Science.gov

Sample records for impaired lung function

  1. Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers Predict Lung Function Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Bushra; Weiden, Michael D.; Kwon, Sophia; Gracely, Edward J.; Comfort, Ashley L.; Ferrier, Natalia; Kasturiarachchi, Kusali J.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Rom, William N.; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cross-sectional studies demonstrate an association between metabolic syndrome and impaired lung function. Objectives: To define if metabolic syndrome biomarkers are risk factors for loss of lung function after irritant exposure. Methods: A nested case-control study of Fire Department of New York personnel with normal pre–September 11th FEV1 and who presented for subspecialty pulmonary evaluation before March 10, 2008. We correlated metabolic syndrome biomarkers obtained within 6 months of World Trade Center dust exposure with subsequent FEV1. FEV1 at subspecialty pulmonary evaluation within 6.5 years defined disease status; cases had FEV1 less than lower limit of normal, whereas control subjects had FEV1 greater than or equal to lower limit of normal. Measurements and Main Results: Clinical data and serum sampled at the first monitoring examination within 6 months of September 11, 2001, assessed body mass index, heart rate, serum glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), leptin, pancreatic polypeptide, and amylin. Cases and control subjects had significant differences in HDL less than 40 mg/dl with triglycerides greater than or equal to 150 mg/dl, heart rate greater than or equal to 66 bpm, and leptin greater than or equal to 10,300 pg/ml. Each increased the odds of abnormal FEV1 at pulmonary evaluation by more than twofold, whereas amylin greater than or equal to 116 pg/ml decreased the odds by 84%, in a multibiomarker model adjusting for age, race, body mass index, and World Trade Center arrival time. This model had a sensitivity of 41%, a specificity of 86%, and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.77. Conclusions: Abnormal triglycerides and HDL and elevated heart rate and leptin are independent risk factors of greater susceptibility to lung function impairment after September 11, 2001, whereas elevated amylin is protective. Metabolic biomarkers are predictors of lung disease, and may be useful for assessing

  2. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  3. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  4. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  5. Characterization of Lung Function Impairment in Adults with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-min; Lin, Zhi-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2014-01-01

    Background Characteristics of lung function impairment in bronchiectasis is not fully understood. Objectives To determine the factors associated with lung function impairment and to compare changes in spirometry during bronchiectasis exacerbation and convalescence (1 week following 14-day antibiotic therapy). Methods We recruited 142 patients with steady-state bronchiectasis, of whom 44 with acute exacerbations in the follow-up were included in subgroup analyses. Baseline measurements consisted of chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), sputum volume, purulence and bacteriology, spirometry and diffusing capacity. Spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, was examined during acute exacerbations and convalescence. Results In the final multivariate models, having bronchiectasis symptoms for 10 years or greater (OR = 4.75, 95%CI: 1.46–15.43, P = 0.01), sputum culture positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 4.93, 95%CI: 1.52–15.94, P<0.01) and HRCT total score being 12 or greater (OR = 7.77, 95%CI: 3.21–18.79, P<0.01) were the major variables associated with FEV1 being 50%pred or less; and the only variable associated with reduced DLCO was 4 or more bronchiectatic lobes (OR = 5.91, 95%CI: 2.20–17.23, P<0.01). Overall differences in FVC and FEV1 during exacerbations and convalescence were significant (P<0.05), whereas changes in other spirometric parameters were less notable. This applied even when stratified by the magnitude of FEV1 and DLCO reduction at baseline. Conclusion Significant lung function impairment should raise alert of chest HRCT abnormality and sputum culture positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in patients with predominantly mild to moderate steady-state bronchiectasis. Acute exacerbations elicited reductions in FVC and FEV1. Changes of other spirometric parameters were less significant during exacerbations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01761214 PMID:25405614

  6. [Impaired lung function in patients with moderate chronic obstructive bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Nefedov, V B; Popova, L A; Shergina, E A

    2004-01-01

    VC, FVC, FEV1, FEV1/VC%, PEF, MEF25, MEF50, MEF75, TLC, TGV, RV, Raw, Rin, Rex, DLCO-SS, paO2 and paCO2 were determined in 22 patients with moderate chronic obstructive bronchitis (FEV1, 79-50% of the normal value). All the patients were found to have impaired bronchial patency, 90.9% of the patients had lung volume and capacity changes; pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction was present in 72.7%. Bronchial patency impairments were manifested by a decrease in FEV1, FEV1/VC%, PEF, MEF25, MEF50, MEF75, and an increase in Raw, Rin, Rex. Changes in the lung volumes and capacities appeared as higher RV, TGV, TLC, lower VC and FVC. Pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction showed up as a reduction in pO2 and DLCO-SS a reduction and an increase in paCO2. The magnitude of the functional changes observed in most patients was low. Significant and pronounced disorders were seen in one third of the patients. PMID:15719666

  7. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging. PMID:26540298

  8. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age‐related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase‐like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging. PMID:26540298

  9. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  10. Older Adults with Chronic Lung Disease Report Less Limitation Compared with Younger Adults with Similar Lung Function Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meilan K.; Thompson, Bruce; Limper, Andrew H.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Criner, Gerald J.; Wise, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Disability guidelines are often based on pulmonary function testing, but factors other than lung function influence how an individual experiences physiologic impairment. Age may impact the perception of impairment in adults with chronic lung disease. Objectives: To determine if self-report of physical functional impairment differs between older adults with chronic lung disease compared with younger adults with similar degrees of lung function impairment. Methods: The Lung Tissue Research Consortium provided data on 981 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease who were well characterized with clinical, radiological, and pathological diagnoses. We used multiple logistic regression to determine if responses to health status questions (from the Short Form-12 and St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire) related to perception of impairment differed in older adults (age ≥ 65 yr, n = 427) compared with younger adults (age < 65 yr, n = 393). Measurements and Main Results: Pulmonary function was higher in older adults (median FEV1 %, 70) compared with younger adults (median FEV1 %, 62) (P < 0.001), whereas the median 6-minute-walk distance was similar between groups (372 m vs. 388 m, P = 0.21). After adjusting for potential confounders, older adults were less likely to report that their health limited them significantly in performing moderate activities (odds ratio [OR], 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22–0.58) or climbing several flights of stairs (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.34–0.77). The odds of reporting that their physical health limited the kinds of activities they performed were reduced by 63% in older adults (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.24–0.58), and, similarly, the odds of reporting that their health caused them to accomplish less than they would like were also lower in older adults (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.25–0.60). The OR for reporting that their breathing problem stops them from doing most

  11. Ultrafine particles in the airway aggravated experimental lung injury through impairment in Treg function.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanggang; Cao, Yinghua; Sun, Yue; Xu, Ruxiang; Zheng, Zhendong; Song, Haihan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition characterized by rapid-onset alveolar-capillary damage mediated by pathogenic proinflammatory immune responses. Since exposure to airway particulate matter (PM) could significantly change the inflammatory status of the individual, we investigated whether PM instillation in the airway could alter the course of ALI, using a murine model with experimental lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS challenge. We found that PM-treated mice presented significantly aggravated lung injury, which was characterized by further reductions in body weight, increased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and higher mortality rate, compared to control saline-treated mice. The PM-treated mice also presented elevated lung and systemic type 1 T helper cell (Th1) frequency as well as reduced lung regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency, which was associated with severity of lung injury. Further examinations revealed that the Treg function was impaired in PM-treated mice, characterized by significantly repressed transforming growth factor beta production. Adoptive transfer of functional Tregs from control mice to PM-treated mice significantly improved their prognosis after intratracheal LPS challenge. Together, these results demonstrated that first, PM in the airway aggravated lung injury; second, severity of lung injury was associated with T cell subset imbalance in PM-treated mice; and third, PM treatment induced quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the Tregs. PMID:27179778

  12. Combined effect of urinary monohydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and impaired lung function on diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jian; Sun, Huizhen; Xiao, Lili; Zhou, Yun; Yin, Wenjun; Xu, Tian; Cheng, Juan; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Associations of type 2 diabetes with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and reduced lung function have been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of reduced lung function and exposure to background PAHs on diabetes. A total of 2730 individuals were drawn from the Wuhan-Zhuhai (WHZH) Cohort Study (n=3053). Participants completed physical examination, measurement of lung function and urinary monohydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis, and the presence of additive interaction between levels of urinary OH-PAHs and lower lung function was evaluated by calculation of the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion due to interaction (AP). Urinary OH-PAHs levels was positively associated with type 2 diabetes among individuals with impaired lung function (p<0.05). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, odd ratio (OR): 0.664, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.491-0.900) and forced vital capacity (FVC, OR: 0.693, 95% CI: 0.537-0.893) were negatively associated with diabetes among individuals. Additive interaction of higher urinary levels of OH-PAHs and lower FVC (RERI: 0.679, 95% CI: 0.120-1.238); AP: 0.427, 95% CI: 0.072-0.782) was associated with diabetes. Exposure to background PAHs was related to diabetes among individuals with lower lung function. Urinary levels of OH-PAHs and reduced lung function had an additive effect on diabetes. PMID:27136672

  13. Bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis and lung function impairment in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed Central

    Groen, H; Aslander, M; Bootsma, H; van der Mark, T W; Kallenberg, C G; Postma, D S

    1993-01-01

    We examined the relationship between peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) lymphocyte phenotypes and lung function in 19 patients with SLE, and evaluated their association with disease activity. Lung function assessment showed a mildly restrictive pattern with frequent impairment of transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1,co) and diffusing capacity of the alveolocapillary membrane (Dm), of late-expiratory airflow rates and with a high prevalence of increased airway resistance. T1,co, Kco and Dm correlated inversely with the numbers of CD8+ cells and CD56+/CD16+/CD3- (NK) cells in BAL. Oxygen radical production, both by stimulated and unstimulated BAL cells and blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) was significantly increased in SLE. In comparison with healthy controls, patients with SLE had a lower percentage of CD19+ B cells in the BAL versus an increased percentage of these cells in peripheral blood. HLA-DR expression on CD4+ and CD8+ lung lymphocytes was markedly increased in SLE. Current SLE disease activity was not associated with changes in BAL or peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotypes. Our data suggest that an ongoing cell-mediated immune response is present in the lungs in SLE, particularly involving activated CD8+ T cells and CD56+/CD16+/CD3- NK cells. It is associated with up-regulated local production of oxygen radicals and with impaired pulmonary diffusing capacity. This inflammatory process seems to be independent of general SLE disease activity. PMID:8403494

  14. Relationship Between Lung Function Impairment and Health-Related Quality of Life in COPD and Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Cristine E.; Drummond, M. Bradley; Han, MeiLan K.; Li, Daner; Fuller, Cathy; Limper, Andrew H.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) measures have been correlated with lung function in patients with COPD and interstitial lung disease (ILD). However, different pathophysiologic mechanisms may influence how these distinct diseases affect HRQL, resulting in differing HRQL by pulmonary diagnosis among patients with similar severity of ventilatory impairment. Methods: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Lung Tissue Research Consortium provided data on well-characterized participants with COPD (n = 576) and ILD (n = 405) at four clinical sites. Using multiple linear regression, we examined the effects of FEV1 (% predicted) and diagnosis (ILD vs COPD) on HRQL scores, including total St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores and Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Results: Participants with ILD had, on average, higher SGRQ scores (15.33 points; 95% CI, 12.46-18.19; P <.001) and lower SF-12 PCS scores ( − 4.73 points; 95% CI, − 6.31 to − 3.14; P <.001) compared with patients with COPD with similar FEV1 % predicted values, indicating worse HRQL. The specific diagnosis also modified the effect of FEV1 on the total SGRQ score (P = .003) and the SF-12 PCS score (P = .03). There was no relationship between lung function and SF-12 MCS scores. Conclusions: HRQL scores were worse for patients with ILD compared with patients with COPD with similar degrees of ventilatory impairment. Differences in dyspnea mechanism or in the rate of disease progression may account for these differences in HRQL. PMID:22576634

  15. Relationship between linear and nonlinear dynamics of heart rate and impairment of lung function in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuco, Adriana; Medeiros, Wladimir Musetti; Sperling, Milena Pelosi Rizk; de Souza, Aline Soares; Alencar, Maria Clara Noman; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Neder, José Alberto; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), functional and structural impairment of lung function can negatively impact heart rate variability (HRV); however, it is unknown if static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity negatively impacts HRV responses. We investigated whether impairment of static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity could be related to HRV indices in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Methods Sixteen sedentary males with COPD were enrolled in this study. Resting blood gases, static lung volumes, and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were measured. The RR interval (RRi) was registered in the supine, standing, and seated positions (10 minutes each) and during 4 minutes of a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (M-RSA). Delta changes (Δsupine-standing and Δsupine-M-RSA) of the standard deviation of normal RRi, low frequency (LF, normalized units [nu]) and high frequency (HF [nu]), SD1, SD2, alpha1, alpha2, and approximate entropy (ApEn) indices were calculated. Results HF, LF, SD1, SD2, and alpha1 deltas significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second, DLCO, airway resistance, residual volume, inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio, and residual volume/total lung capacity ratio. Significant and moderate associations were also observed between LF/HF ratio versus total gas volume (%), r=0.53; LF/HF ratio versus residual volume, %, r=0.52; and HF versus total gas volume (%), r=−0.53 (P<0.05). Linear regression analysis revealed that ΔRRi supine-M-RSA was independently related to DLCO (r=−0.77, r2=0.43, P<0.05). Conclusion Responses of HRV indices were more prominent during M-RSA in moderate to severe COPD. Moreover, greater lung function impairment was related to poorer heart rate dynamics. Finally, impaired lung diffusion capacity was related to an altered parasympathetic response in these patients. PMID:26316739

  16. Gender differences in the effect of occupational endotoxin exposure on impaired lung function and death: the Shanghai Textile Worker Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-ying; Lin, Xinyi; Zheng, Bu-yong; Dai, Hei-Lian; Su, Li; Cai, Tianxi; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Airborne endotoxin exposure has both adverse and protective health effects. Studies show males have augmented acute inflammatory responses to endotoxin. In this longitudinal cohort study we investigated the effect of long-term exposure to endotoxin in cotton dust on health, and determined whether these effects differ by gender. METHODS In the Shanghai Textile Worker Study, 447 cotton and 472 control silk textile workers were followed from 1981 to 2011 with repeated measures of occupational endotoxin exposure, spirometry, and health questionnaires. Impaired lung function was defined as a decline in forced expiratory volume in one second to less than the 5th percentile of population predicted. Death was ascertained by death registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the effect of endotoxin exposure on the time to development of impaired lung function and death. RESULTS 128 deaths and 164 diagnoses of impaired lung function were ascertained between 1981 and 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the composite endpoint of impaired lung function or death was 1.47 (95% CI 1.09-1.97) for cotton vs. silk workers and 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07) per 10,000 endotoxin units (EU)/m3-years increase in exposure. HRs for all-cause mortality was 1.36 (95% CI 0.93-1.99) for cotton vs. silk workers and 1.04 (95% CI 0.99-1.08) per 10,000 EU/m3-years. The risk associated with occupational endotoxin exposure was elevated only in men. CONCLUSIONS Occupational endotoxin exposure is associated with an increase in the risk of impaired lung function and all-cause mortality in men. PMID:24297825

  17. Chest imaging and lung function impairment after long-term occupational exposure to low concentrations of chrysotile.

    PubMed

    Spyratos, Dionisios; Chloros, Diamantis; Haidich, Bettina; Dagdilelis, Loukas; Markou, Stamatia; Sichletidis, Lazaros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the investigation of radiographic findings in relation to lung function after occupational exposure to permissible levels of relatively pure chrysotile (0.5-3% amphiboles). We studied 266 out of the total 317 employees who have worked in an asbestos cement factory during the period 1968-2004 with chest x-ray, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and lung function tests. Sensitivity of chest x-ray was 43% compared to HRCT. Abnormal HRCT findings were found in 75 subjects (67%) and were related to age, occupational exposure duration, and spirometric data. The presence of parenchymal or visceral pleural lesions (exclusively or as the predominant abnormality) was being accompanied by lower total lung capacity and diffusion capacity. HRCT was much more sensitive than chest x-ray for occupational chrysotile exposure. Lung function impairment was related with parenchymal but not with pleural HRCT abnormalities. PMID:22524648

  18. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  19. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T; Kallen, Caleb B; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  20. Efferocytosis impairs pulmonary macrophage and lung antibacterial function via PGE2/EP2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Alexandra I.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Lee, Sang Pyo; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The ingestion of apoptotic cells (ACs; termed “efferocytosis”) by phagocytes has been shown to trigger the release of molecules such as transforming growth factor β, interleukin-10 (IL-10), nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Although the antiinflammatory actions of these mediators may contribute to the restoration of homeostasis after tissue injury, their potential impact on antibacterial defense is unknown. The lung is highly susceptible to diverse forms of injury, and secondary bacterial infections after injury are of enormous clinical importance. We show that ACs suppress in vitro phagocytosis and bacterial killing by alveolar macrophages and that this is mediated by a cyclooxygenase–PGE2–E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2)–adenylyl cyclase–cyclic AMP pathway. Moreover, intrapulmonary administration of ACs demonstrated that PGE2 generated during efferocytosis and acting via EP2 accounts for subsequent impairment of lung recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as enhanced generation of IL-10 in vivo. These results suggest that in addition to their beneficial homeostatic influence, antiinflammatory programs activated by efferocytosis in the lung have the undesirable potential to dampen innate antimicrobial responses. They also identify an opportunity to reduce the incidence and severity of pneumonia in the setting of lung injury by pharmacologically targeting synthesis of PGE2 or ligation of EP2. PMID:19124657

  1. Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment Occurs during Human Metapneumovirus Infection despite Virus-Like Particle Induction of Functional CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sherry C.; Schuster, Jennifer E.; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Boyd, Kelli L.; Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. There is currently no licensed HMPV vaccine. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine candidate because they are noninfectious and elicit a neutralizing antibody response. However, studies show that serum neutralizing antibodies are insufficient for complete protection against reinfection and that adaptive T cell immunity is important for viral clearance. HMPV and other respiratory viruses induce lung CD8+ T cell (TCD8) impairment, mediated by programmed death 1 (PD-1). In this study, we generated HMPV VLPs by expressing the fusion and matrix proteins in mammalian cells and tested whether VLP immunization induces functional HMPV-specific TCD8 responses in mice. C57BL/6 mice vaccinated twice with VLPs and subsequently challenged with HMPV were protected from lung viral replication for at least 20 weeks postimmunization. A single VLP dose elicited F- and M-specific lung TCD8s with higher function and lower expression of PD-1 and other inhibitory receptors than TCD8s from HMPV-infected mice. However, after HMPV challenge, lung TCD8s from VLP-vaccinated mice exhibited inhibitory receptor expression and functional impairment similar to those of mice experiencing secondary infection. HMPV challenge of VLP-immunized μMT mice also elicited a large percentage of impaired lung TCD8s, similar to mice experiencing secondary infection. Together, these results indicate that VLPs are a promising vaccine candidate but do not prevent lung TCD8 impairment upon HMPV challenge. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory disease for which there is no licensed vaccine. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine candidate and induce antibodies, but T cell responses are less defined. Moreover, HMPV and other respiratory viruses induce lung CD8+ T cell (TCD8) impairment mediated by

  2. Long-term ambient air pollution and lung function impairment in Chinese children from a high air pollution range area: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Vivian, Elaina; Mohammed, Kahee A.; Jakhar, Shailja; Vaughn, Michael; Huang, Jin; Zelicoff, Alan; Xaverius, Pamela; Bai, Zhipeng; Lin, Shao; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Si-Quan; Qian, Zhengmin; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent and inconclusive associations between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung function in children from Europe and America, where air pollution levels were typically low. The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between air pollutants and lung function in children selected from heavily industrialized and polluted cities in northeastern China. During 2012, 6740 boys and girls aged 7-14 years were recruited in 24 districts of seven northeastern cities. Portable electronic spirometers were used to measure lung function. Four-year average concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were measured at monitoring stations in the 24 districts. Two-staged regression models were used in the data analysis, controlling for covariates. Overall, for all subjects, the increased odds of lung function impairment associated with exposure to air pollutants, ranged from 5% (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.10) for FVC < 85% predicted per 46.3 μg/m3 for O3 to 81% (aOR = 1.81; 95%CI = 1.44, 2.28) for FEV1 < 85% predicted per 30.6 μg/m3 for PM10. The linear regression models consistently showed a negative relationship between all air pollutants and lung function measures across subjects. There were significant interaction terms indicating gender differences for lung function impairment and pulmonary function from exposure to some pollutants (P < 0.10). In conclusion, long term exposure to high concentrations of ambient air pollution is associated with decreased pulmonary function and lung function impairment, and females appear to be more susceptible than males.

  3. Overweight and obesity as risk factors for impaired lung function in patients with asthma: A real-life experience.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Schiavetti, Irene; Bellezza Fontana, Rossana; Sorbello, Valentina; Ricciardolo, Fabio L M

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have outlined a possible relationship between an increased body mass index (BMI) and asthma. The aim of the study was to investigate in patients with asthma, enrolled in a real-life setting, a possible relationship between BMI and asthma parameters, including lung function markers (i.e., forced vital capacity [FVC], forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow at 25-75%), fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), asthma control level, Asthma Control Test (ACT), comorbid allergy, and allergic rhinitis (AR). The study included 286 patients with asthma. All subjects were evaluated performing clinical examination, spirometry, FeNO measurement, and ACT questionnaire. Ninety-six (33.6%) patients were overweight and 45 (14.1%) patients were obese. Lung function was significantly impaired in overweight and obese asthmatic patients in comparison with normal-weight ones. Increased BMI did not affect FeNO values and asthma control level. Overweight patients had double the risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.89) and obese patients had triple the risk (OR, 3.17) of having pathological FEV1 in comparison with normal-weight patients. Both in overweight (OR, 2.415) and obese patients (OR, 2.126), the risk to have pathological FEV1/FVC was about two times higher than in normal-weight patients. In overweight and obese asthmatic patients the probability of allergy was, respectively, 3.5 times (OR, 0.285) and 4.5 times (OR, 0.224) lower compared with normal-weight asthmatic patients. The risk of suffering from AR was three times lower in overweight (OR, 0.331) patients and six times lower in obese (OR, 0.163) patients. The present study suggests that BMI assessment should be routinely considered in asthmatic patients to reveal bronchial obstruction, also, in controlled asthma. PMID:24992544

  4. Impaired function of CTLA-4 in the lungs of patients with chronic beryllium disease contributes to persistent inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chain, Jennifer L; Martin, Allison K; Mack, Douglas G; Maier, Lisa A; Palmer, Brent E; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-08-15

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is an occupational lung disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation and the accumulation of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung. These differentiated effector memory T cells secrete IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α upon in vitro activation. Beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung are CD28 independent and have increased expression of the coinhibitory receptor, programmed death 1, resulting in Ag-specific T cells that proliferate poorly yet retain the ability to express Th1-type cytokines. To further investigate the role of coinhibitory receptors in the beryllium-induced immune response, we examined the expression of CTLA-4 in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage cells from subjects with CBD. CTLA-4 expression was elevated on CD4(+) T cells from the lungs of study subjects compared with blood. Furthermore, CTLA-4 expression was greatest in the beryllium-responsive subset of CD4(+) T cells that retained the ability to proliferate and express IL-2. Functional assays show that the induction of CTLA-4 signaling in blood cells inhibited beryllium-induced T cell proliferation while having no effect on the proliferative capacity of beryllium-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Collectively, our findings suggest a dysfunctional CTLA-4 pathway in the lung and its potential contribution to the persistent inflammatory response that characterizes CBD. PMID:23851684

  5. Impaired mesenchymal cell function in Gata4 mutant mice leads to diaphragmatic hernias and primary lung defects

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Patrick Y.; Bielinska, Malgorzata; Erlich, Jonathan M.; Mannisto, Susanna; Pu, William T.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is an often fatal birth defect that is commonly associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and cardiac malformations. Some investigators hypothesize that this constellation of defects results from genetic or environmental triggers that disrupt mesenchymal cell function in not only the primordial diaphragm but also the thoracic organs. The alternative hypothesis is that the displacement of the abdominal viscera in the chest secondarily perturbs the development of the heart and lungs. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding FOG-2, a transcriptional co-regulator, have been linked to CDH and pulmonary hypoplasia in humans and mice. Here we show that mutagenesis of the gene for GATA-4, a transcription factor known to functionally interact with FOG-2, predisposes inbred mice to a similar set of birth defects. Analysis of wild-type mouse embryos demonstrated co-expression of Gata4 and Fog2 in mesenchymal cells of the developing diaphragm, lungs, and heart. A significant fraction of C57Bl/6 mice heterozygous for a Gata4 deletion mutation died within one day of birth. Developmental defects in the heterozygotes included midline diaphragmatic hernias, dilated distal airways, and cardiac malformations. Heterozygotes had any combination of these defects or none. In chimeric mice, Gata4−/− cells retained the capacity to contribute to cells in the diaphragmatic central tendon and lung mesenchyme, indicating that GATA-4 is not required for differentiation of these lineages. We conclude that GATA-4, like its co-regulator FOG-2, is required for proper mesenchymal cell function in the developing diaphragm, lungs, and heart. PMID:17069789

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Tuberculosis-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impaired Lung Function Among Advanced HIV/TB Co-infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients with pulmonary TB (pTB) can have worsening of respiratory symptoms as part of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Thus, reconstitution of immune function on ART could drive incident lung damage in HIV/TB. Methods We hypothesized that increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which can degrade lung matrix, on ART are associated with TB-IRIS among a cohort of advanced, ART naïve, HIV-infected adults with pTB. Furthermore, we related early changes in immune measures and MMPs on ART to lung function in an exploratory subset of patients post-TB cure. This study was nested within a prospective cohort study. Rank sum and chi-square tests, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and logistic regression were used for analyses. Results Increases in MMP-8 following ART initiation were independently associated with TB-IRIS (p = 0.04; adjusted odds ratio 1.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.0–2.1]; n = 32). Increases in CD4 counts and MMP-8 on ART were also associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in one-second post-TB treatment completion (r = − 0.7, p = 0.006 and r = − 0.6, p = 0.02, respectively; n = 14). Conclusions ART-induced MMP increases are associated with TB-IRIS and may affect lung function post-TB cure. End-organ damage due to TB-IRIS and mechanisms whereby immune restoration impairs lung function in pTB deserve further investigation. PMID:27014741

  7. Impaired caveolae function and upregulation of alternative endocytic pathways induced by experimental modulation of intersectin-1s expression in mouse lung endothelium.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dan N; Neamu, Radu; Bardita, Cristina; Wang, Minhua; Predescu, Sanda A

    2012-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a protein containing five SH3 (A-E) domains, regulates via the SH3A the function of dynamin-2 (dyn2) at the endocytic site. ITSN-1s expression was modulated in mouse lung endothelium by liposome delivery of either a plasmid cDNA encoding myc-SH3A or a specific siRNA targeting ITSN-1 gene. The lung vasculature of SH3A-transduced and ITSN-1s- deficient mice was perfused with gold albumin (Au-BSA) to analyze by electron microscopy the morphological intermediates and pathways involved in transendothelial transport or with dinitrophenylated (DNP)-BSA to quantify by ELISA its transport. Acute modulation of ITSN-1s expression decreased the number of caveolae, impaired their transport, and opened the interendothelial junctions, while upregulating compensatory nonconventional endocytic/transcytotic structures. Chronic inhibition of ITSN-1s further increased the occurrence of nonconventional intermediates and partially restored the junctional integrity. These findings indicate that ITSN-1s expression is required for caveolae function and efficient transendothelial transport. Moreover, our results demonstrate that ECs are highly adapted to perform their transport function while maintaining lung homeostasis. PMID:22506115

  8. Impaired Caveolae Function and Upregulation of Alternative Endocytic Pathways Induced by Experimental Modulation of Intersectin-1s Expression in Mouse Lung Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Dan N.; Neamu, Radu; Bardita, Cristina; Wang, Minhua; Predescu, Sanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a protein containing five SH3 (A-E) domains, regulates via the SH3A the function of dynamin-2 (dyn2) at the endocytic site. ITSN-1s expression was modulated in mouse lung endothelium by liposome delivery of either a plasmid cDNA encoding myc-SH3A or a specific siRNA targeting ITSN-1 gene. The lung vasculature of SH3A-transduced and ITSN-1s- deficient mice was perfused with gold albumin (Au-BSA) to analyze by electron microscopy the morphological intermediates and pathways involved in transendothelial transport or with dinitrophenylated (DNP)-BSA to quantify by ELISA its transport. Acute modulation of ITSN-1s expression decreased the number of caveolae, impaired their transport, and opened the interendothelial junctions, while upregulating compensatory nonconventional endocytic/transcytotic structures. Chronic inhibition of ITSN-1s further increased the occurrence of nonconventional intermediates and partially restored the junctional integrity. These findings indicate that ITSN-1s expression is required for caveolae function and efficient transendothelial transport. Moreover, our results demonstrate that ECs are highly adapted to perform their transport function while maintaining lung homeostasis. PMID:22506115

  9. Lung function and radiation response.

    PubMed

    Hong, A; Dische, S; Saunders, M I; Lockwood, P; Crocombe, K

    1991-12-01

    This study investigated whether impaired respiratory function affected the response to radiotherapy. A prospective study was performed in which lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The findings were considered to reflect the physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and these were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of the patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between the tests performed and the severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In the patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. In patients selected for curative radiotherapy, lung function would not appear to be an important factor influencing the response of normal tissues or tumour to irradiation. PMID:1663411

  10. Analysis of impulse oscillometric measures of lung function and respiratory system model parameters in small airway-impaired and healthy children over a 2-year period

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Is Impulse Oscillometry System (IOS) a valuable tool to measure respiratory system function in Children? Asthma (A) is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease in children. Therefore, early and accurate assessment of respiratory function is of tremendous clinical interest in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of respiratory conditions in this subpopulation. IOS has been successfully used to measure lung function in children with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity to small airway impairments (SAI) and asthma. IOS measures of airway function and equivalent electrical circuit models of the human respiratory system have been developed to quantify the severity of these conditions. Previously, we have evaluated several known respiratory models based on the Mead's model and more parsimonious versions based on fitting IOS data known as extended RIC (eRIC) and augmented RIC (aRIC) models have emerged, which offer advantages over earlier models. Methods IOS data from twenty-six children were collected and compared during pre-bronchodilation (pre-B) and post- bronchodilation (post-B) conditions over a period of 2 years. Results and Discussion Are the IOS and model parameters capable of differentiating between healthy children and children with respiratory system distress? Children were classified into two main categories: Healthy (H) and Small Airway-Impaired (SAI). The IOS measures and respiratory model parameters analyzed differed consistently between H and SAI children. SAI children showed smaller trend of "growth" and larger trend of bronchodilator responses than H children. The two model parameters: peripheral compliance (Cp) and peripheral resistance (Rp) tracked IOS indices of small airway function well. Cp was a more sensitive index than Rp. Both eRIC and aRIC Cps and the IOS Reactance Area, AX, (also known as the "Goldman Triangle") showed good correlations. Conclusions What are the most useful IOS and model parameters? In this work we

  11. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  12. Caveolins and lung function.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  13. CAVEOLINS AND LUNG FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A.; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  14. T-cell–restricted T-bet overexpression induces aberrant hematopoiesis of myeloid cells and impairs function of macrophages in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Iriguchi, Shoichi; Kikuchi, Norihiro; Noguchi, Emiko; Morishima, Yuko; Matsuyama, Masashi; Yoh, Keigyou; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Ishii, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Although overexpression of T-bet, a master transcription factor in type-1 helper T lymphocytes, has been reported in several hematologic and immune diseases, its role in their pathogenesis is not fully understood. In the present study, we used transgenic model mice (T-bettg/wt and T-bettg/tg) to investigate the effects of T-bet overexpression selectively in T lymphocytes on the development of hematologic and immune diseases. The results showed that T-bet overexpression in T cells spontaneously induced maturation arrest in the mononuclear phagocyte lineage, as well as spontaneous dermatitis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP)-like disease in T-bettg/wt and T-bettg/tg mice, respectively. T-bettg/tg alveoli with the PAP phenotype showed remarkable reorganization of alveolar mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations and impaired function, in addition to augmented T-cell infiltration. In addition, PAP development in T-bettg/tg mice was found to be associated with increased migration of myeloid cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. These findings reveal an unexpected link between T-bet overexpression in T lymphocytes and the development of PAP caused by reorganization of mononuclear phagocytes in the lung, and provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of secondary PAP accompanied by hematologic disorders. PMID:25349175

  15. Minnelide/Triptolide Impairs Mitochondrial Function by Regulating SIRT3 in P53-Dependent Manner in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Corey, Catherine; Scott, Iain; Shiva, Sruti; D’Cunha, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Minnelide/Triptolide (TL) has recently emerged as a potent anticancer drug in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the precise mechanism of its action remains ambiguous. In this study, we elucidated the molecular basis for TL-induced cell death in context to p53 status. Cell death was attributed to dysfunction of mitochondrial bioenergetics in p53-deficient cells, which was characterized by decreased mitochondrial respiration, steady-state ATP level and membrane potential, but augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS production resulted in oxidative stress in TL-treated cells. This was exhibited by elevated nuclear levels of a redox-sensitive transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2), along with diminished cellular glutathione (GSH) content. We further demonstrated that in the absence of p53, TL blunted the expression of mitochondrial SIRT3 triggering increased acetylation of NDUAF9 and succinate dehydrogenase, components of complexes I and II of the electron transport chain (ETC). TL-mediated hyperacetylation of complexes I and II proteins and these complexes displayed decreased enzymatic activities. We also provide the evidence that P53 regulate steady-state level of SIRT3 through Proteasome-Pathway. Finally, forced overexpression of Sirt3, but not deacetylase-deficient mutant of Sirt3 (H243Y), restored the deleterious effect of TL on p53-deficient cells by rescuing mitochondrial bioenergetics. On contrary, Sirt3 deficiency in the background of wild-type p53 triggered TL-induced mitochondrial impairment that echoed TL effect in p53-deficeint cells. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which TL exerts its potent effects on mitochondrial function and ultimately the viability of NSCLC tumor. PMID:27501149

  16. Minnelide/Triptolide Impairs Mitochondrial Function by Regulating SIRT3 in P53-Dependent Manner in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Corey, Catherine; Scott, Iain; Shiva, Sruti; D'Cunha, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Minnelide/Triptolide (TL) has recently emerged as a potent anticancer drug in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the precise mechanism of its action remains ambiguous. In this study, we elucidated the molecular basis for TL-induced cell death in context to p53 status. Cell death was attributed to dysfunction of mitochondrial bioenergetics in p53-deficient cells, which was characterized by decreased mitochondrial respiration, steady-state ATP level and membrane potential, but augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS production resulted in oxidative stress in TL-treated cells. This was exhibited by elevated nuclear levels of a redox-sensitive transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2), along with diminished cellular glutathione (GSH) content. We further demonstrated that in the absence of p53, TL blunted the expression of mitochondrial SIRT3 triggering increased acetylation of NDUAF9 and succinate dehydrogenase, components of complexes I and II of the electron transport chain (ETC). TL-mediated hyperacetylation of complexes I and II proteins and these complexes displayed decreased enzymatic activities. We also provide the evidence that P53 regulate steady-state level of SIRT3 through Proteasome-Pathway. Finally, forced overexpression of Sirt3, but not deacetylase-deficient mutant of Sirt3 (H243Y), restored the deleterious effect of TL on p53-deficient cells by rescuing mitochondrial bioenergetics. On contrary, Sirt3 deficiency in the background of wild-type p53 triggered TL-induced mitochondrial impairment that echoed TL effect in p53-deficeint cells. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which TL exerts its potent effects on mitochondrial function and ultimately the viability of NSCLC tumor. PMID:27501149

  17. Revival of impaired lung perfusion after sleeve lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shibano, Tomoki; Endo, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Maki, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sleeve resection, a mainstay for centrally-located lung cancer, is a challenging procedure when the preserved lung is impaired. We herein reported a 61-year-old male who underwent right upper sleeve lobectomy for squamous cell carcinoma located at the orifice of the upper bronchus. The tumor invaded the main bronchus. A lung perfusion scan showed severe impairment, while the right middle and lower lobes were well expanded. Not only the spirogram, but also the lung perfusion in the residual lung, had markedly recovered at 2 months after the right upper extended sleeve lobectomy. The patient is currently living his normal daily life. Residual lung perfusion can be revived, even if it is impaired preoperatively. PMID:27076980

  18. Regulation of Immunoproteasome Function in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Ilona E.; Vosyka, Oliver; Takenaka, Shinji; Kloß, Alexander; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Willems, Lianne I.; Verdoes, Martijn; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Marcos, Elisabeth; Adnot, Serge; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Herold, Susanne; Ohno, Shinji; Adler, Heiko; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Impaired immune function contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Disease progression is further exacerbated by pathogen infections due to impaired immune responses. Elimination of infected cells is achieved by cytotoxic CD8+  T cells that are activated by MHC I-mediated presentation of pathogen-derived antigenic peptides. The immunoproteasome, a specialized form of the proteasome, improves generation of antigenic peptides for MHC I presentation thereby facilitating anti-viral immune responses. However, immunoproteasome function in the lung has not been investigated in detail yet. In this study, we comprehensively characterized the function of immunoproteasomes in the human and murine lung. Parenchymal cells of the lung express low constitutive levels of immunoproteasomes, while they are highly and specifically expressed in alveolar macrophages. Immunoproteasome expression is not altered in whole lung tissue of COPD patients. Novel activity-based probes and native gel analysis revealed that immunoproteasome activities are specifically and rapidly induced by IFNγ treatment in respiratory cells in vitro and by virus infection of the lung in mice. Our results suggest that the lung is potentially capable of mounting an immunoproteasome-mediated efficient adaptive immune response to intracellular infections. PMID:25989070

  19. Lacking power impairs executive functions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela K; Jostmann, Nils B; Galinsky, Adam D; van Dijk, Wilco W

    2008-05-01

    Four experiments explored whether lacking power impairs executive functioning, testing the hypothesis that the cognitive presses of powerlessness increase vulnerability to performance decrements during complex executive tasks. In the first three experiments, low power impaired performance on executive-function tasks: The powerless were less effective than the powerful at updating (Experiment 1), inhibiting (Experiment 2), and planning (Experiment 3). Existing research suggests that the powerless have difficulty distinguishing between what is goal relevant and what is goal irrelevant in the environment. A fourth experiment established that the executive-function impairment associated with low power is driven by goal neglect. The current research implies that the cognitive alterations arising from powerlessness may help foster stable social hierarchies and that empowering employees may reduce costly organizational errors. PMID:18466404

  20. A model of low-level primary blast brain trauma results in cytoskeletal proteolysis and chronic functional impairment in the absence of lung barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Eugene; Gottlieb, James J; Cheung, Bob; Shek, Pang N; Baker, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    Shock-wave exposure from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) has been implicated as a possible contributing factor to neurological impairment reported in combat veterans. However, evidence-based substantiation of this implication, particularly for low-level exposure in the absence of external signs of trauma, remain elusive. Accordingly, we constructed an open-ended shock tube producing a short-duration, low-amplitude shockwave. Low-level (11.5 kPa static overpressure) complex shock-wave exposure in rats resulted in no histological evidence of lung injury. By contrast, delayed cytoskeletal proteolysis of αII-spectrin was detected in the cortex and hippocampus by 12 h post-injury. Cell death was minimal and localized predominantly in the corpus callosum and periventricular regions. These regions, with presumably different density interfaces, exhibit biological responses to shockwaves consistent with interface turbulence described by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Evoked compound action potential (CAP) recordings from the corpus callosum showed a significant increase in the duration of CAP responses at 14 and 30 days post-injury, and a gradual depression in the unmyelinated fiber amplitude. Shielding the head attenuated αII-spectrin cytoskeletal breakdown, thus directly implicating low-level shock-wave exposure as a cause of brain injury in the rat. Despite anatomical and scaling differences in rats compared to humans, the results suggest the potential for undiagnosed traumatic brain pathologies occurring in combat veterans following shock-wave exposure. PMID:21142686

  1. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kieran A; Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Lambert, Allison A; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells and alter their function by impairing cell-cell adhesion and increasing the expression of inflammatory mediators. These observed changes may contribute local inflammation, which can lead to lung function decline and increased susceptibility to COPD in HIV patients. PMID:26930653

  2. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M. Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M.

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells and alter their function by impairing cell-cell adhesion and increasing the expression of inflammatory mediators. These observed changes may contribute local inflammation, which can lead to lung function decline and increased susceptibility to COPD in HIV patients. PMID:26930653

  3. Lung function after bone marrow grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Depledge, M.H.; Barrett, A.; Powles, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    Results of a prospective lung function study are presented for 48 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1978 and 1980. Patients with active disease or who were in remission following cytoreductive chemotherapy had mildly impaired gas exchange prior to grafting. After TBI and BMT all patients studied developed progressive deterioration of lung function during the first 100 days, although these changes were subclinical. Infection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) were associated with further worsening of restrictive ventilatory defects and diffusing capacity (D/sub L/CO). Beyond 100 days, ventilatory ability returned to normal and gas transfer improved, although it failed to reach pre-transplant levels. There was no evidence of progressive pulmonary fibrosis during the first year after grafting.

  4. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  5. Functional impairment in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G; Nickerson, Angela; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Marom, Sofi

    2012-04-01

    The present study examined functional impairment among treatment seekers with social anxiety disorder (SAD). We investigated the effects of diagnostic subtypes of SAD and comorbidity with mood and anxiety disorders on impairment. In addition, we used cluster analysis procedures to empirically identify subgroups of individuals with distinct patterns of impairment. Participants were 216 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD. Clinical interviews were undertaken to determine diagnoses of anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder, and a battery of self-report measures was administered to index symptoms of social anxiety, depression and extent of impairment. Results indicated that individuals with the generalized subtype of SAD had greater impairment in all three life domains compared to individuals with the nongeneralized subtype. Comorbidity with mood disorders was associated with greater impairment than SAD alone, but comorbidity with anxiety disorders was not. Four distinct impairment profiles emerged from the cluster analysis: primary work/studies impairment, primary social life impairment, both work/studies and social impairment, and impairment in all domains. Findings from this study suggest that SAD is associated with substantial impairment across multiple domains, and that individuals with SAD present diverse impairment profiles. These profiles may inform subtyping of the disorder as well as therapeutic interventions. PMID:22306132

  6. 38 CFR 4.10 - Functional impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Functional impairment. 4.10 Section 4.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.10 Functional impairment. The basis of disability evaluations is the ability of the body as a...

  7. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease. PMID:8457492

  8. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F.

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via functional impairment. We estimated a latent variable causal model using 3 waves of data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 1,832). Results indicated that marital conflict directly led to increases in depression and functional impairment and indirectly led to a rise in depression via functional impairment. Overall, findings suggest marital conflict is a significant risk factor for psychological and physical health among midlife and older adults. PMID:18698378

  9. Multiple Inhibitory Pathways Contribute to Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment and Protect against Immunopathology during Acute Viral Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John J; Rogers, Meredith C; Tollefson, Sharon J; Boyd, Kelli L; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Viruses are frequent causes of lower respiratory infection (LRI). Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) signaling contributes to pulmonary CD8(+) T cell (TCD8) functional impairment during acute viral LRI, but the role of TCD8 impairment in viral clearance and immunopathology is unclear. We now find that human metapneumovirus infection induces virus-specific lung TCD8 that fail to produce effector cytokines or degranulate late postinfection, with minimally increased function even in the absence of PD-1 signaling. Impaired lung TCD8 upregulated multiple inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), T cell Ig mucin 3, and 2B4. Moreover, coexpression of these receptors continued to increase even after viral clearance, with most virus-specific lung TCD8 expressing three or more inhibitory receptors on day 14 postinfection. Viral infection also increased expression of inhibitory ligands by both airway epithelial cells and APCs, further establishing an inhibitory environment. In vitro Ab blockade revealed that multiple inhibitory receptors contribute to TCD8 impairment induced by either human metapneumovirus or influenza virus infection. In vivo blockade of T cell Ig mucin 3 signaling failed to enhance TCD8 function or reduce viral titers. However, blockade of LAG-3 in PD-1-deficient mice restored TCD8 effector functions but increased lung pathology, indicating that LAG-3 mediates lung TCD8 impairment in vivo and contributes to protection from immunopathology during viral clearance. These results demonstrate that an orchestrated network of pathways modifies lung TCD8 functionality during viral LRI, with PD-1 and LAG-3 serving prominent roles. Lung TCD8 impairment may prevent immunopathology but also contributes to recurrent lung infections. PMID:27259857

  10. Inferential functioning in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millán, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children perform slightly better in the use of inductive and relational inferences in the verbal format, while in the manipulative format children with normal sight perform better. These results suggest that in inferential functioning of young children, and especially visually impaired children, the format of the task influences performance more than the child's visual ability. PMID:16647837

  11. Functional impairment in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study sought to describe the functional profiles of patients with early-stage progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in a large prospective, multisite study. Methods: Using data from 202 individuals meeting criteria for clinically definite or probable PSP, 3 functional scales were examined. Functional scores were then compared to measures of motor, cognition, and psychiatric symptoms. Results: Functional disability was high in early-stage PSP, with 100% of patients having less than perfect scores on all functional scales. Whereas functional scores tended not to be related to cognition or psychiatric symptoms, they were strongly related to motoric ratings. Conclusions: Both clinically and in research settings, the definition of functional intactness/impairment has important implications. Future studies should examine if functional impairment is this high in PSP or if new scales of functional abilities need to be developed for this condition. PMID:23303854

  12. Functional respiratory assessment in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect, to a greater or lesser degree, the alveolus, peripheral airway, and septal interstitium. Functional assessment in patients suspected of having an interstitial lung disease has implications for diagnosis and makes it possible to objectively analyze both response to treatment and prognosis. Recently the clinical value of lung-diffusing capacity and the six-minute walking test has been confirmed, and these are now important additions to the traditional assessment of lung function that is based on spirometry. Here we review the state-of-the-art methods for the assessment of patients with interstitial lung disease. PMID:25857578

  13. Reduced airway surface pH impairs bacterial killing in the porcine cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H Abou; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Phillip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Haagsman, Henk P; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R; Stoltz, David A; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how the loss of CFTR function first disrupts airway host defence has remained uncertain. To investigate the abnormalities that impair elimination when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed onto the airway surface. As a model, we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly kills bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduces bacterial killing. We found that the ASL pH was more acidic in CF pigs, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and, conversely, increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defence defect to the loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO(3)(-) transport. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion is defective, the ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs the killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF, and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  14. Kinase Impaired BRAF Mutations Confer Lung Cancer Sensitivity to Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Banibrata; Peng, Shaohua; Tang, Ximing; Erickson, Heidi S.; Galindo, Hector; Mazumdar, Tuhina; Stewart, David J.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Johnson, Faye M.

    2013-01-01

    During a clinical trial of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib for advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) one patient responded dramatically and remains cancer-free 4 years later. A comprehensive analysis of his tumor revealed a previously undescribed, kinase inactivating BRAF mutation (Y472CBRAF); no inactivating BRAF mutations were found in the non-responding tumors taken from other patients. Cells transfected with Y472CBRAF exhibited CRAF, MEK, and ERK activation – characteristics identical to signaling changes that occur with previously known kinase inactivating BRAF mutants. Dasatinib selectively induced senescence in NSCLC cells with inactivating BRAF mutations. Transfection of other NSCLC cells with these BRAF mutations also increased these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity, whereas transfection with an activating BRAF mutation led to their increased dasatinib resistance. The sensitivity induced by Y472CBRAF was reversed by the introduction of a BRAF mutation that impairs RAF dimerization. Dasatinib inhibited CRAF modestly, but concurrently induced RAF dimerization resulting in ERK activation in NSCLC cells with kinase inactivating BRAF mutations. The sensitivity of NSCLC with kinase impaired BRAF to dasatinib suggested synthetic lethality of BRAF and a dasatinib target. Inhibiting BRAF in NSCLC cells expressing wild-type BRAF likewise enhanced these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity. Thus, the patient’s BRAF mutation was likely responsible for his tumor’s marked response to dasatinib, suggesting that tumors bearing kinase impaired BRAF mutations may be exquisitely sensitive to dasatinib. Moreover, the potential synthetic lethality of combination therapy including dasatinib and BRAF inhibitors may lead to additional therapeutic options against cancers with wild-type BRAF. PMID:22649091

  15. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26899624

  16. Loss of Mitochondrial Function Impairs Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Demers-Lamarche, Julie; Guillebaud, Gérald; Tlili, Mouna; Todkar, Kiran; Bélanger, Noémie; Grondin, Martine; Nguyen, Angela P; Michel, Jennifer; Germain, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial function, as observed in neurodegenerative diseases, lead to disrupted energy metabolism and production of damaging reactive oxygen species. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction also disrupts the structure and function of lysosomes, the main degradation and recycling organelle. Specifically, inhibition of mitochondrial function, following deletion of the mitochondrial protein AIF, OPA1, or PINK1, as well as chemical inhibition of the electron transport chain, impaired lysosomal activity and caused the appearance of large lysosomal vacuoles. Importantly, our results show that lysosomal impairment is dependent on reactive oxygen species. Given that alterations in both mitochondrial function and lysosomal activity are key features of neurodegenerative diseases, this work provides important insights into the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26987902

  17. Reduced Airway Surface pH Impairs Bacterial Killing in the Porcine Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Phillip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Haagsman, Henk P.; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene 1. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how loss of CFTR first disrupts airway host defense has remained uncertain 2–6. We asked what abnormalities impair eradication when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway? To investigate these defects, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed on the airway surface. As a model we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease 7,8. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria 8. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly killed bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung, and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduced bacterial killing. We found that ASL pH was more acidic in CF, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defense defect to loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO3− transport 9–13. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO3− secretion is defective, ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  18. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... caused by conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis). Also, these tests might ...

  19. Risk Factors for Physical Impairment after Acute Lung Injury in a National, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Amy W.; Hough, Catherine L.; Morris, Peter E.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Jackson, James C.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Ely, E. Wesley; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Existing studies of risk factors for physical impairments in acute lung injury (ALI) survivors were potentially limited by single-center design or relatively small sample size. Objectives: To evaluate risk factors for three measures of physical impairments commonly experienced by survivors of ALI in the first year after hospitalization. Methods: A prospective, longitudinal study of 6- and 12-month physical outcomes (muscle strength, 6-minute-walk distance, and Short Form [SF]-36 Physical Function score) for 203 survivors of ALI enrolled from 12 hospitals participating in the ARDS Network randomized trials. Multivariable regression analyses evaluated the independent association of critical illness–related variables and intensive care interventions with impairments in each physical outcome measure, after adjusting for patient demographics, comorbidities, and baseline functional status. Measurements and Main Results: At 6 and 12 months, respectively, mean (± SD) values for strength (presented as proportion of maximum strength score evaluated using manual muscle testing) was 92% (± 8%) and 93% (± 9%), 6-minute-walk distance (as percent-predicted) was 64% (± 22%) and 67% (± 26%), and SF-36 Physical Function score (as percent-predicted) was 61% (± 36%) and 67% (± 37%). After accounting for patient baseline status, there was significant association and statistical interaction of mean daily dose of corticosteroids and intensive care unit length of stay with impairments in physical outcomes. Conclusions: Patients had substantial impairments, from predicted values, for 6-minute-walk distance and SF-36 Physical Function outcome measures. Minimizing corticosteroid dose and implementing existing evidence-based methods to reduce duration of intensive care unit stay and associated patient immobilization may be important interventions for improving ALI survivors’ physical outcomes. PMID:24716641

  20. Multi-walled carbon nanotube instillation impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used in many disciplines due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Therefore, some concerns about the possible human health and environmental impacts of manufactured MWCNTs are rising. We hypothesized that instillation of MWCNTs impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice due to development of lung inflammation and fibrosis. Methods MWCNTs were administered to C57BL/6 mice by oropharyngeal aspiration (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg) and we assessed lung inflammation and fibrosis by inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen content, and histological assessment. Pulmonary function was assessed using a FlexiVent system and levels of Ccl3, Ccl11, Mmp13 and IL-33 were measured by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Mice administered MWCNTs exhibited increased inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen deposition and granuloma formation in lung tissue, which correlated with impaired pulmonary function as assessed by increased resistance, tissue damping, and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs induced an inflammatory signature marked by cytokine (IL-33), chemokine (Ccl3 and Ccl11), and protease production (Mmp13) that promoted the inflammatory and fibrotic changes observed within the lung. Conclusions These results further highlight the potential adverse health effects that may occur following MWCNT exposure and therefore we suggest these materials may pose a significant risk leading to impaired lung function following environmental and occupational exposures. PMID:21851604

  1. Respiratory and lower limb muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Marios; Polychronopoulos, Vlasis; Strange, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence suggests that respiratory and limb muscle function may be impaired in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Importantly, muscle dysfunction could promote dyspnoea, fatigue and functional limitation all of which are cardinal features of ILD. This article examines the risk factors for skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD, reviews the current evidence on overall respiratory and limb muscle function and focuses on the occurrence and implications of skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD. Research limitations and pathways to address the current knowledge gaps are highlighted. PMID:26768011

  2. Rehabilitation of impaired speech function (dysarthria, dysglossia)

    PubMed Central

    Schröter-Morasch, Heidrun; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Speech disorders can result (1) from sensorimotor impairments of articulatory movements = dysarthria, or (2) from structural changes of the speech organs, in adults particularly after surgical and radiochemical treatment of tumors = dysglossia. The decrease of intelligibility, a reduced vocal stamina, the stigmatization of a conspicuous voice and manner of speech, the reduction of emotional expressivity all mean greatly diminished quality of life, restricted career opportunities and diminished social contacts. Intensive therapy based on the pathophysiological facts is absolutely essential: Functional exercise therapy plays a central role; according to symptoms and their progression it can be complemented with prosthetic and surgical approaches. In severe cases communicational aids have to be used. All rehabilitation measures have to take account of frequently associated disorders of body motor control and/or impairment of cognition and behaviour. PMID:22073063

  3. Lung function in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Koumbourlis, Anastassios C

    2014-03-01

    Although some of the most severe complications of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) tend to be acute and severe (e.g. acute chest syndrome, stroke etc.), the chronic ones can be equally debilitating. Prominent among them is the effect that the disease has on lung growth and function. For many years the traditional teaching has been that SCD is associated with the development of a restrictive lung defect. However, there is increasing evidence that this is not a universal finding and that at least during childhood and adolescence, the majority of the patients have a normal or obstructive pattern of lung function. The following article reviews the current knowledge on the effects of SCD on lung growth and function. Special emphasis is given to the controversies among the published articles in the literature and discusses possible causes for these discrepancies. PMID:24268618

  4. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme Y impairs endothelial cell proliferation and vascular repair following lung injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Trevor C; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Morrow, K Adam; Robson, Matthew J; Prasain, Nutan; Zhou, Chun; Alvarez, Diego F; Frank, Dara W; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2014-05-15

    Exoenzyme Y (ExoY) is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin that is introduced into host cells through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). Once inside the host cell cytoplasm, ExoY generates cyclic nucleotides that cause tau phosphorylation and microtubule breakdown. Microtubule breakdown causes interendothelial cell gap formation and tissue edema. Although ExoY transiently induces interendothelial cell gap formation, it remains unclear whether ExoY prevents repair of the endothelial cell barrier. Here, we test the hypothesis that ExoY intoxication impairs recovery of the endothelial cell barrier following gap formation, decreasing migration, proliferation, and lung repair. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were infected with P. aeruginosa strains for 6 h, including one possessing an active ExoY (PA103 exoUexoT::Tc pUCPexoY; ExoY(+)), one with an inactive ExoY (PA103ΔexoUexoT::Tc pUCPexoY(K81M); ExoY(K81M)), and one that lacks PcrV required for a functional T3SS (ΔPcrV). ExoY(+) induced interendothelial cell gaps, whereas ExoY(K81M) and ΔPcrV did not promote gap formation. Following gap formation, bacteria were removed and endothelial cell repair was examined. PMVECs were unable to repair gaps even 3-5 days after infection. Serum-stimulated growth was greatly diminished following ExoY intoxication. Intratracheal inoculation of ExoY(+) and ExoY(K81M) caused severe pneumonia and acute lung injury. However, whereas the pulmonary endothelial cell barrier was functionally improved 1 wk following ExoY(K81M) infection, pulmonary endothelium was unable to restrict the hyperpermeability response to elevated hydrostatic pressure following ExoY(+) infection. In conclusion, ExoY is an edema factor that chronically impairs endothelial cell barrier integrity following lung injury. PMID:24705722

  7. Influence of Pulmonary Rehabilitation on Lung Function Changes After the Lung Resection for Primary Lung Cancer in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Mujovic, Natasa; Mujovic, Nebojsa; Subotic, Dragan; Ercegovac, Maja; Milovanovic, Andjela; Nikcevic, Ljubica; Zugic, Vladimir; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-11-01

    Influence of physiotherapy on the outcome of the lung resection is still controversial. Study aim was to assess the influence of physiotherapy program on postoperative lung function and effort tolerance in lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that are undergoing lobectomy or pneumonectomy. The prospective study included 56 COPD patients who underwent lung resection for primary non small-cell lung cancer after previous physiotherapy (Group A) and 47 COPD patients (Group B) without physiotherapy before lung cancer surgery. In Group A, lung function and effort tolerance on admission were compared with the same parameters after preoperative physiotherapy. Both groups were compared in relation to lung function, effort tolerance and symptoms change after resection. In patients with tumors requiring a lobectomy, after preoperative physiotherapy, a highly significant increase in FEV1, VC, FEF50 and FEF25 of 20%, 17%, 18% and 16% respectively was registered with respect to baseline values. After physiotherapy, a significant improvement in 6-minute walking distance was achieved. After lung resection, the significant loss of FEV1 and VC occurred, together with significant worsening of the small airways function, effort tolerance and symptomatic status. After the surgery, a clear tendency existed towards smaller FEV1 loss in patients with moderate to severe, when compared to patients with mild baseline lung function impairment. A better FEV1 improvement was associated with more significant loss in FEV1. Physiotherapy represents an important part of preoperative and postoperative treatment in COPD patients undergoing a lung resection for primary lung cancer. PMID:26618048

  8. Respiratory sequelae and lung function after whooping cough in infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I; Bjure, J; Claesson, I; Eriksson, B; Sixt, R; Trollfors, B

    1990-01-01

    The lung function of 31 children, aged 6-13 years, who had whooping cough as infants and 32 control children matched for age, sex, and residence area were compared in a community based cohort study. Family history of obstructive airway disease, smoking habits in the family, atopy, and other background factors examined were similar in the two groups. The ratios of recalled repeated acute respiratory infections did not differ among the groups. Children in the control group were slightly more involved in physical activities. History of obstructive airway disease, findings on chest radiography, and distribution of immunoglobulin concentrations, including IgE, did not differ significantly. Lung function before and after exercise and after inhalation of salbutamol were not different. No impairment of small airways was detected. Our data do not support the hypothesis that whooping cough in itself is a causal factor for later obstructive respiratory disease. PMID:2378512

  9. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group. PMID:27102012

  10. Rat lung macrophage tumor cytotoxin production: impairment by chronic in vivo cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Flick, D A; Gonzalez-Rothi, R J; Harris, J O; Gifford, G E

    1985-11-01

    Macrophages in the presence of bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimuli produce a soluble cytotoxin which is toxic to tumor cells. In this study, we examined various parameters of cytotoxin production from pulmonary lavage cells obtained from Fisher 344 cesarean-derived rats. Cultures of macrophages were derived from pulmonary lavage cells and stimulated in vitro with LPS. Cytotoxin production was assayed in vitro using an L-929 cell target assay. Pulmonary lavage preparations contained a relatively pure population of macrophages, and adherence studies revealed that nonadherent lavage cells contributed negligible amounts of cytotoxin, indicating that macrophages were responsible for cytotoxin production. After LPS stimulation, cytotoxin production became maximal within 10 h and thereafter plateaued. Doses of LPS above 0.1 microgram/ml were optimal for production, and in the absence of LPS, no cytotoxin was detected. Because cigarette smoke is the major etiological factor in the development of lung cancers and because smoking is known to profoundly alter the function of alveolar macrophages in humans and experimental animals, subsequent experiments examined the role of chronic cigarette smoke exposure on tumoricidal activity of lung macrophages. Rats were exposed in vivo for 8 wk to either cigarette smoke or air (sham-treated controls). When lavage cells were cultured and stimulated with LPS (1 microgram/ml), 5- to 10-fold less cytotoxin was produced by lavage cells from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Similarly, using a direct cytotoxicity assay, lung macrophages of smoke-exposed animals also revealed marked impairment in cytotoxicity against L-929 cell targets, and this was noted over a wide range of macrophage:tumor target cell ratios. Another product of macrophages, interferon, was also decreased in rats exposed in vivo to cigarette smoke when compared to sham-treated controls. These results suggest that cigarette smoke exposure may impair pulmonary

  11. Does lung diffusion impairment affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, P G; Bussotti, M; Palermo, P; Guazzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between impairment of lung diffusion and reduced exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Design: 40 patients with heart failure in stable clinical condition and 40 controls participated in the study. All subjects underwent standard pulmonary function tests plus measurements of resting lung diffusion (carbon monoxide transfer, Tlco), pulmonary capillary volume (Vc), and membrane resistance (Dm), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In 20 patients and controls, the following investigations were also done: (1) resting and constant work rate Tlco; (2) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with inspiratory O2 fractions of 0.21 and 0.16; and (3) rest and peak exercise blood gases. The other subjects underwent Tlco, Dm, and Vc measurements during constant work rate exercise. Results: In normoxia, exercise induced reductions of haemoglobin O2 saturation never occurred. With hypoxia, peak exercise uptake (peak V̇o2) decreased from (mean (SD)) 1285 (395) to 1081 (396) ml/min (p < 0.01) in patients, and from 1861 (563) to 1771 (457) ml/min (p < 0.05) in controls. Resting Tlco correlated with peak V̇o2 in heart failure (normoxia < hypoxia). In heart failure patients and normal subjects, Tlco and peak V̇o2 correlated with O2 arterial content at rest and during peak exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. Tlco, Vc, and Dm increased during exercise. The increase in Tlco was greater in patients who had a smaller reduction of exercise capacity with hypoxia. Alveolar–arterial O2 gradient at peak correlated with exercise capacity in heart failure during normoxia and, to a greater extent, during hypoxia. Conclusions: Lung diffusion impairment is related to exercise capacity in heart failure. PMID:12381630

  12. Imaging Phenotype of Occupational Endotoxin-Related Lung Function Decline

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hang, Jing-qing; Zhang, Feng-ying; Sun, J.; Zheng, Bu-Yong; Su, Li; Washko, George R.; Christiani, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although occupational exposures contribute to a significant proportion of obstructive lung disease, the phenotype of obstructive lung disease associated with work-related organic dust exposure independent of smoking remains poorly defined. Objective: We identified the relative contributions of smoking and occupational endotoxin exposure to parenchymal and airway remodeling as defined by quantitative computed tomography (CT). Methods: The Shanghai Textile Worker Study is a longitudinal study of endotoxin-exposed cotton workers and endotoxin-unexposed silk workers that was initiated in 1981. Spirometry, occupational endotoxin exposure, and smoking habits were assessed at 5-year intervals. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) was performed in 464 retired workers in 2011, along with quantitative lung densitometric and airway analysis. Results: Significant differences in all CT measures were noted across exposure groups. Occupational endotoxin exposure was associated with a decrease (–1.3%) in percent emphysema (LAAI-950), a 3.3-Hounsfield unit increase in 15th percentile density, an 18.1-g increase in lung mass, and a 2.3% increase in wall area percent. Current but not former smoking was associated with a similar CT phenotype. Changes in LAAI-950 were highly correlated with 15th percentile density (correlation –1.0). Lung mass was the only measure associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) decline, with each 10-g increase in lung mass associated with an additional loss (–6.1 mL) of FEV1 (p = 0.001) between 1981 and 2011. Conclusions: There are many similarities between the effects of occupational endotoxin exposure and those of tobacco smoke exposure on lung parenchyma and airway remodeling. The effects of occupational endotoxin exposure appear to persist even after the cessation of exposure. LAAI-950 may not be a reliable indicator of emphysema in subjects without spirometric impairment. Lung mass is a CT-based biomarker of

  13. Claudins: Gatekeepers of lung epithelial function.

    PubMed

    Schlingmann, Barbara; Molina, Samuel A; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lung must maintain a proper barrier between airspaces and fluid filled tissues in order to maintain lung fluid balance. Central to maintaining lung fluid balance are epithelial cells which create a barrier to water and solutes. The barrier function of these cells is mainly provided by tight junction proteins known as claudins. Epithelial barrier function varies depending on the different needs within the segments of the respiratory tree. In the lower airways, fluid is required to maintain mucociliary clearance, whereas in the terminal alveolar airspaces a thin layer of surfactant enriched fluid lowers surface tension to prevent airspace collapse and is critical for gas exchange. As the epithelial cells within the segments of the respiratory tree differ, the composition of claudins found in these epithelial cells is also different. Among these differences is claudin-18 which is uniquely expressed by the alveolar epithelial cells. Other claudins, notably claudin-4 and claudin-7, are more ubiquitously expressed throughout the respiratory epithelium. Claudin-5 is expressed by both pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells. Based on in vitro and in vivo model systems and histologic analysis of lungs from human patients, roles for specific claudins in maintaining barrier function and protecting the lung from the effects of acute injury and disease are being identified. One surprising finding is that claudin-18 and claudin-4 control lung cell phenotype and inflammation beyond simply maintaining a selective paracellular permeability barrier. This suggests claudins have more nuanced roles for the control of airway and alveolar physiology in the healthy and diseased lung. PMID:25951797

  14. Lung Extracellular Matrix and Fibroblast Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a tissue-specific macromolecular structure that provides physical support to tissues and is essential for normal organ function. In the lung, ECM plays an active role in shaping cell behavior both in health and disease by virtue of the contextual clues it imparts to cells. Qualities including dimensionality, molecular composition, and intrinsic stiffness all promote normal function of the lung ECM. Alterations in composition and/or modulation of stiffness of the focally injured or diseased lung ECM microenvironment plays a part in reparative processes performed by fibroblasts. Under conditions of remodeling or in disease states, inhomogeneous stiffening (or softening) of the pathologic ECM may both precede modifications in cell behavior and be a result of disease progression. The ability of ECM to stimulate further ECM production by fibroblasts and drive disease progression has potentially significant implications for mesenchymal stromal cell–based therapies; in the setting of pathologic ECM stiffness or composition, the therapeutic intent of progenitor cells may be subverted. Taken together, current data suggest that lung ECM actively contributes to health and disease; thus, mediators of cell–ECM signaling or factors that influence ECM stiffness may represent viable therapeutic targets in many lung disorders. PMID:25830832

  15. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  16. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  17. Functional impairments due to unilateral deafness.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Louis W; Welsh, John J; Rosen, Laurie F; Dragonette, Joseph E

    2004-12-01

    The authors investigated the impact of unilateral listening upon two central auditory functions: speech discrimination in a noisy environment, and the ability to process and clearly recognize modestly accelerated speech by 30% compression (shortened exposure). We determined that the negative impact of listening to speech in the milieu of noise was individually variable. The data revealed a wide range of impairment, from mild to relatively severe (ie, 0% to 60% [mean, 34%]; normative data, 4% to 36% [mean, 14%]). The performance scores for recognition of compressed sentences were not markedly influenced by unilateral deafness, but the functional results of the residual ear were correlated with a loss of high-frequency sensitivity (mean of 54% correct in severe unilateral deafness with an associated high-frequency loss versus 93% correct in normal controls). Reorganization of the central nervous system by "plasticity" or biological maturation over time failed to improve the performance of monaural listening. The currently recommended methods of remediation for this sensory deficit are discussed, and newer technologies under investigation are examined. PMID:15633902

  18. LUNG FUNCTION AND ITS GROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence that certain uncomplicated upper respiratory infections (URI) induce pulmonary function abnormalities in adults prompted a study in children where such infections occur more frequently. In a longitudinal study, 55 children aged 2.5-9 years were observed for a mean durati...

  19. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  20. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-01

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works. PMID:25987201

  1. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  2. Hyperglycemia Impairs Proteasome Function by Methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Queisser, Markus A.; Yao, Dachun; Geisler, Sven; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lochnit, Günter; Schleicher, Erwin D.; Brownlee, Michael; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the main degradation machinery for intracellularly altered proteins. Hyperglycemia has been shown to increase intracellular levels of the reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MGO) in cells damaged by diabetes, resulting in modification of proteins and alterations of their function. In this study, the influence of MGO-derived advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation on the activity of the proteasome was investigated in vitro and in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MGO-derived AGE modification of proteasome subunits was analyzed by mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blots. Proteasome activity was analyzed using proteasome-specific fluorogenic substrates. Experimental models included bovine retinal endothelial cells, diabetic Ins2Akita mice, glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) knockdown mice, and streptozotocin (STZ)-injected diabetic mice. RESULTS In vitro incubation with MGO caused adduct formation on several 20S proteasomal subunit proteins. In cultured endothelial cells, the expression level of the catalytic 20S proteasome subunit was not altered but proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity was significantly reduced. In contrast, levels of regulatory 19S proteasomal proteins were decreased. In diabetic Ins2Akita, STZ diabetic, and nondiabetic and diabetic G101 knockdown mice, chymotrypsin-like activity was also reduced and MGO modification of the 20S-β2 subunit was increased. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia-induced formation of MGO covalently modifies the 20S proteasome, decreasing its activity in the diabetic kidney and reducing the polyubiquitin receptor 19S-S5a. The results indicate a new link between hyperglycemia and impairment of cell functions. PMID:20009088

  3. Systemic Metabolic Impairment and Lung Injury Following Acrolein Inhalation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single ozone exposure causes pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic alterations through neuronal and hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis activation. Metabolically impaired Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats with non-obese type-2 diabetes are more sensitive to ozone induced changes than h...

  4. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Alba, Cesar Gonzalez-De; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero is associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and diseases in adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero was associated with impairment in the lung function in children and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammatory response to the metalloid. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their As levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsenic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. PMID:26048584

  5. Lung function changes in wildland firefighters working at prescribed burns.

    SciTech Connect

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Hall, Daniel, B.; Naeher, L,P.

    2011-10-01

    Although decline in lung function across workshift has been observed in wildland firefighters, measurements have been restricted to days when they worked at fires. Consequently, such results could have been confounded by normal circadian variation associated with lung function. We investigated the across-shift changes in lung function of wildland firefighters, and the effect of cumulative exposure on lung function during the burn season.

  6. Cognitive Function, Mental Health, and Health-related Quality of Life after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David G.; Christie, Jason D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Judy, Ryan P.; Shah, Rupal J.; Cantu, Edward; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Blumenthal, Nancy P.; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Hopkins, Ramona O.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Cognitive and psychiatric impairments are threats to functional independence, general health, and quality of life. Evidence regarding these outcomes after lung transplantation is limited. Objectives: Determine the frequency of cognitive and psychiatric impairment after lung transplantation and identify potential factors associated with cognitive impairment after lung transplantation. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed cognitive function, mental health, and health-related quality of life using a validated battery of standardized tests in 42 subjects post-transplantation. The battery assessed cognition, depression, anxiety, resilience, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cognitive function was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, a validated screening test with a range of 0 to 30. We hypothesized that cognitive function post-transplantation would be associated with type of transplant, cardiopulmonary bypass, primary graft dysfunction, allograft ischemic time, and physical therapy post-transplantation. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship between candidate risk factors and cognitive function post-transplantation. Measurements and Main Results: Mild cognitive impairment (score, 18–25) was observed in 67% of post-transplant subjects (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50–80%) and moderate cognitive impairment (score, 10–17) was observed in 5% (95% CI, 1–16%) of post-transplant subjects. Symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety and depression were observed in 21 and 3% of post-transplant subjects, respectively. No transplant recipients reported symptoms of PTSD. Higher resilience correlated with less psychological distress in the domains of depression (P < 0.001) and PTSD (P = 0.02). Prolonged graft ischemic time was independently associated with worse cognitive performance after lung transplantation (P = 0.001). The functional gain in 6-minute-walk distance achieved at the end of post

  7. Impaired immune function in Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    Whistler, Toni; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Lonergan, William; Zeng, Xiao-R; Lin, Jin-Mann; LaPerriere, Arthur; Vernon, Suzanne D; Klimas, Nancy G

    2009-01-01

    Background Gulf War Illness (GWI) remains a serious health consequence for at least 11,000 veterans of the first Gulf War in the early 1990s. Our understanding of the health consequences that resulted remains inadequate, and this is of great concern with another deployment to the same theater of operations occurring now. Chronic immune cell dysfunction and activation have been demonstrated in patients with GWI, although the literature is not uniform. We exposed GWI patients and matched controls to an exercise challenge to explore differences in immune cell function measured by classic immune assays and gene expression profiling. Methods This pilot study enrolled 9 GWI cases identified from the Department of Veterans Affairs GWI registry, and 11 sedentary control veterans who had not been deployed to the Persian Gulf and were matched to cases by sex, body mass index (BMI) and age. We measured peripheral blood cell numbers, NK cytotoxicity, cytokines and expression levels of 20,000 genes immediately before, immediately after and 4 hours following a standard bicycle ergometer exercise challenge. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences for three NK cell subsets and NK cytotoxicity between cases and controls (p < 0.05). Linear regression analysis correlating NK cell numbers to the gene expression profiles showed high correlation of genes associated with NK cell function, serving as a biologic validation of both the in vitro assays and the microarray platform. Intracellular perforin levels in NK and CD8 T-cells trended lower and showed a flatter profile in GWI cases than controls, as did the expression levels of the perforin gene PRF1. Genes distinguishing cases from controls were associated with the glucocorticoid signaling pathway. Conclusion GWI patients demonstrated impaired immune function as demonstrated by decreased NK cytotoxicity and altered gene expression associated with NK cell function. Pro

  8. Lung Function Monitoring; A Randomized Agreement Study

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Sveinung; Stølevik, Solvor B.; Mowinckel, Petter; Nystad, Wenche; Stensrud, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the agreement between devices and repeatability within devices of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory flow at 50% of FVC (FEF50) values measured using the four spirometers included in the study. Methods: 50 (24 women) participants (20-64 years of age) completed maximum forced expiratory flow manoeuvres and measurements were performed using the following devices: MasterScreen, SensorMedics, Oxycon Pro and SpiroUSB. The order of the instruments tested was randomized and blinded for both the participants and the technicians. Re-testing was conducted on a following day within 72 hours at the same time of the day. Results: The devices which obtained the most comparable values for all lung function variables were SensorMedics and Oxycon Pro, and MasterScreen and SpiroUSB. For FEV1, mean difference was 0.04 L (95% confidence interval; -0.05, 0.14) and 0.00 L (-0.06, 0.06), respectively. When using the criterion of FVC and FEV1 ≤ 0.150 L for acceptable repeatability, 67% of the comparisons of the measured lung function values obtained by the four devices were acceptable. Overall, Oxycon Pro obtained most frequently values of the lung function variables with highest precision as indicated by the coefficients of repeatability (CR), followed by MasterScreen, SensorMedics and SpiroUSB (e.g. min-max CR for FEV1; 0.27-0.46). Conclusion: The present study confirms that measurements obtained by the same device at different times can be compared; however, measured lung function values may differ depending on spirometers used. PMID:27583055

  9. Functional Impairment in Youth Three Years after Detention

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Karen M.; Choe, Jeanne Y.; Washburn, Jason J.; Romero, Erin G.; Teplin, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This article examines functional impairment across global and specific dimensions among youth 3 years after their detention. Methods Functional impairment was assessed using the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) in a large, stratified, random sample of formerly detained youth (N = 1653). Results More than one-fifth of the sample were scored as having marked impairment that required, at minimum, “multiple sources of care” (CAFAS Total Score of 100 or higher); 7.0% required “intensive intervention” (CAFAS Total Score ≥140). Most of the sample had impairment; only 7.5% of the sample had “no noteworthy impairment” (CAFAS Total Score ≤10). Significantly more males were impaired than females. Among males living in the community at follow-up, African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to be impaired than non-Hispanic whites. In comparison to males living in the community, males who were incarcerated at follow-up were significantly more likely to have impaired thinking and impaired functioning at their place of residence but less likely to have substance use problems. Conclusions Three years after detention, most youth struggle in one or more life domains; more than one in five have marked impairment in functioning. These findings underscore the ongoing costs, to both youth and society, of our failure to provide effective rehabilitation to youth after detention. PMID:19465316

  10. Impaired elastin deposition in Fstl1-/- lung allograft under the renal capsule.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Li, Lian; Dong, Yingying; Liu, Xue; Li, Xiao-He; Ning, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Lung alveolar development in late gestation is a process important to postnatal survival. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a matricellular protein of the Bmp antagonist class, which is involved in the differentiation/maturation of alveolar epithelial cells during saccular stage of lung development. This study investigates the role of Fstl1 on elastin deposition in mesenchyme and subsequent secondary septation in the late gestation stage of terminal saccular formation. To this aim, we modified the renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture by grafting diced E15.5 distal lung underneath the renal capsule of syngeneic host and cultured up to 7 days. The saccular development of the diced lung allografts, as indicated by the morphology, epithelial and vascular developments, occurred in a manner similar to that in utero. Fstl1 deficiency caused atelectatic phenotype companied by impaired epithelial differentiation in D3 Fstl1(-/-) lung allografts, which is similar to that of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs, supporting the role of Fstl1 during saccular stage. Inhibition of Bmp signaling by intraperitoneal injection of dorsomorphin in the host mice rescued the pulmonary atelectasis of D3 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Furthermore, a marked reduction in elastin expression and deposition was observed in walls of air sacs of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs and at the tips of the developing alveolar septae of D7 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Thus, in addition to its role on alveolar epithelium, Fstl1 is crucial for elastin expression and deposition in mesenchyme during lung alveologenesis. Our data demonstrates that the modified renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture is a robust and efficient technique to increase our understanding of saccular stage of lung development. PMID:24282586

  11. Individual residual symptoms and functional impairment in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Romera, Irene; Pérez, Víctor; Quail, Deborah; Berggren, Lovisa; Lenox-Smith, Alan; Gilaberte, Inmaculada

    2014-12-15

    The aim of treatment of depression is remission of symptoms and functioning. Although there is a relationship between remission of symptoms and remission of functioning, it is not known how individual residual symptoms are related to functioning. Here we report a post-hoc analysis of two studies which treated depressed patients with duloxetine in an open fashion for 10-12 weeks. We evaluated the association of individual residual symptoms and functional impairment in patients who remitted or partially remitted after acute treatment. Logistic regression was used to investigate residual symptoms associated with functional impairment at endpoint. Our results suggest that in partial remitters, the only residual symptom associated with a reduction in the risk of having impaired function was the resolution of painful physical symptoms (PPS). In patients who remitted, the presence of residual core mood symptoms (CMS), particularly in patients without any anxiety, predicted impaired functioning. The resolution of PPS in the presence of residual CMS was associated with less risk of impaired functioning. Our results contribute to understand better the role of specific residual symptoms on functional impairment. To achieve normal functioning, intervention on specific residual symptoms is recommended. PMID:25149132

  12. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 <1 L) due to the theoretically increased risk of pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 <1 L nor transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (TLCO) <40% predicted shown to be independent predictors of HVCD insertion or pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort. PMID:26980011

  13. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function. PMID:26556913

  14. A Proposed In Vitro Method to Assess Effects of Inhaled Particles on Lung Surfactant Function.

    PubMed

    Sørli, Jorid B; Da Silva, Emilie; Bäckman, Per; Levin, Marcus; Thomsen, Birthe L; Koponen, Ismo K; Larsen, Søren T

    2016-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) lining is a thin liquid film covering the air-liquid interface of the respiratory tract. LS reduces surface tension, enabling lung surface expansion and contraction with minimal work during respiration. Disruption of surface tension is believed to play a key role in severe lung conditions. Inhalation of aerosols that interfere with the LS may induce a toxic response and, as a part of the safety assessment of chemicals and inhaled medicines, it may be relevant to study their impact on LS function. Here, we present a novel in vitro method, based on the constrained drop surfactometer, to study LS functionality after aerosol exposure. The applicability of the method was investigated using three inhaled asthma medicines, micronized lactose, a pharmaceutical excipient used in inhaled medication, and micronized albumin, a known inhibitor of surfactant function. The surfactometer was modified to allow particles mixed in air to flow through the chamber holding the surfactant drop. The deposited dose was measured with a custom-built quartz crystal microbalance. The alterations allowed the study of continuously increasing quantified doses of particles, allowing determination of the dose of particles that affects the LS function. The tested pharmaceuticals did not inhibit the function of a model LS even at extreme doses--neither did lactose. Micronized albumin, however, impaired surfactant function. The method can discriminate between safe inhaled aerosols--as exemplified by the approved inhaled medicines and the pharmaceutical excipient lactose--and albumin known to impair lung functionality by inhibiting LS function. PMID:26524226

  15. The EPICure Study: Association between Hemodynamics and Lung Function at 11 Years after Extremely Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Charlotte E.; Stocks, Janet; Hennessy, Enid; Cockcroft, John R.; Fawke, Joseph; Lum, Sooky; McEniery, Carmel M.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Marlow, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between disturbed lung function and large-artery hemodynamics in school-age children born extremely preterm (EP) (at 25 completed weeks of gestation or less). Study design This was a cross-sectional study of participants from the EPICure study, now aged 11 years (n = 66), and 86 age- and sex-matched term-born classmates. Spirometry parameters (including forced expiratory volume in 1 second), blood pressure, and augmentation index (AIx, a composite of arterial stiffness and global wave reflections) were measured. Results Compared with their classmates, the EP children had significantly impaired lung function, particularly those with neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Peripheral blood pressure did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, but AIx values were on average 5% higher (95% CI, 2%-8%) in the preterm infants, remaining significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia status was not related to AIx. Lung function and maternal smoking were independently associated with AIx; AIx increased by 2.7% per z-score reduction in baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second and by 4.9% in those whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. Conclusion The independent association between impaired lung function and cardiovascular physiology in early adolescence implies higher cardiovascular risk for children born EP, and suggests that prevention of chronic neonatal lung disease may be a priority in reducing later cardiovascular risk in preterm infants. PMID:22575246

  16. Lung perfusion impairments in pulmonary embolic and airway obstruction with noncontrast MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Nobuhiko; Okada, Munemasa; Tsukuda, Toshinobu; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Miyazaki, Mitsue

    2002-06-01

    A noncontrast electrocardiography (ECG)-gated, fast-spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging was applied to noninvasively define perfusion impairments in pulmonary embolic and airway obstruction dog models. Two-phase ECG-gated lung images of the minimal lung signal intensity during systole and maximal signal intensity during diastole were acquired by using optimized R-wave triggering delay times in seven dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium before, soon after, and 2 mo after embolization with enbucrilate and in another eight dogs before and after bronchial occlusion with balloon catheters, in combination with a gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced dynamic study. An ECG-gated subtraction image between the two-phase lung images provided a uniform but gravity-dependent perfusion map in normal lungs. Furthermore, it defined all 13 variable-size perfusion deficits associated with pulmonary embolism and the dynamically decreased perfusion with time after bronchial occlusion in all the airway obstruction models. These results were consistent with contrast-enhanced pulmonary arterial perfusion phase images. This noncontrast imaging could be equivalent to a contrast-enhanced dynamic study in the definition of regionally impaired pulmonary arterial perfusion in pulmonary embolism and airway obstruction. PMID:12015358

  17. Adenosine A2A Agonist Improves Lung Function During Ex-vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Emaminia, Abbas; LaPar, Damien J.; Zhao, Yunge; Steidle, John F.; Harris, David A.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel technique to assess, and potentially repair marginal lungs that may otherwise be rejected for transplantation. Adenosine has been shown to protect against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury through its A2A receptor. We hypothesized that combining EVLP with adenosine A2A receptor agonist treatment would enhance lung functional quality and increase donor lung usage. Methods Eight bilateral pig lungs were harvested and flushed with cold Perfadex. After 14 hours storage at 4°C, EVLP was performed for 5 hours on two explanted lung groups: 1) Control group lungs (n=4), were perfused with Steen Solution and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and 2) treated group lungs (n=4) received 10μM CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor agonist, in a Steen Solution-primed circuit. Lung histology, tissue cytokines, gas analysis and pulmonary function were compared between groups. Results Treated lungs demonstrated significantly less edema as reflected by wet-dry weight ratio (6.6 vs. 5.2, p<0.03) and confirmed by histology. In addition, treated lung demonstrated significantly lower levels of interferon gamma (45.1 vs. 88.5, p<0.05). Other measured tissue cytokines (interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8) were lower in treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Oxygenation index was improved in the treated group (1.5 vs. 2.3, p<0.01) as well as mean airway pressure (10.3 vs. 13 p<0.009). Conclusions EVLP is a novel and efficient way to assess and optimize lung function and oxygen exchange within donor lungs, and the use of adenosine A2A agonist potentiates its potential. EVLP with the concomitant administration of A2A agonist may enhance donor lung quality and could increase the donor lung pool for transplantation. PMID:22051279

  18. Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth.

    PubMed

    Jakus, Zoltán; Gleghorn, Jason P; Enis, David R; Sen, Aslihan; Chia, Stephanie; Liu, Xi; Rawnsley, David R; Yang, Yiqing; Hess, Paul R; Zou, Zhiying; Yang, Jisheng; Guttentag, Susan H; Nelson, Celeste M; Kahn, Mark L

    2014-05-01

    Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants. PMID:24733830

  19. Cognitive Impairment Precedes and Predicts Functional Impairment in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Siemers, Eric; Price, Karen; Han, Baoguang; Selzler, Katherine J.; Henley, David; Sundell, Karen; Aisen, Paul; Cummings, Jeffrey; Raskin, Joel; Mohs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The temporal relationship of cognitive deficit and functional impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not well characterized. Recent analyses suggest cognitive decline predicts subsequent functional decline throughout AD progression. Objective: To better understand the relationship between cognitive and functional decline in mild AD using autoregressive cross-lagged (ARCL) panel analyses in several clinical trials. Methods: Data included placebo patients with mild AD pooled from two multicenter, double-blind, Phase 3 solanezumab (EXPEDITION/2) or semagacestat (IDENTITY/2) studies, and from AD patients participating in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Cognitive and functional outcomes were assessed using AD Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), AD Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living instrumental subscale (ADCS-iADL), or Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ), respectively. ARCL panel analyses evaluated relationships between cognitive and functional impairment over time. Results: In EXPEDITION, ARCL panel analyses demonstrated cognitive scores significantly predicted future functional impairment at 5 of 6 time points, while functional scores predicted subsequent cognitive scores in only 1 of 6 time points. Data from IDENTITY and ADNI programs yielded consistent results whereby cognition predicted subsequent function, but not vice-versa. Conclusions: Analyses from three databases indicated cognitive decline precedes and predicts subsequent functional decline in mild AD dementia, consistent with previously proposed hypotheses, and corroborate recent publications using similar methodologies. Cognitive impairment may be used as a predictor of future functional impairment in mild AD dementia and can be considered a critical target for prevention strategies to limit future functional decline in the dementia process. PMID:26402769

  20. Profusion of opacities in simple coal workers’ pneumoconiosis is associated with reduced lung function

    PubMed Central

    Blackley, David J.; Laney, A. Scott; Halldin, Cara N.; Cohen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence demonstrates dose-response relationships of cumulative coal mine dust exposure with lung function impairment and with small opacity profusion. However, medical literature generally holds that simple coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) is not associated with lung function impairment. This study examines the relationship between small opacity profusion and lung function in U.S. underground coal miners with simple CWP. Methods Miners were examined during 2005–2013 as part of the Enhanced Coal Workers’ Health Surveillance Program. Work histories were obtained, and chest radiographs and spirometry were administered. For those with multiple Program encounters, the most recent visit was used. Lung parenchymal abnormalities consistent with CWP were classified according to International Labour Organization guidelines, and reference values for FEV1 and FVC were calculated using reference equations derived from the 3rd National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Differences in lung function were evaluated by opacity profusion, and regression models were fit to characterize associations between profusion and lung function. Results A total of 8,230 miners were eligible for analysis; 269 had category 1 or 2 simple CWP. Decrements in FEV1 percent predicted were nearly consistent across profusion subcategories. Clear decrements in FVC percent predicted and FEV1/FVC were also observed, although these were less consistent. Controlling for smoking status, BMI, and mining tenure, each one-unit subcategory increase in profusion was associated with decreases of 1.5% (95% CI 1.0% to 1.9%), 1.0% (95% CI 0.6% to 1.3%), and 0.6% (95% CI 0.4% to 0.8%) in FEV1 percent predicted, FVC percent predicted, and FEV1/FVC, respectively. Conclusions We observed progressively lower lung function across the range of small opacity profusion. These findings address a longstanding question in occupational medicine, and point to the importance of medical

  1. Forced expiratory flows' contribution to lung function interpretation in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Bernard; Koskas, Marc; Guillo, Houda; Maingot, Lucia; La Rocca, Marie-Claude; Boulé, Michèle; Just, Jocelyne; Momas, Isabelle; Corinne, Alberti; Beydon, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Forced expiratory flow (FEF) at low lung volumes are supposed to be better at detecting lung-function impairment in asthmatic children than a forced volume. The aim of this study was to examine whether FEF results could modify the interpretation of baseline and post-bronchodilator spirometry in asthmatic schoolchildren in whom forced expiratory volumes are within the normal range. Spirometry, with post-bronchodilator vital capacity within 10% of that of baseline in healthy and asthmatic children, was recorded prospectively. We defined abnormal baseline values expressed as z-scores <-1.645, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) reversibility as a baseline increase >12%, FEF reversibility as an increase larger than the 2.5th percentile of post-bronchodilator changes in healthy children. Among 66 healthy and 50 asthmatic schoolchildren, only two (1.7%) children with normal vital capacity and no airways obstruction had abnormal baseline forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75%). After bronchodilation, among the 45 asthmatic children without FEV1 reversibility, 5 (11.1%) had an FEF25-75% increase that exceeded the reference interval. Isolated abnormal baseline values or significant post-bronchodilator changes in FEF are rare situations in asthmatic schoolchildren with good spirometry quality. PMID:25186269

  2. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  3. Hypercapnic acidosis impairs plasma membrane wound resealing in ventilator-injured lungs.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Clinton H; Gajic, Ognjen; Berrios, Jorge C; Caples, Sean; Abdel, Matthew; Lymp, James F; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2005-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of hypercapnic acidosis on lung cell injury and repair by confocal microscopy in a model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Three groups of normocapnic, hypocapnic, and hypercapnic rat lungs were perfused ex vivo, either during or after injurious ventilation, with a solution containing the membrane-impermeant label propidium iodide. In lungs labeled during injurious ventilation, propidium iodide fluorescence identifies all cells with plasma membrane wounds, both permanent and transient, whereas in lungs labeled after injurious ventilation propidium iodide fluorescence identifies only cells with permanent plasma membrane wounds. Hypercapnia minimized the adverse effects of high-volume ventilation on vascular barrier function, whereas hypocapnia had the opposite effect. Despite CO2-dependent differences in lung mechanics and edema the number of injured subpleural cells per alveolus was similar in the three groups (0.48 +/- 0.34 versus 0.51 +/- 0.19 versus 0.43 +/- 0.20 for hypocapnia, normocapnia, and hypercapnia, respectively). However, compared with normocapnia the probability of wound repair was significantly reduced in hypercapnic lungs (63 versus 38%; p < 0.02). This finding was subsequently confirmed in alveolar epithelial cell scratch models. The potential relevance of these observations for lung inflammation and remodeling after mechanical injury is discussed. PMID:15695495

  4. Intermedin Stabilized Endothelial Barrier Function and Attenuated Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger Christian; Kummer, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Uwe; Hellwig, Katharina; Will, Daniel; Paddenberg, Renate; Tabeling, Christoph; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Even protective ventilation may aggravate or induce lung failure, particularly in preinjured lungs. Thus, new adjuvant pharmacologic strategies are needed to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Intermedin/Adrenomedullin-2 (IMD) stabilized pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro. We hypothesized that IMD may attenuate VILI-associated lung permeability in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) monolayers were incubated with IMD, and transcellular electrical resistance was measured to quantify endothelial barrier function. Expression and localization of endogenous pulmonary IMD, and its receptor complexes composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1–3 were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence in non ventilated mouse lungs and in lungs ventilated for 6 h. In untreated and IMD treated mice, lung permeability, pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and cytokine levels were assessed after mechanical ventilation. Further, the impact of IMD on pulmonary vasoconstriction was investigated in precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and in isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lungs. IMD stabilized endothelial barrier function in HPMVECs. Mechanical ventilation reduced the expression of RAMP3, but not of IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1 and 2. Mechanical ventilation induced lung hyperpermeability, which was ameliorated by IMD treatment. Oxygenation was not improved by IMD, which may be attributed to impaired hypoxic vasoconstriction due to IMD treatment. IMD had minor impact on pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and did not reduce cytokine levels in VILI. Conclusions/Significance IMD may possibly provide a new approach to attenuate VILI. PMID:22563471

  5. Cross sectional study on lung function of coke oven workers: a lung function surveillance system from 1978 to 1990

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Kreis, I; Griffiths, D; Darling, C

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the association between lung function of coke oven workers and exposure to coke oven emissions. Methods: Lung function data and detailed work histories for workers in recovery coke ovens of a steelworks were extracted from a lung function surveillance system. Multiple regressions were employed to determine significant predictors for lung function indices. The first sets of lung function tests for 613 new starters were pooled to assess the selection bias. The last sets of lung function tests for 834 subjects with one or more year of coke oven history were pooled to assess determinants of lung function. Results: Selection bias associated with the recruitment process was not observed among the exposure groups. For subjects with a history of one or more years of coke oven work, each year of working in the most exposed "operation" position was associated with reductions in FEV1 of around 9 ml (p = 0.006, 95% CI: 3 ml to 16 ml) and in FVC of around 12 ml (p = 0.002, 95% CI: 4 ml to 19 ml). Negative effects of smoking on lung function were also observed. Conclusions: Exposure to coke oven emissions was found to be associated with lower FEV1 and FVC. Effects of work exposure on lung function are similar to those found in other studies. PMID:12468747

  6. Systematic phenotyping and correlation of biomarkers with lung function and histology in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Isis E; Amarie, Oana V; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-15

    To date, phenotyping and disease course prediction in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) primarily relies on lung function measures. Blood biomarkers were recently proposed for diagnostic and outcome prediction in IPF, yet their correlation with lung function and histology remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively assessed biomarkers in liquid biopsies and correlated their abundance with lung function and histology during the onset, progression, and resolution of lung fibrosis, with the aim to more precisely evaluate disease progression in the preclinical model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Importantly, the strongest correlation of lung function with histological extent of fibrosis was observed at day 14, whereas lung function was unchanged at days 28 and 56, even when histological assessment showed marked fibrotic lesions. Although matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), MMP-9, and PAI-1 were significantly elevated in broncheoalveolar lavage of fibrotic mice, only soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) was elevated in the peripheral blood of fibrotic mice and was strongly correlated with the extent of fibrosis. Importantly, tissue-bound ICAM-1 was also elevated in lung homogenates, with prominent staining in hyperplastic type II alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells. In summary, we show that lung function decline is not a prerequisite for histologically evident fibrosis, particularly during the onset or resolution thereof. Plasma levels of sICAM-1 strongly correlate with the extent of lung fibrosis, and may thus be considered for the assessment of intraindividual therapeutic studies in preclinical studies of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26993522

  7. Impaired physical function following pediatric LT.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubhra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W; Alonso, Estella M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients 12-24 months after LT. Review data were collected through the functional outcomes group, an ancillary study of the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12-24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n = 1658) and between survivors with optimal versus nonoptimal health. A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.3-11.4 years) and 5.9 years (IQR, 2.6-13.1 years), respectively. The mean physical functioning score on child and parent reports were 81.2 ± 17.3 and 77.1 ± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (P < 0.001); 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is > 1 standard deviation below the mean of a healthy population. Physical functioning scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with nonoptimal health (P < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between emotional functioning and physical functioning scores for LT recipients (r = 0.69; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height z score < -1.64 at longterm follow-up (LTF) visit,  > 4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not being listed as status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. In conclusion, pediatric LT recipients 1-2 years after LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and

  8. Impairment of bronchial mucociliary clearance in long-term survivors of heart/lung and double-lung transplantation. The Paris-Sud Lung Transplant Group.

    PubMed

    Herve, P; Silbert, D; Cerrina, J; Simonneau, G; Dartevelle, P

    1993-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate bronchial mucociliary clearance after heart/lung and double lung transplantation. Bronchial mucociliary clearance was measured using a noninvasive radioaerosol technique: 99mTc-labeled albumin was aerosolized using a spinning-top generator (mass median aerodynamic diameter, 7.5 mu; geometric standard deviation, 1.5 mu). Radioactivity counts were acquired during 60 min with a gamma camera. A region of interest was drawn over the right lung delineated by a 133Xe lung ventilation image. Bronchial mucociliary clearance was assessed as the percentage of decrease in radioactivity per hour calculated on time-activity curves fitted by a monoexponential model. To exclude patients with acute lung rejection, opportunistic lung infection, and obliterative bronchiolitis, all patients with transplants underwent pulmonary function tests and bronchoscopic examination before clearance measurement. Eight heart/lung and five double-lung nonsmoking transplant patients with normal lung histology were studied 19.3 +/- 4.0 mo after surgery and compared to nine normal nonsmokers. A similar proximal deposition of the aerosol was obtained in patients with transplants and normal subjects; skew values of distribution histograms of aerosol radioactivity counts were 2.1 +/- 0.2 and 1.8 +/- 0.1, respectively, and the ratios between central and peripheral 99mTc radioactivity counts were 2.4 +/- 0.1 and 2.3 +/- 0.2, respectively. No significant difference was observed in bronchial clearance values between patients with heart/lung and double-lung transplants (26.4 +/- 3.0 percent/h vs 35.9 +/- 3.5 percent/h). Conversely, bronchial clearance was significantly lower in transplant recipients (30.0 +/- 2.5 percent/h) than in normal controls (58.7 +/- 6.2 percent/h; p < 0.001). This decreased bronchial clearance can be expected to increase the risk of lung infection in long-term survivors of heart/lung and double-lung transplantation. PMID:8380268

  9. Hypothermic lung preservation functions, six or more years later.

    PubMed Central

    Garzon, A A; Goldstein, S; Okadigwe, C I; Paley, N B; Minkowitz, S

    1977-01-01

    The functions of each lung were measured 41 and 79 months following hypothermic twenty-four four lung preservation and autotransplantation in six and four dogs respectively. Functional results were compared with long-term autotransplanted canine lungs. Compliance, total lung capacity, functional reserve capacity and ventilation of preserved lungs were similar to autotransplanted lungs, and only slightly decreased as compared with normal animals. There was no statistically significant difference between the pulmonary diffusion capacity and oxygen uptake of the preserved and autotransplanted lungs group and autotransplants alone. However, in both groups, diffusion capacity and oxygen uptake were decreased as compared with intact animals. Pulmonary hypertension was found on occlusion of the contralateral lung's artery: it was due to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. No gross narrowing of the pulmonary artery or venous anastomosis was found that could explain the increased resistance. Diffuse emphysema of various degrees was observed in all animals. This study seems to indicate that hypothermic preservation of the lung does not affect significantly the long-term functional ability of the organ, and probably will have practical value in future clinical lung transplantation. Images Fig. 1. PMID:341822

  10. Triadin Deletion Induces Impaired Skeletal Muscle Function*

    PubMed Central

    Oddoux, Sarah; Brocard, Julie; Schweitzer, Annie; Szentesi, Peter; Giannesini, Benoit; Brocard, Jacques; Fauré, Julien; Pernet-Gallay, Karine; Bendahan, David; Lunardi, Joël; Csernoch, Laszlo; Marty, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Triadin is a multiple proteins family, some isoforms being involved in muscle excitation-contraction coupling, and some having still unknown functions. To obtain clues on triadin functions, we engineered a triadin knock-out mouse line and characterized the physiological effect of triadin ablation on skeletal muscle function. These mice presented a reduced muscle strength, which seemed not to alter their survival and has been characterized in the present work. We first checked in these mice the expression level of the different proteins involved in calcium homeostasis and observed in fast muscles an increase in expression of dihydropyridine receptor, with a large reduction in calsequestrin expression. Electron microscopy analysis of KO muscles morphology demonstrated the presence of triads in abnormal orientation and a reduction in the sarcoplasmic reticulum terminal cisternae volume. Using calcium imaging on cultured myotubes, we observed a reduction in the total amount of calcium stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Physiological studies have been performed to evaluate the influence of triadin deletion on skeletal muscle function. Muscle strength has been measured both on the whole animal model, using hang test or electrical stimulation combined with NMR analysis and strength measurement, or on isolated muscle using electrical stimulation. All the results obtained demonstrate an important reduction in muscle strength, indicating that triadin plays an essential role in skeletal muscle function and in skeletal muscle structure. These results indicate that triadin alteration leads to the development of a myopathy, which could be studied using this new animal model. PMID:19843516

  11. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  12. Relationship of structural to functional impairment during alveolar-capillary membrane development.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Shawn K; Gao, Yong; Conway, Simon J; Tepper, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of extreme preterm infants and results in impaired gas exchange. Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is characterized histologically by alveolar-capillary simplification in animal models, it is clinically defined by impaired gas diffusion. With the use of a developmentally relevant model, we correlated alveolar-capillary structural simplification with reduced functional gas exchange as measured by the diffusing factor for carbon monoxide (DFCO). Neonatal mouse pups were exposed to >90% hyperoxia or room air during postnatal days 0 to 7, and then all pups were returned to room air from days 7 to 56. At day 56, DFCO was measured as the ratio of carbon monoxide uptake to neon dilution, and lungs were fixed for histologic assessment of alveolar-capillary development. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure inhibited alveolar-capillary septal development as evidenced by significantly increased mean linear intercept, increased airspace-to-septal ratio, decreased nodal density, and decreased pulmonary microvasculature. Importantly, alveolar-capillary structural deficits in hyperoxia-exposed pups were accompanied by a significant 28% decrease in DFCO (0.555 versus 0.400; P < 0.0001). In addition, DFCO was highly and significantly correlated with structural measures of reduced alveolar-capillary growth. Simplification of alveolar-capillary structure is highly correlated with impaired gas exchange function. Current mechanistic and therapeutic animal models of inhibited alveolar development may benefit from application of DFCO as an alternative physiologic indicator of alveolar-capillary development. PMID:25661110

  13. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  14. LUNG FUNCTION IN SCHOOL CHILDREN: 1971-1972 CHATTANOOGA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies of lung function in children have indicated that decreases in lung function are associated with higher air pollution exposures. For this reason, three quarter second timed forced expiratory volume was chosen as one of the health indicators in the Environmental Pr...

  15. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Patrizia; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Tuccio, Vanessa; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Bacci, Giovanni; Morelli, Patrizia; Dolce, Daniela; Dalmastri, Claudia; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Taccetti, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S) versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD). Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs) no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe) were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good candidates for the

  16. Pharmacokinetics of oral cefatrizine in patients with impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Couet, W; Fauvel, J P; Laville, M; Pozet, N; Fourtillan, J B

    1991-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefatrizine was studied in 15 patients with various degrees of renal impairment, after single oral administration of 500 mg. Cefatrizine elimination was reduced in parallel to renal function, as indicated by the significant correlations between apparent clearance (Cl/F) and creatinine clearance (Clcr), and between renal clearance (Clr) and creatinine clearance (Clcr). In patients with totally impaired renal function, the residual clearance (Cl/F) was 63 ml.min-1 per 1.73 m2. Comparisons with previously published data indicate that the apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of cefatrizine was lower in patients with impaired renal function than in young healthy volunteers, leading to increased peak concentrations (Cmax), but there was no relationship between V/F and Clcr. In patients with totally impaired renal function, the upper limit of cefatrizine elimination half-life was estimated to 5.5 h. The clinical significance of pharmacokinetic modifications observed in renal disease patients may only be realized through integration of pharmacodynamic characteristics of cefatrizine. The observed increase in Cmax and the lengthening of t1/2 could suggest a reduction of dosing frequency in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:1869342

  17. Evaluation of effect of impaired renal function on lamivudine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bouazza, Naïm; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Hirt, Déborah; Benaboud, Sihem; Foissac, Frantz; Viard, Jean-Paul; Urien, Saik

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to describe lamivudine pharmacokinetics in patients with impaired renal function and to evaluate the consistency of current dosing recommendations. Methods A total of 244 patients, ranging in age from 18 to 79 years (median 40 years) and in bodyweight from 38 to 117 kg (median 71 kg), with 344 lamivudine plasma concentrations, were analysed using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Serum creatinine clearance (CLCR) was calculated using the Cockcroft–Gault formula; 177 patients had normal renal function (CLCR > 90 ml min−1), 50 patients had mild renal impairment (CLCR = 60–90 ml min−1), 20 patients had moderate renal impairment (CLCR = 30–60 ml min−1), and five patients had severe renal impairment (CLCR < 30 ml min−1). Results A two-compartment model adequately described the data. Typical population estimates (percentage interindividual variability) of the apparent clearance (CL/F), central (Vc/F) and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vp/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F) and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 29.7 l h−1 (32%), 68.2 l, 114 l, 10.1 l h−1 (85%) and 1 h−1, respectively. Clearance increased significantly and gradually with CLCR. Our simulations showed that a dose of 300 mg day−1 in patients with mild renal impairment could overexpose them. A dose of 200 mg day−1 maintained an exposure close to that of adults with normal renal function. However, the current US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for lamivudine in other categories of patients (from severe to moderate renal impairment) provided optimal exposures. Conclusions Lamivudine elimination clearance is related to renal function. To provide optimal exposure, patients with mild renal impairment should receive 200 mg day−1 instead of 300 mg day−1. PMID:24750102

  18. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb−/y) mice and found that Fancb−/y mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb−/y mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb−/y mice. Furthermore, Fancb−/y BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb−/y HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb−/y mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  19. Topoisomerase 1 inhibition reversibly impairs synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Kullmann, Paul H. M.; Twomey, Margaret A.; Miriyala, Jayalakshmi; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Topotecan is a topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitor that is used to treat various forms of cancer. We recently found that topotecan reduces the expression of multiple long genes, including many neuronal genes linked to synapses and autism. However, whether topotecan alters synaptic protein levels and synapse function is currently unknown. Here we report that in primary cortical neurons, topotecan depleted synaptic proteins that are encoded by extremely long genes, including Neurexin-1, Neuroligin-1, Cntnap2, and GABAAβ3. Topotecan also suppressed spontaneous network activity without affecting resting membrane potential, action potential threshold, or neuron health. Topotecan strongly suppressed inhibitory neurotransmission via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms and reduced excitatory neurotransmission. The effects on synaptic protein levels and inhibitory neurotransmission were fully reversible upon drug washout. Collectively, our findings suggest that TOP1 controls the levels of multiple synaptic proteins and is required for normal excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:25404338

  20. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  1. Association between the Type of Workplace and Lung Function in Copper Miners

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyński, Leszek; Wojakowska, Anna; Ścieszka, Marek; Turczyn, Barbara; Schmidt, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the analysis was to retrospectively assess changes in lung function in copper miners depending on the type of workplace. In the groups of 225 operators, 188 welders, and 475 representatives of other jobs, spirometry was performed at the start of employment and subsequently after 10, 20, and 25 years of work. Spirometry Longitudinal Data Analysis software was used to estimate changes in group means for FEV1 and FVC. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess an association between workplace and lung function. Lung function assessed on the basis of calculation of longitudinal FEV1 (FVC) decline was similar in all studied groups. However, multiple linear regression model used in cross-sectional analysis revealed an association between workplace and lung function. In the group of welders, FEF75 was lower in comparison to operators and other miners as early as after 10 years of work. Simultaneously, in smoking welders, the FEV1/FVC ratio was lower than in nonsmokers (p < 0,05). The interactions between type of workplace and smoking (p < 0,05) in their effect on FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF50 were shown. Among underground working copper miners, the group of smoking welders is especially threatened by impairment of lung ventilatory function. PMID:27274987

  2. Neural origins of psychosocial functioning impairments in major depression.

    PubMed

    Pulcu, Erdem; Elliott, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Major depressive disorder, a complex neuropsychiatric condition, is associated with psychosocial functioning impairments that could become chronic even after symptoms remit. Social functioning impairments in patients could also pose coping difficulties to individuals around them. In this Personal View, we trace the potential neurobiological origins of these impairments down to three candidate domains-namely, social perception and emotion processing, motivation and reward value processing, and social decision making. We argue that the neural basis of abnormalities in these domains could be detectable at different temporal stages during social interactions (eg, before and after decision stages), particularly within frontomesolimbic networks (ie, frontostriatal and amygdala-striatal circuitries). We review some of the experimental designs used to probe these circuits and suggest novel, integrative approaches. We propose that an understanding of the interactions between these domains could provide valuable insights for the clinical stratification of major depressive disorder subtypes and might inform future developments of novel treatment options in return. PMID:26360902

  3. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  4. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. Results In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Conclusions Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23419080

  5. Executive Functioning in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2012-01-01

    Background: A limited range of evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulties with higher order thinking and reasoning skills (executive functioning, EF). This study involved a comprehensive investigation of EF in this population taking into account the contributions of age, nonverbal IQ and verbal…

  6. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  7. Altered lung function at mid-adulthood in mice following neonatal exposure to hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Sozo, Foula; Horvat, Jay C; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; O'Reilly, Megan; Hansbro, Philip M; Harding, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Infants born very preterm are usually exposed to high oxygen concentrations but this may impair lung function in survivors in later life. However, the precise changes involved are poorly understood. We determined how neonatal hyperoxia alters lung function at mid-adulthood in mice. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice inhaled 65% oxygen (HE group) from birth for 7 days. They then breathed room air until 11 months of age (P11mo); these mice experienced growth restriction. Controls breathed only room air. To exclude the effects of growth restriction, a group of dams was rotated between hyperoxia and normoxia during the exposure period (HE+DR group). Lung function was measured at P11mo. HE mice had increased inspiratory capacity, work of breathing and tissue damping. HE+DR mice had further increases in inspiratory capacity and work of breathing, and reduced FEV100/FVC. Total lung capacity was increased in HE+DR males. HE males had elevated responses to methacholine. Neonatal hyperoxia alters lung function at mid-adulthood, especially in males. PMID:26197245

  8. Correlation of Apical Fluid-Regulating Channel Proteins with Lung Function in Human COPD Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meimi; Liu, Shan-Lu; Huang, Yao; Idell, Steven; Li, Xiumin; Ji, Hong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII)-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD. PMID:25329998

  9. PREOPERATIVE PREDICTION OF LUNG FUNCTION IN PNEUMONECTOMY BY SPIROMETRY AND LUNG PERFUSION SCINTIGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused by common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Loss of lung tissue in such patients can worsen much the postoperative pulmonary function. So it is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function especially after maximal resection, i.e. pneumonectomy. Objective: To check over the accuracy of preoperative prognosis of postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy using spirometry and lung perfusion scinigraphy. Material and methods: The study was done on 17 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery, who were treated previously at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 12. 2008. to 01. 06. 2011. Postoperative pulmonary function expressed as ppoFEV1 (predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second) was prognosticated preoperatively using spirometry, i.e.. simple calculation according to the number of the pulmonary segments to be removed and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Results: There is no significant deviation of postoperative achieved values of FEV1 from predicted ones obtained by both methods, and there is no significant differences between predicted values (ppoFEV1) obtained by spirometry and perfusion scintigraphy. Conclusion: It is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function before lung resection to avoid postoperative respiratory failure and other cardiopulmonary complications. It is absolutely necessary for pneumonectomy, i.e.. maximal pulmonary resection. It can be done with great possibility using spirometry or perfusion lung scintigraphy. PMID:23378687

  10. Assessment of respiratory symptoms and lung function values among the brick field workers of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Banibrata

    2016-07-01

    Brick manufacturing process releases large amounts of silica dust into the work environment due to the use of silica-containing materials. The main aim of the study was to investigate the impairment of lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms among the different groups of brick field workers in comparison with control subjects. A total of 250 brick field workers and 130 unexposed control subjects were randomly selected in which demographic characteristics, respiratory symptoms, and lung function values were recorded. The result showed significantly lower p value (<.001) in lung function and respiratory symptoms among brick field workers when compared with control group. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was dyspnea (46.8%), phlegm (39.2%), and chest tightness (27.6%). Dust exposure in working environment affected the lung function values and increased the respiratory symptoms among the brick field workers. PMID:26176596

  11. Mild carbon monoxide poisoning impairs left ventricular diastolic function

    PubMed Central

    Çiftçi, Özgür; Günday, Murat; Çalışkan, Mustafa; Güllü, Hakan; Doğan, Rafi; Güven, Aytekin; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is associated with direct cardiovascular toxicity. In mild CO poisoning in which cardiovascular life support is not required, the effects of CO on left and right ventricular functions are unknown in patients without cardiac failure. Objectives: Echocardiography was used to determine whether or not mild CO poisoning impairs ventricular function. Twenty otherwise healthy patients with CO poisoning and 20 age- and gender-matched controls were studied. Echocardiographic examinations were performed at the time of admission and 1 week after poisoning. Results: The impairment observed in the left and right ventricular diastolic function at the time of admission was greater than the impairment 1 week after poisoning. Mild CO poisoning did not have a significant effect on systolic function. Carboxyhemoglobin levels were positively correlated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, whereas the levels were not correlated with right ventricular diastolic function. Conclusions: In CO intoxication, the development of left and right ventricular diastolic dysfunction precedes systolic abnormality. Patients with mild CO poisoning do not manifest cardiovascular symptoms; however, it should be borne in mind that most of these patients have myocardial involvement. PMID:24082611

  12. Exercise testing in severe emphysema: association with quality of life and lung function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia D; Benditt, Joshua O; Sciurba, Frank C; Lee, Shing M; Criner, Gerard J; Mosenifar, Zab; Shade, David M; Slivka, William A; Wise, Robert A

    2008-04-01

    Six-minute walk testing (6MWT) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) are used to evaluate impairment in emphysema. However, the extent of impairment in these tests as well as the correlation of these tests with each other and lung function in advanced emphysema is not well characterized. During screening for the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, maximum ergometer CPX and 6MWT were performed in 1,218 individuals with severe COPD with an average FEV(1) of 26.9 +/- 7.1 % predicted. Predicted values for 6MWT and CPX were calculated from reference equations. Correlation coefficients and multivariable regression models were used to determine the association between lung function, quality of life (QOL) scores, and exercise measures. The two forms of exercise testing were correlated with each other (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001). However, the impairment of performance on CPX was greater than on the 6MWT (27.6 +/- 16.8 vs. 67.9 +/- 18.9 % predicted). Both exercise tests had similar correlation with measures of QOL, but maximum exercise capacity was better correlated with lung function measures than 6-minute walk distance. After adjustment, 6MWD had a slightly greater association with total SGRQ score than maximal exercise (effect size 0.37 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.03 %predicted/unit). Despite advanced emphysema, patients are able to maintain 6MWD to a greater degree than maximum exercise capacity. Moreover, the 6MWT may be a better test of functional capacity given its greater association with QOL measures whereas CPX is a better test of physiologic impairment. PMID:18415810

  13. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  14. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  15. Insulin Resistance and Impaired Mitochondrial Function in Obese Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Thakur, Hena; Torriani, Martin; Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in the development of muscle insulin resistance (IR) and the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) in skeletal muscle that can, in turn, interfere with insulin signaling. The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function (MF) and IMCL in obese adolescent girls with and without IR to determine whether: (1) Girls with IR have impaired MF, and (2) impaired MF in girls with IR is related to higher IMCL. Methods: We examined 22 obese girls aged 13–21 years old for IR [defined as a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value >4. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), respectively, were used to determine MF and IMCL of the soleus muscle along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of visceral, subcutaneous, and total adipose tissue (VAT, SAT, and TAT) in girls with HOMA-IR >4 (insulin-resistant group) versus HOMA-IR ≤4 (insulin-sensitive group). Serum lipids and waist-to-hip ratio (W/H) were also measured. Results: Girls with IR (n=8) did not differ from the insulin-sensitive group (n=14) for age, bone age, weight, VAT, SAT, TAT, or IMCL. However, the insulin-resistant group had higher W/H. Additionally the insulin-resistance group had a lower log rate of postexercise phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery (ViPCr) and a higher log PCr recovery constant (tau), indicative of impaired MF. Conclusions: Obese girls with increased IR have impaired mitochondrial function. This association is not mediated by alterations in IMCL or adipose tissue. Further studies are necessary to determine whether there is a causal relation between impaired mitochondrial function and IR in obesity and mediators of such a relationship. PMID:24251951

  16. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  17. Impaired Pulmonary Defense Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in VEGF Gene Inactivated Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Ellen C.; Malloy, Jaret L.; Tang, Kechun; Xia, Feng; Fu, Zhenxing; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Overhage, Joerg; Wagner, Peter D.; Spragg, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated bacterial and viral infections are known to contribute to worsening lung function in several respiratory diseases, including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have reported alveolar wall cell apoptosis and parenchymal damage in adult pulmonary VEGF gene ablated mice. We hypothesized that VEGF expressed by type II cells is also necessary to provide an effective host defense against bacteria in part by maintaining surfactant homeostasis. Therefore, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) levels were evaluated in mice following lung-targeted VEGF gene inactivation, and alterations in VEGF-dependent type II cell function were evaluated by measuring surfactant homeostasis in mouse lungs and isolated type II cells. In VEGF-deficient lungs increased PAO1 levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, were detected 24 hours after bacterial instillation compared to control lungs. In vivo lung-targeted VEGF gene deletion (57% decrease in total pulmonary VEGF) did not alter alveolar surfactant or tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) levels. However, sphingomyelin content, choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) mRNA and SP-D expression were decreased. In isolated type II cells an 80% reduction of VEGF protein resulted in decreases in total phospholipids (PL), DSPC, DSPC synthesis, surfactant associated proteins (SP)-B and -D, and the lipid transporters, ABCA1 and Rab3D. TPA-induced DSPC secretion and apoptosis were elevated in VEGF-deficient type II cells. These results suggest a potential protective role for type II cell-expressed VEGF against bacterial initiated infection. PMID:22718316

  18. Regional lung function and mechanics using image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai

    The main function of the respiratory system is gas exchange. Since many disease or injury conditions can cause biomechanical or material property changes that can alter lung function, there is a great interest in measuring regional lung function and mechanics. In this thesis, we present a technique that uses multiple respiratory-gated CT images of the lung acquired at different levels of inflation with both breath-hold static scans and retrospectively reconstructed 4D dynamic scans, along with non-rigid 3D image registration, to make local estimates of lung tissue function and mechanics. We validate our technique using anatomical landmarks and functional Xe-CT estimated specific ventilation. The major contributions of this thesis include: (1) developing the registration derived regional expansion estimation approach in breath-hold static scans and dynamic 4DCT scans, (2) developing a method to quantify lobar sliding from image registration derived displacement field, (3) developing a method for measurement of radiation-induced pulmonary function change following a course of radiation therapy, (4) developing and validating different ventilation measures in 4DCT. The ability of our technique to estimate regional lung mechanics and function as a surrogate of the Xe-CT ventilation imaging for the entire lung from quickly and easily obtained respiratory-gated images, is a significant contribution to functional lung imaging because of the potential increase in resolution, and large reductions in imaging time, radiation, and contrast agent exposure. Our technique may be useful to detect and follow the progression of lung disease such as COPD, may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy.

  19. Impaired renal function and bleeding in elderly treated with dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Lavenu-Bombled, Cecile; Orostegui-Giron, Lupe; Desconclois, Céline; Assayag, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Advantages of dabigatran, a thrombin inhibitor, for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation are numerous. Elderly patients with impaired renal function are at high risk of bleeding. Recommendations about the renal monitoring in elderly patients are not precise enough. The hemoclot direct thrombin inhibitor (HTI) assay measures accurately the dabigatran activity. Both could help managing serious bleeding events in selected populations. Four elderly patients recently treated with appropriate doses of dabigatran were hospitalized for major bleeding. Three patients were very elderly (> 80 years) and three had impaired renal function (clearance < 50 ml/min) before treatment initiation. Serious bleeding events occurred shortly after dabigatran initiation (< 2 months). In all cases, there was a documented dabigatran plasma overdose associated with a renal function impairment concomitant with the bleeding. Why should physicians be aware of this finding?: A close follow-up of the renal function in clinically fragile elderly patient, before and during the weeks following dabigatran initiation, could help to detect the risk of major bleeding event. The HTI dosage could help managing the treatment in case of severe bleeding event. PMID:24509332

  20. Systematic review of pleural plaques and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Kerper, Laura E.; Lynch, Heather N.; Zu, Ke; Tao, Ge; Utell, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context US EPA proposed a Reference Concentration for Libby amphibole asbestos based on the premise that pleural plaques are adverse and cause lung function deficits. Objective We conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether there is an association between pleural plaques and lung function and ascertain whether results were dependent on the method used to identify plaques. Methods Using the PubMed database, we identified studies that evaluated pleural plaques and lung function. We assessed each study for quality, then integrated evidence and assessed associations based on the Bradford Hill guidelines. We also compared the results of HRCT studies to those of X-ray studies. Results We identified 16 HRCT and 36 X-ray studies. We rated six HRCT and 16 X-ray studies as higher quality based on a risk-of-bias analysis. Half of the higher quality studies reported small but statistically significant mean lung function decrements associated with plaques. None of the differences were clinically significant. Many studies had limitations, such as inappropriate controls and/or insufficient adjustment for confounders. There was little consistency in the direction of effect for the most commonly reported measurements. X-ray results were more variable than HRCT results. Pleural plaques were not associated with changes in lung function over time in longitudinal studies. Conclusion The weight of evidence indicates that pleural plaques do not impact lung function. Observed associations are most likely due to unidentified abnormalities or other factors. PMID:25518994

  1. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  2. A Comparative Study of Lung Host Defense in Murine Obesity Models. Insights into Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Ubags, Niki D J; Burg, Elianne; Antkowiak, Maryellen; Wallace, Aaron M; Dilli, Estee; Bement, Jenna; Wargo, Matthew J; Poynter, Matthew E; Wouters, Emiel F M; Suratt, Benjamin T

    2016-08-01

    We have shown that obesity-associated attenuation of murine acute lung injury is driven, in part, by blunted neutrophil chemotaxis, yet differences were noted between the two models of obesity studied. We hypothesized that obesity-associated impairment of multiple neutrophil functions contributes to increased risk for respiratory infection but that such impairments may vary between murine models of obesity. We examined the most commonly used murine obesity models (diet-induced obesity, db/db, CPE(fat/fat), and ob/ob) using a Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia model and LPS-induced pneumonitis. Marrow-derived neutrophils from uninjured lean and obese mice were examined for in vitro functional responses. All obesity models showed impaired clearance of K. pneumoniae, but in differing temporal patterns. Failure to contain infection in obese mice was seen in the db/db model at both 24 and 48 hours, yet this defect was only evident at 24 hours in CPE(fat/fat) and ob/ob models, and at 48 hours in diet-induced obesity. LPS-induced airspace neutrophilia was decreased in all models, and associated with blood neutropenia in the ob/ob model but with leukocytosis in the others. Obese mouse neutrophils from all models demonstrated impaired chemotaxis, whereas neutrophil granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mediated survival, LPS-induced cytokine transcription, and mitogen-activated protein kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in response to LPS and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, respectively, were variably impaired across the four models. Obesity-associated impairment of host response to lung infection is characterized by defects in neutrophil recruitment and survival. However, critical differences exist between commonly used mouse models of obesity and may reflect variable penetrance of elements of the metabolic syndrome, as well as other factors. PMID:27128821

  3. Rapamycin inhibited the function of lung CSCs via SOX2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Xia; Sun, Feng-Feng; He, Bin-Feng; Zhan, Xiao-Feng; Song, Juan; Chen, Sheng-Song; Yu, Shi-Cang; Ye, Xiao-Qun

    2016-04-01

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is the source of occurrence, aggravation, and recurrence of lung cancer. Accordingly, targeting killing the lung CSCs has been suggested to be an effective approach for lung cancer treatment. In this study, we showed that rapamycin inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction in A549 cells and improved the sensitivity to cisplatin (DDP). The mechanisms involve inhibition of the SOX2 expression, cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, and sphere formation. Interestingly, knocked down SOX2 was a similar effect with rapamycin in A549 sphere. Furthermore, we showed that ectopic expression of Sox2 in A549 cells was sufficient to render them more resistant to rapamycin treatment in vitro. These data suggested that rapamycin inhibited the function of lung CSCs via SOX2. It will be of great interest to further explore the therapeutic strategies of lung cancer. PMID:26526583

  4. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  5. Prenatal ethanol exposure impairs executive function in mice into adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Kristin; Sigdel, Rahul; Caldwell, Kevin; Brigman, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can lead to a wide range of impairments in cognitive, social and emotional behaviors, drinking during pregnancy remains common. Although there is a general understanding that high levels of drinking during pregnancy are unsafe, conflicting evidence regarding the impact of low intake may account for the persistence of this behavior. Methods In order to investigate the effects of PAE on learning and executive control we utilized a voluntary paradigm where pregnant mice had access to a saccharin sweetened 10% alcohol solution for 4 hours, during the dark cycle, throughout gestation. Male and female offspring were tested as adults on a touch-screen discrimination and reversal task mediated by corticostriatal circuits. Results Consistent with previous findings, PAE did not lead to gross morphological, motor or sensory alterations in offspring. Both PAE and saccharin control female mice were slower to acquire the discrimination than males, but PAE did not impair associative learning in either sex. During reversal, PAE led to a specific and significant impairment in the early phase, where cortical control is most required to flexibly alter choice behavior. PAE mice showed a significant increase in maladaptive perseverative responses but showed intact learning of the new association during late reversal. Conclusions Previously, data from clinical studies have suggested that executive control deficits may underlie cognitive, as well as social, problems seen in adolescents with documented PAE. These data demonstrate that even more moderate alcohol exposure during development can lead to impaired cognitive functioning well into adulthood. PMID:25581651

  6. Treatment Concerns and Functional Impairment in Pediatric Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B; Selles, Robert R; McBride, Nicole M; Crawford, Erika A; Storch, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Although there are efficacious, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders, youth often experience delays in seeking therapy. Myriad reasons may contribute to this lag in treatment initiation, with some youth possessing concerns about therapy. Treatment concerns are broadly characterized by worries/ambivalence about seeking treatment, including concerns about the negative reactions, consequences, and inconvenience of treatment. As no studies exist for youth with anxiety disorders, this study examined the phenomenology of treatment concerns in 119 treatment-seeking, anxious youth and utilized a structural equation model to examine the relationship between child anxiety, depressive symptoms, treatment concerns, and anxiety-related functional impairment. Over 90 % of the children positively endorsed some type of treatment-related fear, with the most frequently expressed concern being that therapy would take too much time (50.4 %). Based on the model, both child anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted functional impairment, and treatment concerns mediated the relationship between child anxiety and functional impairment. PMID:26438217

  7. Microbial colonization and lung function in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hector, Andreas; Kirn, Tobias; Ralhan, Anjali; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Berenbrinker, Sina; Riethmueller, Joachim; Hogardt, Michael; Wagner, Marlies; Pfleger, Andreas; Autenrieth, Ingo; Kappler, Matthias; Griese, Matthias; Eber, Ernst; Martus, Peter; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-05-01

    With intensified antibiotic therapy and longer survival, patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are colonized with a more complex pattern of bacteria and fungi. However, the clinical relevance of these emerging pathogens for lung function remains poorly defined. The aim of this study was to assess the association of bacterial and fungal colonization patterns with lung function in adolescent patients with CF. Microbial colonization patterns and lung function parameters were assessed in 770 adolescent European (German/Austrian) CF patients in a retrospective study (median follow-up time: 10years). Colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA were most strongly associated with loss of lung function, while mainly colonization with Haemophilus influenzae was associated with preserved lung function. Aspergillus fumigatus was the only species that was associated with an increased risk for infection with P. aeruginosa. Microbial interaction analysis revealed three distinct microbial clusters within the longitudinal course of CF lung disease. Collectively, this study identified potentially protective and harmful microbial colonization patterns in adolescent CF patients. Further studies in different patient cohorts are required to evaluate these microbial patterns and to assess their clinical relevance. PMID:26856310

  8. Lung function in post-poliomyelitis syndrome: a cross-sectional study*

    PubMed Central

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Minozzo, Fábio Carderelli; Sousa, Bolivar Saldanha; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; Quadros, Abrahão Augusto Juviniano; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare lung function between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and those with sequelae of paralytic poliomyelitis (without any signs or symptoms of post-poliomyelitis syndrome), as well as between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty-nine male participants were assigned to one of three groups: control; poliomyelitis (comprising patients who had had paralytic poliomyelitis but had not developed post-poliomyelitis syndrome); and post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Volunteers underwent lung function measurements (spirometry and respiratory muscle strength assessment). RESULTS: The results of the spirometric assessment revealed no significant differences among the groups except for an approximately 27% lower mean maximal voluntary ventilation in the post-poliomyelitis syndrome group when compared with the control group (p = 0.0127). Nevertheless, the maximal voluntary ventilation values for the post-poliomyelitis group were compared with those for the Brazilian population and were found to be normal. No significant differences were observed in respiratory muscle strength among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of lower maximal voluntary ventilation, there was no significant lung function impairment in outpatients diagnosed with post-poliomyelitis syndrome when compared with healthy subjects and with patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis without post-poliomyelitis syndrome. This is an important clinical finding because it shows that patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome can have preserved lung function. PMID:24068267

  9. Asymptomatic HIV-infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Impaired Lung CD4+ T-Cell Responses to Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Dominic H.; Afran, Louise; Kankwatira, Anstead M.; Malamba, Rose D.; Allain, Theresa J.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain at higher risk of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) than HIV-uninfected individuals. This increased susceptibility may be caused by impairment of alveolar macrophage (AM) function and/or mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses observed in HIV-infected ART-naive adults. Objectives: To determine whether ART was associated with improvement in both AM function, assessed by phagosomal proteolysis, and alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses to Mycobacterium in HIV-infected individuals. Methods: Peripheral blood was drawn and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed on healthy, 35 HIV-uninfected, 25 HIV-infected ART-naive, and 50 HIV-infected ART-treated asymptomatic adults. Phagosomal proteolysis of AM was assessed with fluorogenic beads. Mycobacteria-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining. Measurements and Main Results: HIV-infected adults on ART exhibited lower plasma HIV viral load and higher blood CD4+ T-cell count than ART-naive adults. AM proteolysis and total mycobacteria-specific Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses in individuals on ART for greater than or equal to 4 years were similar to HIV-uninfected control subjects but those on ART for less than 4 years had impaired responses. Total influenza-specific alveolar Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses were intact in all individuals receiving ART. In contrast, BAL and blood mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses were impaired in adults on ART irrespective of duration. Conclusions: AM and mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses in HIV-infected adults on ART for less than 4 years are impaired and may partly explain the high risk of TB in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Strategies to augment ART to improve lung immune cell function and reduce the high incidence of TB in HIV-infected adults who initiate ART should be investigated. PMID:25225948

  10. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  11. Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Stupic, Karl F.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies. PMID:24023683

  12. Impaired functional integration in multiple sclerosis: a graph theory study.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Meani, Alessandro; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to explore the topological organization of functional brain network connectivity in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to assess whether its disruption contributes to disease clinical manifestations. Graph theoretical analysis was applied to resting state fMRI data from 246 MS patients and 55 matched healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity between 116 cortical and subcortical brain regions was estimated using a bivariate correlation analysis. Global network properties (network degree, global efficiency, hierarchy, path length and assortativity) were abnormal in MS patients vs HC, and contributed to distinguish cognitively impaired MS patients (34%) from HC, but not the main MS clinical phenotypes. Compared to HC, MS patients also showed: (1) a loss of hubs in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus and anterior cingulum in the left hemisphere; (2) a different lateralization of basal ganglia hubs (mostly located in the left hemisphere in HC, and in the right hemisphere in MS patients); and (3) a formation of hubs, not seen in HC, in the left temporal pole and cerebellum. MS patients also experienced a decreased nodal degree in the bilateral caudate nucleus and right cerebellum. Such a modification of regional network properties contributed to cognitive impairment and phenotypic variability of MS. An impairment of global integration (likely to reflect a reduced competence in information exchange between distant brain areas) occurs in MS and is associated with cognitive deficits. A regional redistribution of network properties contributes to cognitive status and phenotypic variability of these patients. PMID:25257603

  13. Functional MRI in investigating cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rocca, M A; De Meo, E; Filippi, M

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that the severity of the clinical manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) does not simply result from the extent of tissue destruction, but it rather represents a complex balance between tissue damage, tissue repair, and cortical reorganization. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides information about the plasticity of the human brain. Therefore, it has the potential to provide important pieces of information about brain reorganization following MS-related structural damage. When investigating cognitive systems, fMRI changes have been described in virtually all patients with MS and different clinical phenotypes. These functional changes have been related to the extent of brain damage within and outside T2-visible lesions as well as to the involvement of specific central nervous system structures. It has also been suggested that a maladaptive recruitment of specific brain regions might be associated with the appearance of clinical symptoms in MS, such as fatigue and cognitive impairment. fMRI studies from clinically (and cognitively) impaired MS patients may be influenced by different task performances between patients and controls. As a consequence, new strategies have been introduced to assess the role, if any, of brain reorganization in severely impaired patients, including the analysis of resting-state networks. The enhancement of any beneficial effects of this brain adaptive plasticity should be considered as a potential target of therapy for MS. PMID:27580905

  14. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Vazquez de Anda, G F; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, S J; Gommers, D; Haitsma, J J; Lachmann, B

    2001-07-01

    Disturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately after randomization and used as an untreated control. The second group received only sham treatment and ventilation, and three groups received treatment with perfluorocarbon (10 mL x kg(-1), 20 mL x kg(-1), and 20 ml x kg(-1) plus an additional 5 mL x kg(-1) after 1 h). The four groups were maintained on mechanical ventilation for a further 2-h observation period. Blood gases, lung mechanics, total protein concentration, minimal surface tension, and small/large surfactant aggregates ratio were determined. The results show that in ventilation-induced lung injury, partial liquid ventilation with different amounts of perflubron improves gas exchange and pulmonary function, when compared to a group of animals treated with standard respiratory care. These effects have been observed despite the presence of a high intra-alveolar protein concentration, especially in those groups treated with 10 and 20 mL of perflubron. The data suggest that replacement of perfluorocarbon, lost over time, is crucial to maintain the constant effects of partial liquid ventilation. PMID:11510811

  15. Assessing Depression Related Severity and Functional Impairment: The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masaya; Bentley, Kate H.; Oe, Yuki; Nakajima, Shun; Fujisato, Hiroko; Kato, Noriko; Miyamae, Mitsuhiro; Kanie, Ayako; Horikoshi, Masaru; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS) is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis. Methods From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive–compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists). Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test–retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately. Conclusions This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity. PMID:25874558

  16. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  17. Alterations in Lung Functions Based on BMI and Body Fat % Among Obese Indian Population at National Capital Region

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ritul; Bihari, Vipin; Sathian, Brijesh; Srivastava, Anup Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In India, non-asthmatic hospital admission case study has been conducted to find out the relationship between obesity and lung functions. The main objective of the present study was to find out the alterations in lung functions due to obesity among Indian population living at National Capital Region (NCR). Materials and Methods We examined 609 non obese and 211 obese subjects in a cross sectional study from National Capital Region, India with age group ranges between 18-70 years. BMI and body fat % was determined using body fat analyzer. Obese and non-obese subjects were classified based on criteria for BMI and Body fat %. Lung function test viz., FEV1 and PEFR were conducted using portable spirometer (PIKO-1). Results A significant correlation (p<0.05) was observed between BMI and PEFR among non-obese male and female subjects. Decline in PEFR and FEV1 values for corresponding increase in body fat % was observed among study subjects. A significant (p<0.01) decline in mean FEV1 and PEFR was observed among non-obese and obese subjects, compared to their Indian reference standards for lung functions. A significant negative correlation (p<0.01) was observed between body fat % and lung functions (FEV1, PEFR). Conclusion It is concluded that obese subjects are at a risk of lung function impairment, based on the criteria followed for BMI and body fat %. The study also demonstrate that body fat% classification as a better index for determination of obese subjects compared to BMI classification, with respect to lung function impairments. PMID:26913206

  18. Effects of air pollution on lung function and symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Altuğ, Hicran; Gaga, Eftade O; Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Ozden, Ozlem; Ornektekin, Sermin; Brunekreef, Bert; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard; Van Doorn, Wim

    2013-09-01

    Health effects of ambient air pollution were studied in three groups of schoolchildren living in areas (suburban, urban and urban-traffic) with different air pollution levels in Eskişehir, Turkey. This study involved 1,880 students aged between 9 and 13 years from 16 public primary schools. This two-season study was conducted from January 2008 through March 2009. Symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and eczema were determined by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire in 2008. Two lung function tests were performed by each child for summer and winter seasons with simultaneous ambient air measurements of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) by passive sampling. Effects of air pollution on impaired lung function and symptoms in schoolchildren were estimated by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Girls with impaired lung function (only for the summer season evaluation) were more observed in suburban and urban areas when compared to urban-traffic area ([odds ratio (OR) = 1.49; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04-2.14] and [OR = 1.69 (95 % CI 1.06-2.71)] for suburban vs. urban-traffic and urban vs. urban-traffic, respectively). Significant association between ambient ozone concentrations and impaired lung function (for an increase of 10 μg m(-3)) was found only for girls for the summer season evaluation [OR = 1.11 (95 % CI 1.03-1.19)]. No association was found for boys and for the winter season evaluation. No association was found between any of the measured air pollutants and symptoms of current wheeze, current rhinoconjunctivitis and current itchy rash. The results of this study showed that increasing ozone concentrations may cause a sub-acute impairment in lung function of school aged children. PMID:23591930

  19. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  20. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  1. [Lung function changes during anesthesia and thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bigler, Dennis R

    2003-01-13

    After anaesthesia and thorax surgery, a significant reduction in pulmonary function with up to a 50% decrease in FEV1, FVC, and FRC is seen, leading to a high risk of atelectasis and hypoxia, and therefore making respiratory complications the major course of perioperative morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. This severe reduction in lung function gradually diminishes within three weeks, but postoperative pain and sedation increase the deterioration in lung function, and treatment is therefore based on anaesthetic drugs with a short elimination time and effective postoperative pain treatment with epidural analgesia or other regional blockade, and minimal use of opioids. Together with more sparing surgical methods, it is possible to operate on patients with severely reduced preoperative lung function (FEV1 = 0.651 or 22% of predicted value) with lung resection and immediate extubation. A reduction in pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery from 25-30% down to 10-15% is also seen, depending on age and preoperative lung function. PMID:12555706

  2. Surgical trauma and immune functional changes following major lung resection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H; Lau, Kelvin K W

    2015-02-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has evolved greatly over the last two decades. VATS major lung resection for early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has been shown to result in less postoperative pain, less pulmonary dysfunction postoperatively, shorter hospital stay, and better patient tolerance to adjuvant chemotherapy compared with patients who underwent thoracotomy. Several recent studies have even reported improved long-term survival in those who underwent VATS major lung resection for early stage NSCLC when compared with open technique. Interestingly, the immune status and autologous tumor killing ability of lung cancer patients have previously been associated with long-term survival. VATS major lung resection can result in an attenuated postoperative inflammatory response. Furthermore, the minimal invasive approach better preserve patients' postoperative immune function, leading to higher circulating natural killer and T cells numbers, T cell oxidative activity, and levels of immunochemokines such as insulin growth factor binding protein 3 following VATS compared with thoracotomy. Apart from host immunity, the angiogenic environment following surgery may also have a role in determining cancer recurrence and possibly survival. Whether differences in immunological and biochemical mediators contribute significantly towards improved clinical outcomes following VATS major lung resection for lung cancer remains to be further investigated. Future studies will also need to address whether the reduced access trauma from advanced thoracic surgical techniques, such as single-port VATS, can further attenuate the postoperative inflammatory response. PMID:25829712

  3. The Nature of Elder Impairment and Its Impact on Family Caregivers' Health and Psychosocial Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattanach, Lynn; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    1991-01-01

    Assessed nature of elder impairment and its impact on health and psychosocial functioning of 102 family caregivers. Found no differences among caregivers of cognitively impaired, functionally impaired, and nonimpaired elderly relatives in terms of self-reported health or psychosocial functioning. Suggests that other aspects of caregiving context…

  4. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6–16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects’ ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7–11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account. PMID:26834878

  5. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-11-22

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6-16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects' ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7-11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account. PMID:26834878

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs tumor suppressor p53 expression/function.

    PubMed

    Compton, Shannon; Kim, Chul; Griner, Nicholas B; Potluri, Prasanth; Scheffler, Immo E; Sen, Sabyasachi; Jerry, D Joseph; Schneider, Sallie; Yadava, Nagendra

    2011-06-10

    Recently, mitochondria have been suggested to act in tumor suppression. However, the underlying mechanisms by which mitochondria suppress tumorigenesis are far from being clear. In this study, we have investigated the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the tumor suppressor protein p53 using a set of respiration-deficient (Res(-)) mammalian cell mutants with impaired assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our data suggest that normal mitochondrial function is required for γ-irradiation (γIR)-induced cell death, which is mainly a p53-dependent process. The Res(-) cells are protected against γIR-induced cell death due to impaired p53 expression/function. We find that the loss of complex I biogenesis in the absence of the MWFE subunit reduces the steady-state level of the p53 protein, although there is no effect on the p53 protein level in the absence of the ESSS subunit that is also essential for complex I assembly. The p53 protein level was also reduced to undetectable levels in Res(-) cells with severely impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that p53 protein expression is differentially regulated depending upon the type of electron transport chain/respiratory chain deficiency. Moreover, irrespective of the differences in the p53 protein expression profile, γIR-induced p53 activity is compromised in all Res(-) cells. Using two different conditional systems for complex I assembly, we also show that the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on p53 expression/function is a reversible phenomenon. We believe that these findings will have major implications in the understanding of cancer development and therapy. PMID:21502317

  7. Cadaver lung donors: effect of preharvest ventilation on graft function.

    PubMed

    Ulicny, K S; Egan, T M; Lambert, C J; Reddick, R L; Wilcox, B R

    1993-05-01

    The pulmonary donor pool would increase substantially if lungs could be safely transplanted after cessation of circulation. To determine whether ventilation of cadaver lungs could improve graft function, canine donors were sacrificed and then ventilated with 100% oxygen (n = 6) or 100% nitrogen (n = 6); 6 served as nonventilated controls. Four hours after death, the lungs were flushed with modified Euro-Collins solution and harvested. Controls were ventilated with 100% oxygen only during flush and harvest. Recipients were rendered dependent on the transplanted lung by occlusion of the right pulmonary artery and bronchus 1 hour after transplantation. Ventilation was maintained at a constant inspired oxygen fraction of 0.4. Four controls died of pulmonary edema shortly after occlusion of the native lung. The mean arterial oxygen tensions in the oxygen-ventilated, nitrogen-ventilated, and control groups at the end of 8 hours were 81 mm Hg (n = 4), 88 mm Hg (n = 3), and 55 mm Hg (n = 2), respectively. Postmortem oxygen ventilation improved early recipient survival and gas exchange. Postmortem nitrogen ventilation improved early gas exchange and delayed recipient death compared with non-ventilated controls. The mechanics of ventilation appears to confer a functional advantage independent of a continued supply of oxygen. Transplantation of lungs harvested from cadavers after cessation of circulation might be feasible. PMID:8494430

  8. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenzi; Zhang, Chunfang; Duan, Chaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. PMID:27499635

  9. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  10. The optical properties of lung as a function of respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, J. F.; van Staveren, H. J.; Posthumus, P.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; van Gemert, M. J. C.

    1997-11-01

    Lung consists of alveoli enclosed by tissue and both structures contribute to volume-dependent scattering of light. It is the purpose of this paper to determine the volume-dependent optical properties of lung. In vivo interstitial fibre measurements of the effective attenuation coefficient at 632.8 nm differed during inspiration from that during expiration . In vitro measurements on a piglet lung insufflated with oxygen from 50 to 150 ml showed the effective attenuation coefficient at 632.8 nm decreases as a function of oxygen volume in the lung (at 50 ml , at 100 ml , and at 150 ml ). This was explained by combining scattering of alveoli (Mie theory) with optical properties of collapsed lung tissue using integrating sphere measurements. Theory and measured in vitro values showed good agreement (deviation ). Combination of these data yields the absorption coefficient and scattering parameters of lung tissue as a function of lung volume. We conclude that the light fluence rate in lung tissue should be estimated using optical properties that include scattering by the alveoli.

  11. Normalization of lung function following treatment of secondary usual interstitial pneumonia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Laurie A; Montero-Arias, Felicia; Roden, Anja C; Vassallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most common idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) and is associated with a poor prognosis and poor responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy. We present a case of a woman with steroid-responsive biopsy-proven UIP with significant and sustained improvement in pulmonary function. A female in her 40s presented following a one-year history of progressive dyspnea, a 20 lb weight loss, and fatigue. Imaging of the chest with computed tomography (CT) showed bibasilar subpleural reticular opacities and minimal peripheral honeycombing. Comprehensive connective tissue disease (CTD) antibody testing was negative. Pulmonary function testing showed moderate impairment with reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC, 69% predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 73% predicted), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 52% predicted). Surgical lung biopsy showed UIP with prominent inflammatory infiltrates. Following treatment with prednisone and azathioprine, the patient's symptoms resolved, while objective pulmonary function testing showed normalization of lung function, which is sustained at >4 years of follow-up. Improvement in lung function following immunosuppressive therapy is distinctly uncommon in either idiopathic or secondary UIP. This report suggests that occasionally, patients with secondary UIP occurring in the context of otherwise undefinable autoimmune clinical syndromes may be responsive to immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25922588

  12. Normalization of Lung Function Following Treatment of Secondary Usual Interstitial Pneumonia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hohberger, Laurie A; Montero-Arias, Felicia; Roden, Anja C; Vassallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most common idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) and is associated with a poor prognosis and poor responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy. We present a case of a woman with steroid-responsive biopsy-proven UIP with significant and sustained improvement in pulmonary function. A female in her 40s presented following a one-year history of progressive dyspnea, a 20 lb weight loss, and fatigue. Imaging of the chest with computed tomography (CT) showed bibasilar subpleural reticular opacities and minimal peripheral honeycombing. Comprehensive connective tissue disease (CTD) antibody testing was negative. Pulmonary function testing showed moderate impairment with reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC, 69% predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 73% predicted), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 52% predicted). Surgical lung biopsy showed UIP with prominent inflammatory infiltrates. Following treatment with prednisone and azathioprine, the patient’s symptoms resolved, while objective pulmonary function testing showed normalization of lung function, which is sustained at >4 years of follow-up. Improvement in lung function following immunosuppressive therapy is distinctly uncommon in either idiopathic or secondary UIP. This report suggests that occasionally, patients with secondary UIP occurring in the context of otherwise undefinable autoimmune clinical syndromes may be responsive to immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25922588

  13. Sustained Effects of Sirolimus on Lung Function and Cystic Lung Lesions in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Jones, Amanda M.; Julien-Williams, Patricia; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Sirolimus therapy stabilizes lung function and reduces the size of chylous effusions and lymphangioleiomyomas in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Objectives: To determine whether sirolimus has beneficial effects on lung function, cystic areas, and adjacent lung parenchyma; whether these effects are sustained; and whether sirolimus is well tolerated by patients. Methods: Lung function decline over time, lung volume occupied by cysts (cyst score), and lung tissue texture in the vicinity of the cysts were quantified with a computer-aided diagnosis system in 38 patients. Then we compared cyst scores from the last study on sirolimus with studies done on sirolimus therapy. In 12 patients, we evaluated rates of change in lung function and cyst scores off and on sirolimus. Measurements and Main Results: Sirolimus reduced yearly declines in FEV1 (−2.3 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.3% predicted; P < 0.001) and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (−2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2% predicted; P < 0.001). Cyst scores 1.2 ± 0.8 years (30.5 ± 11.9%) and 2.5 ± 2 years (29.7 ± 12.1%) after initiating sirolimus were not significantly different from pretreatment values (28.4 ± 12.5%). In 12 patients followed for 5 years, a significant reduction in rates of yearly decline in FEV1 (−1.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.3 ± 0.4% predicted; P = 0.025) was observed. Analyses of 104 computed tomography scans showed a nonsignificant (P = 0.23) reduction in yearly rates of change of cyst scores (1.8 ± 0.2 vs. 0.3 ± 0.3%; P = 0.23) and lung texture features. Despite adverse events, most patients were able to continue sirolimus therapy. Conclusions: Sirolimus therapy slowed down lung function decline and increase in cystic lesions. Most patients were able to tolerate sirolimus therapy. PMID:25329516

  14. Exercise Ventilatory Inefficiency Adds to Lung Function in Predicting Mortality in COPD.

    PubMed

    Neder, J Alberto; Alharbi, Abdullah; Berton, Danilo C; Alencar, Maria Clara N; Arbex, Flavio F; Hirai, Daniel M; Webb, Katherine A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2016-08-01

    Severity of resting functional impairment only partially predicts the increased risk of death in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Increased ventilation during exercise is associated with markers of disease progression and poor prognosis, including emphysema extension and pulmonary vascular impairment. Whether excess exercise ventilation would add to resting lung function in predicting mortality in COPD, however, is currently unknown. After an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, 288 patients (forced expiratory volume in one second ranging from 18% to 148% predicted) were followed for a median (interquartile range) of 57 (47) months. Increases in the lowest (nadir) ventilation to CO2 output (VCO2) ratio determined excess exercise ventilation. Seventy-seven patients (26.7%) died during follow-up: 30/77 (38.9%) deaths were due to respiratory causes. Deceased patients were older, leaner, had a greater co-morbidity burden (Charlson Index) and reported more daily life dyspnea. Moreover, they had poorer lung function and exercise tolerance (p < 0.05). A logistic regression analysis revealed that ventilation/VCO2 nadir was the only exercise variable that added to age, body mass index, Charlson Index and resting inspiratory capacity (IC)/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio to predict all-cause and respiratory mortality (p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that survival time was particularly reduced when ventilation/VCO2 nadir > 34 was associated with IC/TLC ≤ 0.34 or IC/TLC ≤ 0.31 for all-cause and respiratory mortality, respectively (p < 0.001). Excess exercise ventilation is an independent prognostic marker across the spectrum of COPD severity. Physiological abnormalities beyond traditional airway dysfunction and lung mechanics are relevant in determining the course of the disease. PMID:27077955

  15. Altered Lung Function Test in Asymptomatic Women Using Biomass Fuel for Cooking

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: One third of the world’s population use biomass fuel like wood, dung or charcoal for cooking. The smoke from these organic materials increases the incidence of respiratory illness including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Aim: To evaluate forced expiratory lung volumes in asymptomatic women previously exposed to biomass fuel smoke. Materials and Methods: The study was done in 74 healthy asymptomatic women divided into two age matched groups of 37 each. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) were assessed by computerised spirometry and statistical comparisons done on women using biomass fuel (study group) and women using other sources of fuel (LPG/ electric stove) for cooking (control group). Results: The PFT results showed significant reduction in forced expiratory lung volumes like Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in 1st sec (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Flow between 25-75% (FEF 25-75%) and Forced Expiratory Volume percentage (FEV1%) in biomass fuel users as compared to those not exposed to biomass fuel smoke. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that biomass fuel smoke may produce definite impairment in lung function, especially with regard to the smaller airways. PMID:25478331

  16. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  17. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P; Wilk, Jemma B; Wain, Louise V; Brody, Jennifer A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M; Strachan, David P; Deary, Ian J; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F; North, Kari E; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R; Jarvis, Deborah L; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Hall, Ian P; Parks, William C; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease. PMID:26395457

  18. Heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion: a sensitive indicator of lung impairment in nonsmoking coal miners.

    PubMed

    Susskind, H; Acevedo, J C; Iwai, J; Rasmussen, D L; Heydinger, D K; Pate, H R; Harold, W H; Brill, A B

    1988-03-01

    Twenty life-long nonsmoking West Virginia coal-miners participated in a study to amplify the role of focal irregularities on regional ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q) and to develop an improved method for the early detection of coal-workers' pneumoconiosis. Their mean age was 59.3 yr and they averaged 35.2 years' exposure to coal dust. Conventional pulmonary function tests were supplemented by measurement of V, Q and lung volume (V), using radioactive Kr-81m, Tc-99m MAA and Xe-127, respectively, to determine regional abnormalities in lung function. A computer analysis of the regional distributions of V/V, Q/V and V/Q was performed, and their topographical distributions and indices of heterogeneity (HI) computed. V/V and Q/V were significantly reduced in the lower third, and increased in the upper two-thirds of the miners' lungs; V/Q was reduced in the upper half. The miners' V/V and Q/V were more heterogeneous (p less than 0.001) than that of eleven age-matched controls, with mean ventilation HI values of 0.190 +/- 0.027 and 0.133 +/- 0.011, respectively, and mean perfusion HI values of 0.206 +/- 0.022 and 0.164 +/- 0.041, respectively. P(A-a)O2 correlated positively (r = 0.72; p less than 0.001) with ventilation HI. Gas exchange was the most significant functional measurement, being abnormal in 19/20 subjects. In contrast, conventional spirometric measurements were within the predicted normal limits in all but four miners. PMID:3384076

  19. Pharmacotherapy of impaired mucociliary clearance in non-CF pediatric lung disease. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Ruben; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2007-11-01

    Mucoactive agents are used to treat a variety of lung diseases involving impaired mucociliary clearance or mucus hypersecretion. The mucoactive agents studied most frequently are N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase), and hypertonic saline. Studies on the efficacy of these have been mainly conducted in adults, and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The exact role of mucoactive agents in children with non-CF lung disease is not well established. We present an overview of the current literature reporting clinical outcome measures of treatment with NAC, rhDNase, and hypertonic saline in children. PMID:17902149

  20. A peptide that inhibits function of Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) reduces lung cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C-H; Thai, P; Yoneda, K; Adler, KB; Yang, P-C; Wu, R

    2015-01-01

    Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate (MARCKS), a substrate of protein kinase C, is a key regulatory molecule controlling mucus granule secretion by airway epithelial cells as well as directed migration of leukocytes, stem cells and fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of MARKCS may be involved in these responses. However, the functionality of MARCKS and its related phosphorylation in lung cancer malignancy have not been characterized. This study demonstrated elevated levels of MARCKS and phospho-MARCKS in highly invasive lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer specimens from non-small-cell lung cancer patients. siRNA knockdown of MARCKS expression in these highly invasive lung cancer cell lines reduced cell migration and suppressed PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase)/Akt phosphorylation and Slug level. Interestingly, treatment with a peptide identical to the MARCKS N-terminus sequence (the MANS peptide) impaired cell migration in vitro and also the metastatic potential of invasive lung cancer cells in vivo. Mechanistically, MANS peptide treatment resulted in a coordination of increase of E-cadherin expression, suppression of MARCKS phosphorylation and AKT/Slug signalling pathway but not the expression of total MARCKS. These results indicate a crucial role for MARCKS, specifically its phosphorylated form, in potentiating lung cancer cell migration/metastasis and suggest a potential use of MARCKS-related peptides in the treatment of lung cancer metastasis. PMID:23955080

  1. Does perinatal asphyxia impair cognitive function without cerebral palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, F F; Miller, S P

    2006-01-01

    Some studies on neurodevelopmental outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy have suggested that cognitive deficits do not occur in the absence of cerebral palsy. It is increasingly apparent that childhood survivors of overt neonatal encephalopathy may have cognitive impairments, even in the absence of functional motor deficits. The risk of cognitive deficits is related to the severity of neonatal encephalopathy and the pattern of brain injury on neuroimaging, particularly the watershed pattern of injury. A better understanding of the risk factors for cognitive abnormalities after neonatal encephalopathy will ultimately lead to interventions to prevent these deficits. Identifying the full spectrum of neurodevelopmental outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy will also allow care givers to identify children requiring early intervention to maximise their potential for independent function throughout development. PMID:17056843

  2. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  3. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  4. Lung function in West Sussex firemen: a four year study.

    PubMed

    Horsfield, K; Guyatt, A R; Cooper, F M; Buckman, M P; Cumming, G

    1988-02-01

    Although firefighting is a hazardous occupation, published evidence of long-term lung damage in firemen is inconsistent. A group of 96 men from the West Sussex Fire Brigade, which covers a simi-rural, semi-urban area, were followed up for between one and four years. They included 31 non-smokers, 40 smokers, and 25 ex-smokers. After four years 12 firemen had been lost to the study. A control group of 69 volunteers, consisting of non-smoking men from various other occupations, were followed up in parallel. Lung function tests, covering a wider range than has been previously used in similar studies, were repeated six monthly for two years and annually for a further two years. The results were expressed in terms of the rate of change with time of the lung function variables. Many of the variables deteriorated in both firemen and controls, but the rate of deterioration was greater in the controls than the firemen for vital capacity, ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity, FEV1, FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF), flow at 50% and 25% remaining vital capacity (V50 and V25 respectively), and airways resistance (Raw). With respect to PEF, V50, V25, and Raw the control subjects deteriorated more rapidly even than the smokers and ex-smokers among the firemen. Alveolar mixing efficiency (AME), a measure of small airways function, did not change significantly over the study period in any group. Non-smoking firemen had the highest mean value of AME, decreasing through ex-smokers, controls, and smokers. We conclude that these results show no evidence of chronic lung damage in West Sussex firemen; indeed, the firemen as a group show a lower rate of deterioration of lung function with age than do the control subjects. This is attributed to the selection of fit men for the service, continued physical training, and the regular use of breathing apparatus. PMID:3342193

  5. Updates on Functional Characterization of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia – The Contribution of Lung Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, Anne; Pahuja, Anoop

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease that predominantly affects prematurely born infants. Initially, BPD was described in infants who had suffered severe respiratory failure and required high pressure, mechanical ventilation with high concentrations of supplementary oxygen. Now, it also occurs in very prematurely born infants who initially had minimal or even no signs of lung disease. These differences impact the nature of the lung function abnormalities suffered by “BPD” infants, which are also influenced by the criteria used to diagnose BPD and the oxygen saturation level used to determine the supplementary oxygen requirement. Key also to interpreting lung function data in this population is whether appropriate lung function tests have been used and in an adequately sized population to make meaningful conclusions. It should also be emphasized that BPD is a poor predictor of long-term respiratory morbidity. Bearing in mind those caveats, studies have consistently demonstrated that infants who develop BPD have low compliance and functional residual capacities and raised resistances in the neonatal period. There is, however, no agreement with regard to which early lung function measurement predicts the development of BPD, likely reflecting different techniques were used in different populations in often underpowered studies. During infancy, lung function generally improves, but importantly airflow limitation persists and small airway function appears to decline. Improvements in lung function following administration of diuretics or bronchodilators have not translated into long-term improvements in respiratory outcomes. By contrast, early differences in lung function related to different ventilation modes have led to investigation and demonstration that prophylactic, neonatal high-frequency oscillation appears to protect small airway function. PMID:26131449

  6. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications. PMID:26655584

  7. Farmer's lung

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, E. J.; Seal, R. M. E.; Thomas, G. O.; Hayes, M.; Meek, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    In assessing patients suffering from farmer's lung, the acute stage must be distinguished from the chronic stage of the disease. The conspicuous radiographic signs in the acute farmer's lung episode and the often dramatic clearing make an important contribution to the diagnosis. The radiographic changes in chronic farmer's lung are not specific and cover a wide range of appearances. Even minor nodular changes are significant. Farmer's lung, acute and chronic, is not a disease predominantly characterized by a defect in gas exchange. During the acute illness the reduction in diffusing capacity is often accompanied by a decrease in lung volumes; the pulmonary function profile of the chronic stage is variable. In only a relatively small proportion of chronic farmer's lung patients does a defect in gas exchange predominate, and in some it may be manifest only during exercise. Airway obstruction is a feature of chronic farmer's lung. In chronic farmer's lung patients discrepancies between the severity of complaints and results of pulmonary function tests are not infrequent. In some patients with considerable disability conventional pulmonary function studies may demonstrate little or no impairment of the functions measured. In patients suffering from an acute farmer's lung episode, serological tests should be positive, possibly in high titre. In the chronic stage of the disease the chance of finding positive serology in a patient diminishes with the length of time elapsed since the last acute episode. The period of serological transition appears to be the third year. Images PMID:4971361

  8. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, William D.; Buonora, John E.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Lucky, Jessica J.; D’Acchille, Michaela I.; McMullen, David C.; Boston, Andrew G.; Kuczmarski, Andrew V.; Kean, William S.; Verma, Ajay; Grunberg, Neil E.; Cole, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury, or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post-TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury were examined. State 3, state 4, and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios (RCRs) were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only non-significant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradigm, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days. PMID:24550822

  9. Impaired dendritic cell function in a spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Quan, Songhua; Kim, Hye-Jung; Dukala, Danuta; Sheng, Jian Rong; Soliven, Betty

    2015-05-01

    Spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy (SAP) in B7-2 knockout NOD mice mimics the progressive form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, and is mediated by myelin protein zero (P0)-reactive Th1 cells. In this study, we focused on the effect of B7-2 deletion on the function of dendritic cells (DCs) within the context of SAP. We found that development of SAP was associated with a preponderance or increase of CD11b(+) DCs in peripheral lymph nodes and sciatic nerves. B7-2 deletion led to altered immunophenotypic properties that differ between CD11b(+) DCs and CD8α(+) DCs. Both DC subsets from B7-2 knockout NOD mice exhibited impaired capacity to capture fluorophore-labeled myelin P0, but diminished Ag-presenting function was observed only in CD11b(+) DCs. Clinical assessment, electrophysiologic studies, and splenocyte proliferation studies revealed that absence of B7-2 on DCs was sufficient to cause impaired ability to induce tolerance to P0, which could be overcome by preconditioning with IL-10. Tolerance induction by Ag-pulsed wild-type NOD DCs was dependent on IL-10 and was associated with increased CD4(+) regulatory T cells, whereas tolerance induction by IL-10-conditioned B7-2-deficient DCs was associated with increased percentages of both regulatory T cells and B10 cells in the spleen. We conclude that B7-2 deletion has an impact on the distribution of DC subsets in lymphoid organs and alters the expression of costimulatory molecules, but functional consequences are not uniform across DC subsets. Defective tolerance induction in the absence of B7-2 can be restored by preconditioning of DCs with IL-10. PMID:25825437

  10. Work related impairment of nasal function in Swedish woodwork teachers.

    PubMed Central

    Ahman, M; Holmström, M; Cynkier, I; Söderman, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relation between exposure and nasal function in woodwork teachers. METHODS: 39 selected woodwork teachers employed full time and 32 control subjects (other school personnel) were examined at the beginning and at the end of a working week with symptom rating, nose and throat inspection, rhinomanometry, nasal mucociliary clearance test, and a smell identification test. During one working day of the same week climate, dust and terpene concentrations were measured in all 39 schools. RESULTS: The ventilation rate was highest in rooms with mechanical ventilation. Range of total dust (personally sampled) was 0.12-1.18 mg/m3, respirable dust 0.02-0.21 mg/m3, and terpenes (area sampled) 0.02-6.8 mg/m3. In contrast to the control subjects, the woodwork teachers had more nasal symptoms on the Thursday afternoon than on the Monday morning, especially those working in rooms without mechanical ventilation. Their mucociliary clearance worsened during the week (mean increase 4 min, P < 0.001). A small impairment of olfactory function was also found, but their rhinomanometric values did not change significantly. Nasal symptoms correlated weakly with the percentage of respirable dust in the total dust. Otherwise there were no significant dose-effect relations between measured dust or terpene concentrations and nasal tests. CONCLUSIONS: The woodwork teachers had mainly reversible nasal complaints, impaired nasal mucociliary clearance and olfactory function related to the work environment, with dust concentrations below the Swedish threshold limit value of 2 mg/m3. PMID:8777447

  11. Socioeconomic Status and Longitudinal Lung Function of Healthy Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Briseño, David; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Mendoza-Alvarado, Laura; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to estimate the longitudinal effect of Socioeconomic status (SES) on lung function growth of Mexican children and adolescents. Materials and Methods A cohort of Mexican children in third grade of primary school was followed with spirometry twice a year for 6 years through secondary school. Multilevel mixed-effects lineal models were fitted for the spirometric variables of 2,641 respiratory-healthy Mexican children. Monthly family income (in 2002 U.S. dollars [USD]) and parents’ years completed at school were used as proxies of SES. Results Individuals with higher SES tended to have greater height for age, and smaller sitting height/standing height and crude lung function. For each 1-year increase of parents’ schooling, Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and Forced vital capacity (FVC) increased 8.5 (0.4%) and 10.6 mL (0.4%), respectively (p <0.05) when models were adjusted for gender. Impact of education on lung function was reduced drastically or abolished on adjusting by anthropometric variables and ozone. Conclusions Higher parental schooling and higher monthly family income were associated with higher lung function in healthy Mexican children, with the majority of the effect likely due to the increase in height-for-age. PMID:26379144

  12. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  13. Lung function in Greenlandic and Danish children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Krause, Tyra Grove; Pedersen, Bo V; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Koch, Anders; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Backer, Vibeke; Melbye, Mads

    2005-03-01

    Respiratory morbidity in Inuit children is high. However, little is know regarding lung function measures in this population. The forced expiratory volumes in one second (FEV(1)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) in 888 Greenlandic Inuits (N=888) and Danes (N=477) aged 6-18 years were compared. Furthermore, associations between level of lung function and atopy and lifestyle factors were estimated in Greenlanders. The effect of height on FEV(1) and FVC was significantly different in Greenlanders and Danes, this difference in lung function increased with increasing height, and could not be explained by differences in age weight and BMI. Thus, Greenlanders taller than 130 cm had up to 300-400 ml higher FEV(1) and FVC compared with Danes of the same height. Among Greenlanders, those living in settlements had the highest levels of both FEV(1) and FVC. Greenlanders had elevated levels of FEV(1) and FVC compared with Danes. The Inuit having a shorter limb length in relation to trunk height may account for these differences. However, our finding that Greenlanders living in settlements had the highest lung function level also suggests a possible role of factors in the traditional Greenlandic lifestyle. PMID:15733513

  14. Gas cooking and reduced lung function in school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Hutter, Hans-Peter; Neuberger, Manfred

    RationaleOutdoor nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) is associated with reduced respiratory health. This could be due to a unique biological effect of this gaseous pollutant or because it serves as a surrogate of fine particles from incineration sources. Cooking with gas in small kitchens produces high concentrations of gaseous irritants (mainly nitrogen dioxide), but not fine particles. ObjectivesTo study the relative impact of cooking with gas on lung function parameters in a cross sectional study of school children. MethodsNearly all elementary school children (2898 children aged 6-10 years) living in the city of Linz (capital of Upper Austria) underwent lung function testing. In a questionnaire administered simultaneously to their parents, information on household conditions including cooking and tobacco smoke exposure was collected. Impact of cooking with gas on lung function controlling for various confounders was analyzed using loglinear multiple regression. ResultsGas cooking reduced lung function parameters ranging from 1.1% (not significant) for MEF 25 up to 3.4% ( p=0.01) for peak expiratory flow (PEF). ConclusionsGas stoves can have an adverse impact on children's respiratory health. Parents and caretakers should be advised to insure good ventilation while and after cooking, especially in small and poorly ventilated rooms. This study adds to the growing evidence that gaseous pollutants from incineration sources affect respiratory health directly.

  15. Executive functioning in preschoolers with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Constance; Koolen, Sophieke; Hermans, Daan; Scheper, Annette; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is still largely beyond our understanding. In this review, a neuropsychological perspective on language impairments in SLI is taken, focusing specifically on executive functioning (EF) in preschoolers (age range: 2.6–6.1 years) with SLI. Based on the studies described in this review, it can be concluded that similar to school-aged children with SLI, preschoolers with SLI show difficulties in working memory, inhibition and shifting, as revealed by both performance based measures and behavioral ratings. It seems plausible that a complex, reciprocal relationship exists between language and EF throughout development. Future research is needed to examine if, and if yes how, language and EF interact in SLI. Broad neuropsychological assessment in which both language and EF are taken into account may contribute to early detection of SLI. This in turn can lead to early and tailored treatment of children with (suspected) SLI aimed not only at stimulating language development but also at strengthening EF. PMID:26539136

  16. Formaldehyde exposure impairs the function and differentiation of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Lee, Eun-Hee; Lee, Ki-Mo; Park, Min; Ji, Kon-Young; Jang, Ji-Hun; Jeong, Yun-Hwa; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yoon, Il-Joo; Kim, Su-Man; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kang, Hyung-Sik

    2013-11-25

    We investigated the cytotoxic effects of formaldehyde (FA) on lymphocytes. FA-exposed mice showed a profound reduction not only in the number of natural killer (NK) cells but also in the expression of NK cell-specific receptors, but these mice did not exhibit decreases in the numbers of T or B lymphocytes. FA exposure also induced decreases in NK cytolytic activity and in the expression of NK cell-associated genes, such as IFN-γ, perforin and CD122. To determine the effect of FA on tumorigenicity, C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with B16F10 melanoma cells after FA exposure. The mass of the B16F10 tumor and the concentration of extravascular polymorphonuclear leukocytes were greater than those in unexposed tumor-bearing control mice. The number and cytolytic activity of NK cells were also reduced in B16F10 tumor-bearing mice exposed to FA. To determine how FA reduces the NK cell number, NK precursor (pNK) cells were treated with FA, and the differentiation status of the NK cells was analyzed. NK cell differentiation was impaired by FA treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings indicate that FA exposure may promote tumor progression by impairing NK cell function and differentiation. PMID:24060340

  17. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers

    PubMed Central

    Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers. Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7–4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m−3, using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group. Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest. Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  18. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Karl-Christian; Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers.Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7-4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m(-3), using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group.Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest.Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  19. Effects of nanoparticles on the mechanical functioning of the lung.

    PubMed

    Arick, Davis Q; Choi, Yun Hwa; Kim, Hyun Chang; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding field that has very promising applications that will improve industry, medicine, and consumer products. However, despite the growing widespread use of engineered nanoparticles in these areas, very little has been done to assess the potential health risks they may pose to high-risk areas of the body, particularly the lungs. In this review we first briefly discuss the structure of the lungs and establish that the pulmonary surfactant (PS), given its vulnerability and huge contribution to healthy lung function, is a mechanism of great concern when evaluating potential nanoparticle interactions within the lung. To warrant that these interactions can occur, studies on the transport of nanoaerols are reviewed to highlight that a plethora of factors contribute to a nanoparticle's ability to travel to the deep regions of the lung where PS resides. The focus of this review is to determine the extent that physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, hydrophobicity, and surface charge effect PS function. Numerous nanoparticle types are taken into consideration in order to effectively evaluate observed consistencies across numerous nanoparticle types and develop general trends that exist among the physicochemical characteristics of interest. Biological responses from other mechanisms/components of the lung are briefly discussed to provide further insights on how the toxicology of different nanoparticles is determined. We conclude by discussing general trends that summarize consistencies observed among the studies in regard to physicochemical properties and their effects on monolayer function, addressing current gaps in our understanding, and discussing the future outlook of this field of research. PMID:26494653

  20. Predicting ventilator-induced lung injury using a lung injury cost function.

    PubMed

    Hamlington, Katharine L; Smith, Bradford J; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-07-01

    Managing patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requires mechanical ventilation that balances the competing goals of sustaining life while avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In particular, it is reasonable to suppose that for any given ARDS patient, there must exist an optimum pair of values for tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that together minimize the risk for VILI. To find these optimum values, and thus develop a personalized approach to mechanical ventilation in ARDS, we need to be able to predict how injurious a given ventilation regimen will be in any given patient so that the minimally injurious regimen for that patient can be determined. Our goal in the present study was therefore to develop a simple computational model of the mechanical behavior of the injured lung in order to calculate potential injury cost functions to serve as predictors of VILI. We set the model parameters to represent normal, mildly injured, and severely injured lungs and estimated the amount of volutrauma and atelectrauma caused by ventilating these lungs with a range of VT and PEEP. We estimated total VILI in two ways: 1) as the sum of the contributions from volutrauma and atelectrauma and 2) as the product of their contributions. We found the product provided estimates of VILI that are more in line with our previous experimental findings. This model may thus serve as the basis for the objective choice of mechanical ventilation parameters for the injured lung. PMID:27174922

  1. Lung Function in Sickle Cell Hemoglobinopathy Patients Compared With Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Young, Roscoe C.; Rachal, Raylinda E.; Reindorf, Carl A.; Armstrong, Earl M.; Polk, Octavius D.; Hackney, Robert L.; Scott, Roland B.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies of lung function tests performed on patients with sickle cell disease have shown a restrictive ventilatory defect, usually a diffusion defect, and mild hypoxia at rest. The present study was undertaken to explain the pathophysiology of these changes and to extend these studies to include functional measurements not reported previously. Lung function studies were performed at rest and during treadmill walking on 66 patients with sickle cell anemia and on 16 healthy control subjects. Patients had restrictive ventilatory defects, decreased lung compliance, and uneven ventilation-perfusion ratios. These abnormalities caused an increased alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference that caused hypoxemia. The diffusion defects were because of the sickle cell disease. Carboxyhemoglobin levels were increased in patients with sickle cell disease. This increase may be caused by a combination of factors, including increased cigarette smoking, hemolysis, and preferential survival of red blood cells that contain carbon monoxide and which do not sickle. During treadmill walking, the patients with sickle cell disease showed a decreased work tolerance caused by impaired oxygen delivery. The anaerobic threshold is reached sooner in patients with sickle cell disease and may also account for the limitations in work capacity of these patients. PMID:3418733

  2. X-ray findings, lung function, and respiratory symptoms in black South African vermiculite workers

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, P.A.; Sluis-Cremer, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Health effects have been documented among American vermiculite workers who mined and processed vermiculite contaminated with amphibole asbestos, viz., tremolite-actinolite. Workers mining and processing South Africa vermiculite (N = 172), which contains very little asbestos, underwent x-ray examination and lung function testing and completed a respiratory symptom questionnaire. The vermiculite workers were compared with other workers involved in the mining or refining of copper. Only two of the vermiculite workers showed evidence of small opacities of 1/0 or more (according to the ILO 1980 classification); lung function was comparable with the other groups of workers, and there was no excess of respiratory symptoms among the vermiculite workers. It is concluded that workers exposed to vermiculite that is minimally contaminated with asbestos are probably not at risk for pneumoconiosis, lung function impairment, or respiratory symptoms. It is likely that the health effects observed in other studies of vermiculite workers are the result of concomitant asbestos exposure. A risk of mesothelioma caused by the fiber content of the vermiculite cannot be excluded by this study.

  3. The Role of Impaired Epidermal Barrier Function in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jurakić Tončić, Ružica; Marinović, Branka

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory, pruritic skin disease with increasing prevalence. The etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors that induce derangements in the structure and function of the epidermal barrier and immune system. Due to great heterogeneity of etiopathogenesis, there is also great variability of clinical presentation, and diagnosis can sometimes be challenging and difficult. Diagnosis mostly relies on clinical features and laboratory tests, but morphology alone cannot reliably establish the diagnosis, so the spectrum of features associated with AD must be considered. Traditionally, patients with AD have been separated into two different subgroups, i.e. intrinsic and extrinsic. Today, most of authors prefer the outside to inside and back to outside hypothesis, suggesting that the primary disorder lies in epidermal structure and function, resulting in inflammation and immunological downstream activation which further provokes secondary barrier abnormalities. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of the epidermal barrier and the role of impaired barrier function in etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. PMID:27477169

  4. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  5. Violence exposure, a chronic psychosocial stressor, and childhood lung function

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira Franco; Ryan, Louise; Laden, Francine; Dockery, Douglas; Wright, Rosalind J

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic psychosocial stressors, including violence, have been linked to neuropsychological and behavioral development in children as well as physiologic alterations that may lead to broader health effects. Methods We examined the relationship between violence and childhood lung function in a prospective birth cohort of 313 urban children 6 and 7 years of age. Mothers reported on their child’s lifetime exposure to community violence (ETV) and interparental conflict in the home [Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS)] within one year of the lung function assessment. Results In linear regression analyses, adjusting for maternal education, child’s age, race, birthweight, tobacco smoke exposure, and medical history, girls in the highest CTS verbal aggression tertile had a 5.5% (95% CI: −9.6, −1.5) decrease in percent predicted FEV1 and a 5.4% (95% CI: −9.7, −1.1) decrease in FVC compared to girls in the lowest tertile. The CTS verbal aggression subscale was associated with lung function among boys in the same direction, albeit this was not statistically significant. Boys in the highest ETV tertile had a 3.4% (95% CI: −8.0, 1.1) lower FEV1 and 5.3% lower (95% CI: −10.2, −0.4) FVC compared to boys in the lowest tertile. The ETV score was not a significant predictor of girl’s lung function. Conclusions Interparental conflict, specifically verbal aggression, and exposure to community violence were associated with decreased childhood lung function independent of socioeconomic status, tobacco smoke exposure, birthweight and respiratory illness history. Gender differences were noted based on the type of violence exposure which may warrant further exploration. PMID:18158365

  6. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  7. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  8. Deterioration in lung function following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Maasilta, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-four patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation as part of the treatment for pleural mesothelioma were studied with regard to changes in lung function following irradiation, and these changes were correlated with the radiologically-assessed lung injury. The latter was scored from 0 to 500 and found to be severe by 6 months (mean score 360), very severe by 9 months (mean score 430), and nearly total by 12 months (mean score 480) after treatment. Forced vital capacity and diffusing capacity both showed a significant decline at 1.5-2 months following the end of radiotherapy and thereafter up to the end of the 1 year follow-up period. Neither of these variables could be correlated consistently with the radiologically-assessed changes. Hypoxemia and pathological physiological shunting increased transiently 1-2 months after irradiation in 2 of the 6 patients monitored. The observed radiologically-assessed final effects of high-dose hemithorax irradiation are compatible with a total loss of lung function on the irradiated side. Before this form of treatment is used, lung function should be evaluated as for pneumonectomy.

  9. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  10. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  11. Air pollution and lung function among susceptible adult subjects: a panel study

    PubMed Central

    Lagorio, Susanna; Forastiere, Francesco; Pistelli, Riccardo; Iavarone, Ivano; Michelozzi, Paola; Fano, Valeria; Marconi, Achille; Ziemacki, Giovanni; Ostro, Bart D

    2006-01-01

    Background Adverse health effects at relatively low levels of ambient air pollution have consistently been reported in the last years. We conducted a time-series panel study of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and ischemic heart disease (IHD) to evaluate whether daily levels of air pollutants have a measurable impact on the lung function of adult subjects with pre-existing lung or heart diseases. Methods Twenty-nine patients with COPD, asthma, or IHD underwent repeated lung function tests by supervised spirometry in two one-month surveys. Daily samples of coarse (PM10–2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter were collected by means of dichotomous samplers, and the dust was gravimetrically analyzed. The particulate content of selected metals (cadmium, chrome, iron, nickel, lead, platinum, vanadium, and zinc) was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were obtained from the regional air-quality monitoring network. The relationships between concentrations of air pollutants and lung function parameters were analyzed by generalized estimating equations (GEE) for panel data. Results Decrements in lung function indices (FVC and/or FEV1) associated with increasing concentrations of PM2.5, NO2 and some metals (especially zinc and iron) were observed in COPD cases. Among the asthmatics, NO2 was associated with a decrease in FEV1. No association between average ambient concentrations of any air pollutant and lung function was observed among IHD cases. Conclusion This study suggests that the short-term negative impact of exposure to air pollutants on respiratory volume and flow is limited to individuals with already impaired respiratory function. The fine fraction of ambient PM seems responsible for the observed effects among COPD cases, with zinc and iron having a potential role via oxidative stress. The respiratory function

  12. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Yeh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Han-Chung; Lee, Chung-Shu; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital.

  13. Effect of ozone exposure on lung functions and plasma prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.D.; Ainsworth, D.; Lam, H.F.; Amdur, M.O.

    1987-03-30

    Male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) for 1 hr. At 2, 8, 24, or 48 hr after exposure we measured ventilation, respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and alveolar volume (VA) in anesthetized, tracheotomized animals. Respiratory frequency and tidal volume were unchanged in all groups. Pulmonary resistance was increased 2 hr after O/sub 3/ but returned to control at 8 hr and thereafter. Prolonged reductions in lung volumes (total lung capacity, vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) as well as in DLCO and VA occurred after O/sub 3/, with maximum decreases at 8 and 24 hr postexposure. Increased ratios of wet lung weight to body weight were seen at 2, 8, and 24 hr. In separate groups of animals, also exposed either to filtered air or to 1 ppm O/sub 3/, plasma eicosanoid (EC) concentrations were measured at 2, 8, 24, 48, or 72 hr after exposure. Significant increases in thromboxane B2 concentrations were seen at 2, 24, and 48 hr after exposure. Plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) were increased at 24 hr and at 24, 48, and 72 hr, respectively. The nature of this long-term pulmonary response to a short-term exposure to O/sub 3/ suggests alveolar involvement, including probable alveolar duct constriction and localized pulmonary edema. Although changes in plasma EC concentrations were observed concurrent with impaired lung functions, no simple causal relationship was apparent from these studies.

  14. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  15. Impairment of immunological functions in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    PubMed

    De Sarro, G; Liberto, M C; Berlinghieri, M C; Focà, A; Aragona, M; Cavaliere, R; Gulletta, E

    1996-06-01

    1. In genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-9s), which represent a natural genetic model of epilepsy, we observed that the number of peritoneal macrophages was significantly lower with respect to normal rats, and that some functional parameters (i.e. phagocytosis and intracellular killing) of these macrophages were impaired. 2. The count of lymphocyte populations showed a predominance of T-helper over T-cytotoxic/suppressor both in the spleen and lymph nodes. Moreover, an increased T-cell/B-cell ratio was observed in GEPR-9s. Flow cytometry revealed that GEPR-9s spleens possessed a large percentage of T-helper cells in comparison to normal rats. 3. By using concanavalin A-induced proliferation of GEPR-9s cultured lymphocytes, we have shown increased functional activation. 4. We suggest that the alterations in T-cell functions in GEPR-9s could be due to the involvement of the neuroendocrine system in the modulation of immunity, in the shift between Th1 and Th2, and in the activation of stress response. PMID:8853298

  16. Hepatitis B virus antigens impair NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    An inadequate immune response of the host is thought to be a critical factor causing chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, as one of the key players in the eradication and control of viral infections, were functionally impaired in CHB patients, which might contribute to viral persistence. Here, we reported that HBV antigens HBsAg and HBeAg directly inhibited NK cell function. HBsAg and/or HBeAg blocked NK cell activation, cytokine production and cytotoxic granule release in human NK cell-line NK-92 cells, which might be related to the downregulation of activating receptors and upregulation of inhibitory receptor. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms likely involved the suppression of STAT1, NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings implicated that HBV antigen-mediated inhibition of NK cells might be an efficient strategy for HBV evasion, targeting the early antiviral responses mediated by NK cells and resulting in the establishment of chronic virus infection. Therefore, this study revealed the relationship between viral antigens and human immune function, especially a potential important interaction between HBV and innate immune responses. PMID:27341035

  17. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  18. Neuropsychological functioning in youth with obsessive compulsive disorder: an examination of executive function and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Adam B; Larson, Michael J; Park, Jennifer M; McGuire, Joseph F; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2014-04-30

    Preliminary research suggests neuropsychological deficits in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) similar to those in adults; however, small samples and methodological confounds limit interpretation. We aimed to examine the rates and clinical correlates of cognitive sequelae in youth with OCD, focusing on executive functioning and memory abilities. Youth ages 7-17 years with OCD (N=96) completed a hypothesis-driven neuropsychological battery (including the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure, California Verbal Learning Test, and subtests of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning) that primarily assessed executive functioning, memory and processing speed. Cognitive sequelae were identified in 65% of youth (37% using a more stringent definition of impairment). Magnitude of cognitive sequelae was not associated with OCD severity or age; however, greater neuropsychological impairments were found amongst youth prescribed atypical neuroleptics and those diagnosed with comorbid tic disorders. Comorbidity burden was associated with presence of neuropsychological impairment, but was not specific to any single test. Findings suggest that the presence of cognitive sequelae is prevalent amongst treatment-seeking youth with OCD. Deficits were found in executive functioning and non-verbal memory performance but these impairments were not associated with OCD severity. PMID:24508366

  19. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  20. [Problems of lung function testing in the laboratory].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Naoko

    2006-08-01

    Spirometry is indispensable for the screening test of general respiratory function, and measurements of lung volume and diffusing capacity play an important role in the assessment of disease severity, functional disability, disease activity and response to treatment. Pulmonary function testing requires cooperation between the subjects and the examiner, and the results obtained depend on technical as well as personal factors. In order to diminish the variability of results and improve measurement accuracy, the Japan Respiratory Society published the first guidelines on the standardization of spirometry and diffusing capacity for both technical and clinical staff in 2004. It is therefore essential to distribute the guidelines to both laboratory personnel and general physicians. Furthermore, training workshops are mandatory to improve their understanding of the basics of lung function testing. Recently, there has been increasing interest in noninvasive methods of lung function testing without requiring the patient's cooperation during spontaneous breathing. Three alternative techniques, i.e. the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) method to detect expiratory flow limitation, impulse oscillation system (IOS) to measure respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs), and interruption resistance (Rint) to measure respiratory resistance have been introduced. Further study is required to determine the advantage of these methods. PMID:16989403

  1. Lung function and morphology of dogs after sublethal exposure to nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.K.; Mauderly, J.L.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1982-08-01

    The relationship between respiratory function and morphological changes in 10 dogs exposed for 6 h to 69 ppm nitrogen dioxide was studied. Two additional dogs served as controls. Functional assessments included breathing pattern, breathing mechanics, forced expiration, gas exchange, and acid-base status. Gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural evaluations were made of lung tissues from dogs killed at 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 7.0 and 14.0 d after exposure. Functional changes were similar to those reported for man. The principal dysfunction was gas-exchange impairment, apparently resulting from foam in the airways. Breathing-pattern alterations appeared to result from stimulation of neural receptors. Gas-exchange measurements provided the most useful indicators of the pulmonary damage observed in this study.

  2. Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, Alexander N.; Foong, Rachel E.; Bozanich, Elizabeth M.; Berry, Luke J.; Garratt, Luke W.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Jones, Jessica E.; Dousha, Lovisa F.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Larcombe et al. (2011) Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 334–342. Background  Males are generally more susceptible to respiratory infections; however, there are few data on the physiological responses to such infections in males and females. Objectives  To determine whether sexual dimorphism exists in the physiological/inflammatory responses of weanling and adult BALB/c mice to influenza. Methods  Weanling and adult mice of both sexes were inoculated with influenza A or appropriate control solution. Respiratory mechanics, responsiveness to methacholine (MCh), viral titre and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular inflammation/cytokines were measured 4 (acute) and 21 (resolution) days post‐inoculation. Results  Acute infection impaired lung function and induced hyperresponsiveness and cellular inflammation in both sexes at both ages. Males and females responded differently with female mice developing greater abnormalities in tissue damping and elastance and greater MCh responsiveness at both ages. BAL inflammation, cytokines and lung viral titres were similar between the sexes. At resolution, all parameters had returned to baseline levels in adults and weanling males; however, female weanlings had persisting hyperresponsiveness. Conclusions  We identified significant differences in the physiological responses of male and female mice to infection with influenza A, which occurred in the absence of variation in viral titre and cellular inflammation. PMID:21668688

  3. Restoration of alveolar type II cell function contributes to simvastatin-induced attenuation of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaqin; Lv, Junjie; Feng, Dongjie; Jiang, Feng; Fan, Xiaohu; Zhang, Zhi; Yin, Rong; Xu, Lin

    2012-12-01

    Alveolar type (AT) II cells transdifferentiate into ATI cells and as such represent a promising source for regenerating lung epithelium following lung injury. ATII cells are characterized by the presence of lamellar bodies (LBs), which store and secrete the surfactant protein-C (SP-C). Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) causes a distinct impairment of the ATII cell function, subsequently hindering lung repair by loss of ATI transdifferentiation. In this study, we provide new evidence that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor simvastatin may restore the function of impaired ATII cells in vitro and in vivo. ATII cell lines, A549 (human) and MLE-12 (mouse), were subjected to hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) injury. Simvastatin pretreatment at low (5-20 µM), but not high (50-100 µM) doses markedly reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation and SP-C expression. In a rat lung ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) model, simvastatin treatment also increased ATII cell proliferation in vivo, as demonstrated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen/SP-C double staining. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the number and volume density of LBs were significantly increased in the simvastatin-treated rat lungs. The protective effects of simvastatin were reversed in vitro by PI3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin and L-mevalonate, indicating that the PI3K/Akt and mevalonate pathways may be involved in simvastatin-induced ATII cell function restoration. These data demonstrate that an appropriate dose of simvastatin has a protective effect on LIRI in vitro and in vivo, due at least partially to restored ATII cell function via the HMG-CoA reductase pathway-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt signaling in a mevalonate pathway-dependent manner. PMID:23076613

  4. Vitamin D-responsive SGPP2 variants associated with lung cell expression and lung function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is associated with lung health in epidemiologic studies, but mechanisms mediating observed associations are poorly understood. This study explores mechanisms for an effect of vitamin D in lung through an in vivo gene expression study, an expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in lung tissue, and a population-based cohort study of sequence variants. Methods Microarray analysis investigated the association of gene expression in small airway epithelial cells with serum 25(OH)D in adult non-smokers. Sequence variants in candidate genes identified by the microarray were investigated in a lung tissue eQTL database, and also in relation to cross-sectional pulmonary function in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) study, stratified by race, with replication in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). Results 13 candidate genes had significant differences in expression by serum 25(OH)D (nominal p < 0.05), and a genome-wide significant eQTL association was detected for SGPP2. In Health ABC, SGPP2 SNPs were associated with FEV1 in both European- and African-Americans, and the gene-level association was replicated in European-American FHS participants. SNPs in 5 additional candidate genes (DAPK1, FSTL1, KAL1, KCNS3, and RSAD2) were associated with FEV1 in Health ABC participants. Conclusions SGPP2, a sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase, is a novel vitamin D-responsive gene associated with lung function. The identified associations will need to be followed up in further studies. PMID:24274704

  5. Recovery of impaired muscle function in severe sciatica.

    PubMed

    Balagué, F; Nordin, M; Sheikhzadeh, A; Echegoyen, A C; Skovron, M L; Bech, H; Chassot, D; Helsen, M

    2001-06-01

    were not found during the last three visits. The isokinetic tests showed a higher prevalence of muscle function impairment. At visit 5, the isokinetic test showed impaired muscle function recovery from 23% to 32%, while the manual test showed almost full recovery. The issues of agreement between manual and isokinetic muscle testing are discussed. In this selected and homogeneous cohort of patients, the prevalence of motor deficit was rather low and the outcome excellent according to the results of the manual testing. Isokinetic muscle tests showed a higher prevalence of deficit and a much slower recovery. The manual muscle test is a crude clinical test. For more indepth muscle performance evaluation, additional testing may be necessary, especially for those patients with physically demanding jobs or activities. PMID:11469737

  6. Acrolein Impairs the Cholesterol Transport Functions of High Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Holme, Rebecca L.; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J.; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. PMID:25849485

  7. Impaired proteasome function in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Strong, Michael J; Durham, Heather D

    2012-06-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome system, important for maintaining protein quality control, is compromised in experimental models of familial ALS. The objective of this study was to determine if proteasome function is impaired in sporadic ALS. Proteasomal activities and subunit composition were evaluated in homogenates of spinal cord samples obtained at autopsy from sporadic ALS and non-neurological control cases, compared to cerebellum as a clinically spared tissue. The level of 20S α structural proteasome subunits was assessed in motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. Catalysis of peptide substrates of the three major proteasomal activities was substantially reduced in ALS thoracic spinal cord, but not in cerebellum, accompanied by alterations in the constitutive proteasome machinery. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased to 60% and 65% of control in ventral and dorsal spinal cord, respectively, concomitant with reduction in the β5 subunit with this catalytic activity. Caspase- and trypsin-like activities were reduced to a similar extent (46% - 68% of control). Proteasome levels, although generally maintained, appeared reduced specifically in motor neurons by immunolabelling. In conclusion, there are commonalities of findings in sporadic ALS patients and presymptomatic SOD1-G93A transgenic mice and these implicate inadequate proteasome function in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic ALS. PMID:22632443

  8. Sleep Restriction Impairs Blood–Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J.; Wang, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice. PMID:25355222

  9. Immunomodulation of phloretin by impairing dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Ching-Liang; Ng, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Der-Yuan; Pan, I-Hong; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2014-05-01

    Dietary compounds in fruits and vegetables have been shown to exert many biological activities. In addition to antioxidant effects, a number of flavonoids are able to modulate inflammatory responses. Here, we demonstrated that phloretin (PT), a natural dihydrochalcone found in many fruits, suppressed the activation and function of mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Phloretin disturbed the multiple intracellular signaling pathways in DCs induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), including ROS, MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK), and NF-κB, and thereby reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Phloretin also effectively suppressed the activation of DCs treated with different dosages of LPS or various TLR agonists. The LPS-induced DC maturation was attenuated by phloretin because the expression levels of the MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules were down-regulated, which then inhibited the LPS-stimulating DCs and the subsequent naïve T cell activation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, in vivo administration of phloretin suppressed the phenotypic maturation of the LPS-challenged splenic DCs and decreased the IFN-γ production from the activated CD4 T cells. Thus, we suggest that phloretin may potentially be an immunomodulator by impairing the activation and function of DCs and phloretin-contained fruits may be helpful in the improvement of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24651121

  10. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-10-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice. PMID:25355222

  11. Improved effect of Pycnogenol on impaired spatial memory function in partial androgen deficiency rat model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Noboru; Mochizuki, Miyako

    2009-06-01

    The improved effect of Pycnogenol on impaired spatial memory function was studied in orchidectomized rats. Endogenous testosterone levels were decreased by approximately one-half for 3 months after castration. In the radial arm maze, castration significantly impaired working and reference memory function without lowering motor function. Pycnogenol increased the NGF content in the hippocampus and cortex, and improved the spatial memory impairment. These observations confirmed that diagnostic accuracy can be improved by Pycnogenol in androgen-deficient rats. PMID:19142987

  12. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Akihiro Hiraki, Takao; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuda, Toshihide; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  13. In vivo hydroquinone exposure alters circulating neutrophil activities and impairs LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, André Luiz Teroso; Shimada, Ana Lúcia Borges; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; de Oliveira, Tiago Franco; de Melo Loureiro, Ana Paula; Filho, Walter Dos Reis Pereira; Santos, Alcinéa Meigikos Dos Anjos; de Lima, Wothan Tavares; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2011-10-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an environmental contaminant which causes immune toxicity. In this study, the effects of exposure to low doses of HQ on neutrophil mobilization into the LPS-inflamed lung were investigated. Male Swiss mice were exposed to aerosolized vehicle (control) or 12.5, 25 or 50ppm HQ (1h/day for 5 days). One hour later, oxidative burst, cell cycle, DNA fragmentation and adhesion molecules expressions in circulating neutrophils were determined by flow cytometry, and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured by HPLC. Also, 1h later the last exposures, inflammation was induced by LPS inhalation (0.1mg/ml/10min) and 3h later, the numbers of leukocytes in peripheral blood and in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using a Neubauer chamber and stained smears; adhesion molecules expressed on lung microvessel endothelial cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured in the lung tissue by colorimetric assay; and cytokines in the BALF were determined by ELISA. In vivo HQ exposure augmented plasma MDA levels and oxidative activity of neutrophils, but did not cause alterations in cell cycle and DNA fragmentation. Under these conditions, the number of circulating leukocytes was not altered, but HQ exposure reduced LPS-induced neutrophil migration into the alveolar space, as these cells remained in the lung tissue. The impaired neutrophil migration into BALF may not be dependent on reduced cytokines secretions in the BALF and lung endothelial adhesion molecules expressions. However, HQ exposure increased the expression of β(2) and β(3) integrins and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in neutrophils, which were not further enhanced by fMLP in vitro stimulation, indicating that HQ exposure activates circulating neutrophils, impairing further stimulatory responses. Therefore, it has been shown, for the first time, that neutrophils are target of lower levels of in vivo HQ

  14. Predictors of deterioration of lung function in Polish children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olszowiec-Chlebna, Małgorzata; Koniarek-Maniecka, Agnieszka; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Smejda, Katarzyna; Jerzyńska, Joanna; Majak, Paweł; Białas, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severity of lung disease varies in patients with the same CFTR genotype. It suggests that other factors affect the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of the study was to identify risk factors that determine lung function decline in Polish cystic fibrosis children. Material and methods The follow-up time was no less than 5 years of respiratory status observation based on the forced expiratory volume in 1 s value (FEV1). The socio-economic data, perinatal interview, presence of meconium ileus (MI), time of CF diagnosis, initiation of tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS), pancreatic function, sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus, presence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diabetes mellitus, chronic bacterial colonization and number of exacerbations and hospitalizations were assessed. Results The mean age of 61 included children was 13.3 ±7.6 years. Delta F508 homozygosity was detected in 45.9%, 44.3% were delta F508 heterozygous, and 9.8% had other genotypes. FEV1 decline was observed among 20% of patients; the rest of the patients presented stable values of FEV1 during at least 5 years of observation. The most significant predictors related to the decline of FEV1 were presentation of MI (p = 0.0344), IGT (p = 0.0227), number of exacerbations (p = 0.0288), and early Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) chronic colonization (p = 0.0165) followed by late TIS initiation after the first detection of PA (p=0.0071). Neither time of diagnosis nor type of CFTR mutation was statistically significant as a predictor of lung deterioration. Conclusions The presence of MI, IGT, chronic PA colonization, and number of exacerbations are risk factors for lung function deterioration. PMID:27186187

  15. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  16. Lung function over six years among professional divers

    PubMed Central

    Skogstad, M; Thorsen, E; Haldorsen, T; Kjuus, H

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To analyse longitudinal changes in pulmonary function in professional divers and their relation with cumulative diving exposure. Methods: The study included 87 men at the start of their education as professional divers. At follow up one, three, and six years later, 83, 81, and 77 divers were reexamined. The median number of compressed air dives in the 77 divers over the follow up period was 196 (range 37–2000). A group of non-smoking policemen (n = 64) were subjected to follow up examinations in parallel with the divers. Assessment of lung function included dynamic lung volumes, maximal expiratory flow rates, and transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TlCO). The individual rates of change of the lung function variables were calculated by fitting linear regression lines to the data, expressed as percent change per year. Results: The annual reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expired volume in one second (FEV1) were 0.91 (SD 1.22) and 0.84 (SD 1.28) per cent per year in divers, which were significantly higher than the reductions in the policemen of 0.24 (SD 1.04) and 0.16 (SD 1.07) per cent per year (p < 0.001). The annual reduction in the maximal expiratory flow rates at 25% and 75% of FVC expired (FEF25% and FEF75%) were related to the log10 transformed cumulative number of dives in a multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). The annual reductions in TlCO were 1.33 (SD 1.85) and 0.43 (SD 1.53) per cent per year in divers and policemen (p < 0.05). Conclusions: FVC, FEV1, maximal expiratory flow rates, and TlCO were significantly reduced in divers over the follow up period when compared with policemen. The contrasts within and between groups suggest that diving has contributed to the reduction in lung function. PMID:12205238

  17. Association between lung function and airway wall density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Tedrow, John; Park, Sang C.; Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Drescher, John M.; Gur, David; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2009-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examination is often used to quantify the relation between lung function and airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this preliminary study, we examined the association between lung function and airway wall computed attenuation ("density") in 200 COPD screening subjects. Percent predicted FVC (FVC%), percent predicted FEV1 (FEV1%), and the ratio of FEV1 to FVC as a percentage (FEV1/FVC%) were measured post-bronchodilator. The apical bronchus of the right upper lobe was manually selected from CT examinations for evaluation. Total airway area, lumen area, wall area, lumen perimeter and wall area as fraction of the total airway area were computed. Mean HU (meanHU) and maximum HU (maxHU) values were computed across pixels assigned membership in the wall and with a HU value greater than -550. The Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) between FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% and meanHU were -0.221 (p = 0.002), -0.175 (p = 0.014), and -0.110 (p = 0.123), respectively. The PCCs for maxHU were only significant for FVC%. The correlations between lung function and the airway morphometry parameters were slightly stronger compared to airway wall density. MeanHU was significantly correlated with wall area (PCC = 0.720), airway area (0.498) and wall area percent (0.611). This preliminary work demonstrates that airway wall density is associated with lung function. Although the correlations in our study were weaker than a recent study, airway wall density initially appears to be an important parameter in quantitative CT analysis of COPD.

  18. Genetic Ancestry Influences Asthma Susceptibility and Lung Function Among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Thakur, Neeta; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Eng, Celeste; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Oh, Sam S.; Vora, Hita; Huntsman, Scott; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Hu, Donglei; Drake, Katherine A.; Conti, David V.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Lurmann, Fred; Islam, Talat S.; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lenoir, Michael A.; Ford, Jean G.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Thyne, Shannon M.; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Williams, L. Keoki; Gilliland, Frank D.; Gauderman, W. James; Kumar, Rajesh; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity varies among Latinos in the United States, with Puerto Ricans having the highest and Mexicans the lowest. Objective To determine whether genetic ancestry is associated with the odds of asthma among Latinos, and secondarily whether genetic ancestry is associated with lung function among Latino children. Methods We analyzed 5,493 Latinos with and without asthma from three independent studies. For each participant we estimated the proportion of African, European, and Native American ancestry using genome-wide data. We tested whether genetic ancestry was associated with the presence of asthma and lung function among subjects with and without asthma. Odds ratios (OR) and effect sizes were assessed for every 20% increase in each ancestry. Results Native American ancestry was associated with lower odds of asthma (OR=0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66–0.78, p=8.0×10−15), while African ancestry was associated with higher odds of asthma (OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.14–1.72, p=0.001). These associations were robust to adjustment for covariates related to early life exposures, air pollution and socioeconomic status. Among children with asthma, African ancestry was associated with lower lung function, including both pre- and post-bronchodilator measures of forced expiratory volume in the first second (−77±19 ml, p=5.8×10−5 and −83±19 ml, p=1.1×10−5, respectively) and forced vital capacity (−100±21 ml, p=2.7×10−6 and −107±22 ml, p=1.0×10−6, respectively). Conclusion Differences in the proportions of genetic ancestry can partially explain disparities in asthma susceptibility and lung function among Latinos. PMID:25301036

  19. Microbubbles shunting via a patent foramen ovale impair endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exposure to intravascular microbubbles after diving and during medical procedures alters endothelial function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a patent foramen ovale altered forearm endothelial function by facilitating microbubbles transfer. Design Patients attended on two separate visits, at least seven days apart receiving agitated saline or no active intervention in random order. On both days, flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery was measured using vascular ultrasound. On the intervention visit, agitated saline was injected and the passage of microbubbles into the arterial circulation was confirmed by echocardiography. Serial flow-mediated dilatation measurements were made after agitated saline and at the same time points after no intervention. Setting St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Participants Patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO+n = 14, 9 male, mean ± SD age 42.2 ± 10.5 years) and patients without a patent foramen ovale (PFO− n = 10, 7 male, mean ± SD age 49.4 ± 18.4 years) were recruited. Main outcome measures Change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation. Results In patent foramen ovale + patients, flow-mediated dilatation did not change significantly on the control day but after agitated saline reduced by 2.3 ± 0.3%, 20 minutes after bubble injection (P < 0.005 vs. corresponding change in flow-mediated dilatation during control study). There was no significant change in flow-mediated dilatation for patent foramen ovale− patients at either visit. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of a patent foramen ovale facilitated impairment of endothelial function acutely by the transfer of microbubbles into the arterial circulation. As a patent foramen ovale is a common condition, this may be relevant to microbubbles exposure in medical procedures and in decompression illness. PMID:26668739

  20. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  1. A Function of Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, M. L.; Bisagno, A. M.; Zasadzinski, J. A. N.; Bruni, R.; Waring, A. J.

    1993-07-01

    The primary function of lung surfactant is to form monolayers at the alveolar interface capable of lowering the normal surface tension to near zero. To accomplish this process, the surfactant must be capable of maintaining a coherent, tightly packed monolayer that avoids collapse during expiration. The positively charged amino-terminal peptide SP-B1-25 of lung surfactant-specific protein SP-B increases the collapse pressure of an important component of lung surfactant, palmitic acid (PA), to nearly 70 millinewtons per meter. This alteration of the PA isotherms removes the driving force for "squeeze-out" of the fatty acids from the primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of lung surfactant. An uncharged mutant of SP-B1-25 induced little change in the isotherms, suggesting that a specific charge interaction between the cationic peptide and the anionic lipid is responsible for the stabilization. The effect of SP-B1-25 on fatty acid isotherms is remarkably similar to that of simple poly-cations, suggesting that such polymers might be useful as components of replacement surfactants for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

  2. Pyrosequencing Unveils Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiome Differences Associated with a Severe Lung Function Decline

    PubMed Central

    Bacci, Giovanni; Paganin, Patrizia; Lopez, Loredana; Vanni, Chiara; Dalmastri, Claudia; Cantale, Cristina; Daddiego, Loretta; Perrotta, Gaetano; Dolce, Daniela; Morelli, Patrizia; Tuccio, Vanessa; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Taccetti, Giovanni; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infection is a hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. In the present study, sputum samples from CF patients were collected and characterized by 16S rRNA gene-targeted approach, to assess how lung microbiota composition changes following a severe decline in lung function. In particular, we compared the airway microbiota of two groups of patients with CF, i.e. patients with a substantial decline in their lung function (SD) and patients with a stable lung function (S). The two groups showed a different bacterial composition, with SD patients reporting a more heterogeneous community than the S ones. Pseudomonas was the dominant genus in both S and SD patients followed by Staphylococcus and Prevotella. Other than the classical CF pathogens and the most commonly identified non-classical genera in CF, we found the presence of the unusual anaerobic genus Sneathia. Moreover, the oligotyping analysis revealed the presence of other minor genera described in CF, highlighting the polymicrobial nature of CF infection. Finally, the analysis of correlation and anti-correlation networks showed the presence of antagonism and ecological independence between members of Pseudomonas genus and the rest of CF airways microbiota, with S patients showing a more interconnected community in S patients than in SD ones. This population structure suggests a higher resilience of S microbiota with respect to SD, which in turn may hinder the potential adverse impact of aggressive pathogens (e.g. Pseudomonas). In conclusion, our findings shed a new light on CF airway microbiota ecology, improving current knowledge about its composition and polymicrobial interactions in patients with CF. PMID:27355625

  3. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in animal feed workers.

    PubMed

    Jorna, T H; Borm, P J; Valks, J; Houba, R; Wouters, E F

    1994-10-01

    In a study among 194 male workers exposed to endotoxin-containing organic dust in animal feed mills, lung function was measured by flow volume curves and impedance measurements and respiratory symptoms were recorded by means of a validated questionnaire. The aims were to detect and localize airway obstruction caused by fodder dust and endotoxin, and to relate respiratory symptoms to both types of lung function measurements. Flow volume and impedance parameters were significantly related to present exposure. All impedance parameters, of the spirometric measures only FEF25, were significantly related to cumulative dust or endotoxin exposure. The changes in impedance parameters were for overall increasing resistance at 8 Hz and decreasing reactance at 8 Hz, reflecting an increase in peripheral airflow obstruction, with increasing exposure. The changes in all lung function parameters were more strongly related to (cumulative) endotoxin exposure than to inspirable dust exposure. All impedance parameters and FEV1 showed a good correlation with complaints of chronic bronchitis and breathlessness. Impedance measurement of the respiratory system proved to be a useful tool for objectively assessing (early) airflow obstruction in workers exposed to inspirable dust and endotoxin and in localizing airflow obstruction. PMID:7924472

  4. Impairments of neural circuit function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Busche, Marc Aurel; Konnerth, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    An essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain, many years to decades before the onset of overt cognitive symptoms. We suggest that during this very extended early phase of the disease, soluble Aβ oligomers and amyloid plaques alter the function of local neuronal circuits and large-scale networks by disrupting the balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in the brain. The analysis of mouse models of AD revealed that an Aβ-induced change of the E/I balance caused hyperactivity in cortical and hippocampal neurons, a breakdown of slow-wave oscillations, as well as network hypersynchrony. Remarkably, hyperactivity of hippocampal neurons precedes amyloid plaque formation, suggesting that hyperactivity is one of the earliest dysfunctions in the pathophysiological cascade initiated by abnormal Aβ accumulation. Therapeutics that correct the E/I balance in early AD may prevent neuronal dysfunction, widespread cell loss and cognitive impairments associated with later stages of the disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377723

  5. Aspects of studies on the functional impairment electrohypersensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Olle

    2010-04-01

    Persons, claiming to suffer from exposure to electromagnetic fields, have been described in the literature. In Sweden, electrohypersensitivity (EHS) is an officially fully recognized functional impairment (i.e., it is not regarded as a disease). Survey studies show that somewhere between 230,000 - 290,000 Swedish men and women - out of a population of 9,000,000 - report a variety of symptoms when being in contact with electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. Swedish electrohypersensitive people have their own handicap organization, The Swedish Association for the Electrohypersensitive, which has its own website in both Swedish and English. This organization is included in the Swedish Disability Federation (Handikappförbundens SamarbetsOrgan; HSO). One aim of our studies has been to investigate possible alterations, in the cellular and neuronal systems of these persons' skin. In summary, it is evident from our preliminary data that various alterations are present in the electrohypersensitive persons' skin that are not indicated in the skin of normal healthy volunteers.

  6. Dexamethasone impairs hypoxia-inducible factor-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.E.; Huck, G.; Stiehl, D.P.; Jelkmann, W.; Hellwig-Buergel, T.

    2008-07-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription-factor composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits. HIF-1 is not only necessary for the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, but it is also involved in inflammatory processes and wound healing. Glucocorticoids (GC) are therapeutically used to suppress inflammatory responses. Herein, we investigated whether GC modulate HIF-1 function using GC receptor (GR) possessing (HepG2) and GR deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cell cultures as model systems. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment increased HIF-1{alpha} levels in the cytosol of HepG2 cells, while nuclear HIF-1{alpha} levels and HIF-1 DNA-binding was reduced. In addition, DEX dose-dependently lowered the hypoxia-induced luciferase activity in a reporter gene system. DEX suppressed the hypoxic stimulation of the expression of the HIF-1 target gene VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in HepG2 cultures. DEX did not reduce hypoxically induced luciferase activity in HRB5 cells, a Hep3B derivative lacking GR. Transient expression of the GR in HRB5 cells restored the susceptibility to DEX. Our study discloses the inhibitory action of GC on HIF-1 dependent gene expression, which may be important with respect to the impaired wound healing in DEX-treated patients.

  7. Monocyte function is severely impaired by the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester

    SciTech Connect

    Czepluch, Frauke S.; Olieslagers, Serve J.F.; Waltenberger, Johannes . E-mail: j.waltenberger@cardio.azm.nl

    2007-09-21

    For rapid chemotaxis quantification, cell prelabelling is often performed with the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester (calcein AM). We investigated whether calcein AM-prelabelling is reliable for monocyte migration analysis. Human monocytes were either preexposed to calcein AM or unlabelled. Monocyte migration towards the potent chemoattractants transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and N-formyl-Methionin-Leucin-Phenylalanin (fMLP) was assessed using a 48-well micro-chemotaxis chamber. For quantification, cells were visualized by light microscopy and counted. Surprisingly, random migration of calcein AM-prelabelled cells was significantly impaired compared to the unlabelled control. Accordingly, monocyte chemotaxis towards either TGF-{beta}1 or fMLP dramatically declined. Adherence of calcein AM-labelled monocytes on plastic was also significantly decreased compared to control cells. As adhesion is regarded as an essential component of monocyte migration, the reduced migration observed in calcein AM-labelled monocytes might be explained by a fluorochrome-induced adhesion defect. Therefore, use of the fluorochrome calcein AM cannot be recommended for functional testing of monocytes.

  8. Smoking and intermediate alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and lung function in middle-aged men.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, C; Eriksson, S; Dirksen, H

    1977-01-01

    Lung function was evaluated in a representative population sample of 50-year-0ld men living in one Swedish city. Twenty-four smoking and 15 non-smoking men heterozygous for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency--that is, with the protease-inhibitor (Pi1 phenotype MZ--were carefully matched for weight and smoking habit with Pi M controls. The pulmonary function of non-smoking Pi MZ subjects did not differ from that of non-smoking Pi M controls. In contrast, smoking heterozygotes showed a significant loss of elastic recoil, enlarged residual volumes, and increased closing capacity but no signs of obstructive ventilatory impairment. Most smoking Pi MZ individuals reported mild exertional dyspnoea. PMID:303135

  9. Unwarranted Administration of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Can Impair Genioglossus and Diaphragm Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, Matthias; Fassbender, Philipp; Malhotra, Atul; Takahashi, Masaya; Kubo, Shigeto; Jordan, Amy S.; Gautam, Shiva; White, David P.; Chamberlin, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is standard practice to administer a cholinesterase inhibitor (e.g., neostigmine) at the end of a surgical case to reverse suspected effects of neuromuscular blocking agents regardless of whether such residual effects are present. The authors hypothesized that cholinesterase inhibition when given the in absence of neuromuscular blockade (NB) would decrease upper airway dilatory muscle activity and consequently upper airway volume. Methods The authors measured genioglossus and diaphragm electromyograms during spontaneous ventilation in anesthetized, tracheostomized rats before and after administration of neostigmine (0.03, 0.06, or 0.12 mg/kg), after recovery of the train-of-four ratio (quadriceps femoris muscle) to unity after NB (n = 18). For comparison, the authors made the same measurements in rats that had no previous NB (n = 27). In intact anesthetized rats, the authors measured upper airway volume and end-expiratory lung volume by magnetic resonance imaging before and after 0.12 mg/kg neostigmine (n = 9). Results Neostigmine treatment in rats that had fully recovered from NB based on the train-of-four ratio caused dose-dependent decreases in genioglossus electromyogram (to 70.3 = 7.6, 49.2 = 3.2, and 39.7 = 2.3% of control, respectively), decreases in diaphragm electromyogram (to 103.1 ± 6.5, 83.1 ± 4.7, and 68.7 ± 7.3% of control), and decreases in minute ventilation to a nadir value of 79.6 ± 6% of preneostigmine baseline. Genioglossus electromyogram effects were the same when neostigmine was given with no previous NB. Neostigmine caused a decrease in upper airway volume to 83 ± 3% of control, whereas end-expiratory lung volume remained constant. Conclusions The cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine markedly impairs upper airway dilator volume, genioglossus muscle function, diaphragmatic function, and breathing when given after recovery from vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block. PMID:17893459

  10. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-RasG12V-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:25971796