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Sample records for impaired nasal breathing

  1. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  2. The switching point from nasal to oronasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Niinimaa, V; Cole, P; Mintz, S; Shephard, R J

    1980-10-01

    The switching point from nasal to oronasal breathing during incrementally graded submaximal exercise was determined in 30 (14 M, 16 F) healthy adult volunteers. Nasal airflow was measured by a pneumotachograph attached to a nasal mask. Oral airflow was determined as the difference between nasal airflow and total pulmonary airflow, the latter being measured by a head-out exercise body plethysmograph. The airflow and pressure signals were sampled every 20 msec by a micropressor, which calculated respiratory volumes and nasal work of breathing, and produced an on-line print-out. Twenty of the 30 subjects (normal augmenters) switched from nasal to oronasal breathing at submaximal exercise of 105.0 W (SD = 30.1), four subjects (mouth breathers) breathed habitually oronasally, five subjects (nose breathers) persistently breathed through the nose only, and one subject showed no consistent nose/mouth breathing pattern. In normal augmenters, the onset of oronasal breathing (VE 35.3 +/- 10.81 . min-1) was quite consistent individually, but varied considerably between inividuals without showing a significant sex difference. The factors most closely related to the switching point were rating of perceived exertion of breathing and nasal work of breathing. PMID:7444224

  3. Breath Powered Nasal Delivery: A New Route to Rapid Headache Relief

    PubMed Central

    Djupesland, Per G; Messina, John C; Mahmoud, Ramy A

    2013-01-01

    The nose offers an attractive noninvasive alternative for drug delivery. Nasal anatomy, with a large mucosal surface area and high vascularity, allows for rapid systemic absorption and other potential benefits. However, the complex nasal geometry, including the narrow anterior valve, poses a serious challenge to efficient drug delivery. This barrier, plus the inherent limitations of traditional nasal delivery mechanisms, has precluded achievement of the full potential of nasal delivery. Breath Powered bi-directional delivery, a simple but novel nasal delivery mechanism, overcomes these barriers. This innovative mechanism has now been applied to the delivery of sumatriptan. Multiple studies of drug deposition, including comparisons of traditional nasal sprays to Breath Powered delivery, demonstrate significantly improved deposition to superior and posterior intranasal target sites beyond the nasal valve. Pharmacokinetic studies in both healthy subjects and migraineurs suggest that improved deposition of sumatriptan translates into improved absorption and pharmacokinetics. Importantly, the absorption profile is shifted toward a more pronounced early peak, representing nasal absorption, with a reduced late peak, representing predominantly gastrointestinal (GI) absorption. The flattening and “spreading out” of the GI peak appears more pronounced in migraine sufferers than healthy volunteers, likely reflecting impaired GI absorption described in migraineurs. In replicated clinical trials, Breath Powered delivery of low-dose sumatriptan was well accepted and well tolerated by patients, and onset of pain relief was faster than generally reported in previous trials with noninjectable triptans. Interestingly, Breath Powered delivery also allows for the potential of headache-targeted medications to be better delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the sphenopalatine ganglion, potentially improving treatment of various types of headache. In brief, Breath Powered bi

  4. Nasal and Oral Inspiration during Natural Speech Breathing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Hoit, Jeannette D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it. Method: Ten healthy adults, 18-45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and video recordings were obtained. Inspirations…

  5. Nasal Contribution to Breathing and Fine Particle Deposition in Children Versus Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both the route of breathing, nasal versus oral, and the effectiveness of the nose to filter inhaled, fine particles may differ between children and adults. This study compared (1) the nasal contribution to breathing at rest and during mild to moderate exercise in children (age 6–...

  6. Changes in nasal air flow and school grades after rapid maxillary expansion in oral breathing children

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Hilda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the changes in nasal air flow and school grades after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in oral breathing children with maxillary constriction. Material and Methods: Forty-four oral breathing children (mean age 10.57 y) underwent orthodontic RME with a Hyrax screw. Forty-four age-matched children (mean age 10.64 y) with nasal physiological breathing and adequate transverse maxillary dimensions served as the control group. The maxillary widths, nasal air flow assessed via peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), and school grades were recorded at baseline, and 6 months and one year following RME. Results: After RME, there were significant increases in all the maxillary widths in the study group. PNIF was reduced in the study group (60.91 ± 13.13 l/min) compared to the control group (94.50 ± 9.89 l/min) (P < 0.000) at the beginning of the study. Six months after RME, a significant improvement of PNIF was observed in the study group (36.43 ± 22.61). School grades were lower in the study group (85.52 ± 5.74) than in the control group (89.77 ± 4.44) (P < 0.05) at the baseline, but it increased six months after RME (2.77 ± 3.90) (P < 0.001) and one year later (5.02 ± 15.23) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Nasal air flow improved in oral breathing children six months and one year after RME. School grades also improved, but not high enough to be academically significant. Key words:Maxillary constriction, oral breathing, nasal air flow, rapid maxillary expansion, school grades. PMID:22322516

  7. Nasal reflexes: implications for exercise, breathing, and sex.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James N; Merck, Samantha J

    2008-04-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli leading to nasal reflexes include exercise; alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature; neurologic syndromes; and dentistry. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiologic importance are the naso-hypopharyngeal-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women, and song are linked with airflow through the nose-the nose, which by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  8. Nasal Reflexes: Implications for Exercise, Breathing, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; Merck, Samantha J.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli that lead to nasal reflexes include exercise, alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature, neurological syndromes, and dentists. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiological importance are the naso-hypopharyngea-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women and song are linked with airflow through the nose, the nose, that by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  9. Work related impairment of nasal function in Swedish woodwork teachers.

    PubMed Central

    Ahman, M; Holmström, M; Cynkier, I; Söderman, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relation between exposure and nasal function in woodwork teachers. METHODS: 39 selected woodwork teachers employed full time and 32 control subjects (other school personnel) were examined at the beginning and at the end of a working week with symptom rating, nose and throat inspection, rhinomanometry, nasal mucociliary clearance test, and a smell identification test. During one working day of the same week climate, dust and terpene concentrations were measured in all 39 schools. RESULTS: The ventilation rate was highest in rooms with mechanical ventilation. Range of total dust (personally sampled) was 0.12-1.18 mg/m3, respirable dust 0.02-0.21 mg/m3, and terpenes (area sampled) 0.02-6.8 mg/m3. In contrast to the control subjects, the woodwork teachers had more nasal symptoms on the Thursday afternoon than on the Monday morning, especially those working in rooms without mechanical ventilation. Their mucociliary clearance worsened during the week (mean increase 4 min, P < 0.001). A small impairment of olfactory function was also found, but their rhinomanometric values did not change significantly. Nasal symptoms correlated weakly with the percentage of respirable dust in the total dust. Otherwise there were no significant dose-effect relations between measured dust or terpene concentrations and nasal tests. CONCLUSIONS: The woodwork teachers had mainly reversible nasal complaints, impaired nasal mucociliary clearance and olfactory function related to the work environment, with dust concentrations below the Swedish threshold limit value of 2 mg/m3. PMID:8777447

  10. Effects of a Mask on Breathing Impairment During a Fencing Assault: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Passali, Desiderio; Cambi, Jacopo; Salerni, Lorenzo; Stortini, Giancarlo; Bellussi, Luisa Maria; Passali, Francesco Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fencers often complain of progressive difficulty in breathing during matches, which is generally attributed to restricted air, light and heat circulation from wearing a mask. Physiologically, the nasal structure generates airflow resistance that can reach -50% of the total respiratory resistance. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the presence of nasal obstruction in fencers and the relationship with the use of mask. Materials and Methods: An observational study on 40 fencers (18 males, 22 females) was conducted. Fencers perform a usual assault, wearing the mask and standardized physical exercises (running, sprints and obstacles) without the mask. ENT examination with a nasal flexible fiberscope, Anterior Active Rhinomanometry (AAR) and Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) measurement before and after physical activity with or without the mask was recorded. Results: Before physical exercise, the total nasal airway resistance mean value for AAR was 0.33 ± 0.17 Pa/cm3/s at 150 Pa. After a match with the mask, the mean value was 0.28 ± 0.16 Pa/cm3/s. After normal physical exercises without mask, the mean value was 0.24 ± 0.15 Pa/cm3/s. Using t tests, statistically significant difference between nasal resistance before and after physical activity (P < 0.05) was observed, but no significant difference in nasal resistance between the basal value and that taken after a match wearing the masks (P = 0.1265). PNIF values significantly increase with exercise (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our study shows that wearing the mask causes increased breathing impairment in fencers, when compared with similar physical activity without the mask. PMID:26448845

  11. Restorative procedures in disturbed function of the upper airways - nasal breathing

    PubMed Central

    Mlynski, Gunter

    2005-01-01

    These days, functional rhinosurgery is almost always taken to mean the improvement of nasal airflow. However, air should not only pass through the nose without obstruction. It needs to be warmed, moistened and filtered. This requires sufficient air/mucous membrane contact by spreading airflow over the entire turbinate region, as well as regulation of nasal airway resistance and the degree of turbulence within the nasal cycle. These factors are not considered enough in the concept of functional rhinosurgery. There cannot be a rigid concept for functional/aesthetic rhinosurgery, the surgical procedure must be adapted to the individual anatomy and pathology. In spite of this, it must be clear (based on evidence) which surgical steps can solve a functional problem of the nose in the long term. This paper cannot explain evidence-based treatment strategies to restore nasal respiratory function because in all branches of rhinosurgery, there are no prospective studies available with a sufficiently high sample size and long-term results objectivized by functional diagnosis. Studies available on septal surgery show better results for SP after Cottle than for SMR after Killian. However, the success rate of a 70 to 80% improvement in nasal breathing is not satisfactory. The incidence of postoperative, dry nasal mucosa is also too high. The task of rhinology is to stress the functional side of rhinosurgery more. This includes preoperative analysis of the causes of disturbed respiratory function using the functional diagnosis methods available, the use of evidence-based surgical techniques and postoperative, objectivized quality control. More research needs to be done on the physiology and pathophysiology of nasal airflow as well as on the effect of rhinosurgery on airflow. Numerical flow simulation can contribute greatly to this because the effects of shape changes on the flow can be visualized. Methods need to be developed which can be used for routine, diagnostic recording of

  12. Restorative procedures in disturbed function of the upper airways - nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Gunter

    2005-01-01

    These days, functional rhinosurgery is almost always taken to mean the improvement of nasal airflow. However, air should not only pass through the nose without obstruction. It needs to be warmed, moistened and filtered. This requires sufficient air/mucous membrane contact by spreading airflow over the entire turbinate region, as well as regulation of nasal airway resistance and the degree of turbulence within the nasal cycle. These factors are not considered enough in the concept of functional rhinosurgery.There cannot be a rigid concept for functional/aesthetic rhinosurgery, the surgical procedure must be adapted to the individual anatomy and pathology. In spite of this, it must be clear (based on evidence) which surgical steps can solve a functional problem of the nose in the long term. This paper cannot explain evidence-based treatment strategies to restore nasal respiratory function because in all branches of rhinosurgery, there are no prospective studies available with a sufficiently high sample size and long-term results objectivized by functional diagnosis. Studies available on septal surgery show better results for SP after Cottle than for SMR after Killian. However, the success rate of a 70 to 80% improvement in nasal breathing is not satisfactory. The incidence of postoperative, dry nasal mucosa is also too high. The task of rhinology is to stress the functional side of rhinosurgery more. This includes preoperative analysis of the causes of disturbed respiratory function using the functional diagnosis methods available, the use of evidence-based surgical techniques and postoperative, objectivized quality control. More research needs to be done on the physiology and pathophysiology of nasal airflow as well as on the effect of rhinosurgery on airflow. Numerical flow simulation can contribute greatly to this because the effects of shape changes on the flow can be visualized. Methods need to be developed which can be used for routine, diagnostic recording of

  13. Diaphragmatic amplitude and accessory inspiratory muscle activity in nasal and mouth-breathing adults: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maria Elaine; Boufleur, Jalusa; Soares, Juliana Corrêa; Haygert, Carlos Jesus Pereira; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electromyographic activity of the accessory inspiratory muscles and the diaphragmatic amplitude (DA) in nasal and mouth-breathing adults. The study evaluated 38 mouth-breathing (MB group) and 38 nasal-breathing (NB group) adults, from 18 to 30years old and both sexes. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to evaluate the amplitude and symmetry (POC%) of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles at rest, during nasal slow inspiration at Lung Total Capacity (LTC) and, during rapid and abrupt inspiration: Sniff, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) and Maximum Inspiratory Pressure (MIP). M-mode ultrasonography assessed the right diaphragm muscle amplitude in three different nasal inspirations: at tidal volume (TV), Sniff and inspiration at LTC. The SCM activity was significantly lower in the MB group during Sniff, PNIF (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney test) and MIP (p<0.01, t-test). The groups did not differ during rest and inspiration at LTC, regarding sEMG amplitude and POC%. DA was significantly lower in the MB group at TV (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney) and TLC (p=0.03, t-test). Mouth breathing reflected on lower recruitment of the accessory inspiratory muscles during fast inspiration and lower diaphragmatic amplitude, compared to nasal breathing. PMID:25900327

  14. Technical and practical issues for tidal breathing measurements of nasal nitric oxide in children.

    PubMed

    Beydon, Nicole; Chambellan, Arnaud; Alberti, Corinne; de Blic, Jacques; Clément, Annick; Escudier, Estelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel

    2015-12-01

    To promote early screening of patients with suspected Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurements during tidal breathing (TB) have been developed for children unable to ensure velum closure (VC) during breath hold or expiration against resistance. To investigate technical and practical issues related to TB-nNO methods in children referred for suspected or asserted PCD, we recorded, in a prospective multicenter study, TB-nNO (calculated as the mean of 5 peaks, 10 or 30 sec during tidal breathing) and VC-nNO when available. We studied 142 children (PCD diagnosis asserted in 47, excluded in 39). Nasal NO values were significantly different according to methods, VC-nNO being higher than TB-nNO (TB-nNO 5 peaks higher than mean of 10 or 30 sec). Specificity (90-94%) and sensitivity (86-97%) were similar between TB-nNO and VC-nNO methods. Age was more correlated with VC-nNO than with TB-nNO. TB-nNO could differ between the two nostrils by more than 10% (or 10 ppb when nNO absolute value lower 100 ppb) in 32-43% of the tested children, according to the different tidal breathing values, and was reproducible in the long term but influenced by ambient NO. Despite TB-nNO values being lower than VC-nNO, TB-nNO was found to be as discriminant for PCD, and probably more discriminant in children less than 8 years old, as the VC method. These results were obtained using the chemiluminescence technique which allows an easier assessment of relevant factors such as nasal permeability and ambient NO than the electrochemical technique. PMID:25731630

  15. Inspiratory flow dynamics during phrenic nerve stimulation in awake normals during nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Demoule, A; Marc, I; Sanfaçon, C; Derenne, J P; Similowski, T

    1999-08-01

    The loss of upper airway (UA) dilators preactivation before inspiratory muscle contraction is an important determinant of the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothetized that phrenic nerve stimulation could provide a practical way to explore the effects of the dissociation between UA dilators and inspiratory muscles, and possibly to determine UA critical closing pressure during wakefulness. The pattern of inspiratory airflow was therefore studied in normal awake subjects during diaphragm twitches induced by either electrical phrenic stimulation (ES) or cervical magnetic stimulation (CMS) (n = 9) and with and without a nasal stent during ES (n = 7). End-expiratory stimulations applied during exclusive nasal breathing induced 200 to 300 ms twitch inspiratory flow. The average maximal twitch flow of flow-limited twitches was higher during CMS than ES (1.18 +/- 0.29 L. PMID:10430737

  16. Effects of ozone exposure: a comparison between oral and nasal breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, B.; Silverman, F.; Cole, P.; Corey, P.

    1988-09-01

    Mode of inhalation, by nose or by mouth, as a determinant of pulmonary toxicity to acute inhalant exposure has been investigated incompletely. This communication addresses whether there are significant differences in toxic pulmonary responses to acute ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure between differing modes of inhalation (nasal vs. oral breathing). Changes in the results of pulmonary function tests and symptomatology of healthy young adults were compared following both exclusive nose and exclusive mouth breathing during a 30-min exposure to approximately 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ under conditions of moderate continuous exercise. In this single-blind, randomized, crossover study, no significant differences in either the results of pulmonary function tests or in symptomatology were found between the two modes of inhalation.

  17. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  18. Impaired Air Conditioning within the Nasal Cavity in Flat-Faced Homo.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Shigeru; Samarat, Kaouthar; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    We are flat-faced hominins with an external nose that protrudes from the face. This feature was derived in the genus Homo, along with facial flattening and reorientation to form a high nasal cavity. The nasal passage conditions the inhaled air in terms of temperature and humidity to match the conditions required in the lung, and its anatomical variation is believed to be evolutionarily sensitive to the ambient atmospheric conditions of a given habitat. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with three-dimensional topology models of the nasal passage under the same simulation conditions, to investigate air-conditioning performance in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The CFD simulation showed a horizontal straight flow of inhaled air in chimpanzees and macaques, contrasting with the upward and curved flow in humans. The inhaled air is conditioned poorly in humans compared with nonhuman primates. Virtual modifications to the human external nose topology, in which the nasal vestibule and valve are modified to resemble those of chimpanzees, change the airflow to be horizontal, but have little influence on the air-conditioning performance in humans. These findings suggest that morphological variation of the nasal passage topology was only weakly sensitive to the ambient atmosphere conditions; rather, the high nasal cavity in humans was formed simply by evolutionary facial reorganization in the divergence of Homo from the other hominin lineages, impairing the air-conditioning performance. Even though the inhaled air is not adjusted well within the nasal cavity in humans, it can be fully conditioned subsequently in the pharyngeal cavity, which is lengthened in the flat-faced Homo. Thus, the air-conditioning faculty in the nasal passages was probably impaired in early Homo members, although they have survived successfully under the fluctuating climate of the Plio-Pleistocene, and then they moved "Out of Africa" to explore the more severe climates of

  19. Impaired Air Conditioning within the Nasal Cavity in Flat-Faced Homo

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Shigeru; Samarat, Kaouthar; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    We are flat-faced hominins with an external nose that protrudes from the face. This feature was derived in the genus Homo, along with facial flattening and reorientation to form a high nasal cavity. The nasal passage conditions the inhaled air in terms of temperature and humidity to match the conditions required in the lung, and its anatomical variation is believed to be evolutionarily sensitive to the ambient atmospheric conditions of a given habitat. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with three-dimensional topology models of the nasal passage under the same simulation conditions, to investigate air-conditioning performance in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The CFD simulation showed a horizontal straight flow of inhaled air in chimpanzees and macaques, contrasting with the upward and curved flow in humans. The inhaled air is conditioned poorly in humans compared with nonhuman primates. Virtual modifications to the human external nose topology, in which the nasal vestibule and valve are modified to resemble those of chimpanzees, change the airflow to be horizontal, but have little influence on the air-conditioning performance in humans. These findings suggest that morphological variation of the nasal passage topology was only weakly sensitive to the ambient atmosphere conditions; rather, the high nasal cavity in humans was formed simply by evolutionary facial reorganization in the divergence of Homo from the other hominin lineages, impairing the air-conditioning performance. Even though the inhaled air is not adjusted well within the nasal cavity in humans, it can be fully conditioned subsequently in the pharyngeal cavity, which is lengthened in the flat-faced Homo. Thus, the air-conditioning faculty in the nasal passages was probably impaired in early Homo members, although they have survived successfully under the fluctuating climate of the Plio-Pleistocene, and then they moved “Out of Africa” to explore the more severe climates of

  20. [Aerosol deposition in nasal passages of burrowing and ground rodents when breathing dust-laden air].

    PubMed

    Moshkin, M P; Petrovskiĭ, D V; Akulov, A E; Romashchenko, A V; Gerlinskaia, L A; Muchnaia, M I; Ganimedov, V L; Sadovskiĭ, A S; Savelov, A A; Koptiug, I V; Troitskiĭ, S Iu; Bukhtiiarov, V I; Kolchanov, N A; Sagdeev, R Z; Fomin, V M

    2014-01-01

    In subterranean rodents, which dig down the passages with frontal teeth, adaptation to the underground mode of life presumes forming of mechanisms that provide protection against inhaling dust particles of different size when digging. One of such mechanisms can be specific pattern of air flow organization in the nasal cavity. To test this assumption, comparative study of geometry and aerodynamics of nasal passages has been conducted with regard to typical representative of subterranean rodents, the mole vole, and a representative of ground rodents, the house mouse. Numerical modeling of air flows and deposition of micro- and nanoparticle aerosols indicates that sedimentation of model particles over the whole surface of nasal cavity is higher in mole vole than in house mouse. On the contrary, particles deposition on the surface of olfactory epithelium turns out to be substantially less in the burrowing rodent as compared to the ground one. Adaptive significance of the latter observation has been substantiated by experimental study on the uptake ofnanoparticles of hydrated manganese oxide MnO x (H2O)x and Mn ions from nasal cavity into brain. It has been shown with use of magnetic resonance tomography method that there is no difference between studied species with respect to intake of particles or ions by olfactory bulb when they are introduced intranasally. Meanwhile, when inhaling nanoparticle aerosol of MnCl2, deposition of Mn in mouse's olfactory bulbs surpasses markedly that in vole's bulbs. Thereby, the morphology of nasal passages as a factor determining the aerodynamics of upper respiratory tract ensures for burrowing rodents more efficient protection of both lungs and brain against inhaled aerosols than for ground ones. PMID:25771679

  1. Anatomical Details of the Rabbit Nasal Passages and Their Implications in Breathing, Air Conditioning, and Olfaction.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A; Kim, Jongwon; Zhang, Yu; Jacob, Richard E; Kabilan, Senthil; Corley, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    The rabbit is commonly used as a laboratory animal for inhalation toxicology tests and detail knowledge of the rabbit airway morphometry is needed for outcome analysis or theoretical modeling. The objective of this study is to quantify the morphometric dimension of the nasal airway of a New Zealand white rabbit and to relate the morphology and functions through analytical and computational methods. Images of high-resolution MRI scans of the rabbit were processed to measure the axial distribution of the cross-sectional areas, perimeter, and complexity level. The lateral recess, which has functions other than respiration or olfaction, was isolated from the nasal airway and its dimension was quantified separately. A low Reynolds number turbulence model was implemented to simulate the airflow, heat transfer, vapor transport, and wall shear stress. Results of this study provide detailed morphological information of the rabbit that can be used in the studies of olfaction, inhalation toxicology, drug delivery, and physiology-based pharmacokinetics modeling. For the first time, we reported a spiral nasal vestibule that splits into three paths leading to the dorsal meatus, maxilloturbinate, and ventral meatus, respectively. Both non-dimensional functional analysis and CFD simulations suggested that the airflow in the rabbit nose is laminar and the unsteady effect is only significantly during sniffing. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio, the maxilloturbinate is highly effective in warming and moistening the inhaled air to body conditions. The unique anatomical structure and respiratory airflow pattern may have important implications for designing new odorant detectors or electronic noses. Anat Rec, 299:853-868, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27145450

  2. pH in exhaled breath condensate and nasal lavage as a biomarker of air pollution-related inflammation in street traffic-controllers and office-workers

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Thamires Marques; Kazama, Cristiane Mayumi; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Macchione, Mariangela; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; de Paula Santos, Ubiratan; Bueno-Garcia, Maria Lucia; Zanetta, Dirce Maria; de André, Carmen Diva Saldiva; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To utilize low-cost and simple methods to assess airway and lung inflammation biomarkers related to air pollution. METHODS: A total of 87 male, non-smoking, healthy subjects working as street traffic-controllers or office-workers were examined to determine carbon monoxide in exhaled breath and to measure the pH in nasal lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate. Air pollution exposure was measured by particulate matter concentration, and data were obtained from fixed monitoring stations (8-h work intervals per day, during the 5 consecutive days prior to the study). RESULTS: Exhaled carbon monoxide was two-fold greater in traffic-controllers than in office-workers. The mean pH values were 8.12 in exhaled breath condensate and 7.99 in nasal lavage fluid in office-workers; these values were lower in traffic-controllers (7.80 and 7.30, respectively). Both groups presented similar cytokines concentrations in both substrates, however, IL-1β and IL-8 were elevated in nasal lavage fluid compared with exhaled breath condensate. The particulate matter concentration was greater at the workplace of traffic-controllers compared with that of office-workers. CONCLUSION: The pH values of nasal lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate are important, robust, easy to measure and reproducible biomarkers that can be used to monitor occupational exposure to air pollution. Additionally, traffic-controllers are at an increased risk of airway and lung inflammation during their occupational activities compared with office-workers. PMID:24473505

  3. The Effect of Nasal Septal Perforation and its Treatment on Objective Sleep and Breathing Parameters.

    PubMed

    Boynuegri, Suleyman; Cayonu, Melih; Tuna, Evrim Unsal; Kurukahvecioglu, Selma; Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Turkay, Burak; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nasal septal perforation (NSP) may alter nasal airflow patterns and physiology. To the best of our knowledge, no studies in the English literature have investigated the effect of NSP and its treatment on polysomnographic parameters. In this study, we aimed to investigate polysomnographic parameters in patients with NSP as well as changes in those parameters after treatment of NSP. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen patients diagnosed with NSP were included in the study. All patients had baseline and post-procedure polysomnographies (PSG) after insertion of silicone septal button for closure of NSP. RESULTS Both median AHI [5.30 (14.40) vs. 2.40 (14.50)] and median supine AHI [10.00 (42.10) vs. 6.60 (37.00)] decreased after correction of the perforation. There was a large reduction in median supine AHI in patients with a perforation size >66 mm2 [10.10 (34.15) vs. 1.60 (28.30)]. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that NSP did not cause any deterioration in objective sleep parameters as determined by PSG, other than a decrease in REM sleep duration and an increase in supine AHI. Correction of NSP did not affect REM duration and supine AHI decreased after treatment. PMID:26878399

  4. The Effect of Nasal Septal Perforation and its Treatment on Objective Sleep and Breathing Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Boynuegri, Suleyman; Cayonu, Melih; Tuna, Evrim Unsal; Kurukahvecioglu, Selma; Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Turkay, Burak; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal septal perforation (NSP) may alter nasal airflow patterns and physiology. To the best of our knowledge, no studies in the English literature have investigated the effect of NSP and its treatment on polysomnographic parameters. In this study, we aimed to investigate polysomnographic parameters in patients with NSP as well as changes in those parameters after treatment of NSP. Material/Methods Nineteen patients diagnosed with NSP were included in the study. All patients had baseline and post-procedure polysomnographies (PSG) after insertion of silicone septal button for closure of NSP. Results Both median AHI [5.30 (14.40) vs. 2.40 (14.50)] and median supine AHI [10.00 (42.10) vs. 6.60 (37.00)] decreased after correction of the perforation. There was a large reduction in median supine AHI in patients with a perforation size >66 mm2 [10.10 (34.15) vs. 1.60 (28.30)]. Conclusions We conclude that NSP did not cause any deterioration in objective sleep parameters as determined by PSG, other than a decrease in REM sleep duration and an increase in supine AHI. Correction of NSP did not affect REM duration and supine AHI decreased after treatment. PMID:26878399

  5. Impairment of nasal mucociliary clearance in woodworkers in the furniture industry

    PubMed Central

    Black, A.; Evans, J. C.; Hadfield, Esme H.; Macbeth, R. G.; Morgan, A.; Walsh, M.

    1974-01-01

    Black, A., Evans, J. C., Hadfield, Esme H., Macbeth, R. G., Morgan, A., and Walsh, M. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 10-17. Impairment of nasal mucociliary clearance in woodworkers in the furniture industry. Measurements of mucociliary clearance from the anterior end of the middle turbinate were made using technetium-99m-labelled particles in nine woodworkers from the furniture industry and in 12 controls, none of whom had been occupationally exposed to wood dust. Clearance rates in the controls ranged from 1·9 to 18·5 mm min-1 with a mean of 6·8. These values are in good agreement with measurements reported elsewhere for normal subjects. Only one of the woodworkers had a clearance rate which fell within the normal range and he had been occupationally exposed for the shortest period (6 years). In four woodworkers clearance was very slow (< 1 mm min-1) and in three there was almost complete stasis. The results of this preliminary investigation suggest that nasal mucociliary function is significantly impaired in workers who have been exposed to wood dust in the furniture industry for more than 10 years. PMID:4821406

  6. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  7. Low-dose oxytocin delivered intranasally with Breath Powered device affects social-cognitive behavior: a randomized four-way crossover trial with nasal cavity dimension assessment.

    PubMed

    Quintana, D S; Westlye, L T; Rustan, Ø G; Tesli, N; Poppy, C L; Smevik, H; Tesli, M; Røine, M; Mahmoud, R A; Smerud, K T; Djupesland, P G; Andreassen, O A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the promise of intranasal oxytocin (OT) for modulating social behavior, recent work has provided mixed results. This may relate to suboptimal drug deposition achieved with conventional nasal sprays, inter-individual differences in nasal physiology and a poor understanding of how intranasal OT is delivered to the brain in humans. Delivering OT using a novel 'Breath Powered' nasal device previously shown to enhance deposition in intranasal sites targeted for nose-to-brain transport, we evaluated dose-dependent effects on social cognition, compared response with intravenous (IV) administration of OT, and assessed nasal cavity dimensions using acoustic rhinometry. We adopted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, crossover design, with 16 healthy male adults completing four single-dose treatments (intranasal 8 IU (international units) or 24 IU OT, 1 IU OT IV and placebo). The primary outcome was social cognition measured by emotional ratings of facial images. Secondary outcomes included the pharmacokinetics of OT, vasopressin and cortisol in blood and the association between nasal cavity dimensions and emotional ratings. Despite the fact that all the treatments produced similar plasma OT increases compared with placebo, there was a main effect of treatment on anger ratings of emotionally ambiguous faces. Pairwise comparisons revealed decreased ratings after 8 IU OT in comparison to both placebo and 24 IU OT. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between nasal valve dimensions and anger ratings of ambiguous faces after 8-IU OT treatment. These findings provide support for a direct nose-to-brain effect, independent of blood absorption, of low-dose OT delivered from a Breath Powered device. PMID:26171983

  8. Breathing resistance and ultrafine particle deposition in nasal-laryngeal airways of a newborn, an infant, a child, and an adult.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Berlinski, Ariel; Zhou, Yue; Greenberg, Bruce; Ou, Xiawei

    2012-12-01

    As a human grows from birth to adulthood, both airway anatomy and breathing conditions vary, altering the deposition rate and pattern of inhaled aerosols. However, deposition studies have typically focused on adult subjects, results of which may not be readily extrapolated to children. This study numerically evaluated the age-related effects on the airflow and aerosol dynamics in image-based nose-throat models of a 10-day-old newborn, a 7-month-old infant, a 5-year-old child, and a 53-year-old adult. Differences in airway physiology, breathing resistance, and aerosol filtering efficiency among the four models were quantified and compared. A high-fidelity fluid-particle transport model was employed to simulate the multi-regime airflows and particle transport within the nasal-laryngeal airways. Ultrafine particles were evaluated under breathing conditions ranging from sedentary to heavy activities. Results of this study indicate that the nasal-laryngeal airways at different ages, albeit differ significantly in morphology and dimension, do not significantly affect the total deposition fractions or maximum local deposition enhancement for ultrafine aerosols. Further, the deposition partitioning in the sub-regions of interest is different among the four models. Results of this study corroborate the use of the in vivo-based diffusion parameter (D(0.5)Q(-0.28)) over the replica-based parameter in correlating nasal-laryngeal depositions of ultrafine aerosols. Improved correlations have been developed for the four age groups by implementing this in vivo-based diffusion parameter as well as the Cunningham correction factor. PMID:22660850

  9. Association between Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Neuropsychological Performance in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Terpening, Zoe; Lewis, Simon J G; Yee, Brendon J; Grunstein, Ron R; Hickie, Ian B; Naismith, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing in middle-age and older adults has been shown to be linked to a range of neuropsychological deficits, but the extent to which these relationships are evident in older people 'at risk' of developing dementia in unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine whether changes in sleep-disordered breathing and sleep fragmentation during nocturnal sleep were related to neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Forty-six patients with MCI (mean age = 66.1 y, sd = 8.4) and 40 age-matched healthy controls (mean age = 63.5 y, sd = 8.9) underwent psychiatric, medical, and neuropsychological assessment, in addition to overnight polysomnography and self-report questionnaires. Measures of hypoxemia, sleep fragmentation, and sleep quality were derived including the apnoea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index, percentage of total sleep time spent below 90% oxygen saturation, arousal index, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset. Patients with MCI did not differ from healthy aging on any measure of sleep-disordered breathing or sleep fragmentation. In MCI, processing speed was negatively correlated with greater sleep time spent below 90% oxygen saturation and a higher apnoea-hypopnea index. In contrast, in the healthy aging, processing speed was negatively correlated with an increased oxygen desaturation index and the arousal index. Sleep-disordered breathing is evident in both healthy aging and MCI with associated decrements in processing speed. Future research is needed to determine the unique and synergistic effects of these differential associations, their potential to inform disease trajectory, and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25720400

  10. The effects of nasal irritant induced responses on breathing and cough in anaesthetized and conscious animal models.

    PubMed

    Biringerova, Z; Gavliakova, S; Brozmanova, M; Tatar, M; Hanuskova, E; Poliacek, I; Plevkova, J

    2013-12-01

    There is little evidence to support the down-regulation of coughing from the nose. The cough response to citric acid (CA) was studied in anesthetized and conscious guinea pigs after nasal pretreatment with saline, 1% DMSO, allylisothiocyanate (TRPA1 agonist) and allylisothiocyanate +AP-18 (TRPA1 antagonist). Cough was induced by adding citric acid (CA) to the tracheal perfusion in anaesthetized animals, or by inhaling 0.4M CA in conscious animals. The cough response was counted from the dose response curves, airflow traces and cough sound analysis. In conscious animals, nasal allylisothiocyanate induced reproducible, dose dependent nasal symptoms and a significant drop in respiratory rate. Cough induced by CA was suppressed after nasal allylisothiocyanate (p<0.05), and this effect was prevented by AP-18 (1mM). In anaesthetized animals, nasal allylisothiocyanate induced a significant drop in respiratory rate. Cough induced subsequently by CA was suppressed when compared to baseline and vehicle responses (p<0.05). The reasons for the suppression of CA induced cough by TRPA1 agonist applied to the nose are not clear and remain to be elucidated. PMID:23994043

  11. Acute hypoxic gas breathing severely impairs cognition and task learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare E; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L; Connell, Charlotte J W; Gant, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Impairments in neural function are common when oxygen supply to the brain is reduced. This study examined neurocognitive processes that are vulnerable to oxygen deprivation. We induced moderate-to-severe hypoxia in healthy adults, thereby inducing impairments caused by low brain oxygen availability. 22 healthy adults participated in this matched-pairs study with a single-blind, randomised design. Baseline neurocognitive function was examined during a familiarisation trial and participants were assigned to hypoxia (10% O2) or sham (21% O2) groups. Neurocognitive performance was assessed via computerised test battery after 50 min of breathing a gas mixture that reduced arterial oxygen saturation by 20% (p<0.01). Hypoxia severely reduced performance across all neurocognitive domain scores; with significant drops in neurocognitive index (-20%), composite memory (-30%), verbal memory (-34%), visual memory (-23%), processing speed (-36%), executive function (-20%), psychomotor speed (-24%), reaction time (-10%), complex attention (-19%) and cognitive flexibility (-18%; all p<0.05). Practice effects were blocked by hypoxia but occurred in sham for information processing speed (+30%), executive function (+14%), psychomotor speed (+18%), reaction time (+5%), cognitive flexibility (+14%), and overall cognitive functioning (+9%; all p<0.05). Neuropsychological performance decrements caused by acute experimental hypoxia are comparable to cognitive domains impaired with high altitude exposure and mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:25660759

  12. Neostigmine but not sugammadex impairs upper airway dilator muscle activity and breathing

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, M.; Zaremba, S.; Malhotra, A.; Jordan, A. S.; Rosow, C.; Chamberlin, N. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cholinesterase inhibitor-based reversal agents, given in the absence of neuromuscular block, evoke a partial upper airway obstruction by decreasing skeletal upper airway muscle function. Sugammadex reverses neuromuscular block by encapsulating rocuronium. However, its effects on upper airway integrity and breathing are unknown. Methods Fifty-one adult male rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane, tracheostomized, and a femoral artery and vein were cannulated. First, we compared the efficacy of sugammadex 15 mg kg−1 and neostigmine 0.06 mg kg−1 to reverse respiratory effects of rocuronium-induced partial paralysis [train-of-four ratio (T4/T1)=0.5]. Subsequently, we compared the safety of sugammadex and neostigmine given after recovery of the T4/T1 to 1, by measuring phasic genioglossus activity and breathing. Results During partial paralysis (T4/T1=0.5), time to recovery of minute volume to baseline values was 10.9 (2), 75.8 (18), and 153 (54) s with sugammadex, neostigmine, and placebo, respectively (sugammadex was significantly faster than neostigmine and placebo, P<0.05). Recovery of T4/T1 was also faster for sugammadex than neostigmine and placebo. Neostigmine administration after complete recovery of T4/T1 decreased upper airway dilator muscle activity to 64 (30)% of baseline and decreased tidal volume (P<0.05 for both variables), whereas sugammadex had no effect on either variable. Conclusions In contrast to neostigmine, which significantly impairs upper airway dilator muscle activity when given after recovery from neuromuscular block, a reversal dose of sugammadex given under the same conditions does not affect genioglossus muscle activity and normal breathing. Human studies will be required to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:18559352

  13. Disorders of the nasal valve area

    PubMed Central

    Bloching, Marc Boris

    2008-01-01

    The nasal valve area is not a singular structure, but a complex three-dimensional construct consisting of several morphological structures. From the physiologic point of view, it is the place of maximum nasal flow resistance (“flow limiting segment”). Therefore, according to Poiseuille’s law, even minor constrictions of this area result in a clinically relevant impairment of nasal breathing for the patient. This narrow passage, also called “ostium internum nasi”, is formed by the mobile lateral nasal wall, the anterior septum with the swell body, the head of the inferior turbinate and the osseous piriform aperture. Within the framework of aetiology, static and dynamic disorders of the nasal valve area have to be distinguished since they result in different therapeutic measures. In the context of diagnosis, the exploration of the case history for assessing the patient’s extent of suffering and the clinical examination are very important. In addition to the presentation of the basics of disorders of the nasal valves, this paper focuses on the treatment of dynamic disorders that mainly constitute the more important therapeutic issue. In this context, we distinguish between stabilisation techniques through grafts or implants and stabilising suture techniques. Following a thorough analysis, the correction of static nasal valve disorders requires various plastic-reconstructive measures using transposition grafting and skin or composite grafts. PMID:22073083

  14. Sleep-disordered breathing, psychiatric distress, and quality of life impairment in sexual assault survivors.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Barry; Melendrez, Dominic; Johnston, Lisa; Warner, Teddy D; Clark, James O; Pacheco, Mary; Pedersen, Beth; Koss, Mary; Hollifield, Michael; Schrader, Ron

    2002-07-01

    Using American Academy of Sleep Medicine research criteria, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) was assessed in a pilot study of 187 sexual assault survivors with posttraumatic stress symptoms. Nightmares, sleep quality, distress, and quality of life were also assessed along with historical accounts of prior treatments for sleep complaints. Presumptive SDB diagnoses were established for 168 patients. Twenty-one of 168 underwent sleep testing, and all met objective SDB diagnostic criteria. There were no clinically meaningful differences in age, body-mass index, sleep quality, distress, or quality of life measures between 21 confirmed SDB cases and 147 suspected cases not tested. Compared with 19 women without SDB, 168 women with diagnosed or suspected SDB reported significantly worse nightmares, sleep quality, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and impaired quality of life. Despite suffering from sleep problems for an average of 20 years, which had not responded to repeated use of psychotropic medications or psychotherapy, few of these women had been referred to sleep specialists. SDB appears widespread among sexual assault survivors seeking help for nightmares. Research is needed to clarify the associations among SDB, distress, and physical and mental health impairment in trauma patients. PMID:12142845

  15. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly ...

  16. [Test using vapourated expired nasal breathing in medicine 100 years ago and in paestum 2 300 years ago].

    PubMed

    Pirsig, W

    2014-11-01

    This historical sketch follows the traces of a mirror, once used to test the last breath of a dying woman. It was found on the fresco of a tomb in Paestum dated about 320 BC. In 1889, Hendrik Zwaardemaker (Utrecht) was the first to present a hygrometric functional test using a cold mirror placed under the nose to estimate the degree of airflow obstruction during exhalation. In 1901, Ernst Glatzel (Berlin) modified Zwaardemaker's concept by engraving a series of equidistant arcs into his metallic mirror to further quantify the amounts of condensed vapour in the expired air. The Glatzel-mirror was used in Germany until after the Second World War. PMID:25369157

  17. Respiratory monitoring system based on the nasal pressure technique for the analysis of sleep breathing disorders: Reduction of static and dynamic errors, and comparisons with thermistors and pneumotachographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Mesquita, Jayme; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2004-03-01

    Thermally sensitive devices—thermistors—have usually been used to monitor sleep-breathing disorders. However, because of their long time constant, these devices are not able to provide a good characterization of fast events, like hypopneas. Nasal pressure recording technique (NPR) has recently been suggested to quantify airflow during sleep. It is claimed that the short time constants of the devices used to implement this technique would allow an accurate analysis of fast abnormal respiratory events. However, these devices present errors associated with nonlinearities and acoustic resonance that could reduce the diagnostic value of the NPR. Moreover, in spite of the high scientific and clinical potential, there is no detailed description of a complete instrumentation system to implement this promising technique in sleep studies. In this context, the purpose of this work was twofold: (1) describe the development of a flexible NPR device and (2) evaluate the performance of this device when compared to pneumotachographs (PNTs) and thermistors. After the design details are described, the system static accuracy is evaluated by a comparative analysis with a PNT. This analysis revealed a significant reduction (p<0.001) of the static error when system nonlinearities were reduced. The dynamic performance of the NPR system was investigated by frequency response analysis and time constant evaluations and the results showed that the developed device response was as good as PNT and around 100 times faster (τ=5,3 ms) than thermistors (τ=512 ms). Experimental results obtained in simulated clinical conditions and in a patient are presented as examples, and confirmed the good features achieved in engineering tests. These results are in close agreement with physiological fundamentals, supplying substantial evidence that the improved dynamic and static characteristics of this device can contribute to a more accurate implementation of medical research projects and to improve the

  18. Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep quality, and mild cognitive impairment in the general population.

    PubMed

    Dlugaj, Martha; Weinreich, Gerhard; Weimar, Christian; Stang, Andreas; Dragano, Nico; Wessendorf, Thomas E; Teschler, Helmut; Winkler, Angela; Wege, Natalia; Moebus, Susanne; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that sleep disorders are associated with cognitive decline. We, therefore, examined the cross-sectional association of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), sleep quality, and three types of sleep complaints (difficulties initiating sleep, difficulties maintaining sleep, and early morning awakening) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its subtypes. A group of 1,793 participants (51% men; 63.8 ± 7.5 years) of the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study (total sample n = 4,157) received a screening for SDB and self-report measures of sleep complaints. Group comparisons were used to compare performances among five cognitive subtests. Multivariate logistic regression models were calculated to determine the association of MCI (n = 230) and MCI subtypes (amnestic MCI, n = 120; non-amnestic MCI, n = 110) with SDB severity levels, poor sleep quality, and sleep complaints. Severe SDB (apnea-hypopnea index ≥30/h, n = 143) was not associated with MCI, amnestic MCI, or non-amnestic MCI. Poor sleep quality was associated with MCI (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-2.03; fully adjusted) as well as frequently reported difficulties initiating sleep (OR = 1.94, 1.20-3.14), difficulties maintaining sleep (OR = 2.23, 1.27-4.63), and early morning awakening (OR = 2.30, 1.32-4.00). Severe difficulties initiating sleep (OR = 2.23, 1.21-4.13) and early morning awakening (OR = 2.88, 1.45-5.73) were solely associated with the amnestic MCI subtype, whereas, severe difficulties maintaining sleep (OR = 3.84, 1.13-13.08) were associated with non-amnestic MCI. Our results suggest that poor sleep quality, rather than SDB, is associated with MCI. The selective association of difficulties initiating sleep and early morning awakening with amnestic MCI and of difficulties maintaining sleep with non-amnestic MCI might serve as a marker to improve diagnostic accuracy in the earliest stages of cognitive impairment and will be further

  19. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Breath Powered Nasal Delivery of Sumatriptan Powder (AVP-825) in the Treatment of Acute Migraine (The TARGET Study)

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger K; McAllister, Peter J; Spierings, Egilius LH; Messina, John; Carothers, Jennifer; Djupesland, Per G; Mahmoud, Ramy A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of AVP-825, a drug–device combination of low-dose sumatriptan powder (22 mg loaded dose) delivered intranasally through a targeted Breath Powered device vs an identical device containing lactose powder (placebo device) in the treatment of migraine headache. Background Early treatment of migraine headaches is associated with improved outcome, but medication absorption after oral delivery may be delayed in migraineurs because of reduced gastric motility. Sumatriptan powder administered with an innovative, closed-palate, Bi-Directional, Breath Powered intranasal delivery mechanism is efficiently absorbed across the nasal mucosa and produces fast absorption into the circulation. Results from a previously conducted placebo-controlled study of AVP-825 showed a high degree of headache relief with an early onset of action (eg, 74% AVP-825 vs 38% placebo device at 1 hour, P < .01). Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in adults with a history of migraine with or without aura, participants were randomized via computer-generated lists to AVP-825 or placebo device to treat a single migraine headache of moderate or severe intensity. The primary endpoint was headache relief (defined as reduction of headache pain intensity from severe or moderate migraine headache to mild or none) at 2 hours post-dose. Results Two hundred and thirty patients (116 AVP-825 and 114 placebo device) were randomized, of whom 223 (112 and 111, respectively) experienced a qualifying migraine headache (their next migraine headache that reached moderate or severe intensity). A significantly greater proportion of AVP-825 patients reported headache relief at 2 hours post-dose compared with those using the placebo device (68% vs 45%, P = .002, odds ratio 2.53, 95% confidence interval [1.45, 4.42]). Between-group differences in headache relief were evident as early as 15 minutes, reached statistical significance at 30

  20. Visual exploration of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Stefan; Muigg, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Doleisch, Helmut; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Rhinologists are often faced with the challenge of assessing nasal breathing from a functional point of view to derive effective therapeutic interventions. While the complex nasal anatomy can be revealed by visual inspection and medical imaging, only vague information is available regarding the nasal airflow itself: Rhinomanometry delivers rather unspecific integral information on the pressure gradient as well as on total flow and nasal flow resistance. In this article we demonstrate how the understanding of physiological nasal breathing can be improved by simulating and visually analyzing nasal airflow, based on an anatomically correct model of the upper human respiratory tract. In particular we demonstrate how various Information Visualization (InfoVis) techniques, such as a highly scalable implementation of parallel coordinates, time series visualizations, as well as unstructured grid multi-volume rendering, all integrated within a multiple linked views framework, can be utilized to gain a deeper understanding of nasal breathing. Evaluation is accomplished by visual exploration of spatio-temporal airflow characteristics that include not only information on flow features but also on accompanying quantities such as temperature and humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth visual exploration of the physiological function of the nose over several simulated breathing cycles under consideration of a complete model of the nasal airways, realistic boundary conditions, and all physically relevant time-varying quantities. PMID:19834215

  1. Nocturnal periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Baseler, G; Ghofrani, H A; Grimminger, F; Olschewski, H; Seeger, W

    2002-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is frequently observed in congestive heart failure. Among other factors, prolongation of circulation time, hypocapnia and hypoxia are thought to underlie this sleep-related breathing disorder. Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is also characterized by reduced cardiac output and blood gas alterations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether a nocturnal periodic breathing (PB) occurs in PPH. A total of 20 consecutive patients with PPH who had been admitted for pharmacological investigation of pulmonary vasoreactivity were investigated by lung function testing, right heart catheterization and full-night attended polysomnography. PB was detected in six patients (30%) (mean +/- SEM: apnoea/hypopnoea index 37 +/- 5 h(-1); arterial oxygen saturation was <90% during 56 +/- 6.5% of total sleep time). The patients with PB had more severe haemodynamic impairment than those without. They also had a more marked reduction in the pulmonary diffusion capacity and greater arterial hypoxia. PB was markedly improved or even eradicated by nasal oxygen during the night. Periodic breathing occurs in patients with advanced primary pulmonary hypertension and can be reversed by nocturnal nasal oxygen. The clinical and prognostic significance of periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension needs to be determined by further studies. PMID:11998995

  2. Masticatory Changes in Oral Breath Secondary to Allergic Rhinitis: Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo; Silva, Hilton Justino da; Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Moraes, Klyvia Juliana Rocha de; Cunha, Renata Andrade da; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Medeiros, Décio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012) defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment) in some cases. Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis. Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis. Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully. Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population. Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time), with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate), would be necessary to examine such changes. PMID:25992077

  3. Masticatory changes in oral breath secondary to allergic rhinitis: integrative review.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo; Silva, Hilton Justino da; Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Moraes, Klyvia Juliana Rocha de; Cunha, Renata Andrade da; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Medeiros, Décio

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012) defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment) in some cases. Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis. Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis. Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully. Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population. Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time), with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate), would be necessary to examine such changes. PMID:25992077

  4. Different reactions of human nasal and Eustachian tube mucosa after hyperbaric oxygen exposure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mutzbauer, Till S; Neubauer, Birger; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of Eustachian tube function has been observed after hyperbaric oxygen treatment as well as after diving on oxygen used as breathing gas. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen exposure on Eustachian tube ventilatory function and airflow characteristics of the nose. Six police task force divers performing two consecutive dives within a regular training schedule on oxygen were examined. Middle ear impedance, and nasal airflow velocities before and after diving as well as on the morning after the dive day were measured. Middle ear impedance decreased overnight in comparison to pre-dive values (P = 0.027) as well as compared to the value after the first dive (P = 0.032). Rhinoflowmetry did not reveal any changes of nasal airflow velocities related to the dives. Furthermore, no association between middle ear impedance and nasal airflow velocities was found. An impairment of Eustachian tube ventilatory function was obtained after hyperbaric oxygen exposure during dives employing oxygen as breathing gas. This impairment, however, was not associated with altered airflow characteristics of divers' noses. Thus, it seems unlikely that hyperbaric oxygen exerts an effect on the nasal mucosa similar to that on the Eustachian tube mucosa. PMID:22829159

  5. Rational design of nasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Hagenaars, Niels; Jiskoot, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Nasal vaccination is a promising alternative to classical parental vaccination, as it is non-invasive and, in principle, capable of eliciting strong systemic and local immune responses. However, the protective efficacy of nasally administered antigens is often impaired because of delivery problems: free antigens are readily cleared from the nasal cavity, poorly absorbed by nasal epithelial cells and generally have low intrinsic immunogenicity. In this review paper, we describe the main physiological hurdles to nasal vaccine delivery, survey the progress made in technological approaches to overcome these hurdles and discuss emerging opportunities for improving nasal vaccines. According to current insights, encapsulation of the antigen into bioadhesive (nano)particles is a promising approach towards successful nasal vaccine delivery. These antigen-loaded particles can be tailor made by supplying them with targeting ligands, adjuvants or endosomal escape mediators to form the desired vaccine that provides long-lasting protective immunity. PMID:18172815

  6. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    PubMed

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  7. Excessive Fibrin Deposition in Nasal Polyps Caused by Fibrinolytic Impairment through Reduction of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kato, Atsushi; Peters, Anju T.; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick; Norton, James; Grammer, Leslie C.; Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Nasal polyps (NPs) are characterized by intense edema or formation of pseudocysts filled with plasma proteins, mainly albumin. However, the mechanisms underlying NP retention of plasma proteins in their submucosa remain unclear. Objectives: We hypothesized that formation of a fibrin mesh retains plasma proteins in NPs. We assessed the fibrin deposition and expression of the components of the fibrinolytic system in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods: We assessed fibrin deposition in nasal tissue from patients with CRS and control subjects by means of immunofluorescence. Fibrinolytic components, d-dimer, and plasminogen activators were measured using ELISA, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We also performed gene expression and protein quantification analysis in cultured airway epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Immunofluorescence data showed profound fibrin deposition in NP compared with uncinate tissue (UT) from patients with CRS and control subjects. Levels of the cross-linked fibrin cleavage product protein, d-dimer, were significantly decreased in NP compared with UT from patients with CRS and control subjects, suggesting reduced fibrinolysis (P < 0.05). Expression levels of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) mRNA and protein were significantly decreased in NP compared with UT from patients with CRS and control subjects (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated clear reduction of t-PA in NP, primarily in the epithelium and glands. Th2 cytokine–stimulated cultured airway epithelial cells showed down-regulation of t-PA, suggesting a potential Th2 mechanism in NP. Conclusions: A Th2-mediated reduction of t-PA might lead to excessive fibrin deposition in the submucosa of NP, which might contribute to the tissue remodeling and pathogenesis of CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:23155140

  8. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Afrin® Nasal Spray ... Anefrin® Nasal Spray ... Dristan® Nasal Spray ... Mucinex® Nasal Spray ... Nostrilla® Nasal Spray ... Vicks Sinex® Nasal Spray ... Zicam® Nasal Spray ... Oxymetazoline nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to ...

  9. Type 5 and 6 nasal septal deformities: Could we predict and prevent acute coronary syndrome attacks in the future?

    PubMed

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Carić, Tomislav; Raguž, Miroslav

    2015-11-01

    Undisturbed nasal breathing is essential for normal breathing physiology as a whole. Nasal septal deformities (NSD) are well known as a factor which can remarkably and substantially affect the quality of nasal and pulmonary breathing. However, it is well known that type 5 and type 6 nasal septal deformities may cause only a moderate, unilateral nasal obstruction or none at all. The effects of nasal obstruction on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems have been well studied so far: right ventricle problems, ischemic heart diseases, sleep disorders, mucociliary clearance system disturbances, paranasal sinus pathology, have all been described as a result of impaired nasal breathing. The connection between the upper and lower respiratory systems has been recognized in allergic rhinitis and asthma as well, resulting in the united airways concept. Most recently, the ostensible connection between chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and acute myocardial infarction has been said to be proven. However, the results of this study might have not been well founded since there are no direct and clear proofs that CRS as a chronic inflammatory process has anything to do with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS). On the other hand, a large international study on the incidence of NSD in CRS patients, based on the Mladina classification, showed that NSD were present in a high incidence and that the most frequent deformities were types 5 (36.18%) and 7 (29.92%). The vast majority of those types 7 consisted of types 3 and (again) types 5 or types 6 (76.32%). The fact that in CRS patients a remarkably high incidence of type 5 septal deformity can be seen, gives rise to thinking that this factor perhaps plays a role in the onset of ACS. Acute coronary syndrome is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Traditional risk factors such as family history, overweight body, smoking, stress, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery calcium score, C

  10. Air-conditioning in the human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Elad, David; Wolf, Michael; Keck, Tilman

    2008-11-30

    Healthy humans normally breathe through their nose even though its complex geometry imposes a significantly higher resistance in comparison with mouth breathing. The major functional roles of nasal breathing are defense against infiltrating particles and conditioning of the inspired air to nearly alveolar conditions in order to maintain the internal milieu of the lung. The state-of-the-art of the existing knowledge on nasal air-conditioning will be discussed in this review, including in vivo measurements in humans and computational studies on nasal air-conditioning capacity. Areas where further studies will improve our understanding and may help medical diagnosis and intervention in pathological states will be introduced. PMID:18565805

  11. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 43. Becker SS. Surgical management of polyps in the treatment of nasal airway ...

  12. Nasal Physiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose is constantly exposed to inhaled debris and microbes (viruses, bacteria, and fungus). The respiratory system has ... Mucus is designed to trap inhaled particles (including microbes) that are subsequently cleared from the airways. Nasal ...

  13. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Your paranasal sinuses are small hollow spaces around the nose. They are lined with cells that make mucus, which keeps your nose from drying out. The nasal cavity is the passageway just behind your ...

  14. Newborn nasal obstruction due to congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo; Silva, Vanessa; Hazboun, Igor; Paschoal, Jorge; Maunsell, Rebecca; Sakano, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal obstruction is an important condition that can lead to severe respiratory distress in newborns. There are several differential diagnoses, and one of them is congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS). CNPAS is a rare case of respiratory distress caused by excessive growth of the nasal process of the maxilla and leads to narrowing of the anterior third of the nasal cavity. Diagnosis, associated anomalies, and treatment strategies are reviewed by the following presentation of two cases. Case Presentation: We report two cases of infants diagnosed with CNPAS. The patients in the first case had no concomitant comorbidities, and the outcome was successful after surgical correction of stenosis. The patient in the second case had an associated holoprosencephaly, and although surgical correction and nasal cavity patency, the patient remains dependent on tracheostomy due to dysphagia and neurologic impairment. Discussion: Airway obstruction affects 1 in 5000 children, and CNPAS is a diagnosis frequently forgotten and even unknown to neonatal and pediatric intensivists. Newborns are obligate nasal breathers, and, nasal obstruction, therefore, can lead to severe respiratory distress. CNPAS is not only rare but, many times, is not easily recognized. It is important to bear in mind the diagnostic criteria when evaluating infants with nasal obstruction. Conservative treatment should be prioritized, but surgical treatment is required in severe cases with failure to thrive and persistent respiratory distress. Respiratory distress and dysphagia may persist to some degree despite correction of the stenotic pyriform aperture due to associated narrowing of the entire nasal cavity and association with other anomalies. Final Comments: CNPAS is a rare condition and may be lethal in newborns. Differential diagnosis of nasal obstruction must be remembered to recognize this anomaly, and the otolaryngologist must be familiarized with this condition and its

  15. Pediatric sleep-disordered breathing: New evidence on its development.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, Christian; Akhtar, Farah

    2015-12-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children could be resolved by adenotonsillectomy (T&A). However, incomplete results are often noted post-surgery. Because of this partial resolution, long-term follow-up is needed to monitor for reoccurrence of SDB, which may be diagnosed years later through reoccurrence of complaints or in some cases, through systematic investigations. Children undergoing T&A often have small upper airways. Genetics play a role in the fetal development of the skull, the skull base, and subsequently, the size of the upper airway. In non-syndromic children, specific genetic mutations are often unrecognized early in life and affect the craniofacial growth, altering functions such as suction, mastication, swallowing, and nasal breathing. These developmental and functional changes are associated with the development of SDB. Children without genetic mutations but with impairment of the above said functions also develop SDB. When applied early in life, techniques involved in the reeducation of these functions, such as myofunctional therapy, alter the craniofacial growth and the associated SDB. This occurs as a result of the continuous interaction between cartilages, bones and muscles involved in the growth of the base of the skull and the face. Recently collected data show the impact of the early changes in craniofacial growth patterns and how these changes lead to an impairment of the developmental functions and consequent persistence of SDB. The presence of nasal disuse and mouth breathing are abnormal functions that are easily amenable to treatment. Understanding the dynamics leading to the development of SDB and recognizing factors affecting the craniofacial growth and the resulting functional impairments, allows appropriate treatment planning which may or may not include T&A. Enlargement of lymphoid tissue may actually be a consequence as opposed to a cause of these initial dysfunctions. PMID:26500024

  16. Dynamic Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Nasal Airflow Resistance during Nasal Allergen Provocation Test.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Tiina M; Alho, Olli-Pekka; Seppänen, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease and an immunoneuronal disorder. We aimed at providing further knowledge on the function of the neural system in nasal allergic reaction. Here, a method to assess simultaneously the nasal airflow resistance and the underlying function of autonomic nervous system (ANS) is presented and used during the nasal provocation of allergic and nonallergic subjects. Continuous nasal airflow resistance and spectral heart rate variability parameters show in detail the timing and intensity differences in subjects' reactions. After the provocation, the nasal airflow resistance of allergic subjects showed a positive trend, whereas LF/HF (Low Frequency/High Frequency) ratio and LF power showed a negative trend. This could imply a gradual sympathetic withdrawal in allergic subjects after the allergen provocation. The groups differed significantly by these physiological descriptors. The proposed method opens entirely new opportunities to research accurately concomitant changes in nasal breathing function and ANS. PMID:27196870

  17. Human respiratory deposition of particles during oronasal breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, David L.; Proctor, Donald F.

    Deposition of particles in the tracheobronchial and pulmonary airways is computed as a function of particle size, correcting for deposition in the parallel nasal and oral airways with oronasal breathing. Thoracic deposition is lower at all sizes for oronasal breathing than for mouth breathing via tube, and is negligible for aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 10 μm or larger.

  18. Nasal flaring

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: Arterial blood gas analysis Complete blood count (CBC) ECG Pulse oximetry to measure blood oxygen level X-rays of the chest Oxygen may be given if there is a breathing problem.

  19. Variability of inspired oxygen concentration with nasal cannulas.

    PubMed Central

    Bazuaye, E A; Stone, T N; Corris, P A; Gibson, G J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The likely values of inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease breathing via nasal cannulas have not been assessed previously. METHODS: Seven patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and seven healthy subjects were studied while breathing oxygen via nasal cannulas or fixed performance (Venturi) or uncontrolled (MC) oxygen masks. Breath to breath values of FIO2 were calculated by extrapolation from expired oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations on the basis of the oxygen-carbon dioxide relationship and on the assumption of a respiratory exchange ratio (R) of 0.8. RESULTS: In both groups of subjects the average values of FIO2 with nasal cannulas at 1 and 2 l min-1 were of a similar order to those achieved with 24.5% and 28% Venturi masks, but variations within and between subjects in both groups breathing via nasal cannulas were considerable and similar to those found with MC masks. In the seven patients with chronic obstructive lung disease breathing via nasal cannulas at 2 l min-1 the average FIO2 varied from 23.7% to 34.9%. CONCLUSIONS: "Typical" values of FIO2 quoted with nasal cannulas can mislead. The results confirm that this mode of oxygen delivery is unsatisfactory if precise control of inspired oxygen is desired. PMID:1412117

  20. Nasal endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Nasal endoscopy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  1. Mucociliary clearance, airway inflammation and nasal symptoms in urban motorcyclists

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Tereza C S; Yoshida, Carolina T; de S. Carvalho, Tomas; Nicola, Marina L; Martins, Jocimar A; Braga, Lays M; de Oliveira, Regiani C; Leyton, Vilma; de André, Carmen S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Rubin, Bruce K; Nakagawa, Naomi K

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is evidence that outdoor workers exposed to high levels of air pollution exhibit airway inflammation and increased airway symptoms. We hypothesized that these workers would experience increased airway symptoms and decreased nasal mucociliary clearance associated with their exposure to air pollution. METHODS: In total, 25 non-smoking commercial motorcyclists, aged 18-44 years, were included in this study. These drivers work 8-12 hours per day, 5 days per week, driving on urban streets. Nasal mucociliary clearance was measured by the saccharine transit test; airway acidification was measured by assessing the pH of exhaled breath condensate; and airway symptoms were measured by the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-20 questionnaire. To assess personal air pollution exposure, the subjects used a passive-diffusion nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration-monitoring system during the 14 days before each assessment. The associations between NO2 and the airway outcomes were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test and the Chi-Square test. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01976039. RESULTS: Compared with clearance in healthy adult males, mucociliary clearance was decreased in 32% of the motorcyclists. Additionally, 64% of the motorcyclists had airway acidification and 92% experienced airway symptoms. The median personal NO2 exposure level was 75 mg/m3 for these subjects and a significant association was observed between NO2 and impaired mucociliary clearance (p = 0.036). CONCLUSION: Non-smoking commercial motorcyclists exhibit increased airway symptoms and airway acidification as well as decreased nasal mucociliary clearance, all of which are significantly associated with the amount of exposure to air pollution. PMID:25628001

  2. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    Using Nasal Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a ... Breathe in quickly while squeezing down on the pump bottle one time. Repeat in other nostril. Do ...

  3. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube) in place. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... kidney failure (can cause breath to smell like ammonia ) Diabetes (fruity or sweet chemical smell associated with ...

  4. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. ... emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part ...

  5. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  6. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a potentially life-threatening condition. Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolonged vomiting , especially ... renal failure Bowel obstruction (can cause breath to smell like feces) Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure (can cause ...

  7. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray ...

  8. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  9. Impaired E Prostanoid2 Expression and Resistance to Prostaglandin E2 in Nasal Polyp Fibroblasts from Subjects with Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katherine N; Raby, Benjamin A; Zhou, Xiaobo; Guo, Feng; Thibault, Derek; Baccarelli, Andreas; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bhattacharyya, Neil; Steinke, John W; Boyce, Joshua A; Laidlaw, Tanya M

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent, rapidly growing nasal polyps are hallmarks of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), although the mechanisms of polyp growth have not been identified. Fibroblasts are intimately involved in tissue remodeling, and the growth of fibroblasts is suppressed by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which elicits antiproliferative effects mediated through the E prostanoid (EP)2 receptor. We now report that cultured fibroblasts from the nasal polyps of subjects with AERD resist this antiproliferative effect. Fibroblasts from polyps of subjects with AERD resisted the antiproliferative actions of PGE2 and a selective EP2 agonist (P < 0.0001 at 1 μM) compared with nasal fibroblasts from aspirin-tolerant control subjects undergoing polypectomy or from healthy control subjects undergoing concha bullosa resections. Cell surface expression of the EP2 receptor protein was lower in fibroblasts from subjects with AERD than in fibroblasts from healthy control subjects and aspirin-tolerant subjects (P < 0.01 for both). Treatment of the fibroblasts with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, significantly increased EP2 receptor mRNA in fibroblasts from AERD and aspirin-tolerant subjects but had no effect on cyclooxygenase-2, EP4, and microsomal PGE synthase 1 (mPGES-1) mRNA levels. Histone acetylation (H3K27ac) at the EP2 promoter correlated strongly with baseline EP2 mRNA (r = 0.80; P < 0.01). These studies suggest that the EP2 promotor is under epigenetic control, and one explanation for PGE2 resistance in AERD is an epigenetically mediated reduction of EP2 receptor expression, which could contribute to the refractory nasal polyposis typically observed in this syndrome. PMID:26051534

  10. Nasal meatus plasty: a contribution to plastic reconstruction of the nasal valve during midfacial degloving.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kai J; Maier, Heinz; Wilde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Midfacial degloving is a proven method for easily accessing the midface, the nasal pyramid, the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses, the orbits, as well as the anterior skull base. Indications for this method of access mainly include tumour resections in the area of the midface, the septum, the maxillary sinus, the paranasal to the sphenoidal sinus as well as the clivus. In addition, this method of access allows for the exposure of the bony structures of the midface in the event of extensive fractures. In general, this method of access combines an incision in the oral vestibule and circular incisions in the nasal vestibule area in order to release the nasal pyramid. After removing the facial wall of the maxillary sinus, extensive exposure of the surgical site is possible. One disadvantage of this method of access is the difficult reconstruction of the nasal valve area, which often leads to cicatricial stenoses and difficulties with breathing through the nose. Furthermore, wound healing problems and osteoradionecrosis in the area of the lateral margin of the anterior nasal aperture after replantation of the facial wall of the maxillary sinus have been described, because in this area sufficient soft tissue coverage cannot be ensured when a conventional technique is used. We describe a soft tissue flap pedicled in the cranial and caudal directions in the nasal valve area which makes both the reconstruction of the nasal vestibule and sufficient soft tissue coverage of the anterior nasal aperture possible. PMID:26504717

  11. Effects of an external nasal dilator strip (ENDS) compared to xylometazolin nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Høyvoll, L R; Lunde, K; Li, Henrik S; Dahle, S; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Steinsvåg, S K

    2007-11-01

    Nasal blockage is a common complaint in Family Practice. Decongestive nosedrops are frequently employed therapeutic measures. Due to a considerable risk of abuse and side effects, alternatives are wanted. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent ENDS might represent an alternative to decongestive nose sprays (DNS). The effects of DNS (xylometazolin) and ENDS (BreatheRight) on subjective and objective nasal blockage were compared in 89 patients. Main outcome measures were recordings of nasal symptom scores on visual analogue scales (VAS), minimal cross-sectional areas (MCA) and nasal cavity volumes (NCV) as measured by acoustic rhinometry (AR), and peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF). ENDS significantly increased the MCA and the NCV in the anterior 0.0-3.0 cm of the nose compared to DNS, but had no effect on MCA from 3.0 to 5.4 cm behind the nostrils. In contrast to DNS, ENDS had no effect on the posterior NCV. ENDS and DNS gave comparable increase in nasal inspiratory flow as measured by PNIF, and in the subject's own experience of nasal obstruction. ENDS may represent an alternative to DNS as a measure against nasal blockage. PMID:17530269

  12. External nasal dilators: definition, background, and current uses

    PubMed Central

    Dinardi, Ricardo Reis; de Andrade, Cláudia Ribeiro; Ibiapina, Cássio da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to revise the literature about external nasal dilators (ENDs) as to their definition, history, and current uses. We reviewed journals in the PubMed and MEDLINE databases. The current uses hereby presented and discussed are physical exercise, nasal congestion and sleep, snoring, pregnancy, cancer, and healthy individuals. Numerous studies have shown that ENDs increase the cross-sectional area of the nasal valve, reducing nasal resistance and transnasal inspiratory pressure and stabilizing the lateral nasal vestibule, avoiding its collapse during final inspiration. These effects also facilitate breathing and are beneficial to patients with nasal obstruction. Furthermore, END use is simple, noninvasive, painless, affordable, and bears minimum risk to the user. Most studies have limited sample size and are mainly focused on physical exercise. In conclusion, ENDs seem useful, so further studies involving potential effects on the performance of physical tests and improvements in sleep quality are necessary, especially in children and teenagers. PMID:25419156

  13. Stereoscopic PIV measurements of flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.; Moore, S. M.

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the airflow characteristics within the nasal cavity with nasal high flow (NHF) therapy and during unassisted breathing is essential to understand the treatment's efficacy. The distribution and velocity of the airflow in the nasal cavity with and without NHF cannula flow has been investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at steady peak expiration and inspiration. In vivo breathing flows were measured and dimensionally scaled to reproduce physiological conditions in vitro. A scaled model of the complete nasal cavity was constructed in transparent silicone and airflow simulated with an aqueous glycerine solution. NHF modifies nasal cavity flow patterns significantly, altering the proportion of inspiration and expiration through each passageway and producing jets with in vivo velocities up to 17.0 ms-1 for 30 l/min cannula flow. Velocity magnitudes differed appreciably between the left and right sides of the nasal cavity. The importance of using a three-component measurement technique when investigating nasal flows has been highlighted.

  14. Dirhythmic breathing.

    PubMed

    Flemister, G; Goldberg, N B; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with severe chronic obstructive lung disease and recent respiratory failure are described in whom two distinct simultaneous respiratory rhythms were identified, one at 8 to 13 breaths per minute and the other at 39 to 65 per minute. Magnetometer measurements of thoracoabdominal motion together with simultaneous electromyograms of multiple inspiratory muscles suggested that both rhythms were the result of coordinated action of several inspiratory muscles. We suggest that this phenomenon, which we have called dirhythmic breathing, results from the conflicting influence upon respiratory centers and motoneurons of two or more stimuli, some favoring rapid shallow breaths and others slow deep breaths. PMID:7449504

  15. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    When you're short of breath, it's hard or uncomfortable for you to take in the oxygen your body needs. You may feel as if you're ... stuffy nose or hard exercise. But shortness of breath can also be a sign of a serious ...

  16. Automatic Recognition of Breathing Route During Sleep Using Snoring Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Yohichiro

    This letter classifies snoring sounds into three breathing routes (oral, nasal, and oronasal) with discriminant analysis of the power spectra and k-nearest neighbor method. It is necessary to recognize breathing route during snoring, because oral snoring is a typical symptom of sleep apnea but we cannot know our own breathing and snoring condition during sleep. As a result, about 98.8% classification rate is obtained by using leave-one-out test for performance evaluation.

  17. Paediatric nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohd Slim, Mohd Afiq; Dick, David; Trimble, Keith; McKee, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of nasal polyps. We present the case of a 17-month-old Caucasian patient with CF who presented with hypertelorism causing cycloplegic astigmatism, right-sided mucoid discharge, snoring and noisy breathing. Imaging suggested bilateral mucoceles in the ethmoid sinuses. Intraoperatively, bilateral soft tissue masses were noted, and both posterior choanae were patent. Polypectomy and bilateral mega-antrostomies were performed. Histological examination revealed inflammatory nasal polyposis typical of CF. The role of early functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) in children with CF nasal polyposis remains questionable as the recurrence rate is higher, and no improvement in pulmonary function has been shown. Our case, however, clearly demonstrates the beneficial upper airway symptom relief and normalisation of facial appearance following FESS in a child with this condition. PMID:27329094

  18. Nasal lift-nasal valve lift and nasal tip lift-preliminary results of a new technique using noninvasive self-retaining unidirectional nasal suspension with threads.

    PubMed

    Saban, Yves; Javier, De Benito; Massa, Michela

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nasal obstruction treatment, an alternative, no invasive technique is described. It consists in the suspension of the nasal valve or in the association of the suspension of the valve and rotation of the tip, through the placement of one or two absorbable threads, already known in aesthetic medicine. This technique allows to open the nasal valve and to correct the moderate closure of the nasolabial angle obtaining an immediate benefit of breathing. Functional improvement has been evaluated at regular intervals, that is, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then provided for every 6 months, through the use of a visual scale of 0/10 to 10/10. In our experience, the technique allows to obtain satisfactory results, avoiding more invasive techniques and postoperative recovery days. PMID:25536134

  19. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  20. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone nasal spray should not be used to ...

  1. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make the nasal wash solution. Do not use tap water for the nasal wash (unless boiled or filtered ... water. You may use: Distilled water Sterilized water Tap water that has been boiled for 1 minute (at ...

  2. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  3. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  4. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  5. Post-Nasal Drip

    MedlinePlus

    ... guaifenesin (Humibid®, Robitussin®) may also thin secretions. Nasal irrigations may alleviate thickened secretions. These can be performed ... device or a Water Pik® with a nasal irrigation nozzle. Warm water with baking soda or salt ( ...

  6. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  7. Nasal disease in relation to fitness of a pilot.

    PubMed

    Pickard, B H

    1984-05-01

    The nasal cavity and sinus system is extensive but its examination is limited. Listening to breathing and respiration can afford useful clues to underlying abnormality. Examination of the nasal cavity may reveal the pale swollen mucosa of allergic rhinitis or the overdeveloped lining seen in perennial rhinorrhoea and hypertropic rhinitis. Localised hypertrophy gives rise to the nasal polyp which usually forms in the region of the ethmoid sinus. Atrophic rhinitis is a destructive condition of the nasal lining. Sinusitis may be open or closed, presenting with localised pain and displacement of the eye in the case of frontal or ethmoidal abscess or mucocoele. Deformities of the external nose or nasal septum are often encountered during examination. Epistaxis may be caused by bleeding simply from Kiesselbach's vessels, or may be an early feature of telangiectasia or cardiovascular diseases. Tumors are rarely found but include papillomata and the mucous membrane melanoma. PMID:6732702

  8. The relationship between nasal obstruction and craniofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, R M; Gonzalez, C

    1989-12-01

    The relationship between nasal obstruction and craniofacial growth is unclear. The literature indicates that upper-airway compromise produces chronic mouth breathing, especially in the dolichocephalic (narrow-faced) child. It has been shown that a greater tendency exists toward the skeletal pattern associated with long face syndrome in dolichocephalic head types. Therefore, it becomes difficult to assess whether the long face syndrome is a cause or an effect of increased nasal airway resistance. Nevertheless, animal studies have demonstrated the development of typical craniofacial anomalies in experimentally induced nasal obstruction. Some of these changes are also noted to be reversed by removing the nasal obstruction. Although much of the concern for nasal obstruction and abnormal dentofacial growth has centered around adenotonsillar hypertrophy, other causes for nasal obstruction should be sought. Allergic rhinitis and choanal atresia also should be considered. Longitudinal data are lacking to support conclusively abnormal dentofacial growth as an indication for surgical intervention. Available literature would suggest, however, that relief of nasal obstruction should be attempted in an effort to establish a patent airway and decrease the possibility of abnormal craniofacial development. The more information we gain about nasal obstruction and abnormal dentofacial development, the greater our diagnostic ability becomes. We can now incorporate information from a thorough nasal-oral examination with rhinomanometry and cephalometrics to provide a rational treatment plan for these children. Future directions should investigate genetic influences on craniofacial morphology and growth. PMID:2587086

  9. Unsteady flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy measured by stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Nasal high flow (NHF) cannulae are used to deliver heated and humidified air to patients at steady flows ranging from 5 to 50 l/min. In this study, the flow velocities in the nasal cavity across the complete respiratory cycle during natural breathing and with NHF has been mapped in vitro using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). An anatomically accurate silicone resin model of a complete human nasal cavity was constructed using CT scan data and rapid prototyping. Physiological breathing waveforms were reproduced in vitro using Reynolds and Womersley number matching and a piston pump driven by a ball screw and stepper motor. The flow pattern in the nasal cavity with NHF was found to differ significantly from natural breathing. Velocities of 2.4 and 3.3 ms-1 occurred in the nasal valve during natural breathing at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively; however, on expiration, the maximum velocity of 3.8 ms-1 occurred in the nasopharynx. At a cannula flow rate of 30 l/min, maximal velocities of 13.6 and 16.5 ms-1 at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively, were both located in the cannula jet within the nasal valve. Results are presented that suggest the quasi-steady flow assumption is invalid in the nasal cavity during natural breathing; however, it was valid with NHF. Cannula flow has been found to continuously flush the nasopharyngeal dead space, which may enhance carbon dioxide removal and increase oxygen fraction.

  10. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth and between your teeth produce the bad odor. Other problems in your mouth, such as gum ... and medicines are associated with a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing ...

  11. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ... Flossing once a day helps get rid of particles wedged between your teeth. Also, visit your dentist ...

  12. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  13. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    Salt water washes; Nasal irrigation; Nasal lavage; Sinusitis - nasal wash ... by mixing: 3 teaspoons (tsp) canning or pickling salt (no iodine) 1 tsp baking soda 1 cup warm distilled, filtered, or boiled water To use the wash: Fill the device with ...

  14. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  15. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  16. Effects of tracheostomy breathing on brain and body temperatures in hyperthermic sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Laburn, H P; Mitchell, D; Mitchell, G; Saffy, K

    1988-01-01

    1. We measured rectal and hypothalamic temperature in sheep breathing nasally and via a tracheostomy, during hyperthermia resulting from exposure to a hot environment, exercise and fever. 2. In normothermic and hyperthermic sheep hypothalamic temperature was up to 1.0 degree C lower than rectal temperature when the sheep breathed nasally. Tracheostomy breathing abolished the rectal-hypothalamic temperature difference. 3. In sheep breathing via the tracheostomy and exposed to a dry-bulb temperature of 45-50 degrees C for 2 h, hypothalamic temperature exceeded rectal temperature by about 0.4 degrees C, and was significantly higher than that in sheep breathing nasally in the same environment. 4. During exercise on a treadmill and in the post-exercise period, the difference between hypothalamic and rectal temperature was abolished in the sheep while breathing through the tracheostomy, and rectal temperature rose to higher levels compared to those evident in the same activity while breathing nasally. 5. After an I.V. injection of 0.4 micrograms/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the difference between hypothalamic and rectal temperature again was abolished in the sheep when breathing through the tracheostomy, but rectal temperature rose significantly less compared to when breathing nasally. 6. Our results indicate that selective brain cooling depends on upper respiratory tract cooling in normo- and hyperthermic states in sheep. PMID:3254414

  17. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  18. Subchronic inhalation exposure to 2-ethyl-1-hexanol impairs the mouse olfactory bulb via injury and subsequent repair of the nasal olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Mio; Ito, Yuki; Sawada, Masato; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Himiko; Sakamoto, Tatsuo; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system can be a toxicological target of volatile organic compounds present in indoor air. Recently, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) emitted from adhesives and carpeting materials has been postulated to cause "sick building syndrome." Patients' symptoms are associated with an increased sense of smell. This investigation aimed to characterize the histopathological changes of the olfactory epithelium (OE) of the nasal cavity and the olfactory bulb (OB) in the brain, due to subchronic exposure to 2E1H. Male ICR mice were exposed to 0, 20, 60, or 150 ppm 2E1H for 8 h every day for 1 week, or 5 days per week for 1 or 3 months. After a 1-week exposure, the OE showed inflammation and degeneration, with a significant concentration-dependent reduction in the staining of olfactory receptor neurons and in the numbers of globose basal cells at ≥20 ppm. Regeneration occurred at 1 month along with an increase in the basal cells, but lymphocytic infiltration, expanded Bowman's glands, and a decrease in the olfactory receptor neurons were observed at 3 months. Intriguingly, the OB at 3 months showed a reduction in the diameters of the glomeruli and in the number of olfactory nerves and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons, but an increased number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive microglia in glomeruli. Accordingly, 2E1H inhalation induced degeneration of the OE with the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of 20 ppm. The altered number of functional cell components in the OB suggests that effects on olfactory sensation persist after subchronic exposure to 2E1H. PMID:27055686

  19. Inhalation of nasally derived nitric oxide modulates pulmonary function in humans.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, J O; Settergren, G; Gelinder, S; Lundberg, J M; Alving, K; Weitzberg, E

    1996-12-01

    The vasodilator gas nitric oxide (NO) is produced in the paranasal sinuses and is excreted continuously into the nasal airways of humans. This NO will normally reach the lungs with inspiration, especially during nasal breathing. We wanted to investigate the possible effects of low-dose inhalation of NO from the nasal airways on pulmonary function. The effects of nasal and oral breathing on transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) were studied in healthy subjects. Furthermore, we also investigated whether restoring low-dose NO inhalation would influence pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) and arterial oxygenation (PaO2) in intubated patients who are deprived of NO produced in the nasal airways. Thus, air derived from the patient's own nose was aspirated and led into the inhalation limb of the ventilator. In six out of eight healthy subjects tcPO2 was 10% higher during periods of nasal breathing when compared with periods of oral breathing. In six out of six long-term intubated patients PaO2 increased by 18% in response to the addition of nasal air samples. PVRI was reduced by 11% in four of 12 short-term intubated patients when nasal air was added to the inhaled air. The present study demonstrates that tcPO2 increases during nasal breathing compared with oral breathing in healthy subjects. Furthermore, in intubated patients, who are deprived of self-inhalation of endogenous NO. PaO2 increases and pulmonary vascular resistance may decrease by adding NO-containing air, derived from the patient's own nose, to the inspired air. The involvement of self-inhaled NO in the regulation of pulmonary function may represent a novel physiological principle, namely that of an enzymatically produced airborne messenger. Furthermore, our findings may help to explain one biological role of the human paranasal sinuses. PMID:8971255

  20. Phonatory Effects of Airway Dehydration: Preliminary Evidence for Impaired Compensation to Oral Breathing in Individuals with a History of Vocal Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Erickson, Elizabeth; Schneider, Sara; Hawes, Ashleigh

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Airway drying is detrimental to phonation and is posited to exacerbate vocal fatigue. However, limited research has demonstrated the adverse phonatory effects of dehydration in speakers reporting vocal fatigue. We compared the negative phonatory consequences of short-term oral breathing at low, moderate, and high humidity in individuals…

  1. Effect of Nasal Allergy Over Spirometric Parameters: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Poorey, Vijay Kumar; Soni, Smita; Thakur, Pooja; Gupta, Alok

    2016-03-01

    Nasal allergy is characterized by an IgE mediated inflammatory response of nasal mucosa to allergens and it has a close association with Asthma. Nasal allergy has been demonstrated to be a strong risk factor for the onset of asthma in adults. Spirometric parameters like Forced expiratory volume at timed interval of 1 s (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75 %) are impaired in patients with nasal allergy or allergic rhinitis. The FEF25-75 % has been evidenced to be a reliable marker of early bronchial impairment in nasal allergy. Nasal allergy may be considered as the first step of the progression of respiratory allergy towards asthma. It has been demonstrated that FEF25-75 % is useful in predicting the presence of airway hyper responsiveness.It may be a more sensitive indicator of chronic airway obstruction than FEV1 and is considered as a risk factor for the persistence of respiratory symptoms in asthmatic patients. The impact of allergic rhinitis or nasal allergy on asthma (ARIA) guidelines, clearly underlined the role of allergic rhinitis as risk factor for asthma development. The possible presence of spirometric abnormalities in patient with allergic rhinitis has been well documented. So keeping this in mind, present study is undertaken to evaluate the impairment of spirometric parameters, like FEV1, FEF25-75 %, and forced vital capacity, in patients with nasal allergy and to predict the presence of airway hyper responsiveness. PMID:27066401

  2. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    MedlinePlus

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  3. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    MedlinePlus

    ... breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead ...

  4. A reservoir nasal cannula improves protection given by oxygen during muscular exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Arlati, S; Rolo, J; Micallef, E; Sacerdoti, C; Brambilla, I

    1988-06-01

    We verified the utility of an oxygen economizer (Pendant Oxymizer) in assuring greater protection than nasal prongs against worsening of oxyhemoglobin resting desaturation (delta SaO2) induced by muscular exercise in 16 patients (ten with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and six with restrictive pulmonary disease). This worsening was quantified as desaturation surface accumulated within five minutes of exercise and was expressed in arbitrary units (au). Each patient carried out the same exercise three times, in a randomized fashion (breathing air or breathing supplemental oxygen [3 L/min] delivered by either nasal prongs or by oxygen economizer). In patients with obstructive disease, delta SaO2 was reduced from 38 +/- 12.0 au when they were breathing air to 18.1 +/- 11.7 au when breathing oxygen by nasal prongs (p less than 0.001) and to 10.1 +/- 9.5 au when breathing oxygen by economizer (p less than 0.001). In patients with restrictive disease, delta SaO2 was reduced from 35.6 +/- 9.9 au when breathing air to 14.9 +/- 10.2 au breathing oxygen by nasal prongs (p less than 0.01) and to 13.7 +/- 10.3 au breathing oxygen by economizer (p less than 0.01). The difference between breathing by economizer and nasal prongs was significant (paired t-test; p less than 0.01) only in patients with COPD. One explanation could lie in the different values of the respiratory rate, which was significantly greater in patients with restrictive disease (20.7 +/- 1.2 breaths per minute at rest and 25.8 +/- 1.5 with exercise) than in patients with obstructive disease (15.3 +/- 1.2 breaths per minute at rest and 20.8 +/- 1.4 with exercise). PMID:3371094

  5. Partially Withdrawn Nasotracheal Tube: An Alternative to the Nasal Trumpet.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hee; Choi, Young Jun; Choi, Won Cheul; Lee, Ui Lyong

    2015-01-01

    After 2-jaw surgery, difficulty in breathing through the mouth and the nose is common due to nasal airway obstruction, intraoral bleeding, and sometimes maxillomandibular fixation. A partially withdrawn nasotracheal tube can be used economically with equal efficacy to the nasopharyngeal airway to provide supplemental oxygen after 2-jaw surgery. PMID:26650496

  6. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath when you walk 150 ... or less Have been in the hospital for breathing problems recently Use oxygen at home, even if ...

  7. Treatment of nasal hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Simic, R; Vlahovic, A; Subarevic, V

    2009-10-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common soft tissue tumors of infancy. Almost 60% of these tumors develop in the head and neck region. Nasal hemangiomas, distort human physiognomy and leave long lasting psychological sequelae. Conservative approach (intralesional corticosteroids, laser) may accelerate involution. Proponents of an early surgery suggest that aesthetic improvement during a critical period in child development can be achieved. Fourteen patients with nasal hemangioma were treated during 5-year period (2003-2007) with intralesional corticosteroids, lenticular excision, open rhinoplasty excision, and circular excision with "purse string suture". The first line of treatment for large nasal hemangiomas is intralesional corticosteroids. Excision is indicated for small hemangiomas, while subtotal excision is preferable for large nasal hemangiomas. Circular excision and "purse string suture" is appropriate for prominent hemangiomas with predominant deep component. In our opinion surgery with maximal care for nasal architecture is the treatment option for nasal hemangioma. PMID:19656579

  8. Nasal vs oral intubation.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, L

    2003-05-01

    Both nasal and oral route for intubation have advantages and disadvantages. Oral intubation is easier to perform, faster and less painful than nasal intubation under direct laryngoscopy, while blind nasal intubation represents a good alternative in conscious patient, without sedation. In trauma patient, oral route should be preferred, with cervical immobilisation. By the contrary, nasal intubation can cause bleeding, retro-pharyngeal and turbinate bones injury, but it seems preferable in preventing laryngeal complications. Moreover nasal intubation seem to increase risk for sinusitis while, there is no clear advantage for any of the two routes, concerning nosocomial pneumonia, bacteriemia and otitis. Nevertheless nasal route increases comfort for the patient and decreases injury and necrosis of tongue and lips; tube fastening is simpler thus reducing accidental extubation. PMID:12768165

  9. Measurement of nitric oxide in human exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, S.M.; Spicer, C.W.; Ollison, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    This project was initiated to confirm the reliability of nitric oxide (NO) measurement in the breath matrix, using two different analytical techniques - ozone and luminol chemiluminescence - and to corroborate literature reports of elevated breath NO values. To measure peak oral and nasal NO levels, subjects performed slow vital capacity and breath holding maneuvers directly into the monitors through the mouth and the nose, respectively. Additional measurements were made using normal breathing techniques. Initial interferent tests indicate that measured NO signals are real and are not confounded by measurement artifacts. Similar results were obtained using the two independent analytical methods in dry or humid air. The NO signal was unaffected by maximum concentrations of potential breath interferents, such as sulfur compounds and alkenes. The measured breath NO concentrations were greater than typical room air levels and differed significantly with the breathing technique used. During these tests room air averaged 4-5 ppb NO. Peak oral NO levels were 4.3 {+-} 1.5 ppb during a slow vital capacity maneuver and 8.0 {+-} 5.0 ppb during a breath holding maneuver. By contrast, higher peak nasal NO levels were measured for both slow vital capacity (17.8 {+-} 7.8 ppb) and breath holding maneuvers (45.4 {+-} 29.5 ppb).

  10. Investigation of the vascular reaction of the nasal mucosa in cosmonauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakovleva, I. Y.; Baranova, V. P.

    1982-01-01

    Rhinopneumometric examinations in 3 positions of the body were undertaken in 36 cosmonauts aged 25 to 45 years, 14 of whom participated in space flights of various lengths. The nasal vascular response standards were defined in persons of the group examined. A subjective characteristic of the nasal vascular, reactions arising during the flight is provided. Examinations of 14 people were performed before and after the space flight. The rise of intranasal resistance in the horizontal body position permits forecasting different degrees of nasal breathing disturbances during a period of acute adaptation to weightlessness owing to vasomotor alterations of the nasal mucous membrane.

  11. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  12. The crooked nasal tip.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jeremy; Adamson, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Successful treatment of the crooked nasal tip includes proper analysis and assessment, employment of the proper techniques, reaching ideal tip dynamics, and close follow-up. Both the caudal septum and the nasal tip cartilages must be addressed. When executed properly, satisfaction should be high for both the patient and the surgeon. PMID:22028009

  13. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation Improves Breathing-Swallowing Interaction of Ventilator Dependent Neuromuscular Patients: A Prospective Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Garguilo, Marine; Lejaille, Michèle; Vaugier, Isabelle; Orlikowski, David; Terzi, Nicolas; Lofaso, Frédéric; Prigent, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory involvement in neuromuscular disorders may contribute to impaired breathing-swallowing interactions, swallowing disorders and malnutrition. We investigated whether the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) controlled by the patient could improve swallowing performances in a population of neuromuscular patients requiring daytime NIV. Methods Ten neuromuscular patients with severe respiratory failure requiring extensive NIV use were studied while swallowing without and with NIV (while ventilated with a modified ventilator allowing the patient to withhold ventilation as desired). Breathing-swallowing interactions were investigated by chin electromyography, cervical piezoelectric sensor, nasal flow recording and inductive plethysmography. Two water-bolus sizes (5 and 10ml) and a textured yogurt bolus were tested in a random order. Results NIV use significantly improved swallowing fragmentation (defined as the number of respiratory interruption of the swallowing of a single bolus) (p = 0.003) and breathing-swallowing synchronization (with a significant increase of swallows followed by an expiration) (p <0.0001). Patient exhibited piecemeal swallowing which was not influenced by NIV use (p = 0.07). NIV use also significantly reduced dyspnea during swallowing (p = 0.04) while preserving swallowing comfort, regardless of bolus type. Conclusion The use of patient controlled NIV improves swallowing parameters in patients with severe neuromuscular respiratory failure requiring daytime NIV, without impairing swallowing comfort. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01519388 PMID:26938617

  14. An investigation on airflow in disordered nasal cavity and its corrected models by tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. K.; Chung, S. K.

    2004-06-01

    Knowledge of airflow characteristics in nasal cavities is essential to understand the physiology and pathology aspects of nasal breathing. Several studies have utilized physical models of the healthy nasal cavity to investigate the relationship between nasal anatomy and airflow. Since the final goal of these works is their contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of nasal diseases, therefore, the next step in this topic must be followed by the studies for disordered nasal cavities. In this paper, airflows in normal and abnormal nasal cavities and surgically created models, which simulate surgical treatment, are investigated experimentally by PIV. High-resolution computerized tomogram data and careful manipulation of the model surface by the ear, nose and throat doctor provide more sophisticated nasal cavity models. The correlation based correction PIV algorithm with window offset is used for PIV flow analysis. Average and RMS distributions in sagittal and coronal sections are obtained for inspiratory and expiratory nasal airflows. Comparisons in nasal airflows for both normal and abnormal cases are also examined. Airflow characteristics that are related to the abnormalities in the nasal cavity are proposed. In the case of simulations of surgical operations, velocity and RMS distributions in coronal section change locally, this may cause some difficulties in physiologic functions of noses and may hurt mucosal surface.

  15. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  16. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  17. Pharmacotherapy of nasal disease.

    PubMed

    Mygind, N

    1985-01-01

    Rhinitis may be classified as infectious (purulent), seasonal allergic, perennial allergic, perennial nonallergic (vasomotor) and nasal polyps. Pharmacotherapy can be local or systemic. A variety of compounds are available, including alpha adrenergic agonists, mast cell stabilizing agents, Beta-2 agonists, antihistamines, cholinergic antagonists and corticosteroids. In terms of histamine receptors, H1 receptors predominate in the epithelium and glands but both H1 and H2 receptors are present in nasal blood vessels. Trigeminus-reflex mediated nasal secretions, can be treated by parasympatholytic drugs. PMID:2888012

  18. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Shortness of breath Shortness of breath E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... oxygen your baby gets. Causes of shortness of breath during pregnancy Early pregnancy In the first few ...

  19. What Controls Your Breathing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  20. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  1. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than a minute before a child regains consciousness and resumes breathing normally. Breath-holding spells can ... spells cause kids to stop breathing and lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ...

  2. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  3. Methodological Issues of Sample Collection and Analysis of Exhaled Breath

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recommended standardized procedures have been developed for measurement of exhaled lower respiratory nitric oxide (NO) and nasal NO. It would be desirable to develop similar guidelines for the sampling of exhaled breath related to other compounds. For such systemic volatile o...

  4. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Mometasone nasal spray is in a class of ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  5. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve sneezing and a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is ... comes as a liquid to spray in the nose. Olopatadine nasal spray is usually sprayed in each ...

  6. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to relieve sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused ... treat symptoms (e.g., sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Budesonide nasal spray ...

  7. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is in a class of ... Olopatadine nasal spray controls the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, but does not cure these condition. Continue to ...

  8. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  9. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  10. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  11. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... prescribed by your doctor.Ciclesonide nasal spray is only for use in the nose. Do not swallow ...

  12. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction. PMID:27400845

  13. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  14. Nasal bots...a fascinating world!

    PubMed

    Angulo-Valadez, Carlos E; Scholl, Philip J; Cepeda-Palacios, Ramón; Jacquiet, Philippe; Dorchies, Philippe

    2010-11-24

    Larvae causing obligatory myiasis are numerous and they may affect cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, wounds, nasopharyngeal cavities (nasal bots), internal organs and the digestive tract (bots) of domestic and wild animals and humans as well. Nasal bots belong to the Family Oestridae, Subfamily Oestrinae, which includes several important genera: Oestrus, Kirkioestrus, and Gedoelstia infecting Artiodactyla (except Cervidae) in Africa and Eurasia, Cephenemyia and Pharyngomyia infecting Cervidae, Rhinoestrus infecting horses, Cephalopina infecting camels, Pharyngobolus infecting African elephants, and Tracheomyia infecting Australian kangaroos. Nasal bots are widespread in Mediterranean and tropical areas and in affected animals they induce sneezing and nasal discharge which may become caked with dust making breathing very difficult. The aforementioned species of larvae are host-specific but sometimes the may be deposited in human eyes inducing a painful opthalmomyiasis of short duration. The first fascinating trait of these parasites is the very efficient morphological and biological adaptations to parasitism they show either as larvae or as adults, in order to facilitate their survival and search for a suitable host. Nasal bots have reached different degrees of complexity in their life cycles. Indeed, while for some species (e.g., Oestrus ovis, Rhinoestrus usbekistanicus) larvae are injected by flies directly into nostrils and develop in the sinuses before being ejected for external pupation, some other species migrate from eyes to blood before returning to nasal cavities either through the ethmoid bone (Gedoelstia hässleri) or via lungs and bronchi (Gedoelstia cristata). Moreover, larvae are very well-adapted to their environment being able to undergo through hypobiosis either inside or outside the host, according to the climatic environmental conditions and seasonality. The second fascinating trait of nasal bots is related to host behavioural and immune

  15. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients. PMID:26802697

  16. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bachiega, Joanna Carolina; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Laranja, Lorena Tristão; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. RESULTS: There was a significantly greater number of boys with the mouth-breathing pattern than girls. A total of 23.6% of the participants had no mouth odor, 12.7% had mild odor, 12.7% had moderate odor and 50.9% had strong odor. There was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of halitosis was high among the children evaluated, and there was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. PMID:21808855

  17. Alterations in Maxillary Sinus Volume among Oral and Nasal Breathers

    PubMed Central

    Agacayak, Kamil Serkan; Gulsun, Belgin; Koparal, Mahmut; Atalay, Yusuf; Aksoy, Orhan; Adiguzel, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral breathing causes many changes in the facial anatomical structures in adult patients. In this study we aimed to determine the effects of long-term oral breathing (>5 years) on the maxillary sinus volumes among adult male patients. Material/Methods We accessed medical records of 586 patients who had undergone cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for any reason between September 2013 and April 2014. Patients who had undergone cone-beam dental volumetric tomography scans for any reason and who had answered a questionnaire about breathing were screened retrospectively. Cone beam dental volumetric tomography (I-Cat, Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) was used to take the images of the maxillo-facial area at a setting of 120 kVp and 3.7 mA. This study involved male patients older than 21 years of age. Results The study included a total of 239 male patients, of which 68 were oral breathers and 171 were nasal breathers. The mean age of the oral breathers was 48.4 years and that of the nasal breathers was 46.7 years and the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The mean maxillary sinus volumes of the oral and nasal breathers were 9043.49±1987.90 and 10851.77±2769.37, respectively, and the difference in maxillary sinus volume between the 2 groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The volume of maxillary sinus in oral breathers (>5 years) was significantly lower than in nasal breathers, but it remains unclear whether this is due to malfunctioning of the nasal cavity or due to the underlying pathological condition. PMID:25553770

  18. Deposition of radon progeny in nonhuman primate nasal airways

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Morgan, K.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Information on aerosol deposition patterns in the human respiratory tract is needed to improve health risk estimates for exposure to airborne radon progeny. To investigate this, deposition of {sup 220}Rn progeny in Rhesus monkey nasal casts was examined. A substantial fraction of the inhaled ultrafine particles are deposited in the nasal cast. Deposition efficiency increases with decreasing particle size, reaching a maximum value of 80% for particles 1.7 nm in diameter. Breathing flow rate has a minimal effect on deposition efficiency. Deposition efficiencies for particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter are similar for monkey and human nasal casts. Equations based on turbulent diffusion can be fitted to these data for either inspirational or expirational flow. These mathematical expressions will be useful for modifying the inhaled particle deposition and dosimetry models. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab (MHB)

  19. Reconstructive procedures for disturbed functions within the upper airway: pharyngeal breathing/snoring

    PubMed Central

    Verse, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Breathing disorders which have their origin within the pharynx mainly occur during sleep. These so-called obstructive sleep-related breathing disorders include three different disturbances which have to be distinguished properly: simple snoring, upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Each disturbance requires a different treatment. Simple snoring does not affect the physical health of the snorer himself, but often leads to social problems due to the annoying character of the breathing sounds. Appropriate treatment modalities are oral devices and transcutaneous or ttransmucosal electrical stimulation of the muscles of the floor of the mouth via surface electrodes. As reconstructive surgical procedures adenotomies, tonsillectomies, tonsillotomies, or adenotonsillectomies are successfully used in children. Moreover, in adults radiofrequency treatments of the tonsils, the soft palate and of the base of tongue, as well as uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) and palatal implants are adequate treatments for simple snoring. Adequate therapies for UARS and mild OSA (less than 20 breathing events per hour of sleep) are oral appliances. Nasal continuos positive airway pressure (NCPAP) ventilation is a very successful treatment modality, but shows low compliance in these patients, as daytime symptoms like excessive sleepiness or or impaired cognitive functions are often unincisive in patients with mild OSA. Reconstructive procedures like UPPP, radiofrequency surgery of the tonsils or the base of tongue, hyoid suspension, mandibular osteotomy with genioglossus advancement (MO) are successful treatment options either as isolated procedures or in combination within so-called multi-level surgery concepts. Goldstandard for the treatment of moderate to severe OSA is the nCPAP ventilation. All patients should at least try this treatment modality. Only in the rare cases of nCPAP failure (2%) and in the

  20. Mice lacking brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (GLS1) have impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission, altered breathing, disorganized goal-directed behavior and die shortly after birth

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Justine; Darmon, Michèle; Conjard, Agnès; Chuhma, Nao; Ropert, Nicole; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Foutz, Arthur S.; Parrot, Sandrine; Miller, Gretchen M.; Jorisch, Renée; Polan, Jonathan; Hamon, Michel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitter glutamate has been thought to derive mainly from glutamine via the action of glutaminase type 1 (GLS1). To address the importance of this pathway in glutamatergic transmission, we knocked out GLS1 in mice. The insertion of a STOP cassette by homologous recombination produced a null allele that blocked transcription, encoded no immunoreactive protein and abolished GLS1 enzymatic activity. Null mutants were slightly smaller, were deficient in goal-directed behavior, hypoventilated and died in the first post-natal day. No gross or microscopic defects were detected in peripheral organs or in the central nervous system. In cultured neurons from the null mutants, miniature EPSC amplitude and duration were normal; however, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs decayed more rapidly with sustained 10 Hz stimulation, consistent with an observed reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release. Because of this activity-dependent impairment in glutamatergic transmission, we surmised that respiratory networks, which require temporal summation of synaptic input, would be particularly affected. We found that the amplitude of inspirations was decreased in vivo, chemosensitivity to CO2 was severely altered, and the frequency of pacemaker activity recorded in the respiratory generator in the Pre-Bötzinger complex, a glutamatergic brainstem network that can be isolated in vitro, was increased. Our results show that while alternate pathways to GLS1 glutamate synthesis support baseline glutamatergic transmission, the GLS1 pathway is essential for maintaining the function of active synapses, and so the mutation is associated with impaired respiratory function, abnormal goal-directed behavior and neonatal demise. PMID:16641247

  1. Nasal vaccine innovation.

    PubMed

    Jabbal-Gill, Inderjit

    2010-12-01

    The current vaccine market is gaining momentum in the development of alternative administration routes namely intranasal, oral, topical, pulmonary, vaginal, and rectal; the nasal route offers the most promising opportunity for vaccine administration. It can enhance convenience, safety, elicit both local and systemic immune responses; thus potentially provide protection from pathogens at the site of entry. Nasal vaccine innovation comes with both opportunities and challenges. The innovative strategies used by industry and researchers to overcome the hurdles are discussed in this article: these include live-attenuated vaccines, adjuvants, mucoadhesives, particulate delivery systems, virus-like particles, vaccine manufacture, challenges of regulatory authorities, and the nasal vaccine impact on market potential. Critical issues for effective nasal vaccination are the antigen-retention period that enables its interaction with the lymphatic system and choice of an adjuvant that is nontoxic and induces the required immune response. Co-adjuvanting by means of a mucoadhesive technology addresses some of these issues. ChiSys(®), a natural bioadhesive with proven intranasal safety profile, has already demonstrated efficacy for several nasally delivered vaccines including norovirus. With the looming threat of a pandemic, alternatives such as intranasal vaccination will ultimately facilitate greater public compliance and rapid mass global vaccination. PMID:21047271

  2. Nasal highflow improves ventilation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bräunlich, Jens; Köhler, Marcus; Wirtz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal highflow (NHF) provides a warmed and humidified air stream up to 60 L/min. Recent data demonstrated a positive effect in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, especially when caused by pneumonia. Preliminary data show a decrease in hypercapnia in patients with COPD. Therefore, NHF should be evaluated as a new ventilatory support device. This study was conducted to assess the impact of different flow rates on ventilatory parameters in patients with COPD. Materials and methods This interventional clinical study was performed with patients suffering from severe COPD. The aim was to characterize flow-dependent changes in mean airway pressure, breathing volumes, breathing frequency, and decrease in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Mean airway pressure was measured in the nasopharyngeal space (19 patients). To evaluate breathing volumes, we used a polysomnographic device (18 patients). All patients received 20 L/min, 30 L/min, 40 L/min, and 50 L/min and – to illustrate the effects – nasal continuous positive airway pressure and nasal bilevel positive airway pressure. Capillary blood gas analyses were performed in 54 patients with hypercapnic COPD before and two hours after the use of NHF. We compared the extent of decrease in pCO2 when using 20 L/min and 30 L/min. Additionally, comfort and dyspnea during the use of NHF were surveyed. Results NHF resulted in a minor flow dependent increase in mean airway pressure. Tidal volume increased, and breathing rate decreased. The calculated minute volume decreased under NHF breathing. In spite of this fact, hypercapnia decreased with increasing flow (20 L/min vs 30 L/min). Additionally, an improvement in dyspnea was observed. The rapid shallow breathing index shows a decrease when using NHF. Conclusion NHF leads to a flow-dependent reduction in pCO2. This is most likely achieved by a washout of the respiratory tract and a functional reduction in dead space. In summary, NHF enhances effectiveness of

  3. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  4. Nasal reconstruction after epithelioma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camps, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present our procedure for the treatment, histopathological diagnosis, and resection of skin cancer in the nasal pyramid and its subsequent reconstruction. Because we are dealing with the most important anatomical feature of the face our goal is an aesthetic reconstruction [2,4] according to the anatomical subunits criterion of Burget [3]. First, a histopathological diagnosis is made to determine the nature of the tumor. Then, we proceed with the resection according to the Mohs Micrographic Surgery [1,5,7]. Then we begin with the first step of the nasal reconstruction. PMID:11568830

  5. Snoring and Nasal Congestion

    MedlinePlus

    ... and soft palate. This negative pressure increases the vibration of these "noise-makers" (the uvula and soft ... is generally considered the noisy breathing caused by vibrations of the upper airway during sleep. In contrast ...

  6. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... other symptoms such as nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Zolmitriptan is in a class of ... stomach pain sudden weight loss paleness or blue color of the fingers and toes shortness of breath ...

  7. Sumatriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes are accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan is in a class of ... stomach pain sudden weight loss paleness or blue color of the fingers and toes shortness of breath ...

  8. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  9. Impact of nasal obstruction on sleep quality: a community-based study of women.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Caroline; Jonsson, Lars; Holmström, Mats; Svensson, Malin; Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny; Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the impact of self-reported nasal obstruction on sleep quality in women. A community-based sample of 400 women underwent a full night of polysomnography. Airway diseases, allergies and sleep-related symptoms were assessed by questionnaires. Women with subjective nasal obstruction were subdivided into three groups: persistent nasal obstruction (PNO, n = 46), hay fever (n = 88) and nasal obstruction at night (NON, n = 30). Sleep problems and related daytime symptoms were most prevalent among women with NON. After adjusting for age, BMI, smoking and asthma, NON was an independent predictor of 'Difficulties inducing sleep due to nasal obstruction' [adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 89.5 (27.0-296.7)], 'Snoring' [4.2 (1.7-10.2)], 'Sweating at night' [2.6 (1.1-6.1)], 'Difficulties maintaining sleep' [2.7 (1.2-6.2)], and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath' [32.2 (8.7-119.1)]. 'Dry mouth on awakening' [7.7 (3.2-18.4)], 'Waking up unrefreshed' [2.7 (1.2-6.0)], 'Excessive daytime sleepiness' [2.6 (1.1-6.0)], and 'Daytime nasal obstruction' [12.2 (4.8-31.2)] were also associated with NON. Persistent nasal obstruction and hay fever were both associated with some reported sleep problems due to an overlap with NON. When women with NON were excluded, only 'Daytime nasal obstruction' was still significantly associated with PNO, while hay fever was associated with 'Daytime nasal obstruction' and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath'. There were no significant differences in objectively measured sleep variables between any of the three subgroups and the study cohort. Self-reported nasal obstruction at night in women has a significant effect on several subjective day- and nighttime symptoms, but it does not appear to affect objectively measured sleep quality. PMID:24792065

  10. Clinical implications for breath-powered powder sumatriptan intranasal treatment.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Stewart J

    2013-09-01

    The acute treatment of migraine requires matching patient need to drug and formulation. In particular, nausea and vomiting, quick time to peak intensity, and the common gastroparesis of migraineurs, all call for a variety of non-oral formulations for treatment of attacks. A novel breath-powered powder sumatriptan intranasal treatment offers an improvement, at least in pharmacokinetics, over conventional liquid nasal sumatriptan spray. The device for delivery in this breath-powered nasal sumatriptan uses natural nose anatomy to close the soft palate and propel the sumatriptan high up in the nasal cavity on one side with bidirectional airflow coming out the other side. This approach has the potential to reduce adverse events and improve efficacy. Phase 3 data on this system are in press at the time of this writing and results appear promising. The clinical role for a fast acting non-oral nasal formulation will be in those for whom tablets are bound to fail, that is, in the setting of nausea and vomiting or when the time to central sensitization, allodynia, and disabling migraine is too short for the patient to respond to a tablet. This review provides a clinical perspective on the breath-powered powder sumatriptan intranasal treatment. PMID:23809006

  11. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide nasal spray is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... Ciclesonide comes as a solution (liquid) to spray in the nose. It is usually sprayed in each nostril once daily. Use ciclesonide at around the same time every day. Follow the ...

  12. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ... and herbal products you are taking, or have recently taken, or ...

  13. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  14. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and stomach pain caused by decreased blood flow to the intestines). Your doctor may tell you not to use zolmitriptan nasal spray.tell your doctor if you smoke or are overweight; if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or liver or ...

  15. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, he or she should give you your first naloxone dose and then call 911 immediately. After receiving the naloxone nasal spray, ... the person on their side (recovery position) and call for emergency medical ... after giving the first naloxone dose. If the person does not respond ...

  16. Barotraumatic orbital emphysema of rhinogenic origin in a breath-hold diver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, A; Delehaye, E; Cau, M; Cosso, L

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a well-recognized complication of fractures involving the orbit. Commonly, it occurs when high pressure develops in nasal cavity as during nose blowing, coughing or Valsalva's maneuver and usually occurs in the subcutaneous tissues. We report the case of a young breath-hold diver who developed spontaneous, non compressive orbital emphysema during underwater fishing, with a maximal depth of 25-30 meters in the Sardinian sea. He was otherwise healthy, without previous cranio-facial trauma and nasosinusal diseases or surgery were not present in the history. When he was referred to our attention the patient presented right eyelid ptosis but diplopia and vision impairment were absent. Computer tomography scans showed subcutaneous air in the right upper eyelid and around the eyeball, particularly near the orbit's roof but optic nerve area, intraconal, was free of air. A dehiscence in lamina papyracea was evident. In our opinion, this has been the point of air entry into the orbit. A supportive therapy was advised and two weeks later the emphysema was recovered completely and the subject was symptoms free. The literature has been revised and to our knowledge no previous cases of barotraumatic orbital emphysema, in a breath-hold diver, are referred. PMID:18619111

  17. Comparing Thoracic and Intra-Nasal Pressure Transients to Monitor Active Odor Sampling during Odor-Guided Decision Making in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Reisert, Johannes; Golden, Glen J.; Matsumura, Koichi; Smear, Matt; Rinberg, Dmitry; Gelperin, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Recording of physiological parameters in behaving mice has seen an immense increase over recent years driven by, for example, increased miniaturization of recording devices. One parameter particularly important for odorant-driven behaviors is the breathing frequency, since the latter dictates the rate of odorant delivery to the nasal cavity and the olfactory receptor neurons located therein. New Method Typically, breathing patterns are monitored by either measuring the breathing-induced temperature or pressure changes in the nasal cavity. Both require the implantation of a nasal cannula and tethering of the mouse to either a cable or tubing. To avoid these limitations we used an implanted pressure sensor which reads the thoracic pressure and transmits the data telemetrically, thus making it suitable for experiments which require a freely moving animal. Results Mice performed a Go/NoGo odorant-driven behavioral task with the implanted pressure sensor, which proved to work reliably to allow recording of breathing signals over several weeks from a given animal. Comparison to existing Method(s) We simultaneously recorded the thoracic and nasal pressure changes and found that measuring the thoracic pressure change yielded similar results compared to measurements of nasal pressure changes. Conclusion Telemetrically recorded breathing signals are a feasible method to monitor odorant-guided behavioral changes in breathing rates. Its advantages are most significant when recording from a freely moving animal over several weeks. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods to record breathing patterns are discussed. PMID:24056232

  18. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Key points Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common and the severity increases as pregnancy progresses. Frequent snoring, older age and high pre-pregnancy body mass index (>25 kg⋅m−2) could be reliable indicators for SDB in early pregnancy. SDB screening tools, including questionnaires, used in the nonpregnant population have poor predictive ability in pregnancy. Accumulating evidence suggests that SDB during pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because several studies failed to adjust for potential maternal confounders and have other study limitations. There are no pregnancy-specific practice guidelines for SDB treatment. Many clinicians and practices follow recommendations for the treatment in the general population. Women with pre-existing SDB might need to be reassessed, particularly after the sixth month of pregnancy, because symptoms can worsen with nasal congestion and weight gain. Educational aims To highlight the prevalence and severity of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in the pregnant population. To inform readers about risk factors for SDB in pregnancy. To explore the impact of SDB on adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, and biological pathways for associated adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. To introduce current management options for SDB in pregnancy, including medical and behavioural approaches. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the

  19. Click production during breathing in a sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Frantzis, Alexandros; Alexiadou, Paraskevi; Madsen, Peter T.; Møhl, Bertel

    2005-12-01

    A sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) was observed at the surface with above- and underwater video and synchronized underwater sound recordings. During seven instances the whale ventilated its lungs while clicking. From this observation it is inferred that click production is achieved by pressurizing air in the right nasal passage, pneumatically disconnected from the lungs and the left nasal passage, and that air flows anterior through the phonic lips into the distal air sac. The capability of breathing and clicking at the same time is unique among studied odontocetes and relates to the extreme asymmetry of the sperm whale sound-producing forehead.

  20. Nasal Mucociliary Clearance in Adenoid Hypertrophy and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Hasmet

    2015-12-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), which exists in many systems, is the first defensive mechanism of the human body. Nasal MCC has an important role in transporting the secretions of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses along with the trapped inhaled pathogens to the nasopharynx. Physiologic or pathologic situations that effect nasal MCC, such as temperature, humidity, nasal obstruction, allergic rhinitis, chronic infections, etc., lead to impaired MCC and related local or circumjacent system disorders. With this perspective, when a unified airway with a multiple disease principle is considered, investigating the relationship between adenoid hypertrophy (AH), otitis media with effusion (OME) and nasal MCC is logical. In this review, histological and physiologic properties of nasal MCC and its possible role involving pathologic situations such as AH and OME is discussed together with recent literature findings. PMID:26496764

  1. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... confronted Breath holding spells are more common in children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells (parents ...

  2. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  3. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  4. Characterizing adult human nasal airway dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1994-11-01

    Respiratory tract models used in calculating radiation dose from exposure to inhaled radioactive aerosols have only recently focused attention on the importance of the nasal airways (NAs). Because the NAs are the first tissues of the respiratory tract available for aerosol deposition in normally nose-breathing people, any deposition of aerosol in this anatomical structure will reduce the amounts available to be deposited in the remainder of the respiratory tract. Thus, uncertainties in estimating the deposition fractions in the NAs will propagate throughout the remainder of the respiratory tract, creating errors in the calculated dose estimates. Additionally, there is evidence that the NAs are also at risk for induction of cancer from exposure to certain occupational aerosols such as wood dust, leather dust, chromium, and nickel. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct an anatomical study to assess the variabilities in NA dimensions.

  5. Fundamentals of breath malodour.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Roldán, S; Herrera, D

    2001-11-15

    Breath malodour is a condition that has health and social implications. The origin of breath malodour problems are related to both systemic and oral conditions. The advice of dental professionals for treatment of this condition occurs with regularity since 90% of breath odor problems emanate from the oral cavity. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the etiology of breath odor, its prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for the condition. PMID:12167916

  6. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en ... Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  7. What is normal nasal airflow? A computational study of 22 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nasal airflow is essential for functioning of the human nose. Given individual variation in nasal anatomy, there is yet no consensus what constitutes normal nasal airflow patterns. We attempt to obtain such information that is essential to differentiate disease-related variations. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated nasal airflow in 22 healthy subjects during resting breathing. Streamline patterns, airflow distributions, velocity profiles, pressure, wall stress, turbulence, and vortical flow characteristics under quasi-steady state were analyzed. Patency ratings, acoustically measured minimum cross-sectional area (MCA), and rhinomanometric nasal resistance (NR) were examined for potential correlations with morphological and airflow-related variables. Results Common features across subjects included: >50% total pressure-drop reached near the inferior turbinate head; wall shear stress, NR, turbulence energy, and vorticity were lower in the turbinate than in the nasal valve region. However, location of the major flow path and coronal velocity distributions varied greatly across individuals. Surprisingly, on average, more flow passed through the middle than the inferior meatus and correlated with better patency ratings (r=-0.65, p<0.01). This middle flow percentage combined with peak post-vestibule nasal heat loss and MCA accounted for >70% of the variance in subjective patency ratings and predicted patency categories with 86% success. Nasal index correlated with forming of the anterior dorsal vortex. Expected for resting breathing, the functional impact for local and total turbulence, vorticity, and helicity was limited. As validation, rhinomanometric NR significantly correlated with CFD simulations (r=0.53, p<0.01). Conclusion Significant variations of nasal airflow found among healthy subjects; Key features may have clinically relevant applications. PMID:24664528

  8. Noninvasive detection of expiratory flow limitation in COPD patients during nasal CPAP.

    PubMed

    Dellacà, R L; Rotger, M; Aliverti, A; Navajas, D; Pedotti, A; Farré, R

    2006-05-01

    The difference between mean inspiratory and expiratory respiratory reactance (delta(rs)) measured with forced oscillation technique (FOT) at 5 Hz allows the detection of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients breathing spontaneously. This aim of this study was to evaluate whether this approach can be applied to COPD patients during noninvasive pressure support. Delta(rs) was measured in seven COPD patients subjected to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) at 0, 4, 8 and 12 cmH2O in sitting and supine positions. Simultaneous recording of oesophageal pressure and the Mead and Whittenberger (M-W) method provided a reference for scoring each breath as flow-limited (FL), non-flow-limited (NFL) or indeterminate (I). For each patient, six consecutive breaths were analysed for each posture and CPAP level. According to M-W scoring, 47 breaths were FL, 166 NFL and 51 I. EFL scoring using FOT coincided with M-W in 94.8% of the breaths. In the four patients who were FL in at least one condition, delta(rs) was reduced with increasing CPAP. These data suggest that the forced oscillation technique may be useful in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients on nasal pressure support by identifying continuous positive airway pressure levels that support breathing without increasing lung volume, which in turn increase the work of breathing and reduce muscle effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:16446315

  9. Posttraumatic Nasal Deformities: Correcting the Crooked and Saddle Nose.

    PubMed

    Chua, Dennis Yu Kim; Park, Stephen S

    2015-06-01

    The nose is frequently traumatized in facial injuries and this often results from motor vehicle accidents, sports-related injuries, and altercations. Subsequently, posttraumatic nasal deformity is one of the most common reasons that patients seek consultation in the doctor's office. Depending on the type of nasal deformities, this can result in functional impairment and aesthetic problems. Two challenging problems to be addressed in the posttraumatic nose include the crooked nose deformity and the saddle nose deformity. The numerous publications on these two topics attest to the exacting surgical expertise required in its treatment. The key features in management of these conditions are discussed further. PMID:26126222

  10. Management of the Nasal Valve.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Dane M; Casanueva, Fernando J; Cook, Ted A

    2016-08-01

    The nasal valve is an important consideration in patients presenting with nasal obstruction. Controversy exists regarding the anatomy, terminology, evaluation, and management of the nasal valve. Innumerable techniques with variable effects have been described in the literature. The evidence qualifying these techniques has been plentiful, though often lacking in quality. This article reviews the controversial aspects of nasal valve management applying the best available evidence to help clarify potential areas of confusion. Future research using standardized definitions, consistent methodologies, and validated outcome measures are necessary to improve the quality of evidence and impact surgical decision-making. PMID:27400837

  11. Assessment of nasal patency after rhinoplasty through the Glatzel mirror

    PubMed Central

    de Pochat, Victor Diniz; Alonso, Nivaldo; Mendes, Rogério Rafael da Silva; Gravina, Paula Rocha; Cronenberg, Eduardo Valente; Meneses, José Valber Lima

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Objective evaluation of nasal function is a constant challenge for plastic surgeons, otolaryngologists, and allergists. The modified Glatzel mirror can evaluate nasal expiratory flow; however, there is little information on this method and its use in the measurement of nasal patency after surgical procedures. Objective: To compare, in a prospective study, the functional results before and after cosmetic rhinoplasty and evaluate the use of the Glatzel mirror as an objective method to assess nasal patency. Methods: To achieve this objective, we analyzed the functional results of surgery through a subjective questionnaire and objective evaluation through a modified Glatzel mirror, and evaluated the correlation between the 2 methods. Twenty patients (14 women and 6 men) underwent aesthetic rhinoplasty using spreader grafts. Pre- and postoperative evaluation (90–120 days) included a respiratory quality score (subjective) and modified Glatzel mirror test (objective). Subsequently, the Spearman test was used to compare the pre- and postoperative subjective and objective data. Results: The subjective evaluation demonstrated a statistical difference between pre- and postoperative scores (8 ± 2 and 9.4 ± 0.7, P ≤ 0.001). There was no statistical difference in mean nasal patency by modified Glatzel mirror. No statistically significant correlation was observed when comparing the modified Glatzel mirror values with the subjective scores reported by patients pre- or postoperatively. Conclusion: The Glatzel method lacks sensitivity in detecting patient-reported improvements in breathing following rhinoplasty. This suggests that the method is a poor assessment tool to detect small, post-surgical changes in the nasal airways. PMID:25991955

  12. [Experience in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress with nasal CPAP].

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, S; Bellato, S; De Carlo, L; Mescoli, G; Vanin, E; Marcazzò, L

    2000-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, when continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) was introduced as a method of treatment of neonatal respiratory distress, many technical approaches have been suggested. The Authors report their experience with a new technique for nasal CPAP which has been developed to minimize impedance to breathing and offering maximum airway pressure stability and tolerance to leakage. Thirty-two newborns with symptoms of RDS were treated with Infant Flow System, a new device for nasal CPAP with nasal prongs which resulted inexpensive, simple to use and with lower risk for serious complications. Furthermore, the results suggest that treatment by early CPAP with nasal prongs in newborns presenting symptoms of RDS can be effective in reducing the number of newborns transferred to the third level Unit. PMID:10767978

  13. Form and Function of the Nasal Tip: Reorienting and Reshaping the Lateral Crus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Grant S

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the external nasal valve affects both the form and function of the nose. Successful treatment of these problems is dependent on proper analysis and diagnosis of the aberrant anatomy. Cephalic malpositioning of the lateral crura has been described for nearly 30 years. Repositioning of the lateral crura in a more caudal orientation with lateral crural strut grafts will correct aesthetic abnormalities and reinforce the external nasal valve. Sagittal malpositioning has been more recently described and also has deleterious effects on both the shape of the nasal tip and breathing. Reorienting the short axis of the lateral crus is another powerful tool for the rhinoplasty surgeon to correct the weak and narrow external nasal valve. PMID:26862964

  14. Comparison between Perceptual Assessments of Nasality and Nasalance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnegard, Karin; Lohmander, Anette; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are different reports of the usefulness of the Nasometer[TM] as a complement to listening, often as correlation calculations between listening and nasalance measurements. Differences between findings have been attributed to listener experience and types of speech stimuli. Aims: To compare nasalance scores from the Nasometer with…

  15. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  16. Nasal septal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Nasal septal ulceration can have multiple etiologies. Determining the exact cause depends on who the consulting specialist is, who could either be the ENT surgeon or the dermatologist. The common causes are infections (tuberculosis, leprosy, leishmaniasis), vasculitis (Wegener's granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), and lupus erythematosus. Traumatic causes and malignancy can also be seen in tertiary referral centers. The diagnosis often requires thorough investigations and multiple tissue specimens from various sites, and in chronic cases, a suspicion of lymphoma should be considered. Apart from disease-specific therapy, a multidisciplinary approach is required in most cases to tackle the cosmetic disfigurement. PMID:25441476

  17. Increased oxygen load in the prefrontal cortex from mouth breathing: a vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Sayaka; Oka, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Kayoko; Kato, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who habitually breathe through the mouth are more likely than nasal breathers to have sleep disorders and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. We hypothesized that brain hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might be different for mouth and nasal breathing. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex during mouth breathing and nasal breathing in healthy adults (n=9) using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. The angle k, calculated from changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin and indicating the degree of oxygen exchange, was significantly higher during mouth breathing (P<0.05), indicating an increased oxygen load. Mouth breathing also caused a significant increase in deoxyhemoglobin, but oxyhemoglobin did not increase. This difference in oxygen load in the brain arising from different breathing routes can be evaluated quantitatively using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. Phase responses could help to provide an earlier and more reliable diagnosis of a patient’s habitual breathing route than a patient interview. PMID:24169579

  18. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  19. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  20. A Real-time Method to Evaluate the Nasal Deposition and Clearance of Acetone in the Human Volunteer

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Schwartz, Ronald E.; Weitz, Karl K. ); Soelberg, Jolen J. ); Foureman, Gary L.; Prah, James D.; Timchalk, Charles

    2003-05-01

    Nasal dosimetry models have become increasingly quantitative as insights into tissue deposition/clearance and computational fluid dynamics have become available. Validation of these models requires sufficient experimental data. However, investigations into respiratory deposition, particularly in human volunteers, have been historically limited due to methodological limitations. To overcome this, a method for evaluating the nasal wash-in, wash-out phenomena of a highly water-soluble compound in human volunteers was developed and characterized. This methodology was assessed using controlled human inhalation exposures to uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at approximately 1 ppm concentration for 30 minutes under different breathing maneuvers (inhale nose/exhale nose; inhale nose/exhale mouth; inhale mouth/exhale nose). A small-diameter air-sampling probe inserted in the nasopharyngeal cavity of the volunteer was connected directly to an ion-trap mass spectrometer capable of sampling every 0.8 sec. A second ion-trap mass spectrometer simultaneously sampled from the volunteer?s exhaled breath stream via a breath-inlet device interface. Together, the two mass spectrometers provided real-time appraisal of the 13C-acetone concentrations in the nasopharyngeal region and in the exhaled breath stream before, during, and after the different breathing maneuvers. The breathing cycle (depth and frequency) and heart rate were concurrently monitored throughout the exposure using a heart rate monitor and a human plethysmograph to differentiate inhalation and exhalation. Graphical overlay of the plethysmography results with the mass spectrometer measurements show clear quantifiable differences in 13C-acetone levels at the nasal probe as a function of breathing maneuvers. Breath-by-breath analysis of 13C-acetone concentrations indicate that between 40-75% of the compound is absorbed upon inhalation and nearly all of that absorbed released back into the breath stream during exhalation.

  1. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. J. M.; Mitchell, G.; Bailie, N.; Thornhill, D.; Watterson, J.; Kimbell, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  2. Accuracy of CO2 monitoring via nasal cannulas and oral bite blocks during sedation for esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Chen; Orr, Joe; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Yu, Lu; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Westenskow, Dwayne R; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedures are typically performed under conscious sedation. Drug-induced respiratory depression is a major cause of serious adverse effects during sedation. Capnographic monitoring of respiratory activity improves patient safety during procedural sedation. This bench study compares the performance of the nasal cannulas and oral bite blocks used to monitor exhaled CO2 during sedation. We used a spontaneously breathing mechanical lung to evaluated four CO2 sampling nasal cannulas and three CO2 sampling bite blocks. We placed pneumatic resistors in the mouth of the manikin to simulate different levels of mouth opening. We compared CO2 measurements taken from the sampling device to CO2 measurements taken directly from the trachea. The end tidal CO2 concentration (PETCO2) measured through the bite blocks and nasal cannulas was always lower than the corresponding PETCO2 measured at the trachea. The difference became larger as the amount of oxygen delivered through the devices increased. The difference was larger during normal ventilation than during hypoventilation. The difference became larger as the amount of oral breathing increased. The two nasal cannulas without oral cups failed to provide sufficient CO2 for breath detection when the mouth was fully open and oxygen was delivered at 10 L/min. Our simulation found that respiratory rate can be accurately monitored during the procedure using a CO2 sampling bite block or a nasal cannula with oral cup. The accuracy of PETCO2 measurements depends on the device used, the amount of supplement oxygen, the amount of oral breathing and the patient's minute ventilation. PMID:25895481

  3. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  4. Simulated breath waveform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed which provides twelve waveform controls to breath drive mechanism. Twelve position, magnetically actuated rotary switch is connected to one end of crankshaft drive, such that it makes one complete revolution for each simulated breath. Connections with common wired point are included in modifications made to standard motor speed controller.

  5. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breathing Problems Rett Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  6. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  7. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Hulse, K E; Stevens, W W; Tan, B K; Schleimer, R P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  8. Keratoacanthoma: an unusual nasal mass.

    PubMed

    Sazafi, M S; Salina, H; Asma, A; Masir, N; Primuharsa Putra, S H A

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of keratoacanthoma in a non-sun-exposed nasal vestibule of an 84-year-old man. He presented with a progressively growing left nasal mass that had been present for 8 months. Examination showed a non-tender protruding mass arising from medial vestibular wall of the left nostril. Histopathology indicated it was a keratoacanthoma. In an elderly patient with a history of a progressively growing mass in the nose, a differential diagnosis of malignancy should be ruled out, and histological conformation is essential. To our knowledge, only a very small number of cases of nasal vestibular keratoacanthoma have been reported. PMID:24376301

  9. Numerical simulation of airflow and micro-particle deposition in human nasal airway pre- and post-virtual sphenoidotomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahmanzadeh, Hojat; Abouali, Omid; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of endoscopic sphenoidotomy surgery on the flow patterns and deposition of micro-particles in the human nasal airway and sphenoid sinus were investigated. A realistic model of a human nasal passage including nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses was constructed using a series of CT scan images of a healthy subject. Then, a virtual sphenoidotomy by endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the left nasal passage and sphenoid sinus. Transient airflow patterns pre- and post-surgery during a full breathing cycle (inhalation and exhalation) were simulated numerically under cyclic flow condition. The Lagrangian approach was used for evaluating the transport and deposition of inhaled micro-particles. An unsteady particle tracking was performed for the inhalation phase of the breathing cycle for the case that particles were continuously entering into the nasal airway. The total deposition pattern and sphenoid deposition fraction of micro-particles were evaluated and compared for pre- and post-surgery cases. The presented results show that sphenoidotomy increased the airflow into the sphenoid sinus, which led to increased deposition of micro-particles in this region. Particles up to 25 μm were able to penetrate into the sphenoid in the post-operation case, and the highest deposition in the sphenoid for the resting breathing rate occurred for 10 μm particles at about 1.5%. PMID:25862997

  10. Nasal congestion in infants and children: a literature review on efficacy and safety of non-pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Chirico, G; Quartarone, G; Mallefet, P

    2014-12-01

    The most common causes of nasal obstruction and runny nose in infants and children are infections, mainly of viral origin, or allergies. In neonates and infants viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) are frequently observed during episodes of nasal obstruction. Saline irrigation of the nose is believed to alleviate URTI symptoms by helping to eliminate excess mucus, to reduce congestion and by contributing to improve breathing. Objective of the study was to review the efficacy and safety of non-pharmacological options for the treatment of nasal congestion and its sequelae, in infants and children, with a special focus on hypertonic and isotonic solutions and other medical devices, including nasal aspirators. Available data indicate that nasal symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis or acute sinusitis significantly improved following nasal saline irrigation. The use of medical devices is less documented. Nasal aspiration with a medical device, associated with an isotonic saline solution, during viral rhinitis, has been shown to lower the risk of developing acute otitis media and rhinosinusitis, in comparison with a group treated with physiological saline solution alone. Safety and tolerability have been evaluated and no serious adverse events have been reported. Literature data highlighted the good tolerability. The use of isotonic and hypertonic saline solutions to relief nasal congestion in infants and children is widespread; it is a safe and valuable therapeutic support, and can reduce the use of medications (antihistamines, decongestant, antibiotics, corticosteroids) during the treatment of URTIs. PMID:25336097

  11. Nasal physiological changes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Conboy, P; Al-Azzawi, F; Murty, G

    2004-08-01

    Rhinitis in pregnancy has been previously investigated with variable results. This study examines all the variables of the nasal airway simultaneously for the first time. Eighteen women were recruited in the first trimester of pregnancy and followed through to the postpartum period to monitor the changes that occurred. Measurements of the nasal airway included anterior rhinoscopy (AnR), peak inspiratory nasal flow, acoustic rhinometry, anterior rhinomanometry (ARM), and the saccharin test with rhinitis questionnaire scores providing a symptomatic measurement. All the tests showed a trend consistent with decreasing nasal patency when expressed as an average for the group as a whole, although only AnR, ARM, mucociliary clearance time and rhinitis questionnaire scores were statistically significant (P < or = 0.05). This confirms the effect of pregnancy on the nasal mucosa and coincides with the rise in the serum concentration of the female sex hormones with gestational age, returning to normal postpartum. Pharmacological antagonism of oestrogens may therefore relieve nasal congestion and is currently under further research. PMID:15270820

  12. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  13. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.

  14. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masaji

    2015-01-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy comprises an air/oxygen blender, an active humidifier, a single heated circuit, and a nasal cannula. It delivers adequately heated and humidified medical gas at up to 60 L/min of flow and is considered to have a number of physiological effects: reduction of anatomical dead space, PEEP effect, constant fraction of inspired oxygen, and good humidification. While there have been no big randomized clinical trials, it has been gaining attention as an innovative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Most of the available data has been published in the neonatal field. Evidence with critically ill adults are poor; however, physicians apply it to a variety of patients with diverse underlying diseases: hypoxemic respiratory failure, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, post-extubation, pre-intubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, patients with do-not-intubate order, and so on. Many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces needs of escalation of respiratory support in patients with diverse underlying diseases. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as its indication, timing of starting and stopping HFNC, and escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC oxygen therapy is an innovative and effective modality for the early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases. PMID:25866645

  15. CPAP and High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen in Bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ian P; McBride, Antonia K S; Smith, Rachel; Fernandes, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    Severe respiratory failure develops in some infants with bronchiolitis because of a complex pathophysiologic process involving increased airways resistance, alveolar atelectasis, muscle fatigue, and hypoxemia due to mismatch between ventilation and perfusion. Nasal CPAP and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen may improve the work of breathing and oxygenation. Although the mechanisms behind these noninvasive modalities of respiratory support are not well understood, they may help infants by way of distending pressure and delivery of high concentrations of warmed and humidified oxygen. Observational studies of varying quality have suggested that CPAP and HFNC may confer direct physiologic benefits to infants with bronchiolitis and that their use has reduced the need for intubation. No trials to our knowledge, however, have compared CPAP with HFNC in bronchiolitis. Two randomized trials compared CPAP with oxygen delivered by low-flow nasal cannula or face mask and found some improvements in blood gas results and some physiologic parameters, but these trials were unable to demonstrate a reduction in the need for intubation. Two trials evaluated HFNC in bronchiolitis (one comparing it with headbox oxygen, the other with nebulized hypertonic saline), with the results not seeming to suggest important clinical or physiologic benefits. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of respiratory failure in bronchiolitis, discuss these trials in detail, and consider how future research studies may be designed to best evaluate CPAP and HFNC in bronchiolitis. PMID:25836649

  16. [Hemangiopericytoma in nasal cavity: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghai; Shi, Qifeng; Chen, Jidong

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of a 46 year old female patient with nasal hemangiopericytoma. She complained of left nasal congestion, pus snot for 10 years, sometimes with left nasal bleeding. Physical examination: in the left nasal tract saw red soft neoplasm, roughness surface, easy bleeding when touched. Sinus CT shows: bilateral maxillary sinus, ethmoid sinus, sphenoid sinus and the left posterior nasal cavity lesions, considering inflammation with the formation of polyps, tumor not excluded. The left nasal cavity neoplasm biopsy shows: hemangioma of left nasal cavity. After admission in general anesthesia, we do transnasal endoscopic sinus openning operation and the left nasal cavity neoplasm resection. Postoperative pathological examination shows: the left nasal cavity hemangiopericytoma. Immunohistochemical showed: Vimentin(+), Smooth muscle actin(+), Desmin(-), endothelial cells CD31(-) and CD34(-). No postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy, no tumor recurrence. After one year of follow-up, the contact was lost. PMID:26281069

  17. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high altitude Blood clot in the lung Collapsed lung (pneumothorax) Heart attack Injury to the neck, chest wall, ... cavity with each breath. This can cause a collapsed lung . Bandage the wound with plastic wrap, a plastic ...

  18. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with obstructive sleep apnea, for example. Prolonged apnea means a person has stopped breathing. If ... that requires immediate medical attention and first aid. Prolonged apnea with no heart activity in a person ...

  19. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  20. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... deep breath, which usually results in retention of carbon dioxide and not enough oxygen in blood (obesity hypoventilation ... for anemia), and oximetry or blood oxygen or carbon dioxide levels. Your doctor also may obtain a chest ...

  1. A modified Goldman nasal tip procedure for the drooping nasal tip.

    PubMed

    McLure, T C

    1991-02-01

    A modification of Irving Goldman's nasal tip procedure that borrows from the lateral crus to augment the height of the medial crus is described. Goldman's procedure has been modified by not including the vestibular skin with the segment of the lateral crus that is rolled medially to increase nasal tip projection, by adding a nasal septal cartilage strut between the medial crura for support when the medial crura are weak, and by maintaining a small separation caudally of the repositioned lateral crura at the new nasal dome to simulate a double nasal dome. This modified Goldman nasal tip procedure allows the surgeon to reshape the lower lateral nasal cartilage to increase nasal tip projection as an alternative to the use of a shield-type nasal tip graft, and at the same time it narrows the nasal tip with minimal resection of the lateral crus of the lower lateral nasal cartilage. PMID:1989017

  2. Laser reshaping of nasal septum cartilage: clinical results for 40 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Svistushkin, Valeriy M.; Shinaev, Alexander N.

    2000-05-01

    Clinical results on sparing laser reshaping of nasal septum cartilage are reported for the first time. Forty patients have been treated with holmium laser to correct a deformed cartilage. The laser reshaping is a bloodless, painless procedure which takes few minutes to straighten nasal septum. The stability of the new shape and possible side effects have been examined during twelve months. The headache and other negative symptoms have disappeared, as a result of laser treatment for the most of patients. Rhinoscopic examination show an excellent long-term reshaping effects for nasal septum of 23 patients, and, also, good results for other 12 patients. For 5 patients only a little effect takes place. Our rhinomanometric examinations demonstrate a pronounced improvement of the breathing for 35 patients. No visible undesirable side effects were observed for all patients underwent to laser reshaping procedure.

  3. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T.; Chen, D.; Wang, P.H.; Chen, J.; Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  4. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Chen, D; Wang, P H; Chen, J; Deng, J

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  5. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits

    PubMed Central

    Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M.; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  6. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, Farid; Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  7. Surgery of the nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Gunter

    2006-11-01

    Long-term results after septoplasty are not satisfactory. Apart from a recurrence of deviation, there are various reasons for this: false preoperative analysis, complete straightening of the septum, and a disturbed nasal cycle. Preoperative functional diagnostics with a combination of rhinoresistometry, acoustic rhinometry, and long-term rhinoflowmetry are necessary for differentiating between "physiological" and "pathological" septal deviations and recognizing other causes for obstruction. The surgical procedure of septoplasty includes approach, mobilization, resection, reposition, and finally reconstruction of all three layers. The goal of the operation should not be complete straightening of the nasal septum. The space between the septum and turbinates is of utmost importance. It should not be enlarged as much as possible; rather, it must be shaped in such a way as to allow freely congestion and decongestion reciprocal on the two sides during the nasal cycle. PMID:17131264

  8. Experimental transmission of enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma (ENA) is a contagious neoplasm of the secretory epithelial cells of the nasal mucosa of sheep and goats. It is associated with the betaretrovirus, enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV), but a causative relationship has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, 14-day-old lambs were experimentally infected via nebulization with cell-free tumor filtrates derived from naturally occurring cases of ENA. At 12 weeks post-infection (wpi), one of the five infected lambs developed clinical signs, including continuous nasal discharge and open mouth breathing, and was euthanized. Necropsy revealed the presence of a large bilateral tumor occupying the nasal cavity. At 45 wpi, when the study was terminated, none of the remaining infected sheep showed evidence of tumors either by computed tomography or post-mortem examination. ENTV-1 proviral DNA was detected in the nose, lung, spleen, liver and kidney of the animal with experimentally induced ENA, however there was no evidence of viral protein expression in tissues other than the nose. Density gradient analysis of virus particles purified from the experimentally induced nasal tumor revealed a peak reverse transcriptase (RT) activity at a buoyant density of 1.22 g/mL which was higher than the 1.18 g/mL density of peak RT activity of virus purified from naturally induced ENA. While the 1.22 g/mL fraction contained primarily immature unprocessed virus particles, mature virus particles with a similar morphology to naturally occurring ENA could be identified by electron microscopy. Full-length sequence analysis of the ENTV-1 genome from the experimentally induced tumor revealed very few nucleotide changes relative to the original inoculum with only one conservative amino acid change. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ENTV-1 is associated with transmissible ENA in sheep and that under experimental conditions, lethal tumors are capable of developing in as little as 12 wpi demonstrating the

  9. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  10. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Nasal Epithelial Cells from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Papon, Jean-François; Chhuon, Cerina; Zadigue, Patricia; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Amselem, Serge; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Edelman, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease remains incompletely understood. New explanations for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease may be discovered by studying the patterns of protein expression in cultured human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). To that aim, we compared the level of protein expressions in primary cultures of HNEC from nasal polyps secondary to CF (CFNP, n = 4), primary nasal polyps (NP, n = 8) and control mucosa (CTRL, n = 4) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. The analysis of the data revealed 42 deregulated protein expressions in CFNP compared to NP and CTRL, suggesting that these alterations are related to CF. Overall, AmiGo analysis highlighted six major pathways important for cell functions that seem to be impaired: metabolism, G protein process, inflammation and oxidative stress response, protein folding, proteolysis and structural proteins. Among them, glucose and fatty acid metabolic pathways could be impaired in CF with nine deregulated proteins. Our proteomic study provides a reproducible set of differentially expressed proteins in airway epithelial cells from CF patients and reveals many novel deregulated proteins that could lead to further studies aiming to clarify the involvement of such proteins in CF pathophysiology. PMID:25268127

  12. [Nasal endometriosis: apropos of 1 case].

    PubMed

    Laghzaoui, O; Laghzaoui, M

    2001-12-01

    The nasal mucosa is an exceptional localization for endometriosis. We report a case observed in a woman who developed nasal tumefaction associated with epistaxis that had followed a cyclic repetitive pattern since puberty. Surgical excision of the nasal nodule confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis. Local and general evaluated identified other localizations. Outcome has been favorable at short and mid term. Endometriosis is a frequent condition although extra-pelvic localizations are uncommon. The nasal localization is highly exceptional. PMID:11917731

  13. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  14. Imposed Work of Breathing for Flow Meters with In-Line versus Flow-Through Technique during Simulated Neonatal Breathing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to determine airflow during nasal CPAP (NCPAP) treatment without adding dead space or resistance would be useful when investigating the physiologic effects of different NCPAP systems on breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on pressure stability of different flow measuring devices at the in-line and flow-through position, using simulated neonatal breathing. Methods Six different flow measure devices were evaluated by recording pressure changes and imposed work of breathing for breaths with 16 and 32 ml tidal volumes. The tests were performed initially with the devices in an in line position and with 5 and 10 L/min using flow through technique, without CPAP. The flow meters were then subsequently tested with an Infant Flow CPAP system at 3, 5 and 8 cm H2O pressure using flow through technique. The quality of the recorded signals was compared graphically. Results The resistance of the measuring devices generated pressure swings and imposed work of breathing. With bias flow, the resistance also generated CPAP pressure. Three of the devices had low resistance and generated no changes in pressure stability or CPAP pressure. The two devices intended for neonatal use had the highest measured resistance. Conclusion The importance of pressure stability and increased work of breathing during non-invasive respiratory support are insufficiently studied. Clinical trials using flow-through technique have not focused on pressure stability. Our results indicate that a flow-through technique might be a way forward in obtaining a sufficiently high signal quality without the added effects of rebreathing and increased work of breathing. The results should stimulate further research and the development of equipment for dynamic flow measurements in neonates. PMID:26192188

  15. Correlation between nasal membrane permeability and nasal absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Lin, Chih-Wei; Donovan, Maureen D

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between in vitro permeability (Papp) values obtained from isolated nasal tissues and the absorption rates (ka) of the same compounds following nasal administration in animals and humans. The Papp of a set of 11 drug compounds was measured using animal nasal explants and plasma time-concentration profiles for each of the same compounds following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration were experimentally determined or obtained from literature reports. The plasma clearance was estimated from the IV plasma time-concentration profiles, and ka was determined from the IN plasma time-concentration profiles using a deconvolution approach. The level of correlation between Papp and ka was established using Pearson correlation analysis. A good correlation (r=0.77) representing a point-to-point relationship for each of the compounds was observed. This result indicates that the nasal absorption for many drug candidates can be estimated from a readily measured in vitro Papp value. PMID:23225081

  16. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity. PMID:27322954

  17. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  18. Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an important clinical entity diagnosed by the presence of both subjective and objective evidence of chronic sinonasal inflammation. Symptoms include anterior or posterior rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, hyposmia, and/or facial pressure or pain that last for a duration of more than 12 weeks. Nasal polyps are inflammatory lesions that project into the nasal airway, are typically bilateral, and originate from the ethmoid sinus. Males are more likely to be affected than females, but no specific genetic or environmental factors have been strongly linked to the development of this disorder to date. CRSwNP is frequently associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the clinical symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, increased exposure to pathogenic and colonized bacteria, and dysregulation of the host immune system are all thought to play prominent roles in disease pathogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further explore the clinical and pathophysiological features of CRSwNP so that biomarkers can be identified and novel advances can be made to improve the treatment and management of this disease. PMID:27393770

  19. Immunophenotype Heterogeneity in Nasal Glomangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Magkou, Christina; Lae, Marick

    2015-01-01

    Nasal glomangiopericytoma is rare. The immunophenotype is heterogeneous, more frequently smooth-muscle-actin and CD34-positive. We report expression patterns for several vascular-related proteins such as CD99, CD146, Bcl2, and WT1 as well as for treatment-related proteins such as mTOR and EGFR in a nasal glomangiopericytoma. The patient (woman, 86 years) presented with a left nasal tumefaction. The resected specimen (1.5-cm) showed a glomangiopericytoma. Tumor cells expressed smooth-muscle-actin, CD31, CD34, and progesterone receptor. They also expressed the vascular-cell-related proteins Bcl2, CD99, CD146, and WT1, as well as mTOR and EGFR. Nasal glomangiopericytomas show immunohistochemical heterogeneity for vascular-related markers, suggesting a possible extensive pericytic differentiation. The expression of potential targets for drug treatments such as mTOR and EGFR may impact on the clinical follow-up of these tumors occurring at advanced ages, which may require complex surgery. PMID:26351605

  20. Nasal drug delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Christoph; Suter-Zimmermann, Katja; Surber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal administration is an attractive option for local and systemic delivery of many therapeutic agents. The nasal mucosa is--compared to other mucosae--easily accessible. Intranasal drug administration is noninvasive, essentially painless and particularly suited for children. Application can be performed easily by patients or by physicians in emergency settings. Intranasal drug delivery offers a rapid onset of therapeutic effects (local or systemic). Nasal application circumvents gastrointestinal degradation and hepatic first-pass metabolism of the drug. The drug, the vehicle and the application device form an undividable triad. Its selection is therefore essential for the successful development of effective nasal products. This paper discusses the feasibility and potential of intranasal administration. A series of questions regarding (a) the intended use (therapeutic considerations), (b) the drug, (c) the vehicle and (d) the application device (pharmaceutical considerations) are addressed with a view to their impact on the development of products for nasal application. Current and future trends and perspectives are discussed. PMID:21325837

  1. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates ࣈ 5.7 L/min and ࣈ 11.3 L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range - 10(o) C ⩽ To ⩽50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory. PMID:24574201

  2. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  3. [Comparison of CPAP and BiPAP equipment with reference to work of breathing, pressure and flow constancy].

    PubMed

    Raschke, F; Fischer, J

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated mask pressure curves and nasal flow during nasal C- and BiPAP ventilation in the recumbent position. Nasal spontaneous breathing, C- and BiPAP-applications of 10 and 10/7 cmH2O have been investigated in 7 patients and 4 controls. With aid of an automatic computerised analysis each in- and expiratory phase has been normalized by time and plotted as pressure-volume-loop from pooled data. The ventilators showed significant intra- and inter-machine differences. The investigations are considered as approach to real assessment of patient's work of breathing on home ventilators. They clearly show that ventilators have individual patterns, which should be considered carefully, long term machine-according effects are not yet known. PMID:7617616

  4. Characteristics of Nasal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and Nasal Absorption Capacity in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Haihong; Yan, Mengfei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    As the main mucosal immune inductive site of nasal cavity, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) plays an important role in both antigen recognition and immune activation after intranasal immunization. However, the efficiency of intranasal vaccines is commonly restricted by the insufficient intake of antigen by the nasal mucosa, resulting from the nasal mucosal barrier and the nasal mucociliary clearance. The distribution of NALT and the characteristic of nasal cavity have already been described in humans and many laboratory rodents, while data about poultry are scarce. For this purpose, histological sections of the chicken nasal cavities were used to examine the anatomical structure and histological characteristics of nasal cavity. Besides, the absorptive capacity of chicken nasal mucosa was also studied using the materials with different particle size. Results showed that the NALT of chicken was located on the bottom of nasal septum and both sides of choanal cleft, which mainly consisted of second lymphoid follicle. A large number of lymphocytes were distributed under the mucosal epithelium of inferior nasal meatus. In addition, there were also diffuse lymphoid tissues located under the epithelium of the concha nasalis media and the walls of nasal cavity. The results of absorption experiment showed that the chicken nasal mucosa was capable to absorb trypan blue, OVA, and fluorescent latex particles. Inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) could be taken up by chicken nasal mucosa except for the stratified squamous epithelium sites located on the forepart of nasal cavity. The intake of IAIV by NALT was greater than that of the nasal mucosa covering on non-lymphoid tissue, which could be further enhanced after intranasal inoculation combined with sodium cholate or CpG DNA. The study on NALT and nasal absorptive capacity will be benefit for further understanding of immune mechanisms after nasal vaccination and development of nasal vaccines for poultry. PMID

  5. Life and Breath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Helen D.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a public education program combining the screening process and a follow-up program for teaching victims of emphysema and other respiratory diseases how to better their living condition through proper breathing, avoidance of air pollutants and cigarette smoking, and taking better care of themselves physically. (PD)

  6. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  7. Firefighter's Breathing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Giorgini, E. A.; Sullivan, J. L.; Simmonds, M. R.; Beck, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    System, based on open-loop demand-type compressed air concept, is lighter and less bulky than former systems, yet still provides thirty minutes of air supply. Comfort, visibility, donning time, and breathing resistance have been improved. Apparatus is simple to recharge and maintain and is comparable in cost to previously available systems.

  8. INTERMITTENT POSITIVE PRESSURE BREATHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficacy of long-term intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) treatment when used as an adjunct to the overall care of ambulatory outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evaluation compared the use of IPPB with use of a powered nebulizer.

  9. Breathing Like a Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  10. Effect of nasal decongestion on voice spectrum of a nasal consonant-vowel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H; Wang, Ching-Ping; Kuo, Terry B J

    2005-03-01

    The nasal cavity and its related structures make significant contributions to human phonation, especially the resonance of voice spectra. The voice spectra of the nasal consonant-vowel (CV), [md:], in the subjects with nasal obstruction were obtained and were compared with the spectra of the same CV vocalized by the same subjects after topical nasal decongestion treatment with 1:1000 epinephrine solution. Results revealed that the intensity damping was more marked in the high-frequency area (>1600 Hz) after the nasal decongestion. Moreover, the intensities of the spectral valleys damped more than the spectral peaks, especially the spectral valley of 1000-2700 Hz. Therefore, a more complex spectral pattern was formed by the resultant uneven damping effect after nasal decongestion. The nasal cavity plays an important role in the formation of spectral peaks and valleys, and such engraved voice spectra may also characterize nasal voices like the nasal CV [md:] demonstrated in our study. PMID:15766851

  11. Primary Nasal Reconstruction in Self-Inflicted Nasal Injury.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Abizer; John, Jerry R; Gaba, Sunil; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Self-inflicted injury of the nose is extremely rare. It may be associated with severe psychopathology and suicidal ideation. The authors report a case of a 24-year-old man, who presented with soft-tissue loss over both the alae of his nose. He had cut off the alar rims with an ordinary razor blade. He was overtly concerned about his nose being excessively broad and fat. A diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder with nonsuicidal self-injury was made. Patient was observed during 72 hours in hospital with psychiatric support and local dressings. The authors undertook primary nasal reconstruction with nasolabial flaps on both sides for coverage. In conclusion, self-inflicted nasal injury mandates a judicious balancing of psychiatric support and surgical reconstruction. This can prevent untoward sequelae including further self-harm and suicide. PMID:26468831

  12. Evaluation of a nasal/oral discriminate sampling system for capnographic respiratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Derrick, S J; Waters, H; Kang, S W; Cwalina, T F; Simmons, W

    1993-10-01

    Although continuous end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2 mmHg) measurements permit the earliest detection of alveolar hypoventilation, apnea and/or obstruction, technical difficulties have thus far precluded its reliable implementation in the spontaneously breathing patient with a natural (e.g., nonartificially secured) airway. Among the technical difficulties is the fact that conventional sampling devices do not take into account the possibility that breathing may take place primarily through either the nose or the mouth. As a result, the efficacy of a new nasal/oral discriminate sampling system (NODSS) was examined for capnographic observation of respiratory adequacy. NODSS is unique because it provides the opportunity to select simultaneous or discriminate collection of carbon dioxide exhaled through the nose and/or mouth. Twenty-four American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to IV patients (ages 30-88 years) were capnographically monitored in the postanesthesia care unit following general anesthesia for various surgical procedures. All patients were extubated and breathing spontaneously. Simultaneously, direct arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2 mmHg) determinations were made using an indwelling radial artery catheter to determine their correlation with PETCO2 obtained by NODSS. A comparison between PaCO2 values and noninvasive nasal and/or oral PETCO2 obtained by NODSS showed a positive correlation (r value) of 0.602 to 0.849 when statistically analyzed by Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient. There was no significant difference between the mean (PaCO2-PETCO2) gradient derived through nasal sampling, as compared to the mean gradient derived by oral sampling with this device (P > 0.05). Noninvasive capnographic monitoring by NODSS is a convenient, reliable, effective, and accurate alternative to direct arterial blood gas determination that may be used for the early detection of respiratory inadequacy in the spontaneously breathing patient who

  13. Clinical course and implications of congenital nasal pyriform stenosis and solitary median maxillary central incisor in a newborn: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis and solitary median maxillary central incisor are uncommon anomalies and are associated with further malformations. Solitary median maxillary central incisor itself has initially no impact on a child’s health, but congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis is a potentially life-threatening condition. Case presentation A Caucasian baby boy showed severe dyspnoea and was intubated orotracheally. Multiple anomalies were detected, including urogenital and craniofacial malformations. Computed tomography scans revealed congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis with a diameter of 4.9mm and a solitary median maxillary central incisor. A 3.0mm tube was inserted in his left nasal cavity, and the baby was able to breathe sufficiently and spontaneously. The nasal tube was removed after seven days, and the baby was discharged under application of decongestant drops. After seven months, the baby was readmitted with respiratory distress, and surgery was carried out using an intraoral sublabial approach. The stenotic area of the pyriform aperture was widened, and 3.0mm tubes were inserted in both nasal cavities for 10 days. Over a period of six months, no further respiratory distress has occurred. Conclusions The decision to perform surgery was delayed since the baby’s nasal breathing was adequate as a result of the insertion of a nasal tube. Since treatment depends on the severity of symptoms, it is appropriate in some cases to take a conservative approach at first, and to keep surgery as a last resort. Once a conservative approach has been selected for congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis, awareness of the life-threatening nature of the condition should be kept in mind, and a surgical approach must still be taken into account. PMID:24950703

  14. Contrastive and contextual vowel nasalization in Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfenstein, Marie

    2005-09-01

    Ottawa is a Central Algonquian language that possesses the recent innovation of contrastive vowel nasalization. Most phonetic studies done to date on contrastive vowel nasalization have investigated Indo-European languages; therefore, a study of Ottawa could prove to be a valuable addition to the literature. To this end, a percentage of nasalization (nasal airflow/oral + nasal airflow) was measured during target vowels produced by native Ottawa speakers using a Nasometer 6200-3. Nasalized vowels in the target word set were either contrastively or contextually nasalized: candidates for contextual nasalization were either regressive or perserverative in word-initial and word-final syllables. Subjects were asked to read words containing target vowels in a carrier sentence. Mean, minimum, and maximum nasalance were obtained for each target vowel across its full duration. Target vowels were compared across context (regressive or perseverative and word-initial or word-final). In addition, contexts were compared to determine whether a significant difference existed between contrastive and contextual nasalization. Results for Ottawa will be compared with results for vowels in similar contexts in other languages including Hindi, Breton, Bengali, and French.

  15. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  16. Local and systemic immunotherapy in nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Palma-Carlos, M L; Spínola Santos, A; Santos, C; Pedro, E; Pregal, A

    1999-10-01

    Two assays have been done to evaluate the effect of immunotherapy in nasal allergy. First, a trial of nasal immunotherapy and second, the study of mediator release after vaccines. Local immunotherapy, applied directly, triggers different response mechanisms. Specific nasal immunotherapy started before seasonal or perennial symptoms peak, has been done by increasing the doses of allergen three times a week during a 3-month period and a manutention period of a weekly nasal puff of the same allergen. Symptom scores and drug consumption have been registered. The results have been compared with the scores obtained in the same patients over the same period of the same year before immunotherapy. In perennial rhinitis blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching scores all decreased. In seasonal rhinitis, a similar score decrease was obtained for blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching. Pharmacological scores also decreased. These data point to a short-term effect of nasal immunotherapy. Tryptase release has been evaluated in nasal washings after nasal challenge with a Parietaria (Pellitory wall) extract before and after specific systemic immunotherapy, in order to evaluate changes in mast cells reactivity. Eight patients were studied, all allergic to Parietaria. Nasal provocation tests have been done before the season with increasing doses of 10, 100 and 1000 PNU and tryptase assayed in nasal washings at 10, 20 and 30 min after provocation. Immunotherapy decreased tryptase release after nasal challenge. The data point to the effect of systemic specific immunotherapy on mast cell reactivity. PMID:10577807

  17. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Parsons, J.T.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal vestibule are essentially skin cancers that require special therapeutic considerations because of the regional anatomy. They have sometimes been considered poorly suited for treatment by irradiation because of potential or actual cartilage and/or bone invasion and therefore have been treated by surgical resection, sometimes producing defects that are difficult to reconstruct satisfactorily. From 1966 to April 1980, 13 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Florida. Eight lesions were de novo; 5 were recurrent after 1 or more surgical procedures. Treatment consisted of radium needle implantation and/or external beam therapy. Neck management was individualized. All de novo and 4 of 5 recurrent lesions were controlled locally. Cosmetic resultes were good in patients with de novo lesions. There were no instances of significant cartilage or soft tissue necrosis despite cartilage involvement by tumor in 6 cases.

  18. It Takes a Mouth to Eat and a Nose to Breathe: Abnormal Oral Respiration Affects Neonates' Oral Competence and Systemic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Trabalon, Marie; Schaal, Benoist

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian, including human, neonates are considered to be obligate nose breathers. When constrained to breathe through their mouth in response to obstructed or closed nasal passages, the effects are pervasive and profound, and sometimes last into adulthood. The present paper briefly surveys neonates' and infants' responses to this atypical mobilisation of the mouth for breathing and focuses on comparisons between human newborns and infants and the neonatal rat model. We present the effects of forced oral breathing on neonatal rats induced by experimental nasal obstruction. We assessed the multilevel consequences on physiological, structural, and behavioural variables, both during and after the obstruction episode. The effects of the compensatory mobilisation of oral resources for breathing are discussed in the light of the adaptive development of oromotor functions. PMID:22811731

  19. The effects of smoking and smoking cessation on nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Utiyama, Daniela Mitiyo Odagiri; Yoshida, Carolina Tieko; Goto, Danielle Miyuki; de Santana Carvalho, Tômas; de Paula Santos, Ubiratan; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess nasal mucociliary clearance, mucus properties and inflammation in smokers and subjects enrolled in a Smoking Cessation Program (referred to as quitters). METHOD: A total of 33 subjects with a median (IQR) smoking history of 34 (20-58) pack years were examined for nasal mucociliary clearance using a saccharine transit test, mucus properties using contact angle and sneeze clearability tests, and quantification of inflammatory and epithelial cells, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations in nasal lavage fluid. Twenty quitters (mean age: 51 years, 9 male) were assessed at baseline, 1 month, 3 months and 12 months after smoking cessation, and 13 smokers (mean age: 52 years, 6 male) were assessed at baseline and after 12 months. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02136550. RESULTS: Smokers and quitters showed similar demographic characteristics and morbidities. At baseline, all subjects showed impaired nasal mucociliary clearance (mean 17.6 min), although 63% and 85% of the quitters demonstrated significant nasal mucociliary clearance improvement at 1 month and 12 months, respectively. At 12 months, quitters also showed mucus sneeze clearability improvement (∼26%), an increased number of macrophages (2-fold) and no changes in mucus contact angle or cytokine concentrations. CONCLUSION: This study showed that smoking cessation induced early improvements in nasal mucociliary clearance independent of mucus properties and inflammation. Changes in mucus properties were observed after only 12 months of smoking cessation. PMID:27438569

  20. Nasal Administration of Cholera Toxin as a Mucosal Adjuvant Damages the Olfactory System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Okada, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) induces severe diarrhea in humans but acts as an adjuvant to enhance immune responses to vaccines when administered orally. Nasally administered CT also acts as an adjuvant, but CT and CT derivatives, including the B subunit of CT (CTB), are taken up from the olfactory epithelium and transported to the olfactory bulbs and therefore may be toxic to the central nervous system. To assess the toxicity, we investigated whether nasally administered CT or CT derivatives impair the olfactory system. In mice, nasal administration of CT, but not CTB or a non-toxic CT derivative, reduced the expression of olfactory marker protein (OMP) in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs and impaired odor responses, as determined with behavioral tests and optical imaging. Thus, nasally administered CT, like orally administered CT, is toxic and damages the olfactory system in mice. However, CTB and a non-toxic CT derivative, do not damage the olfactory system. The optical imaging we used here will be useful for assessing the safety of nasal vaccines and adjuvants during their development for human use and CT can be used as a positive control in this test. PMID:26422280

  1. Mapleson's Breathing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification) are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:24249884

  2. Emergency Response Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace Design & Development, Inc.'s (ADD's) SCAMP was developed under an SBIR contract through Kennedy Space Center. SCAMP stands for Supercritical Air Mobility Pack. The technology came from the life support fuel cell support systems used for the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. It uses supercritical cryogenic air and is able to function in microgravity environments. SCAMP's self-contained breathing apparatus(SCBA) systems are also ground-based and can provide twice as much air than traditional SCBA's due to its high-density capacity. The SCAMP system was designed for use in launch pad emergency rescues. ADD also developed a protective suit for use with SCAMP that is smaller and lighter system than the old ones. ADD's SCAMP allows for body cooling and breathing from the supercritical cryogenic air, requiring no extra systems. The improvement over the traditional SCBA allows for a reduction of injuries, such as heat stress, and makes it easier for rescuers to save lives.

  3. [Inflammatory mechanisms in nasal polyposis].

    PubMed

    Perić, Aleksandar; Vojvodić, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa, characterized by prolapse of edematous mucosa, most commonly from the area of anterior ethmoid. The mean histological characteristics are proliferation of pseudostratified respiratory epithelium, thickening of the basement membrane, focal fibrosis and eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Although etiology is unknown, two hypotheses are dominant among the scientists: "hypothesis of staphylococcal superantigens" and "hypothesis of immune barrier dysfunction". Although we have not yet achieved a full understanding of the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease, it is known that nasal polyposis is associated with intensive chronic inflammation, followed by dysregulation of chemotaxis, migration, activation and function of eosinophils. A great number of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules are involved in the regulation of these complex mechanisms. After activation, eosinophils produce and release enzymes, which can lead to the damage of mucosa and tissue remodeling. Hyperactive eosinophils release a new amount of chemokines and cytokines, attracting new eosinophils into the site of inflammation, and may cause the persistence of chronic inflammation. PMID:25731009

  4. Effects of nasal CPAP on exhaled SIRT1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Ji; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used to examine airway inflammation and oxidative stress. This study aimed to evaluate if there were abnormal Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in EBC and to determine if these levels could be improved after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who wanted nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The EBC SIRT1 protein levels and EBC TNF-α protein levels were assessed by ELISA. All patients underwent sleep studies that were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in patients with OSAS. Results showed that in OSAS before nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 protein levels were lower than that in normal subjects, whereas the EBC TNF-α protein levels were higher. After nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 levels increased and EBC TNF-α levels decreased. In conclusion, successful treatment of OSAS by nasal CPAP can normalize the levels of EBC SIRT1 and EBC TNF-α. PMID:26976689

  5. Will Septal Correction Surgery for Deviated Nasal Septum Improve the Sense of Smell? A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neelima; Singh, P. P.; Bagla, Rahul Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Nasal obstruction due to deviated nasal septum is a common problem bringing a patient to an otorhinolaryngologist. Occasionally, these patients may also complain of olfactory impairment. We proposed to study the effect of septal deviation on the lateralised olfactory function and the change in olfaction after surgery of the septum (septoplasty). Methods. Forty-one patients with deviated nasal septum were evaluated for nasal airflow, olfactory score, and nasal symptomatology. Septoplasty was done under local anesthesia. Pre- and postoperative olfactory scores, airflow and olfactory scores, and nasal symptomatology and olfactory scores were compared and correlated. Results. The range of preoperative composite olfactory score (COS) on the side of septal deviation was 4–14 (mean 7.90 ± 2.234) and on the nonobstructed side was 9–18 (mean 14.49 ± 2.378). Severity of deviated nasal septum and preoperative COS of diseased side were correlated and the correlation was found to be significant (rho = −0.690, p = 0.000 (<0.001)). The preoperative mean COS (7.90 ± 2.234) was compared with the postoperative mean COS (12.39 ± 3.687) and the improvement was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.000 (<0.001)). Conclusion. We found improvement in olfactory function in 70.6% patients after surgery, no change in 20.1%, and reduced function in 7.6%. With the limitation of a small sample size and a potential repeat testing bias, we would conclude that correction of nasal septal deviation may lead to improvement in sense of smell. PMID:26491724

  6. Deposition of ultrafine aerosols and thoron progeny in replicas of nasal airways of children

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.S.; Smith, S.M.; Yeh, H.C.; Kim, D.B.; Cheng, K.H.; Swift, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The deposition efficiencies of ultrafine aerosols and thoron progeny were measured in youth nasal replicas. Clear polyester-resin casts of the upper airways of 1.5-yr-old (Cast G), 2.5-yr-old (Cast H), and 4-yr-old (Cast I) children were used. These casts were constructed from series of coronal magnetic resonance images of healthy children. Total deposition was measured for monodisperse NaCl or Ag aerosols between 0.0046 and 0.20 {mu}m in diameter at inspiratory and expiratory flow rates of 3, 7, and 16 L min{sup -1} (covering a near normal range of breathing rates for children of different ages). Deposition efficiency decreased with increasing particle size and flow rate, indicating that diffusion was the main deposition mechanism. Deposition efficiency also decreased with increasing age at a given flow rate and particle size. Based on information obtained and information on minute volumes for different age groups, we predicted nasal deposition in age groups ranging from 1.5- to 20-yr-old at resting breathing rates. Our results showed that the nasal deposition increases with decreasing age for a given particle size between 0.001 to 0.2 {mu}m. This information will be useful in deriving future population-wide models of respiratory tract dosimetry. 24 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Preparation of bisoprolol fumarate nasal spray and its nasal delivery in rats.

    PubMed

    Fugen, Gu; Duo, Hao; Gendalai, Meng; Chunzhi, Wu; Yi, Wang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare a nasal spray of bisoprolol fumarate (BF). The Pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of the BF nasal formulation were evaluated in Wistar rats. The BF nasal spray after administration exhibited very fast absorption and higher plasma drug concentration. The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the time to reach it (T(max)) were 409.5 ng/ml and 3.6 min for the BF nasal spray, 39.4 ng/ml and 26.7 min for the drug solution, respectively. The bioavailability of the BF nasal spray was greater than 1500.0%. Meantime, the effect of the BF nasal spray on nasal mucociliary movement was also studied with a toad palate model. The BF nasal preparation showed minor ciliotoxicity, but the adverse effect was temporary and reversible. PMID:26639509

  8. Does oral prednisolone increase the efficacy of subsequent nasal steroids in treating nasal polyposis?

    PubMed Central

    Wongsritrang, Krongthong; Ruttanaphol, Suwalee

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although combined oral and nasal steroid therapy is widely used in nasal polyposis, a subset of patients show an unfavorable therapeutic outcome. This study aimed to evaluate whether oral prednisolone produces any additive effects on subsequent nasal steroid therapy and to evaluate if any clinical variables can predict therapeutic outcome. Methods: Using a 3:2 randomization ratio, 67 patients with nasal polyposis received 50 mg of prednisolone and 47 patients received placebo daily for 2 weeks, followed by mometasone furoate nasal spray (MFNS) at 200 micrograms twice daily for 10 weeks. Clinical response was evaluated by nasal symptom score (NSS), peak expiratory flow index (PEFI), and total nasal polyps score (TNPS). Potential predictor variables were assessed by clinical history, nasal endoscopy, allergy skin test, and sinus radiography. Results: At the end of the 2-week oral steroid phase, the prednisolone group showed significantly greater improvements in all nasal symptoms, nasal airflow, and polyp size than the placebo group. In the nasal steroid phase, while the MFNS maintained the outcome improvements in the prednisolone group, all outcome variables in the placebo group showed continuing improvements. At the end of the nasal steroid phase, there were no significant differences of most outcome improvements between the two groups, except in hyposmia, PEFI, and TNPS (p = 0.049, p = 0.029, and p = 0.005, respectively). In the prednisolone group, patients with polyps grade 3 and endoscopic signs of meatal discharge showed significantly less improvement in total NSS, PEFI, and TNPS than patients with grade 1–2 size and negative metal discharge. Conclusion: In the 12-week treatment evaluation of nasal polyposis, pretreatment with oral steroids had no significant advantage for most nasal symptoms other than earlier relief; however, combined oral and nasal steroid therapy more effectively improved hyposmia, polyps size, and nasal airflow. Polyps size

  9. Double blind randomised controlled trial of two different breathing techniques in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Slader, C A; Reddel, H K; Spencer, L M; Belousova, E G; Armour, C L; Bosnic‐Anticevich, S Z; Thien, F C K; Jenkins, C R

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that breathing techniques reduce short acting β2 agonist use and improve quality of life (QoL) in asthma. The primary aim of this double blind study was to compare the effects of breathing exercises focusing on shallow nasal breathing with those of non‐specific upper body exercises on asthma symptoms, QoL, other measures of disease control, and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose. This study also assessed the effect of peak flow monitoring on outcomes in patients using breathing techniques. Methods After a 2 week run in period, 57 subjects were randomised to one of two breathing techniques learned from instructional videos. During the following 30 weeks subjects practised their exercises twice daily and as needed for relief of symptoms. After week 16, two successive ICS downtitration steps were attempted. The primary outcome variables were QoL score and daily symptom score at week 12. Results Overall there were no clinically important differences between the groups in primary or secondary outcomes at weeks 12 or 28. The QoL score remained unchanged (0.7 at baseline v 0.5 at week 28, p = 0.11 both groups combined), as did lung function and airway responsiveness. However, across both groups, reliever use decreased by 86% (p<0.0001) and ICS dose was reduced by 50% (p<0.0001; p>0.10 between groups). Peak flow monitoring did not have a detrimental effect on asthma outcomes. Conclusion Breathing techniques may be useful in the management of patients with mild asthma symptoms who use a reliever frequently, but there is no evidence to favour shallow nasal breathing over non‐specific upper body exercises. PMID:16517572

  10. Nasal Myiasis in Hinduism and Contemporary Otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Bosmia, Anand N; Zimmermann, Terence M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Shane Tubbs, R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Various case reports on nasal myiasis written during the 1990s and 2000s state that nasal myiasis, which is known as peenash among South Asian natives, is a form of divine punishment in Hindu mythology, but do not provide citations from Hindu scriptures that would suggest this interpretation. This paper aims to discuss the phenomenon of peenash in a historical context by examining medical literature written during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to identify Hindu texts contributing to the belief of some Hindus that nasal myiasis is a form of divine punishment, and to provide an overview of contemporary treatment for and management of nasal myiasis. PMID:24385004

  11. [Review: pathophysiology and methodology of nasal packing].

    PubMed

    Beule, A G; Weber, R K; Kaftan, H; Hosemann, W

    2004-08-01

    Nasal packing is a frequent procedure to control spontaneous nasal bleeding or postoperative oozing following different types of nasal surgery. It strives for internal stabilization of the nasal framework and for optimizing wound healing by prevention of stenosis or synechia. A lot of different materials is used and there is no accepted standard concerning the type and application. A review on pathophysiology of the packed nose is given together with a survey on customary packing materials focussing on the specific merits, demerits and side-effects including economical aspects. PMID:15316896

  12. Nasal and Oral Consonant Similarity in Speech Errors: Exploring Parallels with Nasal Consonant Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has found that "similar" sounds interact in phonological nasal consonant harmony, wherein certain consonants become nasals when the word contains a nasal (e.g., Kikongo: /-kun-idi/ [right arrow] [-kun-ini] "planted"). Across languages, stops and approximants are chiefly affected, especially voiced consonants and ones that match…

  13. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  14. Perception of Better Nasal Patency Correlates with Increased Mucosal Cooling after Surgery for Nasal Obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Guilherme; Sullivan, Corbin; Frank-Ito, Dennis; Kimbell, Julia; Rhee, John

    2014-11-01

    Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a common health problem with 340,000 patients undergoing surgery annually in the United States. Traditionally, otolaryngologists have focused on airspace cross-sectional areas and nasal resistance to airflow as objective measures of nasal patency, but neither of these variables correlated consistently with patients' symptoms. Given that the sensation of nasal airflow is also associated with mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) during inspiration, we investigated the correlation between the sensation of nasal obstruction and mucosal cooling in 10 patients before and after NAO surgery. Three-dimensional models of the nasal anatomy were created based on pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify nasal resistance and mucosal cooling. Patient-reported symptoms were measured by a visual analog scale and the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE), a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire. Our results revealed that the subjective sensation of nasal obstruction correlated with both nasal resistance and heat loss, but the strongest correlation was between the NOSE score and the nasal surface area where heat flux exceeds 50 W /m2 . In conclusion, a significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients' perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery.

  15. Preventive Audiology: Screening for Hearing Impairment in Children Having Recurrent URTI.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Pannu, M S; Arora, A; Sharma, V

    2016-06-01

    A late detection of hearing impairment in children can affect speech and language development. Otitis media with effusion (OME) associated with risk factors like recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) is considered the most common cause of silent hearing impairment among children. So this study was carried out to screen such at risk children for hearing impairment. The study was conducted on 1000 children in the age group of 2-12 years who presented to the OPD of ENT and Pediatrics Department, Govt Medical College with the complaint of recurrent URTI. The children were screened by history taking, general physical examination and local ENT examination. This was followed by impedance audiometry and pure tone audiometry (PTA, wherever indicated). Children with discharging ears and perforated tympanic membrane (TM) were excluded from the study. The most common presenting complaint was nasal discharge (67.9 %), followed by mouth breathing (66.3 %) and snoring (65 %). Only 16.2 % cases actually complained of some hearing impairment on exploratory history indicating the silent nature of OME. On examination 52.65 % cases had a normal looking TM whereas 41.2 % had a dull retracted TM. Results of impedance audiometry showed Type A graph in 56.75 %, Type B in 33.4 % indicating OME and Type C in 9.85 % indicating Eustachian tube dysfunction. PTA showed a mild conductive hearing loss in 26.7 % cases. OME is quite prevalent in high risk children and incidence of OME resulting in silent hearing impairment is quite high especially in young children having recurrent URTI. Impedance audiometry has been proved to be an objective screening tool for the same with a diagnostic accuracy of 87 % and thus under preventive audiology, it has a definite role in young children having recurrent URTI. PMID:27340630

  16. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  17. Smell - impaired

    MedlinePlus

    ... tell between other flavors. Some spices (such as pepper) may affect the nerves of the face. You ... help keep mucus loose and moving. Steroid nasal sprays or pills may be recommended. Vitamin A may ...

  18. Airflow in the Human Nasal Passage and Sinuses of Chronic Rhinosinusitis Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Jain, Ravi; Douglas, Richard G.; Tawhai, Merryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery is performed on patients with chronic inflammatory disease of the paranasal sinuses to improve sinus ventilation. Little is known about how sinus surgery affects sinonasal airflow. In this study nasal passage geometry was reconstructed from computed tomographic imaging from healthy normal, pre-operative, and post-operative subjects. Transient air flow through the nasal passage during calm breathing was simulated. Subject-specific differences in ventilation of the nasal passage were observed. Velocity magnitude at ostium was different between left and right airway. In FESS, airflow in post-surgical subjects, airflow at the maxillary sinus ostium was upto ten times higher during inspiration. In a Lothrop procedure, airflow at the frontal sinus ostium can be upto four times higher during inspiration. In both post-operative subjects, airflow at ostium was not quasi-steady. The subject-specific effect (of surgery) on sinonasal interaction evaluated through airflow simulations may have important consequences for pre- and post-surgical assessment and surgical planning, and design for improvement of the delivery efficiency of nasal therapeutics. PMID:27249219

  19. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  20. Bradykinin metabolism in rat and sheep nasal secretions.

    PubMed

    Chung, F Y; Donovan, M D

    1995-07-01

    The nasal secretions are the first barrier that nasally administered drugs encounter. Therefore, the characterization of peptide metabolism in the nasal secretions is essential to predict nasal peptide bioavailability. Metabolism of bradykinin was measured in rat and sheep nasal secretions to estimate the extent of degradation of nasally administered peptide compounds. A single-pass, in situ nasal perfusion technique was employed to collect secretions for the investigation of peptide metabolism in rat nasal secretions. The protein content, mucin concentration, and degree of bradykinin metabolism in perfusate aliquots collected over a 2-h period showed that the early perfusate fractions contained most of the active secretory materials. Evidence of continuous mucus secretion and plasma extravasation was found in the nasal perfusate throughout the entire collection period. Sheep nasal secretions were collected with a cotton pledget inserted into the nasal cavity. Bradykinin and its fragments were degraded by carboxypeptidases and endopeptidases present in both rat and sheep nasal secretions. Hydrolysis of Phe5-Ser6 was the major metabolism pathway of bradykinin in the rat nasal perfusate, whereas in sheep nasal secretions, hydrolysis of the Pro7-Phe8 and Phe8-Arg9 bonds also occurred. Evidence of angiotensin converting enzyme, carboxypeptide N, and aminopeptidase activity was identified in the rat nasal perfusate with specific substrates and inhibitors. The activity of these and other enzymes in the nasal secretions may significantly limit the bioavailability of nasally administered peptide drugs prior to their exposure to the nasal mucosal tissues. PMID:7562432

  1. An exposure system for measuring nasal and lung uptake of vapors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Brookins, L.K.; Gerde, P.

    1995-12-01

    Inhaled gases and vapors often produce biological damage in the nasal cavity and lower respiratory tract. The specific site within the respirator tract at which a gas or vapor is absorbed strongly influences the tissues at risk to potential toxic effects; to predict or to explain tissue or cell specific toxicity of inhaled gases or vapors, the sites at which they are absorbed must be known. The purpose of the work reported here was to develop a system for determining nose and lung absorption of vapors in rats, an animal commonly used in inhalation toxicity studies. In summary, the exposure system described allows us to measure in the rate: (1) nasal absorption and desorption of vapors; (2) net lung uptake of vapors; and (3) the effects of changed breathing parameters on vapor uptake.

  2. EOG responses in anesthetized freely breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Chaput, M A

    2000-12-01

    In mammals, access of odor molecules to the olfactory receptor neurons is controlled by respiratory activity. Thus, anesthetized, freely breathing rats were used to record from the olfactory mucosa in the intact nasal cavity (electroolfactogram or EOG) so as to study global response characteristics to odor stimuli. During alternation of the inspiratory phases of odor sampling and expiratory phases, the response was a succession of individual EOG events synchronized with respiration. These were characterized by a steep decrease that started approximately 100-150 ms after the beginning of inhalation, reached its maximum at the transition between inspiration and expiration and was followed by a slower rise until the next inhalation. They were greater during the first respiratory cycles following odor stimulation onset. Thereafter their amplitudes decreased throughout odor delivery, but a significant EOG signal was still present at the end of short (10 s) and long (60 s) odor presentations. Amplitude increased with odor concentration, but much less than expected from concentration changes. Lastly, for some odors EOG responses persisted well beyond the end of stimulation. These results are in agreement with the respiratory synchronization of mitral cell activities observed during short odor presentations and long duration odor exposures. They underline again the importance of taking into account the respiratory activity in studies on the functioning of the olfactory system. PMID:11114147

  3. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, J.S.; Frank, D.O.; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G.J.M.; Rhee, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  4. A rare cause of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, David; Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    We describe a patient with mid-facial pain and nasal obstruction due to a nasal septal abscess (NSA) complicating an occult fungal ball of the sphenoid sinus. We highlight the importance of suspecting unusual pathology in patients with NSA and no trauma history. PMID:23793181

  5. Nasal Airway Resistance: Its Measurement and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lyle H.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of regulation of nasal airway resistance (Rn). Describes methods of calculating Rn by measuring pressure-flow relationship. Data are presented on improved methods for measuring Rn and effects for expiratory and inspiratory Rn after topical application of phenylephrine nasal decongestant spray. (Author/SA)

  6. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  11. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  12. Pythiosis in the Nasal Cavity of Horses.

    PubMed

    Souto, E P F; Maia, L A; Olinda, R G; Galiza, G J N; Kommers, G D; Miranda-Neto, E G; Dantas, A F M; Riet-Correa, F

    2016-01-01

    Two cases of nasal pythiosis are reported in horses from the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil. From January 1986 to December 2015, the Laboratory of Animal Pathology, Federal University of Campina Grande received 830 equine samples, 156 (18.79%) of which were diagnosed with pythiosis. Of these, two horses (1.28%), a male and a female adult cross-breed, had lesions in the nasal cavity. Both horses had access to water reservoirs. Clinically, they had swelling in the rhinofacial region and a serosanguineous nasal discharge. Macroscopically, in case 1, the lesion affected the nasal vestibule, extending to the alar cartilage and nasal septum. In case 2, the lesion extended through the turbinates and the meatuses of the nasal cavity, as well as the ethmoid region. In both cases, the lesions were characterized by having a yellow-grey granular surface with cavitations of different sizes containing coral-like masses of necrotic tissue (kunkers). Histologically, multifocal necrotizing eosinophilic rhinitis associated with hyphae (2-8 μm) similar to Pythium insidiosum were observed. In case 2, the lesions extended to the muscle, cartilage and bone adjacent to the nasal cavity and lungs. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. It is concluded that nasal pythiosis occurs sporadically in horses in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil where cutaneous pythiosis is prevalent. PMID:27406311

  13. Mouth breathing in allergic children: its relationship to dentofacial development.

    PubMed

    Bresolin, D; Shapiro, P A; Shapiro, G G; Chapko, M K; Dassel, S

    1983-04-01

    While there are many claims that abnormal breathing patterns alter facial growth, there are limited controlled data to confirm this. We evaluated forty-five North American Caucasians of both sexes, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years. Thirty chronically allergic mouth-breathing subjects were selected from a pediatric allergy practice, and fifteen nonallergic nose breathers were selected from a general pediatric practice. Each subject underwent an intraoral clinical examination and a cephalometric radiograph analysis. Various skeletal and dental relationships were evaluated for statistical differences related to mode of breathing and age. The upper anterior facial height and the total anterior facial height were significantly larger in the mouth breathers. Angular relationships of the sella-nasion, palatal, and occlusal planes to the mandibular plane were greater in the mouth breathers, and their gonial angles were larger. The mouth breathers' maxillae and mandibles were more retrognathic. Palatal height was higher, and overjet was greater in the mouth breathers. Maxillary intermolar width was narrower in the mouth breathers and was associated with a higher prevalence of posterior cross-bite. Over all, mouth breathers had longer faces with narrower maxillae and retrognathic jaws. This supports previous claims that nasal airway obstruction is associated with aberrant facial growth. Longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of early intervention in preventing these growth alterations. PMID:6573147

  14. Investigation of breathing parameters during odor perception and olfactory imagery.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, A M; Kopietz, R; Albrecht, J; Schöpf, V; Pollatos, O; Schreder, T; May, J; Linn, J; Brückmann, H; Wiesmann, M

    2009-01-01

    Compared with visual and auditory imagery, little is known about olfactory imagery. There is evidence that respiration may be altered by both olfactory perception and olfactory imagery. In order to investigate this relationship, breathing parameters (respiratory minute volume, respiratory amplitude, and breathing rate) in human subjects during olfactory perception and olfactory imagery were investigated. Fifty-six subjects having normal olfactory function were tested. Nasal respiration was measured using a respiratory pressure sensor. Using an experimental block design, we alternately presented odors or asked the subjects to imagine a given smell. Four different pleasant odors were used: banana, rose, coffee, and lemon odor. We detected a significant increase in respiratory minute volume between olfactory perception and the baseline condition as well as between olfactory imagery and baseline condition. Additionally we found significant differences in the respiratory amplitude between imagery and baseline condition and between odor and imagery condition. Differences in the breathing rate between olfactory perception, olfactory imagery, and baseline were not statistically significant. We conclude from our results that olfactory perception and olfactory imagery both have effects on the human respiratory profile and that these effects are based on a common underlying mechanism. PMID:18701432

  15. Extrathoracic and intrathoracic removal of O3 in tidal-breathing humans

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrity, T.R.; Weaver, R.A.; Berntsen, J.; House, D.E.; O'Neil, J.J.

    1988-07-01

    We measured the efficiency of O3 removal from inspired air by the extrathoracic and intrathoracic airways in 18 healthy, nonsmoking, young male volunteers. Removal efficiencies were measured as a function of O3 concentration (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 ppm), mode of breathing (nose only, mouth only, and oronasal), and respiration frequency (12 and 24 breaths/min). Subjects were placed in a controlled environmental chamber into which O3 was introduced. A small polyethylene tube was then inserted into the nose of each subject, with the tip positioned in the posterior pharynx. Samples of air were collected from the posterior pharynx through the tube and into a rapidly responding O3 analyzer yielding inspiratory and expiratory O3 concentrations in the posterior pharynx. The O3 removal efficiency of the extrathoracic airways was computed with the use of the inspiratory concentration and the chamber concentration, and intrathoracic removal efficiency was computed with the use of the inspiratory and expiratory concentrations. The mean extrathoracic removal efficiency for all measurements was 39.6 +/- 0.7% (SE), and the mean intrathoracic removal efficiency was 91.0 +/- 0.5%. Significantly less O3 was removed both extrathoracically and intrathoracically when subjects breathed at 24 breaths/min compared with 12 breaths/min (P less than 0.001). O3 concentration had no effect on extrathoracic removal efficiency, but there was a significantly greater intrathoracic removal efficiency at 0.4 ppm than at 0.1 ppm (P less than 0.05). Mode of breathing significantly affected extrathoracic removal efficiency, with less O3 removed during nasal breathing than during either mouth breathing or oronasal breathing (P less than 0.01).

  16. Mechanisms of nasal high flow on ventilation during wakefulness and sleep.

    PubMed

    Mündel, Toby; Feng, Sheng; Tatkov, Stanislav; Schneider, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Nasal high flow (NHF) has been shown to increase expiratory pressure and reduce respiratory rate but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Ten healthy participants [age, 22 ± 2 yr; body mass index (BMI), 24 ± 2 kg/m(2)] were recruited to determine ventilatory responses to NHF of air at 37°C and fully saturated with water. We conducted a randomized, controlled, cross-over study consisting of four separate ∼60-min visits, each 1 wk apart, to determine the effect of NHF on ventilation during wakefulness (NHF at 0, 15, 30, and 45 liters/min) and sleep (NHF at 0, 15, and 30 liters/min). In addition, a nasal cavity model was used to compare pressure/air-flow relationships of NHF and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) throughout simulated breathing. During wakefulness, NHF led to an increase in tidal volume from 0.7 ± 0.1 liter to 0.8 ± 0.2, 1.0 ± 0.2, and 1.3 ± 0.2 liters, and a reduction in respiratory rate (fR) from 16 ± 2 to 13 ± 3, 10 ± 3, and 8 ± 3 breaths/min (baseline to 15, 30, and 45 liters/min NHF, respectively; P < 0.01). In contrast, during sleep, NHF led to a ∼20% fall in minute ventilation due to a decrease in tidal volume and no change in fR. In the nasal cavity model, NHF increased expiratory but decreased inspiratory resistance depending on both the cannula size and the expiratory flow rate. The mechanisms of action for NHF differ from those of CPAP and are sleep/wake-state dependent. NHF may be utilized to increase tidal breathing during wakefulness and to relieve respiratory loads during sleep. PMID:23412897

  17. Nasal T cell lymphoma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Maliha; Ikram, Mubasher; Junaid, Montasir

    2014-03-01

    Nasal type of Natural Killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma manifests in the nasal cavity. Approximately 95% of them are associated with EBV(Ebstein Barr Virus) with a strong predilection for the Asian population. It has certain systemic and localized symptoms which aid in diagnosis of the condition. However, the histological criteria is pivotal in confirming the diagnosis as well as aiding in confirming the association of EBV. Nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma has a guarded prognosis. Treatment plan include radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Despite all this, the 5-year survival rate ranges from 15-75%. A 35 years old male presented with an ulcerative nasal lesion. Diagnosed as nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma via a tissue biopsy, it was managed by chemo-radiotherapy leading to complete resolution of symptoms and disease free on his follow-up 6 months later. PMID:24718007

  18. Clinical applications of breath testing

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years. PMID:21173863

  19. BREATHE to Understand©

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisa, Maxine

    2015-01-01

    BREATHE is an acronym for Breathe, Reflect, Empathize, Accept, Thank, Hearten, Engage. The addition of Understand allows for a holistic approach to living a healthy and balanced life both inside and outside the classroom. This paper took form as a result of my personal, spiritual journey, as well as my teaching practice. I noticed that the…

  20. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  1. SCUBA Diving for Blind and Visually Impaired People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candela, Anthony R.

    1982-01-01

    The author, a trained scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diver who is severely visually impaired provides an orientation to scuba diving as a leisure and career activity. (Author/SB)

  2. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  3. Functional nasal morphology of chimaerid fishes.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lauren E; Holmes, William M; Ferrando, Sara; Maclaine, James S; Kelsh, Robert N; Ramsey, Andrew; Abel, Richard L; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2013-09-01

    Holocephalans (chimaeras) are a group of marine fishes comprising three families: the Callorhinchidae (callorhinchid fishes), the Rhinochimaeridae (rhinochimaerid fishes) and the Chimaeridae (chimaerid fishes). We have used X-ray microcomputed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to characterise in detail the nasal anatomy of three species of chimaerid fishes: Chimaera monstrosa, C. phantasma and Hydrolagus colliei. We have shown that the nasal chamber of these three species is linked to the external environment by an incurrent channel and to the oral cavity by an excurrent channel via an oral groove. A protrusion of variable morphology is present on the medial wall of the incurrent channel in all three species, but is absent in members of the two other holocephalan families that we inspected. A third nasal channel, the lateral channel, functionally connects the incurrent nostril to the oral cavity, by-passing the nasal chamber. From anatomical reconstructions, we have proposed a model for the circulation of water, and therefore the transport of odorant, in the chimaerid nasal region. In this model, water could flow through the nasal region via the nasal chamber or the lateral channel. In either case, the direction of flow could be reversed. Circulation through the entire nasal region is likely to be driven primarily by the respiratory pump. We have identified several anatomical features that may segregate, distribute, facilitate and regulate flow in the nasal region and have considered the consequences of flow reversal. The non-sensory cilia lining the olfactory sensory channels appear to be mucus-propelling, suggesting that these cilia have a common protective role in cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays and chimaeras). The nasal region of chimaerid fishes shows at least two adaptations to a benthic lifestyle, and suggests good olfactory sensitivity, with secondary folding enhancing the hypothetical flat sensory surface area by up to 70%. PMID:23630172

  4. Influence of Mouth Breathing on the Dentofacial Growth of Children: A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Bahija; Hegde, K Sundeep; Bhat, Sham S; Umar, Dilshad; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Background: The involvement of mouth breathing, facial, and structural growth alterations, especially during childhood has been discussed in medical and dental literature. The relevance of airway obstruction and its assumed effect on facial growth continues to be debated. Materials and Methods: This study was aimed at assessing the dental and soft tissue abnormalities in mouth breathing children with and without adenoid hypertrophy. Fifty children aged between 6 and 12 years following otolaryngological examination were divided into three groups: Group I (MBA): Twenty mouth breathing children with enlarged adenoids and 60% of nasopharynx obstruction; Group II (MB): Twenty mouth breathing children without any nasal obstruction; Group III (nasal breathers [NB]): Ten nose breathing healthy individuals (control group). Digital lateral cephalograms were obtained and the dental and soft tissue parameters were assessed using the cephalometric software, Dolphin Imaging 11.5 version. Comparison was done using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in IMPA (P = 0.001 and 0.007 respectively), interlabial gap (P = 0.007 and 0.002 respectively) and facial convexity (P < 0.001 and 0.001 respectively) in both MBA and MB groups when compared to NB. The upper incisor proclination (P = 0.012) and facial convexity (P = 0.003) were significantly higher in mouthbreathers with adenoid hypertrophy. However, upper incisor proclination (P = 0.009) was statistically signifi cant only in group MB when compared to NB. Conclusion: All subjects with mouth-breathing habit exhibited a significant increase in lower incisor proclination, lip incompetency and convex facial profile. The presence of adenoids accentuated the facial convexity and mentolabial sulcus depth. PMID:25628484

  5. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  6. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  7. Breathing rhythms and emotions.

    PubMed

    Homma, Ikuo; Masaoka, Yuri

    2008-09-01

    Respiration is primarily regulated for metabolic and homeostatic purposes in the brainstem. However, breathing can also change in response to changes in emotions, such as sadness, happiness, anxiety or fear. Final respiratory output is influenced by a complex interaction between the brainstem and higher centres, including the limbic system and cortical structures. Respiration is important in maintaining physiological homeostasis and co-exists with emotions. In this review, we focus on the relationship between respiration and emotions by discussing previous animal and human studies, including studies of olfactory function in relation to respiration and the piriform-amygdala in relation to respiration. In particular, we discuss oscillations of piriform-amygdala complex activity and respiratory rhythm. PMID:18487316

  8. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  9. [Long-term effects of home mechanical ventilation with positive pressure using a nasal mask].

    PubMed

    Escarrabill, J; Estopà, R; Robert, D; Casolivé, V; Manresa, F

    1991-10-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an efficient alternative in the treatment of patients with chronic respiratory failure secondary to restrictive mechanical disorders (neuromuscular disease, such as Duchenne's disease, thorax deformities due to kyphoscoliosis or tuberculosis sequelae). The case of a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis in the phase of chronic respiratory failure (PaO2 34 mmHg and PaCO2 61 mmHg, breathing ambient air) is presented in which, following the failure of negative pressure mechanical ventilation ("poncho"), positive pressure ventilation was tested with a silicon made-to-measure nasal mask as the access via. Adaptation to HMV was good with the patient using the ventilation nightly. Following 12 months of treatment the patient is able to carry out everyday activities and arterial gasometry breathing ambient air is PaO2 77 mmHg and PaCO2 43 mmHg. PMID:1961049

  10. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  11. Nasal Septal Deviation and Facial Skeletal Asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christopher; Holton, Nathan; Miller, Steven; Yokley, Todd; Marshall, Steven; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Southard, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    During ontogeny, the nasal septum exerts a morphogenetic influence on the surrounding facial skeleton. While the influence of the septum is well established in long snouted animal models, its role in human facial growth is less clear. If the septum is a facial growth center in humans, we would predict that deviated septal growth would be associated with facial skeletal asymmetries. Using computed tomographic (CT) scans of n = 55 adult subjects, the purpose of this study was to test whether there is a correlation between septal deviation and facial asymmetries using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric techniques. We calculated deviation as a percentage of septal volume relative to the volume of a modeled non-deviated septum. We then recorded skeletal landmarks representing the nasal, palatal, and lateral facial regions. Landmark data were superimposed using Procrustes analysis. First, we examined the correlation between nasal septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry. Next, we assessed whether there was a relationship between nasal septal deviation and more localized aspects of asymmetry using multivariate regression analysis. Our results indicate that while there was no correlation between septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry, septal deviation was associated with asymmetry primarily in the nasal floor and the palatal region. Septal deviation was unassociated with asymmetries in the lateral facial skeleton. Though we did not test the causal relationship between nasal septal deviation and facial asymmetry, our results suggest that the nasal septum may have an influence on patterns of adult facial form. PMID:26677010

  12. Nonneoplastic nasal lesions in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T; Uraih, L

    1990-01-01

    Rodents are commonly used for inhalation toxicology studies, but until recently the nasal passages have often been overlooked or only superficially examined. The rodent nose is a complex organ in which toxicant-induced lesions may vary, depending on the test compound. A working knowledge of rodent nasal anatomy and histology is essential for the proper evaluation of these responses. Lack of a systematic approach for examining rodent nasal tissue has led to a paucity of information regarding nonneoplastic lesions in the rodent nose. Therefore, slides from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) were examined, and the literature was reviewed to assemble the spectrum of nonneoplastic rodent nasal pathology. Presented are lesions associated with the various types of epithelia lining the rodent nasal cavity plus lesions involving accessory nasal structures. Even though there are anatomic and physiologic differences between the rodent and human nose, both rats and mice provide valuable animal models for the study of nasal epithelial toxicity, following administration of chemical compounds. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PLATE 16. PLATE 17. PLATE 18. PLATE 19. PLATE 20. PLATE 21. PLATE 22. PLATE 23. PLATE 24. PLATE 25. PLATE 26. PLATE 27. PLATE 28. PLATE 29. PLATE 30. PLATE 31. PLATE 32. PLATE 33. PLATE 34. PLATE 35. PLATE 36. PLATE 37. PLATE 38. PMID:2200665

  13. Canine and feline nasal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Christine

    2006-05-01

    Dogs and cats of our society have outgrown their status as merely pets and are now considered our close companions and even family members. This shift in their roles has led to pet owners seeking improved preventative medicine for their four-legged friends. Subsequently, dogs and cats are living longer lives than ever before and developing more old-age-related diseases. One of the most devastating diseases of older animals is cancer. Once a veterinarian has detected cancer in a pet, pet owners seek advice on their next course of action. This article is intended to provide concise information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of intranasal tumors of the dog and cat. This article outlines the forms of nasal tumors that are the most common, the recommended imaging and biopsy techniques to diagnose the tumor, and the most appropriate treatments of them. PMID:16711615

  14. Does nasal decongestion improve obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Clarenbach, Christian F; Kohler, Malcolm; Senn, Oliver; Thurnheer, Robert; Bloch, Konrad E

    2008-12-01

    Whether nasal congestion promotes obstructive sleep apnea is controversial. Therefore, we performed a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial on the effects of topical nasal decongestion in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and nasal congestion. Twelve OSA patients with chronic nasal congestion (mean +/- SD age 49.1 +/- 11.1 years, apnea/hypopnea index 32.6 +/- 24.5/h) were treated with nasal xylometazoline or placebo for 1 week each. At the end of treatment periods, polysomnography including monitoring of nasal conductance by an unobtrusive technique, vigilance by the OSLER test, and symptom scores were assessed. Data from xylometazoline and placebo treatments were compared. Mean nocturnal nasal conductance on xylometazoline was significantly higher than on placebo (8.6 +/- 5.3 versus 6.3 +/- 5.8 mL s(-1)Pa(-1), P < 0.05) but the apnea/hypopnea index was similar (29.3 +/- 32.5/h versus 33.2 +/- 32.8/h, P = NS). However, 30-210 min after application of xylometazoline, at the time of the maximal pharmacologic effect, the apnea/hypopnea index was slightly reduced (27.3 +/- 30.5/h versus 33.2 +/- 33.9/h, P < 0.05). Xylometazoline did not alter sleep quality, sleep resistance time (33.6 +/- 8.8 versus 33.4 +/- 10.1 min, P = NS) and subjective sleepiness (Epworth score 10.5 +/- 3.8 versus 11.8 +/- 4.4, P = NS). The reduced apnea/hypopnea index during maximal nasal decongestion by xylometazoline suggests a pathophysiologic link but the efficacy of nasal decongestion was not sufficient to provide a clinically substantial improvement of OSA. PMID:18710420

  15. A computational fluid dynamics approach to assess interhuman variability in hydrogen sulfide nasal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kimbell, Julia S

    2010-03-01

    Human exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) gas occurs from natural and industrial sources and can result in dose-related neurological, respiratory, and cardiovascular effects. Olfactory neuronal loss in H(2)S-exposed rats has been used to develop occupational and environmental exposure limits. Using nasal computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, a correlation was found between wall mass flux and olfactory neuronal loss in rodents, suggesting an influence of airflow patterns on lesion locations that may affect interspecies extrapolation of inhaled dose. Human nasal anatomy varies considerably within a population, potentially affecting airflow patterns and dosimetry of inhaled gases. This study investigates interhuman variability of H(2)S nasal dosimetry using anatomically accurate CFD models of the nasal passages of five adults and two children generated from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scan data. Using allometrically equivalent breathing rates, steady-state inspiratory airflow and H(2)S uptake were simulated. Approximate locations of olfactory epithelium were mapped in each model to compare air:tissue flux in the olfactory region among individuals. The fraction of total airflow to the olfactory region ranged from 2% to 16%. Despite this wide range in olfactory airflow, H(2)S dosimetry in the olfactory region was predicted to be similar among individuals. Differences in the 99 th percentile and average flux values were <1.2-fold at inhaled concentrations of 1, 5, and 10 ppm. These preliminary results suggest that differences in nasal anatomy and ventilation among adults and children do not have a significant effect on H(2)S dosimetry in the olfactory region. PMID:20064104

  16. Nose and Nasal Planum Neoplasia, Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Worley, Deanna R

    2016-07-01

    Most intranasal lesions are best treated with radiation therapy. Computed tomographic imaging with intravenous contrast is critical for treatment planning. Computed tomographic images of the nose will best assess the integrity of the cribriform plate for central nervous system invasion by a nasal tumor. Because of an owner's emotional response to an altered appearance of their dog's face, discussions need to include the entire family before proceeding with nasal planectomy or radical planectomy. With careful case selection, nasal planectomy and radical planectomy surgeries can be locally curative. PMID:26968300

  17. Case report: unilateral mydriasis following nasal cautery.

    PubMed

    Koo Ng, Nigel K F; Calder, Nick

    2010-12-01

    We report a case of unilateral mydriasis following nasal electrocautery presumed to be the result of retrograde flow of adrenaline and/or xylometazoline hydrochloride (Otrivine) through the nasolacrimal duct into the eye. We review the literature and highlight the importance of correct interpretation of finding a dilated pupil post-operatively. To our knowledge. we report the first such case involving xylometazoline hydrochloride and also following nasal electrocautery. Unilateral mydriasis is alarming after nasal surgery but must be interpreted with caution. During minimally invasive procedures it is likely to be due to the effects of topical medication to the nose rather than surgical trauma. PMID:21158576

  18. Pharmacology of Nasal Medications: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article reviews the pharmacology of nasal medication, focusing on the indications and side-effects. The newer group of non-sedating antihistamines proves to be a useful supplement to disodium cromoglycate and the traditional antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The topical steroids (flunisolide and beclomethasone dipropionate) did not produce a significant incidence of adrenal suppression, mucosal atrophy, or nasal candidiasis. The anticholinergic ipatropium bromide shows promise in the treatment of rhinorrhea. The author also reviews the use of decongestants and emollients and remarks on the factors that affect patient compliance when nasal medications are prescribed. PMID:20469495

  19. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control shortness of breath: Call your doctor, palliative care team, or hospice nurse for advice Call 911 ... Bicanovsky L. Comfort care: symptom control in the dying. In: Walsh ... . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 181.

  20. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  1. Liquid-Air Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact unit supplies air longer than compressed-air unit. Emergency breathing apparatus stores air as cryogenic liquid instead of usual compressed gas. Intended for firefighting or rescue operations becoming necessary during planned potentially hazardous procedures.

  2. Effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Dávila, I; Sastre, J; Mullol, J; Montoro, J; Jáuregui, I; Ferrer, M; del Cuvillo, A; Bartra, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    H1 antihistamines constitute one of the main references for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Classically, these drugs have been considered effective in controlling sneezing, rhinorrhea and itching, though they have not been regarded as particularly effective in application to nasal obstruction. The most recent studies, involving second-generation H1 antihistamines (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, rupatadine), have shown these drugs to offer effects upon nasal obstruction significantly superior to those of placebo. The present review examines the effect of bilastine, a new, potent and highly specific H1 antihistamine without sedative effects or cardiac toxicity, upon nasal obstruction. The analysis of the data from the different clinical trials indicates that in patients with allergic rhinitis, the effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction is superior to that of placebo and similar to that of other second-generation H1 antihistamines, manifesting within 24 hours after the start of treatment. PMID:22185044

  3. Nasal Chondromesenchymal Hamartoma in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Finitsis, Stefanos; Giavroglou, Constantinos; Potsi, Stamatia; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Mpaltatzidis, Angelos; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Tzioufa, Valentini

    2009-05-15

    Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma (NCMH) is a benign tumor that was described in 1998. The occurrence of this lesion in the nasal cavity of infants and children is especially rare, with only 21 cases reported in the international literature. We report a 12-month-old boy with respiratory distress due to nasal obstruction. Computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a soft-tissue mass obstructing the left nasal cavity. Digital subtraction angiography and preoperative superselective embolization with microparticles were also performed. The tumor was completely resected surgically. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor disclosed a NCMH. The imaging characteristics of the tumor are described and the radiology literature is reviewed.

  4. NASAL cytology: practical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Quaranta, N; Landi, M; Passalacqua, G

    2016-06-01

    Nasal cytology is a simple and safe diagnostic procedure that allows to assess the normal and pathological aspects of the nasal mucosa, by identifying and counting the cell types and their morphology. It can be easily performed by a nasal scraping followed by May-Grunwald-Giemsa staining and optical microscopy reading. This procedure allows to identify the normal cells (ciliated and mucinous), the inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells), bacteria, or fungal hyphae/spores. Apart from the normal cell population, some specific cytological patterns can be of help in discriminating among various diseases. Viral infections, allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis and overlapping forms can be easily identified. According to the predominant cell type, various entities can be defined (named as NARES, NARESMA, NARMA). This implies a more detailed knowledge and assessment of the disease that can integrate the standard diagnostic procedures. Nasal cytology also represents a useful research tool for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27009397

  5. [Diagnostic methods of nasal respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Mlynski, G; Beule, A

    2008-01-01

    Objective assessment of nasal obstruction may help with preoperative planning for rhinosurgery and indicate different aspects of endonasal pathology. To improve quality control, preoperative and postoperative objective assessment is desirable. This review presents objective functional diagnostic tools and explains their appropriate uses, the information obtained, and their limitations. An algorithm is presented for analysing nasal obstruction by means of objective functional assessment. Examples illustrate how to use this information for preoperative planning in rhinosurgery. PMID:18210011

  6. Numerical simulation and nasal air-conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Tilman; Lindemann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Heating and humidification of the respiratory air are the main functions of the nasal airways in addition to cleansing and olfaction. Optimal nasal air conditioning is mandatory for an ideal pulmonary gas exchange in order to avoid desiccation and adhesion of the alveolar capillary bed. The complex three-dimensional anatomical structure of the nose makes it impossible to perform detailed in vivo studies on intranasal heating and humidification within the entire nasal airways applying various technical set-ups. The main problem of in vivo temperature and humidity measurements is a poor spatial and time resolution. Therefore, in vivo measurements are feasible only to a restricted extent, solely providing single temperature values as the complete nose is not entirely accessible. Therefore, data on the overall performance of the nose are only based on one single measurement within each nasal segment. In vivo measurements within the entire nose are not feasible. These serious technical issues concerning in vivo measurements led to a large number of numerical simulation projects in the last few years providing novel information about the complex functions of the nasal airways. In general, numerical simulations merely calculate predictions in a computational model, e.g. a realistic nose model, depending on the setting of the boundary conditions. Therefore, numerical simulations achieve only approximations of a possible real situation. The aim of this review is the synopsis of the technical expertise on the field of in vivo nasal air conditioning, the novel information of numerical simulations and the current state of knowledge on the influence of nasal and sinus surgery on nasal air conditioning. PMID:22073112

  7. Deposition of radon progeny in nonhuman primate nasal airways

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.; Morgan, K.T.

    1992-12-31

    Radon progeny are usually associated with ultrafine particles ranging in diameter from 0.001 to 0.005 {mu}m for {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} progeny and from 0.005 to 0.2 {mu}m for those attached to indoor aerosols. To assess the health effects of inhaling indoor radon progeny, it is necessary to study the regional deposition of these inhaled ultrafine particles. Laboratory animals are often used in studies of the toxicity of inhaled particles and vapors. Information on the deposition of particles larger than 0.2 {mu}m in the nasal passages of laboratory animals is available; however, there is little information on the deposition of particles smaller than 0.2 {mu}m. In this report, we describe the use of nasal casts of a rhesus monkey to measure total deposition of ultrafine aerosols, including unattached {sup 220}Rn progeny, in a unidirectional-flow inhalation exposure system. Deposition data were obtained for monodisperse silver aerosols with particle sizes ranging from 0.005 to 0.2 {mu}m, at several inspiratory and expiratory flow rates that represented normal breathing as well as hypo- and hyperventiliation. In addition, we studied the deposition of unattached {sup 22-}Rn progeny, at particle sizes from 0.001 to 0.003 {mu}m. The deposition efficiency decreased with increasing particle size, indicating that diffusion was the dominant deposition mechanism. The effect of flow rate was essentially negligible. Based on assumptions that turbulent flow and complete mixing of aerosols occur in the nasal airways, a general equation E = 1-exp (-a D{sup b}Q{sup c}) for d{sub p} {<=} 0.2 {mu}m, was derived, where E is the deposition efficiency, d{sub p} is the particle diameter, D is the diffusion coefficient, and Q is the flow rate. Constants a, b, and c are estimated from experimental data, for either inspiration or expiration. This mathematical expression will be useful for making modifications to both deposition and dosimetry models.

  8. Hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  9. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  10. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Divya; Sharma, Sonal; Agarwal, Sarla; Saha, Rumpa; Gupta, Neelima

    2016-09-01

    To detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in nasal polyps. A case-control study was conducted enrolling 35 patients with nasal polyps (cases) and patients undergoing septoplasty (controls). Fresh tissue samples were used for urea broth test and imprint cytology, while formalin fixed tissue sections were used for morphology, special stains and immunohistochemistry for H. pylori. Fresh stool samples from both groups were tested to correlate the gastrointestinal status. H. pylori was detected in 40.0 % (14/35) of cases and 8.5 % of controls (3/35) (p = 0.004) by immunohistochemistry. Amongst cases, eight were positive with urea broth test, six with imprint cytology (Giemsa stain), three with H & E, and nine with modified McMullen's stain. Hyperplasia of the lining epithelium and lymphoid aggregates were significantly noticed in nasal polyps positive for H. pylori. Stool antigen test was positive in subjects who were positive for H. pylori in the nasal mucosa. There appears to be an association between H. pylori and nasal polyps. Immunohistochemistry is more sensitive and specific method to detect H. pylori. H. pylori induced inflammatory tissue reaction pattern indicates a possible causal association. Further studies are needed to prove the causal relationship between H. pylori and nasal polyps. PMID:26830396

  11. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of the Nasal Septum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

  12. A Novel Approach for Full-Thickness Defect of the Nasal Alar Rim: Primary Closure of the Defect and Reduction of the Contralateral Normal Ala for Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Min-Woo

    2015-01-01

    In full-thickness defects of the nasal alar rim, to achieve projection and maintain airway patency, cartilage graft is frequently needed. However, cartilage graft presents a challenge in considerations such as appropriate donor site, skeletal shape and size, and healing of the donor area. To avoid these demerits, we tried primary closure of alar rim defects by also making the contralateral normal ala smaller. We treated two patients who had a full-thickness nasal alar defect after tumor excision. Cartilage graft was considered for the reconstruction. However, their alar rims were overly curved and their nostril openings were large. To utilize their nasal shape, we did primary closure of the defect rather than cartilage graft, and then downsized the contralateral nasal ala by means of wedge resection to make the alae symmetric. Both patients were satisfied with their aesthetic results, which showed a smaller nostril and nearly straight alar rims. Moreover, functionally, there was no discomfort during breathing in both patients. We propose our idea as one of the reconstruction options for nasal alar defects. It is a simple and easy-to-perform procedure, in addition to enhancing the nasal contour. This method would be useful for patients with a large nostril and an overly curved alar rim. PMID:26719646

  13. [Peculiarities of respiration mechanics in spontaneously breathing newborn infants. 1. Principles of the measurement technics].

    PubMed

    Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    1983-01-01

    Disturbances of breathing mechanics may involve disturbances of ventilation as one cause of hypoxaemia. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of breathing mechanics has several diagnostical and therapeutical advantages, but their application in newborns, under conditions of spontaneous ventilation, is rendered more difficult by the missing co-operation of the newborns and by the missing of suitable measurement devices for a bedside measurement. The determination of parameters of breathing mechanics is based on the measurement of breathing flow rate (V), tidal volume (VT) and esophageal pressure (Pe). Bodyplethysmographs, face masks and nasal prongs can be used for the measurement of V and VT, however, face masks have the most methodological and technical advantages for the bedside application, moreover, they guarantee a very low injury of newborns. Until now the fluid-filled open catheter is used most frequently for the measurement of esophageal pressure, however, it will be replaced in future by the microtip pressure transducer (Tip-catheter), which offers fundamental advantages. In addition to these technical problems the complete clinical application of breathing mechanical investigations is rendered more difficult, because the standardization of the investigative conditions, the parameters and the proposals on evaluation techniques are absent until now. PMID:6670321

  14. Effects of formaldehyde inhalation on the junctional proteins of nasal respiratory mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Arican, R Yavuz; Sahin, Zeliha; Ustunel, Ismail; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Ozdem, Sadi; Oguz, Nurettin

    2009-07-01

    Exposure to formaldehyde, which is an organic compound, disturbs the integrity of nasal mucosa. In this study, we aimed to clarify the protein changes in the junctional complex of nasal mucosa of Wistar rats exposed to formaldehyde inhalation. The study was performed in 20 female Wistar rats. Rats were divided into two groups randomly. Control rats were allowed free access to standard rat chaw and tap water (n:10). Experimental group was exposed to formaldehyde vapor at 15ppm, 6h/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks (n:10). Histological evaluation of the experimental model was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stainings of paraffin-embedded nasal mucosa tissues and by electron microscopy. The effects of formaldehyde inhalation on the distribution of occludin, E-cadherin, and gamma-catenin were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The nasal mucosa of the experimental group was correlated with hypertrophy in goblet cell, degeneration in basal lamina, stratification of epithelium, and proliferation. Thickness of basal lamina and also local degenerative regions, vacuole increase in cytoplasmic areas, irregular forms of kinocilium and loss of sharpness in the kinocilium membrane were the findings at the ultrastructural level. The expressions of E-cadherin, occludin, gamma-catenin proteins in intercellular junctional complexes of rat nasal mucosa were also decreased in experimental group compared to control group. The findings of the present study indicated that formaldehyde vapor inhalation in the concentrations and duration of exposure used in the present experiment significantly decreased the density of structural proteins of the junctional complex in the nasoepithelium. It was suggested that, the formaldehyde inhalation could cause complete impairment of intercellular junctional complexes and disturb the tissue integrity in nasal mucosa at higher concentrations. PMID:18996001

  15. Treatment of recurrent nasal polyp using the ultrapulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wu-Yan; Cheng, Jun-Ping; Chen, Cheng-Wei

    1998-11-01

    The recurrent nasal polyp complicated with nasosinusitis offer reflareacutely, and even form which various encranial and eye's compliances and lost smell are resulted. It is shown that the problem can cause the blocked breathes and bad sleeping of afflicted patients only if their nasal polyp was not completely cut out and relapsed into an action repeatedly. It is a goal procedure for ultrapulse CO2 laser manufactured by Coherent Corp. Ltd. USA treating the problem. The machine gives out a great high power of pulse mode that destroyed precisely the polyp tissue by its vaporization. However, neither the continual laser nor the pulse laser does so easily. The selected cases included fiber persons with recurrent nasal polyp who were at the age range of 25-40 years old and took a different ill-period of 5-20 years long. They consisted of 3 cases for posterior rhinopolypus with bent nasoseta and 2 cases for median rhinopolypus. Majority of them experienced traditional operations of four times and at least for two times, but the relapse of rhinopolypus always adhere to them.

  16. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis: A Case of Nasal Mass, Necrotic Lung, and Normal Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Zungsontiporn, Nath; O-charoen, Pichaya; Changcharoen, Bhisit; Bolger, Dennis T

    2015-09-01

    A diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) can be challenging given various clinical manifestations. We report an incident case of GPA presenting with chronic sinusitis and mimicking an early lung abscess without renal involvement. A 51 year-old woman with chronic obstructive sinusitis presented with subacute dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain and fever. Physical examination revealed a right nasal mass without discharge or bleeding. Decreased to absent breath sounds and dullness to percussion were noted at the left lung base. Laboratory findings were significant for leukocytosis but normal renal function. The chest CT demonstrated dense consolidation with hypo-enhancement of the lingula. The sinus CT revealed an enhancing mass in the right nasal cavity and anterior ethmoid sinuses with associated bony destruction. Patient did not improve with empiric antibiotics for lung abscess. Aspiration of the lingular fluid showed purulent material, however, microbes did not grow in culture. A positive C-ANCA screen was confirmed. A right nasal biopsy was performed which revealed granulomatous inflammation with focal necrosis and vasculitis. The final diagnosis was GPA. Given various clinical manifestations, the diagnosis of GPA can be difficult to distinguish from infectious etiologies. This can delay the treatment, which may be life-saving and organ sparing. We emphasize that an initial screening ANCA serology test is recommended in patients with suggestive clinical findings of GPA. Biopsy of an affected organ is paramount for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:26793412

  17. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  18. Objective Measures in Aesthetic and Functional Nasal Surgery – Perspectives on Nasal Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin S.; Garcia, Guilherme J.M.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The outcomes of aesthetic and functional nasal surgery are difficult to assess objectively due to the intricate balance between nasal form and function. Despite historical emphasis on patient-reported subjective measures, objective measures are gaining importance in both research and the current outcomes-driven healthcare environment. Objective measures presently available have several shortcomings which limit their routine clinical use. In particular, the low correlation between objective and subjective measures poses a major challenge. However, advances in computer, imaging, and bioengineering technology are now setting the stage for the development of innovative objective assessment tools for nasal surgery that can potentially address some of the current limitations. Assessment of nasal form following aesthetic surgery is evolving from two-dimensional analysis to more sophisticated three-dimensional analysis. Similarly, assessment of nasal function is evolving with the introduction of computational fluid dynamics techniques, which allow for a detailed description of the biophysics of nasal airflow. In this paper, we present an overview of objective measures in both aesthetic and functional nasal surgery and discuss future trends and applications that have the potential to change the way we assess nasal form and function. PMID:20665410

  19. Numerical study of the effect of the nasal cycle on unilateral nasal resistance.

    PubMed

    Jo, Gyehwan; Chung, Seung-Kyu; Na, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to study the effects of the nasal cycle on the modification of unilateral nasal resistance using nasal cavity models from 2 different patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. A steady airflow field with an inspiratory flow rate of 250 mL/s was simulated using ANSYS-FLUENT v14.5. The distribution of local unilateral nasal resistance showed different shapes of variation and magnitudes of resistance depending on the distribution of cross-sectional area in the nasal cavity models. The highest local resistance on the congested side was found near the nasal valve area in the first patient, whereas the highest value was found in the nasal vestibule for the second patient. The relative importance of nasal resistance in the turbinated air passage differed for the 2 patients. The unilateral resistance of the congested state was in the range of 0.0229-0.221 Pas/mL. In the inferior meatus, greater flow rate was allowed during the congested state than during the decongested state if an extensive backflow developed. PMID:26315663

  20. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  1. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  2. Perception of better nasal patency correlates with increases in mucosal cooling after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Corbin D.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Frank, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives 1. Quantify mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) spatially in the nasal passages of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) patients before and after surgery using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 2. Correlate mucosal cooling with patient-reported symptoms, as measured by the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for sensation of nasal airflow. Study Design Prospective Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods Computed tomography (CT) scans and NOSE and VAS surveys were obtained from 10 patients before and after surgery to relieve NAO. Three-dimensional models of each patient’s nasal anatomy were used to run steady-state CFD simulations of airflow and heat transfer during inspiration. Heat loss across the nasal vestibule and the entire nasal cavity, and the surface area of mucosa exposed to heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 were compared pre- and post-operatively. Results After surgery, heat loss increased significantly on the pre-operative most obstructed side (p values < 0.0002). A larger surface area of nasal mucosa was exposed to heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 after surgery. The best correlation between patient-reported and CFD measures of nasal patency was obtained for NOSE against surface area in which heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 (Pearson r = −0.76). Conclusion A significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients’ perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery. CFD-derived heat fluxes may prove to be a valuable predictor of success in NAO surgery. PMID:24154749

  3. Immunolocalization of aquaporins 1, 3, and 5 in the nasal respiratory mucosa of a panting species, the sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Vesterdorf, Kristine; Blache, Dominique; Maloney, Shane K

    2014-07-01

    The nasal respiratory mucosa is the primary site for evaporative water loss in panting species, necessitating the movement of water across the nasal epithelium. Aquaporins (AQP) are protein channels that facilitate water movement in various fluid transporting tissues of non-panting species. Whether the requirement for enhanced capacity for transepithelial water movement in the nasal respiratory mucosa of panting species has led to differences in AQP localization is unknown. Using immunohistochemistry, we report the localization of AQP1, 3, and 5 in the nasal respiratory mucosa of sheep being exposed to ambient temperatures of ~21 °C or ~38 °C for 4.5 h before death (n=3/treatment). Exposure to either treatment resulted in panting. While exposure to ~38 °C resulted in a higher respiratory frequency (mean difference: 82 breaths min(-1); P<0.001) than exposure to ~21 °C, there was no difference in the localization of AQPs. Connective tissue and vascular endothelial cells expressed AQP1. Glandular acini expressed AQP1 and apically localized AQP5, which was also present in glandular duct cells. Ciliated columnar epithelial cells expressed AQP5 apically and AQP3 basolaterally. Basal cells expressed AQP3. The distribution and co-localization of AQPs in the ovine nasal respiratory mucosa is different to that reported in non-panting species and may reflect the physiological demands associated with enhanced respiratory evaporation. We propose that AQP1, 3, and 5 may constitute a transepithelial water pathway via glandular secretions and across the surface epithelium, which provides a possible means for rapid and controllable water movement in the nasal respiratory mucosa of a panting species. PMID:24956959

  4. Facial and dental alterations according to the breathing pattern

    PubMed Central

    RETAMOSO, Luciana Borges; KNOP, Luégya Amorin Henriques; GUARIZA FILHO, Odilon; TANAKA, Orlando Motohiro

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature about possible interaction of the respiratory mode with the facial and dental structures. Objectives The aim of this study was to perform a longitudinal assessment of the changes in facial and dental structures in Angle’s Class II, division 1 malocclusion individuals, divided according to the respiratory pattern (predominantly nasal or mouth), at two distinct moments of craniofacial development. Material and Methods Pogonium and nose measurements were made on the lateral cephalometric tracings (LS’-Pog’, LS’-B’, B’-Pog’, Pog’-PogTeg’, Line NB, Pog-NB, N'-Prn, Prn-NPog, N-Prn-Sn, Prn-Sn-LS). Dental measurements were made on the plaster models (distances between the tips of the canine cusps and the tips of mesial cusps of the first molars) of 40 individuals aged 10 to 14 years (moment 1) and 13 to 16 years (moment 2), 23 being nose breathers (NB) and 17 being predominantly mouth breathers (MB). Results The Student’s-t test and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were applied to indicate differences between the mean values of these variables according to the moments and/or respiratory mode. Conclusions There were alterations in the facial measurements, without interference of the breathing pattern. However, the breathing pattern influenced dental alterations. PMID:21552720

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing: effects on brain structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Macey, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing is accompanied by neural injury that affects a wide range of physiological systems which include processes for sensing chemoreception and airflow, driving respiratory musculature, timing circuitry for coordination of breathing patterning, and integration of blood pressure mechanisms with respiration. The damage also occurs in regions mediating emotion and mood, as well as areas regulating memory and cognitive functioning, and appears in structures that serve significant glycemic control processes. The injured structures include brain areas involved in hormone release and action of major neurotransmitters, including those playing a role in depression. The injury is reflected in a range of structural magnetic resonance procedures, and also appears as functional distortions of evoked activity in brain areas mediating vital autonomic and breathing functions. The damage is preferentially unilateral, and includes axonal projections; the asymmetry of the injury poses unique concerns for sympathetic discharge and potential consequences for arrhythmia. Sleep-disordered breathing should be viewed as a condition that includes central nervous system injury and impaired function; the processes underlying injury remain unclear. PMID:23643610

  6. The contribution of nasal receptors to the cardiac response to diving in restrained and unrestrained redhead ducks (Aythya americana).

    PubMed

    Furilla, R A; Jones, D R

    1986-03-01

    In restrained redhead ducks, forced submergence caused heart rate to fall from 100 +/- 3 beats min-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., N = 12) to a stable underwater rate of 35 +/- 4 beats min-1 (N = 12) within 5 s after submergence. Bradycardia was unaffected by breathing oxygen before a dive, but was virtually eliminated by local anaesthesia of the narial region. In contrast, in a dabbling duck (Anas platyrhynchos) bradycardia in short dives was eliminated by breathing oxygen before a dive. In unrestrained diving, on a man-made pond, heart rate in redheads diving voluntarily (y) was related to pre-dive heart rate (x) by the equation y = 76 + 0.29 +/- 0.05x +/- 17 (r2 = 0.71). Chasing, to induce submergence, had variable effects on this relationship. Local anaesthesia of the narial region inhibited voluntary diving but heart rates in chase-induced dives after nasal blockade were significantly higher, by 10-30%, than those obtained from untreated ducks in chase-induced dives. Breathing oxygen before voluntary dives had no apparent effect on heart rate after 2-5 s submergence. Voluntary head submersion by dabbling ducks caused no change in heart rate. We conclude that nasal receptors make only a minor contribution to cardiac responses in unrestrained dives, compared with forced dives, in diving ducks. Furthermore, these results show that little can be learned about cardiac responses in free diving ducks from studies of forced dives in dabblers or divers. PMID:3958677

  7. A Study of the Effects of Breath Management Instruction on the Breathing Mode, Knowledge of Breathing, and Performance Skills of College-Level Brass Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Kenneth H.; Sehmann, Karin Harfst

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of breathing instruction on the breath management, performance, and knowledge of breathing among college-level brass musicians. Finds that breathing instruction significantly improved the breath management and knowledge of the breathing for the experimental groups and the musical range of the trombone players in the…

  8. Comparative study of the in situ immune response in oral and nasal mucosal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, M R; Morgado, F N; Valete-Rosalino, C M; Martins, A C; Moreira, J; Quintella, L P; de Oliveira Schubach, A; Conceição-Silva, F

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal Leishmaniasis (ML) may occur in both nasal and oral mucosa. However, despite the impressive tissue destruction, little is known about the oral involvement. To compare some changes underlying inflammation in oral and nasal ML, we performed immunohistochemistry on mucosal tissue of 20 patients with ML (nasal [n = 12]; oral [n = 8] lesions) and 20 healthy donors using antibodies that recognize inflammatory markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD22, CD68, neutrophil elastase, CD1a, CLA, Ki67, Bcl-2, NOS2, CD62E, Fas and FasL). A significantly larger number of cells, mainly T cells and macrophages, were observed in lesions than in healthy tissue. In addition, high nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression was associated with a reduced detection of parasites, highlighting the importance of NOS2 for parasite elimination. Oral lesions had higher numbers of neutrophils, parasites, proliferating cells and NOS2 than nasal lesions. These findings, together with the shorter duration of oral lesions and more intense symptoms, suggest a more recent inflammatory process. It could be explained by lesion-induced oral cavity changes that lead to eating difficulties and social stigma. In addition, the frequent poor tooth conservation and gingival inflammation tend to amplify tissue destruction and symptoms and may impair and confuse the correct diagnosis, thus delaying the onset of specific treatment. PMID:22098533

  9. Nasal peak inspiratory flow at altitude.

    PubMed

    Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Richalet, J P

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated whether there are changes in nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) during hypobaric hypoxia under controlled environmental conditions. During operation Everest III (COMEX '97), eight subjects ascended to a simulated altitude of 8,848 m in a hypobaric chamber. NPIF was recorded at simulated altitudes of 0 m, 5,000 m and 8,000 m. Oral peak inspiratory and expiratory flow (OPIF, OPEF) were also measured. Ambient air temperature and humidity were controlled. NPIF increased by a mean +/- SD of 16 +/- 12% from sea level to 8,000 m, whereas OPIF increased by 47 +/- 14%. NPIF rose by 0.085 +/- 0.03 L x s(-1) per kilometre of ascent (p<0.05), significantly less than the rise in OPIF and OPEF of 0.35 +/- 0.10 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 L x s(-1) per kilometre (p<0.0005). Nasal peak inspiratory flow rises with ascent to altitude. The rise in nasal peak inspiratory flow with altitude was far less than oral peak inspiratory flow and less than the predicted rise according to changes in air density. This suggests flow limitation at the nose, and occurs under controlled environmental conditions, refuting the hypothesis that nasal blockage at altitude is due to the inhalation of cold, dry air. Further work is needed to determine if nasal blockage limits activity at altitude. PMID:11843316

  10. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  11. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of human aspiration in low velocity air: orientation effects on nose-breathing simulations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kimberly R; Anthony, T Renée

    2014-06-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1-0.4 m s(-1)). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Nose-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberly R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  13. Septoplasty and decongestant improve distribution of nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jiaoping; Fan, Yunping; Feng, Shaoyan; Xia, Wentong; Wang, Jingqing; Li, Huabin

    2011-12-01

    This study prospectively examined the intranasal distribution of nasal spray after nasal septal correction and decongestant administration. A cohort of 20 patients was assessed for the distribution of nasal spray before and after nasal septum surgery. Sprays were dyed and administered one puff per nostril when patients hold their head up in an upright position. Before and after decongestant administration, the intranasal distribution was semi-quantitatively determined by nasal endoscopy. The results showed that the dyed drug was preferentially sprayed onto the nasal vestibule, the head of the inferior turbinate, the anterior part of septum and nasal floor. As far as the anterior-inferior segment of the nasal cavity was concerned, the distribution was found to be influenced neither by the decongestant nor by the surgery (P>0.05). However, both the decongestant and surgery expanded the distribution to the anatomical structures in the superior and posterior nasal cavity such as olfactory fissure, middle turbinate head and middle nasal meatus. No distribution was observed in the sphenoethmoidal recess, posterior septum, tail of inferior turbinate and nasopharynx. It was concluded that nasal septum surgery and decongestant administration significantly improves nasal spray distribution in the nasal cavity. PMID:22173509

  14. Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap for nasal lining in reconstruction of large full thickness lateral nasal defects

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Obviously, restoring the nasal lining is a great challenge in the reconstruction of nasal defects. Full thickness nasal defects usually require special flaps for reconstructing the nasal lining. Intranasal mucosal flaps, hinge over flaps, perinasal second flaps, folded or second forehead flaps and finally free flaps are examples that can be used for this purpose. Moreover, the case presented in this article expresses a new role for the superiorly based Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap in this topic. Furthermore, mucosal island variant of this flap is presented to reduce the tension on this flap while restoring the nasal lining in large full thickness nasal defect. PMID:26566439

  15. Effects of nasal cleansing and topical decongestants on patient tolerance during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Akbaba, Soner; Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Bozkırlı, Bahadır Osman; Akın, Fatma Ebru; Gündoğdu, Rıza Haldun; Ersoy, Osman; Karakaya, Jale; Ersoy, Pamir Eren

    2014-01-01

    Adequate patient tolerance is essential for successful completion of safe endoscopic examination. Although there are many reported methods to increase patient tolerance, none of these fully resolve this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate whether relaxing the nasal airways increase patient tolerance to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). A total of 300 patients scheduled for diagnostic UGE were randomized into three separate groups. Prior to the UGE procedure the first group was administered intranasal cortisone spray following nasal cleansing (INC). Patients in the second group were administered intranasal saline after nasal cleansing (INSP). The patients in the third group were treated with the standard endoscopic procedure alone (SEP). After the UGE procedure, both endoscopists and patients were asked to evaluate the ease of performing the procedure. Furthermore, patients who had undergone endoscopy before were asked to compare their current experience to their most recent endoscopy. Results shown that INC and INSP groups had significantly better tolerance than the SEP group. When comparing their current experience with the previous one, INC and INSP groups reported that the current experience was better. Conclusions: Taking measures to relax the nasal airways makes breathing more comfortable and increase patient tolerance during UGE. PMID:24995106

  16. [Nasal Highflow (NHF): A New Therapeutic Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Failure].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, J; Nilius, G

    2016-01-01

    The therapy of choice in hypoxemic respiratory failure (type 1) is the application of supplemental oxygen at flow rates of 1 to 15 l/min via nasal prongs or mask. Non-invasive or invasive positive pressure ventilation will be initiated when the oxygen therapy effects are not sufficient or if hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2) is the underlying problem. Recently, an alternative therapy option is available, from the pathophysiology it can be classified between oxygen therapy and positive pressure ventilation. The therapy called Nasal High Flow (NHF) is based on the nasal application of a heated and humidified air oxygen mixture with a flow range of up to 60 l/min. The precise pathophysiological principles of NHF are only partly understood, yet various aspects are well studied already: it is possible to deliver high oxygen concentrations, airway dryness can be avoided, dead space ventilation reduced and clearance of nasal dead space is achieved. Additionally, an end expiratory positive pressure is built up, which helps to prevent airway collapse, thus resulting in an improvement of respiratory efficiency and reduction of breathing work. Current studies demonstrate improvement in gas exchange and reduction of reintubation rate when applying the NHF treatment in acute respiratory failure. Thus the NHF therapy attracts attention in intensive care medicine. The application in other fields like chronic respiratory insufficiency is less well clarified. The objectives of this review are to present the pathophysiological effects and mechanisms of NHF, as far as understood, and to give an overview over the current state of relevant studies. PMID:26789432

  17. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  18. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  19. The relationship between nasal index and nasal airway resistance, and response to a topical decongestant.

    PubMed

    Doddi, N M; Eccles, R

    2011-12-01

    The differences in the shape and size of the nose have been proposed to be an adaptation to climate with broad noses (platyrrhine) evolving in a warm humid environment where there was little need for air conditioning and narrow noses (leptorrhine) evolving in colder climates where the air needed more warming. The main aim of this research was to determine if there was any relationship between the shape of the nose as expressed in terms of nasal height and width (nasal index) and total nasal airway resistance (NAR), as one would predict that the narrower leptorrhine noses would have a greater resistance to air flow than the broader platyrrhine noses. It was also proposed that the narrow leptorrhine nose would have better developed vascular tissue than the broad platyrrhine nose in order to condition cold air, and would exhibit a greater response to nasal decongestion. No correlation was found between nasal index and NAR (r = -0.09) and similarly no correlation was found between nasal index and response to a topical nasal decongestant (r = 0.02). The absence of any physiological differences between the different nose types may be due to acclimatisation of participants to the area of recruitment. PMID:22125790

  20. In vitro evaluation of nasal mucociliary clearance using excised rat nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Kimura, Toshikiro; Higaki, Kazutaka; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira; Higashi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Mucus on the nasal mucosa is translocated to the pharynx by ciliary beating, which is an important nonspecific defense mechanism called mucociliary clearance (MC). MC is one of the important factors determining the rate and extent of drug absorption after nasal application. The purpose of this study is to evaluate MC using rat nasal septum under physiological condition in an in vitro system. The nasal septum was excised from rats anesthetized with urethane and the movement of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) applied on the nasal septum was observed with a fluorescence microscope. FMS were transported at a constant velocity in the same direction for a few minutes, but addition of 4% mucin solution on the nasal septum maintained MC for at least 90 min after excision. With our evaluation system established by modifying the method of Saldiva, MC was determined to be around 1 mm/min. Furthermore, the ciliostatic effect of benzalkonium chloride was observed, and it was confirmed that β-adrenergic antagonists and a cholinergic antagonist decreased MC, and that β-adrenergic agonists and a cholinergic agonist tended to increase MC, indicating that our system is valid and useful for evaluating MC function and the effect of drugs and pharmaceutical additives for nasal application on MC. PMID:22687480

  1. Nasal leech infestation causing persistent epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sarathi, Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are commonly encountered as a cause of epistaxis; however, nasal leech infestation as a cause of unilateral persistent epistaxis is very rare. Examination of nasal cavity revealed fleshy material in the left nostril, which was identified as leech. The leech was removed with the help of an artery forceps following irrigation of the left nostril with normal saline and adopting wait-and-watch policy. In developing countries, leech infestation as a cause of epistaxis should be suspected in patients with lower socioeconomic status or in those living in rural areas who give history of drinking polluted water from, or bathing in, stagnant ponds and puddles. PMID:21887037

  2. Nasal Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis with Orbital Extension.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Moghimi, Mansour; Sharouny, Hadi; Behniafard, Nasim

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is an extremely rare, chronic, benign, idiopathic disorder that mostly affects the upper respiratory tract, particularly the nasal cavity, and features progressive submucosal perivascular fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, only seven cases of EAF with orbital involvement have been reported. We report a case of sinonasal EAF with orbital extension that presented with left nasolacrimal duct obstruction. A 35-year-old man presented with left epiphora, proptosis, anterolateral globe displacement and nasal obstruction. Endoscopic sinus examination showed a firm, gritty, creamy, yellow, fibrous, adherent mass of maxillary sinus. Diagnosis was established with histopathological examination of excisional biopsy of the lesion. Although EAF is very rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions of upper airway tract, particularly the nasal cavity. Biopsy is necessary for diagnosis and treatment planning. Resecting of the involved tissues completely is essential for prevention of recurrence. PMID:25601283

  3. CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159535.html CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective Agency advisors say the product has ... do without the easier, nasal spray form of flu vaccine next flu season, a panel of experts ...

  4. Pediatricians' Group Advises Against Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Pediatricians' Group Advises Against Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine Shot far more effective against current influenza strains, ... 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The nasal spray flu vaccine is ineffective and should not be used in ...

  5. CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159535.html CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective Agency advisors say the product has lost ... without the easier, nasal spray form of flu vaccine next flu season, a panel of experts decided ...

  6. Nasal Carriage of 200 Patients with Nasal Bone Fracture in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Wook; Kim, Young Joon; Kim, Hoon; Nam, Sang Hyun; Shin, Bo Moon

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogens in the nasal cavity during nasal surgery could lead to a systemic infectious condition, such as bacteremia, nosocomial infection, or toxic shock syndrome. However, there is no research about the prevalence of nasal carriage in patients with nasal bone fracture. Methods This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized study about the rate of nasal carriage in 200 patients with nasal bone fracture in Korea. Nasal secretions were taken from both the middle nasal meatus and colonized. All analyses were carried out using SPSS software. Results Pathogens were identified in 178 of the 200 cases. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the most cultured bacteria in 127 (66.84%) of the 190 total patients after excluding 10 cases of contaminated samples, and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCNS) were found in 48 (25.26%). Staphylococcus aureus was the second most identified pathogen, found in 36 (18.95%), followed by 7 cases (3.68%) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The prevalence rate of MRSA in the females was higher than that in the males (RR=4.70; 95% CI, 1.09-20.18), but other demographic factors had no effect on the prevalence rate of MRSA and MRCNS. Conclusions The prevalence rate of these pathogens in patients with nasal bone fracture in Korea was similar to other reports. However, few studies have addressed the prevalence rate of CNS and MRCNS in accordance with risk factors or the change in prevalence according to specific prophylaxis against infectious complications. Additional research is needed on the potential connections between clinical factors and microbiological data. PMID:24086806

  7. Nasal high-flow therapy delivers low level positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Parke, R.; McGuinness, S.; Eccleston, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether a level of positive airway pressure was generated in participants receiving nasal high flow (NHF) delivered by the Optiflow™ system (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand) in a cardiothoracic and vascular intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Nasopharyngeal airway pressure was measured in 15 postoperative cardiac surgery adult patients who received both NHF and standard facemask therapy at a flow rate of 35 litre min−1. Measurements were repeated in the open mouth and closed mouth positions. Mean airway pressure was determined by averaging the pressures at the peak of inspiration of each breath within a 1 min period, allowing the entire pressure profile of each breath to be included within the calculation. Results Low level positive pressure was demonstrated with NHF at 35 litre min−1 with mouth closed when compared with a facemask. NHF generated a mean nasopharyngeal airway pressure of mean (sd) 2.7 (1.04) cm H2O with the mouth closed. Airway pressure was significantly higher when breathing with mouth closed compared with mouth open (P≤0.0001). Conclusions This study demonstrated that a low level of positive pressure was generated with NHF at 35 litre min−1 of gas flow. This is consistent with results obtained in healthy volunteers. Australian Clinical Trials Registry www.actr.org.au ACTRN012606000139572. PMID:19846404

  8. Understanding Lung Problems: Make Each Breath Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each Breath Healthy Heath and Aging Understanding Lung Problems—Make Each Breath Healthy Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ( ... time your likelihood of having a serious lung problem increases, especially if you smoke. Lung problems that ...

  9. Surgical Treatment of Nasal Obstruction in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ankona; Friedman, Oren

    2016-01-01

    The key to a successful septorhinoplasty includes an understanding of nasal anatomy and physiology. This allows the surgeon the ability to properly address both form and function during the operation. History and physical examination are paramount in diagnosing and subsequently treating the epicenter of obstruction, which is commonly found among the internal and external nasal valve, the septum, or the turbinates. Treatment of each of these areas is nuanced and multiple approaches are discussed to provide an understanding of the current surgical techniques that allow for excellent functional and cosmetic rhinoplasty results. PMID:26616692

  10. Hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Panogeorgou, T; Tserbini, E; Filou, S; Vynios, D H; Naxakis, S S; Papadas, T A; Goumas, P D; Mastronikolis, N S

    2016-07-01

    Nasal polyps (NPs) are benign lesions of nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa affecting 1-4 % of all adults. Nasal polyposis affects the quality of patient's life as it causes nasal obstruction, postnasal drainage, purulent nasal discharge, hyposmia or anosmia, chronic sinusitis, facial pain and snoring. Without treatment, the disease can alter the craniofacial skeleton in cases of extended growth of polyps. The development of NPs is caused by the hyperplasia of nasal or paranasal sinuses mucosa, and edema of extracellular matrix. This is usually the result of high concentration of high molecular mass hyaluronan (HA) which is either overproduced or accumulated from blood supply. The size of HA presents high diversity and, especially in pathologic conditions, chains of low molecular mass can be observed. In NPs, chains of about 200 kDa have been identified and considered to be responsible for the inflammation. The purpose of the present study was the investigation, in NPs and normal nasal mucosa (NM), of the expression of the wild-type and alternatively spliced forms of hyaluronidases, their immunolocalization, and the expression of HA synthases to examine the isoform(s) responsible for the increased amounts of HA in NPs. Hyaluronidases' presence was examined on mRNA (RT-PCR analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry) levels. Hyaluronan synthases' presence was examined on mRNA levels. Hyaluronidases were localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and inflammatory cells, as well as in the matrix. On mRNA level, it was found that hyal-1-wt was decreased in NPs compared to NM and hyal-1-v3, -v4 and -v5 were substantially increased. Moreover, HAS2 and HAS3 were the only hyaluronan synthases detected, the expression of which was almost similar in NPs and NM. Overall, the results of the present study support that hyaluronidases are the main enzymes responsible for the decreased size of hyaluronan observed in NPs; thus they behave as inflammatory agents. Therefore, they

  11. Primary Nasal Tuberculosis in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Murat; Özsurekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Özçelik, Uğur; Yalçın, Ebru; Gököz, Özay

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity which mainly presents in elderly people. Nasal tuberculosis has always been considered to be secondary to tuberculosis of the lungs, and in rare instances it is a primary infection, usually when mycobacteria are inhaled. We describe the case of a 10-year-old girl who was successfully treated for primary nasal tuberculosis. This patient is one of the very few children who have been reported to have primary nasal tuberculosis. PMID:27366187

  12. Absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A A; Iseki, K; Kagoshima, M; Dittert, L W

    1992-04-01

    The fate of salicylate in the plasma of rats was followed after nasal, intravenous, and oral administration of 2.0-mg doses of aspirin. Aspirin was well absorbed following nasal administration of a neutralized, nonirritating solution containing triethanolamine. The rate of absorption was slower than that of other nasally administered drugs, such as propranolol or progesterone. The bioavailability of aspirin following nasal administration was 100%, whereas the oral bioavailability was only 58.8% at the dose studied. PMID:1501071

  13. Strengthening Impaired-Driving Enforcement in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Robert B.; Fell, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Progress in reducing alcohol-impaired driving crash fatalities in the United States has stagnated over the last 15 years. This paper reviews two current U.S. driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) laws and their enforcement with an aim toward generating opportunities to improve their enforcement approaches. Methods Impaired-driving enforcement methods in Europe and Australia are compared with those in the United States, and the legal basis for current DWI criminal procedures is examined. Results An examination of relevant U.S. Supreme Court decisions and current legal practices indicates that the requirements for use of breath-test technology to determine blood alcohol concentrations of drivers on public roads are not entirely clear. Several potential methods for using field breath-test technology to improve the detection of impaired drivers are suggested. These include (a) breath testing all drivers stopped for certain violations that have a high probability of involving an impaired driver, (b) breath testing all drivers at sobriety checkpoints, and (c) breath testing all drivers involved in fatal and serious injury crashes. Conclusions Breath-test technology has enabled other countries around the world to adopt and implement enforcement strategies that serve as both general and specific deterrents to alcohol-impaired driving. Many of these enforcement strategies have been shown to be effective. If any one of these strategies can be adopted in the United States, further progress in reducing impaired driving is probable. It may be necessary to provide the U.S. Supreme Court with a test case of breath testing all drivers at a sobriety checkpoint, depending upon whether or not a police agency is willing to use that strategy. PMID:23944649

  14. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  15. Breathing Problems: An Individualized Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vodola, Thomas M.

    As one of the components of the Project ACTIVE (All Children Totally Involved Exercising) Teacher Training Model Kit, the manual is designed to enable the educator to organize, conduct, and evaluate individualized-personalized physical education programs for children (prekindergarten through high school) with breathing problems. An introductory…

  16. Underlying Phoneme Velar Nasal with Lip Rounding in Hueyapan Nahuatl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. Joe

    1976-01-01

    Reasons are given for the idea that Hueyapan (Morelos) Nahuatl has an underlying velar nasal with lip rounding phoneme which never has the surface reflex of a rounded velar nasal allophone, but occurs phonetically as a velar nasal allophone or a labial dental voiced allophone or disappears. (SCC)

  17. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  7. [Personal experience in the surgery of nasal sinus polyps].

    PubMed

    García Juncal, J; Soto Sánchez, C; Farina Conde, J; Rodríguez Alvarez, E; Estrada Gromaz, J

    1994-01-01

    Personal opinions on surgery of polyps of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, including from simple polypectomy to ethmoid microsurgery and nasal endoscopic surgery. The diagnostic importance of tomodensitometry and the essential postsurgical care are emphasized. The results of 29 patients with polyps of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses treated with intranasal microsurgery and endoscopic surgery are reported. PMID:8068361

  8. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5620 - Breathing mouthpiece.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing mouthpiece. 868.5620 Section 868.5620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5620 Breathing mouthpiece. (a) Identification. A breathing mouthpiece is a rigid device that is inserted into a patient's mouth and...

  10. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  11. Nasal nitric oxide in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Torretta, S; Marchisio, P; Capaccio, P; Pignataro, L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, reduced Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) nNO levels have been reported in children with adenoidal hypertrophy predisposing to chronic nasosinusal inflammation. Given the strict anatomic and physiopathologic link between the nasopharyngeal and middle ear compartments, and considering the high prevalence of otitis prone children among those affected with chronic adenoiditis, we designed a study aimed to test any possible difference in nNO levels between non-allergic children with and without recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) associated with chronic adenoiditis. The study involved 54 children with RAOM (44.4% males; mean age= 7.5±3.5 years) and 51 children without RAOM (47.4% males; mean age= 7.0±3.8 years). nNO levels were significantly reduced in children with RAOM compared to children without RAOM (676.9±250.7 ppb vs 831.8±320.4 ppb, respectively; p= 0.02). Our results could be related to reduced NO production by the ciliated paranasal, nasopharyngeal and middle ear epithelium and the impaired sinusal ostial and Eustachian tube patency due to chronic inflammation, and seem to confirm the involvement of NO pathway in recurrent upper airway infections related to impaired ciliated respiratory mucosa. PMID:27049104

  12. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Breathing Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Agathe; Yu, Lianchun; Klein, Isabelle; De Mazancourt, Marine; Jebrak, Gilles; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Fournier, Michel; Courbage, Maurice; Dauriat, Gaelle; Schouman-Clayes, Elisabeth; Clerici, Christine; Mangin, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL) medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex) and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group). fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in neurons can

  13. [Experiences with therapy of pediatric sleep apnea syndrome and obstructive nasopharyngeal respiratory pattern with nasal BIPAP and CPAP therapy].

    PubMed

    Zwacka, G; Scholle, S

    1995-03-01

    Sleep-apnea in childhood shows a frequency similar to adults but it is caused by many other reasons. Therapeutic effects of nasal CPAP and BIPAP can replace surgical ENT-Therapy in large extent mainly in ages at 2-5 years. But also in older children is it possible to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation neuromuscular diseases by BIPAP. Examples for treatment of children by BIPAP who are two years old were given. Other demonstrated cases cover children with stridor congenitus, obstructive sleep apnea, hypoventilation, adenoidal breathing disturbances with primary surgical treated tonsillar hyperplasia and one case of thoracal postobstructive malformation with therapeutic BIPAP options. PMID:7617601

  14. Characteristics of Chloride Transport in Nasal Mucosa from Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Hwang, Peter H.; Illek, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder that produces lifelong difficulties with chronic airway inflammation. Little is known about the role of chronic airway inflammation on chloride ion transport properties in PCD. This study is to assess the cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl) ion transport properties of freshly excised nasal mucosa from PCD compared with normal and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design Electrophysiology study utilizing Ussing type hemi-chamber technique with three different types of nasal tissue (normal, CRS, PCD) obtained from patients during endoscopic surgery at tertiary referral center. Methods Nasal tissues were examined under short-circuit conditions and gradient-driven Cl currents were continuously recorded. The cAMP elevating agonist (forskolin) was added to stimulate CFTR-mediated Cl secretion. To prevent misinterpretation of flux measurement, Cl transport inhibitors were used at the end of all experiments. Basal Cl currents (ICl) and changes in IClto forskolin (ΔICl) were compared between normal, CRS and PCD nasal tissues. Results Forskolin stimulated Cl currents across all different types of nasal epithelia. The Cl secretory response was effectively blocked by the Cl ion transport inhibitors. ICl were significantly higher in normals (155.0 ± 9.3μA/cm2) compared to CRS (79.1 ± 15.0μA/cm2) and PCD (70.9 ± 20.4μA/cm2) (p = 0.005). ΔICl in CRS (14.8 ± 2.3μA/cm2) and PCD (12.2 ± 2.4μA/cm2) were markedly diminished compared to normals (28.3 ± 4.7μA/cm2) (p = 0.024). Conclusions PCD tissues were characterized by impaired ICl and ΔICl. Both parameters were reduced by 54.3 % and 56.9 % in PCD when compared to normals. PMID:20564725

  15. Primary Air-Liquid Interface Culture of Nasal Epithelium for Nasal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Xin; Jackson, Claire L; Cole, Janice L; Lackie, Peter M; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Lucas, Jane; Conway, Joy

    2016-07-01

    Nasal drug administration is a promising alternative to oral and parenteral administration for both local and systemic delivery of drugs. The benefits include its noninvasive nature, rapid absorption, and circumvention of first pass metabolism. Hence, the use of an in vitro model using human primary nasal epithelial cells could be key to understanding important functions and parameters of the respiratory epithelium. This model will enable investigators to address important and original research questions using a biologically relevant in vitro platform that mimics the in vivo nasal epithelial physiology. The purpose of this study was to establish, systematically characterize, and validate the use of a primary human nasal epithelium model cultured at the air-liquid interface for the study of inflammatory responses and drug transport and to simultaneously quantify drug effects on ciliary activity. PMID:27223825

  16. Bioequivalence for locally acting nasal spray and nasal aerosol products: standard development and generic approval.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing V; Jin, Feiyan; Lee, Sau L; Bai, Tao; Chowdhury, Badrul; Caramenico, Hoainhon T; Conner, Dale P

    2013-07-01

    Demonstrating bioequivalence (BE) for nasal spray/aerosol products for local action has been very challenging because the relationship between the drug in systemic circulation and the drug reaching the nasal site of action has not been well established. Thus, the current BE standard for these drug/device combination products is based on a weight-of-evidence approach, which contains three major elements: equivalent in vitro performance, equivalent systemic exposure, and equivalent local delivery. In addition, formulation sameness and device similarity are evidences to support BE. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the scientific rationale of the current BE standard and their development history for nasal spray/aerosol products, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's review and approval status of generic nasal sprays/aerosols with the application of these BE standard. PMID:23686396

  17. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A.; George, Subi J.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2014-02-01

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration.

  18. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow

    PubMed Central

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A.; George, Subi J.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration. PMID:24531132

  19. Drive mechanism for production of simulated human breath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Lambert, J. W.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Simulated breath drive mechanism was developed as subsystem to breathing metabolic simulator. Mechanism reproduces complete range of human breath rate, breath depth, and breath waveform, as well as independently controlled functional residual capacity. Mechanism was found capable of simulating various individual human breathing characteristics without any changes of parts.

  20. Arousal and breathing responses to airway occlusion in healthy sleeping adults.

    PubMed

    Issa, F G; Sullivan, C E

    1983-10-01

    The arousal and breathing responses to total airway occlusion during sleep were measured in 12 normal subjects (7 males and 5 females) aged 25-36 yr. Subjects slept while breathing through a specially designed nosemask, which was glued to the nose with medical-grade silicon rubber. The lips were sealed together with a thin layer of Silastic. The nosemask was attached to a wide-bore (20 mm ID) rigid tube to allow a constant-bias flow of room air from a blower. Total airway occlusion was achieved by simultaneously inflating two rubber balloons fixed in the inspiratory and expiratory pipes. A total of 39 tests were done in stage III/IV nonrapid-eye movement (NREM) sleep in 11 subjects and 10 tests in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep in 5 subjects. The duration of total occlusion tolerated before arousal from NREM sleep varied widely (range 0.9-67.0 s) with a mean duration of 20.4 +/- 2.3 (SE) s. The breathing response to occlusion in NREM sleep was characterised by a breath-by-breath progressive increase in suction pressure achieved by an increase in the rate of inspiratory pressure generation during inspiration. In contrast, during REM sleep, arousal invariably occurred after a short duration of airway occlusion (mean duration 6.2 +/- 1.2 s, maximum duration 11.8 s), and the occlusion induced a rapid shallow breathing pattern. Our results indicate that total nasal occlusion during sleep causes arousal with the response during REM sleep being more predictable and with a generally shorter latency than that in NREM sleep. PMID:6629941

  1. Risk factors for nasal malignancies in German men: the South-German Nasal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are few studies of the effects of nasal snuff and environmental factors on the risk of nasal cancer. This study aimed to investigate the impact of using nasal snuff and of other risk factors on the risk of nasal cancer in German men. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted in the German Federal States of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg. Tumor registries and ear, nose and throat departments provided access to patients born in 1926 or later. Results Telephone interviews were conducted with 427 cases (mean age 62.1 years) and 2.401 population-based controls (mean age 60.8 years). Ever-use of nasal snuff was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for nasal cancer of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88–2.38) in the total study population, whereas OR in smokers was 2.01 (95% CI 1.00-4.02) and in never smokers was 1.10 (95% CI 0.43–2.80). The OR in ever-smokers vs. never-smokers was 1.60 (95% CI 1.24–2.07), with an OR of 1.06 (95% CI 1.05–1.07) per pack-year smoked, and the risk was significantly decreased after quitting smoking. Exposure to hardwood dust for at least 1 year resulted in an OR of 2.33 (95% CI 1.40–3.91) in the total population, which was further increased in never-smokers (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.92–12.49) in analyses stratified by smoking status. The OR for nasal cancer after exposure to organic solvents for at least 1 year was 1.53 (1.17–2.01). Ever-use of nasal sprays/nasal lavage for at least 1 month rendered an OR of 1.59 (1.04–2.44). The OR after use of insecticides in homes was 1.48 (95% CI 1.04–2.11). Conclusions Smoking and exposure to hardwood dust were confirmed as risk factors for nasal carcinoma. There is evidence that exposure to organic solvents, and in-house use of insecticides could represent novel risk factors. Exposure to asbestos and use of nasal snuff were risk factors in smokers only. PMID:23130889

  2. Cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on nasal mucosal tissue in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oghan, Fatih; Apuhan, Tayfun; Terzi, Hakan; Kukner, Aysel; Coksuer, Hakan; Yılmaz, Fahrettin

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on rabbit nasal mucosal tissue, twenty-four female rabbits were studied prospectively. The rabbits were divided into 4 groups including 6 rabbits. The rabbits' left noses were included in the all study groups: 150 μg/puff/day of buserelin acetate was administered topically twice daily during 21, 42 and 63 days. Saline was administered topically twice daily to the left nasal cavity in the control group. The nasal septal mucosal stripe tissue was carefully removed from underlaying cartilage after sedation. HE staining, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue and TUNEL staining were used to evaluate mucosal changes. Each preparation was investigated via apoptotic cells, and they were accounted. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate nonparametric comparison of apoptotic cells. Mononuclear cells have been raised in the sub-epithelial connective tissue, nucleuses of epithelial cells in the apical region were pyknotic, and apoptotic cells were determined on 21-day group. In the 42-day group, nasal epithelial tissue was similar to 21-day group and epithelial cells including pyknotic nucleus were present in this group, too. In the 63-day group, epithelial cells were light colored. Venous sinuses in the sub-epithelial connective tissue were wide but not congested and not raised collagen filaments. In the intra-epithelial tissue, some of cells were TUNEL (+). Apoptotic cells were fewer in the control group according to 21-day group. In 42- and 63-day groups, these cells were fewer than in 21-day group. Numerical difference was present between the groups, but statistical significance was not found between the groups. We concluded that nasal buserelin cytotoxicity was not potent in the nasal cavity in rabbits. We use nasal buserelin in all indications with confidence. PMID:22160101

  3. An Areal Study of Nasalization in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Matthew Y.

    1975-01-01

    From a survey of over a thousand "diapoints" emerges a clear distributional pattern of nasal vowels in the contemporary dialects of China. They tend to occupy the lower portion of the vowel space. Three hypotheses are proposed to explain this phenomenon and each hypothesis is examined against a broad data base. (Author/TL)

  4. Nasal reconstruction with articulated irradiated rib cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, C.S.; Cook, T.A.; Guida, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Nasal structural reconstruction is a formidable task in cases where there is loss of support to both the nasal dorsum and tip. A multitude of surgical approaches and materials have been used for the correction of the saddle-nose deformity with varying degrees of success. Articulated irradiated rib cartilage inserted through an external rhinoplasty approach was used to reconstruct nasal deformities in 18 patients over a 6-year period. Simultaneous use of a midline forehead flap to reconstruct the overlying soft tissue was required in four cases. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean, 2.8 years). Results were rewarding in most cases with marked improvement in nasal support and airway. Revision and/or replacement secondary to trauma or warping of the graft was required in four cases. None of the patients exhibited infection, extrusion, or noticeable resorption. A description of the surgical technique, review of all the cases, and recommendation for continued use of this graft material are discussed.

  5. [Nasal drops addiction--the case report].

    PubMed

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Simon, Karolina; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the case of 34-years old man, who has used nasal drops with xylomethazoline for three years. Health consequence of uncontrolled use of the drops and treatment were prescribed. Described problem confirms the need of physicians and pharmacists cooperation to limit the problem of drug-addiction. PMID:23421118

  6. Triclosan Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:24713325

  7. Surgical versus medical treatment of nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Lildholdt, T

    1989-01-01

    Surgical removal of nasal polyps is associated with discomfort and risks for the patient, but is the treatment of choice to most otorhinolaryngologists. Medical treatment alone has been little investigated. In a prospective clinical trial surgical removal followed by continuous topical steroid treatment has been compared with a single dose of steroid deposit followed by continuous topical steroid treatment. During a study period of one year, expiratory nasal peak flow and sense of smell were monitored. In general, the course in the two groups was alike, with a tendency favouring the medically treated group. In another study the clinical efficacy of this medical regimen was further documented experimentally. By acoustic rhinometry the square area of the nasal passages was measured before and a few days after the injection of the steroid deposit. Increased volume was found, corresponding to the instant clinical improvement. It is concluded that primary treatment of nasal polyps should be medical. Surgery is only recommended in cases, resistant to medical therapy. PMID:2672276

  8. Clinical Efficacy of a Spray Containing Hyaluronic Acid and Dexpanthenol after Surgery in the Nasal Cavity (Septoplasty, Simple Ethmoid Sinus Surgery, and Turbinate Surgery)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. This prospective, controlled, parallel-group observational study investigated the efficacy of a spray containing hyaluronic acid and dexpanthenol to optimise regular treatment after nasal cavity surgery in 49 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Methods. The control group received standard therapy. Mucosal regeneration was determined using rhinoscopy sum score (RSS). Pre- and postoperative nasal patency was tested using anterior rhinomanometry. The participants were questioned about their symptoms. Results. Regarding all RSS parameters (dryness, dried nasal mucus, fibrin deposition, and obstruction), mucosal regeneration achieved good final results in both groups, tending to a better improvement through the spray application, without statistically significant differences during the whole assessment period, the mean values being 7.04, 5.00, 3.66, and 3.00 (intervention group) and 7.09, 5.14, 4.36, and 3.33 (control group). No statistically significant benefit was identified for nasal breathing, foreign body sensation, and average rhinomanometric volume flow, which improved by 12.31% (control group) and 11.24% (nasal spray group). Conclusion. The investigational product may have additional benefit on postoperative mucosal regeneration compared to standard cleaning procedures alone. However, no statistically significant advantage could be observed in this observational study. Double-blind, controlled studies with larger populations will be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment modality. PMID:25104962

  9. Coblation nasal septal swell body reduction for treatment of nasal obstruction: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Jeong; Kim, Hee Tae; Park, Yun Hwi; Kim, Ju Yeon; Bae, Jung Ho

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of coblation nasal septal swell body (NSB) reduction for the treatment of nasal obstruction in patients with abnormally thickened NSB. The study design was a retrospective clinical series conducted at a single tertiary medical center. Eight patients underwent coblation NSB reduction. Pre-operative and post-operative nasal functions were evaluated by acoustic rhinometry and subjective symptom scales. We also analyzed pre-operative CT scan images and nasal endoscopic findings. The mean maximal NSB width was 16.4 ± 2.2 mm on pre-operative coronal CT scan images. The mean visual analog scale score for nasal obstruction was decreased from preoperative 7.63 ± 0.99 points to 3.88 ± 0.92 points (postoperative 3 months), 4.16 ± 0.78 points (postoperative 6 months), and 4.63 ± 0.69 points (postoperative 1 year). Six out of the eight patients were satisfied with the clinical outcome at 1 year after the procedure. To the best of our knowledge, coblation NSB reduction has not yet been reported in the medical literature. Our results show that it can be an effective treatment modality for nasal valve narrowing in patients with abnormally thickened NSB. PMID:26912145

  10. Nasal Vestibular Furunculosis Presenting as the Rudolph Sign.

    PubMed

    Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Ucuncu, Harun

    2015-09-01

    Nasal furunculosis is a deep infection of hair follicle within the nasal vestibule. In this report, the authors presented a 49-year-old woman with 4-day history of focal red area and tender swelling on the tip of her nose. On physical examination, together with a swelling at nasal vestibulum, erythema, and edema on the skin of nasal tip were observed, which is called the Rudolph Sign. The patient was treated with intranasal topical mupirocin and oral sodium fusidate. Because nasal furunculosis may lead to serious complications such as ophthalmic vein thrombosis and cavernous sinus thrombosis, early diagnosis and effective treatment is essential. PMID:26335324

  11. Reduced Nasal Nitric Oxide Production in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Elevated Systemic Inflammation Markers

    PubMed Central

    Michl, Ruth K.; Hentschel, Julia; Fischer, Christiane; Beck, James F.; Mainz, Jochen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is produced within the respiratory tract and can be detected in exhaled bronchial and nasal air. The concentration varies in specific diseases, being elevated in patients with asthma and bronchiectasis, but decreased in primary ciliary dyskinesia. In cystic fibrosis (CF), conflicting data exist on NO levels, which are reported unexplained as either decreased or normal. Functionally, NO production in the paranasal sinuses is considered as a location-specific first-line defence mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between upper and lower airway NO levels and blood inflammatory parameters, CF-pathogen colonisation, and clinical data. Methods and Findings Nasal and bronchial NO concentrations from 57 CF patients were determined using an electrochemical analyser and correlated to pathogen colonisation of the upper and lower airways which were microbiologically assessed from nasal lavage and sputum samples. Statistical analyses were performed with respect to clinical parameters (lung function, BMI), laboratory findings (CRP, leucocytes, total-IgG, fibrinogen), and anti-inflammatory and antibiotic therapy. There were significant correlations between nasal and bronchial NO levels (rho = 0.48, p<0.001), but no correlation between NO levels and specific pathogen colonisation. In patients receiving azithromycin, significantly reduced bronchial NO and a tendency to reduced nasal NO could be found. Interestingly, a significant inverse correlation of nasal NO to CRP (rho = −0.28, p = 0.04) and to leucocytes (rho = −0.41, p = 0.003) was observed. In contrast, bronchial NO levels showed no correlation to clinical or inflammatory parameters. Conclusion Given that NO in the paranasal sinuses is part of the first-line defence mechanism against pathogens, our finding of reduced nasal NO in CF patients with elevated systemic inflammatory markers indicates impaired upper airway defence. This may

  12. Secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: breath study on a control group.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lozano, P; Zingaro, L; Finiguerra, A; Cristoni, S

    2011-03-01

    A series of fatty acids among other compounds have recently been detected in breath in real time by secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) (Martínez-Lozano P and Fernández de la Mora J 2008 Anal. Chem. 80 8210). Our main aim in this work was to (1) quantify their abundance in breath calibrating the system with standard vapors and (2) extend the study to a control group for several days, both under fasting conditions and after sucrose intake. For the quantitative study, we fed our system with controlled amounts (∼140-1440 ppt) of fatty acid vapors (i.e. propanoic, butanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids). As a result, we found sensitivities ranging between 1 and 2.2 cps/ppt. Estimated concentrations of these particular acids in the breath of a fasting subject were in the order of 100 ppt. These values were in reasonable agreement with those expected from reported typical plasma concentrations and Henry constants. A second set of experiments on three fasting individuals before and after ingesting 15 g of sucrose showed that the concentration of propionic and butanoic acids increased rapidly in breath for two subjects. This response was attributed to bacterial activity in mouth and pharynx. In contrast, a third subject showed no response to the administration of sucrose. In addition, we performed a survey among six fasting subjects comparing nasal and mouth exhalations during 11 days, 4 months apart. The signal intensity was comparable for mouth and nose breath. This observation, in conjunction with the quantitative study, suggests that these compounds are mostly systemic when measured under fasting conditions. We finally used the NIST MS search algorithm to evaluate the possibility of recognizing a breathing subject based on his/her breath signature. The global recognition score was 63% (41 out of 65), while the probability by chance alone was 6 × 10(-17). This indicates that (i) there are statistically recognizable differences in

  13. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  14. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    . DB is a poorly understood disorder with features that overlap with VCD and asthma. The dysfunctional pattern may reflect abnormalities in the rate or depth of breathing or in breathing mechanics that may involve the nasal passages, oropharynx, larynx, or chest wall muscles. Not unlike VCD, patients with DB are often diagnosed with asthma, and their symptoms do not improve on asthma medicines. There is no consensus regarding diagnostic criteria or appropriate testing for DB. The pathophysiology of DB is poorly understood, but psychological or physiological stress may precipitate episodes in some patients. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach (including speech therapy and psychological support). Prognosis is usually good. PMID:23047311

  15. Free Auricular Composite Graft for Acquired Nasal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Charles A.; Lawlor, Claire M.; Gray, Mingyang Liu; Graham, H. Devon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acquired nasal stenosis poses a reconstructive challenge for the facial plastic surgeon. Many surgical options are available, ranging from primary closure to skin grafts to free flap reconstruction for complex defects. The free auricular composite graft is a single-stage procedure that can be used to repair nasal vestibular stenosis causing nasal obstruction. Case Report: We present the case of a patient with acquired nasal stenosis as a result of prolonged nasal tampon placement secondary to severe epistaxis and subsequent nasal vestibular infection. Repair via auricular composite graft was successful, and we provide a thorough explanation of graft design and operative technique. Conclusion: Free auricular composite grafts can produce desirable functional and aesthetic outcomes and should be considered in patients presenting with acquired nasal stenosis. PMID:27303225

  16. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  17. Dialectal and gender differences in nasalance for a Mandarin population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Kyung; Yu, Xiao-meng; Cao, Yan-jing; Liu, Xiao-ming; Huang, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are dialectal and gender related differences in nasalance of main Mandarin vowels and three sentences in 400 Chinese normal adults. The mean nasalance score difference for dialect and gender was significant (p < .001) in all speech materials. For different dialects, the average nasalance scores show that Chongqing > Beijing > Shanghai > Guangzhou for the nasal sentence, oro-nasal sentence, /a/, /i/ and /u/. In addition, the average nasalance scores of females were higher than those of males for all speech materials in all dialects. The clinical significance of this study can be helpful in making nasalance clinical decisions for Chinese people with cleft palate, hearing disorders and dysarthria with resonance disorders. It also shows the theoretical and socio-cultural features for linguists considering dialects and gender. PMID:26853731

  18. Self-contained breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Giorgini, E. A.; Simmonds, M. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A self-contained breathing apparatus with automatic redundant fluid pressure controls and a facemask mounted low pressure whistle alarm is described. The first stage of the system includes pair of pressure regulators connected in parallel with different outlet pressures, both of which reduce the pressure of the stored supply gas to pressures compatible with the second stage breathing demand regulator. A primary regulator in the first stage delivers a low output pressure to the demand regulator. In the event of a failure closed condition of the primary regulator an automatic transfer valve switches on the backup regulator. A warning that the supply pressure has been depleted is also provided by a supply pressure actuated transfer valve which transfers the output of the first stage pressure regulators from the primary to the backup regulator. The alarm is activated in either the failure closed condition or if the supply pressure is reduced to a dangerously low level.

  19. The athlete "out of breath".

    PubMed

    Couto, M; Moreira, A

    2016-03-01

    Athletes often complain about breathing problems. This is a crucial issue due to potential implications not only on their general health, but also on their competing performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are prevalent conditions in elite athletes, which leads doctors to rely most of the times on asthma medication to treat athletes feeling "out of breath". However, there are several other conditions that may mimic asthma and cause dyspnea in athletes. Effective treatment of dyspnea requires appropriate identification and treatment of all disorders. Proper knowledge and accurate diagnosis of such entities is mandatory, since asthma medication is not effective in those conditions. Herein we review the most common differential diagnosis of dyspnea in athletes, and describe the diagnostic strategies in order to increase awareness and to improve doctor's confidence on dealing with these patients. PMID:26934737

  20. Breathing Mode in Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Bonitz, M.; Melzer, A.; Vitkalov, S.

    2007-11-01

    The breathing mode is a fundamental normal mode present in Coulomb systems, and may have utility in identifying particle charge and the Debye length of certain systems. The question remains whether this mode can be extended to strongly coupled Yukawa balls [1]. These systems are characterized by particles confined within a parabolic potential well and interacting through a shielded Coulomb potential [2,3]. The breathing modes for a variety of systems in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions are computed by solving the eigenvalue problem given by the dynamical (Hesse) matrix. These results are compared to theoretical investigations that assume a strict definition for a breathing mode within the system, and an analysis is made of the most fitting model to utilize in the study of particular systems of complex plasmas [1,4]. References [1] T.E. Sheridan, Phys. of Plasmas. 13, 022106 (2006)[2] C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)[3] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)[4] C. Henning et al., submitted for publication

  1. Breathing Dynamics in Heteropolymer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K.; Krichevsky, Oleg; Metzler, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    While the statistical mechanical description of DNA has a long tradition, renewed interest in DNA melting from a physics perspective is nourished by measurements of the fluctuation dynamics of local denaturation bubbles by single molecule spectroscopy. The dynamical opening of DNA bubbles (DNA breathing) is supposedly crucial for biological functioning during, for instance, transcription initiation and DNA's interaction with selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Motivated by this, we consider the bubble breathing dynamics in a heteropolymer DNA based on a (2+1)-variable master equation and complementary stochastic Gillespie simulations, providing the bubble size and the position of the bubble along the sequence as a function of time. We utilize new experimental data that independently obtain stacking and hydrogen bonding contributions to DNA stability. We calculate the spectrum of relaxation times and the experimentally measurable autocorrelation function of a fluorophore-quencher tagged basepair, and demonstrate good agreement with fluorescence correlation experiments. A significant dependence of opening probability and waiting time between bubble events on the local DNA sequence is revealed and quantified for a promoter sequence of the T7 phage. The strong dependence on sequence, temperature and salt concentration for the breathing dynamics of DNA found here points at a good potential for nanosensing applications by utilizing short fluorophore-quencher dressed DNA constructs. PMID:17237209

  2. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  3. Exhaled breath analysis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Carpagnano, Giovanna E

    2011-10-15

    It is currently estimated that the economic burden for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) cases not coming to medical attention is steadily increasing, thus making OSAS a major public health concern. For its increasing incidence among the common population, the interest of researchers and clinicians has been recently directed to the study of pathological mechanisms underlying sleep disorders. Current opinion is that airway inflammation and oxidative stress play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of OSAS. Recently there has been increasing interest in the investigation of lungs by non-invasive means measuring the exhaled breath volatile mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), ethane and pentane and finally the non-volatile substances in the liquid phase of exhalate, termed breath condensate. The non-invasiveness of these techniques for the study of airways affected by different respiratory disorders and among those, the OSAS, makes these ideally suited for the evaluation and serial monitoring of patients. Notwithstanding the increasing number of scientific contributions on the use of the exhaled markers in sleep disorders, at the moment, their use is not completely suitable for clinical application. An important contribution to the increase of our knowledge on exhaled markers and for their possible concrete application in clinical practice may come from future studies using proteomics, genomics and metabolomics. In this review, we focus on exhaled breath analysis giving an update on its general aspects, its application in OSAS, and finally its actual clinical applicability and areas for future direction. PMID:22003329

  4. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  5. Differences in spontaneous breathing pattern and mechanics in patients with severe COPD recovering from acute exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Vitacca, M; Porta, R; Bianchi, L; Clini, E; Ambrosino, N

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess spontaneous breathing patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recovering from acute exacerbation and to assess the relationship between different breathing patterns and clinical and functional parameters of respiratory impairment. Thirty-four COPD patients underwent assessment of lung function tests, arterial blood gases, haemodynamics, breathing pattern (respiratory frequency (fR), tidal volume (VT), inspiratory and expiratory time (tI and tE), duty cycle (tI/ttot), VT/tI) and mechanics (oesophageal pressure (Poes), work of breathing (WOB), pressure-time product and index, and dynamic intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi,dyn)). According to the presence (group 1) or absence (group 2) of Poes swings during the expiratory phase (premature inspiration), 20 (59%) patients were included in group 1 and 14 (41%) in group 2. Premature inspirations were observed 4.5+/-6.4 times x min(-1) (range 1-31), i.e. 20+/-21% (3.7-100%) of total fR calculated from VT tracings. In group 1 the coefficient of variation in VT, tE, tI/ttot, PEEPi,dyn, Poes and WOB of the eight consecutive breaths immediately preceding the premature inspiration was greater than that of eight consecutive breaths in group 2. There were no significant differences in the assessed parameters between the two groups in the overall population, whereas patients with chronic hypoxaemia in group 1 showed a more severe impairment in clinical conditions, mechanics and lung function than hypoxaemic patients in group 2. In spontaneously breathing patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease recovering from an acute exacerbation, detectable activity of inspiratory muscles during expiration was found in more than half of the cases. This phenomenon was not associated with any significant differences in anthropometric, demographic, physiological or clinical characteristics. PMID:10065683

  6. (13)C-5-FU breath test current status and future directions: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ezzeldin, Hany H; Acosta, Edward P; Mattison, Lori K; Fourie, Jeanne; Modak, Anil; Diasio, Robert B

    2009-12-01

    Breath tests (BTs) represent a safe non-invasive alternative strategy that could provide valuable diagnostic information in conditions like fat malabsorption, carbohydrate (lactose and fructose) malabsorption, liver dysfunction, impaired gastric emptying, abnormal small bowel transit time, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. To date, despite the availability of a number of breath tests, only three have gained approval by the FDA for application in a clinical setting ((13)C-urea breath test for the detection of H. pylori; NO breath test for monitoring asthma and alkane breath test for heart transplant rejection). Unfortunately, none of these tests investigate cancer patients or response to cancer chemotherapy. Several years ago it was realized that the presence of a reliable non-invasive approach could assist in the detection of patients at risk of developing severe life-threatening toxicities prior to the administration of fluoropyrimidines (e.g. 5-FU) or related cancer chemotherapy. 5-FU toxicity results mainly from deficient uracil catabolism. This review discusses the development of a BT that utilizes an orally administered pyrimidine ([2-(13)C]-uracil) which is metabolized via the same catabolic pathway as 5-FU. This ([2-(13)C]-uracil) breath test could provide a valuable addition to the patients' standard of care. PMID:21386199

  7. Real-time breath analysis in type 2 diabetes patients during cognitive effort.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Di Giulio, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    The understanding the functional expression of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has gradually expanded from the initial identification of breath pathological markers to direct expression of physiological activity. In the present study we investigated the potential application of breath analysis in real-time monitoring of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients versus control subjects while performing a cognitive task. T2DM is associated with cognitive impairment and neural deficits, because of insulin resistance and high expression of insulin receptors in the hippocampus. We set out to seek the evidence for mutual associations among breath exhale, on the one side, and T2DM and cognitive effort, on the other side. The recording system consisted of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) which is able to detect a broad range of volatile organic compounds. The sensor provides a measure of VOCs as ppm CO2 equivalents. The MOS is suitable for a non-invasive real-time monitoring of the breath exhale in humans. The study demonstrates that, apart from the T2DM metabolic derangement, performing a cognitive task, taken as an index of central neural effort, evoked distinct alterations in exhaled breath content. We conclude that exhaled breath content measurement might offer a novel diagnostic and therapeutic non-invasive approach in metabolic and neurodegenerative derangements. PMID:23835985

  8. Nasal histamine responses in nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ciofalo, Andrea; Romeo, Raffaello; Soldo, Pietro; Fusconi, Massimo; Greco, Antonio; Magliulo, Giuseppe; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome (NARES) is persistent, without atopy, but with ≥25% nasal eosinophilia. Hypereosinophilia seems to contribute to nasal mucosa dysfunction. Objectives: This analytical case-control study aimed at assessing the presence and severity of nonspecific nasal hyperactivity and at finding out whether eosinophilia may be correlated with the respiratory and mucociliary clearance functions. Materials: The symptom score was assessed in 38 patients and 15 controls whose nasal smear was also tested for eosinophils and mucociliary transport (MCT). Nonspecific nasal provocation tests (NSNPT) with histamine were also carried out, and total nasal resistance (TNR) was determined. Results: The symptom score of NARES after NSNPT were not significantly different from the control group, and there was poor or no correlation among the single symptoms and the differences studied for every nasal reactivity class. This correlation improved when using the composite symptom score. The most severe eosinophilia was observed in high reactivity groups, and it was correlated with an increase in TNR. MCT worsened as eosinophilia and nasal reactivity increased. Unlike controls, a significant correlation was observed between the increase in MCT and TNR. Conclusions: In NARES, nonspecific nasal hyperreactivity is the result of epithelial damage produced by eosinophilic inflammation, which causes MCT slow down, an increase in TNR, and nasal reactivity classes, with possible impact on classification, prognosis, and treatment control. PMID:26302729

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    London, Nyall R; Reh, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    Nasal polyps are semi-translucent mucosal outgrowths of the paranasal sinuses which typically arise in the setting of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Nasal polyps are also associated with asthma, aspirin sensitivity, cystic fibrosis and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFS). The majority of nasal polyps are bilateral and characterized by tissue edema and eosinophil infiltration. Patients with nasal polyps often present with complaints including nasal obstruction, congestion, rhinorrhea or altered sense of smell. The differential diagnosis ranges from benign masses such as schneiderian papilloma, antrochoanal polyp, angiofibroma and encephalocele to malignant neoplasms such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), esthesioneuroblastoma, nasal lymphoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. These lesions may have a similar appearance as nasal polyps and particular attention to an alternative diagnosis for nasal polyps should be entertained if the mass is unilateral or congenital in nature. Workup for patients with a unilateral mass should include radiographic imaging, possible biopsy and careful follow-up when appropriate. Here, we review the disease etiology of nasal polyps and describe the approach to the patient with nasal polyps with emphasis on differential diagnosis and workup. PMID:27466841

  10. Patient experience with mupirocin or povidone-iodine nasal decolonization.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Hutzler, Lorraine; Cuff, Germaine; Rosenberg, Andrew; Phillips, Michael; Bosco, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Led by the federal government, the payers of health care are enacting policies designed to base provider reimbursement on the quality of care they render. This study evaluated and compared patient experiences and satisfaction with nasal decolonization with either nasal povidone-iodine (PI) or nasal mupirocin ointment (MO). A total of 1903 patients were randomized to undergo preoperative nasal decolonization with either nasal MO or PI solution. All randomized patients were also given 2% chlorhexidine gluconate topical wipes. Patients were interviewed prior to discharge to assess adverse events and patient experience with their assigned preoperative antiseptic protocol. Of the 1903 randomized patients, 1679 (88.1%) were interviewed prior to discharge. Of patients receiving PI, 3.4% reported an unpleasant or very unpleasant experience, compared with 38.8% of those using nasal MO (P<.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients using nasal MO believed it to be somewhat or very helpful in reducing surgical site infections, compared with 71% of patients receiving PI (P>.05). Being recruited as an active participant in surgical site infection prevention was a positive experience for 87.2% of MO patients and 86.3% of PI patients (P=.652). Those assigned to receive PI solution preoperatively reported significantly fewer adverse events than the nasal MO group (P<.01). Preoperative nasal decolonization with either nasal PI or MO was considered somewhat or very helpful by more than two-thirds of patients. PMID:24972440

  11. Saline Nasal Irrigation for Upper Respiratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic upper respiratory conditions are common and expensive disorders with enormous impact on patient quality of life and society at large. Saline nasal irrigation (SNI), a therapy with roots in Ayurvedic medicine that bathes the nasal mucosa with in spray or liquid saline, has been used as adjunctive care for upper respiratory conditions. In liquid form, SNI has been found to be effective adjunctive care by the Cochrane Collaboration for symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive clinical trial evidence supports its use in spray and liquid forms as adjunctive treatment for mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory infections. Consensus or expert opinion recommendations exist for SNI as a treatment for a variety of other conditions including rhinitis of pregnancy. SNI appears safe; side effects are minimal and transient. It can be recommended by clinicians to interested patients with a range of upper respiratory conditions in the context of patient education and printed instructional handouts. PMID:19904896

  12. Surgical versus medical treatment of nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Lildholdt, T; Fogstrup, J; Gammelgaard, N; Kortholm, B; Ulsoe, C

    1988-01-01

    A randomized comparison of the usual surgical removal of nasal polyps versus systemic steroid treatment was performed in 53 patients. In all, continuous topical steroid treatment was given during the one year period of observation. In both groups the initial treatment resulted in a continuous increase in mean nasal expiratory peak flow as well as in the sense of smell; these two parameters showed a temporary statistically significant difference in favour of the medically treated group. In general though, the results in the two treatment groups were alike. Therefore medical treatment is recommended for routine use. Surgical removal should be reserved for those few cases in which the presence of residual or recurrent polyps justifies the inherent risks and discomfort for the patient. PMID:3341154

  13. Surgery of the nasal septum and turbinates

    PubMed Central

    Matthias, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    The following article presents nasal septum and turbinate surgery. First an overview with special consideration of the anatomical and physiological background is given followed by indications for surgical procedures. Key steps of the gold standard procedure first described by Cottle and common variations are presented. Furthermore, some techniques dealing with special problems of the septumplasty are discussed followed by an overview on complications and long term results. However, it should be mentioned that studies on surgical procedures of the nasal septum are still not sufficient as higher evidence levels are very rare. Within a separated chapter techniques for closure of septum perforations are presented and indications particularly in the background of the standard procedure of bridge flaps forwarded by Schultz-Coulon are discussed. The second part focusses on turbinate surgery. Accordingly, anatomical and physiological basics are presented followed by indications for surgical procedures and the surgical steps of different procedures as well as postsurgical treatment and long term results. PMID:22073086

  14. Assessment of the effect of deviated nasal septum on the structure of nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junguo; Dou, Xin; Liu, Dingding; Song, Panpan; Qian, Xiaoyun; Wang, Shoulin; Gao, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of DNS on the structure of nasal cavity. The paranasal sinus coronal view CT of 108 patients with DNS and 129 hospitalized patients without DNS was retrospectively analyzed. The transverse diameter of nasal cavity (a), transverse diameter of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (b), angle between maxillary and palatal bone, interalveolar distance, and maxillary rotation distance were measured. The ratio of a/b in experimental group was 0.367 ± 0.006 which was significantly (P = 0.0023) less than that in control group (0.391 ± 0.005). For the angle between maxillary and palatal bone, there was no significant difference found between DNS and control group for both right and left sides. The interalveolar distance was 40.75 mm in experimental group, and 38.8 mm in control (P = 0.0002). For the maxillary rotation distance, findings were considered as significant (P < 0.0001) in experimental group (11.25 mm) compared with control (10.1 mm). The present study demonstrates that long-term DNS affects the development of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus, as well as increases the interalveolar distance and maxillary rotation distance. These influences may be caused by the alteration of airflow inside the nasal cavities. PMID:26370235

  15. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  16. Misuse of xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Salamon, Marek; Habrat, Boguslaw; Scinska, Anna; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2008-12-01

    Six male prisoners who misused xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation were interviewed by a prison physician in 2006. The prisoners received xylometazoline drops during regular visits in the prison ambulatory service. In order to get the medication, the subjects reported false symptoms of rhinosinusitis and allergic reactions. Psychoactive effects of inhaled xylometazoline were described as "stimulation," "excitation," and "feeling of strength." Although preliminary, our findings suggest that topical adrenergic decongestants can produce rewarding effects when administered by inhalation. PMID:19085441

  17. Reconstructing the extended nasal tip defect.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Reconstruction of large facial defects requires surgical skill, an understanding of engineering principles, an artistic eye, and patience to design the most elegant solution for each patient. Extended nasal tip defects, which may involve additional facial subunits, require even more thoughtful analysis and planning. Reconstructive surgeons need to be aware of the pros and cons of various options for flaps, the use of a delay stage, and sequencing and scheduling of staged operations to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:24037937

  18. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  19. Association between respiratory and postural adaptations and self-perception of school-aged children with mouth breathing in relation to their quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Suélen E.; Marchesi, Laís M.; Duarte, Halina; Araújo, Maria T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the respiratory and postural adaptations associated with mouth and nasal breathing and to evaluate the associations of such adaptations in mouth breathers' self-perceived quality of life. Method: Cross-sectional study with mouth breathers (initial n=116 and final n=48) and nasal breathers (initial n=131 and final n=24) from elementary school, aged between 7 and 14 years. Chest expansion, using cirtometry, the breathing pattern and the use of accessory muscles, by means of clinical evaluations and photogrammetry, and flexibility tests were evaluated in both groups. Subsequently, the mouth breathers were asked to complete the quality of life questionnaire. Statistical tests: Chi-square, odds ratio, Mann-Whitney, and binomial tests were first applied followed by logistic regressions. Results: Thoracic breathing (p=0.04), using of accessory muscles (p=0.03) and reductions in flexibility (p=0.001) increased the chances of an individual being a mouth breather when compared to nasal breathers. Subsequently, using of accessory muscles decreased the chances of snoring among mouth breathers (p=0.03); the presence of shoulder asymmetry reduced the chances of experiencing quiet sleep (p=0.05) and increased the chances of coughing or being tired when playing or running (p=0.008). Finally, forward head position reduced the chances of waking up at night (p=0.04) and experiencing shortness of breath (p=0.05). Conclusions: Respiratory and postural adaptations increased the chances of individuals persisting with mouth breathing. Additionally, these adaptations could be associated with mouth breathers' self-perceived quality of life. PMID:26083601

  20. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Adults: Physiological Benefits, Indication, Clinical Benefits, and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masaji

    2016-04-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is carried out using an air/oxygen blender, active humidifier, single heated tube, and nasal cannula. Able to deliver adequately heated and humidified medical gas at flows up to 60 L/min, it is considered to have a number of physiological advantages compared with other standard oxygen therapies, including reduced anatomical dead space, PEEP, constant FIO2 , and good humidification. Although few large randomized clinical trials have been performed, HFNC has been gaining attention as an alternative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Published data are mostly available for neonates. For critically ill adults, however, evidence is uneven because the reports cover various subjects with diverse underlying conditions, such as hypoxemic respiratory failure, exacerbation of COPD, postextubation, preintubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, and conditions entailing do-not-intubate orders. Even so, across the diversity, many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces the need for respiratory support escalation. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as definitive indications for HFNC and criteria for timing the starting and stopping of HFNC and for escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC has emerged as an innovative and effective modality for early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases. PMID:27016353

  1. The influence of vegetative stimuli on the human nasal mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Schmidt-Kloiber, H

    1985-03-01

    Measuring probes were inserted into the inferior nasal meatus in humans to record the effects of certain defined vegetative stimuli on the cavernous state and the temperature of the mucous membrane. An unilateral carotis compression induces a bilateral reactivity of the mucous membrane in the sense of a sympathicus stimulus. An unilateral bulbus pressure causes a bilateral reaction of the mucous membrane opposite to that of carotis compression. Blocking of the stellate ganglion produces a tonus reduction of the nervus sympathicus as was also found in animal experiments by other authors. Trigeminus stimulation induces a swelling of the nasal mucous membrane, whereas a voluntary breathing stop causes decongestion. Facial blushing, the only undefined and involuntary stimulus, is followed by an unswelling and a decrease of mucous membrane temperature. The results of our investigations are in agreement with analogous animal experiments. This is not surprising as man has a vegetative nervous system which is essentially unchanged from the beginning of evolutionary development. Only blushing is an expression of a reaction behaviour characteristic of human beings only. PMID:4001756

  2. Deformation of Nasal Septal Cartilage During Mastication

    PubMed Central

    Dayeh, Ayman A. Al; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Egbert, Mark; Herring, Susan W.

    2009-01-01

    The cartilaginous nasal septum plays a major role in structural integrity and growth of the face, but its internal location has made physiologic study difficult. By surgically implanting transducers in 10 miniature pigs (Sus scrofa), we recorded in vivo strains generated in the nasal septum during mastication and masseter stimulation. The goals were (1) to determine whether the cartilage should be considered as a vertical strut supporting the nasal cavity and preventing its collapse, or as a damper of stresses generated during mastication and (2) to shed light on the overall pattern of snout deformation during mastication. Strains were recorded simultaneously at the septo-ethmoid junction and nasofrontal suture during mastication. A third location in the anterior part of the cartilage was added during masseter stimulation and manipulation. Contraction of jaw closing muscles during mastication was accompanied by anteroposterior compressive strains (around −1,000 με) in the septo-ethmoid junction. Both the orientation and the magnitude of the strain suggest that the septum does not act as a vertical strut but may act in absorbing loads generated during mastication. The results from masseter stimulation and manipulation further suggest that the masticatory strain pattern arises from a combination of dorsal bending and/or shearing and anteroposterior compression of the snout. J. Morphol. PMID:19434723

  3. Minimally Invasive Procedures for Nasal Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Alessio; Limardo, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Nose has an important role in the aesthetics of face. It is easy to understand the reason of the major interest that has revolved around the correction of its imperfections for several centuries, or even from the ancient times. In the last decade, all the surgical or medical minimal-invasive techniques evolved exponentially. The techniques of rejuvenation and corrections of nasal imperfections did not escape this development that is much widespread in the medicine of the third millennium. In many cases, the techniques of surgical correction involve invasive procedure that necessitates, for the majority of cases, hospitalisation. The author, using a different approach, has developed mini-invasive techniques using botulinum toxin A (BTxA) and absorbable fillers for the correction of nasal imperfections. BTxA allows to reduce the imperfections due to hypertension of muscles, while the absorbable fillers allow to correct all the imperfections of the nasal profile from the root to the tip in total safety. The correction is based on the precise rules that allow avoiding the majority of side effects. Results are long lasting and well appreciated by patients. PMID:23060706

  4. How to interpret hydrogen breath tests.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen breath tests using various substrates like glucose, lactulose, lactose and fructose are being used more and more to diagnose small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and lactose or fructose malabsorption. Though quantitative culture of jejunal aspirate is considered as gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, hydrogen breath tests, in spite of their low sensitivity, are popular for their non-invasiveness. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for the diagnosis of SIBO as conventionally accepted double-peak criterion on lactulose hydrogen breath test is very insensitive and recently described early-peak criterion is often false positive. Hydrogen breath test is useful to diagnose various types of sugar malabsorption. Technique and interpretation of different hydrogen breath tests are outlined in this review. PMID:21860825

  5. Persistent rhinitis and epithelial remodeling induced by cyclic ozone exposure in the nasal airways of infant monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Carol A.; Plopper, Charles G.; McDonald, Ruth J.; Bartolucci, Alfred A.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Harkema, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Children chronically exposed to high levels of ozone (O3), the principal oxidant pollutant in photochemical smog, are more vulnerable to respiratory illness and infections. The specific factors underlying this differential susceptibility are unknown but may be related to air pollutant-induced nasal alterations during postnatal development that impair the normal physiological functions (e.g., filtration and mucociliary clearance) serving to protect the more distal airways from inhaled xenobiotics. In adult animal models, chronic ozone exposure is associated with adaptations leading to a decrease in airway injury. The purpose of our study was to determine whether cyclic ozone exposure induces persistent morphological and biochemical effects on the developing nasal airways of infant monkeys early in life. Infant (180-day-old) rhesus macaques were exposed to 5 consecutive days of O3 [0.5 parts per million (ppm), 8 h/day; “1-cycle”] or filtered air (FA) or 11 biweekly cycles of O3 (FA days 1–9; 0.5 ppm, 8 h/day on days 10–14; “11-cycle”). The left nasal passage was processed for light microscopy and morphometric analysis. Mucosal samples from the right nasal passage were processed for GSH, GSSG, ascorbate (AH2), and uric acid (UA) concentration. Eleven-cycle O3 induced persistent rhinitis, squamous metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the anterior nasal airways of infant monkeys, resulting in a 39% increase in the numeric density of epithelial cells. Eleven-cycle O3 also induced a 65% increase in GSH concentrations at this site. The persistence of epithelial hyperplasia was positively correlated with changes in GSH. These results indicate that early life ozone exposure causes persistent nasal epithelial alterations in infant monkeys and provide a potential mechanism for the increased susceptibility to respiratory illness exhibited by children in polluted environments. PMID:21131400

  6. Persistent rhinitis and epithelial remodeling induced by cyclic ozone exposure in the nasal airways of infant monkeys.

    PubMed

    Carey, Stephan A; Ballinger, Carol A; Plopper, Charles G; McDonald, Ruth J; Bartolucci, Alfred A; Postlethwait, Edward M; Harkema, Jack R

    2011-02-01

    Children chronically exposed to high levels of ozone (O(3)), the principal oxidant pollutant in photochemical smog, are more vulnerable to respiratory illness and infections. The specific factors underlying this differential susceptibility are unknown but may be related to air pollutant-induced nasal alterations during postnatal development that impair the normal physiological functions (e.g., filtration and mucociliary clearance) serving to protect the more distal airways from inhaled xenobiotics. In adult animal models, chronic ozone exposure is associated with adaptations leading to a decrease in airway injury. The purpose of our study was to determine whether cyclic ozone exposure induces persistent morphological and biochemical effects on the developing nasal airways of infant monkeys early in life. Infant (180-day-old) rhesus macaques were exposed to 5 consecutive days of O(3) [0.5 parts per million (ppm), 8 h/day; "1-cycle"] or filtered air (FA) or 11 biweekly cycles of O(3) (FA days 1-9; 0.5 ppm, 8 h/day on days 10-14; "11-cycle"). The left nasal passage was processed for light microscopy and morphometric analysis. Mucosal samples from the right nasal passage were processed for GSH, GSSG, ascorbate (AH(2)), and uric acid (UA) concentration. Eleven-cycle O(3) induced persistent rhinitis, squamous metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the anterior nasal airways of infant monkeys, resulting in a 39% increase in the numeric density of epithelial cells. Eleven-cycle O(3) also induced a 65% increase in GSH concentrations at this site. The persistence of epithelial hyperplasia was positively correlated with changes in GSH. These results indicate that early life ozone exposure causes persistent nasal epithelial alterations in infant monkeys and provide a potential mechanism for the increased susceptibility to respiratory illness exhibited by children in polluted environments. PMID:21131400

  7. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity. PMID:25308111

  8. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle on Nasal Resonance Characteristics in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suman; Basu, Shriya; Sinha, Anisha; Chatterjee, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze resonance characteristics (nasality and nasalance values) during the menstrual cycle. Previous studies indicate changes in voice quality and nasal mucosa due to temporary falling estrogen levels in human females during their menstrual cycle. The present study compared the nasality and "nasalance scores"…

  9. The Usefulness of Nasal Packing with Vaseline Gauze and Airway Silicone Splint after Closed Reduction of Nasal Bone Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Sin Rak; Park, Jin Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Background Packing after closed reduction of a nasal bone fracture causes inconvenient nasal obstruction in patients. We packed the superior meatus with Vaseline gauze to support the nasal bone, and packed the middle nasal meatus with a Doyle Combo Splint consisting of an airway tube, a silastic sheet, and an expandable sponge to reduce the inconvenience. In addition, we aimed to objectively identify whether this method not only enables nasal respiration but also sufficiently supports the reduced nasal bone. Methods Nasal ventilation was measured via spirometry 1 day before surgery and compared to 1 day after surgery. To compare support of the reduced nasal bone by the 2 methods, 2 plastic surgeons assessed the displacementon X-rays taken after the surgery and after removing the packing. The extent of nasal obstruction, dry mouth, sleep disturbance, headache, and swallowing difficulty were compared with visual analog scales (VAS) on a pre-discharge survey. Results In the experimental group, the nasal respiration volume 1 day after surgery remained at 71.3%±6.84% on average compared to 1 day prior to surgery. Support of the reduced bone in the experimental group (2.80±0.4) was not significantly different from the control group (2.88±0.33). The VAS scores for all survey items were lower in the experimental group than in the control group, where a lower score indicated a lower level of inconvenience. Conclusions The nasal cavity packing described here maintained objective measures of nasal respiration and supported the reduced bone similar to conventional methods. Maintaining nasal respiration reduced the inconvenience to patients, which demonstrates that this packing method is useful. PMID:23233886

  10. Treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing Reverses Low Fetal Activity Levels in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Blyton, Diane M.; Skilton, Michael R.; Edwards, Natalie; Hennessy, Annemarie; Celermajer, David S.; Sullivan, Colin E.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Preeclampsia affects 5% to 7% of pregnancies, is strongly associated with low birth weight and fetal death, and is accompanied by sleep disordered breathing. We hypothesized that sleep disordered breathing may link preeclampsia with reduced fetal movements (a marker of fetal health), and that treatment of sleep disordered breathing might improve fetal activity during sleep. Design, Setting, and Participants: First, a method of fetal movement recording was validated against ultrasound in 20 normal third trimester pregnancies. Second, fetal movement was measured overnight with concurrent polysomnography in 20 patients with preeclampsia and 20 control subjects during third trimester. Third, simultaneous polysomnography and fetal monitoring was done in 10 additional patients with preeclampsia during a control night and during a night of nasal CPAP. Intervention: Overnight continuous positive airway pressure. Measurements and Results: Women with preeclampsia had inspiratory flow limitation and an increased number of oxygen desaturations during sleep (P = 0.008), particularly during REM sleep. Preeclampsia was associated with reduced total fetal movements overnight (319 [SD 32]) versus controls (689 [SD 160], P < 0.0001) and a change in fetal movement patterns. The number of fetal hiccups was also substantially reduced in preeclampsia subjects (P < 0.0001). Continuous positive airway pressure treatment increased the number of fetal movements and hiccups (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0002, respectively). Conclusions: The effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure in improving fetal movements suggests a pathogenetic role for sleep disordered breathing in the reduced fetal activity and possibly in the poorer fetal outcomes associated with preeclampsia. Citation: Blyton DM; Skilton MR; Edwards N; Hennessy A; Celermajer DS; Sullivan CE. Treatment of sleep disordered breathing reverses low fetal activity levels in preeclampsia. SLEEP 2013;36(1):15–21

  11. Rapid increase to double breathing rate appears during REM sleep in synchrony with REM - a higher CNS control of breathing? -.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Kondo, Hideaki; Matsubuchi, Namiko; Ono, Kyoichi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Breathing rate (BR) during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is known to fluctuate largely, while increases in BR during REM sleep reported were small. In our mice experiments, we found that mice exhibit a rapid increase in instantaneous BR (RIBR) of >2 fold during natural sleep with accompanying atonia, laying their sides down. The RIBR was further found in a sleeping mouse attached with EEG electrodes when the EEG amplitude and delta wave power were lower. Therefore, it is likely that mice show RIBRs during REM sleep. Interestingly, similar RIBRs accompanied by atonia and REM burst during REM sleep were also found in humans by standard polysomnographic studies in 11 healthy volunteers (age: 22.3 +/- 2.8) with BR measurement by nasal/oral airflow sensors and chest/abdomen belt sensors. All subjects underwent RIBR of doubled BR at least once a night. As SpO(2) before RIBRs was a level not effective to be a respiratory stimulant (96.7 +/- 1.6 %, n = 63), the RIBR seems to be controlled by higher central nervous system rather than autonomic nervous system control on response to central and peripheral chemical sensors. In fact, tachypnea with suppressed amplitude during RIBR resulted in a slight fall in SpO(2) (96.4 +/- 1.7 %, p = 0.0007). In the present study, RIBRs accompanied by atonia and REM were not necessarily consistent in change in rate and/or amplitude, therefore, these various pattern of RIBRs may be potential indices of dreams with various emotional contents. Analysis of instantaneous BR, thus, may be a helpful tool for understanding the neural control of breathing during REM sleep. PMID:20217359

  12. Human nasal rhinosporidiosis: a case report from Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Uledi, Sefu; Fauzia, Ayubu

    2011-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a rare chronic granulomatous disease, characterised by polypous lesions of the mucous membrane. Commonly affects the mucous membrane of the naso-pharynx, conjunctiva and palate. Its causative agent is Rhinosporidium seeberi. The disease is more prevalent in the Indian subcontinent, but remains quite rare in our environment. We hereby present a case description of a 70 year old native Malawian male with a polypoid nasal rhinosporidiosis. Patient presented with long standing history of nasal obstruction and intermittent epistaxis for three years. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and he was successfully treated by complete surgical excision. This was a very unusual cause of nasal masses in our setting. Nasal rhinosporidioss lesions may largely mimic other ordinary nasal polyps, it is crucial therefore for clinicians in our region to consider rhinosporidiosis as a differential diagnosis when assessing patients presenting with nasal swellings. PMID:22355433

  13. Calculating rhythmicity of infant breathing using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macey, Katherine E.; Page, Wyatt H.; Harper, Ronald M.; Macey, Paul M.; Ford, Rodney P. K.

    2000-12-01

    Breathing signals are one set of physiological data that may provide information regarding the mechanisms that cause SIDS. Isolated breathing pauses have been implicated in fatal events. Other features of interest include slow amplitude modulation of the breathing signal, a phenomenon whose origin is unclear, and periodic breathing. The latter describes a repetitive series of apnea, and may be considered an extreme manifestation of amplitude modulation with successive cessations of breathing. Rhythmicity is defined to assess the impact of amplitude modulation on breathing signals and describes the extent to which frequency components remain constant for the duration of the signal. The wavelet transform was used to identify sections of constant frequency components within signals. Rhythmicity can be evaluated for all the frequency components in a signal, for individual frequencies. The rhythmicity of eight breathing epochs from sleeping infants at high and low risk for SIDS was calculated. Initial results show breathing from infants at high risk for SIDS exhibits greater rhythmicity of modulating frequencies than breathing from low risk infants.

  14. THE ESSENTIAL ROLE OF THE COM IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SLEEP-DISORDERED BREATHING: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND DISCUSSION.

    PubMed

    Frey, Lorraine; Green, Shari; Fabbie, Paula; Hockenbury, Dana; Foran, Marge; Elder, Kathleen

    2014-11-01

    The origins of Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy began in the early 1960's by orthodontists who recognized the importance of functional nasal breathing, proper swallowing, and more ideal oral rest postures. Re-patterning these functions through myofunctional therapy assisted with better orthodontic outcomes and improved stability. Experts in orofacial myology have concluded that improper oral rest postures and tongue thrusting may be the result of hypertrophy of the lymphatic tissues in the upper airway. Orthodontists are aware of the deleterious effects these habits have on the developing face and dentition. Sleep disordered breathing is a major health concern that affects people from infancy into adulthood. Physicians who treat sleep disorders are now referring patients for orofacial myofunctional therapy. Researchers have concluded that removal of tonsils and adenoids, along with expansion orthodontics, may not fully resolve the upper airway issues that continue to plague patients' health. Sleep researchers report that the presence of mouth breathing, along with hypotonia of the orofacial muscular complex, has been a persistent problem in the treatment of sleep disordered breathing. Orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMDs) coexist in a large population of people with sleep disordered breathing and sleep apnea. Advances in 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) imaging offer the dental and medical communities the opportunity to identify, assess, and treat patients with abnormal growth patterns. These undesirable changes in oral structures can involve the upper airway, as well as functional breathing, chewing and swallowing. Leading researchers have advocated a multidisciplinary team approach. Sleep physicians, otolaryngologists, dentists, myofunctional therapists, and other healthcare professionals are working together to achieve these goals. The authors have compiled research articles that support incorporating the necessary education on sleep disordered

  15. The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing must ultimately encompass all the various neuronal elements physiologically identified in brainstem respiratory circuits and their apparent aggregation into “compartments” within the medulla and pons. These functionally defined respiratory compartments in the brainstem provide the major source of input to cranial motoneurons controlling the airways, and to spinal motoneurons activating inspiratory and expiratory pump muscles. This review provides an overview of the neuroanatomy of the major compartments comprising brainstem respiratory circuits, and a synopsis of the transmitters used by their constituent respiratory neurons. PMID:18706532

  16. 42 CFR 84.72 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.72...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.72 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with breathing apparatus shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a)...

  17. 42 CFR 84.85 - Breathing bags; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bags; minimum requirements. 84.85 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.85 Breathing bags; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing bags shall have.... (b) Breathing bags shall be constructed of materials which are flexible and resistant to...

  18. Breathing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... size of the thoracic cavity and decreases the pressure inside. As a result, air rushes in and ... volume of the thoracic cavity decreases, while the pressure within it increases. As a result, the lungs ...

  19. Breathing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... respiratory system conduct air to the lungs, such as the trachea (windpipe) which branches into smaller structures ... the thoracic cavity and decreases the pressure inside. As a result, air rushes in and fills the ...

  20. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-05-23

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  1. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  2. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  3. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  4. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  5. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, up to 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation. Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized, though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation, and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:22350539

  6. Pathogenesis and management of nasal polyposis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Koitschev, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in preschool age, during their lives, upto 50% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience obstructing nasal polyposis (NP), which is rare in non-CF children. Pathogenetic factors of NP in general and especially in CF are still obscure. However, defective epithelial ion transport from mucosal glands plays a central role in CF, and viscous secretions impair mucociliary clearance, promoting chronic pathogen colonization and neutrophil-dominated chronic inflammation.Presently, CF-NP is not curable but can be clinically stabilized,though the large variety of proposed treatment modalities indicates a lack of standardization and of evidence of treatment efficacy. When conservative measures are exhausted, surgical intervention combining individually adapted endoscopic sinus surgery and supportive conservative treatment is performed. Topical steroids, approved as the gold standard for non-CF NP, may be beneficial, but they are discussed to be less effective in neutrophilic inflammation,and CF-specific antimicrobial and mucolytic therapy, as is true of all treatment modalities, urgently requires evaluation by controlled clinical trials within interdisciplinary networks. PMID:23520643

  7. Role of the lymphoreticular system in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bessen, Richard A; Martinka, Scott; Kelly, Jessica; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Prion neuroinvasion from peripheral tissues involves agent replication in the lymphoreticular system (LRS) prior to entry into the nervous system. This study investigated the role of the LRS in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa in wild-type and immunodeficient mice and in hamsters infected with the HY and DY strains of the transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) agent. Following inoculation at neural sites, all hosts were susceptible to prion disease and had evidence of prion infection in the brain, but infection of the LRS was found only in scrapie-infected wild-type mice and HY TME-infected hamsters. In the LRS replication-deficient models, prion neuroinvasion was not observed following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. However, immunodeficient mice, which have impaired follicular dendritic cells, were susceptible to scrapie following intratongue and intranasal inoculation despite the absence of PrP(Sc) in the tongue or the nasal cavity. For DY TME, hamsters were susceptible following intratongue but not intranasal inoculation and PrP(Sc) was limited to nerve fibers of the tongue. These findings indicate that neuroinvasion from the tongue and nasal cavity can be independent of LRS infection but neuroinvasion was partially dependent on the strain of the prion agent and/or the host species. The paucity of PrP(Sc) deposition in the oral and nasal mucosa from LRS replication-deficient hosts following neuroinvasion from these tissues suggests an infection of nerve fibers that is below the threshold of PrP(Sc) detection and/or the transport of the prion agent along cranial nerves without agent replication. PMID:19369351

  8. Computerized rhinomanometry: a study of total nasal resistance normal values.

    PubMed

    Janosević, L; Dotlić, J; Janosević, S; Dudvarski, Z; Milovanović, A; Pendjer, I

    2009-01-01

    Computerized rhinomanometry with the practical software programmes is used widely as a research tool to evaluate objectively nasal air flow and resistance parameters, while the increase of its clinical application may be facilitated by further standardization of the method. The aim of the study was to determine the total nasal resistance normal values in healthy adult population using a method of computerized rhinomanometry. A randomized sample of 108 white healthy adults (216 nasal cavities), both sexs with a mean age of 32 (20-45) years comprised the test group. Nasal patency was measured by active anterior rhinomanometry in non-decongested mucosa ("at rest") during 10 repetitive measurements at inspiratory and expiratory reference pressure of 150 Pa. Nasal resistance was measured and calculated according to the recommendations of the Committee on objective assessment of the nasal airway, International Rhinologic Society. The mean total nasal resistance in the sample was found to be 0.179 Pa/cm3/s with the confidant interval from 0,167 to 0,191 Pa/cm3/s at the probability level of 95%. Total nasal resistance was very significantly influenced by sex (t = -4.614), height (F=11.625) and weight (F=11.529) of the examinees. This paper provides additional information on total nasal resistance normal values in healthy adult population important for computirezed rhinomanometry normative parameters standardization. PMID:20218102

  9. Rethinking Nasal Tip Support:A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shamouelian, David; Leary, Ryan P; Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Protsenko, Dmitriy E; Wong, Brian JF

    2014-01-01

    Objective We employ a nasal tip finite element model (FEM) to evaluate contributions of two of the three major tip support mechanism: attachments between the upper and lower lateral cartilages and the attachment of the medial crura to the caudal septum. Study Design The nasal tip FEM computed stress distribution and strain energy density (SED) during nasal tip compression. We examined the impact of attachments between the upper and lower lateral cartilages and the attachment of the medial crura to the caudal septum on nasal tip support. Methods The FEM consisted of three tissue components: bone, cartilage, and skin. Four models were created: A) Control model with attachments present at the scroll and caudal septum; B) Simulated disruption of scroll; C) Simulated disruption of medial crura attachments to caudal septum; D) Simulated disruption of scroll and medial crura attachments to caudal septum. Spatial distribution of stress and SED were calculated. Results The keystone, intermediate crura, caudal septum and nasal spine demonstrated high concentration of stress distribution. Across all models, there was no difference in stress distribution. Disruption of the scroll resulted in 1% decrease in SED. Disruption of the medial crura attachments to the caudal septum resulted in 4.2% reduction in SED. Disruption of both scroll and medial crural attachments resulting in 9.1% reduction in SED. Conclusion The nasal tip FEM is an evolving tool to study structural nasal tip dynamics and demonstrates the loss of nasal tip support with disruption of attachments at the scroll and nasal base. PMID:25130506

  10. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  11. Saline nasal irrigation: Its role as an adjunct treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Papsin, Blake; McTavish, Alison

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review clinical evidence on the efficacy of saline nasal irrigation for treatment of sinonasal conditions and to explore its potential benefits. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Clinical trials, reviews, and treatment guidelines discussing nasal irrigation were obtained through a MEDLINE search from January 1980 to December 2001. Most trials were small and some were not controlled; evidence, therefore, is level II, or fair. MAIN MESSAGE: Flushing the nasal cavity with saline solution promotes mucociliary clearance by moisturizing the nasal cavity and by removing encrusted material. The procedure has been used safely for both adults and children, and has no documented serious adverse effects. Patients treated with nasal irrigation rely less on other medications and make fewer visits to physicians. Treatment guidelines in both Canada and the United States now advocate use of nasal irrigation for all causes of rhinosinusitis and for postoperative cleaning of the nasal cavity. CONCLUSION: Nasal irrigation is a simple, inexpensive treatment that relieves the symptoms of a variety of sinus and nasal conditions, reduces use of medical resources, and could help minimize antibiotic resistance. PMID:12619739

  12. Reconstruction of nasal defect with the composite expanded forehead flap.

    PubMed

    Viksraitis, Saulius; Maslauskas, Kestutis; Bagdonas, Rokas

    2010-01-01

    Nasal tip and septal perforations may lead to significant upper airway problems as well as disturbing esthetic changes in the external contour of the nose. Nasal defects impede normal social contact and create great self-identity problems for the patients. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman, taking drugs for 10 years, who had sepsis and nasal abscess with necrosis of the nasal tip and septum. Using a composite expanded forehead flap for reconstruction of the nose, good esthetic and functional results were achieved. PMID:20234161

  13. Airflow Dynamics of Human Jets: Sneezing and Breathing - Potential Sources of Infectious Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre D.; Klettner, Christian A.; Pantelic, Jovan; Wang, Liangde; Suhaimi, Amin Bin; Tan, Ashlynn Y. L.; Ong, Garrett W. X.; Su, Ruikun; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David D. W.; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2013-01-01

    Natural human exhalation flows such as coughing, sneezing and breathing can be considered as ‘jet-like’ airflows in the sense that they are produced from a single source in a single exhalation effort, with a relatively symmetrical, conical geometry. Although coughing and sneezing have garnered much attention as potential, explosive sources of infectious aerosols, these are relatively rare events during daily life, whereas breathing is necessary for life and is performed continuously. Real-time shadowgraph imaging was used to visualise and capture high-speed images of healthy volunteers sneezing and breathing (through the nose – nasally, and through the mouth - orally). Six volunteers, who were able to respond to the pepper sneeze stimulus, were recruited for the sneezing experiments (2 women: 27.5±6.36 years; 4 men: 29.25±10.53 years). The maximum visible distance over which the sneeze plumes (or puffs) travelled was 0.6 m, the maximum sneeze velocity derived from these measured distances was 4.5 m/s. The maximum 2-dimensional (2-D) area of dissemination of these sneezes was 0.2 m2. The corresponding derived parameter, the maximum 2-D area expansion rate of these sneezes was 2 m2/s. For nasal breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.6 m and 1.4 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.11 m2 and 0.16 m2/s, respectively. Similarly, for mouth breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.8 m and 1.3 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.18 m2 and 0.17 m2/s, respectively. Surprisingly, a comparison of the maximum exit velocities of sneezing reported here with those obtained from coughing (published previously) demonstrated that they are relatively similar, and not extremely high. This is in contrast with some earlier estimates of sneeze velocities, and some reasons for this difference are discussed. PMID

  14. Depicting the inner and outer nose: the representation of the nose and the nasal mucosa on the human primary somatosensory cortex (SI).

    PubMed

    Gastl, Mareike; Brünner, Yvonne F; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The nose is important not only for breathing, filtering air, and perceiving olfactory stimuli. Although the face and hands have been mapped, the representation of the internal and external surface of the nose on the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is still poorly understood. To fill this gap functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to localize the nose and the nasal mucosa in the Brodman areas (BAs) 3b, 1, and 2 of the human postcentral gyrus (PG). Tactile stimulation during fMRI was applied via a customized pneumatically driven device to six stimulation sites: the alar wing of the nose, the lateral nasal mucosa, and the hand (serving as a reference area) on the left and right side of the body. Individual representations could be discriminated for the left and right hand, for the left nasal mucosa and left alar wing of the nose in BA 3b and BA 1 by comparing mean activation maxima and Euclidean distances. Right-sided nasal conditions and conditions in BA 2 could further be separated by different Euclidean distances. Regarding the alar wing of the nose, the results concurred with the classic sensory homunculus proposed by Penfield and colleagues. The nasal mucosa was not only determined an individual and bilateral representation, its position on the somatosensory cortex is also situated closer to the caudal end of the PG compared to that of the alar wing of the nose and the hand. As SI is commonly activated during the perception of odors, these findings underscore the importance of the knowledge of the representation of the nasal mucosa on the primary somatosensory cortex, especially for interpretation of results of functional imaging studies about the sense of smell. PMID:24659451

  15. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  16. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  17. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  18. Prolonged partial upper airway obstruction during sleep - an underdiagnosed phenotype of sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Anttalainen, Ulla; Tenhunen, Mirja; Rimpilä, Ville; Polo, Olli; Rauhala, Esa; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a well-recognized disorder conventionally diagnosed with an elevated apnea-hypopnea index. Prolonged partial upper airway obstruction is a common phenotype of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), which however is still largely underreported. The major reasons for this are that cyclic breathing pattern coupled with arousals and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation are easy to detect and considered more important than prolonged episodes of increased respiratory effort with increased levels of carbon dioxide in the absence of cycling breathing pattern and repetitive arousals. There is also a growing body of evidence that prolonged partial obstruction is a clinically significant form of SDB, which is associated with symptoms and co-morbidities which may partially differ from those associated with OSAS. Partial upper airway obstruction is most prevalent in women, and it is treatable with the nasal continuous positive pressure device with good adherence to therapy. This review describes the characteristics of prolonged partial upper airway obstruction during sleep in terms of diagnostics, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and comorbidity to improve recognition of this phenotype and its timely and appropriate treatment. PMID:27608271

  19. Effect of a novel temperature-controlled laminar airflow device on personal breathing zone aeroallergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Gore, R B; Boyle, R J; Gore, C; Custovic, A; Hanna, H; Svensson, P; Warner, J O

    2015-02-01

    Temperature-controlled laminar airflow improves symptoms in atopic asthmatics, but its effects on personal allergen exposure are unknown. We aimed to evaluate its effects on personal cat allergen and particulate exposures in a simulated bedroom environment. Five healthy volunteers lay under an active and an inactive temperature-controlled laminar airflow device for 175 min, in a simulated bedroom containing bedding from a cat owner. Total airborne particles (≥0.5 - ≥10 μm diameter) were quantified with a laser particle counter. Airborne allergen was sampled with Institute of Occupational Medicine filters. Inhaled exposure was sampled with nasal air samplers. Allergen-containing particles were quantified by immunoassay. Treatment reduced total airborne particles (>0.5 μm diameter) by >99% (P < 0.001) and reduced airborne allergen concentration within the breathing zone (ratio of median counts = 30, P = 0.043). Treatment reduced inhaled allergen (ratio of median counts = 7, P = 0.043). Treatment was not associated with a change in airborne allergen concentration outside of the breathing zone (P = 0.160). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow treatment of individuals in an allergen-rich experimental environment results in significant reductions in breathing zone allergenic and non-allergenic particle exposure, and in inhaled cat allergen exposure. These findings may explain the clinical benefits of temperature-controlled laminar airflow. PMID:24750266

  20. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Elmiro, Nathália S.; Velloso, Marcelo; Britto, Raquel R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using the optoelectronic plethysmography system in a supine position with a trunk inclination of 45° during quiet breathing and the breathing exercises. The order of the breathing exercises was randomized. Statistical analysis was performed by the Friedman test and an ANOVA for repeated measures with one factor (breathing exercises), followed by preplanned contrasts and Bonferroni correction. A p<0.005 value was considered significant. RESULTS: All breathing exercises significantly increased the tidal volume of the chest wall (Vcw) and reduced the respiratory rate (RR) in comparison to quiet breathing. The diaphragmatic breathing exercise was responsible for the lowest Vcw, the lowest contribution of the rib cage, and the highest contribution of the abdomen. The sustained maximal inspiration exercise promoted greater reduction in RR compared to the diaphragmatic and intercostal exercises. Inspiratory sighs and intercostal exercises were responsible for the highest values of minute ventilation. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony variables increased significantly during diaphragmatic breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the breathing exercises investigated in this study produced modifications in the breathing pattern (e.g., increase in tidal volume and decrease in RR) as well as in thoracoabdominal motion (e.g., increase in abdominal contribution during diaphragmatic breathing), among others. PMID:25590447

  1. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  2. The relationship between aminopyrine breath test and severity of liver disease in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, A.; Narducci, F.; Pelli, M.A.; Farroni, F.; Vedovelli, A.

    1981-08-01

    Twenty-two patients with cirrhosis were evaluated by the 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test, the conventional liver tests and two systems for grading the severity of liver disease. Twenty-three patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 15 controls were also studied. Reduced 14CO2 values were found in 21 of the 22 cirrhotic patients and seven of those had noncirrhotic liver disease associated with severe functional reserve impairment. The values in patients with minor liver diseases or cholestasis were normal. In the cirrhotic patients 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test scores correlated with prothrombin time, retention of bromosulfalein, fasting serum bile acid, albumin, bilirubin, serum aspartate aminotransferase and, above all, with the scores of the two clinical rating systems. The 2 hr.-(C14)-aminopyrine breath test was superior to conventional tests in quantifying the degree of hepatic functional reserve and forecasting the prognosis.

  3. The role of flow limitation as an important diagnostic tool and clinical finding in mild sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nevin; Meskill, Gerard; Guilleminault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is defined by quantifying apneas and hypopneas along with symptoms suggesting sleep disruption. Subtler forms of sleep-disordered breathing can be missed when this criteria is used. Newer technologies allow for non-invasive detection of flow limitation, however consensus classification is needed. Subjects with flow limitation demonstrate electroencephalogram changes and clinical symptoms indicating sleep fragmentation. Flow limitation may be increased in special populations and treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been shown to improve outcomes. Titrating CPAP to eliminate flow limitation may be associated with improved clinical outcomes compared to treating apneas and hypopneas. PMID:26779320

  4. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers What’s new in nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer research ... Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research? ...

  5. Nasal irrigation for chronic sinus symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma and nasal polyposis: a hypothesis generating study

    PubMed Central

    Rabago, David P.; Guerard, Emily; Bukstein, Don

    2009-01-01

    Background Rhinosinusitis is a common, expensive disorder with a significant impact on patients' quality-of-life. Chronic sinus symptoms are associated with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and nasal polyposis. Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for rhinosinusitis and sinus symptoms. Prior studies suggest that HSNI may be effective for symptoms associated with allergy, asthma and nasal polyposis. Objective To assess the degree to which subjects using nasal irrigation for chronic sinus symptoms also reported improvements in symptoms related to allergy, asthma or nasal polyposis. Design Qualitative study using in-depth long interviews. Participants 28 participants in a prior qualitative nasal irrigation study. Intervention Daily nasal irrigation. Outcome Qualitative transcripts Results Transcripts of interviews were systematically examined. Twelve of 21 subjects with allergic rhinitis spontaneously reported that HSNI improved symptoms. Two of seven subjects with asthma and one of two subjects with nasal polyposis reported a positive association between HSNI use and asthma or nasal polyposis symptoms. Transcript content was organized into themes which included: 1) HSNI resulted in improvement of allergic rhinitis and asthma symptoms, and 2) HSNI should be used for symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Conclusions This hypothesis generating study offers suggestive qualitative evidence that in patients with frequent rhinosinusitis and daily sinus symptoms, symptoms of concomitant allergic rhinitis, asthma or polyposis may also improve with HSNI. The parent studies offer strong evidence that HSNI is an effective adjunctive treatment for symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Larger prospective studies are needed in patients with these diagnoses. PMID:18593081

  6. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... training, I started experiencing decreased exercise endurance, trouble breathing, and coughing. These symptoms affected my ability to ...

  7. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  8. Tracheomalacia and breath holding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Doull, I; Williams, R G; Marnane, C

    2000-10-01

    A child with a long standing history of cyanotic breath holding attacks presented with acute respiratory distress. Subsequent investigation established that her clinical condition was caused by tracheomalacia. We hypothesise that tracheomalacia might be an under recognised contributor to cyanotic breath holding attacks, the pathogenesis of which is poorly understood. PMID:10999873

  9. NASA firefighters breathing system program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Because of the rising incidence of respiratory injury to firefighters, local governments expressed the need for improved breathing apparatus. A review of the NASA firefighters breathing system program, including concept definition, design, development, regulatory agency approval, in-house testing, and program conclusion is presented.

  10. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  11. Nasal diagrams: a tool for recording the distribution of nasal lesions in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Mery, S; Gross, E A; Joyner, D R; Godo, M; Morgan, K T

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of patterns of lesion distribution can provide insight into the relative roles played by regional tissue dose and local tissue susceptibility in toxic responses to xenobiotics in the nose and assist assessment of potential human risk. A consistent approach is needed for recording lesion distribution patterns in the complex nasal airways of rats and mice. The present work provides a series of diagrams of the nasal passages of the Fischer-344 rat and B6C3F1 mouse, designed for mapping nasal lesions. The diagrams present each of the major cross-sectional airway profiles, provide adequate space for nasal mucosal lesion recording, and are suitable for duplication in a commercial photocopier. Sagittal diagrams are also provided to permit transfer of lesion location data observed in transverse sections onto the long axis of the nose. The distribution of lesions induced by a selected range of xenobiotics is presented. Approaches to application of the diagrams and interpretation of results obtained are discussed in relation to factors responsible for lesion distribution in the nose and their relevance to interspecies extrapolation. A modified approach to anatomical classification of the ethmoturbinates of the rodent is also presented. PMID:7817125

  12. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.T.; Monticello, T.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. 61 references.

  13. Slow breathing influences cardiac autonomic responses to postural maneuver: Slow breathing and HRV.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Giovanna Ana de Paula; Tavares, Bruna S; Garner, David M; Porto, Andrey A; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2016-05-01

    Chronic slow breathing has been reported to improve Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in patients with cardiovascular disorders. However, it is not clear regarding its acute effects on HRV responses on autonomic analysis. We evaluated the acute effects of slow breathing on cardiac autonomic responses to postural change manoeuvre (PCM). The study was conducted on 21 healthy male students aged between 18 and 35 years old. In the control protocol, the volunteer remained at rest seated for 15 min under spontaneous breathing and quickly stood up within 3 s and remained standing for 15 min. In the slow breathing protocol, the volunteer remained at rest seated for 10 min under spontaneous breath, then performed slow breathing for 5 min and rapidly stood up within 3 s and remained standing for 15 min. Slow breathing intensified cardiac autonomic responses to postural maneuver. PMID:27157952

  14. Computer simulation of breathing systems for divers

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, P.G.; Nuckols, M.L.

    1983-02-01

    A powerful new tool for the analysis and design of underwater breathing gas systems is being developed. A versatile computer simulator is described which makes possible the modular ''construction'' of any conceivable breathing gas system from computer memory-resident components. The analysis of a typical breathing gas system is demonstrated using this simulation technique, and the effects of system modifications on performance of the breathing system are shown. This modeling technique will ultimately serve as the foundation for a proposed breathing system simulator under development by the Navy. The marriage of this computer modeling technique with an interactive graphics system will provide the designer with an efficient, cost-effective tool for the development of new and improved diving systems.

  15. Use of a frameless computed tomography-guided stereotactic biopsy system for nasal biopsy in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, Gregory M; Taylor, Amanda R; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley M; Griffin, Jay; Cook, Audrey K; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-04-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION 5 dogs (median age, 9 years; median body weight, 31 kg [68.2 lb]) with undefined nasal masses were examined after undergoing CT of the head and nasal biopsy via a rostral rhinoscopic or unaided (blind) approach because histologic results for collected biopsy specimens (inflammatory, necrotic, or hemorrhagic disease) suggested the specimens were nonrepresentative of the underlying disease process identified via CT (aggressive or malignant disease). CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical signs at the time dogs were evaluated included open-mouth breathing, sneezing, or unilateral epistaxis. Histologic findings pertaining to the original biopsy specimens were suggestive of benign processes such as inflammation. In an attempt to obtain better representative specimens, a frameless CT-guided stereotactic biopsy system (CTSBS) was used to collect additional biopsy specimens from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of the dogs. The second set of biopsy specimens was histologically evaluated. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Histologic evaluation of biopsy specimens collected via the CTSBS revealed results suggestive of malignant neoplasia (specifically, chondrosarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, or undifferentiated sarcoma) for 3 dogs, mild mixed-cell inflammation for 1 dog, and hamartoma for 1 dog. No complications were reported. These findings resulted in a change in treatment recommendations for 3 dogs and confirmed that no additional treatment was required for 1 dog (with hamartoma). For the remaining dog, in which CT findings and clinical history were strongly suggestive of neoplasia, the final diagnosis was rhinitis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Biopsy specimens were safely collected from masses within the nasal and sinus passages of dogs by use of a frameless CTSBS, allowing a definitive diagnosis that was unachievable with other biopsy approaches. PMID:27031420

  16. [Nasal Highflow - Treatment option in severe hypoxaemia?].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Jens; Wirtz, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    Nasal High Flow (NHF) provides a warmed and humidified air stream. In pediatrics, this method is already in widespread use and is increasingly replacing the CPAP. New studies show success in treating adults. Currently the acute hypoxemic insufficiency cause of pneumoniae is a secured area of use. NHF is not inferior in comparison to other oxygen delivery systems. At this juncture effectiveness of this easy to use method is not clear. Preliminary reports describe an improvement in ventilation by the NHF. Here, a wash-out of the airways and improved alveolar ventilation seem to be the main operating principles. PMID:26625231

  17. Nasal soft tissue trauma and management.

    PubMed

    Immerman, Sara; Constantinides, Minas; Pribitkin, Edmund A; White, W Matthew

    2010-12-01

    The nose is the most prominent of all facial structures and is susceptible to many types of trauma. All soft tissue injuries of the nose have the potential to distort its appearance and adversely affect the patient's self-image and self-esteem. Once life-threatening injuries are stabilized, a careful history and physical exam should be completed and treatment individualized. The ultimate objective of treatment is to achieve both functional and cosmetic restoration with timely diagnosis and repair. Immediate nasal reconstruction is ideal when medically possible because this decreases long-term sequelae. PMID:21086240

  18. Testosterone nasal gel (Natesto) for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    2015-05-11

    In one study, Natesto nasal gel administered intranasally 3 times daily was effective in raising low serum testosterone levels into the normal range in patients with hypogonadism. Whether patients will find this method of administration more acceptable than an intramuscular injection every 2-4 weeks or once-daily application to the skin remains to be determined. Based on the lack of convincing evidence of benefit in older men and concerns about its safety, the FDA has warned against using testosterone to treat hypogonadism due solely to aging. PMID:25941957

  19. Cephalometric Pattern and Nasal Patency in Children with Primary Snoring: The Evidence of a Direct Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zicari, Anna Maria; Duse, Marzia; Occasi, Francesca; Luzzi, Valeria; Ortolani, Emanuela; Bardanzellu, Flaminia; Bertin, Serena; Polimeni, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) might affect craniofacial growth and children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome present an increase in total and lower anterior heights of the face and a more anterior and inferior position of the hyoid bone when compared to nasal breathers. Objective To investigate the correlation between rhinomanometric and cephalometric parameters in children with primary snoring (PS), without apnea or gas exchange abnormalities. Materials and Methods Thirty children with habitual snoring (16 females and 14 males) aged 4–8 years (mean age 6.85±1.51 years) were selected by a SDB validate questionnaire. All subjects underwent lateral cephalometric, panoramic radiographies. Results In our sample 10 children (33%) had snoring 3 nights/week, 11 (37%) 4–6 nights/week and 9 (30%) every night/week. Overall 7 patients (23.3%) were affected by adenoid hypertrophy (AH), 4 (13.3%) by tonsillar hypertrophy (TH) and 13 (43.3%) by AH and TH. We found a more vertical position of the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane (H⊥VT) in patients with a higher frequency (7.3±2.7 vs 7.6±3.7 vs 10.9±2.5 in children snoring 3 nights/week, 4–6 nights/week and every night/week respectively; p = 0.032). Concerning nasal patency significant correlations were found with ANB (maxillary and jaw position with respect to the cranial base), NS∧Ar (growth predictor), sumangle, FMA (total divergence), SnaSnp∧GoMe (inferior divergence), BaN∧PtGn (facial growth pattern), Phw1_PsP (posterosuperior airway space), AHC3H (the horizontal distance between the most anterosuperior point of the hyoid bone and the third cervical vertebra). Conclusion The present study supports the relationship between nasal obstruction and specific craniofacial characteristics in children with primary snoring and lead us to hypothesize that nasal obstruction might explain the indirect link between snoring and cephalometric alterations. PMID:25360610

  20. Hearing Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  1. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  2. Breathing synchronization in interconnected networks

    PubMed Central

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Global synchronization in a complex network of oscillators emerges from the interplay between its topology and the dynamics of the pairwise interactions among its numerous components. When oscillators are spatially separated, however, a time delay appears in the interaction which might obstruct synchronization. Here we study the synchronization properties of interconnected networks of oscillators with a time delay between networks and analyze the dynamics as a function of the couplings and communication lag. We discover a new breathing synchronization regime, where two groups appear in each network synchronized at different frequencies. Each group has a counterpart in the opposite network, one group is in phase and the other in anti-phase with their counterpart. For strong couplings, instead, networks are internally synchronized but a phase shift between them might occur. The implications of our findings on several socio-technical and biological systems are discussed. PMID:24256765

  3. The indoor air we breathe.

    PubMed

    Oliver, L C; Shackleton, B W

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly recognized as a potential public health problem since the outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Philadelphia in 1976, polluted indoor air has been associated with health problems that include asthma, sick building syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include headache, eye and throat irritation, chest tightness and shortness of breath, and fatigue. Air-borne contaminants include commonly used chemicals, vehicular exhaust, microbial organisms, fibrous glass particles, and dust. Identified causes include defective building design and construction, aging of buildings and their ventilation systems, poor climate control, inattention to building maintenance. A major contributory factor is the explosion in the use of chemicals in building construction and furnishing materials over the past four decades. Organizational issues and psychological variables often contribute to the problem and hinder its resolution. This article describes the health problems related to poor indoor air quality and offers solutions. PMID:9769764

  4. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  5. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  6. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  7. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  8. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  9. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  10. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  11. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  12. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  13. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  14. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis associated with central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Godil, M A; Galvin-Parton, P; Monte, D; Zerah, M; Purandare, A; Lane, A H; Wilson, T A

    2000-08-01

    We describe a child who has central diabetes insipidus associated with congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis without any apparent anterior pituitary dysfunction. This association further strengthens the concept that congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis may be a microform of holoprosencephaly. PMID:10931423

  15. NASAL FILTERING OF FINE PARTICLES IN CHILDREN VS. ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nasal efficiency for removing fine particles may be affected by developmental changes in nasal structure associated with age. In healthy Caucasian children (age 6-13, n=17) and adults (age 18-28, n=11) we measured the fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (1 and 2um MMAD)...

  16. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations. PMID:24818769

  17. Nasal cytochrome P4502A: Identification in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Ding, Xinxin

    1995-12-01

    The nasal mucosa, the first tissue of contact for inhaled xenobiotics, possesses substantial enobiotic-metabolizing capacti. Enzymes of the nasal cavity may metabolize xenobiotics to innocuous, more water-soluble compounds that are eliminated from the body, or they may bioactivate them to toxic metabolites. These toxic metabolites may find to cellular macromolecules in the nasal cavity or be transported to other parts of the body where they may react. Nasal carcinogenesis in rodents often results from bioactivation of xenobiotics. The increased incidences of nasal tumors associated with certain occupations suggest that xenobiotic bioactivation may be important in human nasal cancer etiology, as well. The increasing popularity of the nose as a route of drug administration makes information concerning nasal drug metabolism and disposition vital to accomplish therapeutic goals. For these reasons, the study of xenobiotic-met abolizing capacity of the nasal cavity is an important area of health-related research. In the present study, we have confirmed the presence of CYP2A6 mRNA in human respiratory mucosa.

  18. Dialectical Effects on Nasalance: A Multicenter, Cross-Continental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Bressmann, Tim; Poburka, Bruce; Roy, Nelson; Sharp, Helen; Watts, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated nasalance in speakers from six different dialectal regions across North America using recent versions of the Nasometer. It was hypothesized that many of the sound changes observed in regional dialects of North American English would have a significant impact on measures of nasalance. Method: Samples of the Zoo…

  19. Prevalence of dysfunctional breathing in patients treated for asthma in primary care: cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mike; McKinley, R K; Freeman, Elaine; Foy, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dysfunctional breathing in adults with asthma treated in the community. Design Postal questionnaire survey using Nijmegen questionnaire. Setting One general practice with 7033 patients. Participants All adult patients aged 17-65 with diagnosed asthma who were receiving treatment. Main outcome measure Score ⩾23 on Nijmegen questionnaire. Results 227/307 patients returned completed questionnaires; 219 (71.3%) questionnaires were suitable for analysis. 63 participants scored ⩾23. Those scoring ⩾23 were more likely to be female than male (46/132 (35%) v 17/87 (20%), P=0.016) and were younger (mean (SD) age 44.8 (14.7) v 49.0 (13.8, (P=0.05). Patients at different treatment steps of the British Thoracic Society asthma guidelines were affected equally. Conclusions About a third of women and a fifth of men had scores suggestive of dysfunctional breathing. Although further studies are needed to confirm the validity of this screening tool and these findings, these prevalences suggest scope for therapeutic intervention and may explain the anecdotal success of the Buteyko method of treating asthma. What is already known on this topicAbnormal breathing patterns may cause characteristic symptoms and impair quality of lifeEffective interventions exist for dysfunctional breathingDysfunctional breathing has been described in patients attending hospital respiratory clinicsWhat this study adds29% of adults treated for asthma in primary care had symptoms suggestive of dysfunctional breathingAffected patients were more likely to be female and younger, but no differences were found with severity of asthmaSome patients with asthma may benefit from breathing therapy PMID:11337441

  20. Facilitation of breathing by leptin effects in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bassi, M; Furuya, W I; Zoccal, D B; Menani, J V; Colombari, D S A; Mulkey, D K; Colombari, E

    2016-03-15

    With the global epidemic of obesity, breathing disorders associated with excess body weight have markedly increased. Respiratory dysfunctions caused by obesity were originally attributed to mechanical factors; however, recent studies have suggested a pathophysiological component that involves the central nervous system (CNS) and hormones such as leptin produced by adipocytes as well as other cells. Leptin is suggested to stimulate breathing and leptin deficiency causes an impairment of the chemoreflex, which can be reverted by leptin therapy. This facilitation of the chemoreflex may depend on the action of leptin in the hindbrain areas involved in the respiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a site that receives chemosensory afferents, and the ventral surface of the medulla that includes the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a central chemosensitive area, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the mechanisms and pathways activated by leptin to facilitate breathing are still not completely clear, evidence suggests that the facilitatory effects of leptin on breathing require the brain melanocortin system, including the POMC-MC4R pathway, a mechanism also activated by leptin to modulate blood pressure. The results of all the studies that have investigated the effect of leptin on breathing suggest that disruption of leptin signalling as caused by obesity-induced reduction of central leptin function (leptin resistance) is a relevant mechanism that may contribute to respiratory dysfunctions associated with obesity. PMID:26095748