of full-scale aircraft under controlled conditions. The aircraft are swung by cables from an A-frame structure that is approximately 400 ft. long and 230 foot high. The impact runway can be modified to simulate other grand crash environments, such as packed dirt, to meet a specific test requirement.' 'In 1972, NASA and the FAA embarked on a cooperative effort to develop technology for improved crashworthiness and passenger survivability in general aviation aircraft with little or no increase in weight and acceptable cost. Since then, NASA has 'crashed' dozens of GA aircraft by using the lunar excursion module (LEM) facility originally built for the Apollo program.' This photograph shows Crash Test No. 7.

  12. Impact sensitivity test of liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiaev, Andrei; Trebunskih, Valeri; Dolzhikov, Andrei; Zvereva, Irina

    2015-06-01

    The sensitivity of liquid explosive in the presence of gas bubbles increases many times as compared with the liquid without gas bubbles. If we consider that in the liquid as a result of convection, wave motion, shock, etc. gas bubbles are easily generated, the need to develop a method for determining sensitivity of liquid explosives to impact and a detailed study of the ignition explosives with bubbles is obvious. On a mathematical model of a single steam bubbles in the fluid theoretically considered the process of initiating explosive liquid systems to impact. For the experimental investigation, the well-known K-44 -II and the so-called appliance No. 1 were used. Instead of the metal cap in the standard method in this paper there was polyurethane foam cylindrical container with LHE, which is easily deforms by impact. A large number of tests with different liquid explosives were made. It was found that the test LHE to impact in appliance No. 1 with polyurethane foam to a large extent reflect the real mechanical sensitivity due to the small loss of impact energy on the deformation of the metal cap, as well as the best differentiation LHE sensitivity due to the higher resolution method .

  13. New impact sensitivity test of liquid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiaev, Andrei; Trebunskih, Valeri

    The sensitivity of liquid explosive in the presence of gas bubbles increases many times as compared with the liquid without gas bubbles. Local hot spot in this case formed as a result of compression and heating of the gas inside the bubbles. If we consider that in the liquid as a result of convection, wave motion, shock, etc. gas bubbles are easily generated, the need to develop a method for determining sensitivity of liquid explosives to impact and a detailed study of the ignition explosives with bubbles is obvious. On a mathematical model of a single steam bubbles in the fluid theoretically considered the process of initiating explosive liquid systems to impact. For the experimental investigation, the well-known K-44 -II with the metal cap were used. Instead of the metal cap in the standard method in this paper there was polyurethane foam cylindrical container with LHE, which is easily deforms by impact. A large number of tests with different liquid explosives were made. It was found that the test LHE to impact with polyurethane foam to a large extent reflect the real mechanical sensitivity due to the small loss of impact energy on the deformation of the metal cap, as well as the best differentiation LHE sensitivity due to the higher resolution method . Results obtained in the samara state technical university.

  14. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  15. Impact Landing Dynamics Facility Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    By 1972 the Lunar Landing Research Facility was no longer in use for its original purpose. The 400-foot high structure was swiftly modified to allow engineers to study the dynamics of aircraft crashes. The Impact Dynamics Research Facility is used to conduct crash testing of full- scale aircraft under controlled conditions. The aircraft are swung by cables from an A-frame structure that is approximately 400 ft. long and 230 foot high. The impact runway can be modified to simulate other grand crash environments, such as packed dirt, to meet a specific test requirement. In 1972, NASA and the FAA embarked on a cooperative effort to develop technology for improved crashworthiness and passenger survivability in general aviation aircraft with little or no increase in weight and cceptable cost. Since then, NASA has 'crashed' dozens of GA aircraft by using the lunar excursion module (LEM) facility originally built for the Apollo program.

  16. Testing the Cultural Differences of School Characteristics with Measurement Invariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Ergül

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to model the school characteristics in multivariate structure, and according to this model, aimed to test the invariance of this model across five randomly selected countries and economies from PISA 2012 sample. It is thought that significant differences across group in the context of school characteristics have the…

  17. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  18. Dynamic Characteristics of High Intensity Shock Effect for Medium Weight Shock Testing Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feng; Sai, Jiangang; Yun, He; Bo, Gao

    This paper analyses the dynamic characteristics of MWMS by optimizing the design of the anvil table to ensure the waveform in allowing limit, simulating the impact of MWMS, and demonstrating the influence of the low-pass filter and the height of hammer drop to test results.

  19. Impacts of anthropogenic activities on different hydrological drought characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijdeman, Erik; Stahl, Kerstin; Bachmair, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The natural hazard drought can have severe impacts on a variety of sectors and at a variety of scales. Droughts, here defined as below average water availability, occur everywhere. However, the impact of a drought event is not only influenced by its severity but also by the vulnerability of an area to droughts. Research in catchments with natural flow conditions is crucial to gain process understanding about hydrological droughts. However, the locations of catchments with natural flow are often not representative for regions with a socioeconomic sector that is highly vulnerable to droughts. In these more vulnerable areas, human activities like groundwater extraction can intensify hydrological droughts. On the other hand, human activities can also mitigate or limit the magnitude of drought events. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of different anthropogenic influences on streamflow droughts by comparing hydrological drought characteristics between catchments with natural streamflow and with regulated or otherwise altered streamflow. The study is based on a large set of streamflow records from catchments in Germany, the UK and the USA with either known anthropogenic influences or natural streamflow conditions. Different drought characteristics (duration, deficit, frequency and timing of drought events) are computed for the selected stations. The drought characteristics in catchments influenced by various anthropogenic activities are stratified by the characteristics of anthropogenic influence, but also by similar physical and climatological properties. These stratified groups are then compared to drought characteristics in natural catchments with similar properties. Results show both negative and positive impacts of different human activities on droughts. For example, urbanized areas with low flow regulations show hydrological droughts with shorter durations and lower deficit volumes compared to nearby natural catchments, while records downstream of

  20. The influence of striking object characteristics on the impact energy.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Florian D; Siegenthaler, Lea; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Jackowski, Christian

    2016-05-01

    A common form of violence investigated in legal medicine is blunt trauma caused by striking with different objects. The injuries and medical consequences have been widely examined, whereas the forces and especially the energies acting on impact have rarely been analyzed. This study focuses on how the impact energy of different striking objects depends on their characteristics. A total of 1170 measurements of horizontal strikes against a static and relatively heavy pendulum have been acquired with 13 volunteers. The main focus was laid on how the weight, the length, and the center of mass of the different striking objects influenced the striking energy. The results show average impact energies in the range of 67.3 up to 311.5 J for men with an optimum weight of about 1.3 kg with its center of mass in the far end quarter for a 1-m-long striking object. The average values for women range from 30 to 202.6 J, with an optimum weight between 1.65 and 2.2 kg and similar settings for the center of mass as the men. Also, the impact energies are getting higher with shorter object lengths and reach a maximum at a length of about 0.3 to 0.4 m. The male volunteers' impact energy was on average by 84.2% higher than the values of the female volunteers, where the impact masses were very similar and the impact velocities played the key role. PMID:26449359

  1. Biopsychosocial characteristics and neurocognitive test performance in National Football League players: an initial assessment.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gary S; Haase, Richard F

    2008-09-01

    The use of neurocognitive testing in the assessment of professional athletes sustaining sports-related concussions has become widespread over the past decade. Baseline neurocognitive testing is now a requirement for athletes in the National Football League (NFL). We present preliminary normative data on a computer based neurocognitive test (Immediate Post Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing; ImPACT) for 159 NFL athletes. Also included are summary data on basic biopsychosocial characteristics, including medical, psychiatric, chemical dependency, concussion, learning disability/attention deficit disorder, and symptom variables, and the relevance of each to baseline neurocognitive test scores. PMID:18614333

  2. The GISS sounding temperature impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Ghil, M.; Atlas, R.; Susskind, J.; Quirk, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of DST 5 and DST 6 satellite sounding data on mid-range forecasting was studied. The GISS temperature sounding technique, the GISS time-continuous four-dimensional assimilation procedure based on optimal statistical analysis, the GISS forecast model, and the verification techniques developed, including impact on local precipitation forecasts are described. It is found that the impact of sounding data was substantial and beneficial for the winter test period, Jan. 29 - Feb. 21. 1976. Forecasts started from initial state obtained with the aid of satellite data showed a mean improvement of about 4 points in the 48 and 772 hours Sub 1 scores as verified over North America and Europe. This corresponds to an 8 to 12 hour forecast improvement in the forecast range at 48 hours. An automated local precipitation forecast model applied to 128 cities in the United States showed on an average 15% improvement when satellite data was used for numerical forecasts. The improvement was 75% in the midwest.

  3. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 250 C, 200C and 125C accelerated tests are described. The wear-out distributions from the 250 and 200 C tests were used to estimate the activation energy between the two test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear-out region. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three devices types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment is assessed. Guidlines for the development of accelerated life-test conditions are proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life-test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits is described.

  4. Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results (workshop presentation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, Carl; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Ambient (13A) tests of Cycom 977-2 impact characteristics by the Brucenton and statistical method at MSFC and WSTF. Repeat (13A) tests of tested Cycom from phase I at MSFC to expended testing statistical database. Conduct high-pressure tests (13B) in liquid oxygen (LOX) and GOX at MSFC and WSTF to determine Cycom reaction characteristics and batch effect. Conduct expended ambient (13A) LOX test at MSFC and high-pressure (13B) testing to determine pressure effects in LOX. Expend 13B GOX database.

  5. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact attenuation test. 1203.17 Section 1203.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.17 Impact attenuation test. (a) Impact test instruments and equipment—(1) Measurement...

  6. Polarized light transmission characteristics in smoke indoor test scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyu; Fu, Qiang; Duan, Jing

    2014-11-01

    the polarized light is used in polarization imaging and detection in complex environment, turbid atmosphere under the harsh conditions. Polarized light in the transmission process is affected by smoke composition, the uneven distribution of concentration, particle shape,particle refractive index and other aspects of the causes of polarized light transmission, and the degree of polarization and polarization parameters change. The polarized light research is single on theory study, the experiment equipment simulating environment is not conducive to the transmission characteristics of quantitative study of polarized light in smoke environment. This paper from the research and simulation of smoke device, the device uesd the temperature and humidity adjusting device to control the generation of water mist, to simulate the natural environment in the haze environment, and use of particle size instrument and concentration detection device real-time monitoring test . Polarized light transmission characteristics in the test program and its influencing factors, which can provide reference of polarized light for the transmission characteristics.

  7. Underwater polarization characteristics and their impact on water visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Tonizzo, Alberto; Gilerson, Alex; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we examine the impact of measured underwater polarization characteristics on visibility. Underwater characteristics were measured both in the principal plane and outside the principal plane, with data collected during several cruises in the Chesapeake/Virginia and New York Harbor/Hudson River areas using a multi-angular hyperspectral sensor system. This system, recently developed by us, consists of three hyperspectral Satlantic radiance sensors, each with a polarizer positioned in front of it, and with polarization axes aligned at 0, 90 and 45 deg. Underwater measurements are made with scattering angles from 0-180 degrees with respect to the solar illumination. At the same time as the hyperspectral measurements are made, the inherent optical properties such as absorption and attenuation were also recorded. The waters studied varied from clear open ocean water with attenuation of less than 0.25m-1 at 550nm c (550), to turbid coastal waters with a c(550) of more than 4m-1. In order to examine the extent that polarization techniques can help to improve underwater visibility in these types of field conditions, we computed the related modulation transfer functions from the polarized field measurements, and included the examination of the impact of scattered polarized veiling light, inherent in the field data. Various water parameters are then explored to examine the impact of the polarization of the background light in the principal plane on underwater visibility.

  8. Scientists Popularizing Science: Characteristics and Impact of TED Talk Presenters

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R.; Thelwall, Mike; Larivière, Vincent; Tsou, Andrew; Mongeon, Philippe; Macaluso, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    The TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) conference and associated website of recorded conference presentations (TED Talks) is a highly successful disseminator of science-related videos, claiming over a billion online views. Although hundreds of scientists have presented at TED, little information is available regarding the presenters, their academic credentials, and the impact of TED Talks on the general population. This article uses bibliometric and webometric techniques to gather data on the characteristics of TED presenters and videos and analyze the relationship between these characteristics and the subsequent impact of the videos. The results show that the presenters were predominately male and non-academics. Male-authored videos were more popular and more liked when viewed on YouTube. Videos by academic presenters were more commented on than videos by others and were more liked on YouTube, although there was little difference in how frequently they were viewed. The majority of academic presenters were senior faculty, males, from United States-based institutions, were visible online, and were cited more frequently than average for their field. However, giving a TED presentation appeared to have no impact on the number of citations subsequently received by an academic, suggesting that although TED popularizes research, it may not promote the work of scientists within the academic community. PMID:23638069

  9. Calculation of the impact sensitivity characteristics of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovik, A.V.

    1986-07-01

    A method is proposed for calculating the critical impact initiation parameters of solid explosive in connection with fall-hammer sensitivity tests using a Kholevo No. 2 instrument. Tables present the initial data for calculating the critical initiation parameters of a series of common explosives, and the results of the calculations. Also shown are the results of calculating p and delta as functions of the composition of an ammonium perchlorate-Plexiglas mixture. The experimental data on the sensitivity of this mixture are consistent with the calculations made on the assumption of a chemical reaction between the ammonium-perchlorate and the Plexiglas (or their thermal decomposition products) on impact.

  10. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1994-02-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  11. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  12. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  13. The SU.FOL.OM3 Study: a secondary prevention trial testing the impact of supplementation with folate and B-vitamins and/or Omega-3 PUFA on fatal and non fatal cardiovascular events, design, methods and participants characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Pilar; Briancon, Serge; Blacher, Jacque; Czernichow, Sébastien; Hercberg, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last decades, many basic and clinical research have pointed to the role of B vitamins (folate, vitamins B6 and B12) and n-3 fatty acids as nutritional factors that might have a protective effect on the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods/design The SU.FOL.OM3 (SUpplementation with FOlate, vitamin B6 and B12 and/or OMega-3 fatty acids) trial is a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, secondary-prevention trial designed to test the efficacy of 5-methyl tetra-hydro-folates (5-MTHF) supplementation, in combination with vitamin B6 and B12 and/or n-3 fatty acids, at nutritional doses, on fatal and non fatal ischemic CVD in a 2 × 2 factorial design. A total of 2501 patients aged between 45 and 80 years who had a past history, in the previous year, of myocardial infarction (n = 1151) or instable angina pectoris (n = 711) or an ischemic stroke (n = 639) were included. Subjects have to be supplemented and followed up for five years. Daily supplementation comprised nutritional doses of 5-MTHF (560 μg), vitamin B6 (3 mg) and B12 (20 μg) and/or n-3 fatty acids (600 mg with an EPA:DHA ratio of 2:1). A factorial design 2 × 2 has been applied to investigate the separate effects of the B-vitamins, and the n-3 fatty acids, as well as their interaction as compared to the placebo. The primary endpoint is a combination of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and cardiovascular death. Secondary endpoints are events of the composite endpoint taken separately, total mortality, and other cardiovascular events such as acute coronary syndromes, coronary revascularization, cardiac failure, arrhythmia... Conclusion Baseline socio-demographic and medical characteristics of participants are totally comparable in the four randomized groups. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41926726 PMID:18544171

  14. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the time period from May 1976 to December 1979 and encompasses the three phases of accelerated testing: Phase 1, the 250 C testing; Phase 2, the 200 C testing; and Phase 3, the 125 C testing. The duration of the test in Phase 1 and Phase 2 was sufficient to take the devices into the wear out region. The wear out distributions were used to estimate the activation energy between the 250 C and the 200 C test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test, 20,000 hours, was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear out region; consequently the third data point at 125 C for determining the consistency of activation energy could not be obtained. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three device types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment was assessed. Guidelines for the development of accelerated life test conditions were proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits was explored in Phase 4 of this study and is attached as an appendix to this report.

  15. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 1 20-Inch Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 1 of the EWIT series featured water impact tests of a 20-inch hemisphere dropped from heights of 5 feet and 10 feet. The hemisphere was outfitted with an accelerometer and three pressure gages. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data.

  17. Method and apparatus for testing surface characteristics of a material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David L. (Inventor); Kersker, Karl D. (Inventor); Richardson, David E. (Inventor); Stratton, Troy C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method, apparatus and system for testing characteristics of a material sample is provided. The system includes an apparatus configured to house the material test sample while defining a sealed volume against a surface of the material test sample. A source of pressurized fluid is in communication with, and configured to pressurize, the sealed volume. A load applying apparatus is configured to apply a defined load to the material sample while the sealed volume is monitored for leakage of the pressurized fluid. Thus, the inducement of surface defects such as microcracking and crazing may be detected and their effects analyzed for a given material. The material test samples may include laminar structures formed of, for example, carbon cloth phenolic, glass cloth phenolic, silica cloth phenolic materials or carbon-carbon materials. In one embodiment the system may be configured to analyze the material test sample while an across-ply loading is applied thereto.

  18. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Motorcycle Helmets, 49 CFR 571.218 (S7.1.8). The center of gravity of the drop assembly shall lie within the... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact attenuation test. 1203.17 Section... SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.17 Impact attenuation test. (a) Impact...

  19. Galileo battery testing and the impact of test automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pertuch, W. T.; Dils, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Test complexity, changes of test specifications, and the demand for tight control of tests led to the development of automated testing used for Galileo and other projects. The use of standardized interfacing, i.e., IEEE-488, with desktop computers and test instruments, resulted in greater reliability, repeatability, and accuracy of both control and data reporting. Increased flexibility of test programming has reduced costs by permitting a wide spectrum of test requirements at one station rather than many stations.

  20. Rebound characteristics for ash particles impacting a planar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming; Li, Sufen; Han, Jian; Xie, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The formation of ash deposition on the heat transfer tubes in a boiler reduces the heat transfer coefficient by about 25%. Because of these fouling layers, the efficiency with which energy can be absorbed from flue gases is reduced. The growth of ash deposition is strongly dependent on the interaction of the incident particle with the surface of heat transfer tubes. In this study the interaction is modeled as the outcome of collision between an incident fly ash particle and planar surface that represents a heat transfer surface. The present paper focuses on the applicability of the experimental results to indicate the rebound characteristics of fly ash particles impacting a planar surface. This is studied by impaction experiments of fly ash particles from the power plant dust, under various particle diameters and with different velocities (ranging from 0.1 to 20 m/s). The experiments are carried out in an atmospheric column, and using a digital camera system, individual impacts are recorded. Furthermore, the measured coefficient of restitution values can be predicted by a dynamic simulation model.

  1. Vibration characteristics analysis of rotating shrouded blades with impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Xie, Fangtao; Nai, Haiqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    A dynamic model of rotating shrouded blades with impacts among adjacent shrouded blades is established considering the effects of the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force, and the model is validated using finite element method. In the proposed model, the shrouded blade is simplified as a cantilever Euler-Bernoulli beam with a mass point at the free end, and the flexural dynamic stiffness of shrouded blade is selected as contact stiffness during collision. Based on the developed model, the effects of symmetric and asymmetric shroud gaps, rotational speeds, and aerodynamic force amplitudes on the dynamic characteristics of shrouded blades are analyzed through Newmark-β numerical method. The results indicate that (1) the vibro-impact responses of shrouded blades under some asymmetric gaps are more complicated than that under symmetric gap. (2) With the increase of rotational speed from 6000 to 10,000 rev/min, the system vibration experiences from period-three motion, through chaotic motion, finally to period-one motion during collision process because the increasing rotational speed changes the flexural dynamic stiffness of rotating blade. (3) The vibration displacements of shrouded blades increase linearly, and impact force increases linearly with the increase of aerodynamic force amplitude.

  2. Fall protection characteristics of safety belts and human impact tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt, which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness, which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls. PMID:25345426

  3. Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-08-23

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt(1)), which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness(2, 3)), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference(4-9)) to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model(10)) was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls. PMID:25152087

  4. Micrometeorite Impact Test of Flex Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft with solar arrays operate throughout the near earth environment and are increasingly planned for outer planet missions. An often overlooked test condition for solar arrays that is applicable to these missions is micrometeorite impacts and possibly electrostatic discharge (ESD) events resulting from these impacts. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL) to examine the results of simulated micrometeorite impacts on the electrical performance of an advanced, lightweight flexible solar array design. The test is performed at NASA MSFC's Microlight Gas Gun Facility. The SSL-provided coupons consist of three strings, each string with two solar cells in series. Five impacts will be induced at various locations on a powered test coupon under different string voltage (0 volts - 150 volts) and string current (1.1 amperes - 1.65 amperes) conditions. The maximum specified test voltage and current represent margins of 1.5 times for both voltage and current. The test parameters are chosen to demonstrate new array design robustness to any ESD event caused by plasma plumes resulting from a simulated micrometeorite impact. A second unpowered coupon will undergo two impacts: one impact on the front side and one impact on the back side. Following the impact testing, the second coupon will be exposed to a thermal cycle test to determine possible damage propagation and further electrical degradation due to thermally-induced stress. The setup, checkout, and results from the impact testing are discussed. The challenges for impact testing include precise coupon alignment to control impact location; pressure management during the impact process; and measurement of the true transient electrical response during impact on the powered coupon. Results from pre- and post-test visual and electrical functional testing are also discussed.

  5. Impact of structural characteristics on starch digestibility of cooked rice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masatsugu; Singh, Jaspreet; Kaur, Lovedeep; Ogawa, Yukiharu

    2016-01-15

    To examine the impact of structural characteristics of cooked rice grains on their starch digestibility, a simulated in vitro gastro-small intestinal digestion technique was applied to intact and homogenised cooked rice samples. The starch hydrolysis percentage increased during simulated small intestinal digestion, in which approximately 65% and 24% of the starch was hydrolysed within the first 5min, for homogenised and intact cooked rice, respectively. The kinetic constant of homogenised cooked rice, which was regarded as an estimated digestion rate, was ∼8 times higher than the intact cooked rice. The homogenised and intact samples were also examined for any microstructural changes occurring during the in vitro digestion process using fluorescent and scanning electron microscopy. In the intact samples, the aleurone layers of the endosperm remained as thin-film like layers during in vitro digestion and thus may be regarded as less digestible materials that influence cooked rice digestibility. PMID:26258706

  6. SMALL-SCALE IMPACT SENSITIVITY TESTING ON EDC37

    SciTech Connect

    HSU, P C; HUST, G; MAIENSCHEIN, J L

    2008-04-28

    EDC37 was tested at LLNL to determine its impact sensitivity in the LLNL's drop hammer system. The results showed that impact sensitivities of the samples were between 86 cm and 156 cm, depending on test methods. EDC37 is a plastic bonded explosive consisting of 90% HMX, 1% nitrocellulose and binder. We recently conducted impact sensitivity testing in our drop hammer system and the results are presented in this report.

  7. The California Verbal Learning Test: psychometric characteristics and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Elwood, R W

    1995-09-01

    The California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) is a popular clinical and research test that claims to measure key constructs in cognitive psychology such as repetition learning, serial position effects, semantic organization, intrusions, and proactive interference. The psychometric characteristics of the CVLT are reviewed and related to the test's clinical utility. The utility of the CVLT is shown to be limited by its poor standardization and inflated norms. Further, the validity is limited because the CVLT uses multiple trials whereas the constructs it purports to measure are based on single-trial paradigms. The review proposes modifications to the CVLT and guidelines for its clinical use. It concludes that if the limitations of the CVLT are recognized, it can still make a useful contribution to the clinical assessment of verbal learning and memory. PMID:8653108

  8. Compound simulator IR radiation characteristics test and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Li; Li, Fan; Tian, Yi; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Rui

    2015-10-01

    The Hardware-in-the-loop simulation can establish the target/interference physical radiation and interception of product flight process in the testing room. In particular, the simulation of environment is more difficult for high radiation energy and complicated interference model. Here the development in IR scene generation produced by a fiber array imaging transducer with circumferential lamp spot sources is introduced. The IR simulation capability includes effective simulation of aircraft signatures and point-source IR countermeasures. Two point-sources as interference can move in two-dimension random directions. For simulation the process of interference release, the radiation and motion characteristic is tested. Through the zero calibration for optical axis of simulator, the radiation can be well projected to the product detector. The test and calibration results show the new type compound simulator can be used in the hardware-in-the-loop simulation trial.

  9. Personal genome testing: Test characteristics to clarify the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants simultaneously for the prediction of common multifactorial diseases. Currently, an increasing number of companies are offering personal genome tests directly to consumers and are spurring ELSI-discussions, which stand in need of clarification. This paper presents a systematic approach to the ELSI-evaluation of personal genome testing for multifactorial diseases along the lines of its test characteristics. Discussion This paper addresses four test characteristics of personal genome testing: its being a non-targeted type of testing, its high analytical validity, low clinical validity and problematic clinical utility. These characteristics raise their own specific ELSI, for example: non-targeted genetic profiling poses serious problems for information provision and informed consent. Questions about the quantity and quality of the necessary information, as well as about moral responsibilities with regard to the provision of information are therefore becoming central themes within ELSI-discussions of personal genome testing. Further, the current low level of clinical validity of genetic profiles raises questions concerning societal risks and regulatory requirements, whereas simultaneously it causes traditional ELSI-issues of clinical genetics, such as psychological and health risks, discrimination, and stigmatization, to lose part of their relevance. Also, classic notions of clinical utility are challenged by the newer notion of 'personal

  10. [Impacts of Ochotona pallasi disturbance on alpine grassland community characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-qin; Li, Guang-yong; Ma, Wen-hu; Zhao, Dian-zhi; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-08-01

    Plateau pika is the main fossorial mammal in the alpine grassland in Qinghai Lake Watershed of Northwest China. Based on the field investigation data from 18 alpine grassland quadrats in the Watershed, and by using redundancy analysis (RDA) and the surface fitting offered by 'R-Vegan' , the disturbance intensity of plateau pika (Ochotona pallasi) was classified as four levels. In order to explore the impacts of plateau pika disturbance on the alpine grassland ecosystem and its grazing quality, the community characteristics under different disturbance intensities by plateau pika were analyzed, and a conceptual model about the alpine grassland community succession was proposed. The results showed that with the increase of the disturbance intensity, the dominant species changed from Juncus roemerianus to Poa pratensis and Laux maritima. When the disturbance was small, the community had high quantitative values of coverage, aboveground biomass, biodiversity, and species richness, but the proportion of weeds was also high. When the disturbance was large, the quantitative values were the lowest, while the proportion of weeds was the highest. When the disturbance was moderate, the community had relatively high quantitative values, and the proportion of grasses and sedges was the highest. It was concluded that the community' s characteristic values under low plateau pika disturbance intensity were high but the grazing quality was low, while high disturbance intensity resulted in the grassland degradation. Therefore, the disturbance intensity in the threshold could maintain the stability of alpine grassland ecosystem and improve its grazing quality. PMID:24380328

  11. The influence of impact object characteristics on impact force and force absorption by mouthguard material.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomotaka; Ishigami, Keiichi; Shintaro, Kawamura; Nakajima, Kazunori; Shimada, Atsushi; Regner, Connell Wayne

    2004-02-01

    Most impact force and impact energy absorption tests for mouthguards have used a steel ball in a drop-ball or the pendulum device. However, in reality most sports-related trauma is caused by objects other than the steel ball, e.g. various sized balls, hockey puck, or bat or stick. Also, the elasticity, the velocity and the mass of the object could change the degree and the extent of injuries. In this study, we attempted to measure the impact force from actual sports equipment in order to clarify the exact mechanism of dental-related sports injuries and the protective effects of mouthguards. The present study was conducted using the pendulum impact device and load cell. Impact objects were removable. Seven mobile impact objects were selected for testing: a steel ball, baseball, softball, field hockey ball, ice hockey puck, cricket ball, and wooden baseball bat. The mouthguard material used in this study was a 3-mm-thick Drufosoft (Dreve-Dentamid GmbH, Unna, Germany), and test samples were made of the one-layer type. The peak transmitted forces without mouthguard ranged from the smallest (ice hockey stick, 46.9 kgf) to the biggest (steel ball, 481.6 kgf). The peak transmitted forces were smaller when the mouthguard was attached than without it for all impact materials but the effect was significantly influenced by the object type. The steel ball showed the biggest (62.1%) absorption ability while the wooden bat showed the second biggest (38.3%). The other balls or the puck showed from 0.6 to 6.0% absorbency. These results show that it is important to test the effectiveness of mouthguards on specific types of sports equipment. In future, we may select different materials and mouthguard designs suitable for specific sports. PMID:14998410

  12. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators. PMID:25405432

  13. Orion MPCV Water Landing Test at Hydro Impact Basin

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is the third Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) water landing test conducted at the Hydro Impact Basin at NASA Langley Research Center. This test represented the worst-case scenario for l...

  14. Negative Impacts of High-Stakes Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minarechová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    High-stakes testing is not a new phenomenon in education. It has become part of the education system in many countries. These tests affect the school systems, teachers, students, politicians and parents, whether that is in a positive or negative sense. High-stakes testing is associated with concepts such as a school's accountability, funding…

  15. The drag characteristics of several airships determined by deceleration tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L; Kirschbaum, H W

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of deceleration tests conducted for the purpose of determining the drag characteristics of six airships. The tests were made with airships of various shapes and sizes belonging to the Army, the Navy, and the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation. Drag coefficients for the following airships are shown: Army TC-6, TC-10, and TE-2; Navy Los Angeles and ZMC-2; Goodyear Puritan. The coefficients vary from about 0.045 for the small blunt airships to 0.023 for the relatively large slender Los Angeles. This variation may be due to a combination of effects, but the most important of these is probably the effect of length-diameter ratio.

  16. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  1. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  2. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  3. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  4. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Marking the impact test line. 1203.11 Section 1203.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.11 Marking the impact test line. Prior...

  5. Preparation of calibrated test packages for particle impact noise detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A standard calibration method for any particle impact noise detection (PIND) test system used to detect loose particles responsible for failures in hybrid circuits was developed along with a procedure for preparing PIND standard test devices. Hybrid packages were seeded with a single gold ball, hermetically sealed, leak tested, and PIND tested. Conclusions are presented.

  6. Paddy soil cracks: characteristics and their impact on preferential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongbin; Peng, Xinhua

    2015-04-01

    Paddy soils with harrowing and puddling easily crack under alternate flooding and drying cycles (AFD). These cracks in paddy field may become pathways of preferential flow, improving water infiltration and increasing the pollution risk of groundwater. The objectives of this study were to investigate the 2D and 3D characteristics of soil cracks in paddy fields; and to determine their impacts on preferential flow. Two paddy fields, one cultivated for 20 years (YPF) and the other cultivated for more than 100 years (OPF), were subjected to either alternate flooding and drying (AFD) or continuous flooding (CF) during rice growing season. After the harvest of late rice crop, soil surface cracks were recorded using digital camera; and 3D structure of soil cracks was scanned by computed tomography (CT). The characteristics of 2D and 3D soil cracks were quantified with the aid of image analysis. The influence of soil cracks on preferential flow was characterized by tension infiltrometer, dye tracer and ion breakthrough curve. Our main results in this study were summed up as follows: under AFD condition, for the 2D soil cracks, the YPF presented 10 fold more cracks in quantity but these cracks were finer and more complicated as compared to those generated in the OPF. The results of CT scanning showed that the presence of soil cracks under the AFD increased average macropore length but decreased the number of macropores significantly, and it also changed macropore size distribution and macropore area density distribution with soil depth. The 3D structures of soil cracks were complicated but can be quantified using CT. The depth of soil cracks in young paddy field (7.58 cm) was smaller than that in old paddy field (9.34 cm), but soil cracks in both fields did not reach the plough pan (about 15 cm). Soil cracks significantly increased soil hydraulic conductivity. They serviced as pathways for preferential flow only in plow layer, as evidenced by a large dyed area above plough

  7. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  8. Energy dissipation characteristics of magnetosensitive elastomer under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, D.; Sun, L.; Sun, J.; Chen, W.; Ma, F.; Li, W.; Lin, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetosensitive (MS) elastomers are a class of material that ferro-magnetic particles dispersed in rubber or elastomer whose mechanical properties change with the external magnetic fields. To investigate energy dissipation properties of MS elastomers, experimental method is adopted. Firstly, this paper presents a new fabrication method of a magnetosensitive elastomers with particles in millimeter scale distributed in ideal isotropic or in chain. Then, a drop hammer testing setup is developed to measure the energy dissipation and study the impact behaviour of magnetosensitive elastomers (MSEs). For the same volume fraction and size of particle, the dissipated energy per unit length of MSEs increases with the magnetic field increasing, and chain-like structured MSEs dissipate more energy than homogenous MSEs under the same external magnetic field.

  9. The impact of Cr adhesion layer on CNFET electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Hierold, Christofer; Haluska, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a Cr adhesion layer on the transfer characteristics of Cr/Au-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is presented in this paper. We show that a very thin Cr layer (≈0.4 nm) already has an impact on the carrier transport in Schottky-barrier-modulated CNFETs. The ratio of the p- and n-branch current is reduced by eight times when the Cr adhesion layer thickness is increased from 0 to 8 nm. We suggest a change in Schottky barrier height at the contact as the determining mechanism for this result. Additionally, superior lifetime of devices is observed even for non-passivated CNFETs with preserved clean SWNT/Cr/Au-contacts using Cr layer thinner than 2 nm. Our experiments show that the role of the adhesion layer in metal/nanotube contacts should be explicitly considered when designing CNTFET-based circuits, developing CNFET fabrication processes, and analyzing the corresponding properties of the electrical contacts.

  10. Basic transformer-life characteristics. Volume 1: Overload characteristics and life-test evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, G. H.

    1982-06-01

    The results of experimental studies related to transformer survivability are described. It deals with the behavior of typical power transformer insulation systems during short-time exposure to elevated temperatures, and it provides some insight into failure mechanisms associated with gas bubble evolution within the insulation structure. Another important phase of the program involved the development and exploratory evaluation of a functional test program which may be used for determining the life expectancy characteristics of power transformers. Still another investigation resulted in the development and evaluation of an overload test procedure for power transformers. A feasibility study on a new type of thermal sensor for possible use as a winding hot spot sensor yielded promising results. The data presented is expected to be of help in developing improved transformer operating practices and in permitting an assessment of failure risks associated with particular service conditions.

  11. Impact of uncertainty on modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Hugh W.; Brown, Kendall K.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the uncertainties associated with the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Engine will greatly aid decisions concerning hardware performance and future development efforts. This report will describe the determination of the uncertainties in the modeling and testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine test program at the Technology Test Bed facility at Marshall Space Flight Center. Section 2 will present a summary of the uncertainty analysis methodology used and discuss the specific applications to the TTB SSME test program. Section 3 will discuss the application of the uncertainty analysis to the test program and the results obtained. Section 4 presents the results of the analysis of the SSME modeling effort from an uncertainty analysis point of view. The appendices at the end of the report contain a significant amount of information relative to the analysis, including discussions of venturi flowmeter data reduction and uncertainty propagation, bias uncertainty documentations, technical papers published, the computer code generated to determine the venturi uncertainties, and the venturi data and results used in the analysis.

  12. Micrometeorite Impact Test of Flex Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.; Gardiner, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft with solar arrays operate throughout the near earth environment and are planned for outer planet missions. An often overlooked test condition for solar arrays that is applicable to these missions is micrometeoroid impacts and possibly electrostatic discharge (ESD) events resulting from these impacts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is partnering with Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL) to examine the results of simulated micrometeoroid impacts on the electrical performance of an advanced, lightweight flexible solar array design. The test is performed at MSFC's Micro Light Gas Gun Facility with SSL-provided coupons. Multiple impacts were induced at various locations on a powered test coupon under different string voltage (0V-150V) and string current (1.1A - 1.65A) conditions. The setup, checkout, and results from the impact testing are discussed.

  13. Numerical comparison between different strength after impact test procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, M.; Reimerdes, H. G.

    2010-06-01

    Different procedures are established to investigate the residual properties of sandwich panels after impact damage. Two used procedures for the testing of this properties are compression after impact (CAI) and 4-point bending. In this paper a numerical procedure is presented for a first prediction of the behaviour of pre-damaged sandwich specimens under different boundary conditions (or testing procedures). A sequence of impact experiments using a drop tower is performed to assess the damage tolerance of sandwich panels with aramid paper foldcores and CFRP skins. The tested impact energy range allowed to investigate a variety of damage scenarios from barely visible damages (BVID) to fibre fractures in all plies of the impacted face sheet. Additionally 4-point bending tests are performed with the panels previously damaged by impact loadings to assess the residual bending strength of these samples. The developed numerical procedure is used to reproduce these experiments (the impact as well as the 4-point bending tests). Also the same procedure is employed in an attempt to predict the behaviour of samples with the same build-up in simulated compression after impact tests.

  14. Testing smooth surface characteristics based on thermal infrared polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Zhen; Hong, Jin; Qiao, Yan-li; Chen, Yi-qiong

    2007-12-01

    A novel optical method was provided to test the sample surface using a thermal polarimeter. The polarimeter consists of a rotary polarization filter and a thermal imaging system that is based on an uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) in long wave infrared (LWIR, 8~12μm) band. The thermal infrared polarization images of a Vernier caliper head were taken by a rotary polarizing filter at angles of 0°, 60°, 120° degrees. These images were saved into a computer and were calculated with Stokes parameter formulas to produce digital images of Stokes parameters I, Q and U, degree of linear polarization and direction of polarization. These images clearly show the difference between different areas of Vernier caliper, and this difference is not obtainable from the intensity images. Experimental results show that the introduced method can extract surface roughness information from thermal images and can distinguish different surface characteristics quickly.

  15. Nonlinear characteristics in fracture strength test of ultrathin silicon die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zunxu; Huang, YongAn; Xiao, Lin; Tang, Pengpeng; Yin, Zhouping

    2015-04-01

    The precise evaluation of fracture strength of ultrathin (<50 μm thick) silicon chips/ribbons plays a critical role in design of deformability and lifetime of flexible/stretchable electronics. In its three-point bending test, however, the classical linear theory used to convert the experimental fracture load into fracture strength value fails to match the emerged geometrically nonlinear characteristics for such an ultrathin silicon die. Here, we consider the geometric large deformation and present its nonlinear solution to more reliably evaluate the fracture stress of ultrathin specimen by virtue of the obtained experimental fracture load. A quite good agreement on experiments shows that the nonlinear analytical predictions allow a more comprehensive understanding for the effects of the silicon samples’ thickness on the transformation from linear relation to nonlinearity. The comparisons indicate that the fracture strength values are lower from linear evaluations, and to this the corresponding correction factor is defined to enhance the estimate precision.

  16. Characteristics of an anechoic chamber for fan noise testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuzyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Essary, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustical and mechanical design features of NASA Lewis Research Center's engine fan noise facility are described. Acoustic evaluation of the chamber, which is lined with an array of stepped wedges, is described. Results from the evaluation in terms of cut-off frequency and non-anechoic areas near the walls are detailed. Fan models are electrically driven to 20,600 RPM in either the inlet mode or exhaust mode to facilitate study of both fore and aft fan noise. Inlet noise characteristics of the first fan tested are discussed and compared to full-scale levels. Turbulence properties of the inlet flow and acoustic results are compared with and without a turbulence reducing screen over the fan inlet.

  17. Assessment of asphalt mixtures characteristics through GPR testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Jorge; Fernandes, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Road pavements are composed by granular and asphalt layers, placed over the pavement subgrade, which are designed to resist to traffic and climatic effects. Pavement distresses include permanent deformation mainly due to the contribution of the subgrade and fatigue cracking in the asphalt layers. Fatigue cracking is the main pavement distress and is responsible for the main rehabilitations carried out in road pavements which leads, in most cases, to the pavement reconstruction due to the severity of the cracking observed in many roads. For a given aggregate gradation, the fatigue cracking resistance is related to the proportions of the components in the asphalt mixtures, namely the void content and the binder content. Also the presence of water, or moisture, has an important influence in the fatigue resistance, and its effect is characterized by a reduction in the fatigue cracking resistance. The characteristics of the asphalt mixtures applied in road pavements can be assessed in laboratory through the testing of cores extracted from the pavement. These cores are extracted some representative section of the pavement, usually equally spaced in the road. Due to the construction process, the representative sections of the pavement don't allow to identify the quality of the whole pavement. Thus, the use of continuous measurement is essential to ensure the perfect assessment of the pavement quality and the use of the GPR assumes a paramount importance. Thus, this communication presents several GPR tests carried out on pavement slabs produced in laboratory with different void content, binder content and moisture content in order to establish different classifiers that will allow the identification of this condition during regular inspections. Furthermore, tests carried on specimens before and after fatigue tests will allow to calculate similar parameters to estimate the state of conservation of pavements in terms of stiffness and the presence of cracks. This work is a

  18. Assessing Individual-Level Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Choi, Seung W.; Kim, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, the number of interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seems to be on the rise. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. Researchers such as…

  19. Determining the Overall Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Whitaker, Mike; Kim, Dong-In; Zhang, Litong; Choi, Seung W.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seem unavoidable. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. There is a lack of research on this…

  20. Impact of Measurement System Characteristics on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such an improvement in geophysical information inferred from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as instrument system enhancements for future sensors. This presentation addresses results of tradeoff studies evaluating the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species information obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders. Particular attention will be devoted toward information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument to fly aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites expected to begin in late 2011. While all of these systems cover nearly the same infrared spectral extent, they have very different number of channels, instrument line shapes, coverage continuity, and instrument noise. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 discrete spectral channels ranging from about 0.4 to 2.2/cm resolution; IASI is a Michelson interferometer with 8461 uniformly-spaced spectral channels of 0.5/cm (apodized) resolution; and CrIS is a Michelson interferometer having 1305 spectral channels of 0.625, 1.250, and 2.50/cm (unapodized) spectral resolution, respectively, over its three continuous but non-overlapping bands. Results of tradeoff studies showing information content sensitivity to assumed measurement system characteristics will be presented.

  1. Test bed experiments for various telerobotic system characteristics and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffie, Neil A.; Wiker, Steven F.; Zik, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Dexterous manipulation and grasping in telerobotic systems depends on the integration of high-performance sensors, displays, actuators and controls into systems in which careful consideration has been given to human perception and tolerance. Research underway at the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) has the objective of enhancing the performance of these systems and their components, and quantifying the effects of the many electrical, mechanical, control, and human factors that affect their performance. This will lead to a fundamental understanding of performance issues which will in turn allow designers to evaluate sensor, actuator, display, and control technologies with respect to generic measures of dexterous performance. As part of this effort, an experimental test bed was developed which has telerobotic components with exceptionally high fidelity in master/slave operation. A Telerobotic Performance Analysis System has also been developed which allows performance to be determined for various system configurations and electro-mechanical characteristics. Both this performance analysis system and test bed experiments are described.

  2. The impact of network characteristics on the diffusion of innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Renana

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the influence of network topology on the speed and reach of new product diffusion. While previous research has focused on comparing network types, this paper explores explicitly the relationship between topology and measurements of diffusion effectiveness. We study simultaneously the effect of three network metrics: the average degree, the relative degree of social hubs (i.e., the ratio of the average degree of highly-connected individuals to the average degree of the entire population), and the clustering coefficient. A novel network-generation procedure based on random graphs with a planted partition is used to generate 160 networks with a wide range of values for these topological metrics. Using an agent-based model, we simulate diffusion on these networks and check the dependence of the net present value (NPV) of the number of adopters over time on the network metrics. We find that the average degree and the relative degree of social hubs have a positive influence on diffusion. This result emphasizes the importance of high network connectivity and strong hubs. The clustering coefficient has a negative impact on diffusion, a finding that contributes to the ongoing controversy on the benefits and disadvantages of transitivity. These results hold for both monopolistic and duopolistic markets, and were also tested on a sample of 12 real networks.

  3. Transient analysis of an IVHM grapple impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    A lumped mass model was used to represent the impact condition between a fuel duct and an IVHM in-vessel fuel handling machine. The nonlinear effects of a Bellville spring and the free fall impact of the fuel duct on the IVHM were included. The purpose of the tests was to determine the loads on the fuel duct due to the impact. A comparison between experimental and theoretical results is presented.

  4. LLNL small-scale drop-hammer impact sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. This testing is typically done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ``ERL Type 12 Drop Weight Impact Sensitivity Apparatus``, or ``Drop Hammer Machine``, and the methods used to determine the impact sensitivity of energetic materials, Also discussed are changes made to both the machine and methods since the inception of impact sensitivity testing at LLNL in 1956. The accumulated data for the materials tested in not listed here, the exception being the discussion of those specific materials (primary calibrants: PETN, RDX, Comp-B3,and TNT; secondary calibrants: K-6, RX-26-AF, and TATB) used to calibrate the machine.

  5. NASA VCE test bed engine aerodynamic performance characteristics and test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, M. W.; Allen, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Core Driven Fan Stage (CDFS) Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) has been identified as a leading candidate for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. A scale demonstrator version of this engine has been designed and tested. This testbed engine features a split fan with double bypass capability, variable forward and aft mixers, and a variable area low pressure turbine nozzle to permit exploration and optimization of the cycle in both single and double bypass modes. This paper presents the aerodynamic performance characteristics and experimental results obtained from both the core engine and full engine tests.

  6. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  7. Advantages of impact testing over hardness testing in determining physical integrity of tablets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K E; Potter, A

    1998-11-01

    An investigation of four different tablet strength tests was carried out on four different placebo formulations (differing in Avicel: Pharmatose ratios). The results analysis compared fatigue failure, work of failure, and impact failure to diametrical compression measurements (hardness). The impact results clearly show how different formulations can have the same hardness, yet their impact resistance can vary by as much as 200%. The impact test used in this work and other tests described are useful in tablet development to understand, compare, and mitigate tablet breakage during subsequent unit operations. PMID:9876556

  8. Measurement of Satellite Impact Test Fragments for Modeling Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    There are over 13,000 pieces of catalogued objects 10cm and larger in orbit around Earth [ODQN, January 2009, p12]. More than 6000 of these objects are fragments from explosions and collisions. As the earth-orbiting object count increases, debris-generating collisions in the future become a statistical inevitability. To aid in understanding this collision risk, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has developed computer models that calculate quantity and orbits of debris both currently in orbit and in future epochs. In order to create a reasonable computer model of the orbital debris environment, it is important to understand the mechanics of creation of debris as a result of a collision. The measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from ground-based, hypervelocity impact testing aids in understanding the sizes and shapes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. To advance the accuracy of fragment shape/size determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently implemented a computerized measurement system. The goal of this system is to improve knowledge and understanding of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The technique developed involves scanning a single fragment with a hand-held laser device, measuring its size properties using a sophisticated software tool, and creating a three-dimensional computer model to demonstrate how the object might appear in orbit. This information is used to aid optical techniques in shape determination. This more automated and repeatable method provides higher accuracy in the size and shape determination of debris.

  9. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation Testing to Low Velocity Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Douglas, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The need for a static test method for modeling low-velocity foreign object impact events to composites would prove to be very beneficial to researchers since much more data can be obtained from a static test than from an impact test. In order to examine if this is feasible, a series of static indentation and low velocity impact tests were carried out and compared. Square specimens of many sizes and thickness were utilized to cover the array of types of low velocity impact events. Laminates with a n/4 stacking sequence were employed since this is by the most common type of engineering laminate. Three distinct flexural rigidities under two different boundary conditions were tested in order to obtain damage due to large deflections, contact stresses and both to examine if the static indentation-impact comparisons are valid under the spectrum of damage modes that can be experienced. Comparisons between static indentation and low velocity impact tests were based on the maximum applied transverse load. The dependent parameters examined included dent depth, back surface crack length, delamination area and to a limited extent, load-deflection behavior. Results showed that no distinct differences could be seen between the static indentation tests and the low velocity impact tests, indicating that static indentation can be used to represent a low velocity impact event.

  10. Impact of Fitness Characteristics on Tennis Performance in Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Alexander; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The impact of fitness characteristics on tennis performance in adolescent players is not clearly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test whether physical characteristics are related to players' competitive level (i.e., national youth ranking). A secondary aim was to compare adolescent tennis players by performance level (i.e., regional selected players and the national team). A total of 902 male and female junior players (aged, 11-16 years) in Germany were evaluated using a physical testing battery: grip strength; countermovement jump; 10 and 20-m sprint; tennis-specific sprint; overhead, forehand, and backhand medicine ball throws (MBT); serve velocity and tennis-specific endurance test (hit and turn tennis test). Results showed that serve velocity (r = -0.43 to 0.64 for female subjects [♀]; r = -0.33 to 0.49 for male subjects [♂]) and upper-body power (e.g., MBT r = -0.26 to -0.49 ♀; r = -0.20 to -0.49 ♂) were the most correlated predictors of tennis performance (i.e., national youth ranking) in both female and male tennis players. Moreover, national selected players showed better performance levels than their regional counterparts, mainly in the most predictive physical characteristics (i.e., serve velocity: effect size [ES], 0.78-1.04 ♀; ES 0.92-1.02 ♂, MBT: ES, 0.66-0.88 ♀; ES, 0.67-1.04 ♂) and specific endurance (ES, 0.05-0.95 ♀; ES, 0.31-0.73 ♂). The present findings underline the importance of certain physical attributes, especially serve velocity and strength- and power-related variables (upper body), and suggest the need to include these parameters in the area of training, physical testing, and talent identification of young tennis players. PMID:26605803

  11. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  12. XDT in HTPB propellant from steel flyer plate impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumi; Noda, Keiichiro; Hyodo, Yukio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kosaka, Katsuaki; Nakayama, Takashi; Katayama, Masahide; Takeba, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    Several experiments simulating ground impact explosion following the command destruction of a launch vehicle have been performed using HTPB propellant samples of mass 460 to 940 kg impacted by a steel flyer plate. Impact velocities were varied from 135 m/s to 170 m/s. Strong explosions were observed at impact velocities higher than 150 m/s for tests of solid rocket propellant weighting 460 kg. The XDT (Unknown to Detonation Transition) is studied using a bulk failure reaction model including strain rate effect. Computational results are compared with observed blast waves for various impact velocities. The present model has been successfully applied to 22 inch Critical Diameter tests for SRMU HTPB propellant.

  13. Taylor impact tests and simulations of plastic bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad E.; Thompson, Darla; Luscher, D. J.; DeLuca, Racci; Brown, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Taylor impact tests were conducted on plastic bonded explosives PBX 9501 and PBXN-9 for impact velocities between 80 and 214 m/s. High-speed photography was used to image the impact event at a rate of one frame for every 25 μs. For early times, PBXN-9 showed large-deformation mushrooming of the explosive cylinders, followed by fragmentation by an amount proportional to the impact speed, was observed at all velocities. PBX 9501 appeared to be more brittle than PBXN-9, the latter demonstrated a more viscoelastic response. The post-shot fragments were collected and particle size distributions were obtained. The constitutive model ViscoSCRAM was then used to model the Taylor experiments using the finite element code ABAQUS. Prior to the Taylor simulations, ViscoSCRAM was parameterized for the two explosives using uniaxial stress-strain data. Simulating Taylor impact tests validates the model in situations undergoing extreme damage and fragmentation.

  14. Quasi-Uniform High Speed Foam Crush Testing Using a Guided Drop Mass Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor); Kellas, Sotiris

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple method for measuring the dynamic crush response of foam materials at various loading rates is described. The method utilizes a drop mass impact configuration with mass and impact velocity selected such that the crush speed remains approximately uniform during the entire sample crushing event. Instrumentation, data acquisition, and data processing techniques are presented, and limitations of the test method are discussed. The objective of the test method is to produce input data for dynamic finite element modeling involving crash and energy absorption characteristics of foam materials.

  15. a Method for Determining the Impact Force in Crash Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Isobe, D.; Saito, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miki, Y.

    2000-11-01

    A method for measuring the impact force in crash testing is developed. In this method, a mass is made to collide with the object being tested and the instantaneous value of the impact force is measured as the inertial force acting on the mass. To realise linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass, a pneumatic linear bearing is used, and the velocity and acceleration of the mass, the moving part of the bearing, are measured using an optical interferometer. The relative combined standard uncertainty in determining the impact force in a three-point bending test is estimated to be 0.5×10 -2(0.5%) of the maximum value of the impact force.

  16. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  17. Quality assurance of absorbed energy in Charpy impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, C. L. F.; Fabricio, D. A. K.; Costa, V. M.; Reguly, A.

    2016-07-01

    In order to ensure the quality assurance and comply with standard requirements, an intralaboratory study has been performed for impact Charpy tests, involving two operators. The results based on ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Normalized Error statistical techniques pointed out that the execution of the tests is appropriate, because the implementation of quality assurance methods showed acceptable results.

  18. An evaluation of the liquid oxygen mechanical impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary E.; Schmidt, Naomi E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the repeatability of the ambient LO2 mechanical impact test used by NASA to screen materials for oxygen service (NHB 8060.1B Test 12 Part 1, which is based on the ASTM method). Four materials were tested: Teflon, Vespel SP-21, Viton A, and nylon 6/6. Each test material was subjected to several series of tests that were conducted at different impact energy levels. The results show that the variability from series to series in the reaction threshold energy level is within the precision statement of the ASTM method. However, this precision is considerably broader than the reaction threshold implied by the NHB 8060.1B test criteria.

  19. Taylor impact tests on PBX composites: imaging and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Daria; DeLuca, Racci; Archuleta, Jose; Brown, Geoff W.; Koby, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long), velocities as high as 215 m/s, at a steel anvil. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. Highspeed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto anvil surface. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, Taylor impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  20. Taylor Impact Tests on PBX Composites: Imaging and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2013-06-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long) at velocities as high as 215 m/s. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. High-speed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto the surface of a steel anvil. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, these impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  1. Impact Testing of Composites for Aircraft Engine Fan Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Nie, Walter Z.; Mackenzie, S. Ben; Todd, Kevin B.

    2001-01-01

    Before composite materials can be considered for use in the fan case of a commercial jet engine, the performance of a composite structure under blade-out loads needs to be demonstrated. The objective of this program is to develop an efficient test and analysis method for evaluating potential composite case concepts. Ballistic impact tests were performed on laminated glass/epoxy composites in order to identify potential failure modes and to provide data for analysis. Flat 7x7 in. panels were impacted with cylindrical titanium projectiles, and 15 in. diameter half-rings were impacted with wedge-shaped titanium projectiles. Composite failure involved local fiber fracture as well as tearing and delamination on a larger scale. A 36 in. diameter full-ring subcomponent was proposed for larger scale testing. Explicit, transient, finite element analyses were used to evaluate impact dynamics and subsequent global deformation for the proposed full-ring subcomponent test. Analyses on half-ring and quarter ring configurations indicated that less expensive smaller scale tests could be used to screen potential composite concepts when evaluation of local impact damage is the primary concern.

  2. Addressable test matrix for measuring analog transfer characteristics of test elements used for integrated process control and device evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A set of addressable test structures, each of which uses addressing schemes to access individual elements of the structure in a matrix, is used to test the quality of a wafer before integrated circuits produced thereon are diced, packaged and subjected to final testing. The electrical characteristic of each element is checked and compared to the electrical characteristic of all other like elements in the matrix. The effectiveness of the addressable test matrix is in readily analyzing the electrical characteristics of the test elements and in providing diagnostic information.

  3. The Impact of Personality and Test Conditions on Mathematical Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heather; Embretson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Online and on-demand tests are increasingly used in assessment. Although the main focus has been cheating and test security (e.g., Selwyn, 2008) the cross-setting equivalence of scores as a function of contrasting test conditions is also an issue that warrants attention. In this study, the impact of environmental and cognitive distractions, as…

  4. Experimental sloshing pressure impacts in ensemble domain: Transient and stationary statistical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulian, G.; Botia-Vera, E.; Souto-Iglesias, A.

    2014-03-01

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of impact pressure registrations from repeated model scale sloshing experiments under harmonic rotational excitation. A series of more than 100 experiments, each one encompassing more than 100 impact events, has been conducted seeking the highest feasible repeatability. Different excitation periods, that cover the main features of the impact dynamics, have been considered in a preliminary screening, describing the main features of the impact dynamics. Since, even under a nominally deterministic excitation, the pressure at each impact is characterized by a high variability, a statistical approach is used treating the impact pressure as a stochastic process. For one selected excitation period, the statistical analysis focuses on the ensemble distribution of the maximum pressure during each impact event. Particular attention is given to the evolution of such distributions, in order to detect the variations in the statistical characteristics of the process. This is achieved by, first, identifying the presence and the length of the transient phase and, second, by characterizing the process at stationary state. The statistics of impact pressure for different peaks are discussed mostly in the ensemble domain. Linking the latter with the time domain analysis is made by checking that the problem can be considered "practically ergodic." The "practical ergodicity" of the process is dealt with by checking to what extent steady state ensemble statistical information can be obtained from a single long run experiment. Statistical checks for correlation and independence of maximum impact pressures are also carried out to test the hypothesis of independent identically distributed random variables. The method of analysis presented in this paper through the considered example case is general in nature and is considered to be highly portable. In particular, it is considered to allow for a more thorough understanding of non-deterministic events

  5. Experimental sloshing pressure impacts in ensemble domain: Transient and stationary statistical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bulian, G.; Botia-Vera, E. E-mail: antonio.souto@upm.es; Souto-Iglesias, A. E-mail: antonio.souto@upm.es

    2014-03-15

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of impact pressure registrations from repeated model scale sloshing experiments under harmonic rotational excitation. A series of more than 100 experiments, each one encompassing more than 100 impact events, has been conducted seeking the highest feasible repeatability. Different excitation periods, that cover the main features of the impact dynamics, have been considered in a preliminary screening, describing the main features of the impact dynamics. Since, even under a nominally deterministic excitation, the pressure at each impact is characterized by a high variability, a statistical approach is used treating the impact pressure as a stochastic process. For one selected excitation period, the statistical analysis focuses on the ensemble distribution of the maximum pressure during each impact event. Particular attention is given to the evolution of such distributions, in order to detect the variations in the statistical characteristics of the process. This is achieved by, first, identifying the presence and the length of the transient phase and, second, by characterizing the process at stationary state. The statistics of impact pressure for different peaks are discussed mostly in the ensemble domain. Linking the latter with the time domain analysis is made by checking that the problem can be considered “practically ergodic.” The “practical ergodicity” of the process is dealt with by checking to what extent steady state ensemble statistical information can be obtained from a single long run experiment. Statistical checks for correlation and independence of maximum impact pressures are also carried out to test the hypothesis of independent identically distributed random variables. The method of analysis presented in this paper through the considered example case is general in nature and is considered to be highly portable. In particular, it is considered to allow for a more thorough understanding of non

  6. Microstructural characterization of Charpy-impact-tested nanostructured bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.T.; Chang, H.T.; Huang, B.M.; Huang, C.Y.; Yang, J.R.

    2015-09-15

    In this work, a possible cause of the extraordinary low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite has been investigated. The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted chiefly of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with retained austenite films. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) measurement indicated that no retained austenite existed in the fractured surface of the Charpy-impact-tested specimens. Fractographs showed that cracks propagated mainly along bainitic ferrite platelet boundaries. The change in microstructure after impact loading was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, confirming that retained austenite was completely transformed to strain-induced martensite during the Charpy impact test. However, the zone affected by strained-induced martensite was found to be extremely shallow, only to a depth of several micrometers from the fracture surface. It is appropriately concluded that upon impact, as the crack forms and propagates, strain-induced martensitic transformation immediately occurs ahead of the advancing crack tip. The successive martensitic transformation profoundly facilitates the crack propagation, resulting in the extremely low impact toughness of nanostructured bainite. Retained austenite, in contrast to its well-known beneficial role, has a deteriorating effect on toughness during the course of Charpy impact. - Highlights: • The microstructure of nanostructured bainite consisted of nano-sized bainitic ferrite subunits with retained austenite films. • Special sample preparations for SEM, XRD and TEM were made, and the strain-affected structures have been explored. • Retained austenite films were found to transform into martensite after impact loading, as evidenced by XRD and TEM results. • The zone of strain-induced martensite was found to extend to only several micrometers from the fracture surface. • The poor Charpy impact toughness is associated with the fracture of martensite at a high strain rate during

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  9. Methods for testing theory and evaluating impact in randomized field trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C. Hendricks; Wang, Wei; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Muthén, Bengt O.; Petras, Hanno; Toyinbo, Peter; Poduska, Jeanne; Ialongo, Nicholas; Wyman, Peter A.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Sloboda, Zili; MacKinnon, David P.; Windham, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Randomized field trials provide unique opportunities to examine the effectiveness of an intervention in real world settings and to test and extend both theory of etiology and theory of intervention. These trials are designed not only to test for overall intervention impact but also to examine how impact varies as a function of individual level characteristics, context, and across time. Examination of such variation in impact requires analytical methods that take into account the trial’s multiple nested structure and the evolving changes in outcomes over time. The models that we describe here merge multilevel modeling with growth modeling, allowing for variation in impact to be represented through discrete mixtures—growth mixture models—and nonparametric smooth functions—generalized additive mixed models. These methods are part of an emerging class of multilevel growth mixture models, and we illustrate these with models that examine overall impact and variation in impact. In this paper, we define intent-to-treat analyses in group-randomized multilevel field trials and discuss appropriate ways to identify, examine, and test for variation in impact without inflating the Type I error rate. We describe how to make causal inferences more robust to misspecification of covariates in such analyses and how to summarize and present these interactive intervention effects clearly. Practical strategies for reducing model complexity, checking model fit, and handling missing data are discussed using six randomized field trials to show how these methods may be used across trials randomized at different levels. PMID:18215473

  10. Effect of matrix resin on the impact fracture characteristics of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, P. E.; Smith, B. W.; Miller, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of resin chemistry on basic impact energy absorbent mechanisms exibited by graphite-epoxy composites was investigated. Impact fracture modes and microscopic resin deformation characteristics were examined for 26 NASA-impacted graphite epoxy laminates with different resin chemistries. Discrete specimen fracture modes were identified through cross sectional examination after impact, and subsequently compared with measured glass transition temperatures, cure cycles, and residual impact capabilities. Microscopic resin deformation mechanisms and their overall relationship to impact loading conditions, voids, and resin content were also characterized through scanning electron microscopic examination of separated fracture surfaces.

  11. Applying ISO 16840-2 Standard to differentiate impact force dissipation characteristics of selection of commercial wheelchair cushions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Pell, Martin; Ferguson-Pell, Grace; Mohammadi, Farhood; Call, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Results from applying the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 16840-2 test method for determining the impact damping characteristics of 35 wheelchair cushions plus a high resilience (HR70) polyurethane reference foam sample are reported. The generation of impact forces when a wheelchair user either transfers onto a cushion or the wheelchair encounters rough terrain or bumps down a step can endanger the viability of tissues, especially if these forces occur repeatedly. The results demonstrate significant differences in the impact force dissipation characteristics of different cushion products but do not reliably identify differences in performance that can be attributed to descriptive information about cushion composition alone. Instead, these results demonstrate that the materials, proprietary design, and construction features of wheelchair cushions in combination dictate impact force dissipation properties. The results of a cluster analysis are used to generate a model that can be used to compare the impact damping properties obtained from the ISO 16840-2 test method with those of a range of cushions and the reference cushion. Manufacturers will therefore be able to provide users and clinicians with information about the impact force dissipation properties of the cushions that will enable them to make more informed product choices for achieving improved comfort and to protect skin integrity. PMID:26230038

  12. Product Reputation Manipulation: The Characteristics and Impact of Shill Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Toan C.

    2013-01-01

    Online reviews have become a popular method for consumers to express personal evaluation about products. Ecommerce firms have invested heavily into review systems because of the impact of product reviews on product sales and shopping behavior. However, the usage of product reviews is undermined by the increasing appearance of shill or fake…

  13. Impact tests on rubber compression springs for airplane landing gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K

    1930-01-01

    The present report gives the results of tests which were made for the purpose of solving the problem of whether diagrams obtained from pressure tests could be conclusive for the determination of the safe impact coefficients. It is first established that the rubber rings adhere firmly to the compression surfaces during deformation. Suggestions are thus obtained for a constructive simplification of the rubber rings. The hysteresis phenomenon is ascribed to external and internal friction forces. A device for falling tests is then described with which the process of shock absorption with rubber rings was tested.

  14. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  15. Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

  16. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conduct to determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and reservoir characteristics of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging, formation sampling, or well testing....

  17. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and reservoir characteristics of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging, formation sampling, or well testing....

  18. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and reservoir characteristics of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging, formation sampling, or well testing....

  19. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and reservoir characteristics of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging, formation sampling, or well testing....

  20. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  1. Statistical modeling for particle impact noise detection testing

    SciTech Connect

    Prairie, R.R. ); Zimmer, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Particle Impact Noise Detection (PIND) testing is widely used to test electronic devices for the presence of conductive particles which can cause catastrophic failure. This paper develops a statistical model based on the rate of particles contaminating the part, the rate of particles induced by the test vibration, the escape rate, and the false alarm rate. Based on data from a large number of PIND tests for a canned transistor, the model is shown to fit the observed results closely. Knowledge of the parameters for which this fit is made is important in evaluating the effectiveness of the PIND test procedure and for developing background judgment about the performance of the PIND test. Furthermore, by varying the input parameters to the model, the resulting yield, failure rate and percent fallout can be examined and used to plan and implement PIND test programs.

  2. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  3. Cometary Dust Characteristics: Comparison of Stardust Craters with Laboratory Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Graham, G. A.; Horz, F.; Wozniakiewicz, P. A.; Cole, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium foils exposed to impact during the passage of the Stardust spacecraft through the coma of comet Wild 2 have preserved a record of a wide range of dust particle sizes. The encounter velocity and dust incidence direction are well constrained and can be simulated by laboratory shots. A crater size calibration programme based upon buckshot firings of tightly constrained sizes (monodispersive) of glass, polymer and metal beads has yielded a suite of scaling factors for interpretation of the original impacting grain dimensions. We have now extended our study to include recognition of particle density for better matching of crater to impactor diameter. A novel application of stereometric crater shape measurement, using paired scanning electron microscope (SEM) images has shown that impactors of differing density yield different crater depth/diameter ratios. Comparison of the three-dimensional gross morphology of our experimental craters with those from Stardust reveals that most of the larger Stardust impacts were produced by grains of low internal porosity.

  4. Highly Siderophile Element Characteristics of Lunar Impact Melt Rocks: A Picture Begins to Emerge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; James, O. B.; Kring, D. A.; Liu, J.; Sharp, M. G.; Puchtel, I. S.

    2015-02-01

    Lunar impact melt rocks from multiple sites have highly siderophile element characteristics suggestive of two component mixing. This may indicate that the HSE present in all of the rocks were present in the crust at the times of basin formation.

  5. Discovering the Impact of Preceding Units' Characteristics on the Wait Time of Cardiac Surgery Unit from Statistic Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiming; Tao, Li; Xiao, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Prior research shows that clinical demand and supplier capacity significantly affect the throughput and the wait time within an isolated unit. However, it is doubtful whether characteristics (i.e., demand, capacity, throughput, and wait time) of one unit would affect the wait time of subsequent units on the patient flow process. Focusing on cardiac care, this paper aims to examine the impact of characteristics of the catheterization unit (CU) on the wait time of cardiac surgery unit (SU). Methods This study integrates published data from several sources on characteristics of the CU and SU units in 11 hospitals in Ontario, Canada between 2005 and 2008. It proposes a two-layer wait time model (with each layer representing one unit) to examine the impact of CU's characteristics on the wait time of SU and test the hypotheses using the Partial Least Squares-based Structural Equation Modeling analysis tool. Results Results show that: (i) wait time of CU has a direct positive impact on wait time of SU (); (ii) capacity of CU has a direct positive impact on demand of SU (); (iii) within each unit, there exist significant relationships among different characteristics (except for the effect of throughput on wait time in SU). Conclusion Characteristics of CU have direct and indirect impacts on wait time of SU. Specifically, demand and wait time of preceding unit are good predictors for wait time of subsequent units. This suggests that considering such cross-unit effects is necessary when alleviating wait time in a health care system. Further, different patient risk profiles may affect wait time in different ways (e.g., positive or negative effects) within SU. This implies that the wait time management should carefully consider the relationship between priority triage and risk stratification, especially for cardiac surgery. PMID:21818282

  6. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  7. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dana K. Morton; Spencer D. Snow; Tom E. Rahl; Robert K. Blandford

    2007-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, three previous papers [1, 2, 3] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens that began the investigation of these characteristics. The goal of the work presented herein is to add the results of additional tensile impact testing for 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, additional tests achieved target strain rates of 5, 10, and 22 per second at room temperature, 300, and 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at each designated strain rate and temperature are presented herein.

  8. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  9. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  11. How Changes in Psychosocial Job Characteristics Impact Burnout in Nurses: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pisanti, Renato; van der Doef, Margot; Maes, Stan; Meier, Laurenz Linus; Lazzari, David; Violani, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The main aim of this longitudinal study was to test the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model and to analyze whether changes in psychosocial job characteristics are related to (changes in) burnout. Background: Previous studies on the effects of JDCS variables on burnout dimensions have indicated that the iso-strain hypothesis (i.e., high job demands, low control, and low support additively predict high stress reactions) and the buffer hypotheses (i.e., high job control and/or social support is expected to moderate the negative impact of high demands on stress reactions) have hardly been examined concurrently in a longitudinal design; and that the effects of changes of psychosocial job variables on burnout dimensions have hardly been analyzed. Design: This two wave study was carried out over a period of 14 months in a sample of 217 Italian nurses. Method: Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the cross lagged main and interactive effects of JDCS variables, and to analyse the across-time effects of changes in JDCS dimensions on burnout variables. Results: The Time 1 job characteristics explained 2–8% of the variance in the Time 2 burnout dimensions, but no support for the additive, or the buffer hypothesis of the JDCS model was found. Changes in job characteristics explained an additional 3–20% of variance in the Time 2 burnout dimensions. Specifically, high levels of emotional exhaustion at Time 2 were explained by high levels of social support at Time 1, and unfavorable changes in demands, control, and support over time; high depersonalization at Time 2 was explained by high social support at time 1 and by an increase in demands over time; and high personal accomplishment at Time 2 was predicted by high demands, high control, interactive effect demands × control × social support, at Time 1, and by a decrease in demands over time. No reversed effects of burnout on work characteristics have been found. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that

  12. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  13. Taylor Impact Tests and Simulations on PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad; Thompson, Darla G.; Luscher, D. J.; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    Taylor impact tests have been conducted previously on plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) to characterize the stress state of these materials as they impact smooth and flat steel anvil surfaces at speeds of ~100m/s (i.e. Christopher, et al, 11th Detonation Symposium). In 2003, C. Liu and R. Ellis (unpublished, Los Alamos National Laboratory) performed Taylor tests on PBX 9501 up to speeds of 115 m/s, capturing impact images. In the work presented here, we have extended these tests to velocities of 200 m/s using a composite-lined gun barrel and no specimen sabot. Specimen images are used to validate the thermo-mechanical constitutive model ViscoSCRAM. ViscoSCRAM has been parameterized for PBX 9501 in uniaxial stress configurations. Simulating Taylor impact experiments tests the model in situations undergoing extreme damage. In addition, experimental variations to specimen confinement and friction are introduced in an attempt to establish ignition thresholds in this velocity regime.

  14. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to simulate the damage that meteoroids will produce in the Shuttle Orbiter leading edge structural subsystem material. The nature and extent of the damage is reported and the probability of encountering meteoroids with sufficient energy to produce such damage is discussed.

  15. Performance Verification of Impact Machines for Testing Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, T. A.; Vigliotti, D. P.; Dirling, L. B.; McCowan, C. N.

    1999-01-01

    Valid comparison of impact test energies reported by various organizations and over time depends on consistent performance of impact test machines. This paper investigates the influence of various specimen and test parameters on impact energies in the 1 J to 2 J range for both Charpy V-notch and Izod procedures, leading toward the identification of a suitable material for use in a program to verify machine performance. We investigated the influences on the absorbed energy of machine design, test material, specimen cross sectional area, and machine energy range. For comparison to published round robin data on common plastics, this study used some common metallic alloys, including those used in the international verification program for metals impact machines and in informal calibration programs of tensile machines. The alloys that were evaluated include AISI type 4340 steel, and five aluminum alloys: 2014-T6, 2024-T351, 2219-T87, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6. We found that certain metallic alloys have coefficients of variation comparable to those of the best plastics that are reported in the literature. Also, we found that the differences in absorbed energy between two designs of machines are smaller than the differences that can be attributed to the specimens alone.

  16. Low velocity impact testing and nondestructive evaluation of transparent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.

    2011-06-23

    Advanced transparent materials are used in protective systems for enhancing the survivability of ground vehicles, air vehicles, and personnel in applications such as face shields, riot gear, and vehicle windows. Low velocity impact damage can limit visibility and compromise the structural integrity of a transparent system, increasing the likelihood of further damage or penetration from a high velocity impact strike. For this reason, it is critical to determine damage tolerance levels of transparent systems to indicate whether or not a component should be replaced. In this study, transparent laminate systems will be tested by comparing baseline conditions to experimentally controlled damage states. Destructive testing including air gun and sphere impact testing will be used to replicate low velocity impacts in the field. Characterization of the damaged state will include basic visual inspection as well as nondestructive techniques including cross-polarization, x-ray, and ultrasound. The combination of destructive testing and characterization of the resulting damage can help to establish a damage acceptance criterion for materials used in protective systems.

  17. Performance verification of impact machines for testing plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Vigliotti, D.P.; Dirling, L.B.; McCowan, C.N.

    1999-12-01

    Valid comparison of impact test energies reported by various organizations and over time depends on consistent performance of impact test machines. This paper investigates the influence of various specimen and test parameters on impact energies in the 1 J to 2 J range for both Charpy V-notch and Izod procedures, leading toward the identification of a suitable material for use in a program to verify machine performance. The authors investigated the influences on the absorbed energy of machine design, test material, specimen cross sectional area, and machine energy range. For comparison to published round robin data on common plastics, this study used some common metallic alloys, including those used in the international verification program for metals impact machines and in informal calibration programs of tensile machines. The alloys that were evaluated include AISI type 4340 steel, and five aluminum alloys: 2014-T6, 2024-T351, 2219-T87, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6. They found that certain metallic alloys have coefficients of variation comparable to those of the best plastics that are reported in the literature. Also, they found that the differences in absorbed energy between two designs of machines are smaller than the differences that can be attributed to the specimens alone.

  18. Vibration testing of impact-damaged composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Meyn, Erwin H.

    1989-01-01

    A new test is described that can be used to measure changes in the vibration properties of impact damaged composite materials. Impact-induced delamination was observed to significantly affect natural frequencies of vibration and damping properties in cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates. Natural frequencies are shown to drop by as much as half of their original value, and modal damping ratios can increase by a factor of up to eight when large amounts of damage are present. A simple finite element model of the damaged impact specimens was used to predict the effect of delamination on certain vibration properties. A comparison of the finite element calculations with the experimental measurements suggests that delamination was the dominant mechanism of flexural stiffness loss resulting from the transverse impact.

  19. Analysis-test correlation of airbag impact for Mars landing

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.; Davis, G.; Kuo, C.P.

    1994-12-31

    The NASA Mars Pathfinder mission is intended to demonstrate key low cost technologies for use in future science missions to Mars. Among these technologies is the landing system. Upon entering in Martian atmosphere at about 7000 m/sec., the spacecraft will deploy a series of breaking devices (parachute and solid rockets) to slow down its speed to less than 20 m/sec. as it impacts with the Martian ground. To cushion science instruments form the landing impact, an airbag system is inflated to surround the lander approximately five seconds before impact. After multiple bounces, the lander/airbags comes to rest, the airbags are deflated and retracted, and the lander opens up its petals to allow a microrover to begin exploration. Of interest here, is the final landing phase. Specifically, this paper will focus on the methodology used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of lander/airbags landing impact, and how this simulation correlates with initial tests.

  20. Impact of collisionality on fluctuation characteristics of micro-turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Guercan, Oe. D.; Bourdelle, C.; Clairet, F.; Garbet, X.; Sabot, R.

    2011-01-15

    The influence of changing collisionality on density fluctuation characteristics is studied during dedicated {nu}* scaling experiments, using Doppler backscattering system. First, the repartition of fluctuation energy over different spatial scales, as represented by the wavenumber spectrum, is investigated and a modification of the shape of the perpendicular wavenumber spectrum in the low wavenumber part of the spectrum is observed when changing collisionality. In addition, a new procedure to evaluate the dispersion relation of micro-turbulence is presented. From the behavior of the perpendicular mean velocity of density fluctuations with the perpendicular wavenumber, different dispersion relations are obtained between low and high collisionality cases.

  1. Fibromyalgia Impact and Mindfulness Characteristics in 4986 People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kim D.; Mist, Scott D.; Casselberry, Marie A.; Ali, Ather; Christopher, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective A growing body of literature suggests that mindfulness techniques may be beneficial in fibromyalgia. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of six trials indicated improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, calling for increased rigor and use of standardized measures in future trials. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between mindfulness [as measured by the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ)] and fibromyalgia impact [as measured by the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR)]. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional survey was conducted with adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia from a national fibromyalgia advocacy foundation e-mail list. Results A total of 4986 respondents represented all 50 states in the United States and 30 countries. FIQR scores demonstrated moderate to severe fibromyalgia with the majority of subjects (59%) scoring ≤60. Scores on the FFMQ subscales ranged from 20.8 to 27.3, with highest scores for the observe subscale. All subscale correlations were small to moderate and indicated that more severe fibromyalgia impact was associated with less mindfulness except in the observe scale (r = .15, P > .000). No clinical or demographics explained as much variance in the FIQR total as any of the mindfulness subscales. Conclusions Fibromyalgia patients experience symptoms that may be alleviated by mindfulness interventions. Baseline values for the observe subscale of the FFMQ were unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to know if this may be due to non-mindful observations and should be noted when the FFMQ is used in fibromyalgia clinical trials. PMID:26005199

  2. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Chikahiro; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Harada, Iki; Ma, David C.

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m x 3 m x 2 m (length x width x height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  3. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    SciTech Connect

    Minowa, C.; Ogawa, N.; Harada, I.; Ma, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m {times} 3 m {times} 2 m length {times} width {times} height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  4. Test methods for optical disk media characteristics (for 356 mm ruggedized magneto-optic media)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1991-01-01

    Standard test methods for computer storage media characteristics are essential and allow for conformance to media interchange standards. The test methods were developed for 356 mm two-sided laminated glass substrate with a magneto-optic active layer media technology. These test methods may be used for testing other media types, but in each case their applicability must be evaluated. Test methods are included for a series of different media characteristics, including operational, nonoperational, and storage environments; mechanical and physical characteristics; and substrate, recording layer, and preformat characteristics. Tests for environmental qualification and media lifetimes are also included. The best methods include testing conditions, testing procedures, a description of the testing setup, and the required calibration procedures.

  5. Fixed-time life tests based on fuzzy life characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Akihiro; Ohta, Hiroshi

    1992-06-01

    This paper deals with a reliability demonstration test with type-I censoring and presents a formulation based on fuzzy-set theory. Acceptable and rejectable MTBFs are represented in terms of a fuzzy concept, and Bayes' theorem plays an important role in the formulation. The proposed life test is useful when it is difficult to specify acceptable and rejectable MTBFs strictly.

  6. A Graphical Approach to Evaluating Equating Using Test Characteristic Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    An essential concern in the application of any equating procedure is determining whether tests can be considered equated after the tests have been placed onto a common scale. This article clarifies one equating criterion, the first-order equity property of equating, and develops a new method for evaluating equating that is linked to this…

  7. Adult headform impact tests of three Japanese child bicycle helmets into a vehicle.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Koji; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshida, Ryoichi; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Okada, Hiroshi; Nomura, Mitsunori; Fujii, Chikayo

    2014-12-01

    The head is the body region that most frequently incurs fatal and serious injuries of cyclists in collisions against vehicles. Many research studies investigated helmet effectiveness in preventing head injuries using accident data. In this study, the impact attenuation characteristics of three Japanese child bicycle helmets were examined experimentally in impact tests into a concrete surface and a vehicle. A pedestrian adult headform with and without a Japanese child bicycle helmet was dropped onto a concrete surface and then propelled into a vehicle at 35 km/h in various locations such as the bonnet, roof header, windshield and A-pillar. Accelerations were measured and head injury criterion (HIC) calculated. In the drop tests using the adult headform onto a concrete surface from the height of 1.5m, the HIC for a headform without a child helmet was 6325, and was reduced by around 80% when a child helmet was fitted to the headform. In the impact tests, where the headform was fired into the vehicle at 35 km/h at various locations on a car, the computed acceleration based HIC varied depending on the vehicle impact locations. The HIC was reduced by 10-38% for impacts headforms with a child helmet when the impact was onto a bonnet-top and roof header although the HIC was already less than 1000 in impacts with the headform without a child helmet. Similarly, for impacts into the windshield (where a cyclist's head is most frequently impacted), the HIC using the adult headform without a child helmet was 122; whereas when the adult headform was used with a child helmet, a higher HIC value of more than 850 was recorded. But again, the HIC values are below 1000. In impacts into the A-pillar, the HIC was 4816 for a headform without a child helmet and was reduced by 18-38% for a headform with a child helmet depending on the type of Japanese child helmet used. The tests demonstrated that Japanese child helmets are effective in reducing accelerations and HIC in a drop test using

  8. The psychological impact of genetic testing for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Coon, D W; Davies, H; McKibben, C; Gallagher-Thompson, D

    1999-01-01

    Information regarding one's genetic risk for a particular disease might effectively inform medical, financial, and reproductive decisions and perhaps promote established risk reduction behaviors. However, genetic testing may also lead to significant levels of anxiety, depression, or other forms of distress, especially when psychological coping strategies and social reserves are not adequate to manage positive or inconclusive results. This paper focuses on the psychological impact of predisposition genetic for Alzheimer disease (AD). We present stress and coping models that capture the essence of this impact and discuss the potential role of counseling and follow-up interventions. The discussion draws primarily from the experiences of professionals working with other diseases, and seeks to expand that experience into the AD arena. In addition, we emphasize two issues we believe need additional attention in the psychological literature regarding genetic testing and counseling: (i) the psychosocial vulnerability of individuals being tested and, (ii) the sociocultural context of the AD patient and their family members. PMID:10464586

  9. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  10. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Model Jet Test Facility Flow Conditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Haskin, Harry H.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of flow conditioning devices used to suppress internal rig noise in high speed, high temperature experimental jet facilities is discussed. The aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of a number of devices including pressure loss and extraneous noise generation are measured. Both aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are strongly dependent on the porosity of the flow conditioner and the closure ratio of the duct system. For unchoked flow conditioners, the pressure loss follows conventional incompressible flow models. However, for choked flow conditioners, a compressible flow model where the duct and flow conditioner system is modeled as a convergent-divergent nozzle can be used to estimate pressure loss. Choked flow conditioners generate significantly more noise than unchoked conditioners. In addition, flow conditioners with small hole diameters or sintered metal felt material generate less self-noise noise compared to flow conditioners with larger holes.

  11. Cortisol directly impacts Flavobacterium columnare in vitro growth characteristics.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Annelies Maria; Aerts, Johan; Ampe, Bart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Decostere, Annemie

    2016-01-01

    Teleost fish faced with stressful stimuli launch an endocrine stress response through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis to release glucocorticoids, in particular cortisol, into the blood. For the majority of bacterial fish pathogens, stress is considered a key factor in disease outbreaks. Based upon studies in mammals, there is considerable evidence to suggest that, besides impairing the immune system, cortisol can have a direct effect on bacterial cells. Hitherto, this intriguing field of microbial endocrinology has remained largely unexplored in aquatic diseases. The present study investigated in vitro the impact of cortisol on phenotypic traits of the fresh water fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare. Colonies obtained from the highly virulent (HV) isolates resulted in significantly larger and more spreading colonies compared to those from the low virulent (LV) isolates. High cortisol doses added displayed a direct effect on the bacterial cells and induced a significant decrease in colony size. An additional intriguing finding was the inverse relationship between cortisol concentrations added to the broth and the spreading character of colonies retrieved, with higher cortisol doses resulting in less rhizoid to rough and even smooth colony formation (the latter only in the LV trout isolate), suggesting a dose-response effect. The loss of the rhizoid appearance of the F. columnare colonies upon administration of cortisol, and hence the loss of motility, might indicate a phenotypic change to the biofilm state. These findings form the basis for further research on the impact of glucocorticoids on other virulence factors and biofilm formation of F. columnare. PMID:27530746

  12. Machine Vision Tests for Spent Fuel Scrap Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    BERGER, W.W.

    2000-04-27

    The purpose of this work is to perform a feasibility test of a Machine Vision system for potential use at the Hanford K basins during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) operations. This report documents the testing performed to establish functionality of the system including quantitative assessment of results. Fauske and Associates, Inc., which has been intimately involved in development of the SNF safety basis, has teamed with Agris-Schoen Vision Systems, experts in robotics, tele-robotics, and Machine Vision, for this work.

  13. Program for impact testing of spar-shell fan blades, test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, R.; Salemme, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    Six filament-wound, composite spar-shell fan blades were impact tested in a whirligig relative to foreign object damage resulting from ingestion of birds into the fan blades of a QCSEE-type engine. Four of the blades were tested by injecting a simulated two pound bird into the path of the rotating blade and two were tested by injecting a starling into the path of the blade.

  14. Impact testing of simulated high-level waste glass canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Slate, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three Savannah River Laboratory reference high-level waste canisters were subjected to impact tests at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in June 1983. The purpose of the test was to determine the integrity of the canister, nozzle, and final closure weld and to assess the effects of impacts on the glass. Two of the canisters were fabricated from 304L stainless steel and the third canister from titanium. The titanium canister was subjected to two drops. The first drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the bottom corner of the canister receiving the impact. No failure occurred during this drop. The second drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. A large breach in the canister occurred in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The first stainless steel canister was dropped with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. The canister showed significant strain with no rupturing in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The second canister was dropped with the bottom corner receiving the impact and also, dropped horizontally onto an unyielding vertical solid steel cylinder in a puncture test. The bottom drop did not damage the weld and the puncture test did not rupture the canister body. The glass particles in the damaged zone of these canisters were sampled and analyzed for particle size. A comparison was made with control canister in which no impact had occurred. The particle size distribution for the control canisters and the zones of damaged glass were determined down to 1.5 ..mu..m. The quantity of glass fines, smaller than 10 ..mu..m, which must be determined for transportation safety studies, was found to be the largest in the bottom-damaged zone. The total amount of fines smaller than 10 ..mu..m after impact was less than 0.01 wt % of the total amount of glass in the canister.

  15. Space Shuttle Main Engine Debris Testing Methodology and Impact Tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Stephens, Walter

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster every effort is being made to determine the susceptibility of Space Shuttle elements to debris impacts. Ice and frost debris is formed around the aft heat shield closure of the orbiter and liquid hydrogen feedlines. This debris has been observed to liberate upon lift-off of the shuttle and presents potentially dangerous conditions to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. This paper describes the testing done to determine the impact tolerance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzle coolant tubes to ice strikes originating from the launch pad or other parts of the shuttle.

  16. Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility: A gun for hire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Calvin R.; Rose, M. F.; Hill, D. C.; Best, S.; Chaloupka, T.; Crawford, G.; Crumpler, M.; Stephens, B.

    1994-01-01

    An affordable technique has been developed to duplicate the types of impacts observed on spacecraft, including the Shuttle, by use of a certified Hypervelocity Impact Facility (HIF) which propels particulates using capacitor driven electric gun techniques. The fully operational facility provides a flux of particles in the 10-100 micron diameter range with a velocity distribution covering the space debris and interplanetary dust particle environment. HIF measurements of particle size, composition, impact angle and velocity distribution indicate that such parameters can be controlled in a specified, tailored test designed for or by the user. Unique diagnostics enable researchers to fully describe the impact for evaluating the 'targets' under full power or load. Users regularly evaluate space hardware, including solar cells, coatings, and materials, exposing selected portions of space-qualified items to a wide range of impact events and environmental conditions. Benefits include corroboration of data obtained from impact events, flight simulation of designs, accelerated aging of systems, and development of manufacturing techniques.

  17. High-pressure oxygen test evaluations. [impact tests/metals - space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.; Key, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relevance of impact sensitivity testing to the development of the space shuttle main engine is discussed in the light of the special requirements for the engine. The background and history of the evolution of liquid and gaseous oxygen testing techniques and philosophy is discussed also. The parameters critical to reliable testing are treated in considerable detail, and test apparatus and procedures are described and discussed. Materials threshold sensitivity determination procedures are considered and a decision logic diagram for sensitivity threshold determination was plotted. Finally, high-pressure materials sensitivity test data are given for selected metallic and nonmetallic materials.

  18. Impact of phonon coupling on the radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achakovskiy, Oleg; Avdeenkov, Alexander; Kamerdzhiev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance and photon strength functions (PSF) in stable and unstable Ni and Sn isotopes are calculated within the microscopic self-consistent version of the extended theory of finite Fermi systems in the quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The approach includes phonon coupling (PC) effects in addition to the standard QRPA approach. The Skyrme force SLy4 is used. A pygmy dipole resonance in 72Ni is predicted at the mean energy of 12.4 MeV exhausting 25.7% of the total energy-weighted sum rule. With our microscopic E1 PSFs in the EMPIRE 3.1 code, the following radiative nuclear reaction characteristics have been calculated for several stable and unstable even-even Sn and Ni isotopes: 1) neutron capture cross sections, 2) corresponding neutron capture gamma-spectra, 3) average radiative widths of neutron resonances. Here, three variants of the microscopic nuclear level density models have been used and a comparison with the phenomenological generalized superfluid model has been performed. In all the considered properties, including the recent experimental data for PSF in Sn isotopes, the PC contributions turned out to be significant, as compared with the QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data.

  19. Characteristics of future aircraft impacting aircraft and airport compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Results are reported of an opinion survey of selected individuals at the decision-making level within the five major manufacturers of transport aircraft in the United States and Europe. Opinions were obtained concerning both possible and probable existence of over 50 compatibility-related characteristics of transport aircraft in use in the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. The maximum size of aircraft is expected to increase, at a roughly uniform rate, to the year 2010 by 85 percent in passengers, 55 percent in airfreighter payload, and 35 percent in gross weight weight. Companion to the expected growth in payloads and gross weight was the identification of probable increases in aircraft geometrical dimensions and component capability, and use of fully double-decked passenger compartments. Wing span will increase considerably more than normally expected to provide wings of higher aspect ratio. New aircraft features coming into probable use include large turboprops, synthetic jet-A fuel, winglets, wake-vortex-reducing devices and laminar flow control. New operational concepts considered probable include steep approaches, high-speed turnoffs, and taxiway towing for the aircraft, plus passenger bypass of the terminal building, expedited handling of belly cargo and an intermodal cargo container for the payloads.

  20. Impact of Asphaltenes and Resins on the Wetting Characteristics of Tars at Former Manufactured Gas Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S. C.; Birak, P. S.; Rylander, S.; Pedit, J. A.; Miller, C. T.

    2008-12-01

    Tars produced as a byproduct of coal and oil gasification at manufactured gas plants (MGPs) during the 19th and early 20th centuries were often released into the environment through poor disposal practices or leaks in holding tanks and piping. These tars are persistent contaminants, leaching polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into groundwater and posing a significant risk to human and ecological health. MGP tars also have several properties that make them notoriously difficult to remediate. They are denser than water, so they can migrate to depths which make direct removal difficult or impossible, and their relatively high viscosities and ability to alter the wetting characteristics of porous media result in inefficient removal by traditional pump-and-treat methods. In this study, we investigate the last of these properties. Previous studies have linked wetting changes to asphaltenes---polar, high molecular weight compounds present in the tars. However, we have conducted qualitative bottle tests for tar samples collected from two former MGPs which indicate that there is no direct correlation between asphaltene concentration and the tendency to alter wetting characteristics of porous media. To better understand the factors controlling wetting behavior, we isolate asphaltenes and resins, another class of polar compounds, from a tar sample and recombine them with the remaining PAH mixture to create a series of tars of varying composition. We assess the relative impact of each of the fractions on wettability through contact angle measurements conducted at three different pHs.

  1. The Impact of Youth Risk on Mentoring Relationship Quality: Do Mentor Characteristics Matter?

    PubMed

    Raposa, Elizabeth B; Rhodes, Jean E; Herrera, Carla

    2016-06-01

    Although mentoring is a widely used intervention strategy, effect sizes for at-risk youth remain modest. Research is therefore needed to maximize the impact of mentoring for at-risk youth who might struggle to benefit from mentoring relationships. This study tested the hypothesis that different types of youth risk would have a negative impact on mentoring relationship quality and duration and explored whether mentor characteristics exacerbated or mitigated these negative effects. Results showed that elevated environmental stress at a youth's home and/or school predicted shorter match duration, and elevated rates of youth behavioral problems, such as poor academic performance or misconduct, predicted greater youth dissatisfaction and less positive mentor perceptions of relationship quality. Mentors with greater self-efficacy and more previous involvement with youth in their communities were able to buffer the negative effects of environmental stress on match duration. Similarly, mentors' previous involvement with youth buffered the negative effects of youth behavioral problems on mentor perceptions of relationship quality. Findings have important implications for the matching of mentors and at-risk youth in a way that improves mentoring outcomes. PMID:27221800

  2. Racial Differences in Clinical Characteristics, Perceptions and Behaviors, and Psychosocial Impact of Adult Female Acne

    PubMed Central

    Alexis, Andrew F.; Daniels, Selena R.; Kawata, Ariane K.; Burk, Caroline T.; Wilcox, Teresa K.; Taylor, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Limited data are available on racial differences in clinical characteristics and burden in adult female acne. The objective was to describe racial differences in clinical characteristics, psychosocial impact, perceptions, behaviors, and treatment satisfaction in facial adult female acne. Design: Cross-sectional, web-based survey. Setting: Diverse sample of United States women. Participants: Women between the ages of 25 and 45 years with facial acne (≥25 visible lesions). Measurements: Outcomes included sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial impacts, perceptions, behaviors, and treatment satisfaction. Racial differences were evaluated using descriptive statistics and t-test/chi-square analyses. Results: 208 females participated (mean age 35±6 years); 51.4 percent were White/Caucasian and 48.6 percent were non-White/Caucasian women [Black/African American (n=51); Hispanic/Latina (n=23); Asian (n=16); Other (n=ll)]. Age of acne onset (mean 14.8±5 vs. 17.0±8 years, p<0.05) and acne concern occurred earlier (16.6±7 vs. 19.3±9 years, p<0.05) in White/Caucasian than non-White/Caucasian subjects. Facial acne primarily presented on chin (28.0%) and cheeks (30.8%) for White/Caucasian women versus cheeks (58.4%) for non-White/Caucasian women. Non-White/Caucasian women experienced more postinflammatory hyperpigmentation than White/Caucasian women (p<0.0001). Facial acne negatively affected quality of life (QoL) in both groups, and most participants (>70%) reported some depression/anxiety symptoms. More White/Caucasian than non-White/Caucasian women were troubled by facial acne (88.8% vs. 76.2%, p<0.05). Lesion clearance was most important to White/Caucasian women (57.9 vs. non-White/Caucasian 31.7%, p<0.001); non-White/Caucasian females focused on postinflammatory hyperpigmentation clearance (41.6% vs. Caucasian 8.4%, p<0.0001). Conclusion: Results highlight racial differences in participant-reported clinical characteristics, attitudes, behaviors, and

  3. Infrasound from lightning: characteristics and impact on an infrasound station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, T.; Blanc, E.

    2009-12-01

    More than two third of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO are now certified and measure routinely signals due particularly to natural activity (swell, volcano, severe weather including lightning, …). It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms are continuously active all around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. During the Eurosprite 2005 campaign, we took the opportunity to measure, in France during summer, infrasound from lightning and from sprites (which are transient luminous events occurring over thunderstorm). We examine the possibility to measure infrasound from lightning when thunderstorms are close or far from the infrasound station. Main results concern detection range of infrasound from lightning, amplitude vs. distance law, and characteristics of frequency spectrum. We show clearly that infrasound from lightning can be detected when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. In good noise conditions, infrasound from lightning can be detected when thunderstorms are located more than 200 km from the station. No signal is recorded from lightning flashes occurring between 75 and 200 km away from the station, defining then a silence zone. When the thunderstorm is close to the station, the infrasound signal could reach several Pascal. The signal is then on average 30 dB over the noise level at 1 Hz. Infrasound propagate upward where the highest frequencies are dissipated and can produce a significant heating of the upper mesosphere. Some of these results have been confirmed by case studies with data from the IMS Ivory Coast station. The coverage of the IMS stations is very good to study the thunderstorm activity and its disparity which is a good proxy of the global warming. Progress in data processing for infrasound data in the last ten years and the appearance of global lightning detection network as the World Wide Lightning

  4. Infrasound from lightning: characteristics and impact on an infrasound station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    More than two third of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO are now certified and measure routinely signals due particularly to natural activity (swell, volcano, severe weather including lightning, …). It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms are continuously active all around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. During the Eurosprite 2005 campaign, we took the opportunity to measure, in France during summer, infrasound from lightning and from sprites (which are transient luminous events occurring over thunderstorm). We examine the possibility to measure infrasound from lightning when thunderstorms are close or far from the infrasound station. Main results concern detection range of infrasound from lightning, amplitude vs. distance law, and characteristics of frequency spectrum. We show clearly that infrasound from lightning can be detected when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. In good noise conditions, infrasound from lightning can be detected when thunderstorms are located more than 200 km from the station. No signal is recorded from lightning flashes occurring between 75 and 200 km away from the station, defining then a silence zone. When the thunderstorm is close to the station, the infrasound signal could reach several Pascal. The signal is then on average 30 dB over the noise level at 1 Hz. Infrasound propagate upward where the highest frequencies are dissipated and can produce a significant heating of the upper mesosphere. Some of these results have been confirmed by case studies with data from the IMS Ivory Coast station. The coverage of the IMS stations is very good to study the thunderstorm activity and its disparity which is a good proxy of the global warming. Progress in data processing for infrasound data in the last ten years and the appearance of global lightning detection network as the World Wide Lightning

  5. Headache at high school: clinical characteristics and impact.

    PubMed

    Tonini, M C; Frediani, F

    2012-05-01

    Although migraine (MH) and tension type headache (TTH) are the most common and important causes of recurrent headache in adolescents, they are poorly understood and not recognized by parents and teachers, delaying the first physician evaluation for correct diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge about headache impact among the students of a Communication Private High School in Rimini city, and to evaluate the main different types of headaches interfering with school and social day activities. A self-administered questionnaire interview was given to students of the last 2 years of high school; ten items assessed the headache experience during the prior 12 months, especially during school time: the features and diagnosis of headaches types (based on the 2004 IHS criteria), precipitating factors, disability measured using the migraine disability assessment (MIDAS); therapeutic intervention. Out of the 60 students, 84 % experienced recurrent headache during the last 12 months. 79 % were females, aged 17-20 years; a family history was present in 74 % of headache students, in the maternal line; 45 % of subjects were identified as having MH and 27 % TTH; 25 % had morning headache and 20 % in the afternoon; fatigue, emotional stress and lack of sleep were the main trigger factors for headache, respectively in 86, 50 and 50 % of students; 92 % of headache students could not follow the lessons, could not participate in exercises and physical activity because of the headache; none had consulted a medical doctor and the 90 % of all students had never read, listened or watched television about headache. This study remarks on the need to promote headache educational programs, starting from high school, to increase communication between teachers-family-physician and patient-adolescents, with the goal to have an early appropriate therapeutic intervention, improvement of the quality of life and to prevent long-term headache disease in the

  6. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  7. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1998-01-15

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  8. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  9. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  11. Description, characteristics and testing of the NASA airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Altiz, O.; Schaffner, P.; Schrader, J. H.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a description of a coherent radar scattermeter and its associated signal processing hardware, which have been specifically designed to detect microbursts and record their radar characteristics. Radar parameters, signal processing techniques and detection algorithms, all under computer control, combine to sense and process reflectivity, clutter, and microburst data. Also presented is the system's high density, high data rate recording system. This digital system is capable of recording many minutes of the in-phase and quadrature components and corresponding receiver gains of the scattered returns for selected spatial regions, as well as other aircraft and hardware related parameters of interest for post-flight analysis. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  12. Data Reduction and Its Impact on Test-Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Bark, Lindley W.

    2001-01-01

    A research project has been initiated to improve crash test and analysis correlation. The research has focused on two specimen types: simple metallic beams and plates; and a representative composite fuselage section. Impact tests were performed under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, the specimens were densely instrumented to enable not only correlation with finite element simulations, but to also assess the repeatability of the data. Simulations utilizing a detailed finite element model were executed in a nonlinear transient dynamic code. The results presented in this paper concentrate on the effect of several data reduction processes, to include filtering frequency and sampling rate, on the correlation accuracy.

  13. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  14. West Valley Demonstration Project full-scale canister impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, K.F.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Lutz, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    Five West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) high-level waste (HLW) canisters were impact tested during 1994 to demonstrate compliance with the drop test requirements of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications. The specifications state that the canistered waste form must be able to survive a 7{minus}m (23 ft) drop unbreached. The 10-gauge (0.125 in. wall thickness) stainless steel canisters were approximately 85% filled with simulated vitrified waste and weighed about 2100 kg (4600 lb). Each canister was dropped vertically from a height of 7 m (23 ft) onto an essentially unyielding surface. The integrity of the canister was determined by the application and analysis of strain circles, dimensional measurements, and helium leak testing. The canisters were also visually inspected before and after the drop for physical damage. The results of the impact test verify that the canisters survived the 7{minus}m drops unbreached. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the reference canister meets the drop test specification of the Waste Acceptance Product Specification.

  15. Arcjet Testing of Micro-Meteoroid Impacted Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Munk, Michelle M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    There are several harsh space environments that could affect thermal protection systems and in turn pose risks to the atmospheric entry vehicles. These environments include micrometeoroid impact, extreme cold temperatures, and ionizing radiation during deep space cruise, all followed by atmospheric entry heating. To mitigate these risks, different thermal protection material samples were subjected to multiple tests, including hyper velocity impact, cold soak, irradiation, and arcjet testing, at various NASA facilities that simulated these environments. The materials included a variety of honeycomb packed ablative materials as well as carbon-based non-ablative thermal protection systems. The present paper describes the results of the multiple test campaign with a focus on arcjet testing of thermal protection materials. The tests showed promising results for ablative materials. However, the carbon-based non-ablative system presented some concerns regarding the potential risks to an entry vehicle. This study provides valuable information regarding the capability of various thermal protection materials to withstand harsh space environments, which is critical to sample return and planetary entry missions.

  16. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy. PMID:23403902

  17. Design characteristics of a heat pipe test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Jang, J. Hoon; Yu, Juin S.

    1992-01-01

    LeRC has designed a heat pipe test facility which will be used to provide data for validating heat pipe computer codes. A heat pipe test chamber that uses helium gas for enhancing heat transfer was investigated. The conceptual design employs the technique of guarded heating and guarded cooling to facilitate accurate measurements of heat transfer rates to the evaporator and from the condenser. The design parameters are selected for a baseline heat pipe made of stainless steel with an inner diameter of 38.10 mm and a wall thickness of 1.016 mm. The heat pipe operates at a design temperature of 1000 K with an evaporator radial heat flux of 53 W/sq. cm.

  18. Characteristics of vestibulosensory reactions studied by experimental caloric test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranov, V. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibulo-sensory reactions were studied in 135 workers who were in contact with nitroethers, by the method of an experimental caloric test. The response vestibulo-sensory reactions were recorded by means of an electroencephalograph. The changes in the sensory reaction depended on the duration of the workers' contact with toxic agents. A study of illusion reactions by the labyrinth calorization widens diagnostic possibilities in the examination of functional condition of the vestibular analyser considerably.

  19. Characteristics of lithium-ion batteries during fire tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Lorén, Anders; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2014-12-01

    Commercial lithium-ion battery cells are exposed to a controlled propane fire in order to evaluate heat release rate (HRR), emission of toxic gases as well as cell temperature and voltage under this type of abuse. The study includes six abuse tests on cells having lithium-iron phosphate (LFP) cathodes and, as a comparison, one test on conventional laptop battery packs with cobalt based cathode. The influence of different state of charge (SOC) is investigated and a limited study of the effect of water mist application is also performed. The total heat release (THR) per battery energy capacity are determined to be 28-75 kJ Wh-1 and the maximum HRR values to 110-490 W Wh-1. Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is found in the released gases for all tests but no traceable amounts of phosphorous oxyfluoride (POF3) or phosphorus pentafluoride (PF5) are detected. An extrapolation of expected HF emissions for a typical automotive 10 kWh battery pack exposed to fire gives a release of 400-1200 g HF. If released in a confined environment such emissions of HF may results in unacceptable exposure levels.

  20. Ecological impacts of invasive alien species along temperature gradients: testing the role of environmental matching.

    PubMed

    Iacarella, Josephine C; Dick, Jaimie T A; Alexander, Mhairi E; Ricciardi, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Invasive alien species (IAS) can cause substantive ecological impacts, and the role of temperature in mediating these impacts may become increasingly significant in a changing climate. Habitat conditions and physiological optima offer predictive information for IAS impacts in novel environments. Here, using meta-analysis and laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that the impacts of IAS in the field are inversely correlated with the difference in their ambient and optimal temperatures. A meta-analysis of 29 studies of consumptive impacts of IAS in inland waters revealed that the impacts of fishes and crustaceans are higher at temperatures that more closely match their thermal growth optima. In particular, the maximum impact potential was constrained by increased differences between ambient and optimal temperatures, as indicated by the steeper slope of a quantile regression on the upper 25th percentile of impact data compared to that of a weighted linear regression on all data with measured variances. We complemented this study with an experimental analysis of the functional response (the relationship between predation rate and prey supply) of two invasive predators (freshwater mysid shrimp, Hemimysis anomala and Mysis diluviana) across. relevant temperature gradients; both of these species have previously been found to exert strong community-level impacts that are corroborated by their functional responses to different prey items. The functional response experiments showed that maximum feeding rates of H. anomala and M. diluviana have distinct peaks near their respective thermal optima. Although variation in impacts may be caused by numerous abiotic or biotic habitat characteristics, both our analyses point to temperature as a key mediator of IAS impact levels in inland waters and suggest that IAS management should prioritize habitats in the invaded range that more closely match the thermal optima of targeted invaders. PMID:26214916

  1. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Plan Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-15

    This Test Plan outlines the testing to be done on the Special Protective Coating (SPC) Polyurea which includes: Tank Waste Compatibility, Decontamination Factor Testing, and Adhesion Strength Testing after a sample has been exposed to Radiation.

  2. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  3. Reflectance characteristics of the Viking lander camera reference test charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Burcher, E. E.; Jabson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Reference test charts provide radiometric, colorimetric, and spatial resolution references for the Viking lander cameras on Mars. Reflectance measurements of these references are described, including the absolute bidirectional reflectance of the radiometric references and the relative spectral reflectance of both radiometric and colorimetric references. Results show that the bidirection reflectance of the radiometric references is Lambertian to within + or - 7% for incidence angles between 20 deg and 60 deg, and that their spectral reflectance is constant with wavelength to within + or - 5% over the spectral range of the cameras. Estimated accuracy of the measurements is + or - 0.05 in relative spectral reflectance.

  4. Experimental analysis of dynamic characteristics for vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Lu-ping; Lu, Xu-xiang; Rao, Hong-de; Liu, Yu-jing

    2008-11-01

    Integral shroud is an advanced technique used to improve reliability of steam turbine blades. In this paper, dynamic characteristics of vibration-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud are studied. To test and verify the reliability of calculation result, a series of experiments are well performed on the platform of contracting and impacting of blades tips. The dynamic strain data under different gaps, different loads and different rotating speeds are surveyed through which the log decrement at each condition is obtained, and the effects of vibration damping are obtained by comparing the log decrement. The results of experimental study show that larger log decrement means larger system damping and better effectives of vibration reduction. Besides, the effects of vibro-impact reduction of different parameters are got and the experimental study results show that the vibro-impact structure is a good vibration damper. The dynamic stress of the blade with integral shroud is insensitive to loads when the gap between adjacent integral shrouds is small. In short, the achievements gained in the paper have revealed dynamic characteristics for vibro-impact process of steam turbine blades with integral shroud, which will bring important engineering application to development and modification design of the integrally shrouded blades.

  5. Machine for development impact tests in sports seats and similar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the stages of development of a machine to perform impact tests in sport seats, seats for spectators and multiple seats. This includes reviews and recommendations for testing laboratories that have needs similar to the laboratory where unfolded this process.The machine was originally developed seeking to meet certain impact tests in accordance with the NBR15925 standards; 15878 and 16031. The process initially included the study of the rules and the election of the tests for which the machine could be developed and yet all reports and outcome of interaction with service providers and raw materials.For operating facility, it was necessary to set entirely the machine control, which included the concept of dialogue with operator, the design of the menu screens and the procedures for submission and registration of results. To ensure reliability in the process, the machine has been successfully calibrated according to the requirements of the Brazilian network of calibration.The criticism to this enterprise covers the technical and economic aspects involved and points out the main obstacles that were needed to overcome.

  6. NEXT Long-Duration Test Neutralizer Performance and Erosion Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program is developing the next-generation ion propulsion system with significant enhancements beyond the state-of-the-art to provide future NASA science missions with enhanced capabilities at a low total development cost. A Long-Duration Test (LDT) was initiated in June 2005, to verify the NEXT propellant throughput capability to a qualification-level of 450 kg, 1.5 times the anticipated throughput requirement of 300 kg per thruster based on mission analyses. As of September 2, 2009, the thruster has accumulated 24,400 hr of operation with extensive durations at the following input powers: 6.9, 4.7, 1.1, and 0.5 kW. The thruster has processed 434 kg of xenon, surpassing the NASA Solar Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) program thruster propellant throughput demonstrated during the extended life testing of the Deep Space 1 flight spare ion thruster and approaching the NEXT development qualification throughput goal of 450 kg. The NEXT LDT has demonstrated a total impulse of 16.1 10(exp 6zzz0 N s; the highest total impulse ever demonstrated by an ion thruster. A reduction in neutralizer flow margin has been the only appreciable source of thruster performance degradation. The behavior of the neutralizer is not easily predicted due to both erosion and deposition observed in previous wear tests. Spot-to-plume mode transition flow data and in-situ erosion results for the LDT neutralizer are discussed. This loss of flow margin has been addressed through a combination of a design change in the prototype-model neutralizer to increase flow margin at low emission current and to update the NEXT throttle table to ensure adequate flow margin as a function of propellant throughput processed. The new throttle table will be used for future LDT operations. The performance of the NEXT LDT neutralizer is consistent with that observed for long-life hollow cathodes. The neutralizer life-limiting failure modes are progressing as expected

  7. Single and multiple impact ignition of new and aged high explosives in the Steven Impact Test

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; DePiero, A H; Garza, R G; Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Threshold impact velocities for ignition of exothermic reaction were determined for several new and aged HMX-based solid high explosives using three types of projectiles in the Steven Test. Multiple impact threshold velocities were found to be approximately 10% lower in damaged charges that did not react in one or more prior impacts. Projectiles with protrusions that concentrate the friction work in a small volume of explosive reduced the threshold velocities by approximately 30%. Flat projectiles required nearly twice as high velocities for ignition as rounded projectiles. Blast overpressure gauges were used for both pristine and damaged charges to quantitatively measure reaction violence. Reactive flow calculations of single and multiple impacts with various projectiles suggest that the ignition rates double in damaged charges.

  8. Testing and simulation of composite laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xinglai

    Owing to their high stiffness-to-weight and high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite laminates are excellent materials for high-performance structures. However, their properties in the thickness direction are very poor as they are weakly bonded by polymeric matrices through laminate interfaces. Accordingly, when a composite laminate is subjected to impact loading, high interlaminar stresses along with the low interlaminar strengths could easily result in interlaminar damage such as delamination. This thesis investigated the response of composite laminates under low-velocity impact and presented numerical techniques for impact simulation. To begin with, instrumented drop-weight impacts ranging from subperforation to perforation levels were introduced to composite laminates having various dimensions and thicknesses. Damaged composite laminates were then subjected to compression-after-impact tests for evaluations of residual properties. Experimental results revealed that perforation was an important damage milestone since impact parameters such as peak force, contact duration, maximum deflection and energy absorption, and residual properties such as compressive stiffness, strength and energy absorption all reached critical levels as perforation took place. It was also found that thickness played a more important role than in-plane dimensions in perforation process. In order to understand more about the relationship between laminate thickness and perforation resistance and to present an economical method to improve perforation resistance, thick laminated composite plates and their assembled counterparts were investigated and compared. An energy profile correlating the impact energy and absorbed energy at all energy levels for each type of composite plates investigated was established and found to be able to address the relationship between energy and damage. Experimental results concluded that increasing thickness was more efficient

  9. Test report for 120-inch-diameter Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) model tests. [floating and towing characteristics of space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB's) will be jettisoned to impact in the ocean within a 200-mile radius of the launch site. Tests were conducted at Long Beach, California, using a 12-inch diameter Titan 3C model to simulate the full-scale characteristics of the prototype SRB during retrieval operations. The objectives of the towing tests were to investigate and assess the following: (1) a floating and towing characteristics of the SRB; (2) need for plugging the SRB nozzle prior to tow; (3) attach point locations on the SRB; (4) effects of varying the SRB configuration; (5) towing hardware; and (6) difficulty of attaching a tow line to the SRB in the open sea. The model was towed in various sea states using four different types and varying lengths of tow line at various speeds. Three attach point locations were tested. Test data was recorded on magnetic tape for the tow line loads and for model pitch, roll, and yaw characteristics and was reduced by computer to tabular printouts and X-Y plots. Profile and movie photography provided documentary test data.

  10. Estimating the Impacts of Educational Interventions Using State Tests or Study-Administered Tests. NCEE 2012-4016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert B.; Unlu, Fatih; Price, Cristofer; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the differences in impact estimates and standard errors that arise when these are derived using state achievement tests only (as pre-tests and post-tests), study-administered tests only, or some combination of state- and study-administered tests. State tests may yield different evaluation results relative to a test that is…

  11. Cycom 977-2 Composite Material: Impact Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen; Watkins, Casey

    2005-01-01

    The reaction frequency data from 13A testing by MSFC and WSTF appear well behaved for the sample number used by each and exhibit the same type of energy level dependency. The reaction frequency shift in energy level is unexplained at this time. All the 13A data suggest that only a small amount of material is consumed when reactions take place. At ambient pressure, most of not all reactions are quenched as indicated by the small mass loss. As test pressure is increased in LOX using 13B results. Cycom does not support initiation of reactions or propagations of reactions in GOX at 100 psis based on tests at MSFC and WSTF at 72 ft-lb impact energy. No batch effect was identified in LOX or GOX.

  12. Associations of hospital characteristics with nosocomial pneumonia after cardiac surgery can impact on standardized infection rates.

    PubMed

    Sanagou, M; Leder, K; Cheng, A C; Pilcher, D; Reid, C M; Wolfe, R

    2016-04-01

    To identify hospital-level factors associated with post-cardiac surgical pneumonia for assessing their impact on standardized infection rates (SIRs), we studied 43 691 patients in a cardiac surgery registry (2001-2011) in 16 hospitals. In a logistic regression model for pneumonia following cardiac surgery, associations with hospital characteristics were quantified with adjustment for patient characteristics while allowing for clustering of patients by hospital. Pneumonia rates varied from 0·7% to 12·4% across hospitals. Seventy percent of variability in the pneumonia rate was attributable to differences in hospitals in their long-term rates with the remainder attributable to within-hospital differences in rates over time. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the pneumonia rate was found to be higher in hospitals with more registered nurses (RNs)/100 intensive-care unit (ICU) admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·2, P = 0·006] and more RNs/available ICU beds (aOR 1·4, P < 0·001). Other hospital characteristics had no significant association with pneumonia. SIRs calculated on the basis of patient characteristics alone differed substantially from the same rates calculated on the basis of patient characteristics and the hospital characteristic of RNs/100 ICU admissions. Since SIRs using patient case-mix information are important for comparing rates between hospitals, the additional allowance for hospital characteristics can impact significantly on how hospitals compare. PMID:26449769

  13. Measurements and data analysis of suburban development impacts on runoff event characteristics and unit hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, Nora; Koivusalo, Harri

    2014-05-01

    Urbanisation strongly changes the catchment hydrological response to rainfall. Monitoring data on hydrological variables are most commonly available from rural and large areas, but less so from urban areas, and rarely from small catchments undergoing hydrological changes during the construction processes associated with urban development. Moreover, changes caused by urbanisation in the catchment hydrological response to snowmelt have not been widely studied. In this study, the changes occurring in runoff generation were monitored in a developing catchment under construction and in two urban control catchments. The developing catchment experienced extreme change from forest to a suburban residential area. The data used included rainfall and runoff observations from a five-year period (the years 2001-2006) with 2 to 10 minute temporal resolution. In total, 636 and 239 individual runoff events were investigated for summer and winter conditions, respectively. The changes occurring in runoff event characteristics such as event runoff volumes, peak flow rates, mean runoff intensities, and volumetric runoff coefficients were identified by the means of exploratory data analysis and nonparametric comparison tests (the Kruskall-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney tests). The effect of urbanization on event runoff dynamics was investigated using instantaneous unit hydrographs (IUH) based on a two-parameter gamma distribution. The measurements and data analyses demonstrated how the impact of urbanization on runoff was best detected based on peak flow rates, volumetric runoff coefficients, and mean runoff intensities. Control catchments were essential to distinguish the hydrological impact caused by catchment characteristics from those caused by changes in the meteorological conditions or season. As the imperviousness of the developing catchment increased from 1.5% to 37%, significant increases were observed in event runoff depths and peak flows during rainfall-runoff events. At the

  14. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Vance; Surovell, Todd; Johnson, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  15. A Blind Test of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Vance

    2016-01-01

    The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) states that North America was devastated by some sort of extraterrestrial event ~12,800 calendar years before present. Two fundamental questions persist in the debate over the YDIH: Can the results of analyses for purported impact indicators be reproduced? And are the indicators unique to the lower YD boundary (YDB), i.e., ~12.8k cal yrs BP? A test reported here presents the results of analyses that address these questions. Two different labs analyzed identical splits of samples collected at, above, and below the ~12.8ka zone at the Lubbock Lake archaeological site (LL) in northwest Texas. Both labs reported similar variation in levels of magnetic micrograins (>300 mg/kg >12.8ka and <11.5ka, but <150 mg/kg 12.8ka to 11.5ka). Analysis for magnetic microspheres in one split, reported elsewhere, produced very low to nonexistent levels throughout the section. In the other split, reported here, the levels of magnetic microspherules and nanodiamonds are low or nonexistent at, below, and above the YDB with the notable exception of a sample <11,500 cal years old. In that sample the claimed impact proxies were recovered at abundances two to four orders of magnitude above that from the other samples. Reproducibility of at least some analyses are problematic. In particular, no standard criteria exist for identification of magnetic spheres. Moreover, the purported impact proxies are not unique to the YDB. PMID:27391147

  16. Reconstruction of dynamic forces during impact tests of a crushable structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.; Davie, N.T.

    1993-12-31

    A force reconstruction technique is being used to assess the dynamic performance of a crushable structure (a bomb nose) in both the axial (90{degree}) and slapdown (30{degree}) impact conditions. The dynamic force characteristics for the current nose design, determined from these tests, will be used to write a dynamic force specification for a new nose design that will replace the current nose. Two structures for experimentally determining the dynamic force -- deflection characteristics of the old and new noses have been designed and constructed. One structure has the same dynamic characteristics as the bomb and is being used for axial and slapdown orientations with rocket-propelled testing. The second structure has the same mass as the bomb and is being used for iterative axial testing of candidate designs with a pneumatic ram. The structural characteristics of these two structures have been determined and are presented. A force reconstruction algorithm using the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) has been developed for each of the two structures. The force reconstruction algorithms have been verified for both structures using laboratory data. The force reconstruction process and the resulting algorithms are described. Data verifying the force reconstruction algorithms is presented.

  17. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-10-25

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  18. Impact of Laboratory Test Use Strategies in a Turkish Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Fatma Meriç; Kahveci, Rabia; Aksoy, Altan; Özer Kucuk, Emine; Akın, Tezcan; Mathew, Joseph Lazar; Meads, Catherine; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Eliminating unnecessary laboratory tests is a good way to reduce costs while maintain patient safety. The aim of this study was to define and process strategies to rationalize laboratory use in Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital (ANH) and calculate potential savings in costs. Methods A collaborative plan was defined by hospital managers; joint meetings with ANHTA and laboratory professors were set; the joint committee invited relevant staff for input, and a laboratory efficiency committee was created. Literature was reviewed systematically to identify strategies used to improve laboratory efficiency. Strategies that would be applicable in local settings were identified for implementation, processed, and the impact on clinical use and costs assessed for 12 months. Results Laboratory use in ANH differed enormously among clinics. Major use was identified in internal medicine. The mean number of tests per patient was 15.8. Unnecessary testing for chloride, folic acid, free prostate specific antigen, hepatitis and HIV testing were observed. Test panel use was pinpointed as the main cause of overuse of the laboratory and the Hospital Information System test ordering page was reorganized. A significant decrease (between 12.6–85.0%) was observed for the tests that were taken to an alternative page on the computer screen. The one year study saving was equivalent to 371,183 US dollars. Conclusion Hospital-based committees including laboratory professionals and clinicians can define hospital based problems and led to a standardized approach to test use that can help clinicians reduce laboratory costs through appropriate use of laboratory tests. PMID:27077653

  19. Video game addiction test: validity and psychometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Antonius J; Schoenmakers, Tim M; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M; Vermulst, Ad A; van de Mheen, Dike

    2012-09-01

    The study explores the reliability, validity, and measurement invariance of the Video game Addiction Test (VAT). Game-addiction problems are often linked to Internet enabled online games; the VAT has the unique benefit that it is theoretically and empirically linked to Internet addiction. The study used data (n=2,894) from a large-sample paper-and-pencil questionnaire study, conducted in 2009 on secondary schools in Netherlands. Thus, the main source of data was a large sample of schoolchildren (aged 13-16 years). Measurements included the proposed VAT, the Compulsive Internet Use Scale, weekly hours spent on various game types, and several psychosocial variables. The VAT demonstrated excellent reliability, excellent construct validity, a one-factor model fit, and a high degree of measurement invariance across gender, ethnicity, and learning year, indicating that the scale outcomes can be compared across different subgroups with little bias. In summary, the VAT can be helpful in the further study of video game addiction, and it contributes to the debate on possible inclusion of behavioral addictions in the upcoming DSM-V. PMID:22900926

  20. Comparison of Silicon Photomultiplier Characteristics using Automated Test Setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauß, B.; Brogna, A. S.; Büscher, V.; Chau, P.; Degele, R.; Geib, K. H.; Krause, S.; Liu, Y.; Schäfer, U.; Spreckels, R.; Tapprogge, S.; Wanke, R.; Weitzel, Q.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are photo-sensors consisting of an array of hundreds to thousands pixels with a typical pitch of 10-100 μm. They exhibit an excellent photon counting and time resolution. Therefore applications of SiPMs are emerging in many fields. In order to characterize SiPMs, the PRISMA Detector Lab at Mainz has established three automated test setups. Setup-A is dedicated to measure the gain, the dark count rate and the optical crosstalk probability. The temperature dependencies are characterized by operating the setup in a climate chamber. Setup-B is an optical system to measure the photon detection efficiency. Setup-C addresses the most challenging aspect of comparing SiPMs which is the uniformity of the active surface. Because of the small pixel size, a micro focus lens is attached to a picosecond laser diode to collimate the beam into the sub-structures of the sensors. A three-axis micro-positioning system moves the SiPMs into the focus of the laser spot and then automatically scans the active surfaces. In this paper we present the measurements of several SiPMs and compare their performance.

  1. The aerodynamic characteristics of eight very thick airfoils from tests in the variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N

    1932-01-01

    Report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on a group of eight very thick airfoils having sections of the same thickness as those used near the roots of tapered airfoils. The tests were made to study certain discontinuities in the characteristic curves that have been obtained from previous tests of these airfoils, and to compare the characteristics of the different sections at values of the Reynolds number comparable with those attained in flight. The discontinuities were found to disappear as the Reynolds number was increased. The results obtained from the large-scale airfoil, a symmetrical airfoil having a thickness ratio of 21 per cent, has the best general characteristics.

  2. Psychometric Characteristics of Single-Word Tests of Children's Speech Sound Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.; Ogiela, Diane A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our understanding of test construction has improved since the now-classic review by McCauley and Swisher (1984) . The current review article examines the psychometric characteristics of current single-word tests of speech sound production in an attempt to determine whether our tests have improved since then. It also provides a resource…

  3. How Close Is Close Enough? Testing Nonexperimental Estimates of Impact against Experimental Estimates of Impact with Education Test Scores as Outcomes. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Elizabeth Ty; Hollister, Robinson

    This study tested the performance of nonexperimental estimators of impacts applied to a class size reduction intervention with achievement test scores as the outcome. Nonexperimental estimates of impacts were compared to "true impact" estimates provided by a random-assignment design that assessed intervention effects. Data came from Project STAR,…

  4. How Close Is Close Enough? Testing Nonexperimental Estimates of Impact against Experimental Estimates of Impact with Education Test Scores as Outcomes. Discussion Paper No. 1242-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Elizabeth Ty; Hollister, Robinson

    2002-01-01

    In this study we test the performance of some nonexperimental estimators of impacts applied to an educational intervention--reduction in class size--where achievement test scores were the outcome. We compare the nonexperimental estimates of the impacts to "true impact" estimates provided by a random-assignment design used to assess the…

  5. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  6. Impact of polymer surface characteristics on the microrheological measurement quality of protein solutions - A tracer particle screening.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Katharina Christin; Schermeyer, Marie-Therese; Seidel, Jonathan; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-05-30

    Microrheological measurements prove to be suitable to identify rheological parameters of biopharmaceutical solutions. These give information about the flow characteristics but also about the interactions and network structures in protein solutions. For the microrheological measurement tracer particles are required. Due to their specific surface characteristic not all are suitable for reliable measurement results in biopharmaceutical systems. In the present work a screening of melamine, PMMA, polystyrene and surface modified polystyrene as tracer particles were investigated at various protein solution conditions. The surface characteristics of the screened tracer particles were evaluated by zeta potential measurements. Furthermore each tracer particle was used to determine the dynamic viscosity of lysozyme solutions by microrheology and compared to a standard. The results indicate that the selection of the tracer particle had a strong impact on the quality of the microrheological measurement dependent on pH and additive type. Surface modified polystyrene was the only tracer particle that yielded good microrheological results for all tested conditions. The study indicated that the electrostatic surface charge of the tracer particle had a minor impact than its hydrophobicity. This characteristic was the crucial surface property that needs to be considered for the selection of a suitable tracer particle to achieve high measurement accuracy. PMID:27025292

  7. Eddy current nondestructive testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample utilizing Walsh functions

    DOEpatents

    Libby, Hugo L.; Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    An eddy current testing device for measuring variable characteristics of a sample generates a signal which varies with variations in such characteristics. A signal expander samples at least a portion of this generated signal and expands the sampled signal on a selected basis of square waves or Walsh functions to produce a plurality of signal components representative of the sampled signal. A network combines these components to provide a display of at least one of the characteristics of the sample.

  8. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  9. Operational Characteristics of a One-Parameter Tailored Testing Procedure. Research Report 79-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patience, Wayne M.; Reckase, Mark D.

    An experiment was performed with computer-generated data to investigate some of the operational characteristics of tailored testing as they are related to various provisions of the computer program and item pool. With respect to the computer program, two characteristics were varied: the size of the step of increase or decrease in item difficulty…

  10. Phenomenological Characteristics, Social Problems, and the Economic Impact Associated with Chronic Skin Picking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors collected data on the demographic characteristics, phenomenology, and social and economic impact of skin picking. A total of 92 participants completed an anonymous, Internet-based survey through a link to the Trichotillomania Learning Center's home page. Results indicated that skin pickers experienced social,…

  11. Student Socioeconomic Characteristics: Spring 1984. First Phase of Fee-Impact Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field Research Corp., San Francisco, CA.

    In spring 1984, a study of the socioeconomic characteristics of California's community college students was conducted in order to determine the impact of a recently imposed mandatory fee as measured by changes in student ethnicity, income, and academic load. A stratified random sample of 10,247 students from 62 of the state's 105 community…

  12. The Impact of Gender Characteristics on Mentoring in Graduate Departments of Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dua, Priya

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research on gender inequality in graduate education and the benefits of mentoring. However, most of this research focuses on how mentoring addresses female graduate students' experiences of gender inequality instead of how the gender characteristics of departments impact the level of mentoring they offer. In particular, I…

  13. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog

    2013-07-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  14. Controlled Impact Demonstration instrumented test dummies installed in plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In this photograph are seen some of dummies in the passenger cabin of the B-720 aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center instrumented a large portion of the aircraft and the dummies for loads in a crashworthiness research program. In 1984 NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and the Federal Aviation Adimistration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID). The test involved crashing a Boeing 720 aircraft with four JT3C-7 engines burning a mixture of standard fuel with an additive called Anti-misting Kerosene (AMK) designed to supress fire. In a typical aircraft crash, fuel spilled from ruptured fuel tanks forms a fine mist that can be ignited by a number of sources at the crash site. In 1984 the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994 a full-fledged Center again) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), to test crash a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with an additive designed to supress fire. The additive, FM-9, a high-molecular-weight long-chain polymer, when blended with Jet-A fuel had demonstrated the capability to inhibit ignition and flame propagation of the released fuel in simulated crash tests. This anti-misting kerosene (AMK) cannot be introduced directly into a gas turbine engine due to several possible problems such as clogging of filters. The AMK must be restored to almost Jet-A before being introduced into the engine for burning. This restoration is called 'degradation' and was accomplished on the B-720 using a device called a 'degrader.' Each of the four Pratt & Whitney JT3C-7 engines had a 'degrader' built and installed by General Electric (GE) to break down and return the AMK to near Jet-A quality. In addition to the AMK research the NASA Langley Research Center was involved in a structural loads measurement experiment, which included having instrumented dummies filling the seats in the

  15. Comparison of Autogenous and Alloplastic Cranioplasty Materials Following Impact Testing.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert D; Salt, Craig; Konofaos, Petros

    2015-07-01

    Alloplastic materials are often used when significant defects exist. Benefits include no donor site morbidity, relative ease of use, limitless supply, and predictable durability. Depending on the type of alloplast, limitations include a persistent risk of extrusion and infection. Of particular interest in relation to cranioplasties is the ability of the material to provide neuroprotection. The integrity and neuroprotective properties of autologous bone flaps, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and high-density porous polyethylene (PP) were evaluated following impact testing. Three groups of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) underwent a cranioplasty with either a bone flap, PMMA, or PP. In the control group (N = 4), the animals had no cranioplasty. At the end of the eighth week, an impact was delivered to the center of each cranioplasty. At necropsy each cranium and brain was evaluated grossly and histologically. There was a statistical significant difference among groups for the severity of the hemorrhage (P = 0.022) and the grade of cranioplasty disruption (P = 0.0045). Autologous bone was found to be the weakest of the materials tested. In this group severe injury resulted at much lower energy levels than was observed in the control, PMMA, or PP groups. Both PMMA and PP were resistant to fracture and disruption. PMMA provided the greatest neuroprotection, followed by PP. Autologous bone provided the least protection with cranioplasty disruption and severe brain injury occurring in every patient. Brain injury patterns correlated with the degree of cranioplasty disruption regardless of the cranioplasty material. Regardless of the energy of impact, lack of dislodgement generally resulted in no obvious brain injury. PMID:26114508

  16. Crushable structure performance determined from reconstructed dynamic forces during impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    A force reconstruction technique has been used to assess the dynamic performance of a crushable structure (a bomb nose) in both the axial (90{degrees}) and slapdown (30{degrees}) impact conditions. The dynamic force characteristics for the nose design, determined from these test results, have been used to write a dynamic force specification for a new nose design that will replace the old nose. The dynamic forces are reconstructed from measured acceleration responses with the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Axial characterizations for the old nose are presented from tests at two SNL facilities: a rocket rail launcher facility and an 18-Inch horizontal actuator facility. The characterizations for the old nose are compared to the characterizations for two new nose designs. Slapdown characterizations for the old nose are presented. Incorporation of the test results into a dynamic force specification is discussed.

  17. Force reconstruction for impact tests of an energy-absorbing nose

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Garne, T.G.; McCall, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Delivery of a bomb into hard targets at speeds of up to 120 fps required the design of an energy-absorbing nose. The purpose of the nose is to decelerate the projectile and, by absorbing the kinetic energy with deformation, protect the projectile's internal components from high-level (shock) decelerations. A structural simulation of the projectile was designed to test the dynamic deformation characteristics of the energy-absorbing nose. The simulated projectile was instrumented with eight accelerometers mounted with a shock isolation technique. The dynamic force as a function of nose deformation was the desired result from the impact tests because it provides the designer with a performance criterion for the nose design. The dynamic force was obtained by combining the accelerations using the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). Results from two field tests are presented. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Vaccination Programs for Endemic Infections: Modelling Real versus Apparent Impacts of Vaccine and Infection Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragonnet, Romain; Trauer, James M.; Denholm, Justin T.; Geard, Nicholas L.; Hellard, Margaret; McBryde, Emma S.

    2015-10-01

    Vaccine effect, as measured in clinical trials, may not accurately reflect population-level impact. Furthermore, little is known about how sensitive apparent or real vaccine impacts are to factors such as the risk of re-infection or the mechanism of protection. We present a dynamic compartmental model to simulate vaccination for endemic infections. Several measures of effectiveness are calculated to compare the real and apparent impact of vaccination, and assess the effect of a range of infection and vaccine characteristics on these measures. Although broadly correlated, measures of real and apparent vaccine effectiveness can differ widely. Vaccine impact is markedly underestimated when primary infection provides partial natural immunity, when coverage is high and when post-vaccination infectiousness is reduced. Despite equivalent efficacy, ‘all or nothing’ vaccines are more effective than ‘leaky’ vaccines, particularly in settings with high risk of re-infection and transmissibility. Latent periods result in greater real impacts when risk of re-infection is high, but this effect diminishes if partial natural immunity is assumed. Assessments of population-level vaccine effects against endemic infections from clinical trials may be significantly biased, and vaccine and infection characteristics should be considered when modelling outcomes of vaccination programs, as their impact may be dramatic.

  19. Vaccination Programs for Endemic Infections: Modelling Real versus Apparent Impacts of Vaccine and Infection Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ragonnet, Romain; Trauer, James M.; Denholm, Justin T.; Geard, Nicholas L.; Hellard, Margaret; McBryde, Emma S.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine effect, as measured in clinical trials, may not accurately reflect population-level impact. Furthermore, little is known about how sensitive apparent or real vaccine impacts are to factors such as the risk of re-infection or the mechanism of protection. We present a dynamic compartmental model to simulate vaccination for endemic infections. Several measures of effectiveness are calculated to compare the real and apparent impact of vaccination, and assess the effect of a range of infection and vaccine characteristics on these measures. Although broadly correlated, measures of real and apparent vaccine effectiveness can differ widely. Vaccine impact is markedly underestimated when primary infection provides partial natural immunity, when coverage is high and when post-vaccination infectiousness is reduced. Despite equivalent efficacy, ‘all or nothing’ vaccines are more effective than ‘leaky’ vaccines, particularly in settings with high risk of re-infection and transmissibility. Latent periods result in greater real impacts when risk of re-infection is high, but this effect diminishes if partial natural immunity is assumed. Assessments of population-level vaccine effects against endemic infections from clinical trials may be significantly biased, and vaccine and infection characteristics should be considered when modelling outcomes of vaccination programs, as their impact may be dramatic. PMID:26482413

  20. Patient versus Provider Characteristics Impacting Hospital Lengths of Stay Following Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Styron, Joseph F.; Koroukian, Siran; Klika, Alison; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient’s length of stay in the acute care hospital. Materials and Methods A dataset containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multi-level linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient- and provider-level characteristics on patients’ lengths of stay. Results The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher co-morbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Discussion Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  1. Patient vs provider characteristics impacting hospital lengths of stay after total knee or hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Koroukian, Siran M; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. A data set containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multilevel linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient-level and provider-level characteristics on patients' lengths of stay. The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher comorbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  2. Effects of School Characteristics upon Achievement Test Scores in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William J., Jr.

    The effects of school characteristics upon achievement test scores in New York State were studied. Data, composed of the 1975-76 Consolidated Data Base and Finance Tapes for all 705 school districts in the state, were supplied by the New York State Department of Education. Among the 24 variables of interest were: state pupil evaluation tests of…

  3. Me and My Environment Formative Evaluation Report 1. Arranging Field Tests: Characteristics of Sites and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Joe M.

    The first in a series of evaluation reports gives characteristics of sites and approximately 500 students in field tests of Me and My Environment, a 3-year life science curriculum for 13- to 16-year-old educable mentally handicapped (EMH) adolescents. Described are the field test design, which involves 14 data gathering approaches, and the…

  4. Cyclic Material Properties Test to Determine Hardening/Softening Characteristics of HY-80 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Hodge; J.M. Minicucci; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-30

    The Cyclic Material Properties Test was structured to obtain and provide experimental data for determining cyclic hardening/softening characteristics of HY-80 steel. The inelastic strain history data generated by this test program and the resulting cyclic stress-strain curve will be used to enhance material models in the finite element codes used to perform nonlinear elastic-plastic analysis.

  5. Psychometric Characteristics Associated with Changes on the Passage Comprehension Test of the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpin, Gerald; Simpson, Robert

    Forty adolescent subjects with behavior problems at home or at school were administered the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests. Subjects ranged in age from 12 to 18, and included 25 males and 15 females. The Passage Comprehension Test for each subject was rescored using three different ceiling criteria: (1) five errors in six consecutive responses,…

  6. Characteristics of capacitor-type micrometeoroid flux detectors when impacted with simulated micrometeoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassel, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A series of impact tests are described and data presented which characterize the operation of the capacitor-type micrometeoroid flux detectors used on the Meteoroid Technology Satellite (MTS). Capacitor-type detectors with silicon dioxide dielectric thickness of 0.4 and 1.0 microns were tested in the micrometeoroid impact simulator at the Langley Research Center, a 4-MV Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator. The carbonyl iron projectiles were from 0.5 to 5.0 microns in diameter with velocities from 4 to 10.0 km/sec. The detector bias voltage was varied from -20 to -60 V; some tests were at detector temperatures of 90 C to -100 C; and the angle of impact varied from 0 deg to 75 deg from the normal to the detector. These tests showed that: (1) the detector operation is reliable when the bias voltage is greater than 30 V; (2) after an impact the detector returns to its original condition with an insignificant loss of active area; and (3) the sensitivity of the detector is inversely proportional to the detector thickness. The test results suggest a theoretical model in which the signal is an arc triggered by the impacting projectile, and the detector bias voltage must be high enough to insure that an arc will form.

  7. Compression After Impact Testing of Sandwich Structures Using the Four Point Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Gregory, Elizabeth; Jackson, Justin; Kenworthy, Devon

    2008-01-01

    For many composite laminated structures, the design is driven by data obtained from Compression after Impact (CAI) testing. There currently is no standard for CAI testing of sandwich structures although there is one for solid laminates of a certain thickness and lay-up configuration. Most sandwich CAI testing has followed the basic technique of this standard where the loaded ends are precision machined and placed between two platens and compressed until failure. If little or no damage is present during the compression tests, the loaded ends may need to be potted to prevent end brooming. By putting a sandwich beam in a four point bend configuration, the region between the inner supports is put under a compressive load and a sandwich laminate with damage can be tested in this manner without the need for precision machining. Also, specimens with no damage can be taken to failure so direct comparisons between damaged and undamaged strength can be made. Data is presented that demonstrates the four point bend CAI test and is compared with end loaded compression tests of the same sandwich structure.

  8. Experimental investigation and test on the radiation characteristics of the infrared-strengthened equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qirang; Bu, Man

    1992-02-01

    The infrared radiation characteristics of IR-strengthened equipment (ISE) fixed on a target drone have been tested using on-the-spot measurements of ISE as a point source taken for different structures and ground states. The instruments and their combination in the IR test system are briefly described, and experimental methods are presented for testing the following ISE IR radiation characteristics: IR spectrum characteristics, the distribution of IR energy with respect to time and space, and the effective radiation intensity under manifold working states. The results indicate that the data have good repetitiveness and the parameters have very close correlativity. A test system and method used to develop new kinds of IR radiation sources are described.

  9. Current status of small specimen technology in Charpy impact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurishita, H.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.; Yamazaki, M.

    1994-09-01

    The current status of small-scale specimen technology in Charpy impact testing for ferritic steels is presented, with emphasis on the effect of the notch dimensions (notch depth, notch root radius and notch angle) on the upper shelf energy (USE) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb2 or ( Bb{3}/{2} ( B is the specimen thickness, b the ligament size), is essentially independent of notch geometry and has a linear relationship with the USE of full size specimens, regardless of irradiation and alloy conditions. The DBTT of miniaturized specimens depends strongly on the notch dimensions; this dependence of the DBTT decreases as the DBTT of full size specimens increase due to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. These results may be useful in determining the USE and DBTT for full size specimens from those for miniaturized specimens.

  10. IMPROVED BAR IMPACT TESTS USING A PHOTONIC DOPPLER VELOCIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S J; Tolman, J; Levinson, S; Nguyen, J

    2009-08-24

    Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression, and the 'steady state' strength. For borosilicate glass and soda lime glass, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic (25% spinel) was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic, as opposed to intrinsic property.

  11. IMPROVED BAR IMPACT TESTS USING A PHOTONIC DOPPLER VELOCIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S. J.; Tolman, J.; Levinson, S.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-12-28

    Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and a glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression, and the 'steady state' strength. For borosilicate glass and soda lime glass, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic (25% spinel) was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic, as opposed to intrinsic property.

  12. RTM370 Polyimide Braided Composites: Characterization and Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Criss, Jim M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    RTM370 imide oligomer based on 2,3,3',4'-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA) and terminated with the 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has been shown to exhibit a low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h and a high cured glass transition temperature (Tg) of 370 C. RTM370 resin has been successfully fabricated into composites reinforced with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM). RTM370 composites display excellent mechanical properties up to 327 C (620 F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288degC (550 F) for 1000 h, and under hot-wet conditions. In ballistic impact testing, RTM370 triaxial braided T650-35 carbon fiber composites exhibited enhanced energy absorption at 288 C (550 F) compared to ambient temperature.

  13. The effect of low velocity impact on the strength characteristics of composite materials laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear and dynamic response of composite structures to impact loading conditions was investigated. The convergence of both finite element and finite difference solution procedures was investigated with this configuration. The response of composite beams and plates to impact were examined. Fundamental data on the indentation and flexural response of both plate and beam geometry were collected. Numerical analyses were extended to the study of circular plates subjected to impact loading. Further work was done in modeling the response to simulated impact loading through careful modeling of the momentum transfer from impactor to target. The modeling methodology and solution procedures were well tested and verified. A computer program for the solution of circular plate problems was developed and is under testing.

  14. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  15. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Report Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-04-09

    This Engineering Test report outlines the results obtained from testing polyurea on its decon factor, tank waste compatibility, and adhesion strength when subjected to a high level of gamma radiation. This report is used in conjunction with RPP-7187 Project W-314 Pit Coatings Repair Requirements Analysis, to document the fact polyurea meets the project W-314 requirements contained in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-005 and is therefore an acceptable SPC for use in W-314 pit refurbishments.

  16. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  17. Impact characteristics of a vehicle population in low speed front to rear collisions.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoya; Simms, Ciaran K; Wood, Denis P

    2015-06-01

    Rear impact collisions are mostly low severity, but carry a very high societal cost due to reported symptoms of whiplash and related soft tissue injuries. Given the difficulty in physiological measurement of damage in whiplash patients, there is a significant need to assess rear impact severity on the basis of vehicle damage. This paper presents fundamental impact equations on the basis of an equivalent single vehicle to rigid barrier collision in order to predict relationships between impact speed, maximum dynamic crush, mean and peak acceleration, time to common velocity and vehicle stiffness. These are then applied in regression analysis of published staged low speed rear impact tests. The equivalent mean and peak accelerations are linear functions of the collision closing speed, while the time to common velocity is independent of the collision closing speed. Furthermore, the time to common velocity can be used as a surrogate measure of the normalized vehicle stiffness, which provides opportunity for future accident reconstruction. PMID:25795922

  18. Coastal oceanographic characteristics and their impact on marine effluent biotoxicity studies during the SEFLOE II project

    SciTech Connect

    Commons, D.N.; Proni, J.R.; Fergen, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Southeast Florida Outfall Experiment II (SEFLOE II) study was conducted at four ocean outfalls to determine the dispersion characteristics and biotoxicity of their effluent in the coastal ocean. The effluent from these facilities is secondary treated municipal wastewater. This paper deals with the impact of coastal oceanographic characteristics upon the biotoxicity aspect of the SEFLOE II study on data collected at the Broward County outfall. During the study, whole effluent toxicity (WET) bioassays were compared to bioassays analyzed on samples taken from the outfall dispersion plumes. The ocean bioassays results were then evaluated along with contemporaneous current direction and speed data to determine initial and farfield dilutions and calculate Eularian and Lagrangian exposure impacts. The bioassay comparison appears to indicate that standard WET methodology does not adequately take into consideration the substantial differences in dilution ratios and exposure times used in laboratory analyses with those experienced in actual environmental field conditions especially for ocean outfalls.

  19. Impact of helio-and geophysical disturbances on thermobaric and climatic characteristics of the Earth's troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, G. A.; Kovalenko, V. A.; Molodykh, S. I.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Vasil'Eva, L. A.

    2008-08-01

    We present the mechanism and the concept of a model of the solar activity impact on thermobaric and climatic characteristics of the troposphere. Both are based on the idea of parametric action. The results of analysis are presented concerning specific features and regularities of changes in temperature regime of the troposphere in the period of variable helio-and geophysical activity, as well as long-term variations of temperature and heat content of the troposphere. The influence of changes in circulation in the atmosphere and ocean on processes in the system atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere is considered: thermohaline circulation of the oceans and energy exchange between the atmosphere and ocean. The revealed regularities find their complete explanation within the context of a model and mechanism of solar activity impact on climatic characteristics of the troposphere that were suggested previously by the authors.

  20. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  1. Characteristics of aeroelastic instabilities in turbomachinery - NASA full scale engine test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Several aeromechanical programs have been conducted in the NASA/USAF Joint Engine System Research Programs. The scope of these programs, the instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction, and the test results are discussed. Data pertinent to four different instabilities were acquired; two types of stall flutter, choke flutter and a system mode instability. The data indicates that each instability has its own unique characteristics. These characteristics are described.

  2. Characteristics of aeroelastic instabilities in turbomachinery - NASA full scale engine test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Several aeromechanical programs were conducted in the NASA/USAF Joint Engine System Research Programs. The scope of these programs, the instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction, and the test results are discussed. Data pertinent to four different instabilities were acquired; two types of stall flutter, choke flutter and a system mode instability. The data indicates that each instability has its own unique characteristics. These characteristics are described.

  3. Methods for data reduction and loads analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster model water impact tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The methodology used to predict full scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) water impact loads from scale model test data is described. Tests conducted included 12.5 inch and 120 inch diameter models of the SRB. Geometry and mass characteristics of the models were varied in each test series to reflect the current SRB baseline configuration. Nose first and tail first water entry modes were investigated with full-scale initial impact vertical velocities of 40 to 120 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 60 ft/sec., and off-vertical angles of 0 to plus or minus 30 degrees. The test program included a series of tests with scaled atmospheric pressure.

  4. HIV testing among MSM in Bogotá, Colombia: The role of structural and individual characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Poppen, Paul J.; del Río González, Ana Maria; Romero, Rodrigo A. Aguayo; Pérez, Carolin

    2014-01-01

    This study used mixed methods to examine characteristics related to HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Bogotá, Colombia. A sample of 890 MSM responded to a computerized quantitative survey. Follow-up qualitative data included 20 in-depth interviews with MSM and 12 key informant interviews. Hierarchical logistic set regression indicated that sequential sets of variables reflecting demographic characteristics, insurance coverage, risk appraisal, and social context each added to the explanation of HIV testing. Follow-up logistic regression showed that individuals who were older, had higher income, paid for their own insurance, had had a sexually transmitted infection, knew more people living with HIV, and had greater social support were more likely to have been tested for HIV at least once. Qualitative findings provided details of personal and structural barriers to testing, as well as interrelationships among these factors. Recommendations to increase HIV testing among Colombian MSM are offered. PMID:25068180

  5. Human impact on the Middle and Late Holocene floodplain sediment characteristics along the River Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Prins, M.; Toonen, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Rhine catchment has an extensive history of human land use. Deforestation to create arable land started as early as 6300 cal BP, at the onset of the Late Neolithic. This caused increased erosion and sediment production on the hillslopes in the upstream part of the fluvial system. Recent studies show that this human-induced erosion also increased the suspended load sedimentation rates in the Rhine trunk valley and delta from approximately 3000 years ago. Besides such changes in the quantity of fine sediment, it is hypothesised that human land use may also change the source of the sediment supplied to the fluvial system. Sediment released by erosion during agricultural practises may be different than the sediments that erode under conditions of forest cover. If this is true, the Late Holocene floodplain sediments have different characteristics in terms of grain size and texture than older floodplain deposits (Middle Holocene). To test this, we collected 15 cores from three large stretches along the trunk Rhine River: the Upper Rhine Graben, the Lower Rhine Valley, and the Rhine Delta. Using detailed palaeogeographic reconstructions of the area, the cores were carefully selected in order to (i) to obtain the longest possible record (preferably up to 5000 years), and (ii) to have a continuous sedimentation record as much as possible. Cores are taken from residual channels, and distal flood basin and plains, although very distal sites were avoided to minimise the amount of peat or soil formation. Individual age-depth models are derived from radiocarbon dates taken in the cores, correlation of the regional deposits with a known age, and by using groundwater models (in the delta). Grain size characteristics of the siliciclastic sediment fraction were analysed every 2-5 cm, which yielded a record of grain size variations of the floodplains depositions in time. Using the end-member modelling algorithm EMMA it was possible to distinguish different groups of sediment

  6. Damage Characteristics of the Logical Chip Module Due to Plasma Created by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Enling; Wu, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lijiao; Xiang, Shenghai; Xia, Jin; Liu, Shuhua; He, Liping; Han, Yafei; Xu, Mingyang; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Jianfei

    2016-04-01

    To researching the damage characteristics of typical logical chip modules in spacecraft due to plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts, we have established a triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and a logical chips measurement system, which were used to diagnose plasma characteristic parameters and the logical chip module's logical state changes due to the plasma created by a 7075 aluminum projectile hypervelocity impact on the 2A12 aluminum target. Three sets of experiments were performed with the collision speeds of 2.85 km/s, 3.1 km/s and 2.20 km/s, at the same incident angles of 30 degrees and logical chip module's positions by using a two-stage light gas gun loading system, a plasma characteristic parameters diagnostic system and a logical chip module's logical state measurement system, respectively. Electron temperature and density were measured at given position and azimuth, and damage estimation was performed for the logical chip module by using the data acquisition system. Experimental results showed that temporary damage could be induced on logical chip modules in spacecraft by plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts under the given experimental conditions and the sensors' position and azimuth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10972145, 11272218, 11472178), Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University of China (No. LR2013008), Open Foundation of Key Laboratory of Liaoning Weapon Science and Technology, Liaoning Province Talents Engineering Projects of China (No. 2012921044)

  7. A retrospective study of characteristics of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth in 110 patients treated in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Guthua, S W; Mwaniki, D L

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of 110 records of patients who presented with impacted mandibular 3rd molars was carried out to determine the frequency of occurrence of unilateral and bilateral impactions and their characteristics. 68.2% of the patients had bilateral impactions. Among the patients with bilateral impactions, 72% had mesioangular impaction occurring either bilaterally or in combination with other types of impaction. Furthermore, 38.7% mesioangular impactions were observed on the right and left sides in the patients with bilateral impactions. Among the patients with unilateral impactions 40.2% presented with mesioangular impaction, while 25.7% presented with distoangular impactions. While these observations support the general consensus regarding aetiology of mandibular 3rd molar impactions as being tooth-tissue discrepancy, the possible influence of other factors is suggested. PMID:1344275

  8. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  9. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  10. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  11. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  12. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  13. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  14. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  15. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  16. Ubiquitous testing using tablets: its impact on medical student perceptions of and engagement in learning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ubiquitous testing has the potential to affect medical education by enhancing the authenticity of the assessment using multimedia items. This study explored medical students’ experience with ubiquitous testing and its impact on student learning. Methods: A cohort (n=48) of third-year students at a medical school in South Korea participated in this study. The students were divided into two groups and were given different versions of 10 content-matched items: one in text version (the text group) and the other in multimedia version (the multimedia group). Multimedia items were delivered using tablets. Item response analyses were performed to compare item characteristics between the two versions. Additionally, focus group interviews were held to investigate the students’ experiences of ubiquitous testing. Results: The mean test score was significantly higher in the text group. Item difficulty and discrimination did not differ between text and multimedia items. The participants generally showed positive responses on ubiquitous testing. Still, they felt that the lectures that they had taken in preclinical years did not prepare them enough for this type of assessment and clinical encounters during clerkships were more helpful. To be better prepared, the participants felt that they needed to engage more actively in learning in clinical clerkships and have more access to multimedia learning resources. Conclusion: Ubiquitous testing can positively affect student learning by reinforcing the importance of being able to understand and apply knowledge in clinical contexts, which drives students to engage more actively in learning in clinical settings. PMID:26838569

  17. Tests to evaluate the ecological impact of treated ballast water on three Chinese marine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Zixi; Cai, Leiming; Cai, Xiang; Sun, Wenjun; Ma, Liqing

    2014-09-01

    Ballast water has been a topic of concern for some time because of its potential to introduce invasive species to new habitats. To comply with the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, members of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) must equip their ships with on-board treatment systems to eliminate organism release with ballast water. There are many challenges associated with the implementation of this IMO guideline, one of which is the selection of species for testing the ecological impacts of the treated ballast water. In the United States, ballast water toxicity test methods have been defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. However, the test methods had not been finalized in China until the toxicity test methods for ballast water were established in 2008. The Chinese methods have been based on species from three trophic levels: Skeletonema costatum, Neomysis awatschensis, and Ctenogobius gymnauchen. All three species live in broad estuarine and open sea areas of China; they are sensitive to reference toxicants and acclimatize easily to different conditions. In this paper, the biological characteristics, test processes and statistical analysis methods are presented for the three species. Results indicate that the methods for evaluating these three organisms can be included in the ecological toxicity tests for treated ballast water in China.

  18. [Citation characteristics of German authors in "Der Chirurg": hegemony of the impact factor].

    PubMed

    Hasse, W; Fischer, R J

    2010-04-01

    Characteristics of citation and language in publications of German authors from the journal "Der Chirurg" (vol 78, 2007) were analysed. Out of a total of 3,342 citations, 756 (22.62%) were from German authors with 248 (32.8) self-citations. The hegemony of the impact factor in science, research and education is critically discussed. The imbalance between the number of surgeons in the US and United Kingdom (66,032) and surgeons in the German speaking countries in Europe (25,300) is compared with respect to the counting methods used to create the impact factor of a journal. The creation of an independent impact factor in Europe and the development of an EU-based citation data bank which allows unselected access to national language scientific literature are strongly needed. PMID:19760378

  19. An in-pile testing program to study the performance characteristics of coated particle fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.A. )

    1993-01-15

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in testing coated particle nuclear fuels for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program managed by Phillips Laboratory. The testing program integrates the results of numerous in-pile and out-of-pile tests with modeling efforts to qualify fuel and fuel elements for the SNTP program. This paper briefly describes the capabilities of the Annular Core Research Reactor (in which the experiments are performed), the major in-pile tests, and the models used to determine the performance characteristics of the fuel and fuel elements.

  20. An in-pile testing program to study the performance characteristics of coated particle fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in testing coated particle nuclear fuels for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program managed by Phillips Laboratory. The testing program integrates the results of numerous in-pile and out-of-pile tests with modeling efforts to qualify fuel and fuel elements for the SNTP program. This paper briefly describes the capabilities of the Annular Core Research Reactor (in which the experiments are performed), the major in-pile tests, and the models used to determine the performance characteristics of the fuel and fuel elements. 6 refs.

  1. Study on electromagnetic radiation and mechanical characteristics of coal during an SHPB test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengwu, Li; Qifei, Wang; Pingyang, Lyu

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic loads provided by a Split Hopkinson pressure bar are applied in the impact failure experiment on coal with an impact velocity of 4.174–17.652 m s‑1. The mechanical property characteristics of coal and an electromagnetic radiation signal can be detected and measured during the experiment. The variation of coal stress, strain, incident energy, dissipated energy and other mechanical parameters are analyzed by the unidimensional stress wave theory. It suggests that with an increase of the impact velocity, the mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation increased significantly and the dissipated energy of the coal sample has a high discrete growing trend during the failure process of coal impact. Combined with the received energy of the electromagnetic radiation signal, the relationship between these mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation during the failure process of coal burst could be analyzed by the grey correlation model. The results show that the descending order of the gray correlation degree between the mechanical characteristics and electromagnetic radiation energy are impact velocity, maximum stress, the average stress, incident energy, the average strain, maximum strain, the average strain rate and dissipation energy. Due to the correlation degree, the impact velocity and incident energy are relatively large, and the main factor affecting the electromagnetic radiation energy of coal is the energy magnitude. While the relationship between extreme stress and the radiation energy change trend is closed, the stress state of coal has a greater impact on electromagnetic radiation than the strain and destruction which can deepen the research of the coal-rock dynamic disaster electromagnetic monitoring technique.

  2. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program's goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia's Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  3. The mineralogical, chemical, and chronological characteristics of the crystalline Apollo 16 impact melt rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimold, W. U.; Reimold, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative review of mineralogical, chemical, and chronological data on crystalline Apollo 16 impact melt rocks is presented. The use of such data to identify distinct impact melt complex is discussed, and 22 distinct impact melt bodies are identified. The recently detected group of feldspathic microporphyritic (FM) melt rocks was tested for chemical and isotopic homogeneity; instrumental neutron activation analysis and new Rb-Sr isotopic whole rock data indicate that FMs were probably not derived from a single impact melt sheet, but might be representative of the Descartes basement. Stratigraphical and chronological concepts for the geological development of the landing site are discussed, and a model is presented for the formation of the Cayley Plains and the Descartes formation.

  4. Test characteristics from latent-class models of the California Mastitis Test.

    PubMed

    Sanford, C J; Keefe, G P; Sanchez, J; Dingwell, R T; Barkema, H W; Leslie, K E; Dohoo, I R

    2006-11-17

    We evaluated (using latent-class models) the ability of the California Mastitis Test (CMT) to identify cows with intramammary infections on the day of dry-off. The positive and negative predictive values of this test to identify cows requiring dry-cow antibiotics (i.e. infected) was also assessed. We used 752 Holstein-Friesian cows from 11 herds for this investigation. Milk samples were collected for bacteriology, and the CMT was performed cow-side, prior to milking on the day of dry-off. At the cow-level, the sensitivity and specificity of the CMT (using the four quarter results interpreted in parallel) for identifying all pathogens were estimated at 70 and 48%, respectively. If only major pathogens were considered the sensitivity of the CMT increased to 86%. The negative predictive value of the CMT was >95% for herds with major-pathogen intramammary-infection prevalence <15%, so that selective dry-cow therapy might be reasonable for such herds if cows were screened with the CMT. PMID:16876270

  5. Disruptiveness, Friends' Characteristics, and Delinquency in Early Adolescence: A Test of Two Competing Models of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E.; Kerr, Margaret; Pagani, Linda; Bukowski, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Tested the individual characteristics and deviant peer association theoretical models of friends' influence on the development of delinquency in disruptive boys. Found that moderately disruptive boys with aggressive-disturbing friends were more delinquent at age 13 than other subgroups of moderately disruptive boys. Highly disruptive and…

  6. The Effects of Diverse Test Score Distribution Characteristics on the Estimation of the Rasch Measurement Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cypress, Beulah K.

    The potential of the Rasch model to develop scores, on a ratio scale, suitable for interindividual comparisons, from intact groups with disparate distribution characteristics was investigated. The specific problems studied were: (1) the effects of skewed test score distributions on the ability parameter of the Rasch measurement model; (2) the…

  7. Selected Socioeconomic Characteristics of Farmers Associated with the Use of Soil Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Harold R.

    A study was conducted to determine whether a relationship exists between several selected socioeconomic characteristics and the adoption or non-adoption of soil testing as a farm management tool and to establish whether or not a statistically significant relationship exists between adopters and imperfect adopters (discontinuers). Data were…

  8. Impact of Wettability on Pore-Scale Characteristics of Residual Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Raoush, Riyadh I.

    2009-07-31

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the impact of wettability of porous media on pore-scale characteristics of residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of fractionally wet sand systems with mean grain size of 250 {micro}m. Pore-scale characteristics of NAPL blobs such as volume, lengths, interfacial areas, and sphericity index were computed using three-dimensional image processing algorithms. Four systems comprised of 100, 50, 25, and 0% NAPL-wet mass fractions containing the residual NAPL were imaged and analyzed. Findings indicate that spatial variation in wettability of porous media surfaces has a significant impact on pore-scale characteristics of residual NAPL blobs in saturated porous media systems. As the porous media comprises more water-wet surfaces, residual NAPL blobs increase in size and length due to the entrapment at large pore bodies. NAPL-water interfacial areas tend to increase as the NAPL-wet surface fractions increase in the systems. Overall residual NAPL saturations are less in fractionally wet systems and increase as the systems become more NAPL-wet or water-wet.

  9. The Impact of Prematriculation Admission Characteristics on Graduation Rates in an Accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of admission characteristics on graduation in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Methods. Selected prematriculation characteristics of students entering the graduation class years of 2009-2012 on the Worcester and Manchester campuses of MCPHS University were analyzed and compared for on-time graduation. Results. Eighty-two percent of evaluated students (699 of 852) graduated on time. Students who were most likely to graduate on-time attended a 4-year school, previously earned a bachelor’s degree, had an overall prematriculation grade point average (GPA) greater than or equal to 3.6, and graduated in the spring just prior to matriculating to the university. Factors that reduced the likelihood of graduating on time were also identified. Work experience had a marginal impact on graduating on time. Conclusion. Although there is no certainty in college admission decisions, prematriculation characteristics can help predict the likelihood for academic success of students in an accelerated PharmD program. PMID:26689686

  10. Effects of powder characteristics on impact initiated combustion in aluminum powder compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenich, Jennifer; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    The processes leading to the initiation of impact induced combustion in aluminum powder compacts under uniaxial stress loading are investigated as a function of different powder characteristics. The mechanistic processes leading to reaction initiation in the Al samples are investigated via high speed and IR imaging of light associated with the reaction. Compacts composed of larger size particles of aluminum (approximately 70(μm) are shown to be more sensitive to impact initiated combustion than those composed of smaller particle sizes. Mechanical pre-activation by high energy ball milling (HEBM) of the Al powders shows increased reactivity. Images captured during compaction and deformation, revealing light emission, are correlated with CTH simulations indicating areas of localized strain and heating during deformation of the particles. These observations are used to explain the impact-initiated combustion sensitivity of Al powders as a function of powder characteristics and to understand the processes leading to reaction initiation. This work is supported by DTRA Project No. HDTRA-1-12-1-0052.

  11. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  12. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  13. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  14. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  15. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  16. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  17. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  18. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  19. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  20. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  1. High-Stakes Standardized Testing & Marginalized Youth: An Examination of the Impact on Those Who Fail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Laura-Lee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of high-stakes, large-scale, standardized literacy testing on youth who have failed the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. Interviews with youth indicate that the unintended impact of high-stakes testing is more problematic than policy makers and educators may realize. In contrast to literacy policy's aims to…

  2. SGC tests for influence of material composition on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Li, Yuzhi

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  3. SGC Tests for Influence of Material Composition on Compaction Characteristic of Asphalt Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  4. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Tarantino, P M; Lauben, D S; Close, S

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments. PMID:25933852

  5. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, A.; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  6. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, A. Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  7. Characteristics of Genomic Test Consumers Who Spontaneously Share Results with Their Health Care Provider

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Burcu F.; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J.; Topol, Eric J.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Methods Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Results Of 2024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post-testing, a total of 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p<.001), had a higher income (p=.01), were more likely to be married (p=.005), and more likely to identify with a religion (p=.004). As assessed prior to undergoing testing, sharers also showed higher exercise (p=.003) and lower fat intake (p=.02), and expressed fewer overall concerns about testing (p=.001) and fewer concerns related to the privacy of their genomic information (p=.03). The genomic disease risk estimates disclosed were not associated with sharing. Conclusion In a DTC genomic testing context, physicians and other health care providers may be more likely to encounter patients who are more health conscious and have fewer concerns about the privacy of their genomic information. Genomic risk itself does not appear to be a primary determinant of sharing behavior among consumers. PMID:23384116

  8. Characteristics of genomic test consumers who spontaneously share results with their health care provider.

    PubMed

    Darst, Burcu F; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J; Bloss, Cinnamon S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Of 2,024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post testing, 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p < .001), had a higher income (p = .01), were more likely to be married (p = .005), and were more likely to identify with a religion (p = .004). As assessed prior to undergoing testing, sharers also reported higher levels of exercise (p = .003), lower fat intake (p = .02), fewer overall concerns about testing (p = .001), and fewer concerns related to the privacy of their genomic information (p = .03). The genomic disease risk estimates disclosed were not associated with sharing. Thus, in a DTC genomic testing context, physicians and other health care providers may be more likely to encounter patients who are more health conscious and have fewer concerns about the privacy of their genomic information. Genomic risk itself does not appear to be a primary determinant of sharing behavior among consumers. PMID:23384116

  9. A study on the performance and emission characteristics of esterified pinnai oil tested in VCR engine.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, T; Chandramouli, R; Mohanraj, T

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean renewable fuel derived from vegetable oils and animal fats. It is biodegradable, oxygenated, non toxic and free from sulfur and aromatics. The biodiesel prepared from pinnai oil undergoes acid esterification followed by alkaline transesterification process. The fatty acid methyl esters components were identified using gas chromatography and compared with the standard properties. The properties of biodiesel are comparable with diesel. The yield of the biodiesel production depends upon the process parameters such as reaction temperature, pH, time duration and amount of catalyst. The yield of biodiesel by transesterification process was 73% at 55°C. This fuel was tested in a variable compression ratio engine with blend ratios of B10 and B20. During the test runs the compression ratio of the engine was varied from 15:1 to 18:1 and the torque is adjusted from zero to maximum value of 22Nm. The performance characteristics such as the brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption and exhaust gas temperature of the engine are analyzed. The combustion characteristics of biodiesel like ignition delay, combustion duration and maximum gas temperature and the emission characteristics are also analyzed. The performance characteristics, combustion characteristics and engine emission are effective in the variable compression ratio engine with biodiesel and it is compared with diesel. PMID:26116080

  10. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  11. Assessments of system impacts of spent fuel thermal characteristics and emplacement rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rickertsen, L.D.

    1993-12-31

    Analysis conducted to evaluate the impacts spent fuel thermal characteristics and emplacement rates might have on the thermal conditions in a candidate geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain site are reported here. These analyses considered the effect of the current projections for the burnup of the spent fuel, the variability in waste thermal characteristics, and the sequence and location of waste emplacement on the repository temperatures relative to those predicted for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The results show that, for the same conceptual design, the temperatures in the repository would be significantly higher than those considered for the SCP. These results could affect the evaluations of alternative thermal loading strategies for the candidate repository.

  12. Residential mobility impacts exposure assessment and community socioeconomic characteristics in longitudinal epidemiology studies

    PubMed Central

    Brokamp, Cole; LeMasters, Grace K; Ryan, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies commonly use residential locations to estimate environmental exposures or community-level characteristics. The impact of residential mobility on these characteristics, however, is rarely considered. The objective of this analysis was to examine the effect of residential mobility on estimates of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), greenspace, and community-level characteristics. All residential addresses were reported from birth through age seven for children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study. Exposure to TRAP at each address was estimated using a land use model. Greenspace was estimated using satellite imagery. Indices of neighborhood deprivation and race were created based on socioeconomic-census tract measures. Exposure estimates using the birth record address, the last known address, and the annual address history were used to determine exposure estimation error and bias in the association with asthma at age seven. Overall, 54% of the cohort moved at least once prior to age seven. Each move was separated by a median of 4 miles and associated with a median decrease of 4.4% in TRAP exposure, a 5.3% increase in greenspace, an improved deprivation index, and no change in the race index. Using the birth record address or the last known address instead of the annual address history resulted in exposure misclassification leading to a bias toward the null when associating the exposures with asthma. Using a single address to estimate environmental exposures and community-level characteristics over a time period may result in differential assessment error. PMID:26956935

  13. Residential mobility impacts exposure assessment and community socioeconomic characteristics in longitudinal epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Brokamp, Cole; LeMasters, Grace K; Ryan, Patrick H

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies commonly use residential locations to estimate environmental exposures or community-level characteristics. The impact of residential mobility on these characteristics, however, is rarely considered. The objective of this analysis was to examine the effect of residential mobility on estimates of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), greenspace, and community-level characteristics. All residential addresses were reported from birth through age seven for children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study. Exposure to TRAP at each address was estimated using a land use model. Greenspace was estimated using satellite imagery. Indices of neighborhood deprivation and race were created based on socioeconomic-census tract measures. Exposure estimates using the birth record address, the last known address, and the annual address history were used to determine exposure estimation error and bias in the association with asthma at age seven. Overall, 54% of the cohort moved at least once prior to age seven. Each move was separated by a median of 4 miles and associated with a median decrease of 4.4% in TRAP exposure, a 5.3% increase in greenspace, an improved deprivation index, and no change in the race index. Using the birth record address or the last known address instead of the annual address history resulted in exposure misclassification leading to a bias toward the null when associating the exposures with asthma. Using a single address to estimate environmental exposures and community-level characteristics over a time period may result in differential assessment error. PMID:26956935

  14. Physicochemical characteristics and droplet impact dynamics of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Aria, Adrianus I; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-06-17

    The physicochemical and droplet impact dynamics of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays are investigated. These superhydrophobic arrays are fabricated simply by exposing the as-grown carbon nanotube arrays to a vacuum annealing treatment at a moderate temperature. This treatment, which allows a significant removal of oxygen adsorbates, leads to a dramatic change in wettability of the arrays, from mildly hydrophobic to superhydrophobic. Such change in wettability is also accompanied by a substantial change in surface charge and electrochemical properties. Here, the droplet impact dynamics are characterized in terms of critical Weber number, coefficient of restitution, spreading factor, and contact time. Based on these characteristics, it is found that superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays are among the best water-repellent surfaces ever reported. The results presented herein may pave a way for the utilization of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays in numerous industrial and practical applications, including inkjet printing, direct injection engines, steam turbines, and microelectronic fabrication. PMID:24866696

  15. Plasma Spray-PVD: Plasma Characteristics and Impact on Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Typical plasma characteristics of the plasma spray-physical vapour deposition (PS-PVD) process were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Electron temperatures were determined by Boltzmann plots while temperatures of the heavy species as well as electron densities were obtained by broadening analysis of spectral lines. The results show how the plasma properties and thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are affected by the admixture of hydrogen and the ambient chamber pressure. Some experimental examples of PS-PVD coatings demonstrate the impact on feedstock treatment and deposited microstructures.

  16. Simulation Study of Impact of Aeroelastic Characteristics on Flying Qualities of a High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Buttrill, Carey S.

    2002-01-01

    A piloted simulation study conducted in NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator addressed the impact of dynamic aero- servoelastic effects on flying qualities of a High Speed Civil Transport. The intent was to determine effectiveness of measures to reduce the impact of aircraft flexibility on piloting tasks. Potential solutions examined were increasing frequency of elastic modes through structural stiffening, increasing damping of elastic modes through active control, elimination of control effector excitation of the lowest frequency elastic modes, and elimination of visual cues associated with elastic modes. Six test pilots evaluated and performed simulated maneuver tasks, encountering incidents wherein cockpit vibrations due to elastic modes fed back into the control stick through involuntary vibrations of the pilots upper body and arm. Structural stiffening and compensation of the visual display were of little benefit in alleviating this impact, while increased damping and elimination of control effector excitation of the elastic modes both offered great improvements when applied in sufficient degree.

  17. Rotor performance characteristics from an aeroacoustic helicopter wind-tunnel test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Orie, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of helicopter rotor noise at model scale was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 meter tunnel. The program described was the first of a planned three-phase project whose purpose was to examine the characteristic noise mechanism involved in main rotor/tail rotor interaction noise. This first phase was conducted with a main rotor only, in order to identify the characteristic noise generated by only the main rotor. The aerodynamic operating conditions of the rotor system were defined during the test. The acoustic data were properly referenced.

  18. Aerodynamic characteristics of the Scout 133R vehicle determined from wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramson, F. B.; Muir, T. G., Jr.; Simmons, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    Bending moments and other associated parameters were measured on a Scout vehicle during a launch through high velocity horizontal winds. Comparison of the measured data with predictions revealed some unexplained discrepancies. Possible sources of error in the experimental data and predictions were considered; one of which is the predicted aerodynamic characteristics. A wind tunnel investigation was initiated, including supersonic force and pressure tests, to better define the aerodynamics. In addition to basic aerodynamic coefficients from the force test, detailed pressure and load distributions along the body were established from the pressure test. Pressure coefficients were integrated to determine normal load distributions, total normal force, and total pitching moment of the body. Comparison of the normal forces from pressure and force tests resulted in agreement within 15%. Comparison of pitching moment data from the two tests resulted in larger differences.

  19. The Impact of Socioeconomic Status on High Stakes Testing Reexamined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Melissa; Johnston, Pattie

    2010-01-01

    High-stakes testing plays a critical role in education today in the United States. Every state uses a high-stakes test to comply with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandate. While many believe high-stakes testing is an acceptable and accurate way to measure students' learning, one has to ask whether high stakes testing is an effective measurement…

  20. Ignition of nonmetallic materials by impact of high-pressure oxygen. II - Evaluation of repeatability of pneumatic impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Naomi; Moffett, Gary E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    The gaseous oxygen pneumatic impact test is used to evaluate the suitability of nonmetallic materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems. The test was evaluated by testing the reactivity of four materials over a range of impact pressures. The evaluation also investigated the effect of valve opening time and other test variables on the frequency of reaction. The variability of the data obtained for each test material was too large for the test method to be capable of distinguishing other than gross differences in the reactivity of materials. No relation was found between this variability and changes in valve opening time and other test variables. The materials studied were found to be unacceptable for use as reference standards. Because of the high variability of the test data, it is recommended that new methods be developed for evaluating the suitability of materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems.

  1. Identifying the ideal body size and shape characteristics associated with children's physical performance tests in Peru.

    PubMed

    Bustamante Valdivia, A; Maia, J; Nevill, A

    2015-04-01

    We used allometric models to identify the optimal body size/shape characteristics associated with physical and motor performance tests in Peruvian schoolchildren. The sample consisted of 3624 subjects (1669 boys and 1955 girls) aged 11-17 years from 31 public schools belonging to four cities located in the three natural regions in central Peru. Motor performance included 12-min run, standing long jump, grip strength, curl-ups, shuttle run, and sit and reach. The reciprocal Ponderal index (RPI), a characteristic sometimes referred to as the somatotype "ectomorphy," was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with 12-min run, standing long jump, curl-up, and shuttle run performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with greater standing long jump, grip strength, shuttle run, and sit-and-reach performances. With the exception of the sit-and-reach flexibility, sex differences are pervasive in all tests favoring boys. Rainforest schoolchildren are best performers in the power and flexibility tests, whereas those from high altitude were superior in the 12-min endurance test even after taking their much lighter body size characteristics into account. This latter finding suggests that living at high altitude in Peru benefits children's endurance performance both before and even after controlling for differences in the confounding variable of body size/shape. PMID:24779794

  2. Study on the measurement system of the target polarization characteristics and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Su; Duan, Jin; Yang, Di; Zhan, Juntong; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Hui-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The polarization imaging detection technology increased the polarization information on the basis of the intensity imaging, which is extensive application in the military and civil and other fields, the research on the polarization characteristics of target is particularly important. The research of the polarization reflection model was introduced in this paper, which describes the scattering vector light energy distribution in reflecting hemisphere polarization characteristics, the target polarization characteristics test system solutions was put forward, by the irradiation light source, measuring turntable and camera, etc, which illuminate light source shall direct light source, with laser light sources and xenon lamp light source, light source can be replaced according to the test need; Hemispherical structure is used in measuring circumarotate placed near its base material sample, equipped with azimuth and pitching rotation mechanism, the manual in order to adjust the azimuth Angle and high Angle observation; Measuring camera pump works, through the different in the way of motor control polaroid polarization test, to ensure the accuracy of measurement and imaging resolution. The test platform has set up by existing laboratory equipment, the laser is 532 nm, line polaroid camera, at the same time also set the sending and receiving optical system. According to the different materials such as wood, metal, plastic, azimuth Angle and zenith Angle in different observation conditions, measurement of target in the polarization scattering properties of different exposure conditions, implementation of hemisphere space pBRDF measurement.

  3. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Space Station Freedom Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Best, Steve R.; Myhre, Craig A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar array coupons designed for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system were subjected to hypervelocity impacts using the HYPER facility in the Space Power Institute at Auburn University and the Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Simulation Facility in the Materials and Processes Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At Auburn, the solar cells and array blanket materials received several hundred impacts from particles in the micron to 100 micron range with velocities typically ranging from 4.5 to 10.5 km/s. This fluence of particles greatly exceeds what the actual components will experience in low earth orbit. These impacts damaged less than one percent of total area of the solar cells and most of the damage was limited to the cover glass. There was no measurable loss of electrical performance. Impacts on the array blanket materials produced even less damage and the blanket materials proved to be an effective shield for the back surface of the solar cells. Using the light gas gun at MSFC, one cell of a four cell coupon was impacted by a 1/4 inch spherical aluminum projectile with a velocity of about 7 km/s. The impact created a neat hole about 3/8 inch in diameter. The cell and coupon were still functional after impact.

  4. A Study of the "toss Factor" in the Impact Testing of Cermets by the Izod Pendulum Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H B; Mchenry, Howard T

    1957-01-01

    The test method presented shows that the "toss energy" contributed by the apparatus for brittle materials is negligible. The total toss energy is considered to consist of two components. (a) recovered stored elastic energy and (b) kinetic energy contributed directly by the apparatus. The results were verified by high-speed motion pictures of the test in operation. From these photographs, velocities of tossed specimens were obtained and toss energy computed. In addition, impact energies of some titanium carbide base cermets and high-temperature alloys, as measured by the low-capacity Izod pendulum test, compare well with impact energies measured by the NACA drop test.

  5. Large-scale aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils as tested in the variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Anderson, Raymond F

    1931-01-01

    In order to give the large-scale characteristics of a variety of airfoils in a form which will be of maximum value, both for airplane design and for the study of airfoil characteristics, a collection has been made of the results of airfoil tests made at full-scale values of the reynolds number in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. They have been corrected for tunnel wall interference and are presented not only in the conventional form but also in a form which facilitates the comparison of airfoils and from which corrections may be easily made to any aspect ratio. An example showing the method of correcting the results to a desired aspect ratio has been given for the convenience of designers. In addition, the data have been analyzed with a view to finding the variation of the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils with their thickness and camber.

  6. 16 CFR 1203.11 - Marking the impact test line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (HPI), with the brow parallel to the basic plane. Place a 5-kg (11-lb) preload ballast on top of the... helmet coinciding with the intersection of the surface of the helmet with the impact line planes...

  7. Antipsychotic-induced sensitization and tolerance: Behavioral characteristics, developmental impacts, and neurobiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance refer to the increased and decreased drug effects due to past drug use, respectively. Both effects reflect the long-term impacts of antipsychotic treatment on the brain and result from the brain's adaptive response to the foreign property of the drug. In this review, clinical evidence of the behavioral aspect of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is selectively reviewed, followed by an overview of preclinical literature that examines these behavioral characteristics and the related pharmacological and nonpharmacological factors. Next, recent work on the developmental impacts of adolescent antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is presented and recent research that delineates the neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is summarized. A theoretical framework based on "drug learning and memory" principles is proposed to account for the phenomena of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. It is maintained that antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance follow basic principles of learning or acquisition ("induction") and memory ("expression"). The induction and expression of both effects reflect the consequences of associative and nonassociative processing and are strongly influenced by various pharmacological, environmental, and behavioral factors. Drug-induced neuroplasticity, such as functional changes of striatal dopamine D2 and prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors and their mediated signaling pathways, in principle, is responsible for antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. Understanding the behavioral characteristics and neurobiological underpinnings of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance has greatly enhanced our understanding of mechanisms of antipsychotic action, and may have important implications for future drug discovery and clinical practice. PMID:27371498

  8. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  9. Impact of Filtration Velocities and Particulate Matter Characteristics on Diesel Particulate Filter Wall Loading Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Michael J; Walker, Larry R; Yapaulo, Renato A; Orita, Tetsuo; Wirojsakunchai, Ekathai; Foster, David; Akard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The impact of different types of diesel particulate matter (PM) and different sampling conditions on the wall deposition and early soot cake build up within diesel particulate filters has been investigated. The measurements were made possible by a newly developed Diesel Exhaust Filtration Analysis (DEFA) system in which in-situ diesel exhaust filtration can be reproduced with in small cordierite wafer disks, which are essentially thin sections of a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) wall. The different types of PM were generated from selected engine operating conditions of a single-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine. Two filtration velocities 4 and 8 cm/s were used to investigate PM deep-bed filtration processes. The loaded wafers were then analyzed in a thermal mass analyzer that measures the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) as well as soot and sulfate fractions of the PM. In addition, the soot residing in the wall of the wafer was examined under an optical microscope illuminated with Ultraviolet light and an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E-SEM) to determine the bulk soot penetration depth for each loading condition. It was found that higher filtration velocity results in higher wall loading with approximately the same penetration depth into the wall. PM characteristics impacted both wall loading and soot cake layer characteristics. Results from imaging analysis indicate that soot the penetration depth into the wall was affected more by PM size (which changes with engine operating conditions) rather than filtration velocity.

  10. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation. An experimental investigation was made to determine the landing characteristics of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of a reentry vehicle using a passive landing system to alleviate the landing-impact loads. The passive landing system consisted of a flexible heat shield with a small section of aluminum honeycomb placed between the heat shield and the crew compartment at the point that would be the first to contact the landing surface. The model was landed on concrete and sand landing surfaces at parachute letdown velocities. The investigations simulated a vertical velocity of 30 ft/sec (full scale), horizontal velocities of 0, 15, 30, 40, and 50 ft/sec (full scale), and landing attitudes ranging from -30 degrees to 20 degrees. The model investigation indicated that stable landings could be made on a concrete surface at horizontal velocities up to about 30 ft/sec, but the stable landing-attitude range at these speeds was small. The aluminum honeycomb bottomed occasionally during landings on concrete. When bottoming did not occur, maximum normal and longitudinal accelerations at the center of gravity of the vehicle were approximately 50g and 30g, respectively. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030981. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  11. Numerical Simulation on the Damage Characteristics of Ice Targets by Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wei, Gang; Mu, Zhong-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Interpretation of cratering records on planetary surfaces including the Earth has primarily been concerned with rocky surfaces, most notably the lunar surface and more recently Mars and Venus. Recently, the survey of craters on icy surfaces in the Solar System has been augmented by data from spacecraft close encounters, such as the Galileo mission to the jovian system. To fully understand these cratering records, the physics of hypervelocity impacts needs to be understood. The numerical simulation on the damage characteristics of ice targets by projectile normally hypervelocity impact has been performed using the hydro-code AUTODYN. The 1mm spherical projectile is aluminum 2017 alloy. The targets are water ice. The simulation velocities were in the range of 1km/s-10km/s. The material models are consisted of Tillotson and Polynomial equation of state, Mohr-Coulomb and Johnson-Holmqiust strength model and Johnson-Holmqiust and principle stress failure model. The damage characteristics include peak ejection angle, peak temperature and pressure, maximum crater depth and diameter etc. The simulation results are given and compared with the experimental results of Burchell 2002. The simulation results are consistent very well with the experimental results.

  12. Numerical Simulation on the Damage Characteristics of Ice Targets by Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Gang, Wei; Zhong-Cheng, Mu; Chang, Liu

    2009-12-01

    Interpretation of cratering records on planetary surfaces including the Earth has primarily been concerned with rocky surfaces, most notably the lunar surface and more recently Mars and Venus. Recently, the survey of craters on icy surfaces in the Solar System has been augmented by data from spacecraft close encounters, such as the Galileo mission to the Jovian system. To fully understand these cratering records, the physics of hypervelocity impacts needs to be understood. The numerical simulation on the damage characteristics of ice targets by projectile normal hypervelocity impact has been performed using the hydro-code AUTODYN. The 1 mm spherical projectile is aluminum 2017 alloy. The targets are water ice. The simulation velocities were in the range of 1 km/s-10 km/s. The damage characteristics include peak ejection angle, maximum crater depth and diameter etc. The simulation results are given and compared with the experimental results of Shrine et al. 2002. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental results.

  13. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  14. Experimental and numerical analysis of Al6063 duralumin using Taylor impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, L.; Anaszewicz, Ł.; Janiszewski, J.; Grązka, M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents results of experimental and numerical analysis of dynamic behaviour Al6063 duralumin. Dynamical experiments were made using Taylor impact test. Experimental results at next step of study were used in numerical analyses of dynamic yield stress of tested material and model parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation. The main aim of this analysis is to find out dynamical properties of Al6063 duralumin tested in Taylor impact test.

  15. Determinants of Timely Completion: The Impact of Bachelor's Degree Programme Characteristics and Student Motivation on Study Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Torenbeek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Timely completion of university degree programmes is a topic of growing concern to higher education institutions and their students. This paper reports on a study about the impact of degree programme characteristics and student motivation on study progress. The setting for the study is a Dutch law school. Data on degree programme characteristics,…

  16. The Impact of Teachers' Characteristics and Self-Reported Practices on Students' Algebra Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Liza M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of teachers' characteristics and self-reported practices on students' Algebra achievement while controlling for students' characteristics. This study is based on the secondary analysis of data collected from a nationally representative sample of 9 th grade students and their mathematics teachers during…

  17. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Discordant Diagnostic Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsas, Anna; Simon, Matt; Unruh, Larissa H.; Son, Crystal; Wroblewski, Danielle; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Sepkowitz, Kent; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with discordant test results for the cytotoxin assay (CYT) and PCR assays. A retrospective study from May to August 2008 and March to May 2010 was performed. CDI was diagnosed in 128 patients. PCR increased the yield of C. difficile cases by 2-fold compared to that of the CYT assay. Fifty-six cases (44%) were detected by PCR only (CYT negative). Forty-nine percent of patients with non-NAP1 strains were detected by PCR only, compared to 28% of those infected with NAP1 strains (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the clinical severity of illness and outcome among patients that tested positive for CDI by both tests (CYT and PCR) compared to those that tested positive by PCR only. PMID:22238444

  18. The characteristics of 78 related airfoil sections from tests in the variable-density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E; Pinkerton, Robert M

    1933-01-01

    An investigation of a large group of related airfoils was made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a large value of the Reynolds number. The tests were made to provide data that may be directly employed for a rational choice of the most suitable airfoil section for a given application. The variation of the aerodynamic characteristics with variations in thickness and mean-line form were systematically studied. (author)

  19. [The characteristics of Alzheimer's Disease Units in relation to neuropsychological tests].

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Giacoma C; Caffari, Bruno; Vanacore, Nicola; Maggini, Marina; Raschetti, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The Cronos Project is a post-marketing surveillance study implemented by the Italian Ministry of Health and the National Institute of Health whose main objectives are to characterise the population of Alzheimer's disease patients treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and monitor effectiveness and drug safety in the field practice. In this project 503 Alzheimer's disease units were activated located throughout the country. The characteristics of these Alzheimer's disease units are presented for setting (territorial, university, hospital, extra-hospital), health personnel employed, examinations offered (CT and MRI scans and laboratory tests), counselling activities and relationship with caregiver associations in relation to neuropsychological tests. PMID:16037652

  20. Changes in intraseasonal characteristics of temperature and rainfall and their impacts on West African crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasutti, M.; Lobell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The CMIP3 and CMIP5 models project that, by the end of the century, the western Sahel will see much higher temperatures, a later beginning of the rainy season, and more rainfall accumulation. All of these changes can have a substantial impact on agricultural output, as higher temperatures and late onset are expected to lower yields, but wetter conditions could ameliorate, or even reverse, such changes. To better quantify the overall impact of the projected climate on yields as well as its uncertainty, we need to understand the sensitivity of yields to each climatic factor. This, in turn, is likely to depend on how the mean changes are realized. For example, the mean temperature increase might be less important than the increased occurrence of heat waves, and the mean rainfall increase less important than the increase in the number of rainy days. We therefore (i) validate the CMIP5 historical simulations on both their seasonal mean fields and their intraseasonal characteristics of temperature and rainfall (such as heat wave occurrence, monsoon onset dates, and dry spells); and (ii) characterize the mean changes predicted for the end of the century in terms of their expression at intraseasonal timescales. Whether a climatic driver affects the aggregated agricultural output of West African countries (as opposed to the yield of a single agricultural field) depends on the level of large scale coherence in its variations. We therefore quantify the degree of spatial coherence in the variability of intraseasonal characteristics in both observations (from station and gridded data) and models. Finally, we analyze variations in yields of staple crops (sorghum and millet) at the province and country level and relate them to variations in climate parameters (seasonal means and intraseasonal characteristics).

  1. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  2. Flight testing and frequency domain analysis for rotorcraft handling qualities characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Johnnie A.; Gardner, Charles K.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    A demonstration of frequency domain flight testing techniques and analyses was performed on a U.S. Army OH-58D helicopter in support of the OH-58D Airworthiness and Flight Characteristics Evaluation and the Army's development and ongoing review of Aeronautical Design Standard 33C, Handling Qualities Requirements for Military Rotorcraft. Hover and forward flight (60 knots) tests were conducted in 1 flight hour by Army experimental test pilots. Further processing of the hover data generated a complete database of velocity, angular rate, and acceleration frequency responses to control inputs. A joint effort was then undertaken by the Airworthiness Qualification Test Directorate (AQTD) and the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) to derive handling qualities information from the frequency response database. A significant amount of information could be extracted from the frequency domain database using a variety of approaches. This report documents numerous results that have been obtained from the simple frequency domain tests; in many areas, these results provide more insight into the aircraft dynamics that affect handling qualities than to traditional flight tests. The handling qualities results include ADS-33C bandwidth and phase delay calculations, vibration spectral determinations, transfer function models to examine single axis results, and a six degree of freedom fully coupled state space model. The ability of this model to accurately predict aircraft responses was verified using data from pulse inputs. This report also documents the frequency-sweep flight test technique and data analysis used to support the tests.

  3. Characteristics, finite element analysis, test description, and preliminary test results of the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Smith, G.

    1991-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program has as one of its program elements the development and evaluation of conversion device technologies applicable to dish-electric systems. The primary research and development combines a conversion device (heat engine), solar receiver, and generator mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. The Stirling-cycle heat engine was identified as the conversion device for dish-electric with the most potential for meeting the program`s goals for efficiency, reliability, and installed cost. To advance the technology toward commercialization, Sandia National Laboratories has acquired a Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., kinematic Stirling engine, STM4-120, for evaluation. The engine is being bench-tested at Sandia`s Engine Test Facility and will be combined later with a solar receiver for on-sun evaluation. This report presents the engine characteristics, finite element analyses of critical engine components, test system layout, instrumentation, and preliminary performance results from the bench test.

  4. Soft Soil Impact Testing and Simulation of Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, a 38-ft/s vertical drop test of a 5-ft-diameter, 5-ft-long composite fuselage section that was retrofitted with a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was conducted onto unpacked sand. This test was one of a series of tests to evaluate the multi-terrain capabilities of the DEA and to generate test data for model validation. During the test, the DEA crushed approximately 6-in. and left craters in the sand of depths ranging from 7.5- to 9-in. A finite element model of the fuselage section with DEA was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic code. Pre-test predictions were generated in which the sand was represented initially as a crushable foam material MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63). Following the drop test, a series of hemispherical penetrometer tests were conducted to assist in soil characterization. The penetrometer weighed 20-lb and was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer. Drop tests were performed at 16-ft/s and crater depths were measured. The penetrometer drop tests were simulated as a means for developing a more representative soil model based on a soil and foam material definition MAT_SOIL_AND FOAM (Mat 5) in LS-DYNA. The model of the fuselage with DEA was reexecuted using the updated soil model and test-analysis correlations are presented.

  5. Evaluation of the hazardous impact of landfill leachates by toxicity and biodegradability tests.

    PubMed

    Kalcíková, G; Vávrová, M; Zagorc-Koncan, J; Gotvajn, A Zgajnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our research was to assess the ecotoxicity and biodegradability of leachates originating from two parts of a municipal landfill before and after biological treatment in the existing treatment plant. Biotests represent important tools for adequate environmental characterization of landfill leachates and could be helpful in reliable assessment and monitoring of the treatment plant efficiency. For ecotoxicity testing of landfill leachate before and after biological treatment, different organisms were chosen: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri, a mixed culture of activated sludge, duckweed Lemna minor, white mustard Sinapis alba, brine shrimp Artemia salina, and water flea Daphnia magna. For assessment of biodegradability, the method for determination of oxygen demand in a closed respirometer was used. The investigated leachates were heavily polluted, and in some cases, effluent limits were exceeded even after treatment. Results indicated that toxicity tests and physico-chemical parameters determined before and after treatment equivalently assess the efficiency of the existing treatment plant. However, the investigated leachates showed higher toxicity to Daphnia magna and especially to Lemna minor in contrast to Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina (neither was sensitive to any of the leachates). No leachates were readily biodegradable. Experiments confirmed that the battery of toxicity tests should be applied for more comprehensive assessment of landfill leachate treatment and for reliable assessment of the treated leachate's subsequent environmental impact. It was confirmed that treated leachate, in spite of its better physico-chemical characteristics, still represents a potential environmental risk and thus should not be released into the environment. PMID:21970176

  6. Characteristics of hypervelocity impact craters on LDEF experiment S1003 and implications of small particle impacts on reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Devries, Christopher; Merrow, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The Ion Beam textured and coated surfaces EXperiment (IBEX), designated S1003, was flown on LDEF at a location 98 deg in a north facing direction relative to the ram direction. Thirty-six diverse materials were exposed to the micrometeoroid (and some debris) environment for 5.8 years. Optical property measurements indicated no changes for almost all of the materials except S-13G, Kapton, and Kapton-coated surfaces, and these changes can be explained by other environmental effects. From the predicted micrometeoroid flux of NASA SP-8013, no significant changes in optical properties of the surfaces due to micrometeoroids were expected. There were hypervelocity impacts on the various diverse materials flown on IBEX, and the characteristics of these craters were documented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The S1003 alumigold-coated aluminum cover tray was sectioned into 2 cm x 2 cm pieces for crater documentation. The flux curve generated from this crater data fits well between the 1969 micrometeoroid model and the Kessler debris model for particles less than 10(exp -9) gm which were corrected for the S1003 positions (98 deg to ram). As the particle mass increases, the S1003 impact data is greater than that predicted by even the debris model. This, however, is consistent with data taken on intercostal F07 by the Micrometeoroid/Debris Special Investigating Group (M/D SIG). The mirrored surface micrometeoroid detector flown on IBEX showed no change in solar reflectance and corroborated the S1003 flux curve, as well as results of this surface flown on SERT 2 and OSO 3 for as long as 21 years.

  7. Characteristics of hypervelocity impact craters on LDEF experiment S1003 and implications of small particle impacts on reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Devries, Christopher; Merrow, James E.

    1993-04-01

    The Ion Beam textured and coated surfaces EXperiment (IBEX), designated S1003, was flown on LDEF at a location 98 deg in a north facing direction relative to the ram direction. Thirty-six diverse materials were exposed to the micrometeoroid (and some debris) environment for 5.8 years. Optical property measurements indicated no changes for almost all of the materials except S-13G, Kapton, and Kapton-coated surfaces, and these changes can be explained by other environmental effects. From the predicted micrometeoroid flux of NASA SP-8013, no significant changes in optical properties of the surfaces due to micrometeoroids were expected. There were hypervelocity impacts on the various diverse materials flown on IBEX, and the characteristics of these craters were documented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The S1003 alumigold-coated aluminum cover tray was sectioned into 2 cm x 2 cm pieces for crater documentation. The flux curve generated from this crater data fits well between the 1969 micrometeoroid model and the Kessler debris model for particles less than 10(exp -9) gm which were corrected for the S1003 positions (98 deg to ram). As the particle mass increases, the S1003 impact data is greater than that predicted by even the debris model. This, however, is consistent with data taken on intercostal F07 by the Micrometeoroid/Debris Special Investigating Group (M/D SIG). The mirrored surface micrometeoroid detector flown on IBEX showed no change in solar reflectance and corroborated the S1003 flux curve, as well as results of this surface flown on SERT 2 and OSO 3 for as long as 21 years.

  8. Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission: science investigation of a binary system and mitigation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Cheng, A. F.; Küppers, M.

    2015-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to investigate a binary near-Earth asteroid (NEA) and to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor. AIDA is a joint ESA-NASA cooperative project, which includes the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous spacecraft and the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to investigate the binary NEA (65803) Didymos, (ii) to test our ability to impact its moon by an hypervelocity projectile in 2022 and (iii) to measure and characterize the impact deflection both from space with AIM and from ground based observatories.

  9. Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Subcomponent Flat Plate Impact Testing for Space Shuttle Orbiter Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Brand, Jeremy H.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the Space Shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) and various debris materials which could potentially shed on ascent and impact the Orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS DYNA to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the Orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic material model properties of materials of interest, sub-component impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and full-scale impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This paper discusses the second level subcomponent test program in detail and its application to the LS DYNA model validation process. The level two testing consisted of over one hundred impact tests in the NASA Glenn Research Center Ballistic Impact Lab on 6 by 6 in. and 6 by 12 in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: BX 265 External Tank foam, ice, and PDL 1034 External Tank foam. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile. The information obtained from this testing validated the LS DYNA damage prediction models and provided a certain level of confidence to begin performing analysis for full-size RCC test articles for returning NASA to flight with STS 114 and beyond.

  10. Materials Characterization Center meeting on impact testing of waste forms. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Atteridge, D.; Dudder, G.

    1981-10-01

    A meeting was held on March 25-26, 1981 to discuss impact test methods for waste form materials to be used in nuclear waste repositories. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) in preparing the MCC-10 Impact Test Method to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The meeting focused on two essential aspects of the test method, namely the mechanical process, or impact, used to effect rapid fracture of a waste form and the analysis technique(s) used to characterize particulates generated by the impact.

  11. Hypervelocity impact testing of non-metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative analysis of impact damage in composite and ceramic specimens and in geometrically similar aluminum specimens is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing certain composite and ceramic materials in the design of structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. A similar analysis of the damage in single panel lexan and multi-plane glass windows shows that glass window systems are rather resilent under hypervelocity impact loadings. It is concluded that thin Kevlar 49, IM6/3501-6 graphite/epoxy, and alumina panels offer no advantage over equivalent aluminum 6061-T6 panels in reducing the penetration threat of hypervelocity projectiles.

  12. The Potential Impact of Not Being Able to Create Parallel Tests on Expected Classification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    In many practical testing situations, alternate test forms from the same testing program are not strictly parallel to each other and instead the test forms exhibit small psychometric differences. This article investigates the potential practical impact that these small psychometric differences can have on expected classification accuracy. Ten…

  13. Satellite Test of Radiation Impact on Ramtron 512K FRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Sayyah, Rana; Sims, W. Herb; Varnavas, Kosta A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2009-01-01

    The Memory Test Experiment is a space test of a ferroelectric memory device on a low Earth orbit satellite. The test consists of writing and reading data with a ferroelectric based memory device. Any errors are detected and are stored on board the satellite. The data is send to the ground through telemetry once a day. Analysis of the data can determine the kind of error that was found and will lead to a better understanding of the effects of space radiation on memory systems. The test will be one of the first flight demonstrations of ferroelectric memory in a near polar orbit which allows testing in a varied radiation environment. The memory devices being tested is a Ramtron Inc. 512K memory device. This paper details the goals and purpose of this experiment as well as the development process. The process for analyzing the data to gain the maximum understanding of the performance of the ferroelectric memory device is detailed.

  14. Motivations and psychosocial impact of genetic testing for HNPCC.

    PubMed

    Esplen, M J; Madlensky, L; Butler, K; McKinnon, W; Bapat, B; Wong, J; Aronson, M; Gallinger, S

    2001-09-15

    A type of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is associated with MLHI and MSH2 gene mutations. This study consists of a pilot, cross-sectional study of 50 individuals who were engaged in the genetic testing process for HNPCC. The study investigated the motivations and attitudes around genetic testing and current psychosocial functioning through the use of standardized measures, as well as obtained information on disclosure patterns associated with test results. The mean age of the sample was 44.3 years. (SD = 15.0). Twenty-three individuals were identified as "carriers" (13 had a previous history of CRC), seven were "non-carriers" and 20 individuals were still awaiting test results. The primary motivations for participating in genetic testing were similar to previous reports and included: wanting to know if more screening tests were needed, obtaining information about the risk for offspring and increasing certainty around their own risk. The psychosocial scores demonstrated that a subgroup of individuals exhibited distress, with greater distress for those individuals awaiting results or testing positive. There was a high level of satisfaction associated with the experience of testing. Individuals in this study tended to disclose their test results to a variety of family and non-family members. Disclosure was primarily associated with positive experiences however, some individuals reported regret around disclosure of their results. These preliminary findings should be further explored in a larger prospective study design over multiple time points. PMID:11562928

  15. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of IM7/977-3 with Micro-Sized Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.; Jegley, D. C.; Siochi, E. J.; Wells, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based hypervelocity imapct testing was conducted on IM7/977-3 quasi-isotropic flat panels at normal incidence using micron-sized particles (i.e. less than or equal to 100 microns) of soda lime glass and olivine. Testing was performed at room temperature (RT) and 175 C with results from the 175 C test compared to those obtained at RT. Between 10 and 30 particles with velocities ranging from 5 to 13 km/s impacted each panel surface for each test temperature. Panels were ultrasonically scanned prior to and after impact testing to assess internal damage. Post-impact analysis included microscopic examination of the surface, determination of particle speed and location, and photomicroscopy for microcrack assessment. Internal damage was observed by ultrasonic inspection on panels impacted at 175 C, whereas damage for the RT impacted panels was confined to surface divets/craters as determined by microscopic analysis.

  16. The Effectiveness of the Component Impact Test Method for the Side Impact Injury Assessment of the Door Trim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Younghan; Koo, Jeong-Seo

    The complete evaluation of the side vehicle structure and the occupant protection is only possible by means of the full scale side impact crash test. But, auto part manufacturers such as door trim makers can not conduct the test especially when the vehicle is under the developing process. The main objective of this study is to obtain the design guidelines by a simple component level impact test. The relationship between the target absorption energy and impactor speed were examined using the energy absorbed by the door trim. Since each different vehicle type required different energy levels on the door trim. A simple impact test method was developed to estimate abdominal injury by measuring reaction force of the impactor. The reaction force will be converted to a certain level of the energy by the proposed formula. The target of absorption energy for door trim only and the impact speed of simple impactor are derived theoretically based on the conservation of energy. With calculated speed of dummy and the effective mass of abdomen, the energy allocated in the abdomen area of door trim was calculated. The impactor speed can be calculated based on the equivalent energy of door trim absorbed during the full crash test. With the proposed design procedure for the door trim by a simple impact test method was demonstrated to evaluate the abdominal injury. This paper describes a study that was conducted to determine sensitivity of several design factors for reducing abdominal injury values using the matrix of orthogonal array method. In conclusion, with theoretical considerations and empirical test data, the main objective, standardization of door trim design using the simple impact test method was established.

  17. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Boutwell, Erin; Stine, Rebecca; Gard, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects the total limb stiffness and influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1) a reduced total limb stiffness, and (2) reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping) of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb. PMID:27272982

  18. Impact as a general cause of extinction: A feasibility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Large body impact has been implicated as the possible cause of several extinction events. This is entirely plausible if one accepts two propositions: (1) that impacts of large comets and asteroids produce environmental effects severe enough to cause significant species extinctions and (2) that the estimates of comet and asteroid flux for the Phanerozoic are approximately correct. A resonable next step is to investigate the possibility that impact could be a significant factor in the broader Phanerozoic extinction record, not limited merely to a few events of mass extinction. Monte Carlo simulation experiments based on existing flux estimates and reasonable predictions of the relationship between bolide diameter and extinction are discussed. The simulation results raise the serious possibility that large body impact may be a more pervasive factor in extinction than has been assumed heretofore. At the very least, the experiments show that the comet and asteroid flux estimates combined with a reasonable kill curve produces a reasonable extinction record, complete with occasional mass extinctions and the irregular, lower intensity extinctions commonly called background extinction.

  19. Exploring the impact of forcing error characteristics on physically based snow simulations within a global sensitivity analysis framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Lundquist, J. D.; Clark, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Physically based models provide insights into key hydrologic processes, but are associated with uncertainties due to deficiencies in forcing data, model parameters, and model structure. Forcing uncertainty is enhanced in snow-affected catchments, where weather stations are scarce and prone to measurement errors, and meteorological variables exhibit high variability. Hence, there is limited understanding of how forcing error characteristics affect simulations of cold region hydrology. Here we employ global sensitivity analysis to explore how different error types (i.e., bias, random errors), different error distributions, and different error magnitudes influence physically based simulations of four snow variables (snow water equivalent, ablation rates, snow disappearance, and sublimation). We use Sobol' global sensitivity analysis, which is typically used for model parameters, but adapted here for testing model sensitivity to co-existing errors in all forcings. We quantify the Utah Energy Balance model's sensitivity to forcing errors with 1 520 000 Monte Carlo simulations across four sites and four different scenarios. Model outputs were generally (1) more sensitive to forcing biases than random errors, (2) less sensitive to forcing error distributions, and (3) sensitive to different forcings depending on the relative magnitude of errors. For typical error magnitudes, precipitation bias was the most important factor for snow water equivalent, ablation rates, and snow disappearance timing, but other forcings had a significant impact depending on forcing error magnitudes. Additionally, the relative importance of forcing errors depended on the model output of interest. Sensitivity analysis can reveal which forcing error characteristics matter most for hydrologic modeling.

  20. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Cristina F. B.; Rabelo, Camila M.; Silagi, Marcela L.; Mansur, Letícia L.; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor “years of schooling” was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  1. The Impact of High Stakes Testing: The Australian Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenowski, Val; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2012-01-01

    High stakes testing in Australia was introduced in 2008 by way of the National Assessment Program--Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Currently, every year all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy. In 2010 the…

  2. Reconsidering the Impact of High-Stakes Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Henry

    2004-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, many states have implemented high-stakes tests as part of an effort to strengthen accountability for schools, teachers, and students. Predictably, there has been vigorous disagreement regarding the contributions of such policies to increasing test scores and, more importantly, to improving student learning. A recent…

  3. 16 CFR 1203.17 - Impact attenuation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Motorcycle Helmets, 49 CFR 571.218 (S7.1.8). The center of gravity of the drop assembly shall lie within the... lb), the upper surface of which shall consist of a steel plate at least 12 mm (0.47 in.) thick and... test day) by dropping a spherical impactor onto an elastomeric test medium (MEP). The...

  4. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Cristina F B; Rabelo, Camila M; Silagi, Marcela L; Mansur, Letícia L; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor "years of schooling" was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  5. Gravity Waves characteristics and their impact on turbulent transport above an Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, Daniela; Giostra, Umberto; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence within the stable boundary layer (SBL) remains a ubiquitous feature of many geophysical flows, especially over glaciers and ice-sheets. Although numerous studies have investigated various aspects of the boundary layer motion during stable atmospheric conditions, a unified picture of turbulent transport within the SBL remains elusive. In a strongly stratified SBL, turbulence generation is frequently associated with interactions with sub-meso scale motions that are often a combination of gravity waves (GWs) and horizontal modes. While some progress has been made in the inclusion of GW parameterisation within global models, description and parameterisation of the turbulence-wave interaction remain an open question. The discrimination between waves and turbulence is a focal point needed to make progress as these two motions have different properties with regards to heat, moisture and pollutant transport. In fact, the occurrence of GWs can cause significant differences and ambiguities in the interpretation of turbulence statistics and fluxes if not a priori filtered from the analysis. In this work, the characteristics of GW and their impact on turbulent statistics were investigated using wind velocity components and scalars collected above an Antarctic Ice sheet during an Austral Summer. Antarctica is an ideal location for exploring the characteristics of GW because of persistent conditions of strongly stable atmospheric stability in the lower troposphere. Periods dominated by wavy motions have been identified by analysing time series measured by fast response instrumentation. The GWs nature and features have been investigated using Fourier cross-spectral indicators. The detected waves were frequently characterised by variable amplitude and period; moreover, they often produced non-stationarity and large intermittency in turbulent fluctuations that can significantly alter the estimation of turbulence statistics in general and fluxes in particular. A multi

  6. Deformation mechanisms and impact attenuation characteristics of thin-walled collapsible air chambers used in head protection.

    PubMed

    Lamb, L; Hoshizaki, T B

    2009-11-01

    Head injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, many resulting from sporting activities. There is a constant need in the head protection industry for improved methods to manage impacts and to reduce the risk of mild and severe head injuries. Contemporary head protection primarily consists of foam with several inherent disadvantages, including a limited ability to provide effective energy absorption under both low and high impact velocities. Recently, thin-walled collapsible chambers were engineered to address this problem and have been implemented into sport helmets. The chambers consist of four engineering elements which define their dynamic performance: geometry, air volume, material, and venting system. This research analysed the contribution of air flow through an orifice to the chamber's management of impact energy. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the chamber's vent diameter and material stiffness on peak force and venting rate during an impact. Two material stiffnesses (thermoplastic polyurethane 45D and thermoplastic polyurethane 90A) and five vent diameters (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm) were tested at three inbound velocities (1.3 m/s, 2.3 m/s, and 3.0 m/s). Each chamber was impacted ten times using a monorail drop system. Analysis of the results revealed that the material stiffness, vent diameter, and inbound velocity all had a significant effect on peak force and venting rate (p < 0.001). Under low inbound velocities the largest vent diameters transmitted a lower force than the smallest vent, while this relationship reversed at high inbound velocities. Under low velocities the air flowrate was negatively correlated and the flow duration was positively correlated to the peak force. Under high velocities, the air flowrate was positively correlated and the duration was negatively correlated to the peak force. This suggested that, under low velocities, chambers performed optimally when air was dissipated

  7. Dynamic response characteristics of two transport models tested in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents recent experiences with measuring the dynamic response characteristics of a commercial transport and a military transport model during full scale Reynolds number tests in the National Transonic Facility. Both models were limited in angle of attack while testing at full scale Reynolds number and cruise Mach number due to pitch or stall buffet response. Roll buffet (wing buzz) was observed for both models at certain Mach numbers while testing at high Reynolds number. Roll buffet was more severe and more repeatable for the military transport model at cruise Mach number. Miniature strain-gage type accelerometers were used for the first time for obtaining dynamic data as a part of the continuing development of miniature dynamic measurements instrumentation for cryogenic applications. This paper presents the results of vibration measurements obtained for both the commercial and military transport models and documents the experience gained in the use of miniature strain gage type accelerometers.

  8. Research on the laser transmission characteristics simulation and comprehensive test in complex channel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Huilin; Liu, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    The laser transmission characteristics affected in the complex channel environment, which limits the performance of laser equipment and engineering application severely. The article aim at the influence of laser transmission in atmospheric and seawater channels, summarizes the foreign researching work of the simulation and comprehensive test regarding to the laser transmission characteristics in complex environment. And researched the theory of atmospheric turbulence effect, water attenuation features, and put forward the corresponding theoretical model. And researched the simulate technology of atmospheric channel and sea water channel, put forward the analog device plan, adopt the similar theory of flowing to simulate the atmosphere turbulence .When the flowing has the same condition of geometric limits including the same Reynolds, they must be similar to each other in the motivation despite of the difference in the size, speed, and intrinsic quality. On this basis, set up a device for complex channel simulation and comprehensive testing, the overall design of the structure of the device, Hot and Cold Air Convection Simulation of Atmospheric Turbulence, mainly consists of cell body, heating systems, cooling systems, automatic control system. he simulator provides platform and method for the basic research of laser transmission characteristics in the domestic.

  9. Test and analysis of the infrared characteristic of the plume-smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Guang; Chen, Dapeng; Dong, Yanbing

    2015-04-01

    The plume-smoke is one of the main infrared characteristic signal sources of the engine. In this paper, the infrared signal characteristic of a small test engine's plume-smoke is studied. We conduct a quantitative observation of some specific points in the movement path of the plume-smoke by the MW and LW infrared thermal imager. Through the analysis of the smokeless and smoke infrared sequential images, we can get the infrared radiation and the transmission characteristics of the plume-smoke and their variation law with time. Experiments show that there exists a critical temperature of the plume-smoke; the radiation of background can increase when the temperature of the plume-smoke is higher than the critical temperature. On the contrary, the radiation of background decreases when the temperature of the plume-smoke is lower than the critical temperature. In this paper, the research provides a reference for further study on the infrared characteristic of the plume-smoke.

  10. The impact of climate variability and seasonal characteristics on flood occurrence in north-eastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccatelli, Davide; Borga, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the impact of climate variability and seasonal characteristics in the long-term regimes of extreme precipitation and floods in catchments located in north-eastern Italy. We use seasonality indices, climate variability indexes (NOA and WMO) and atmospheric circulation patterns to isolate the sources of variability on flood-inducing processes. This is supported by cluster analyses to identify areas of similar flood processes, both in terms of precipitation forcing and catchment processes. The results allow to isolate regions of similar flood generation processes, effects of soil moisture seasonality due to evaporation and effects of soil moisture seasonality due to snow melt. It is argued that the synoptic approach proposed here is valuable in both flood analysis and flood estimation.

  11. The Impact of Enzyme Characteristics on Corn Stover Fiber Degradation and Acid Production During Ensiled Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haiyu; Richard, Tom L.; Moore, Kenneth J.

    Ensilage can be used to store lignocellulosic biomass before industrial bioprocessing. This study investigated the impacts of seven commerical enzyme mixtures derived from Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and T. longibrachiatum. Treatments included three size grades of corn stover, two enzyme levels (1.67 and 5 IU/g dry matter based on hemicellulase), and various ratios of cellulase to hemicellulase (C ∶ H). The highest C ∶ H ratio tested, 2.38, derived from T. reesei, resulted in the most effective fermentation, with lactic acid as the dominant product. Enzymatic activity during storage may complement industrial pretreatment; creating synergies that could reduce total bioconversion costs.

  12. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Corwin, W.R.; Owings, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 {times} 5.0 {times} 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 {times} 3.33 {times} 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at {minus}40{degrees}C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  13. Antipsychotic-induced sensitization and tolerance: Behavioral characteristics, developmental impacts, and neurobiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance refer to the increased and decreased drug effects due to past drug use, respectively. Both effects reflect the long-term impacts of antipsychotic treatment on the brain and result from the brain’s adaptive response to the foreign property of the drug. In this review, clinical evidence of the behavioral aspect of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is selectively reviewed, followed by an overview of preclinical literature that examines these behavioral characteristics and the related pharmacological and nonpharmacological factors. Next, recent work on the developmental impacts of adolescent antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is presented and recent research that delineates the neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is summarized. A theoretical framework based on “drug learning and memory” principles is proposed to account for the phenomena of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. It is maintained that antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance follow basic principles of learning or acquisition (“induction”) and memory (“expression”). The induction and expression of both effects reflect the consequences of associative and nonassociative processing and are strongly influenced by various pharmacological, environmental, and behavioral factors. Drug-induced neuroplasticity, such as functional changes of striatal dopamine D2 and prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors and their mediated signaling pathways, in principle, is responsible for antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. Understanding the behavioral characteristics and neurobiological underpinnings of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance has greatly enhanced our understanding of mechanisms of antipsychotic action, and may have important implications for future drug discovery and clinical practice. PMID:27371498

  14. Prevalence and characteristics of migraine in medical students and its impact on their daily activities

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Kinnera, Neeharika

    2013-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common neurological disorder with significant impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of migraine headaches in medical students, to measure its impact on their life, and to assess their knowledge about the ailment. Information about lifestyle variables was also collected. Materials and Methods: All medical students who confirmed of having headache for more than 1 year formed the study group. Students filled a detailed questionnaire focusing on demographics, pain characteristics, accompanying factors, triggers, and family history of migraine. Lifestyle variables were enquired and migraine associated disability was assessed by MIDAS (Migraine Disability Assessment). The diagnosis of migraine was made according to the International Headache Society criteria. Results are expressed in n = numbers and percentage. Results: Sixty-eight percent of medical students had headache. The prevalence of migraine in the whole cohort was 28%; however, of the headache group, migraine constituted 42%. There was a female preponderance. One-fourth of the students had weekly or daily attacks with 31% students reporting increase in their headache intensity and frequency. Forty-four percent of students had severe headaches. Dizziness, allodynia, and neck stiffness were reported as accompanying symptoms. Trigger factors were identified in 99% students, predominant of which were poor sleep hygiene, environmental changes, head movements, and mental stress. Only 4% of students did regular exercise. Twenty-seven percent of students reported self-medication use of analgesics. One-fourth of the students had migraine-associated disability but only 6% realized that they had migraine. Conclusion: Our study found a high prevalence of headache with migraine in medical students. The students’ awareness of the disease was very low with one-fourth of the students resorting to self-medication. Our study identified

  15. Impact of Energy Gain and Subsystem Characteristics on Fusion Propulsion Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidt, G. R.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid transport of large payloads and human crews throughout the solar system requires propulsion systems having very high specific impulse (I(sub sp) > 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 5) s). It also calls for systems with extremely low mass-power ratios (alpha < 10(exp -1) kg/kW). Such low alpha are beyond the reach of conventional power-limited propulsion, but may be attainable with fusion and other nuclear concepts that produce energy within the propellant. The magnitude of energy gain must be large enough to sustain the nuclear process while still providing a high jet power relative to the massive energy-intensive subsystems associated with these concepts. This paper evaluates the impact of energy gain and subsystem characteristics on alpha. Central to the analysis are general parameters that embody the essential features of any 'gain-limited' propulsion power balance. Results show that the gains required to achieve alpha = 10(exp -1) kg/kW with foreseeable technology range from approximately 100 to over 2000, which is three to five orders of magnitude greater than current fusion state of the arL Sensitivity analyses point to the parameters exerting the most influence for either: (1) lowering a and improving mission performance or (2) relaxing gain requirements and reducing demands on the fusion process. The greatest impact comes from reducing mass and increasing efficiency of the thruster and subsystems downstream of the fusion process. High relative gain, through enhanced fusion processes or more efficient drivers and processors, is also desirable. There is a benefit in improving driver and subsystem characteristics upstream of the fusion process, but it diminishes at relative gains > 100.

  16. On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

  17. Testing and Resilience of the Impact Origin of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Canup, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    The leading hypothesis for the origin of the Moon is the giant impact model, which grew out of the post-Apollo science community. The hypothesis was able to explain the high E-M system angular momentum, the small lunar core, and consistent with the idea that the early Moon melted substantially. The standard hypothesis requires that the Moon be made entirely from the impactor, strangely at odds with the nearly identical oxygen isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, compositions that might be expected to be different if Moon came from a distinct impactor. Subsequent geochemical research has highlighted the similarity of both geochemical and isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, and measured small but significant amounts of volatiles in lunar glassy materials, both of which are seemingly at odds with the standard giant impact model. Here we focus on key geochemical measurements and spacecraft observations that have prompted a healthy re-evaluation of the giant impact model, provide an overview of physical models that are either newly proposed or slightly revised from previous ideas, to explain the new datasets.

  18. IMPACT_S: Integrated Multiprogram Platform to Analyze and Combine Tests of Selection

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    Among the major goals of research in evolutionary biology are the identification of genes targeted by natural selection and understanding how various regimes of evolution affect the fitness of an organism. In particular, adaptive evolution enables organisms to adapt to changing ecological factors such as diet, temperature, habitat, predatory pressures and prey abundance. An integrative approach is crucial for the identification of non-synonymous mutations that introduce radical changes in protein biochemistry and thus in turn influence the structure and function of proteins. Performing such analyses manually is often a time-consuming process, due to the large number of statistical files generated from multiple approaches, especially when assessing numerous taxa and/or large datasets. We present IMPACT_S, an easy-to-use Graphical User Interface (GUI) software, which rapidly and effectively integrates, filters and combines results from three widely used programs for assessing the influence of selection: Codeml (PAML package), Datamonkey and TreeSAAP. It enables the identification and tabulation of sites detected by these programs as evolving under the influence of positive, neutral and/or negative selection in protein-coding genes. IMPACT_S further facilitates the automatic mapping of these sites onto the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Other useful tools incorporated in IMPACT_S include Jmol, Archaeopteryx, Gnuplot, PhyML, a built-in Swiss-Model interface and a PDB downloader. The relevance and functionality of IMPACT_S is shown through a case study on the toxicoferan-reptilian Cysteine-rich Secretory Proteins (CRiSPs). IMPACT_S is a platform-independent software released under GPLv3 license, freely available online from http://impact-s.sourceforge.net. PMID:25329307

  19. Characteristics of HER2-positive breast cancer diagnosed following the introduction of universal HER2 testing.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Nirmala; Provan, Pamela J; Mahajan, Hema; Hall, Geoffrey; Byth, Karen; Bilous, A Michael; Balleine, Rosemary L

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of universal HER2 testing on the clinico-pathologic profile of HER2+ breast cancer. Data were extracted from breast cancer pathology reports spanning two periods: before (2003/4, n = 379), and after (2008/9, n = 560) the introduction of universal testing. In 2003/4, 43.3% of breast cancers were tested for HER2 with 16% of tested cases HER2+. In 2008/9, 98.4% of cases were tested with 14.7% HER2+. In 2008/9, HER2+ status was associated with younger age, higher grade, increased tumour size, lymph node involvement, negative oestrogen and/or progesterone receptor status. HER2+ cases diagnosed in 2003/4 were not significantly different in respect of these features. The rate of HER2+ breast cancer amongst screen detected cases in 2008/9 was 8.3%. The phenotype of HER2+ breast cancer was stable following the introduction of universal testing. The overall rate of HER2+ breast cancer was influenced by screen detection. PMID:23099207

  20. Prognostic impact of stress testing in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Severi, S.; Michelassi, C. )

    1991-05-01

    Observational data prospectively collected permit the examination of a complex set of decisions, including the decision not to perform any stress testing. Patients with or without previous myocardial infarction admitted for coronary evaluation and not submitted to any stress testing because of clinical reasons are at a higher risk for subsequent death. For prognostication, no test has been better validated than exercise electrocardiography: it can identify patients at low and high risk for future cardiac events among those without symptoms, with typical chest pain, and with previous myocardial infarction. In patients with triple-vessel disease, the results of exercise also allow those at low and high risk to be recognized. Both exercise radionuclide angiography and {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy (the latter in larger patient populations) have also demonstrated significant prognostic value on patients with or without previous myocardial infarction. Neither one has shown superiority to the other in prognostication. So far, they have been considered the only viable alternatives to exercise electrocardiography stress testing for diagnosis and prognostication. However, their costs limit their extensive application. Preliminary data suggest that intravenous dipyridamole echocardiography can be used for both diagnosis and prognostication of coronary artery disease; moreover, the prognostic information derived from dipyridamole echocardiography testing seems independent of and additive to that provided by exercise electrocardiography. Further prospective studies on larger patient populations are needed to better define the prognostic value of dipyridamole echocardiography testing.47 references.

  1. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  2. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  3. Failure Behavior Characterization of Mo-Modified Ti Surface by Impact Test and Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Qin, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Tang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Using the impact test and finite element simulation, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer on pure Ti was investigated. In the impact test, four loads of 100, 300, 500, and 700 N and 104 impacts were adopted. The three-dimensional residual impact dents were examined using an optical microscope (Olympus-DSX500i), indicating that the impact resistance of the Ti surface was improved. Two failure modes cohesive and wearing were elucidated by electron backscatter diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometer performed in a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Through finite element forward analysis performed at a typical impact load of 300 N, stress-strain distributions in the Mo-modified Ti were quantitatively determined. In addition, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer was determined and an ideal failure model was proposed for high-load impact, based on the experimental and finite element forward analysis results.

  4. Exploring the impact of forcing error characteristics on physically based snow simulations within a global sensitivity analysis framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Lundquist, J. D.; Clark, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    Physically based models provide insights into key hydrologic processes but are associated with uncertainties due to deficiencies in forcing data, model parameters, and model structure. Forcing uncertainty is enhanced in snow-affected catchments, where weather stations are scarce and prone to measurement errors, and meteorological variables exhibit high variability. Hence, there is limited understanding of how forcing error characteristics affect simulations of cold region hydrology and which error characteristics are most important. Here we employ global sensitivity analysis to explore how (1) different error types (i.e., bias, random errors), (2) different error probability distributions, and (3) different error magnitudes influence physically based simulations of four snow variables (snow water equivalent, ablation rates, snow disappearance, and sublimation). We use the Sobol' global sensitivity analysis, which is typically used for model parameters but adapted here for testing model sensitivity to coexisting errors in all forcings. We quantify the Utah Energy Balance model's sensitivity to forcing errors with 1 840 000 Monte Carlo simulations across four sites and five different scenarios. Model outputs were (1) consistently more sensitive to forcing biases than random errors, (2) generally less sensitive to forcing error distributions, and (3) critically sensitive to different forcings depending on the relative magnitude of errors. For typical error magnitudes found in areas with drifting snow, precipitation bias was the most important factor for snow water equivalent, ablation rates, and snow disappearance timing, but other forcings had a more dominant impact when precipitation uncertainty was due solely to gauge undercatch. Additionally, the relative importance of forcing errors depended on the model output of interest. Sensitivity analysis can reveal which forcing error characteristics matter most for hydrologic modeling.

  5. Ground Testing Of Hypervelocity Impact Effects Of Micrometeoroids And Space Debris On Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmerohn, Martin; Rott, Martin; Gerhard, Andreas; Osterholz, Jens; Schafer, Frank; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2011-10-01

    Solar arrays are the satellite component most exposed to micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) impacts. The damage potential of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) is characterized by considerable energy released at the impact interface leading to mechanical damage and the generation of plasma. Impact experiments performed in the past indicate that the impact plasma can induce arcing, which consequently may lead to permanent power losses as known from electrostatic discharges. An ESA study is currently ongoing, the objective of which is to study and test the susceptibility of state-of-the art solar arrays to HVI. This paper describes potential failure modes, a ground testing approach to simulate them and its implementation for the test campaign, which will be performed at Fraunhofer EMI using a light gas gun and at Technische Universität München using a plasma-dynamic accelerator. Solar array simulation equipment and comprehensive plasma diagnostics are to be applied for ground testing.

  6. Large Impact Basins on Mercury: Global Distribution, Characteristics, and Modification History from MESSENGER Orbital Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, Caleb I.; Head, James W.; Baker, David M. H.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Klimczak, Christian; Strom, Robert G.; Chapman, Clark R.; Prockter, Louise M.; Phillips, Roger J.; Oberst, Juergen; Preusker, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The formation of large impact basins (diameter D greater than or equal to 300 km) was an important process in the early evolution of Mercury and influenced the planet's topography, stratigraphy, and crustal structure. We catalog and characterize this basin population on Mercury from global observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft, and we use the new data to evaluate basins suggested on the basis of the Mariner 10 flybys. Forty-two certain or probable impact basins are recognized a few additional basins that may have been degraded to the point of ambiguity are plausible on the basis of new data but are classified as uncertain. The spatial density of large basins (D greater than or equal to 500 km) on Mercury is lower than that on the Moon. Morphological characteristics of basins on Mercury suggest that on average they are more degraded than lunar basins. These observations are consistent with more efficient modification, degradation, and obliteration of the largest basins on Mercury than on the Moon. This distinction may be a result of differences in the basin formation process (producing fewer rings), greater relaxation of topography after basin formation (subduing relief), and/or higher rates of volcanism during the period of heavy bombardment on Mercury compared to the Moon (burying basin rings and interiors).

  7. Tracking Particulate Organic Matter Characteristics in Major Arctic Rivers: Indicators of Watershed-Scale Climate Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. W.; Griffin, C. G.; Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Raymond, P. A.; Spencer, R. G.; Striegl, R. G.; Tank, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Six large rivers, including the Yukon and Mackenzie in North America and the Yenisey, Ob', Lena, and Kolyma in Eurasia, drain the majority of the watershed area surrounding the Arctic Ocean. Parallel sampling programs were initiated at downstream locations on these rivers in 2003 to improve estimates of fluvial export and track large-scale perturbations associated with climate change. Over a decade later, synthesis of water chemistry data from these ongoing sampling efforts provides an unprecedented opportunity to 1) examine similarities and differences among the major Arctic rivers, and 2) think critically about how changes in various water chemistry parameters may or may not inform us about climate change impacts. River-borne organic matter characteristics may be particularly telling because mass flux values and composition/source indicators vary with hydrology and permafrost coverage. However, separating climate impacts that occur within river corridors from those that occur beyond them may be difficult, especially when considering changes in particulate organic matter (POM) loads. Data on suspended POM yields, C:N ratios, stable isotope ratios, and radiocarbon content in the major Arctic rivers show marked spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability that is helpful for thinking about how climate change effects may manifest in the future, but it will be challenging to separate changes in POM related to bank erosion and suspension/deposition of in situ sediment stocks from changes in POM that may be linked to processes such as permafrost thaw occurring across the broader landscape.

  8. Impact of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sendur, Mehmet A.N.; Aksoy, Sercan; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y.; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer has not yet been elucidated in detail; we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of ASA on the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast cancer patients who were taking ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled as ASA users (n = 84); matching patients with the same age who were not taking ASA were included as control group (n = 890). Results The median age was 56 (range 34–82) years in both groups. ASA users had a significantly lower incidence of grade II–III tumors compared to non-users (P = 0.02). The other clinicopathological characteristics and treatment histories were similar in both groups. In patients using ASA, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 97.3%, 89.4%, and 79.9% and in non-users it was 94.1%, 81.8%, and 70.9% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.01). In aspirin users, the overall survival rate was 95.0%, 90.6%, and 87.6% and in non-users it was 98.1%, 91.2%, and 85.5% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.50). Conclusion Using ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly improved DFS in breast cancer patients. PMID:25404885

  9. Suitability of Mixing Fluorescent Dye in Adulticides and its Impact on Droplet Characteristics and Pesticide Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Waits, Christy

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent dyes are commonly used to help visualize insecticidal droplets or to trace movement of insecticides; however, the effect these dyes have on the insecticide's efficacy and droplet characteristics is unknown. This study evaluated the effects of mixing Uvitex OB fluorescent dye with 5 adulticides on their efficacy in a wind tunnel. Efficacy was determined via droplet size characteristics, spray flux (active ingredient [AI] deposition), and female adult Aedes aegypti mortality. Fyfanon® ULV, Anvil® 10+10, Duet™, Aqualuer® 20-20, and Zenivex® E20, diluted with corn oil, were tested with and without the dye at maximum, minimum, and half-minimum label rates. Adulticide droplet size was not affected by the addition of dye to any of the 5 pesticides tested. Mosquito mortality was strongly correlated with AI deposition for all pesticides except Duet. There was no difference among correlation coefficients of the 5 pesticides and between coefficients of any pesticide pairs, indicating that all correlations were similar. The addition of dye slightly but nonsignificantly and nonconsistently affected mortality. It was found that the source of this variability was due to large variation in mortality among different replicates of the same treatment. PMID:26675457

  10. Usefulness of sediment toxicity tests with estuarine plants and animals to indicate municipal and industrial effluent impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Weber, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The environmental impact of municipal and industrial effluents has been predicted from results from single species toxicity tests. The goal of these tests is to ensure that water quality criteria and the designated use of the waterbody is not impacted. Recently, the focus of some effluent toxicity evaluation has centered on determining the effluent impact on the sediment in the receiving water. This study evaluated the toxicities of several sediment samples collected above and below six outfalls to the Pensacola Bay system. Toxicities were determined using three macrophytic plants and four animal species. The sediments, with few exceptions, exhibited a low level of toxicity. The mysid shrimp was more sensitive than Ampelisca, Leptocheirus and the sheepshead minnow. The sensitivities of the plants, Echinochloa crusgalli, Scirpus robustus and Sesbania macrocarpa, were comparable to those of the animal species. The toxicity of time sediment, when compared to that of the effluent, determined using standard single species of plants and animals was less. Overall, the sediment toxicity tests were useful in providing insight on the impact of effluents. However, the application and usefulness of this assessment tool is highly dependent upon a variety of factors, including the geomorphological characteristics of the receiving waters.

  11. The role of the modified taylor impact test in dynamic material research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusat, Frank; Rohr, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic material research with strain rates of more than 1000 1/s is experimentally very often done with a Split-Hopkinson Bar, Taylor impact tests or planar plate impact test investigations. At the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), a variant of an inverted classical Taylor impact test is used by application of velocity interferometers of the VISAR type ("Modified Taylor Impact Test", MTT). The conduction of the experiments is similar to that of planar plate impact tests. The data reduction and derivation of dynamic material data can also be restricted to an analysis of the VISAR signal. Due to these properties, nearly each highly dynamic material characterization in our institute done by planar plate investigations is usually accompanied by MTT experiments. The extended possibilities and usefulness of a combined usage of these two highly dynamic characterization methods are explained. Recently, further developed MTT experiments with very small specimen sizes are presented. For the first time, Taylor impact and planar impact specimen can be used for which the load directions even in case of thin plate test material are identical and not perpendicular to each other. Consequences for testing construction elements are discussed.

  12. The evolution and impact of testing baghouse filter performance.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh; Clark, Christina; Mckenna, John

    2012-08-01

    In 1995, the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program for the purpose of generating both independent and credible performance verification of innovative technologies and helping to accelerate acceptance of these products into the marketplace to further benefit the environment and protect public health. The EPA has approved a testing protocol under this program to verify the performance of commercially available filtration products for pulse-jet baghouses in removingfine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter<2.5 microm; PM2.5). This verification testing protocol was later used as a basis for the development of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D6830-02 and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Method 11057. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California and the EPA s Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) highly encourage the use of ETV/ASTM-verified filtration media. This paper highlights the evolution of the standard test methods, the EPA's and SCAQMD's regulatory activities, the benefits of using verified filtration media, and the importance of including the filter performance testing in future consideration of baghouse permitting, baghouse operation and maintenance (O&M) plans, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and bag monitoring plans. PMID:22916439

  13. Impact resistance of current design composite fan blades tested under short-haul operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Salemme, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite blades were impacted in a rotating whirligig facility with conditions closely simulating those which might be experienced by a STOL engine impacted with various foreign objects. The tip speed of the rotating blades was 800 feet per second. The blades were impacted with simulated birds, real birds, ice balls, and gravel. The results of composite blade impact tests were compared with a titanium blade tested under similar conditions. Neither composite material indicated a clear superiority over the other. Blades made from both composite materials showed more damage than the titanium blades.

  14. Water impact laboratory and flight test results for the space shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of water impact tests was conducted using full-scale segment representations of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt structure. The baseline reinforced structural design was tested as well as various alternative design concepts. A major portion of the test program consisted of evaluating foam as a load attenuation material. Applied pressures and response strains were measured for impact velocities from 40 feet per second (ft/s) to 110 ft/s. The structural configurations, test articles, test results, and flight results are described.

  15. Normalization of Impact Energy by Laminate Thickness for Compression After Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hromisin, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of impact energy used to damage a composite laminate is a critical parameter when assessing residual strength properties. The compression after impact (CAI) strength of impacted laminates is dependent upon how thick the laminate is and this has traditionally been accounted for by normalizing (dividing) the impact energy by the laminate's thickness. However, when comparing CAI strength values for a given lay-up sequence and fiber/resin system, dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness has been noted by the author to give higher CAI strength values for thicker laminates. A study was thus undertaken to assess the comparability of CAI strength data by normalizing the impact energy by the specimen thickness raised to a power to account for the higher strength of thicker laminates. One set of data from the literature and two generated in this study were analyzed by dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness to the 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 powers. Results show that as laminate thickness and damage severity decreased, the value which the laminate thickness needs to be raised to in order to yield more comparable CAI data increases.

  16. Impact response characteristics of a cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine based polymer-bonded explosives under different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaogan, Dai; Yushi, Wen; Hui, Huang; Panjun, Zhang; Maoping, Wen

    2013-09-01

    The temperature-impact safety correlation of a cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) was investigated. Matrix of tests was determined by projectile velocities in the range of 160 m/s-370 m/s and five temperature cases of 28 °C (room temperature), 75 °C, 105 °C, 160 °C, and 195 °C. The safety performance under thermal-impact combined environment was evaluated by high speed camera and air over-pressure gauges. The samples before and after impact were compared by the scanning electron microscope. The mechanical performance and thermal decomposition under different temperatures were also studied by mechanics machine and the thermo gravimetric analysis technique. The phase transition of PBX-2 is investigated by XRD spectrograph. The results show that the reaction threshold of unheated explosive is between 263.5 m/s and 269.9 m/s. While heated to 75 °C and 105 °C, the values are increased to 316 m/s-367 m/s and 286 m/s-298.3 m/s, respectively. However, the threshold is less than 176 m/s at 160 °C and the threshold at 195 °C is even lower, which is less than 166.7 m/s. According to the temperature histories, the pictures of wreckages, the over-pressures, the mechanical performance, the thermal decomposition, and phase transition properties, some conclusions can be drawn. First of all, compared with unheated case, the impact safety of PBX-2 is improved at both 75 °C and 105 °C by a softened, easy-flowing, and energy absorbing mechanical properties. Secondly, at 160 °C, the impact safety becomes worse due to the thermal decomposition. Thirdly, when the temperature reaches or exceeds the β → δ phase transition range, the impact safety of PBX-2 becomes significantly worse.

  17. Diagnostic Characteristics of Tests for Ocular Chlamydia after Mass Azithromycin Distributions

    PubMed Central

    See, Craig W.; Moncada, Jeanne; Ayele, Berhan; Gebre, Teshome; Stoller, Nicole E.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Porco, Travis C.; Gaynor, Bruce D.; Emerson, Paul M.; Schachter, Julius; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Although trachoma control programs frequently use the World Health Organization (WHO) simplified grading system for trachoma to monitor the clinical response after repeated mass azithromycin treatments, the programmatic relevance of this evaluation after multiple rounds of antibiotic treatments is unclear. Methods. Three rounds of annual mass azithromycin were distributed to 12 villages in Ethiopia. Twelve months after the third treatment, children were assessed for follicular trachomatous inflammation (TF) and intense trachomatous inflammation (TI) using the WHO simplified grading system and for ocular chlamydial infection using DNA-based and RNA-based tests. Test characteristics for predicting chlamydial infection were computed assuming a chlamydial RNA-based gold standard. As a secondary analysis, test characteristics were also assessed using a latent class analysis. Results. The prevalence of RNA evidence of ocular chlamydia was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7–17.4). A DNA-based test and TF had sensitivities of 61.0% (95% CI, 47.1–73.3) and 65.9% (95% CI, 41.6–83.9), specificities of 100% (95% CI, 99.3–100) and 67.5% (95% CI, 61.0–73.5), and positive predictive values of 100% (95% CI, 86.3–100) and 13.4% (95% CI, 5.5–29.3) compared with an RNA-based gold standard. The latent class analysis confirmed that the RNA-based test was a reasonable choice for a gold standard, with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 67.1–100) and specificity of 99.6% (95% CI, 98.1–100). Conclusions. Basing treatment decisions after mass azithromycin distributions on the WHO simplified grading system will maximize the treatment of infected persons compared with a DNA-based test but will also result in more uninfected persons being treated. The RNA-based test was considerably more sensitive, and almost equivalently specific, compared with a DNA-based test. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00322972.) PMID:22159017

  18. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  19. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  20. VALIDITY OF EFFLUENT AND AMBIENT TOXICITY TESTS FOR PREDICTING BIOLOGICAL IMPACT, BACK RIVER, BALTIMORE HARBOR, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose for the study was to measure the toxicity of effluents discharged to an estuary using freshwater test species and compare the predictions with the receiving water biological impact. In addition, ambient tests were done in conjunction with salinity tolerance tests to c...

  1. Held Back: The Impact of Curricular and Pedagogical Factors on Tested Achievement in High School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agvanian, Zara

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of curricular factors and teaching practices on students' tested achievement in mathematics, explored the best predictors of the tested achievement, and examined differences in the tested achievement among student subgroups. The study utilized qualitative and quantitative methods and triangulated findings from…

  2. Light airplane crash tests at impact velocities of 13 and 27 m/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfaro-Bou, E.; Vaughan, V. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Two similar general aviation airplanes were crash tested at the Langley impact dynamics research facility at velocities of 13 and 27 m/sec. Other flight parameters were held constant. The facility, instrumentation, tests specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data are discussed.

  3. The Impact of Variability of Item Parameter Estimators on Test Information Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinming

    2012-01-01

    The impact of uncertainty about item parameters on test information functions is investigated. The information function of a test is one of the most important tools in item response theory (IRT). Inaccuracy in the estimation of test information can have substantial consequences on data analyses based on IRT. In this article, the major part (called…

  4. SRB/FWC water impact: Flexible body loads test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Two technical areas were examined: evaluation of potential correction methods for spurious case strain outputs from the pressure transducers during the NSWC tests; and assessing procedures for modifying either the excitation function or the response function to account for hydroelastic effects.

  5. Characteristics of candidate sites selected for onsite fuel cell power plant testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, W. C.; Ferraro, V. D.; Woods, R. R.

    A portion of the Onsite Fuel Cell Program involves field testing forty-nine, 40-kW onsite fuel cell power plants. This paper describes the energy characteristics of 82 different sites that have been selected as potential field test locations. The 82 sites include multi-family residential, commercial and light industrial buildings that represent 26 market segments throughout the United States and Japan. Each one of the 82 sites has been instrumented with a standard data acquisition system to obtain hourly thermal and electrical energy consumption data. This energy data will help determine each site's compatibility with a 40-kW fuel cell power plant, and will provide an extensive data base which may be useful in other energy studies.

  6. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  7. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  8. Disruptiveness, friends' characteristics, and delinquency in early adolescence: a test of two competing models of development.

    PubMed

    Vitaro, F; Tremblay, R E; Kerr, M; Pagani, L; Bukowski, W M

    1997-08-01

    This study tested 2 competing models of friends' influence on the development of delinquency in disruptive boys. In so doing, we examined whether highly disruptive, moderately disruptive, moderately conforming, and highly conforming boys' delinquency increased or decreased depending on their friends' characteristics. A sample of 868 boys was classified into the 4 groups according to teacher ratings at ages 11 and 12. Each group was then subdivided by mutual friends' peer-rated aggressiveness-disturbance at the same ages: aggressive-disturbing friends, average friends, nonaggressive-nondisturbing friends, and no friends. Subgroups were next compared on self-reported delinquency at age 13 while controlling for average self-reported delinquency and socioeconomic variables at ages 11 and 12. Results indicate that moderately disruptive boys with aggressive-disturbing friends were more delinquent at age 13 than other subgroups of moderately disruptive boys. Highly disruptive and conforming boys, however, were unaffected by their friends' characteristics. We conclude that the results partially support each theoretical model, suggesting that both individual characteristics and deviant peer association might play causal roles. PMID:9306646

  9. Methodology for estimating thoracic impact response in frontal crash tests.

    PubMed

    Thor, Craig P; Gabler, Hampton C

    2007-01-01

    This study has investigated the feasibility of estimating chest acceleration from the pelvic acceleration and shoulder belt forces measured on a vehicle occupant exposed to a frontal crash. The method of estimating chest acceleration is based upon a simple two-mass one-dimensional model of a vehicle occupant in which pelvic acceleration and shoulder belt force are applied as forcing functions. The predictive power of the model was evaluated by comparing the estimated and measured chest acceleration of 18 Hybrid-III crash test dummies subjected to 56 km/hr full frontal barrier crash tests. The crashtest dummies were restrained by airbags and three-point belt systems with pretensioners and load-limiting shoulder belts. The combined loads exerted on the chest by the pelvis and the shoulder belts were shown to be a reasonable estimate of force on the chest early in the crash event prior to significant airbag loading. PMID:17487104

  10. The attention network test: a characteristic pattern of deficits in children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Adólfsdóttir, Steinunn; Sørensen, Lin; Lundervold, Astri J

    2008-01-01

    Background The Attention Network test (ANT) gives measures of different aspects of the complex process of attention. We ask if children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will show a characteristic pattern of deficits on this test. Methods The sample included 157 children (M = 10 years) who performed the child version of ANT as participants of the Bergen Child Study. Children with an ADHD diagnosis (N = 45) were compared to a group of children with other diagnoses (N = 55) and a group of children without any diagnosis (N = 57). Results The group of children with ADHD showed low accuracy scores and a variable response set, indicating an inattentive response style. No differences were found between the groups on RT and accuracy measures of the alerting, orienting, and conflict networks. A high correlation between full scale IQ (FSIQ) and ANT measures was only found in the ADHD group. When FSIQ score was included as a covariate, the group differences were not statistically significant on any ANT measure. Conclusion The present study showed that accuracy and variability measures rather than measures of the three attention networks conveyed the characteristic pattern of deficits in children with ADHD. The results emphasized the importance of including these measures to extend the sensitivity of the ANT, and the importance of reporting results both with and without FSIQ as a covariate. PMID:18269768

  11. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank NM

    2015-01-01

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional “malaise”: a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional “malaise” and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially. PMID:26140274

  12. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Twisk, Frank Nm

    2015-06-26

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional "malaise": a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional "malaise" and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially. PMID:26140274

  13. Measurement of Low Level Explosives Reaction in Gauged Multi-Dimensional Steven Impact Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, A M; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Chidester, S K; Garza, R G; Swizter, L L

    2001-05-31

    The Steven Test was developed to determine relative impact sensitivity of metal encased solid high explosives and also be amenable to two-dimensional modeling. Low level reaction thresholds occur at impact velocities below those required for shock initiation. To assist in understanding this test, multi-dimensional gauge techniques utilizing carbon foil and carbon resistor gauges were used to measure pressure and event times. Carbon resistor gauges indicated late time low level reactions 200-540 {micro}s after projectile impact, creating 0.39-2.00 kb peak shocks centered in PBX 9501 explosives discs and a 0.60 kb peak shock in a LX-04 disk. Steven Test modeling results, based on ignition and growth criteria, are presented for two PBX 9501 scenarios: one with projectile impact velocity just under threshold (51 m/s) and one with projectile impact velocity just over threshold (55 m/s). Modeling results are presented and compared to experimental data.

  14. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  15. Permeability Testing of Impacted Composite Laminates for Use on Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite, and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented, and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a nonlinear fashion for almost all the specimens tested.

  16. A seal test facility for the measurement of isotropic and anisotropic linear rotordynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Yang, T.; Pace, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    A new seal test facility for measuring high-pressure seal rotor-dynamic characteristics has recently been made operational at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This work is being sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The fundamental concept embodied in this test apparatus is a double-spool-shaft spindle which permits independent control over the spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable circular vibration orbit for both forward and backward whirl. Also, the static eccentricity between the rotating and non-rotating test seal parts is easily adjustable to desired values. By accurately measuring both dynamic radial displacement and dynamic radial force signals, over a wide range of circular orbit frequency, one is able to solve for the full linear-anisotropic model's 12 coefficients rather than the 6 coefficients of the more restrictive isotropic linear model. Of course, one may also impose the isotropic assumption in reducing test data, thereby providing a valid qualification of which seal configurations are well represented by the isotropic model and which are not. In fact, as argued in reference (1), the requirement for maintaining a symmetric total system mass matrix means that the resulting isotropic model needs 5 coefficients and the anisotropic model needs 11 coefficients.

  17. Ballistic Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Emmerling, William C.; Altobelli, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to develop a consistent set of material property and impact test data, and failure analysis, for a variety of materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property information and impact test results are obtained using identical materials, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. This report describes ballistic impact testing which has been conducted on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade.

  18. Joint arthroplasty Perioperative Surgical Home: Impact of patient characteristics on postoperative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Duy L; Ahn, Kyle; Rinehart, Joseph B; Calderon, Michael-David; Wu, Wei-Der; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of different characteristics on postoperative outcomes for patients in a joint arthroplasty Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) program. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed for patients enrolled in a joint arthroplasty PSH program who had undergone primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients were preoperatively stratified based on specific procedure performed, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System (ASA) score, and Charleston Comorbidity Index (CCI) score. The primary outcome criterion was hospital length of stay (LOS). Secondary criteria including operative room (OR) duration, transfusion rate, Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) stay, readmission rate, post-operative complications, and discharge disposition. For each outcome, the predictor variables were entered into a generalized linear model with appropriate response and assessed for predictive relationship to the dependent variable. Significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 337 patients, 200 in the TKA cohort and 137 in the THA cohort, were eligible for the study. Nearly two-third of patients were female. Patient age averaged 64 years and preoperative BMI averaged 29 kg/m2. The majority of patients were ASA score III and CCI score 0. After analysis, ASA score was the only variable predictive for LOS (P = 0.0011) and each increase in ASA score above 2 increased LOS by approximately 0.5 d. ASA score was also the only variable predictive for readmission rate (P = 0.0332). BMI was the only variable predictive for PACU duration (P = 0.0136). Specific procedure performed, age, gender, and CCI score were not predictive for any of the outcome criteria. OR duration, transfusion rate, post-operative complications or discharge disposition were not significantly associated with any of the predictor variables. CONCLUSION: The joint arthroplasty PSH model reduces

  19. A high loading overland flow system: Impacts on soil characteristics, grass constituents, yields and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Wen, C G; Chen, T H; Hsu, F H; Lu, C H; Lin, J B; Chang, C H; Chang, S P; Lee, C S

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to determine effects of different grass species and their harvests on pollutant removal, elucidate impacts on soil characteristics and grass constituents, observe grass yield and quantify nutrient uptake by vegetation in an overland flow system (OLFS). Polluted creek water was applied to eight channels in the OLFS, which were planted with Paragrass, Nilegrass, Cattail, and Vetiver, with each two channels being randomly planted with a given grass species. The grass in one channel was harvested while that in the other channel was not. At a high rate of 27.8 m d(-1) hydraulic loading, the removal efficiencies of conventional pollutants such as BOD, COD, suspended solids (SS), and total coliforms in wastewater are not affected by the type of the grasses species, but those of nitrogen and phosphorus are affected by different species. Overall average removal efficiencies of BOD, COD, SS, ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total coliforms through the OLFS are 42%, 48%, 78%, 47%, 40%, 33% and 89%, respectively. The concentration of nitrate, however, increases due to nitrification. Soil characteristics in OLFS have been changed significantly; specific conductivity, organic matter, exchangeable magnesium, extractable copper and zinc in soils all increase with time while pHs decrease. During the winter season, there is a significant accumulation of nitrate in grass with the subsequent reduction during the active growing season (Spring). The contents of nitrate and phosphorus in grass tissue are higher than those of grass in general pastureland, probably due to nutrient luxury uptake by grass. The overall grass yield, growth rate and nutrient uptake are quantified and implication of such high rate OLFS discussed. PMID:17234253

  20. The effects of low impact development on urban flooding under different rainfall characteristics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-peng; Li, Zhuo-xi; Fu, Guangtao

    2013-11-15

    Low impact development (LID) is generally regarded as a more sustainable solution for urban stormwater management than conventional urban drainage systems. However, its effects on urban flooding at a scale of urban drainage systems have not been fully understood particularly when different rainfall characteristics are considered. In this paper, using an urbanizing catchment in China as a case study, the effects of three LID techniques (swale, permeable pavement and green roof) on urban flooding are analyzed and compared with the conventional drainage system design. A range of storm events with different rainfall amounts, durations and locations of peak intensity are considered for holistic assessment of the LID techniques. The effects are measured by the total flood volume reduction during a storm event compared to the conventional drainage system design. The results obtained indicate that all three LID scenarios are more effective in flood reduction during heavier and shorter storm events. Their performance, however, varies significantly according to the location of peak intensity. That is, swales perform best during a storm event with an early peak, permeable pavements perform best with a middle peak, and green roofs perform best with a late peak, respectively. The trends of flood reduction can be explained using a newly proposed water balance method, i.e., by comparing the effective storage depth of the LID designs with the accumulative rainfall amounts at the beginning and end of flooding in the conventional drainage system. This paper provides an insight into the performance of LID designs under different rainfall characteristics, which is essential for effective urban flood management. PMID:24029461

  1. Impacts of Climate Change on Drought Characteristics in the Northwest U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madadgar, S.; Moradkhani, H.

    2012-04-01

    Several impacts of climate change on the duration, severity, and intensity of hydrological droughts in the Upper Klamath River basin in southern Oregon and northern California are evaluated in this study. The joint behavior of dependent drought variables is analyzed within the recently applied multivariate distribution functions, the Copula functions, in the complex hydrological systems with correlated variables. Streamflow Drought Index (SDI) with different time windows (3, 6, and 9 months) is employed to establish the primary drought analysis for the historical time period of 1920-2009. Evaluation of historical events shows that duration-severity and duration-intensity have respectively the most and the least correlation among other variable pairs. To analyze the impacts of climate change, the dataset of the five Global Climate Models (GCMs) under A1B emission scenario for the time period of 2020-2090 is obtained from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison study Project phase 3 (CMIP3). Substituting the streamflow volumes in the SDI with the simulated runoff by a hydrological model, the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) is used to recognize the future drought characteristics. Evaluation of future droughts indicates that the study area will be exposed to overall less severe droughts with shorter duration when comparing to the historical events. The GCM products of GFDL-CM2.1 and CSIRO-MK3.0 contribute the future wettest and driest conditions, respectively; while none of the five applied GCM projections are found to make drier conditions than the historical events. Drought duration will not exceed 5 months in future time period while the 8-month droughts are discerned among historical events. Furthermore, the analysis of bivariate and trivariate return periods indicated that the future droughts will be less frequent than the historical droughts which is consistent with an overall wet condition for the study basin in the future

  2. Evaluation of protective ensemble thermal characteristics through sweating hot plate, sweating thermal manikin, and human tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Powell, Jeffery B; Roberge, Raymond J; Shepherd, Angie; Coca, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive capability of fabric Total Heat Loss (THL) values on thermal stress that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ensemble wearers may encounter while performing work. A series of three tests, consisting of the Sweating Hot Plate (SHP) test on two sample fabrics and the Sweating Thermal Manikin (STM) and human performance tests on two single-layer encapsulating ensembles (fabric/ensemble A = low THL and B = high THL), was conducted to compare THL values between SHP and STM methods along with human thermophysiological responses to wearing the ensembles. In human testing, ten male subjects performed a treadmill exercise at 4.8 km and 3% incline for 60 min in two environmental conditions (mild = 22°C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and hot/humid = 35°C, 65% RH). The thermal and evaporative resistances were significantly higher on a fabric level as measured in the SHP test than on the ensemble level as measured in the STM test. Consequently the THL values were also significantly different for both fabric types (SHP vs. STM: 191.3 vs. 81.5 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble A, and 909.3 vs. 149.9 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble B (p < 0.001). Body temperature and heart rate response between ensembles A and B were consistently different in both environmental conditions (p < 0.001), which is attributed to significantly higher sweat evaporation in ensemble B than in A (p < 0.05), despite a greater sweat production in ensemble A (p < 0.001) in both environmental conditions. Further, elevation of microclimate temperature (p < 0.001) and humidity (p < 0.01) was significantly greater in ensemble A than in B. It was concluded that: (1) SHP test determined THL values are significantly different from the actual THL potential of the PPE ensemble tested on STM, (2) physiological benefits from wearing a more breathable PPE ensemble may not be feasible with incremental THL values (SHP test) less than approximately 150-200 W·m(2), and (3) the

  3. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  4. Chicxulub: testing for post-impact hydrothermal inputs into the Tertiary ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, A.; Wilkinson, J.; Morgan, J.

    2003-04-01

    Large terrestrial impacts produce intense fracturing of the crust and large melt sheets, providing ideal conditions for extensive hydrothermal circulation. In marine settings, such as Chicxulub, there is the potential for downward penetration of cold seawater, heating by the thermal anomaly at the impact site and leaching of metals, prior to buoyancy driven flow back to the surface. There, fluids may undergo venting into the water column. A large proportion of the metals in such vent fluids precipitate close to the site of discharge; however, a proportion of the fluid is dispersed as a hydrothermal plume. Dissolved and particulate materials (in particular manganese and iron oxyhydroxides) can be carried for several hundreds of kilometers, before falling out to form metal-rich sediments. A series of Tertiary core samples has been obtained from the International Continental Drilling Program at Chicxulub (CSDP). These comprise fine-grained cream coloured carbonate sediments with fine laminations. Transmitted light and cathodoluminescence petrography have been used to carry out a preliminary characterization of the samples. Multi-element analysis has also been undertaken by ICP-AES. Samples were reduced to powder and digested using a nitric-perchloric-hydrofluoric acid attack. Rare earth elements (REE) have been analysed by ICP-MS and solutions were prepared using a modified nitric-perchloric-hydrofluoric acid attack. Geochemical analyses have been carried out to test for characteristic signals of hydrothermal input, such as enrichments in Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mg, Ba, Co, Cr and Ni. The REE are scavenged from seawater onto iron oxide surfaces in the plume; hence anomalous REE concentrations are also indicative of hydrothermal addition. Furthermore, the type of anomaly can differentiate between sediments proximal (+ve Eu) distal (-ve Ce) to the vent site. The stratigraphic extent of any anomalies can be used to constrain the duration of any post-impact circulation. The

  5. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  6. Mechanical characteristics of impacted morsellised bone grafts used in revision of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Giesen, E B; Lamerigts, N M; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P; Schreurs, B W; Huiskes, R

    1999-11-01

    The use of impacted, morsellised bone grafts has become popular in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). The initial stability of the reconstruction and the effectiveness of any subsequent process of revitalisation and incorporation will depend on the mechanical integrity of the graft. Our aim in this study was to document the time-dependent mechanical properties of the morsellised graft. This information is useful in clinical application of the graft, in studies of migration of the implant and in the design of the joint. We used 16 specimens of impacted, morsellised cancellous bone from the sternum of goats to assess the mechanical properties by confined compression creep tests. Consideration of the graft material as a porous, permeable solid, filled with fluid, allowed determination of the compressive modulus of the matrix, and its permeability to fluid flow. In all specimens the compression tests showed large, irreversible deformations, caused by flow-independent creep behaviour as a result of rolling and sliding of the bone chips. The mean permeability was 8.82 *10(-12) m4/Ns (SD 43%), and the compressive modulus was 38.7 MPa (SD 34%). No correlation was found between the apparent density and the permeability or between the apparent density and the compressive modulus. The irreversible deformations in the graft could be captured by a creep law, for which the parameters were quantified. We conclude that in clinical use the graft is bound to be subject to permanent deformation after operation. The permeability of the material is relatively high compared with, for example, human cartilage. The confined compression modulus is relatively low compared with cancellous bone of the same apparent density. Designs of prostheses used in revision surgery must accommodate the viscoelastic and permanent deformations in the graft without causing loosening at the interface. PMID:10615985

  7. Characteristics of tunneling and impact ionization in ZnS:Mn-based thin-film electroluminescent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gurin, N. T. Sabitov, O. Yu.; Afanas'ev, A. M.

    2007-10-15

    A method for measuring the characteristics of tunneling and impact ionization in thin-film electroluminescent emitters is suggested. This method makes it possible to find time dependences of the space-charge layer thickness near the anode and the length of the impact ionization region, to determine more exactly the time dependence of the field in the potential barrier at the cathode interface, the maximum depth of the surface states from which electron tunneling occurs, the minimum thickness of the barrier, and the electron tunneling probability, as well as the impact ionization rate for the deep centers related to structural defects of the phosphor layer.

  8. Characteristics of health impact assessments reported in Australia and New Zealand 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Fiona; Harris, Elizabeth; Chok, Harrison NG; Baum, Fran; Harris-Roxas, Ben; Kemp, Lynn; Spickett, Jeff; Keleher, Helen; Morgan, Richard; Harris, Mark; Wendel, Arthur M; Dannenberg, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective : To describe the use and reporting of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Australia and New Zealand between 2005 and 2009. Methods : We identified 115 HIAs undertaken in Australia and New Zealand between 2005 and 2009. We reviewed 55 HIAs meeting the study's inclusion criteria to identify characteristics and appraise the quality of the reports. Results : Of the 55 HIAs, 31 were undertaken in Australia and 24 in New Zealand. The HIAs were undertaken on plans (31), projects (12), programs (6) and policies (6). Compared to Australia, a higher proportion of New Zealand HIAs were on policies and plans and were rapid assessments done voluntarily to support decision-making. In both countries, most HIAs were on land use planning proposals. Overall, 65% of HIA reports were judged to be adequate. Conclusion : This study is the first attempt to empirically investigate the nature of the broad range of HIAs done in Australia and New Zealand and has highlighted the emergence of HIA as a growing area of public health practice. It identifies areas where current practice could be improved and provides a baseline against which future HIA developments can be assessed. Implications: There is evidence that HIA is becoming a part of public health practice in Australia and New Zealand across a wide range of policies, plans and projects. The assessment of quality of reports allows the development of practical suggestions on ways current practice may be improved. The growth of HIA will depend on ongoing organisation and workforce development in both countries. PMID:24892152

  9. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1963-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the landing characteristics of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of a reentry vehicle using a passive landing system to alleviate the landing-impact loads. The passive landing system consisted of a flexible heat shield with a small section of aluminum honeycomb placed between the heat shield and the crew compartment at the point that would be the first to contact the landing surface. The model was landed on concrete and sand landing surfaces at parachute letdown velocities. The investigations simulated a vertical velocity of 30 ft/sec (full scale), horizontal velocities of 0, 15, 30, 40, and 50 ft/sec (full scale), and landing attitudes ranging from -30 degrees to 20 degrees. The model investigation indicated that stable landings could be made on a concrete surface at horizontal velocities up to about 30 ft/sec, but the stable landing-attitude range at these speeds was small. The aluminum honeycomb bottomed occasionally during landings on concrete. When bottoming did not occur, maximum normal and longitudinal accelerations at the center of gravity of the vehicle were approximately 50g and 30g, respectively.

  10. SPAD-based leaf nitrogen estimation is impacted by environmental factors and crop leaf characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dongliang; Chen, Jia; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Wanlin; Ling, Xiaoxia; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll meters are widely used to guide nitrogen (N) management by monitoring leaf N status in agricultural systems, but the effects of environmental factors and leaf characteristics on leaf N estimations are still unclear. In the present study, we estimated the relationships among SPAD readings, chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area for seven species grown in multiple environments. There were similar relationships between SPAD readings and chlorophyll content per leaf area for the species groups, but the relationship between chlorophyll content and leaf N content per leaf area, and the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area varied widely among the species groups. A significant impact of light-dependent chloroplast movement on SPAD readings was observed under low leaf N supplementation in both rice and soybean but not under high N supplementation. Furthermore, the allocation of leaf N to chlorophyll was strongly influenced by short-term changes in growth light. We demonstrate that the relationship between SPAD readings and leaf N content per leaf area is profoundly affected by environmental factors and leaf features of crop species, which should be accounted for when using a chlorophyll meter to guide N management in agricultural systems. PMID:26303807

  11. Impact of soil characteristics on relative bioavailability of NDL-PCBs in piglets.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Matthieu; Fournier, Agnès; Tankari Dan-Badjo, Abdourahamane; Schwarz, Jessica; Lerch, Sylvain; Rychen, Guido; Feidt, Cyril

    2015-11-01

    Children may be orally exposed to organic pollutants through involuntary soil ingestion. This study was aimed at determining the impact of the characteristics (organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), clay contents and pH) of ten contaminated soils on the bioavailability of non-dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (NDL-PCBs). Five juvenile male piglets were exposed to increasing amounts of each of the soils. These soil-fed groups were compared by a relative bioavailability approach (RBA) to a reference group fed with corn oil spiked with increasing doses of Aroclor 1254. After 10days of oral exposure, the animals were sacrificed and NDL-PCB concentrations were determined by GC-MS in the adipose tissue. The relative bioavailability (RBA) factors were calculated for PCB 101, 138, 153 and 180. Despite high variations in the amount of black carbon (0.50gkg(-1)-6.0gkg(-1)d.w.) and organic matter (12gkg(-1)-180gkg(-1)d.w.), only 3 soils exhibited a significantly lower RBA for all NDL-PCBs, compared to the oil-group. High levels of OC (>100gkg(-1)) and BC content (3.0gkg(-1)) were related to a significant reduction in RBA. Overall, RBA was higher than 45% independently of the soil and the PCB congener. PMID:26210188

  12. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N2-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5nm to 10nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8-20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. PMID:26652347

  13. Hydraulic characteristics of low-impact development practices in northeastern Ohio, 2008–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darner, Robert A.; Dumouchelle, Denise H.

    2011-01-01

    Low-impact development (LID) is an approach to managing stormwater as near to its source as possible; this is accomplished by minimizing impervious surfaces and promoting more natural infiltration and evapotranspiration than is typically associated with developed areas. Two newly constructed LID sites in northeastern Ohio were studied to document their hydraulic characteristics. A roadside best-management practice (BMP) was constructed by replacing about 1,400 linear feet of existing ditches with a bioswale/rain garden BMP consisting of a grassed swale interspersed with rain-garden/overflow structures. The site was monitored in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Although some overflows occurred, numerous precipitation events exceeding the 0.75-inch design storm did not result in overflows. A second study site consists of an 8,200-square-foot parking lot made of a pervious pavers and a rain garden that receives runoff from the roof of a nearby commercial building. A comparison of data from 2009 and 2010 indicates that the median runoff volume in 2010 decreased relative to 2009. The centroid lag times (time difference between centroid of precipitation and centroid of flow) decreased in 2010, most likely due to more intense, shorter duration precipitation events and maturation of the rain garden. Additional data could help quantify the relation between meteorological variables and BMP efficiency.

  14. Patient and Practice Characteristics: Impact on Career Satisfaction of Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alex M

    2015-01-01

    This study examined demographic and practice characteristics that affect the career satisfaction of obstetrician-gynecologists. Data were retrieved from the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, conducted by the Center for Studying Health System Change. The survey consisted of a nationally representative sample of physicians belonging to the American Medical Association. A final sample of 290 obstetrician-gynecologists was obtained from the study. Results indicated more than 80% of obstetrician-gynecologists were either "somewhat satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their careers in medicine. Nearly 56% were older than 48 years; 59% of respondents were men and 77% were of white race. The average obstetrician-gynecologist worked 54 hours per week in medically related activities. Regression analysis showed a significant relationship between obstetrician-gynecologist career satisfaction and the following: adequate time with patients, perceived quality of care, income, work hours, and revenue from Medicaid. In addition, Hispanic patients and the presence of formal written guidelines had a positive impact on career satisfaction. It was concluded that quality care, time with patients, work hours, and income are the major predictors of obstetrician-gynecologist career satisfaction. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between patient demographics and career satisfaction. PMID:26506293

  15. Social Information Processing and Job Characteristics: A Simultaneous Test of Two Theories with Implications for Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Timothy G.; Whitbred, Robert C.; Contractor, Noshir

    2000-01-01

    Tests two theories regarding the factors that influence job satisfaction in an organizational setting: the job characteristic theory, and the social information processing theory. Finds individuals' job satisfaction is predicted by objective characteristics of the job, and an individual's level of job satisfaction is influenced by the job…

  16. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion inmore » graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.« less

  17. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion in graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.

  18. Correlations among ultrasonographic and microscopic characteristics of prepubescent ram lamb testes.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Jennifer L; Bartlewski, Pawel M; Hahnel, Ann C

    2014-12-01

    The onset of spermatogenesis during prepubertal development is accompanied by dynamic changes in testicular microstructure. Computer-assisted analysis of scrotal ultrasonograms may allow us to track these changes in a noninvasive manner; however, the echotextural characteristics of different histomorphological variables remain unclear. Hence the objective of this study was to compare echotextural and microscopic attributes of the testis over the first wave of spermatogenesis in prepubescent ram lambs. Bi-weekly ultrasound examinations and weekly testicular biopsies were carried out in 22 ram lambs from 9.5-10 weeks of age or the attainment of 15 cm(3) in testicular volume, respectively, to the first detection of elongated spermatids (ESt). Testicular echogenicity was highly variable with age; however, after the alignment of data to the first detection of ESt, there was an initial increase followed by a decline, corresponding to the mitotic and postmitotic phases of spermatogenesis in prepubescent ram lambs. Testicular echotextural attributes (mean numerical pixel values and pixel heterogeneity) correlated with seminiferous tubule (ST) diameter, the number of degenerating cells/ST cross-section (XS), and the number of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L-1 (a marker for prespermatogonia and undifferentiated spermatogonia) staining cells/ST XS during the mitotic and postmitotic phases. Additionally, in the postmitotic phase, significant correlations were recorded between the quantitative echotextural characteristics and ST cell density, nuclear:ST area and percentages of STs with different spermatogenic cells as the most mature germ cell type present. These results indicate that ram testes exhibit distinctive echotextural characteristics during the mitotic and postmitotic phases of germ cell differentiation. It is concluded that scrotal ultrasonography in conjunction with computerized image analysis holds potential as a noninvasive alternative to testicular biopsy in

  19. Contact and artificial soil tests using earthworms to evaluate the impact of wastes in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, E.F.; Loehr, R.C.; Malecki, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate two methods using earthworms that can be used to estimate the biological impact of organic and inorganic compounds that may be in wastes applied to land for treatment and disposal. The two methods were the contact test and the artificial soil test. The contact test is 48-h test using an adult worm, a small glass vial, and filter paper to which the test chemical or waste is applied. The test is designed to provide close contact between the worm and a chemical, similar to the situation in soils. The method provides a rapid estimate of the relative toxicity of chemicals and industrial wastes.

  20. The Impact of Attendance and Student Characteristics on Academic Achievement: Findings from an Undergraduate Business Management Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    The article provides an empirical investigation into the impact of attendance and student characteristics on academic achievement in higher education. It is based on a study of 127 students who completed coursework for a taught undergraduate business management module at London Metropolitan University between 2003/4 and 2005/6. The article…

  1. The Impact of Size on Characteristics and Behaviors that Support General Education Programs in Accredited Public Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined the impact of the size of accredited public associate degree-granting community and technical colleges on institutional characteristics and behaviors that support general education programs. Further, it sought opinions of the chief academic officers (CAOs) of these institutions regarding key elements of their general…

  2. The Impact of Learner Characteristics on Information Utilization Strategies, Cognitive Load Experienced, and Performance in Hypermedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Vollmann, Brigitte; Catrambone, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of an adaptation of Cognitive Load Theory to learner-controlled settings we investigated the impact of learner characteristics on information utilization strategies, cognitive load, and learning outcomes in a hypermedia environment. Based on the data of 79 students, five clusters of students were identified according to…

  3. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAFIA is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyses required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  4. Does food insecurity affect parental characteristics and child behavior? Testing mediation effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Oshima, Karen M Matta; Kim, Youngmi

    2010-01-01

    Using two waves of data from the Child Development Supplement in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this study investigates whether parental characteristics (parenting stress, parental warmth, psychological distress, and parent's self-esteem) mediate household food insecurity's relations with child behavior problems. Fixed-effects analyses examine data from a low-income sample of 416 children from 249 households. This study finds that parenting stress mediates the effects of food insecurity on child behavior problems. However, two robustness tests produce different results from those of the fixed-effects models. This inconsistency suggests that household food insecurity's relations to the two types of child behavior problems need to be investigated further with a different methodology and other measures. PMID:20873019

  5. Testing to determine chemical stability, handling characteristics, and reactivity of energetic-fuel mixtures: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, M.E.

    1988-04-01

    The US Army generates approximately 2.5 million pounds of waste explosives each year as a result of explosives production and the loading of ordnance. In addition, the US Army currently stores >200,000 tons of obsolete munitions. The current alternative to storage is open-air burning, open-air detonation, or incineration. The US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency is currently developing methods and procedures for the utilization of energetic materials blended with fuel oil as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the chemical compatibility, reactivity, and handling characteristics of energetic-fuel mixtures. The energetics studied were TNT, RDX, and Composition B. Results indicated that under specific conditions of energetic content, energetic/fuel oil preparation, and system design, energetic/fuel oil mixtures can successfully be used as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. 9 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAFIA is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyzes required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  7. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  8. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  9. CARTILAGE-ON-CARTILAGE VS. METAL-ON-CARTILAGE IMPACT CHARACTERISTICS AND RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Heiner, Anneliese D.; Smith, Abigail D.; Goetz, Jessica E.; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M.; Judd, Kyle T.; McKinley, Todd O.; Martin, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A common in vitro model for studying acute mechanical damage in cartilage is to impact an isolated osteochondral or cartilage specimen with a metallic impactor. The mechanics of a cartilage-on-cartilage (COC) impact, as encountered in vivo, are likely different than those of a metal-on-cartilage (MOC) impact. The hypothesis of this study was that impacted in vitro COC and MOC specimens would differ in their impact behavior, mechanical properties, chondrocyte viability, cell metabolism, and histologic structural damage. Osteochondral specimens were impacted with either an osteochondral plug or a metallic cylinder at the same delivered impact energy per unit area, and processed after 14 days in culture. The COC impacts resulted in about half of the impact maximum stress and a quarter of the impact maximum stress rate of change, as compared to the MOC impacts. The impacted COC specimens had smaller changes in mechanical properties, smaller decreases in chondrocyte viability, higher total proteoglycan content, and less histologic structural damage, as compared to the impacted MOC specimens. If metal-on-cartilage impact conditions are to be used for modeling of articular injuries and post-traumatic osteoarthritis, the differences between COC and MOC impacts must be kept in mind. PMID:23335281

  10. Health Behaviors and Standardized Test Scores: The Impact of School Health Climate on Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Whitney D.; Daly, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Research has found that many characteristics are related to performance on standardized tests. Many of these are not necessarily "academic" attributes. One area of this research is on the connection between physical health or lifestyles and test performance. The research that exists in this area is often disconnected with each other and…

  11. Impact of progesterone administration on doping test of endogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhu; Yang, Rui; Yang, Wenning; Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi

    2014-09-01

    Progesterone (PROG) is a naturally occurring progestagen, which has been used to prevent preterm birth, control persistent anovulatory bleeding, and treat premenstrual syndrome in clinical practices. Studies on the metabolism of PROG have demonstrated that PROG is the precursor of other steroids such as 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol (PD), testosterone (T), and 17-hydroxyprogesterone. PD is the most commonly used endogenous reference compound (ERC) in the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis for doping control. It is expected that the PROG administration could affect the carbon isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C, expressed as δ (13)C-value) of PD and T metabolites, and lead to the false-negative or false-positive results in doping test. The influences of oral and intramuscular administration of PROG on the urinary steroid profile and carbon isotope ratios of steroids were investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the urine concentrations and the δ (13)C-values of PD were affected obviously. The depleted δ (13)C-values of PD could be used to suggest PROG administration. Using PD as ERC may result in the distorted evaluation for suspicious urine sample in IRMS analysis when PROG is ingested. The 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone could be used as the alternative ERCs in case of PROG administration. The carbon isotope ratios of androsterone (An) and etiocholanolone (Etio), two T metabolites, remained unchanged throughout the excretion study, which suggested that the δ values of An and Etio could still be used as the urinary markers of T administration even when PROG was administrated. PMID:25103527

  12. Testing nanoeffect onto model bacteria: Impact of speciation and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Gelabert, Alexandre; Sivry, Yann; Gobbi, Paola; Mansouri-Guilani, Nina; Menguy, Nicolas; Brayner, Roberta; Siron, Valerie; Benedetti, Marc Fabien; Ferrari, Roselyne

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a very useful prokaryotic model for testing the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO). This toxicity is often linked to Zn(2+) released from nanoparticles in the culture medium, and nano-ZnO dissolution in different media is clearly established. Here, two model E. coli strains MG1655 and W3110 both descendant from the original K-12 showing slight differences in their genome were submitted to nano-ZnO or Zn(2+) in order 1 > to refine the nano-ZnO toxicity mechanisms to E. coli, and 2 > to investigate whether toxicity resulted from a real "nanoparticle" effect or from the release of Zn(2+) in solution. To do so, both strains were submitted to various concentrations (i.e., 0.1-1 mM) of nano-ZnO or Zn(2+) in Luria Bertani (LB) medium. These toxicity studies take into account the nano-ZnO solubility in the culture medium by specifically monitoring the Zn(2+) release in our experimental systems. In our experimental conditions, differences in tolerance to nano-ZnO or Zn(2+) between both strains were clearly evidenced. W3110 is generally more tolerant to metal than MG1655, the latter showing no real difference in its sensitivity to the two zinc added forms unlike W3110. The differences in behavior between both strains could be attributed to differences in the two genomes as a mutation named "amber" in W3110. Moreover, by using these two closely E. coli strains, a real "nano" effect is here clearly demonstrated providing a model to study the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles. PMID:26593393

  13. Hybrid Composite Laminates Reinforced with Kevlar/Carbon/Glass Woven Fabrics for Ballistic Impact Testing

    PubMed Central

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Abdul Jalil, Nawal Aswan; Abang Abdul Majid, Dayang Laila

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers. PMID:24955400

  14. A HIGH TEMPERATURE TEST FACILITY FOR STUDYING ASH PARTICLE CHARACTERISTICS OF CANDLE FILTER DURING SURFACE REGENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, B.S-J.; Johnson, E.K.; Rincon, J.

    2002-09-19

    Hot gas particulate filtration is a basic component in advanced power generation systems such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC). These systems require effective particulate removal to protect the downstream gas turbine and also to meet environmental emission requirements. The ceramic barrier filter is one of the options for hot gas filtration. Hot gases flow through ceramic candle filters leaving ash deposited on the outer surface of the filter. A process known as surface regeneration removes the deposited ash periodically by using a high pressure back pulse cleaning jet. After this cleaning process has been done there may be some residual ash on the filter surface. This residual ash may grow and this may lead to mechanical failure of the filter. A High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) was built to investigate the ash characteristics during surface regeneration at high temperatures. The system is capable of conducting surface regeneration tests of a single candle filter at temperatures up to 1500 F. Details of the HTTF apparatus as well as some preliminary test results are presented in this paper. In order to obtain sequential digital images of ash particle distribution during the surface regeneration process, a high resolution, high speed image acquisition system was integrated into the HTTF system. The regeneration pressure and the transient pressure difference between the inside of the candle filter and the chamber during regeneration were measured using a high speed PC data acquisition system. The control variables for the high temperature regeneration tests were (1) face velocity, (2) pressure of the back pulse, and (3) cyclic ash built-up time.

  15. The Impact of Linking Distinct Achievement Test Scores on the Interpretation of Student Growth in Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airola, Denise Tobin

    2011-01-01

    Changes to state tests impact the ability of State Education Agencies (SEAs) to monitor change in performance over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Standardized Performance Growth Index (PGIz), a proposed statistical model for measuring change in student and school performance, across transitions in tests. The PGIz is a…

  16. The Impact of High-Stakes Testing on Curriculum and Pedagogy: A Teacher Perspective from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polesel, John; Rice, Suzanne; Dulfer, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Debates continue about how high-stakes testing regimes influence schools at all levels: their impact on teaching practices, distribution of resources and curriculum provision, and whether they achieve the intended increases in student achievement in targeted areas. In 2008, the Australian government Introduced a national testing scheme, the"…

  17. An Exploration of the Impact of Accountability Testing on Teaching in Urban Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2015-01-01

    This study explores accountability testing in the elementary schools of New York City with particular emphasis on the impact of a statewide social studies test on the value given to social studies instruction in comparison to other subjects. The attitudes of a group of elementary teachers are examined. Some of the teachers taught all subjects in…

  18. The TOEFL Trump Card: An Investigation of Test Impact in an ESL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen E.; Jordan, Stefanie Rehn; Poehner, Matthew E.

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research on the effects of tests on foreign and second-language classrooms has examined the impact or washback effect that commercial/institutional language tests, such as the TOEFL, have on teachers' instructional practices (Hughes, 1998; Wall & Alderson, 1993). Using a case study methodology, this study uncovered the ways in which…

  19. Magnetic system for the quality control of specimens for Charpy impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. V.; Castanho, M. A. P.

    2015-10-01

    It was developed a non-destructive testing system based on magnetic methods for characterization of steel specimens, used in calibration of Charpy impact testing machines. The magnetic properties saturation, remanence, coercivity, and the hysteresis curves were used to create a "magnetic signature" of reference to ensure the value of energy absorbed by these standard specimens.

  20. An Approach for Addressing the Multiple Testing Problem in Social Policy Impact Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    In social policy evaluations, the multiple testing problem occurs due to the many hypothesis tests that are typically conducted across multiple outcomes and subgroups, which can lead to spurious impact findings. This article discusses a framework for addressing this problem that balances Types I and II errors. The framework involves specifying…

  1. The Impact of Mandated Statewide Testing on Teachers' Classroom Assessment and Instructional Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, James H.; Myran, Steve; Workman, Daryl

    The impact of the new Virginia statewide Standards of Learning (SOL) testing program on classroom instructional and assessment practices was studied through surveys before and after implementation of the testing program. The sample represented responses from 570 secondary school teachers (of mathematics, social studies, English, and science) and…

  2. The "Power Test": Its Impact on Student Learning in a Materials Science Course for Engineering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillie, Caroline; Toohey, Susan

    1997-01-01

    A study explored the impact of a testing change designed to encourage deeper approaches to learning. In an engineering materials science course, an open-book final examination was used, with time and opportunities for colleague interaction. Student attitudes and outcomes were compared to those of students tested with a traditional closed-book…

  3. The role of combustion diagnostics in coal quality impact and NO{sub x} emissions field test programs

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.E.; Dyas, B.

    1995-03-01

    Many utilities are examining low sulfur coal or coal blending options to comply with the Clean Air Act Amendment SO{sub 2} emission limits. Test burns have been conducted with the more promising candidate coals to characterize the potential impact of a change in coal quality on boiler operation and performance. Utilities are also under considerable pressure to evaluate NO{sub x} control options and develop a compliance plan to meet strict NO{sub x} regulations, particularly in high population density metropolitan areas on the Eastern seaboard. Field test programs have been conducted to characterize baseline NO{sub x} emissions, evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction potential of combustion modifications, and assess the potential of combustion tuning as an alternative to burner replacement. Coal quality impacts (slagging, fouling, heat absorption, ash removal) and NO{sub x} emissions are both strongly dependent upon the coal combustion process and site-specific boiler firing practices. Non-uniform combustion in the burner region can result in adverse ash deposition characteristics, carbon carryover problems, high furnace exit gas temperatures, and NO{sub x}emission characteristics that are not representative of the coal or the combustion equipment. Advanced combustion diagnostic test procedures have been developed to evaluate and improve burner zone combustion uniformity, even in cases where the coal flow to the individual burners may be non-uniform. The paper outlines a very practical solving approach to identifying combustion related problems that affect ash deposition and NO{sub x} emissions. The benefits of using advanced diagnostic instrumentation to identify problems and tune combustion conditions is illustrated using test data from recent quality field test programs.

  4. Residual Impact of Previous Injury on Musculoskeletal Characteristics in Special Forces Operators

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Jeffrey J.; Clark, Nicholas C.; Abt, John P.; Kresta, Julie Y.; Keenan, Karen A.; Kane, Shawn F.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal injuries are a significant burden to United States Army Special Operations Forces. The advanced tactical skill level and physical training required of Army Special Operators highlights the need to optimize musculoskeletal characteristics to reduce the likelihood of suffering a recurrent injury. Purpose To identify the residual impact of previous injury on musculoskeletal characteristics. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Isokinetic strength of the knee, shoulder, and back and flexibility of the shoulder and hamstrings were assessed as part of a comprehensive human performance protocol, and self-reported musculoskeletal injury history was obtained. Subjects were stratified based on previous history of low back, knee, or shoulder injury, and within-group and between-group comparisons were made for musculoskeletal variables. Results Knee injury analysis showed no significant strength or flexibility differences. Shoulder injury analysis found internal rotation strength of the healthy subjects (H) was significantly higher compared with injured (I) and uninjured (U) limbs of the injured group (H, 60.8 ± 11.5 percent body weight [%BW]; I, 54.5 ± 10.5 %BW; U, 55.5 ± 11.3 %BW) (P = .014 [H vs I] and P = .05 [H vs U]). The external rotation/internal rotation strength ratio was significantly lower in the healthy subjects compared with injured and uninjured limbs of the injured group (H, 0.653 ± 0.122; I, 0.724 ± 0.121; U, 0.724 ± 0.124) (P = .026 [H vs I] and P = .018 [H vs U]). Posterior shoulder tightness was significantly different between the injured and uninjured limb of the injured group (I, 111.6° ± 9.4°; U, 114.4° ± 9.3°; P = .008). The back injury analysis found no significant strength differences between the healthy and injured groups. Conclusion Few physical differences existed between operators with prior knee or back injury. However, operators with a previous history of shoulder injury

  5. Landscape characteristics impacts on water quality of urban lowland catchments: monitoring the Amsterdam city area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liang; van der Vlugt, Corné; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Broers, Hans Peter; van Breukelen, Boris; Ouboter, Maarten; Stuyfzand, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    downstream, especially in infiltrated urban catchments. We conclude that, apart from artificial regulation, groundwater has significant impacts on surface water quality in the polders. Especially in low-lying urban catchments surface water solute concentrations like TP, TN, NH4+, HCO3-, SO42-, and Ca2+ can be predicted by groundwater characteristics. These results suggest that groundwater quality plays a crucial role in understanding and improving surface water quality in regulated lowland catchments.

  6. Design of Spacecraft Missions to Test Kinetic Impact for Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Hernandez, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Earth has previously been struck with devastating force by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and will be struck again. Telescopic search programs aim to provide advance warning of such an impact, but no techniques or systems have yet been tested for deflecting an incoming NEA. To begin addressing this problem, we have analyzed the more than 8000 currently known NEAs to identify those that offer opportunities for safe and meaningful near-term tests of the proposed kinetic impact asteroid deflection technique. In this paper we present our methodology and results, including complete mission designs for the best kinetic impactor test mission opportunities.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation Tests Performed on Space Shuttle Leading- Edge Materials Subjected to Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Bodis, James R.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space shuttle Return To Flight efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tests were performed on reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite panels subjected to ballistic foam impact. The impact tests were conducted to refine and verify analytical models of an external tank foam strike on the space shuttle leading edge. The NDE tests were conducted to quantify the size and location of the resulting damage zone as well as to identify hidden damage.

  8. Impacts of peat restoration on peak flow characteristics of upland headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allott, Tim; Evans, Martin; Agnew, Clive; Milledge, Dave; Pilkington, Mike; Maskill, Rachael

    2014-05-01

    As part of the current focus on ecosystem services provided by peatlands, there is renewed interest in the hydrology of upland blanket peats and more specifically in the hydrological changes associated with peat erosion and restoration. Peat restoration has often been cited as having potential benefits for downstream flood risk through the reduction of peak flows and increases in storm hydrograph lag times. However, evidence of the impacts of peatland restoration practices on storm hydrology and downstream discharge peaks has been limited by lack of measurement of flow response following restoration programmes. This paper reports a hydrological monitoring programme associated with the restoration of a blanket peatland in the Peak District, UK through the practices of erosion gully blocking and the re-vegetation of bare peat. The main component of the project is a before-after-control-impact (BACI) study on three hectare-scale eroded, bare peat catchments, two of which have been restored and one of which is acting as an unmodified control. Monitoring commenced in early summer 2010, and restoration of the experimental sites by reseeding and gully blocking took place between July 2011 and March 2012. To complement the main study, a broader spatial comparison of the hydrological behaviour of catchments with different degradation and restoration conditions has been made, including (i) an intact reference peatland, (ii) the eroded/bare peat sites, and (iii) a 'late stage' restored area of peatland which was re-vegetated in 2003. Results reveal significant differences between the storm hydrograph characteristics of intact, eroded and restored catchments consistent with the hypotheses that (a) peat erosion significantly decreases storm flow lag times and increases storm flow peaks in these peatland systems and (b) peat restoration reverses these effects. Associated overland flow data suggest that gully blocking and re-vegetation within gully systems are crucial controls on

  9. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  10. High-silicon 238PuO2 fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, Mary Ann H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

  11. Evaluation of seismic spatial interaction effects through an impact testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.D.; Driesen, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified objects falling and striking essential, seismically qualified objects is an analytically difficult problem to assess. Analytical solutions to impact problems are conservative and only available for simple situations. In a nuclear facility, the numerous ``sources`` and ``targets`` requiring evaluation often have complex geometric configurations, which makes calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available for this specialized assessment. A drop test program was recently conducted to ``calibrate`` the judgment of seismic qualification engineers who perform interaction evaluations and to further develop seismic interaction criteria. Impact tests on varying combinations of sources and targets were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto targets that were connected to instruments. This paper summarizes the scope, test configurations, and some results of the drop test program. Force and acceleration time history data and general observations are presented on the ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  12. Evaluation of seismic spatial interaction effects through an impact testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.D.; Driesen, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified objects falling and striking essential, seismically qualified objects is an analytically difficult problem to assess. Analytical solutions to impact problems are conservative and only available for simple situations. In a nuclear facility, the numerous sources'' and targets'' requiring evaluation often have complex geometric configurations, which makes calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available for this specialized assessment. A drop test program was recently conducted to calibrate'' the judgment of seismic qualification engineers who perform interaction evaluations and to further develop seismic interaction criteria. Impact tests on varying combinations of sources and targets were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto targets that were connected to instruments. This paper summarizes the scope, test configurations, and some results of the drop test program. Force and acceleration time history data and general observations are presented on the ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  13. Poroelastic response of articular cartilage by nanoindentation creep tests at different characteristic lengths.

    PubMed

    Taffetani, M; Gottardi, R; Gastaldi, D; Raiteri, R; Vena, P

    2014-07-01

    Nanoindentation is an experimental technique which is attracting increasing interests for the mechanical characterization of articular cartilage. In particular, time dependent mechanical responses due to fluid flow through the porous matrix can be quantitatively investigated by nanoindentation experiments at different penetration depths and/or by using different probe sizes. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for the quantitative interpretation of the poroelastic response of articular cartilage subjected to creep nanoindentation tests. To this purpose, multiload creep tests using spherical indenters have been carried out on saturated samples of mature bovine articular cartilage achieving two main quantitative results. First, the dependence of indentation modulus in the drained state (at equilibrium) on the tip radius: a value of 500 kPa has been found using the large tip (400 μm radius) and of 1.7 MPa using the smaller one (25 μm). Secon, the permeability at microscopic scale was estimated at values ranging from 4.5×10(-16) m(4)/N s to 0.1×10(-16) m(4)/N s, from low to high equivalent deformation. Consistently with a poroelastic behavior, the size-dependent response of the indenter displacement disappears when characteristic size and permeability are accounted for. For comparison purposes, the same protocol was applied to intrinsically viscoelastic homogeneous samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS): both indentation modulus and time response have been found size-independent. PMID:24814573

  14. Slaking characteristics of unsaturated granite residual soils based on a modified slaking test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2012-12-01

    Slaking is one of the distinct process involved in the structural breakdown that occurs when soils are suddenly immersed in, or placed in contact with, water. The process occurs because the tensile stress of soil skeleton cannot withstand the stresses caused by rapid water uptake. Some instability problems caused by slaking process were found on subway tunnels and engineered slopes excavated in granite residual soils (GRS) in Guangzhou, south China. A serious of experimental laboratory studies were carried out in order to get better understanding about the slaking characteristics of GRS. Unsaturated GRS samples with different initial moisture content and different degree of compaction were made for test using homemade apparatus. We proposed a modified slaking test mothod to obtain slaking curves so as to reflect the actual slaking process on the basis of experimental observation and mechanism analysis as much as possible. The method considerred air escape process during water uptaking which combined the two extremes involved in water uptaking with free escape of displaced air and with no air escape. Subsequently, a modified slaking velocity index based on the the slaking curve was calculated and utilized for further data processing and analysis. We discussed the relationship between two main control factors (fillable porosity of soil and initial matric suction of soil) and slaking velocity as well. The results reveal that it has exponential function relationship for fillable porosity of soil and logarithm function relationship for initial matric suction of soil.

  15. The Vertical Error Characteristics of GOES-derived Winds: Description and Impact on Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. Anil; Velden, Christopher S.; Braun, Scott A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Errors in the height assignment of some satellite-derived winds exist because the satellites sense radiation emitted from a finite layer of the atmosphere rather than a specific level. Potential problems in data assimilation may arise because the motion of a measured layer is often represented by a single-level value. In this research, cloud and water vapor motion winds that are derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES winds) are compared to collocated rawinsonde observations (RAOBs). An important aspect of this work is that in addition to comparisons at each assigned height, the GOES winds are compared to the entire profile of the collocated RAOB data to determine the vertical error characteristics of the GOES winds. The impact of these results on numerical weather prediction is then investigated. The comparisons at individual vector height assignments indicate that the error of the GOES winds range from approx. 3 to 10 m/s and generally increase with height. However, if taken as a percentage of the total wind speed, accuracy is better at upper levels. As expected, comparisons with the entire profile of the collocated RAOBs indicate that clear-air water vapor winds represent deeper layers than do either infrared or water vapor cloud-tracked winds. This is because in cloud-free regions the signal from water vapor features may result from emittance over a thicker layer. To further investigate characteristics of the clear-air water vapor winds, they are stratified into two categories that are dependent on the depth of the layer represented by the vector. It is found that if the vertical gradient of moisture is smooth and uniform from near the height assignment upwards, the clear-air water vapor wind tends to represent a relatively deep layer. The information from the comparisons is then used in numerical model simulations of two separate events to determine the forecast impacts. Four simulations are performed for each case: 1) A

  16. Impact testing of the H1224A shipping/storage container

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.C.; Bobbe, J.G.; Stenberg, D.R.; Arviso, M.

    1994-05-01

    H1224A weapons containers have been used for years by the Department of Energy and Department of Defense to transport and store W78 warhead midsections. Although designed to protect these midsections only in low-energy handling drop and impact accidents, a recent transportation risk assessment effort has identified a need to evaluate the container`s ability to protect weapons in higher-energy environments. Four impact tests were performed on H1224A containers with W78 Mod 6c mass mockup midsections inside, onto an essentially unyielding target. Dynamic acceleration and strain levels were recorded during the side-on and end-on impacts, each at 12.2 m/s (40 ft/s) and 38.1 m/s (125 ft/s). Measured peak accelerations experienced by the midsections during lower velocity impacts ranged from 250 to 600 Gs for the end-on impact and 350 to 600 Gs for the side-on impact. Measured peak accelerations of the midsections during the higher velocity impacts ranged from 3,000 to 10,000 Gs for the end-on impact and 8,000 to 10,000 Gs for the side-on impact. Deformations in the H1224A container ranged from minimal to severe buckling and weld tearing. At higher impact velocities, the H1224A container may not provide significant energy absorption for the re-entry vehicle midsection but can provide some confinement of potentially damaged components.

  17. Numerical investigation of the impact of asymmetric fuel injection on shock train characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Bin; Chang, Juntao; Jiao, Xiaoliang; Bao, Wen; Yu, Daren

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the impact of asymmetric fuel injection on shock train characteristics using the commercial-code FLUENT. The asymmetry of fuel injection is examined by changing the fuel flow rates of the upper and lower wall fuel injectors. The numerical approach solves the two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, supplemented with a k-ω model of turbulence. As a result, different ways of fuel injections will always lead to shock train transitions, with the variations of shock train structure, strength and leading edge position. For symmetric fuel injection, the flowfield of the isolator is quite asymmetric with the boundary layer of the upper wall side developing much stronger than that of the lower wall, which is due to the heterogeneity of the incoming flow. Regarding to asymmetric fuel injection with more of lower wall side, though the pressures in the combustor are nearly the same, the first shock of the shock train converts between 'Distinct symmetric X type shock' and 'Obscure and weaker asymmetric shock' and the shock train leading edge moves upstream with the increase of the asymmetry level. With regard to asymmetric fuel injection with more of upper wall side, 'incomplete asymmetric X type shock' occurs and the shock train structures keep nearly the same with low level of fuel injection asymmetry. Unexpected results like unstart will happen when increasing the level of fuel injection asymmetry. And the isolator will come back to normal state by decreasing the differential of upper and lower wall sides fuel injections.

  18. Characteristics of re-suspended road dust and its impact on the atmospheric environment in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lihui; Zhuang, Guoshun; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Ying; Li, Juan

    A sampling campaign of re-suspended road dust samples from 53 sites that could cover basically the entire Beijing, soil samples from the source regions of dust storm in August 2003, and aerosol samples from three representative sites in Beijing from December 2001 to September 2003, was carried out to investigate the characteristics of re-suspended road dust and its impact on the atmospheric environment. Ca, S, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cd were far higher than its crustal abundances and Ca 2+, SO 42-, Cl -, K +, Na +, NO 3- were major ions in re-suspended road dust. Al, Ti, Sc, Co, and Mg in re-suspended road dust were mainly originated from crustal source, while Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb were mainly derived from traffic emissions and coal burning, and Fe, Mn, and Cd were mainly from industrial emissions, coal combustion and oil burning. Ca 2+ and SO 42- mainly came from construction activities, construction materials and secondary gas-particle conversions, Cl - and Na + were derived from industrial wastewater disposal and chemical industrial emissions, and NO 3- and K + were from vehicle emissions, photochemical reactions of NO X, biomass and vegetable burning. The contribution of mineral aerosol from inside Beijing to the total mineral aerosols was ˜30% in spring of 2002, ˜70% in summer of 2002, ˜80% in autumn of 2003, ˜20% in PM 10 and ˜50% in PM 2.5, in winter of 2002. The pollution levels of the major pollution species, Ca, S, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Fe, Mn, and Cd in re-suspended road dust reached ˜76%, ˜87%, ˜75%, ˜80%, ˜82%, ˜90%, ˜45%, ˜51%, and ˜94%, respectively. Re-suspended road dust from the traffic and construction activities was one of the major sources of pollution aerosols in Beijing.

  19. Investigation of hydrological time series using copulas for detecting catchment characteristics and anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Takayuki; Bárdossy, András; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.; Cullmann, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Global climate change can have impacts on characteristics of rainfall-runoff events and subsequently on the hydrological regime. Meanwhile, the catchment itself changes due to anthropogenic influences. However, it is not easy to prove the link between the hydrology and the forcings. In this context, it might be meaningful to detect the temporal changes of catchments independent from climate change by investigating existing long-term discharge records. For this purpose, a new stochastic system based on copulas for time series analysis is introduced in this study.A statistical tool like copula has the advantage to scrutinize the dependence structure of the data and, thus, can be used to attribute the catchment behavior by focusing on the following aspects of the statistics defined in the copula domain: (1) copula asymmetry, which can capture the nonsymmetric property of discharge data, differs from one catchment to another due to the intrinsic nature of both runoff and catchment; and (2) copula distances can assist in identifying catchment change by revealing the variability and interdependency of dependence structures.These measures were calculated for 100 years of daily discharges for the Rhine River and these analyses detected epochs of change in the flow sequences. In a follow-up study, we compared the results of copula asymmetry and copula distance applied to two flow models: (i) antecedent precipitation index (API) and (ii) simulated discharge time series generated by a hydrological model. The results of copula-based analysis of hydrological time series seem to support the assumption that the Neckar catchment had started to change around 1976 and stayed unusual until 1990.

  20. Investigation of hydrological time series using copulas for detecting catchment characteristics and anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Bárdossy, A.; Pegram, G. S. S.; Cullmann, J.

    2015-09-01

    Global climate change can have impacts on characteristics of rainfall-runoff events and subsequently on the hydrological regime. Meanwhile, the catchment itself changes due to anthropogenic influences. In this context, it can be meaningful to detect the temporal changes of catchments independent from climate change by investigating existing long term discharge records. For this purpose, a new stochastic system based on copulas for time series analysis is introduced. While widely used time series models are based on linear combinations of correlations assuming a Gaussian behavior of variables, a statistical tool like copula has the advantage to scrutinize the dependence structure of the data in the uniform domain independent of the marginal. Two measures in the copula domain are introduced herein: 1. Copula asymmetry is defined for copulas and calculated for discharges; this measure describes the non symmetric property of the dependence structure and differs from one catchment to another due to the intrinsic nature of both runoff and catchment. 2. Copula distance is defined as Cramér-von Mises type distance calculated between two copula densities of different time scales. This measure describes the variability and interdependency of dependence structures similar to variance and covariance, which can assist in identifying the catchment changes. These measures are calculated for 100 years of daily discharges for the Rhine rivers. Comparing the results of copula asymmetry and copula distance between an API and simulated discharge time series by a hydrological model we can show the interesting signals of systematic modifications along the Rhine rivers in the last 30 years.