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Sample records for impairs neuropathic pain

  1. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  2. [Neurorehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain].

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Jun; Osumi, Michihiro; Ogata, Toru; Sumitani, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    Deafferentation, like as in limb amputation, brachial plexus avulsion injury and spinal cord injury, is usually followed by neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition and it impairs the quality of life profoundly. Based on recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience, we explain intimate relationships among neuropathic pain, reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices and the sensorimotor integration of the deafferentated limb. From the standpoint of the sensorimotor integration theory for emerging phantom limb pain, we further discuss the analgesic mechanism of neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback treatment and its related neurorobotics advancement for neuropathic pain. PMID:26422941

  3. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  4. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  5. D-Aspartate drinking solution alleviates pain and cognitive impairment in neuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Enza; Luongo, Livio; Guida, Francesca; Marabese, Ida; Romano, Rosaria; Iannotta, Monica; Rossi, Francesca; D'Aniello, Antimo; Stella, Luigi; Marmo, Federica; Usiello, Alessandro; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Maione, Sabatino; de Novellis, Vito

    2016-07-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid detected in multiple brain regions and putative precursor of endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) acting as agonist at NMDA receptors. In this study, we investigated whether D-Asp (20 mM) in drinking solution for 1 month affects pain responses and pain-related emotional, and cognitive behaviour in a model of neuropathic pain induced by the spared nerve injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve in mice. SNI mice developed mechanical allodynia and motor coordination impairment 30 days after SNI surgery. SNI mice showed cognitive impairment, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, reduced sociability in the three chamber sociability paradigm, increased expression of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor and Homer 1a in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The expression of (post synaptic density) PSD-95 and Shank 1was instead unaffected in the mPFC of the SNI mice. Treatment with D-Asp drinking solution, started right after the SNI (day 0), alleviated mechanical allodynia, improved cognition and motor coordination and increased social interaction. D-Asp also restored the levels of extracellular D-Asp, Homer 1a and NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor to physiological levels and reduced Shank1 and PSD-95 protein levels in the mPFC. Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant used also to alleviate neuropathic pain in humans, reverted mechanical allodynia and cognitive impairment, and unlike D-Asp, was effective in reducing depression and anxiety-like behaviour in the SNI mice and increased PSD protein level. Altogether these findings demonstrate that D-Asp improves sensorial, motor and cognitive-like symptoms related to chronic pain possibly through glutamate neurotransmission normalization in neuropathic mice. PMID:27115160

  6. Neuropathic pain in cancer.

    PubMed

    Urch, C E; Dickenson, A H

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic pain in cancer arises following injury to peripheral or central neurons, in a similar manner to such pain arising from a non-cancer injury. Much of our knowledge of neuropathic pain is based on peripheral originating events with little known about central neuropathic pain. This article explores some of the similarities and differences between cancer and non-cancer-related neuropathic pain. The neural pathways, ion channels, receptors and neurotransmitters that potentially can be altered in both neuropathies are the same; however the nature of the injury, the timing, repeated injuries and the co-existence of simultaneous non-neuropathic pain states lead to potential unique constellations of neuroreceptor and neurotransmitter expression in the context of cancer pain. This in turn may lead to different clinical presentation of pain sensations and potentially lead to specific treatment options. PMID:18492553

  7. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  8. Neuropathic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain is a general term employed to describe a number of clinical syndromes, which may be spontaneous or triggered by local trauma or systemic disorders. Symptomatically these painful syndromes may be episodic or continuous and are often difficult to distinguish from dental pathology. In the present article, we review the diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches to trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias, orofacial pain associated with herpetic infection, persistent idiopathic facial pain (previously termed atypical facial pain), post-traumatic orofacial neuropathy and neuritis. PMID:18343328

  9. Managing Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert Carter Wellford; Lawson, Erin; Backonja, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) arises from injuries or diseases affecting the somatosensory component of the nervous system at any level of the peripheral or central nervous system. NP is diagnosed based on common neurologic signs and symptoms. NP is best treated with a combination of multiple therapeutic approaches, and treatments include conservative, complementary, medical, interventional, and surgical treatment modalities. Goals of treatment are the same as in pain management and include improvement in pain control and in coping skills as well as restoration of functional status. Most patients with NP benefit most from an individualized, multimodal approach that emphasizes both pain and function. PMID:26614725

  10. Ocular neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Perry; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    As the biological alarm of impending or actual tissue damage, pain is essential for our survival. However, when it is initiated and/or sustained by dysfunctional elements in the nociceptive system, it is itself a disease known as neuropathic pain. While the critical nociceptive system provides a number of protective functions, it is unique in its central role of monitoring, preserving and restoring the optical tear film in the face of evaporative attrition without which our vision would be non-functional. Meeting this existential need resulted in the evolution of the highly complex, powerful and sensitive dry eye alarm system integrated in the peripheral and central trigeminal sensory network. The clinical consequences of corneal damage to these nociceptive pathways are determined by the type and location of its pathological elements and can range from the spectrum known as dry eye disease to the centalised oculofacial neuropathic pain syndrome characterised by a striking disparity between the high intensity of symptoms and paucity of external signs. These changes parallel those observed in somatic neuropathic pain. When seen through the neuroscience lens, diseases responsible for inadequately explained chronic eye pain (including those described as dry eye) can take on new meanings that may clarify long-standing enigmas and point to new approaches for developing preventive, symptomatic and disease-modifying interventions for these currently refractory disorders. PMID:25943558

  11. Neuropathic pain after dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Tınastepe, Neslihan; Oral, Koray

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck regions are the most common sites of the human body to be involved in chronic pain conditions. Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain condition, and refers to all pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). Trigeminal neuralgia, atypical odontalgia (phantom tooth pain), burning mouth syndrome, traumatic neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgias and complex regional pain syndrome are neuropathic pain conditions in the orofacial region that can be encountered in pain and dental clinics. The majority of the time this problem is misdiagnosed by the dentist, which can lead to unnecessary treatments. These treatments may include endodontic treatment and extraction of the tooth or teeth in the region. In this review, only post-traumatic peripheral pain neuropathies seen after dental treatments will be discussed. PMID:23588863

  12. Advances in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Yuguan; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is pain that arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or diseases affecting the somatosensory system. Treatments for neuropathic pain include pharmacological, nonpharmacological, and interventional therapies. Currently recommended first-line pharmacological treatments include antidepressants and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). However, in some cases, pharmacological therapy alone fails to give adequate control of the chronic pain. New techniques have been invented and have been proved effective on neuropathic pain, such as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. In this review, we focused on the advances in the treatment of central neuropathic pain, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and cancer pain. PMID:26900067

  13. Topical capsaicin formulations in the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Mark; Pasvankas, George

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the scientific and clinical evidence supporting the use of topical formulations containing the pungent principle of chili peppers--capsaicin, for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Given the limitations of current oral and parenteral therapies for the management of pain arising from various forms of nerve injury, alternate therapeutic approaches that are not associated with systemic adverse events that limit quality of life, impair function, or threaten respiratory depression are critically needed. Moreover, neuropathic conditions can be complicated by progressive changes in the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to persistent reorganization of pain pathways and chronic neuropathic pain. Recent advances in the use of high-dose topical capsaicin preparations hold promise in managing a wide range of painful conditions associated with peripheral neuropathies and may in fact help reduce suffering by reversing progressive changes in the nervous system associated with chronic neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:24941666

  14. Improvements in impaired GABA and GAD65/67 production in the spinal dorsal horn contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, MS, Satoru; Tajima, Fumihiro; Senba, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical exercise effectively attenuates neuropathic pain, and multiple events including the inhibition of activated glial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, activation of the descending pain inhibitory system, and reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokines in injured peripheral nerves may contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Since fewer GABAergic hypoalgesic interneurons exist in the dorsal horn in neuropathic pain model animals, the recovery of impaired GABAergic inhibition in the dorsal horn may improve pain behavior. We herein determined whether the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the dorsal horn is restored by treadmill running and contributes to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in neuropathic pain model mice. C57BL/6 J mice underwent partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). PSL-Runner mice ran on a treadmill at 7 m/min for 60 min/day, 5 days/week, from two days after PSL. Results Mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia developed in PSL-Sedentary mice but were significantly attenuated in PSL-Runner mice. PSL markedly decreased GABA and GAD65/67 levels in neuropils in the ipsilateral dorsal horn, while treadmill running inhibited these reductions. GABA+ neuronal nuclei+ interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horn were significantly decreased in PSL-Sedentary mice but not in PSL-Runner mice. Pain behavior thresholds positively correlated with GABA and GAD65/67 levels and GABAergic interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horns of PSL-Sedentary and -Runner mice. Conclusions Treadmill running prevented PSL-induced reductions in GAD65/67 production, and, thus, GABA levels may be retained in interneurons and neuropils in the superficial dorsal horn. Therefore, improvements in impaired GABAergic inhibition may be involved in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:27030712

  15. Emerging Treatments for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Bruno L; Escudeiro, Gabriel; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a series of well-known conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. As such, Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), Alpha-lipoic-acid (ALA), cannabinoids, Clonidine, EMA401, Botulinum Toxin type A, and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be cited. Furthermore, new modalities in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, burst stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and many others have been showing exciting results. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. This article reviews the published literature on the treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded for the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. PMID:26530058

  16. The endocannabinoid system and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Rafael; Baños, Josep Eladi; Cabañero, David

    2016-02-01

    The research of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain represents a major current priority. Important drawbacks to advance in the development of these therapies are the limited translational value of the animal models now available and the elucidation of the complex neuronal and immune pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. One of the neurotransmitter systems participating in neuropathic pain control that has recently raised a particular interest is the endocannabinoid system. This system is highly expressed in neurons and immune cells, and it plays a crucial role in the development of neuropathic pain. Preclinical studies have provided important findings, revealing the potential interest of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of neuropathic pain. These studies have reported the analgesic effects of cannabinoid agonists in multiple neuropathic pain models, and they have identified specific targets within this system to develop more effective and safe analgesic compounds. However, further studies using more relevant neuropathic pain animal models are required to confirm these interesting results. Several clinical studies suggest that cannabinoids significantly reduced neuropathic pain, although most of these trials fail the required standards of quality. The different pain patient populations included in the systematic reviews also make it difficult to get adequate conclusions. Therefore, additional clinical trials that consider an adequate number of patients, the use active treatments as controls, and longer duration of administration are required to have an adequate profile of the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids in neuropathic pain. PMID:26785153

  17. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain. PMID:15363215

  18. Chronic Neuropathic Pain: It's about the Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Alshelh, Zeynab; Di Pietro, Flavia; Youssef, Andrew M; Reeves, Jenna M; Macey, Paul M; Vickers, E Russell; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-01-20

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain remain unclear. Evidence from human investigations suggests that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic burst firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. Additionally, experimental animal investigations show that neuropathic pain is associated with altered infra-slow (<0.1 Hz) frequency oscillations within the dorsal horn and somatosensory thalamus. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether, in humans, neuropathic pain was also associated with altered infra-slow oscillations within the ascending "pain" pathway. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that individuals with orofacial neuropathic pain have increased infra-slow oscillatory activity throughout the ascending pain pathway, including within the spinal trigeminal nucleus, somatosensory thalamus, thalamic reticular nucleus, and primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, these infra-slow oscillations were temporally coupled across these multiple sites and occurred at frequencies similar to calcium waves in activated astrocytes. The region encompassing the spinal trigeminal nucleus also displayed increased regional homogeneity, consistent with a local spread of neural activity by astrocyte activation. In contrast, no increase in oscillatory behavior within the ascending pain pathway occurred during acute noxious stimuli in healthy individuals. These data reveal increased oscillatory activity within the ascending pain pathway that likely underpins increased thalamocortical oscillatory activity, a self-sustaining thalamocortical dysrhythmia, and the constant perception of pain. Significance statement: Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. The mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. In this study, we report in individuals with neuropathic pain increased oscillatory neural activity within the

  19. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:24680498

  20. Neuropathic pain syndrome displayed by malingerers

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, José L.; Verdugo, Renato J.

    2009-01-01

    Among 237 patients communicating chronic pain, associated with sensory-motor and “autonomic” displays, qualifying taxonomically for Neuropathic Pain, there were 16 shown through surveillance to be malingerers. When analyzed through neurological methods, their profile was characteristically atypical. There were no objective equivalents of peripheral or central processes impairing nerve impulse transmission. In absence of medical explanation all 16 had been adjudicated, by default, the label Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). We emphasize that CRPS patients may not only harbor unrecognized pathology (“lesion”) of the nervous system (CRPS II); or hypothetical central neuronal “dysfunction” (CRPS I); or conversion disorder; but may display a recognizable simulated illness without neuropsychiatric pathology. PMID:20686134

  1. Targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors for treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yi; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a major clinical problem and a therapeutic challenge because existing analgesics are often ineffective and can cause serious side effects. Increased N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity contributes to central sensitization in certain types of neuropathic pain. NMDAR antagonists can reduce hyperalgesia and allodynia in animal models of neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy. Clinically used NMDAR antagonists, such as ketamine and dextromethorphan, are generally effective in patients with neuropathic pain, such as complex regional pain syndrome and painful diabetic neuropathy. However, patients with postherpetic neuralgia respond poorly to NMDAR antagonists. Recent studies on identifying NMDAR-interacting proteins and molecular mechanisms of increased NMDAR activity in neuropathic pain could facilitate the development of new drugs to attenuate abnormal NMDAR activity with minimal impairment of the physiological function of NMDARs. Combining NMDAR antagonists with other analgesics could also lead to better management of neuropathic pain without causing serious side effects. PMID:21686074

  2. Neuropathic Pain in Children: Special Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Walco, Gary A.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Krane, Elliot J.; LeBel, Alyssa A.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is relatively uncommon in children. Although some syndromes closely resemble those found in adults, the incidence and course of the condition can vary substantially in children, depending on developmental status and contextual factors. There are some neuropathic pain syndromes that are rare and relatively unique to the pediatric population. This article discusses the array of neuropathic pain conditions in children and available treatment strategies. Data are limited by small numbers and few randomized controlled trials. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20194147

  3. Minimally invasive procedures for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sdrulla, Andrei; Chen, Grace

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system". The prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 7 to 11% of the population and minimally invasive procedures have been used to both diagnose and treat neuropathic pain. Diagnostic procedures consist of nerve blocks aimed to isolate the peripheral nerve implicated, whereas therapeutic interventions either modify or destroy nerve function. Procedures that modify how nerves function include epidural steroid injections, peripheral nerve blocks and sympathetic nerve blocks. Neuroablative procedures include radiofrequency ablation, cryoanalgesia and neurectomies. Currently, neuromodulation with peripheral nerve stimulators and spinal cord stimulators are the most evidence-based treatments of neuropathic pain. PMID:26988024

  4. Diagnosis and management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Napeñas, Joel J; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARY Trigeminal neuropathic pains have presented diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to providers. In addition, knowledge of pathophysiology, current classification systems, taxonomy and phenotyping of these conditions are incomplete. While trigeminal neuralgia is the most identifiable and studied, other conditions are being recognized and require distinct management approaches. Furthermore, other facial pain conditions such as atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome are now considered to have neuropathic elements in their etiology. This article reviews current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of neuropathic pain conditions involving the trigeminal nerve, to include: trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (with traumatically induced neuralgia and atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Treatment modalities are reviewed based on current and best available evidence. Trigeminal neuralgia is managed with anticonvulsant drugs as the first line, with surgical options providing variable results. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is managed medically based on the guidelines for other neuropathic pain conditions. Burning mouth syndrome is also treated with a number of neuropathic medications, both topical and systemic. In all these conditions, patients need to be thoroughly educated about their condition, involved in its management, and be provided with supportive and adjunctive treatment resources. PMID:24645661

  5. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the suggestion of a neuropathic component to sickle cell disease (SCD) pain, there are minimal data on the systematic assessment of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD. Neuropathic pain is defined as pain primarily initiated by dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Procedure In a cross-sectional study, we used the painDETECT questionnaire, a one-page validated neuropathic pain screening tool, to determine the presence of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD and to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain, age, and gender. We hypothesized that 20% of patients with SCD will experience neuropathic pain and that neuropathic pain will be associated with older age and female gender. The completed painDETECT questionnaire yields a total score between 0–38 (≥19=definite neuropathic pain, 13–18=probable neuropathic pain, ≤12=no neuropathic pain). Scores ≥13 were designated as having evidence of neuropathic pain. Results A total of 56 patients participated. Median age was 20.3 years and 77% were female. We found 37% of patients had evidence of neuropathic pain. Age was positively correlated with total score [r=0.43; p=0.001] suggesting older patients experience more neuropathic pain. Females had higher mean total scores [13 vs 8.4; p=0.04]. Significantly more patients with neuropathic pain were taking hydroxyurea [90% vs 59%; p=0.015]. Despite 37% of patients experiencing neuropathic pain, only 5% were taking a neuropathic pain drug. Conclusions Neuropathic pain exists in SCD. Valid screening tools can identify patients that would benefit from existing and future neuropathic pain therapies and could determine the impact of these therapies. PMID:24167104

  6. Treatment Considerations for Elderly and Frail Patients With Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schmader, Kenneth E.; Baron, Ralf; Haanpää, Maija L.; Mayer, John; O'Connor, Alec B.; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Stacey, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Currently, an estimated 38 million individuals 65 years or older live in the United States, and more than 11 million of these individuals are 80 years or older. Older people are at high risk of neuropathic pain because many diseases that cause neuropathic pain increase in incidence with age. Depending on their underlying health, older adults with neuropathic pain may have to cope with multiple coexisting diseases, polypharmacy, and impaired functional ability. The objective of this article is to review how aging and frailty affect the treatment of older adults with neuropathic pain. Specific topics reviewed include the complexity of treatment decisions in older patients due to aged heterogeneity, multimorbidity, and polypharmacy; selection of treatment in an effort to maximize patients' functional abilities in addition to relieving their pain; more careful dosing (usually lower) and monitoring of pharmacotherapy relative to younger patients due to age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and underrepresentation of older adults in clinical trials of neuropathic pain treatments, which further compromises physicians' ability to make informed treatment decisions. PMID:20194145

  7. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  8. Neuropathic pain therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Backonja, Miroslav Misha

    2012-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a result of complex interactions between peripheral and central mechanisms with multiple potential therapeutic targets. However, the complexity of these mechanisms and relative youth of translational pain research, which is in its infancy, have prevented translation of successful basic bench research to human therapy. Most of the clinically available neuropathic pain treatments are borrowed from other therapeutic areas, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics, or involve application of older therapy, such as opioids. Exceptions are ziconotide, tapentadol, and the high-concentration capsaicin patch. Similar to all other analgesic agents, these provide only partial pain relief in subsets of patients. The standard of care for patients with chronic neuropathic pain is multimodal and multidisciplinary. For most patients to achieve and maintain satisfactory pain relief a combination of therapeutic agents is necessary, providing the empiric basis for rational polypharmacy, which has become a standard approach as well. PMID:23117951

  9. Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Lacoux, Phillipe; Ford, Nathan

    2002-07-01

    During Sierra Leone's violent decade-long war, the warring parties used amputation, especially of arms, as a means of terror. In a camp for amputees in the capital city Freetown, Médecins Sans Frontières established a clinic and a treatment programme for neuropathic pain. Insecurity and cultural and language barriers have complicated this work, but medical and humanitarian benefits have been demonstrated. Pain services are virtually non-existent in less-developed countries. There have recently been no major treatment advances for neuropathic or phantom pain; however, the general body of knowledge about amputation pain can be increased by observations from these difficult settings. PMID:12849488

  10. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:25445354

  11. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E

    2016-02-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Because of faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to downregulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, whereas high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear and evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with complex regional pain syndrome suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues. PMID:26785161

  12. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  13. [Non pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Laurent, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Nondrug treatments of neuropathic pain should always begin at the same time as pharmacologic treatment. There are three types of nondrug treatment for neuropathic pain: physical, surgical, and "psychocorporal" and psychotherapeutic treatment. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a simple physical treatment that strengthens local inhibitory controls and is indicated in focal neuropathic pain when upstream stimulation is possible for a superficial sensitive nerve trunk. Destructive surgery is represented today by "DREZotomy", destruction of nociceptive fibers and their dorsal root entry zones. It is indicated essentially in intractable pain due to plexus avulsion. Functional surgery is implanted electric stimulation--either spinal or central (encephalic)--of structures that exert inhibitory control on the pain pathways. Spinal stimulation is performed at the level of the posterior spinal cord and is indicated essentially in segmental mononeuropathies refractory to drug treatment. Central stimulation is performed at the motor cortex and is indicated for refractory central pain. "Psychocorporal" techniques (relaxation, sophrology, hypnosis) are useful to reduce anxiety and neurovegetative hypertonicity, both factors that aggravate neuropathic pain. PMID:18191370

  14. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  15. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  16. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Safarpour, Delaram; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP), a common form of human pain, often poorly responds to analgesic medications. In this review the authors discuss the pathophysiology and conventional treatment of neuropathic pain and provide evidenced-based statements on the efficacy of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in this form of pain. The level of efficacy for BoNT treatment in each category of NP is defined according to the published guidelines of the American Academy of Neurology. The data indicate that BoNT treatment (most of the literature is with onabotulinumtoxinA) is effective (level A evidence) in postherpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. It is probably effective (level B) in posttraumatic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. The data on complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, occipital neuralgia, and phantom limb pain are preliminary and await conduction of randomized, blinded clinical trials. Much remains to be learned about the most-effective dosage and technique of injection, optimum dilutions, and differences among BoNTs in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26866499

  17. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain and to evaluate the adverse events and Ontario-specific economic profile of this technology. Clinical Need SCS is a reversible pain therapy that uses low-voltage electrical pulses to manage chronic, intractable neuropathic pain of the trunk or limbs. Neuropathic pain begins or is caused by damage or dysfunction to the nervous system and can be difficult to manage. The prevalence of neuropathic pain has been estimated at about 1.5% of the population in the United States and 1% of the population in the United Kingdom. These prevalence rates are generalizable to Canada. Neuropathic pain is extremely difficult to manage. People with symptoms that persist for at least 6 months or who have symptoms that last longer than expected for tissue healing or resolution of an underlying disease are considered to have chronic pain. Chronic pain is an emotional, social, and economic burden for those living with it. Depression, reduced quality of life (QOL), absenteeism from work, and a lower household income are positively correlated with chronic pain. Although the actual number is unknown, a proportion of people with chronic neuropathic pain fail to obtain pain relief from pharmacological therapies despite adequate and reasonable efforts to use them. These people are said to have intractable neuropathic pain, and they are the target population for SCS. The most common indication for SCS in North America is chronic intractable neuropathic pain due to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), a term that describes persistent leg or back and leg pain in patients who have had back or spine surgery. Neuropathic pain due to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which can develop in the distal aspect of a limb a minor injury, is another common indication. To a lesser extent, chronic intractable

  18. [Gabapentin for therapy of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Block, F

    2001-08-01

    Gabapentin, which has been approved for add-on therapy of focal seizures, is increasingly used for treatment of neuropathic pain. Its analgesic effect is supposed to be due to reduction of glutamatergic transmission, improvement of GABAergic transmission and to binding to voltage-dependent calcium channels. Experimental studies demonstrated an ameliorating effect of gabapentin on neuropathic pain. Placebo-controlled studies revealed an efficacy of gabapentin against pain in diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia and in prophylaxis of migraine. Case reports show an analgesic effect of gabapentin in trigeminus neuralgia and in reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The main adverse events are dizziness, ataxia and somnolence. Controlled studies, which compare the efficacy of gabapentin with that of the respective reference drug, are needed to evaluate its importance in treatment of pain. PMID:11810368

  19. Relationship between Neuropathic Pain and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Jun; Sumitani, Masahiko; Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Abe, Hiroaki; Oshima, Yasushi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Overweight negatively affects musculoskeletal health; hence obesity is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain. This was conducted to determine if obesity affects neuropathic pain, usually considered unrelated to the weight-load on the musculoskeletal system. Methods. Using a cut-off body mass index value of 25, 44 patients with neuropathic pain were grouped into a “high-BMI” group and a “normal-BMI” group. Results. The numeric rating scale of the high-BMI group was significantly higher than that of the normal-weight group (P < 0.05). The total NPSI scores were significantly higher (P < 0.01), and the paroxysmal pain and the negative symptoms were more serious in the high-BMI group than in the normal-BMI group. The high-BMI subjects also had significantly higher SF-MPQ scores (P < 0.05). However, both physical and mental health status on the SF-36 were comparable between the groups. Discussion. Neuropathic pain that did not arise from musculoskeletal damage was higher in the high-BMI patients. Paroxysmal pain was more severe, suggesting that neural damage might be aggravated by obesity-associated inflammation. These findings should have needed to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27445603

  20. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. PMID:25429237

  1. Pain Part 5a: Chronic (Neuropathic) Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Renton, Tara; Kahwaja, Nadine

    2015-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant social and economic burden. Back pain, joint pain and headaches affect over 30% of the population. Chronic orofacial pain is a common condition and is difficult to diagnose and manage. This two-part paper aims to provide an overview of novel understanding of neuropathic pain, and furnish clinical teams with an update on the less common and less well-recognized chronic orofacial conditions. Headaches and temporomandibular disorders are the most common conditions and are covered in separate papers (6 and 10). Trigeminal neuralgia, burning mouth, and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are also covered in separate papers (7, 8 and 9). The remaining conditions: post-traumatic neuropathy (nerve injury); and persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia are discussed in this and the following paper. Clinical Relevance: Neuropathic pain, though rare, is a consequence of dental treatment. Nerve injury in relation to M3M surgery, dental implants, endodontics and local anaesthesia result in 70% of affected patients experiencing chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26685473

  2. An Epidemiological Study of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms in Canadian Adults

    PubMed Central

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Mann, Elizabeth G.; Torrance, Nicola; Smith, Blair H.; Johnson, Ana; Gilron, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The reported prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 6.9% to 10%; however the only Canadian study reported 17.9%. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of neuropathic pain in Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of Canadian adults. The response rate was 21.1% (1504/7134). Likely or possible neuropathic pain was defined using a neuropathic pain-related diagnosis and a positive outcome on the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale (S-LANSS) or the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) Questions. The prevalence of likely neuropathic pain was 1.9% (S-LANSS) and 3.4% (DN4) and that of possible neuropathic pain was 5.8% (S-LANSS) and 8.1% (DN4). Neuropathic pain was highest in economically disadvantaged males. There is a significant burden of neuropathic pain in Canada. The low response rate and a slightly older and less educated sample than the Canadian population may have led to an overestimate of neuropathic pain. Population prevalence varies by screening tool used, indicating more work is needed to develop reliable measures. Population level screening targeted towards high risk groups should improve the sensitivity and specificity of screening, while clinical examination of those with positive screening results will further refine the estimate of prevalence. PMID:27445636

  3. Early dexamethasone relieves trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Han, S R; Yeo, S P; Lee, M K; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2010-09-01

    The analgesic effects of dexamethasone on neuropathic pain have been controversial. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on mechanical allodynia in rats with mal-positioned dental implants. Under anesthesia, the left mandibular second molar was extracted and replaced by a miniature dental implant to injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Nociceptive behavior was examined on each designated day after surgery. Mal-positioned dental implants significantly decreased air-puff thresholds both ipsilateral and contralateral to the injury site. Distinct mechanical hyperalgesia and cold and thermal hypersensitivity were also observed bilaterally. Daily administration of dexamethasone produced prolonged anti-allodynic effects (25 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.), but failed to reduce mechanical allodynia when it had already been established. Therefore, our findings provide that early treatment with dexamethasone is important in the treatment of nociceptive behavior suggestive of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:20581355

  4. Neuropathic pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Allen, R R

    1998-11-01

    Cancer presents itself in numerous ways, adding to the complexity of any pain syndrome with which it is associated. Neuropathic pain, unlike many other pain syndromes, is difficult to treat even in the absence of cancer. The combination results in a heterogeneous group of patients with a complex set of symptoms. This makes the assessment of pain, classification of syndromes, and clinical study a challenge. If the disease is nonprogressive, general principles of care are essentially the same as in those without cancer. In patients with progressive disease and more refractory painful conditions, spinal anesthetic and neurosurgical therapies must often be considered. Under such circumstances, caregivers are forced to carefully balance uncertain benefits and risks, often without the luxury of time. More careful observation and controlled trials in these patients help facilitate this challenging process. PMID:9767067

  5. Neuropathic pain in hereditary coproporphyria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Liang; Yang, Deng-Ho; Wu, Jeng-Yuau; Kuo, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu

    2013-04-01

    Acute porphyrias are rare diseases with varying incidences worldwide. These diseases are disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by acute attacks of neurological symptoms. Acute porphyria should be considered in patients with unexplained abdominal pain or neurological damage. Clinical manifestations of acute porphyria are nonspecific and are associated with multiple organ systems. This report examines a rare case of an uncommon type of acute porphyria in a patient with an initial presentation of abdominal pain and progressive polyneuropathy. PMID:24353603

  6. Neuropathic pain in hereditary coproporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Liang; Yang, Deng-Ho; Wu, Jeng-Yuau; Kuo, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu

    2013-01-01

    Acute porphyrias are rare diseases with varying incidences worldwide. These diseases are disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by acute attacks of neurological symptoms. Acute porphyria should be considered in patients with unexplained abdominal pain or neurological damage. Clinical manifestations of acute porphyria are nonspecific and are associated with multiple organ systems. This report examines a rare case of an uncommon type of acute porphyria in a patient with an initial presentation of abdominal pain and progressive polyneuropathy. PMID:24353603

  7. Neuropathic Pain Management: A Reference for the Clinical Nurse.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Bree; Barkley, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain neuropathic pain guidelines are presented. Nursing considerations, including neuropathic pain assessment and medication efficacy, are reported to explain medications' primary mechanisms of action and provide a nursing reference for patient education. PMID:26863700

  8. Pain mechanisms and the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J; Black, A

    1992-04-01

    The nociceptive system is not fixed, but changes in response to its input and activity. This 'plasticity' comprises dynamic developments of both pro- and antinociceptive processes. Recent advances in the understanding of these processes have important implications for the treatment of persistent neuropathic pain. PMID:1623250

  9. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

  10. Prior voluntary wheel running attenuates neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Grace, Peter M; Fabisiak, Timothy J; Green-Fulgham, Suzanne M; Anderson, Nathan D; Strand, Keith A; Kwilasz, Andrew J; Galer, Erika L; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Maier, Steven F; Fleshner, Monika; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-09-01

    Exercise is known to exert a systemic anti-inflammatory influence, but whether its effects are sufficient to protect against subsequent neuropathic pain is underinvestigated. We report that 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running terminating before chronic constriction injury (CCI) prevented the full development of allodynia for the ∼3-month duration of the injury. Neuroimmune signaling was assessed at 3 and 14 days after CCI. Prior exercise normalized ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord expression of neuroexcitatory interleukin (IL)-1β production and the attendant glutamate transporter GLT-1 decrease, as well as expression of the disinhibitory P2X4R-BDNF axis. The expression of the macrophage marker Iba1 and the chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1), and a neuronal injury marker (activating transcription factor 3), was attenuated by prior running in the ipsilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Prior exercise suppressed macrophage infiltration and/or injury site proliferation, given decreased presence of macrophage markers Iba1, iNOS (M1), and Arg-1 (M2; expression was time dependent). Chronic constriction injury-driven increases in serum proinflammatory chemokines were suppressed by prior running, whereas IL-10 was increased. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also stimulated with lipopolysaccharide ex vivo, wherein CCI-induced increases in IL-1β, nitrite, and IL-10 were suppressed by prior exercise. Last, unrestricted voluntary wheel running, beginning either the day of, or 2 weeks after, CCI, progressively reversed neuropathic pain. This study is the first to investigate the behavioral and neuroimmune consequences of regular exercise terminating before nerve injury. This study suggests that chronic pain should be considered a component of "the diseasome of physical inactivity," and that an active lifestyle may prevent neuropathic pain. PMID:27355182

  11. Motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sol, J C; Fowo, S; Roux, F E; Verdié, J C

    2007-01-01

    Since the initial publication of Tsubokawa in 1991, epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is increasingly reported as an effective surgical option for the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain although its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. The authors review the extensive literature published over the last 15 years on central and neuropathic pain. Optimal patient selection remains difficult and the value of pharmacological tests or transcranial magnetic stimulation in predicting the efficacy of MCS has not been established. Pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 3-dimensional volume MRI, neuronavigation and intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring have contributed to improvements in the technique for identifying the precise location of the targeted motor cortical area and the correct placement of the electrode array. MCS should be considered as the treatment of choice in post-stroke pain, thalamic pain or facial anesthesia dolorosa. In brachial plexus avulsion pain, it is preferable to propose initially dorsal root entry zone (DREZ)-tomy; MCS may be offered after DREZotomy has failed to control the pain. In our experience, the results of MCS on phantom limb pain are promising. In general, the efficacy of MCS depends on: a) the accurate placement of the stimulation electrode over the appropriate area of the motor cortex, and b) on sophisticated programming of the stimulation parameters. A better understanding of the MCS mechanism of action will probably make it possible to adjust better the stimulation parameters. The conclusions of multicentered randomised studies, now in progress, will be very useful and are likely to promote further research and clinical applications in this field. PMID:17691287

  12. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  13. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  14. Can treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster be predicted in cancer pain with neuropathic components or trigeminal neuropathic pain?

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Brasseur, Louis; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    An expert group of 40 pain specialists from 16 countries performed a first assessment of the value of predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results were based on the retrospective analysis of 68 case reports (sent in by participants in the 4 weeks prior to the conference) and the practical experience of the experts. Lidocaine plaster treatment was mostly successful for surgery or chemotherapy-related cancer pain with neuropathic components. A dose reduction of systemic pain treatment was observed in at least 50% of all cancer pain patients using the plaster as adjunct treatment; the presence of allodynia, hyperalgesia or pain quality provided a potential but not definitively clear indication of treatment success. In trigeminal neuropathic pain, continuous pain, severe allodynia, hyperalgesia, or postherpetic neuralgia or trauma as the cause of orofacial neuropathic pain were perceived as potential predictors of treatment success with lidocaine plaster. In conclusion, these findings provide a first assessment of the likelihood of treatment benefits with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain and support conducting large, well-designed multicenter studies. PMID:23630431

  15. Neuropathic pain and primary somatosensory cortex reorganization following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, P J; Press, S R; Gustin, S M; Macefield, V G; Gandevia, S C; Cousins, M J; Middleton, J W; Henderson, L A; Siddall, P J

    2009-01-01

    The most obvious impairments associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) are loss of sensation and motor control. However, many subjects with SCI also develop persistent neuropathic pain below the injury which is often severe, debilitating and refractory to treatment. The underlying mechanisms of persistent neuropathic SCI pain remain poorly understood. Reports in amputees describing phantom limb pain demonstrate a positive correlation between pain intensity and the amount of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) reorganization. Of note, this S1 reorganization has also been shown to reverse with pain reduction. It is unknown whether a similar association between S1 reorganization and pain intensity exists in subjects with SCI. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the degree of S1 reorganization following SCI correlated with on-going neuropathic pain intensity. In 20 complete SCI subjects (10 with neuropathic pain, 10 without neuropathic pain) and 21 control subjects without SCI, the somatosensory cortex was mapped using functional magnetic resonance imaging during light brushing of the right little finger, thumb and lip. S1 reorganization was demonstrated in SCI subjects with the little finger activation point moving medially towards the S1 region that would normally innervate the legs. The amount of S1 reorganization in subjects with SCI significantly correlated with on-going pain intensity levels. This study provides evidence of a link between the degree of cortical reorganization and the intensity of persistent neuropathic pain following SCI. Strategies aimed at reversing somatosensory cortical reorganization may have therapeutic potential in central neuropathic pain. PMID:19027233

  16. Neuropathic orofacial pain part 1--prevalence and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J

    2000-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system". Neuropathic orofacial pain has previously been known as "atypical odontalgia" (AO) and "phantom tooth pain". The patient afflicted with neuropathic oral/orofacial pain may present to the dentist with a persistent, severe pain, yet there are no clearly identifiable clinical or radiographic abnormalities. Accordingly, multiple endodontic procedures may be instigated to remove the likely anatomical source of the pain, yet the pain persists. There have been few studies and limited patient numbers investigating the condition. Two retrospective studies revealed the incidence of persistent pain following endodontic treatment to be 3-6% and 5% of patients; one author with wide experience in assessing the condition estimated its prevalence at 125,000 individuals in the USA alone. In one study, 50% of neuropathic orofacial pain patients reported persistent pain specifically following endodontic treatment. Patients predisposed to the condition may include those suffering from recurrent cluster or migraine headaches. Neuropathic pain states include postherpetic neuralgia (shingles) and phantom limb/stump pain. The aberrant developmental neurobiology leading to this pain state is complex. Neuropathic pain serves no protective function, in contrast to physiological pain that warns of noxious stimuli likely to result in tissue damage. The relevant clinical features of neuropathic pain include: (i) precipitating factors such as trauma or disease (infection), and often a delay in onset after initial injury (days-months), (ii) typical complaints such as dysaesthesias (abnormal unpleasant sensations), pain that may include burning, and paroxysmal, lancinating or sharp qualities, and pain in an area of sensory deficit, (iii) on physical examination there may be hyperalgesia, allodynia and sympathetic hyperfunction, and (iv) the pathophysiology includes deafferentation

  17. Understanding Neuropathic Corneal Pain-Gaps and Current Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sunali; Hamrah, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    The richly innervated corneal tissue is one of the most powerful pain generators in the body. Corneal neuropathic pain results from dysfunctional nerves causing perceptions such as burning, stinging, eye-ache, and pain. Various inflammatory diseases, neurological diseases, and surgical interventions can be the underlying cause of corneal neuropathic pain. Recent efforts have been made by the scientific community to elucidate the pathophysiology and neurobiology of pain resulting from initially protective physiological reflexes, to a more persistent chronic state. The goal of this clinical review is to briefly summarize the pathophysiology of neuropathic corneal pain, describe how to systematically approach the diagnosis of these patients, and finally summarizing our experience with current therapeutic approaches for the treatment of corneal neuropathic pain. PMID:26959131

  18. Neuropathic Pain Treatment: Still a Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Pessoa, Bruno L.; Orsini, Marco; Ribeiro, Pedro; Davidovich, Eduardo; Pupe, Camila; Filho, Pedro Moreira; Dornas, Ricardo Menezes; Masiero, Lucas; Bittencourt, Juliana; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is the result of a series of conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of NP pathophysiology previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. In this group, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic-acid, cannabinoids, clonidine, EMA401, botulinum toxin type A and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be included. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. We reviewed the published literature on the pharmacological treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. In spite of several studies for the relief of NP, pain control continues being a challenge. PMID:27441065

  19. Neuropathic pain as part of chronic widespread pain: environmental and genetic influences

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Sukhleen K.; Fabiane, Stella Maris; Lachance, Genevieve; Livshits, Gregory; Williams, Frances M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic widespread pain (CWP) has complex aetiology and forms part of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a higher frequency of neuropathic pain features in those with CWP than previously thought. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain features in individuals with CWP and to estimate the influence of genetic and environmental factors on neuropathic pain in CWP. Validated questionnaires (the London Fibromyalgia Screening Study questionnaire and PainDETECT questionnaire) were used to classify twins as having CWP and neuropathic pain, respectively. The prevalence of CWP was 14.7% (n = 4324), and of the 1357 twins invited to complete neuropathic pain screening, 15.9% of those having CWP demonstrated features of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was found to be heritable (A = 37%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23%-50%) with unique environmental factors accounting for 63% (95% CI: 49%-79%) of the variance. Heritability of neuropathic pain and CWP were found to be correlated, 0.54 (95% CI: 0.42-0.65). Increasing age, raised body mass index, female gender, and smoking were all risk factors for neuropathic pain (P < 0.05), and CWP (P < 0.05). High socioeconomic status showed negative correlation with neuropathic pain (P = 0.003) and CWP (P = 0.001). Bivariate analysis of the 2 pain traits revealed that genetic predisposition to neuropathic pain is shared with that for CWP. This is the first study to provide formal heritability estimates for neuropathic pain in CWP. The findings suggest that at least some of the genetic factors underlying the development of neuropathic pain and CWP are the same. PMID:26121255

  20. Persistent orodental pain, atypical odontalgia, and phantom tooth pain: when are they neuropathic disorders?

    PubMed

    Clark, Glenn T

    2006-08-01

    Patients with unrelenting pain in the teeth, gingival, palatal or alveolar tissues often see multiple dentists and have multiple irreversible procedures performed and still have their pain. Up to one-third of patients attending a chronic facial pain clinic have undergone prior irreversible dental procedures for their pain without success. In these cases, if no local source of infectious, inflammatory, or other pathology can be found, then the differential diagnosis must include a focal neuropathic pain disorder. The common diagnoses given include the terms atypical odontalgia, persistent orodental pain, or if teeth have been extracted, phantom tooth pain. One possibility is that these pain complaints are due to a neuropathic alteration of the trigeminal nerve. There are several diagnostic procedures that need to be performed in any patient suspected of having a trigeminal neuropathic disorder including (1) cold testing of involved teeth for pulpal nonvitality; (2) a periapical radiograph examining the teeth for apical change; (3) a panoramic radiograph examining for other maxillofacial disease; (4) a thorough head and neck examination also looking for abnormality; (5) a cranial nerve examination including anesthetic testing which documents any increased or decreased nerve trigeminal nerve sensitivity and rules out other neurologic changes outside the trigeminal nerve; and (6) MRI imaging in some cases. Finally, when a nonobvious atypical toothache first presents, direct microscopic examination of the tooth for incomplete tooth fracture is also suggested. The majority of these patients are women over the age 30 with pain in the posterior teeth/alveolar arch. Multiple causes exist for sustained neuropathic pain including direct nerve injury (e.g., associated with fracture or surgical treatment), nerve injection injury, nerve compression injury (e.g., implant, osseous growth, neoplastic invasion) and infection-inflammation damage to the nerve itself. Sustained nerve

  1. [Capsaicin in treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, P R; Evzelman, M A; Abusueva, B A; Volkov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain (NP) is a serious medical problem. Antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants, used to relief pain, act on the central pain mechanisms and cause several side-effects, thus substantially restricting possibilities of their clinical application.At the same time, NP often has a peripheral component. Ligand-associated channels, including vanilloid receptors TRPV1, play a key role in the development of regional NP syndromes. Capsaicin, a component of chili pepper and several other plants, is a highly selective ligand of TRPV1 receptors and has long been used in treatment of pain syndromes. However, its using is limited by short-term action and relatively low efficacy. Recently it has been shown that the local use of single high doses of capsaicin during 30-60 min causes a marked stable(> 12 weeks) effect. The decrease in NP (>50%) is seen in about half of patients. Current studies will allow to single out groups of patients with the maximal treatment effect of capsaicin. PMID:25629137

  2. Intraoral administration of botulinum toxin for trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Herrero Babiloni, Alberto; Kapos, Flavia P; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    This article presents 2 cases of different neuropathic trigeminal pain conditions treated with intraoral botulinum toxin injections. There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of this substance when administered subcutaneously in the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as in extraoral injections for trigeminal neuralgia. However, reports of intraoral submucosal administration are still lacking. In the 2 cases presented here, neuropathic pain was refractory to treatment with an important intraoral peripheral component, so onabotulinum toxin A was introduced as an adjuvant therapy. The technique, doses, and dilution are discussed. The patients reported significant reductions in pain frequency and intensity, with minimal side effects of temporary mucosal dryness and smile droopiness. The analgesic benefits of botulinum toxin may be utilized to address intraoral neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to confirm safety and effectiveness in larger samples. PMID:27181448

  3. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy 1

    PubMed Central

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. PMID:27508904

  4. [Neuropathic pain. How to open the blackbox].

    PubMed

    Maier, C; Baron, R; Sommer, C

    2015-10-01

    This article, without presuming to be comprehensive, gives a brief outline of the development of research on neuropathic pain in Germany. Current clinical research on this subject focusses on the validation of human models, patient phenotyping, mechanism-based classification and treatment as well as on molecular pathomechanisms. This clinical research is based to a large extent on the work of several internationally recognized basic researchers in the 1990s. In particular, findings from system physiology led to the analysis of clinical phenotypes and the underlying pathophysiology. In parallel, basic research achieved international top levels through the development of innovative methods. Close cooperation, building of consortia and European networking made major contributions to the success of this research. PMID:26264897

  5. Medial plantar nerve ligation as a novel model of neuropathic pain in mice: pharmacological and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Morena B; Kusuda, Ricardo; Bozzo, Tiago A; Bassi, Gabriel S; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ferreira, Sergio H; Souza, Guilherme R; Cunha, Thiago M

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain is a consequence of an injury/disease of the peripheral nerves. The mechanisms involved in its pathophysiology are not entirely understood. To better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, more experimental models are required. Here, we developed a novel peripheral neuropathic pain model in mice by using a minimally invasive surgery and medial plantar nerve ligation (MPNL). After MPNL, mechanical allodynia was established, and mice quickly recovered from the surgery without any significant motor impairment. MPNL causes an increased expression of ATF-3 in the sensory neurons. At 14 days after surgery, gabapentin was capable of reversing the mechanical allodynia, whereas anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were ineffective. MPNL-induced neuropathic pain was mediated by glial cells activation and the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in the spinal cord. These results indicate MPNL as a reasonable animal model for the study of peripheral neuropathic pain, presenting analgesic pharmacological predictivity to clinically used drugs. The results also showed molecular phenotypic changes similar to other peripheral neuropathic pain models, with the advantage of a lack of motor impairment. These features indicate that MPNL might be more appropriate for the study of neuropathic pain than classical models. PMID:27230787

  6. Medial plantar nerve ligation as a novel model of neuropathic pain in mice: pharmacological and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Morena B.; Kusuda, Ricardo; Bozzo, Tiago A.; Bassi, Gabriel S.; Alves-Filho, José C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain is a consequence of an injury/disease of the peripheral nerves. The mechanisms involved in its pathophysiology are not entirely understood. To better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, more experimental models are required. Here, we developed a novel peripheral neuropathic pain model in mice by using a minimally invasive surgery and medial plantar nerve ligation (MPNL). After MPNL, mechanical allodynia was established, and mice quickly recovered from the surgery without any significant motor impairment. MPNL causes an increased expression of ATF-3 in the sensory neurons. At 14 days after surgery, gabapentin was capable of reversing the mechanical allodynia, whereas anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were ineffective. MPNL-induced neuropathic pain was mediated by glial cells activation and the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in the spinal cord. These results indicate MPNL as a reasonable animal model for the study of peripheral neuropathic pain, presenting analgesic pharmacological predictivity to clinically used drugs. The results also showed molecular phenotypic changes similar to other peripheral neuropathic pain models, with the advantage of a lack of motor impairment. These features indicate that MPNL might be more appropriate for the study of neuropathic pain than classical models. PMID:27230787

  7. Neuropathic cancer pain: What we are dealing with? How to manage it?

    PubMed Central

    Esin, Ece; Yalcin, Suayib

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a serious health problem, and imposes a great burden on the lives of patients and their families. Pain can be associated with delay in treatment, denial of treatment, or failure of treatment. If the pain is not treated properly it may impair the quality of life. Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP) is one of the most complex phenomena among cancer pain syndromes. NCP may result from direct damage to nerves due to acute diagnostic/therapeutic interventions. Chronic NCP is the result of treatment complications or malignancy itself. Although the reason for pain is different in NCP and noncancer neuropathic pain, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are similar. Data regarding neuropathic pain are primarily obtained from neuropathic pain studies. Evidence pertaining to NCP is limited. NCP due to chemotherapeutic toxicity is a major problem for physicians. In the past two decades, there have been efforts to standardize NCP treatment in order to provide better medical service. Opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain treatment; however, a new group of therapeutics called coanalgesic drugs has been introduced to pain treatment. These coanalgesics include gabapentinoids (gabapentin, pregabalin), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine, and venlafaxine), corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, and cannabinoids. Pain can be encountered throughout every step of cancer treatment, and thus all practicing oncologists must be capable of assessing pain, know the possible underlying pathophysiology, and manage it appropriately. The purpose of this review is to discuss neuropathic pain and NCP in detail, the relevance of this topic, clinical features, possible pathology, and treatments of NCP. PMID:24790459

  8. Neuropathic pain - the case for opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    For many patients, neuropathic pain (NeP) is arguably more difficult to control than nociceptive or 'normal' pain. We also now recognise the great burden that NeP has on the lives of patients - it is not only a matter of treating pain in isolation, but managing all of the issues that affect the patient's quality of life. Until relatively recently we have had little understanding of the pathophysiology causing NeP and have relied on the secondary effects of non-analgesic drugs as the mainstays of treatment. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of NeP has led to more appropriate therapy and an increased use of multiple drug therapy - 'rational polypharmacy'. Traditional opinions concerning the treatment of NeP have been challenged and it is because of this that the use of opioids in NeP has been re-evaluated. Opioids will never replace tricyclic antidepressants and anti-epileptic drugs as first-line therapy for NeP. However, they are now fully established as effective and useful second- or third-line drugs. Many patients in the past have been potentially undertreated as a result of our inertia to use opioids. The case for opioid therapy in NeP has been firmly established. PMID:18758203

  9. Pharmacological management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of severe and disabling consequences, including chronic pain, and around 40% of patients develop persistent neuropathic pain. Pain following SCI has a detrimental impact on the patient's quality of life and is a major specific healthcare problem in its own right. Thus far, there is no cure for the pain and oral pharmaceutical intervention is often inadequate, commonly resulting in a reduction of only 20-30% in pain intensity. Neuropathic pain sensations are characterized by spontaneous persistent pain and a range of abnormally evoked responses, e.g. allodynia (pain evoked by normally non-noxious stimuli) and hyperalgesia (an increased response to noxious stimuli). Neuropathic pain following SCI may be present at or below the level of injury. Oral pharmacological agents used in the treatment of neuropathic pain act either by depressing neuronal activity, by blocking sodium channels or inhibiting calcium channels, by increasing inhibition via GABA agonists, by serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibition, or by decreasing activation via glutamate receptor inhibition, especially by blocking the NMDA receptor. At present, only ten randomized, double-blind, controlled trials have been performed on oral drug treatment of pain after SCI, the results of most of which were negative. The studies included antidepressants (amitriptyline and trazodone), antiepileptics (gabapentin, pregabalin, lamotrigine and valproate) and mexiletine. Gabapentin, pregabalin and amitriptyline showed a significant reduction in neuropathic pain following SCI. Cannabinoids have been found to relieve other types of central pain, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors as well as opioids relieve peripheral neuropathic pain and may be used to treat patients with SCI pain. PMID:18484790

  10. Topical amitriptyline and ketamine for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    A neuropathy is a disturbance of function or pathological change in nerves. In some cases, peripheral neuropathic pain may occur due to a lesion or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system. Efficacy of different agents for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions is less than optimal. The administration of topical analgesics might be an option, due to the potential of reduced adverse effects and increased patient compliance. There is major interest in compounding topical analgesics for peripheral neuropathic pain, but several challenges remain for this approach. Topical analgesics have the potential to be a valuable additional approach for the management of peripheral neuropathic pain. Topical amitriptyline-ketamine combination (AK) is a promising agent for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions. Some studies have shown its efficacy in neuropathic pain conditions. However, this data was not uniformely obtained and its role remains still controversial. Efficacy may depend on many factors, including the choice of the vehicle, the concentration, the pain site, and specific diseases. More studies are necessary to support the use of AK in clinical practice. PMID:26488799

  11. TNF-α and neuropathic pain - a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was discovered more than a century ago, and its known roles have extended from within the immune system to include a neuro-inflammatory domain in the nervous system. Neuropathic pain is a recognized type of pathological pain where nociceptive responses persist beyond the resolution of damage to the nerve or its surrounding tissue. Very often, neuropathic pain is disproportionately enhanced in intensity (hyperalgesia) or altered in modality (hyperpathia or allodynia) in relation to the stimuli. At time of this writing, there is as yet no common consensus about the etiology of neuropathic pain - possible mechanisms can be categorized into peripheral sensitization and central sensitization of the nervous system in response to the nociceptive stimuli. Animal models of neuropathic pain based on various types of nerve injuries (peripheral versus spinal nerve, ligation versus chronic constrictive injury) have persistently implicated a pivotal role for TNF-α at both peripheral and central levels of sensitization. Despite a lack of success in clinical trials of anti-TNF-α therapy in alleviating the sciatic type of neuropathic pain, the intricate link of TNF-α with other neuro-inflammatory signaling systems (e.g., chemokines and p38 MAPK) has indeed inspired a systems approach perspective for future drug development in treating neuropathic pain. PMID:20398373

  12. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  13. The Sciatic Nerve Cuffing Model of Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Megat, Salim; Barthas, Florent; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system. This syndrome results from maladaptive changes in injured sensory neurons and along the entire nociceptive pathway within the central nervous system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. In order to study neuropathic pain and its treatments, different models have been developed in rodents. These models derive from known etiologies, thus reproducing peripheral nerve injuries, central injuries, and metabolic-, infectious- or chemotherapy-related neuropathies. Murine models of peripheral nerve injury often target the sciatic nerve which is easy to access and allows nociceptive tests on the hind paw. These models rely on a compression and/or a section. Here, the detailed surgery procedure for the "cuff model" of neuropathic pain in mice is described. In this model, a cuff of PE-20 polyethylene tubing of standardized length (2 mm) is unilaterally implanted around the main branch of the sciatic nerve. It induces a long-lasting mechanical allodynia, i.e., a nociceptive response to a normally non-nociceptive stimulus that can be evaluated by using von Frey filaments. Besides the detailed surgery and testing procedures, the interest of this model for the study of neuropathic pain mechanism, for the study of neuropathic pain sensory and anxiodepressive aspects, and for the study of neuropathic pain treatments are also discussed. PMID:25078668

  14. Assessment and management of pain, with particular emphasis on central neuropathic pain, in moderate to severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Scherder, Erik J A; Plooij, Bart

    2012-09-01

    (acetaminophen), which, together with opioids, is the most frequently prescribed analgesic drug in dementia. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are hardly prescribed in a residential setting. Some authors advise starting treatment with a low dose of opioids. Antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs appear to have a positive effect on central neuropathic pain. In the review, advantages and disadvantages of amitriptyline, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin and pregabalin are discussed; a negative effect of these drugs on liver and kidney functions, as well as on cognitive functions in patients who already suffer from cognitive impairment is highlighted. Next to pharmacotherapy, non-pharmacological treatment strategies such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be effective as long as afferent pathways transmitting the electrical stimulus are still intact. PMID:23018606

  15. Methylcobalamin ameliorates neuropathic pain induced by vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Xiong-Xiong; Feng, Yi-Wei; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background Vincristine, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, often induces painful peripheral neuropathy and there are currently no effective drugs to prevent or treat this side effect. Previous studies have shown that methylcobalamin has potential analgesic effect in diabetic and chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion model; however, whether methylcobalamin has effect on vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy is still unknown. Results We found that vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, accompanied by a significant loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the plantar hind paw skin and an increase in the incidence of atypical mitochondria in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, in the spinal dorsal horn, the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and the protein expression of p-p65 as well as tumor necrosis factor α was increased, whereas the protein expression of IL-10 was decreased following vincristine treatment. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of methylcobalamin could dose dependently attenuate vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which was associated with intraepidermal nerve fibers rescue, and atypical mitochondria prevalence decrease in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, methylcobalamin inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway. Production of tumor necrosis factor α was also decreased and production of IL-10 was increased in the spinal dorsal horn following methylcobalamin treatment. Intrathecal injection of Phorbol-12-Myristate-13-Acetate, a NADPH oxidase activator, could completely block the analgesic effect of methylcobalamin. Conclusions Methylcobalamin attenuated vincrinstine-induced neuropathic pain, which was accompanied by inhibition of intraepidermal nerve fibers loss and mitochondria impairment. Inhibiting the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway, resulting in the rebalancing of

  16. Movement imagery increases pain in people with neuropathic pain following complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Sylvia M; Wrigley, Paul J; Gandevia, Simon C; Middleton, James W; Henderson, Luke A; Siddall, Philip J

    2008-07-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in deafferentation and the onset of neuropathic pain in a substantial proportion of people. Based on evidence suggesting motor cortex activation results in attenuation of neuropathic pain, we sought to determine whether neuropathic SCI pain could be modified by imagined movements of the foot. Fifteen subjects with a complete thoracic SCI (7 with below-level neuropathic pain and 8 without pain) were instructed in the use of movement imagery. Movement imagery was practiced three times daily for 7days. On the eighth day, subjects performed the movement imagery in the laboratory and recorded pain ratings during the period of imagined movement. Six out of 7 subjects with neuropathic pain reported an increase in pain during imagined movements from 2.9+/-0.7 during baseline to 5.0+/-1.0 during movement imagery (p<0.01). In SCI subjects without neuropathic pain, movement imagery evoked an increase in non-painful sensation intensity from a baseline of 1.9+/-0.7 to 4.8+/-1.3 during the movement imagery (p<0.01). Two subjects without a history of pain or non-painful phantom sensations had onset of dysesthesia while performing imagined movements. This study reports exacerbation of pain in response to imagined movements and it contrasts with reports of pain reduction in people with peripheral neuropathic pain. The potential mechanisms underlying this sensory enhancement with movement imagery are discussed. PMID:17942228

  17. Learning and memory with neuropathic pain: impact of old age and progranulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Boris; Häussler, Annett; Vannoni, Elisabetta; Wolfer, David P; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2013-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is a frequent consequence of peripheral nerve injuries, particularly in the elderly. Using the IntelliCage we studied if sciatic nerve injury obstructed learning and memory in young and aged mice, each in wild type and progranulin deficient mice, which develop premature signs of brain aging. Both young and aged mice developed long-term nerve injury-evoked hyperalgesia and allodynia. In both genotypes, aged mice with neuropathic pain showed high error rates in place avoidance acquisition tasks. However, once learnt, these aged mice with neuropathic pain showed a significantly stronger maintenance of the aversive memory. Nerve injury did not affect place preference behavior in neither genotype, neither in young nor aged mice. However, nerve injury in progranulin deficient mice impaired the learning of spatial sequences of awarded places, particularly in the aged mice. This task required a discrimination of clockwise and anti-clockwise sequences. The chaining failure occurred only in progranulin deficient mice after nerve injury, but not in sham operated or wildtype mice, suggesting that progranulin was particularly important for compensatory adaptations after nerve injury. In contrast, all aged mice with neuropathic pain, irrespective of the genotype, had a long maintenance of aversive memory suggesting a negative alliance and possibly mutual aggravation of chronic neuropathic pain and aversive memory at old age. PMID:24319417

  18. The Role of Regulatory Transporters in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises from an injury or disease of the somatosensory nervous system rather than stimulation of pain receptors. As a result, the fine balance between excitation and inhibition is perturbed leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. Various neuropathic pain models provide considerable evidence that changes in the glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic systems. Neurotransmitter reuptake transporter proteins have the potential to change the temporal and spatial profile of various neurotransmitters throughout the nervous system. This, in turn, can affect the downstream effects of these neurotransmitters and hence modulate pain. This chapter explores various reuptake transporter systems and implicates their role in pain processing. Understanding the transporter systems will enhance drug discovery targeting different facets of neuropathic pain. PMID:26920015

  19. Characterizing neuropathic pain profiles: enriching interpretation of painDETECT

    PubMed Central

    Cappelleri, Joseph C; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Sadosky, Alesia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To psychometrically evaluate painDETECT, a patient-reported screening questionnaire for neuropathic pain (NeP), for discriminating among sensory pain symptoms (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure). Methods The seven-item version of painDETECT provides an overall score that targets only sensory symptoms, while the nine-item version adds responses on two items to the overall score, covering pain course pattern and pain radiation. Both versions have relevance in terms of characterizing broad NeP. The nine- and seven-item versions of painDETECT were administered to subjects with confirmed NeP across six conditions identified during office visits to US community-based physicians. Responses on the sensory symptom items were dichotomized into “at least moderate” (ie, moderate, strongly, very strongly) relative to the combined other responses (never, hardly noticed, slightly). Logistic regression of dichotomized variables on the total painDETECT score provided probabilities of experiencing each symptom across the range of painDETECT scores. Results Both painDETECT versions discriminated among the symptoms with similar probabilities across the score ranges. Using these data, the probability of moderately experiencing each pain sensory item was estimated for a particular score, providing a pain profile. Additionally, the likelihood of experiencing each sensation was determined for a discrete increase in score, ie, the odds of at least a moderate sensation of burning (versus less than a moderate sensation) was 1.29 for a 1-point increase, 3.52 for a 5-point increase, and 12.42 for every 10-point increase in the nine-item painDETECT score. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates pain profiles across the range of scores such that, for a particular score, the probability of experiencing at least a moderate sensation of each symptom was determined and compared. These results

  20. Increased Spinal Cord Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) Activity Contributes to Impairment of Synaptic Inhibition in Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Zhu, Lihong; Chen, Hong; Wen, Lei; Laumet, Geoffroy; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxol), are effective chemotherapy drugs for treating many cancers, and painful neuropathy is a major dose-limiting adverse effect. Cation-chloride cotransporters, such as Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and K+-Cl− cotransporter-2 (KCC2), critically influence spinal synaptic inhibition by regulating intracellular chloride concentrations. Here we show that paclitaxel treatment in rats significantly reduced GABA-induced membrane hyperpolarization and caused a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential of dorsal horn neurons. However, paclitaxel had no significant effect on AMPA or NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic input from primary afferents to dorsal horn neurons. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased protein levels, but not mRNA levels, of NKCC1 in spinal cords. Inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide reversed the paclitaxel effect on GABA-mediated hyperpolarization and GABA reversal potentials. Also, intrathecal bumetanide significantly attenuated hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by paclitaxel. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NKCC1 interacted with β-tubulin and β-actin in spinal cords. Remarkably, paclitaxel increased NKCC1 protein levels at the plasma membrane and reduced NKCC1 levels in the cytosol of spinal cords. In contrast, treatment with an actin-stabilizing agent had no significant effect on NKCC1 protein levels in the plasma membrane or cytosolic fractions of spinal cords. In addition, inhibition of the motor protein dynein blocked paclitaxel-induced subcellular redistribution of NKCC1, whereas inhibition of kinesin-5 mimicked the paclitaxel effect. Our findings suggest that increased NKCC1 activity contributes to diminished spinal synaptic inhibition and neuropathic pain caused by paclitaxel. Paclitaxel disrupts intracellular NKCC1 trafficking by interfering with microtubule dynamics and associated motor proteins. PMID:25253692

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In

  2. [Pharmacological treatment strategy and mirror visual feedback treatment for neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Masahiko; Miyauchi, Satoru; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2012-11-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition, and pharmacotherapy is the most established treatment strategy. A variety of pharmacotherapies is used for neuropathic pain management: however, pharmacotherapies with evidence for analgesic potency are less common. Several pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines for neuropathic pain treatment recommend the first- to third-line drugs on the basis of evidence-based medicine; however, neuropathic pain is often resistant to pharmacotherapies. We have treated pharmacotherapy-resistant neuropathic pain with neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback (MVF) treatment. Further to our clinical experience using MVF, we discuss the cerebral mechanism associated with neuropathic pain in this study. PMID:23131739

  3. Brain morphological alternation in chronic pain patients with neuropathic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sugimine, Satomi; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic characteristics are highly involved in the development of chronic pain both physically and psychologically. However, little is known about the relationship between neuropathic characteristics and brain morphological alteration. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of chronic pain development by examining the above-mentioned relationships by voxel-based morphometry in patients with chronic pain. Methods First, we assessed neuropathic characteristics using the painDETECT Questionnaire in 12 chronic pain patients. Second, to assess the gray matter volume changes by voxel-based morphometry, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. We applied multiregression analysis of these two assessment methods. Results There were significant positive correlations between painDETECT Questionnaire scores and the gray matter volume in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuropathic characteristics strongly affect the brain regions related to modulation of pain in patients with chronic pain and, therefore, contribute to the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27284013

  4. Topical medications as treatment of neuropathic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Heir, Gary M

    2013-07-01

    Understanding mechanisms of neuropathic orofacial pain, targets of treatment, and basic pharmacology and working with informed compounding pharmacists may result in significant benefit for patients. The clinical significance of topical medications is improvement of quality of life for patients by providing a unique medication delivery system for neuropathic orofacial pain and other dental and extraoral conditions. The use of this route of administration has decreased or minimized side effects compared with other methods and is especially useful in medically compromised and elderly patients. These innovations, supported and improved by ongoing research, will augment the armamentarium of the clinician treating orofacial pain disorders. PMID:23809308

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Refractory Neuropathic Pain of Neuralgic Amyotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-hun; Ha, Sang-woo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to report the effect of temporary and chronic spinal cord stimulation for refractory neuropathic pain in neuralgic amyotrophy (NA). A 35-year-old female presented with two-months history of a severe, relentless neuropathic pain of the left shoulder, forearm, palm, and fingers. The neuropathic pain was refractory to various medical treatments, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opiates, epidural and stellate ganglion blocks, and typically unrelenting. The diagnosis of NA was made with the characteristic clinical history and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent a temporary spinal cord stimulation to achieve an adequate pain relief because her pain was notoriously difficult to control and lasted longer than the average duration (about 4 weeks on average) of a painful phase of NA. Permanent stimulation was given with paddle lead. The neuropathic pain in her NA persisted and she continued using the spinal cord stimulation with 12 months after development of NA. The temporary spinal cord stimulation was effective in a patient with an extraordinary prolonged, acute painful phase of NA attack, and the subsequent chronic stimulation was also useful in achieving an adequate analgesia during the chronic phase of NA. PMID:27169086

  6. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  7. Surgical animal models of neuropathic pain: Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    Challa, Siva Reddy

    2015-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges for discovering more efficacious drugs for the control of neuropathic pain has been the diversity of chronic pain states in humans. It is now acceptable that different mechanisms contribute to normal physiologic pain, pain arising from tissue damage and pain arising from injury to the nervous system. To study pain transmission, spot novel pain targets and characterize the potential analgesic profile of new chemical entities, numerous experimental animal pain models have been developed that attempt to simulate the many human pain conditions. Among the neuropathic pain models, surgical models have paramount importance in the induction of pain states. Many surgical animal models exist, like the chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve, partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL), spinal nerve ligation (SNL), spared nerve injury (SNI), brachial plexus avulsion (BPA), sciatic nerve transaction (SNT) and sciatic nerve trisection. Most of these models induce responses similar to those found in causalgia, a syndrome of sustained burning pain often seen in the distal extremity after partial peripheral nerve injury in humans. Researchers most commonly use these surgical models in both rats and mice during drug discovery to screen new chemical entities for efficacy in the area of neuropathic pain. However, there is scant literature that provides a comparative discussion of all these surgical models. Each surgical model has its own benefits and limitations. It is very difficult for a researcher to choose a suitable surgical animal model to suit their experimental set-up. Therefore, particular attention has been given in this review to comparatively provide the pros and cons of each model of surgically induced neuropathic pain. PMID:24831263

  8. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  9. Glia as a Link between Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Jeon, Sangmin

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary studies illustrate that peripheral injuries activate glial components of the peripheral and central cellular circuitry. The subsequent release of glial stressors or activating signals contributes to neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation. Recent studies document the importance of glia in the development and persistence of neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation as a connecting link, thereby focusing attention on the glial pathology as the general underlying factor in essentially all age-related neurodegenerative diseases. There is wide agreement that excessive glial activation is a key process in nervous system disorders involving the release of strong pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can trigger worsening of multiple disease states. This review will briefly discuss the recent findings that have shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glia as a connecting link between neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation. PMID:22740789

  10. Ganglioside GM3 synthase depletion reverses neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diet-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraj, Nirupa D; Wilson, Heather M; Ren, Dongjun; Flood, Kelsey; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shum, Andrew; Miller, Richard J; Paller, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Background Small fiber neuropathy is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes and has been shown to be responsible for both neuropathic pain and impaired wound healing. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that ganglioside GM3 depletion by knockdown of GM3 synthase fully reverses impaired wound healing in diabetic mice. However, the role of GM3 in neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes is unknown. Purpose Determine whether GM3 depletion is able to reverse neuropathic pain and small fibers neuropathy and the mechanism of the reversal. Results We demonstrate that GM3 synthase knockout and the resultant GM3 depletion rescues the denervation in mouse footpad skin and fully reverses the neuropathic pain in diet-induced obese diabetic mice. In cultured dorsal root ganglia from diet-induced diabetic mice, GM3 depletion protects against increased intracellular calcium influx in vitro. Conclusions These studies establish ganglioside GM3 as a new candidate responsible for neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes. Moreover, these observations indicate that systemic or topically applied interventions aimed at depleting GM3 may improve both the painful neuropathy and the wound healing impairment in diabetes by protecting against nerve end terminal degeneration, providing a disease-modifying approach to this common, currently intractable medical issue. PMID:27590073

  11. Consistence and discrepancy of neuropathic pain screening tools DN4 and ID-Pain.

    PubMed

    Padua, L; Briani, C; Truini, A; Aprile, I; Bouhassirà, D; Cruccu, G; Jann, S; Nobile-Orazio, E; Pazzaglia, C; Morini, A; Mondelli, M; Ciaramitaro, P; Cavaletti, G; Cocito, D; Fazio, R; Santoro, L; Galeotti, F; Carpo, M; Plasmati, R; Benedetti, L; Schenone, A

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a subjective condition that cannot be objectively measured; for this reason, self patient-perspective is crucial. Recently, several screening tools to discriminate between nociceptive and neuropathic pain have been developed. We aimed at assessing the consistence and discrepancy of two widely used screening tools, The Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) and the 6-item questionnaire (ID-Pain), by comparing their ability in discriminating neuropathic from nociceptive pain. DN4 and ID-Pain were administered to 392 Italian patients attending 16 outpatient services for peripheral nerve diseases. Based on medical history, clinical findings and diagnostic tools, patients were divided into two groups (neuropathic and nociceptive). Globally, ID-Pain identified neuropathic pain in 60 % of patients (38 % probable, 22 % likely). Interestingly also DN4 diagnosed neuropathic pain in 60 % of cases. A discrepancy was observed in 16 % of cases. DN4 and ID-Pain resulted to be highly interrelated in the identification of neuropathic pain. Sensitivity of DN4 was 82 % and specificity was 81 %, while ID-Pain (considering both probable and likely groups) showed sensitivity 78 % and specificity 74 %. Reliable screening tools for neuropathic pain are well related between them; hence, they are available for researchers and clinicians who may choose the most appropriate for their activity. Since the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain cannot do without a neurological evaluation, perhaps DN4, that includes physician objective measures, may help reducing the percentage of dubious cases. Conversely, when needing a more agile tool (not needing a physician) ID-Pain may be adopted. PMID:22434411

  12. Lidocaine 5% Medicated Plaster for Spinal Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Freo, Ulderico; Ambrosio, Francesco; Furnari, Maurizio; Ori, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries frequently determine central pain symptoms that are difficult to control. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old suffering from a pleural mesothelioma. During the disease course, he developed a paraplegia syndrome from mesothelioma compression of the spinal cord at T4-T5 level. Following spinal decompression surgery, the patient presented an intense at-level, superficial neuropathic pain syndrome with allodynia and hyperalgesia. After systemic pharmacological therapies had failed, treatment with lidocaine 5% plaster was initiated. The superficial neuropathic symptoms almost completely disappeared within a few days. The lidocaine topical treatment was continued for months with durable analgesic effect. PMID:27018847

  13. P2X4R+ microglia drive neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon; Trang, Tuan; Salter, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, the most debilitating of all clinical pain syndromes, may be a consequence of trauma, infection or pathology from diseases that affect peripheral nerves. Here we provide a framework for understanding the spinal mechanisms of neuropathic pain as distinct from those of acute pain or inflammatory pain. Recent work suggests that a specific microglia response phenotype characterized by de novo expression of the purinergic receptor P2X4 is critical for the pathogenesis of pain hypersensitivity caused by injury to peripheral nerves. Stimulating P2X4 receptors initiates a core pain signaling pathway mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which produces a disinhibitory increase in intracellular chloride in nociceptive (pain-transmitting) neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. The changes caused by signaling from P2X4R+ microglia to nociceptive transmission neurons may account for the main symptoms of neuropathic pain in humans, and they point to specific interventions to alleviate this debilitating condition. PMID:22837036

  14. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  15. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  16. Neuropathic orofacial pain: cannabinoids as a therapeutic avenue.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick; McKenna, Joseph P; McCreary, Christine; Downer, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) exists in several forms including pathologies such as burning mouth syndrome (BMS), persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). BMS and PIFP are classically diagnosed by excluding other facial pain syndromes. TN and PHN are most often diagnosed based on a typical history and presenting pain characteristics. The pathophysiology of some of these conditions is still unclear and hence treatment options tend to vary and include a wide variety of treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy, anti-depressants, anti-convulsants and opioids; however such treatments often have limited efficacy with a great amount of inter-patient variability and poorly tolerated side effects. Analgesia is one the principal therapeutic targets of the cannabinoid system and many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of cannabinoid compounds in the treatment of neuropathic pain. This review will investigate the potential use of cannabinoids in the treatment of symptoms associated with NOP. PMID:25150831

  17. Surgically-Induced Neuropathic Pain (SNPP): Understanding the Perioperative Process

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Kussman, Barry D.; George, Edward; Becerra, Lino R.; Burke, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nerve damage takes place during surgery. As a consequence, significant numbers (10–40%) of patients experience chronic neuropathic pain termed surgically induced neuropathic pain (SNPP). Background The initiating surgery and nerve damage set off a cascade of events that includes both pain and an inflammatory response, resulting in ‘peripheral’ and ‘central sensitization’, with the latter resulting from repeated barrages of neural activity from nociceptors. In affected patients these initial events produce chemical, structural and functional changes in the peripheral (PNS) and central nervous (CNS) systems. The maladaptive changes in damaged nerves lead to peripheral manifestations of the neuropathic state – allodynia, sensory loss, shooting pains etc., that can manifest long after the effects of the surgical injury have resolved. The CNS manifestations that occur are termed ‘centralization of pain’ and affect sensory, emotional and other (e.g., cognitive) systems as well as contributing to some of the manifestations of the chronic pain syndrome (e.g., depression). Conclusions Currently there are no objective measures of pain in the peri-operative period. As such intermittent pain or continuous may take place during and after surgery. New technologies including direct measures of specific brain function of nociception and new insights into preoperative evaluation of patients including genetic predisposition appear to provide initial opportunities for decreasing the burden of SNPP until treatments with high efficacy and low side effects that either prevent or treat pain are discovered. PMID:23059501

  18. Pain catastrophizing predicts poor response to topical analgesics in patients with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mankovsky, Tsipora; Lynch, Mary E; Clark, AJ; Sawynok, J; Sullivan, Michael JL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that high levels of pain catastrophizing might predict poorer response to pharmacological interventions for neuropathic pain. OBJECTIVE: The present study sought to examine the clinical relevance of the relation between catastrophizing and analgesic response in individuals with neuropathic pain. Clinically meaningful reductions were defined in terms of the magnitude of reductions in pain through the course of treatment, and in terms of the number of patients whose end-of-treatment pain ratings were below 4/10. METHODS: Patients (n=82) with neuropathic pain conditions completed a measure of pain catastrophizing at the beginning of a three-week trial examining the efficacy of topical analgesics for neuropathic pain. RESULTS: Consistent with previous research, high scores on the measure of pain catastrophizing prospectively predicted poorer response to treatment. Fewer catastrophizers than noncatastrophizers showed moderate (≥2 points) or substantial reductions in pain ratings through the course of treatment. Fewer catastrophizers than noncatastrophizers achieved end-of-treatment pain ratings below 4/10. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest that the development of brief interventions specifically targeting catastrophic thinking might be useful for enhancing the effects of pharmacological interventions for neuropathic pain. Furthermore, failure to account for the level of catastrophizing might contribute to null findings in clinical trials of analgesic medication. PMID:22518362

  19. [New data for the pathomechanism of neuropathic pain: therapeutic evidences].

    PubMed

    Tajti, Janos; Szok, Delia; Vécsei, László

    2013-03-01

    The present work is based on literature data from PubMed. Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. Peripheral and central sensitization play a crucial role in its pathomechanism. The clinical symptoms are mainly characterized by burning and throbbing pain and sensory disturbances like hyperalgesia and allodynia. Therapeutic recommendations are antidepressants, antiepileptics, opioids and neuro-stimulation methods. PMID:23542755

  20. Differential Transcriptional Profiling of Damaged and Intact Adjacent Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, A. K.; Batti, L.; Bilbao, D.; Buness, A.; Rittner, H. L.; Heppenstall, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and “bystanders,” thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  1. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, A K; Batti, L; Bilbao, D; Buness, A; Rittner, H L; Heppenstall, P A

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF NEUROPATHIC CHRONIC PAIN IN ONCOLOGY PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Zhumaliyeva, V; Cialkowska-Rysz, A; Sirota, V; Kulishov, V; Omarova, I

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the primary prevalence of chronic neuropathic pain syndrome in oncology patients of Karaganda (Kazakhstan), to estimate the structure of pain syndrome in randomly chosen patients, to assess the effectiveness of analgesic therapy in oncology patients. All the patients with confirmed cancer admitted to hospital in Karaganda regional oncologic dispensary were studied. The study period was limited to 60 consecutive days. The results were statistically processed using 6.0 «STATISTICA» program. In 11,2±1,6% of the cases, oncology patients that got combined modality treatment suffered from the chronic neuropathic pain syndrome; 66,7±7,3% patients of them had the III cancer stage. 2. While studying the chronic neuropathic pain structure it was revealed that: 52,4±7,7% of the patients suffered from a mild pain, from average - 38,1±7,5% of the patients, from severe pain - 9,5±4,5%. Neuropathic pain syndrome in the form of numbness occurred in 47,6±7,7% of the respondents, tingling - in 38,1±7,5% of the patients and 14,3±5,4% of the respondents described it as «electric shock». 52,4±7,7% of the patients described temperature changes of the skin, 28,6±7,0% of them told about allodynia. The given pain can be correctly diagnosed on rare occasions. It brings about the low efficiency of currently prescribed standard pain treatment. It was 20%-effective only for ¼ of the patients. In sum, it can be brought into focus that each 10th oncology patient of the II clinical group in Kazakhstan may potentially suffer from the chronic neuropathic pain syndrome. The given syndrome in cancer patients requires selective differential diagnostics and constant management of the pain treatment regimen because of occurrence of standard regimens incapacity, progression of tolerance to the actual pain treatment and significant deterioration of oncology patients' life quality. PMID:27348160

  3. Neuropathic pain in the community: more under-treated than refractory?

    PubMed

    Torrance, Nicola; Ferguson, Janice A; Afolabi, Ebenezer; Bennett, Michael I; Serpell, Michael G; Dunn, Kate M; Smith, Blair H

    2013-05-01

    Best current estimates of neuropathic pain prevalence come from studies using screening tools detecting pain with probable neuropathic features; the proportion experiencing significant, long-term neuropathic pain, and the proportion not responding to standard treatment are unknown. These "refractory" cases are the most clinically important to detect, being the most severe, requiring specialist treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of neuropathic pain in the population that is "refractory," and to quantify associated clinical and demographic features. We posted self-administered questionnaires to 10,000 adult patients randomly selected from 10 general practitioner practices in 5 UK locations. The questionnaire contained chronic pain identification and severity questions, cause of pain, SF-12, EQ-5D, S-LANSS (Self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms), PSEQ (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), use of neuropathic pain medications, and health care utilisation. These data were combined to determine the presence and characteristics of "refractory" neuropathic pain according to the defining features identified by a Delphi survey of international experts. Graded categories of chronic pain with and without neuropathic characteristics were generated, incorporating the refractory criteria. Completed questionnaires were returned by 4451 individuals (response rate 47%); 399 had "chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics" (S-LANSS positive, 8.9% of the study sample); 215 (53.9%) also reported a positive relevant history ("Possible neuropathic pain"); and 98 (4.5% of all Chronic Pain) also reported an "adequate" trial of at least one neuropathic pain drug ("Treated possible neuropathic pain"). The most refractory cases were associated with dramatically poorer physical and mental health, lower pain self-efficacy, higher pain intensity and pain-related disability, and greater health care service use. PMID:23485369

  4. Difficult decisions: managing chronic neuropathic pain with opioids.

    PubMed

    England, John D; Franklin, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    The decision to use opioids to treat chronic neuropathic pain is complex and somewhat controversial. Although opioid therapy may be appropriate for some patients with chronic neuropathic pain, physicians must implement strategies to reduce opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. The decision to use chronic opioids should be made proactively with institution of best practices to ensure safe and effective use. As with all aspects of chronic pain management, better education of both health care providers and patients is necessary. Fortunately, specific recommendations for the safe and effective use of opioids are now available in several recently published guidelines. The best practices embodied in these guidelines should be considered for widespread adoption by both individual providers and health care systems. PMID:22810077

  5. [Current topics in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain from different causes: preface and comments].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2010-11-01

    Neuropathic pain, as a chronic intractable pain, is well known to be difficult in prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Especially, neuropathic pain from different causes has each characteristics for prevention, diagnosis and treatment. These include post-herpetic pain, persistent chronic pain following traffic accident, pain after peripheral nerve injury in venipuncture, phantom limb pain originating from dysfunction of the primary motor cortex, pain from failed back surgery syndrome, and diabetic neuropathy, and are helpful for understanding prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21077299

  6. Interventional management of neuropathic pain: NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O’Connor, Alec B.; Kent, Joel; Mackey, Sean C.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Stacey, Brett R.; Levy, Robert M.; Backonja, Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Harke, Henning; Loeser, John D.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C.; Wells, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is often refractory to pharmacologic and non-interventional treatment. On behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG), the authors evaluated systematic reviews, clinical trials, and existing guidelines for the interventional management of NP. Evidence is summarized and presented for neural blockade, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), intrathecal medication, and neurosurgical interventions in patients with the following peripheral and central NP conditions: herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN); painful diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies; spinal cord injury NP; central post-stroke pain; radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS); complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS); and trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. Due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, no strong recommendations can be made. Four weak recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence, including degree of efficacy and safety, are: (1) epidural injections for herpes zoster; (2) steroid injections for radiculopathy; (3) SCS for FBSS; and (4) SCS for CRPS type 1. Based on the available data, we recommend not to use sympathetic blocks for PHN nor RF lesions for radiculopathy. No other conclusive recommendations can be made due to the poor quality of available of data. Whenever possible, these interventions should either be part of randomized clinical trials or documented in pain registries. Priorities for future research include randomized clinical trials; long-term studies; and head-to-head comparisons among different interventional and non-interventional treatments. PMID:23748119

  7. Impact of Neuropathic Pain at the Population Level

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Ana Shirley Maranhao; Baptista, Abrahao Fontes; Mendes, Livia; Silva, Kamilla Soares; Gois, Sharize Cristine de Araujo; Lima, Flavia Manoela de Almeida; Souza, Israel; Sa, Katia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the chief complaints of individuals who frequent the Family Health Units is chronic pain which, in Salvador, affects over 40% of the population. However, little is known about the type of pain and its impact on quality of life (QoL) at population level. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of neuropathic pain on QoL in a community. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from March to October 2012, in a Family Health Unit, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The DN-4 (type of pain), body map (location), VAS (intensity) and SF-36 (QoL) instruments were applied. The Chi-square (univariate analysis) and logistic regression (multivariate) tests were used, with IC 95% and P < 0.05. Results In a sample of 191 individuals with chronic pain, predominantly women (86.4%), single (48.7%), nonwhite (93.2%), low educational (46.6%) and low economic (100%) level. The most affected locations of the body were knees, lumbar region and head. In 60.2% of interviewees, neuropathic pain, of high intensity (VAS = 7.09 ± 3.0) predominated, with duration of 8.53 ± 8.8 years and mean QoL was reduced in 47.13%. Conclusions Intense pain in the dorsal region and type of neuropathy are independent predictors for greater compromise of QoL. PMID:24578752

  8. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  9. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael A.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  10. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Michael A; Kluding, Patricia M; Wright, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  11. Role of Nucleus Accumbens in Neuropathic Pain: Linked Multi-Scale Evidence in the Rat Transitioning to Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimos; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Macro; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury, SNI). We observed inter-related changes: 1) In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; 2) contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; 3) In SNI (but not sham) covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and 4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior. PMID:24607959

  12. A burden of illness study for neuropathic pain in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Liedgens, Hiltrud; Obradovic, Marko; De Courcy, Jonathan; Holbrook, Timothy; Jakubanis, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neuropathic pain (NP) is often severe and represents a major humanistic and economic burden. This study aimed at providing insight on this burden across France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK, considering direct and indirect costs, productivity loss, and humanistic impact on patients and their families. Methods Physician questionnaires provided data on patients presenting with NP covering demographics, sick leave and retirement, number of consultations, drug treatments, and surgical procedures. Patients provided further demographic and disease-related data and completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI), the EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaires. All health-related direct unitary costs were collected from relevant country-specific sources and adjusted to 2012 prices (€) where necessary. A subgroup analysis of costs based on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (n=894), fibromyalgia (n=300), and low back pain (n=963) was performed. Findings About 413 physicians completed a total of 3,956 patient records forms. Total annual direct health-care costs per patient ranged from €1,939 (Italy) to €3,131 (Spain). Annual professional caregiver costs ranged from €393 (France) to €1,242 (UK), but this only represented a small proportion of total care because much care is provided by family or friends. Sick leave costs ranged from €5,492 (UK) to €7,098 (France), with 10%–32% patients prevented from working at some point by NP. Total cost (including direct and indirect costs) of NP per patient was €10,313 in France (69% of the total cost), €14,446 in Germany (78%), €9,305 in Italy (69%), €10,597 in Spain (67%), and €9,685 in the UK (57%). Indirect costs (ie, sick leave) constituted the majority of costs in all five countries: €7,098 in France, €11,232 in Germany, €6,382 in Italy, €7,066 in Spain, and €5,492 in the UK. In the subgroup analysis, total annual direct costs per patient

  13. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain — A question of age

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the ‘default’ neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a ‘latent’ pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically ‘unexplained’ or ‘functional’ pain in adolescence. PMID:26220898

  14. Are the emergence of affective disturbances in neuropathic pain states contingent on supraspinal neuroinflammation?

    PubMed

    Fiore, Nathan T; Austin, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Neuro-immune interactions contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury. A large body of preclinical evidence supports the idea that the immune system acts to modulate the sensory symptoms of neuropathy at both peripheral and central nervous system sites. The potential involvement of neuro-immune interactions in the highly debilitating affective disturbances of neuropathic pain, such as depression, anhedonia, impaired cognition and reduced motivation has received little attention. This is surprising given the widely accepted view that sickness behaviour, depression, cognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric conditions can arise from inflammatory mechanisms. Moreover, there is a set of well-described immune-to-brain transmission mechanisms that explain how peripheral inflammation can lead to supraspinal neuroinflammation. In the last 5years increasing evidence has emerged that peripheral nerve injury induces supraspinal changes in cytokine or chemokine expression and alters glial cell activity. In this systematic review, based on strong preclinical evidence, we advance the argument that the emergence of affective disturbances in neuropathic pain states are contingent on pro-inflammatory mediators in the interconnected hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuitry that subserve affective behaviours. We explore how dysregulation of inflammatory mediators in these networks may result in affective disturbances through a wide variety of neuromodulatory mechanisms. There are also promising results from clinical trials showing that anti-inflammatory agents have efficacy in the treatment of a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions including depression and appear suited to sub-groups of patients with elevated pro-inflammatory profiles. Thus, although further research is required, aggressively targeting supraspinal pro-inflammatory mediators at critical time-points in appropriate clinical populations is likely to be a novel avenue to treat

  15. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels for neuropathic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Luo, Z. David

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) play obligatory roles in diverse physiological functions. Pathological conditions leading to changes in their biophysical properties and expression levels may cause malfunctions of VGCC mediated activities, resulting in disease states. It is believed that changes in VGCC properties under pain-inducing conditions may play a causal role in the development of chronic pain, including nerve injury-induced pain, or neuropathic pain. Over the past decades, preclinical and clinical research in developing VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain management has been fruitful, leading to some US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs currently available for chronic pain management. However, their efficacy in pain relief is limited in some patients and their long-term use is limited by their side effect profiles. Certainly, there is room for improvement in developing more subtype specific VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain conditions. In this review, we summarized the most recent preclinical and clinical studies related to chronic pain medications acting on the VGCC. We also included clinical trials aiming to expand the application of approved VGCC drugs to different pain states derived from various pathological conditions, as well as drug combination therapies trying to improve the efficacies and side effect profiles of current pain medications. PMID:19789072

  16. Differential pain modulation properties in central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Hila; Zeilig, Gabi; Laufer, Yocheved; Blumen, Nava; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    It seems that central neuropathic pain (CNP) is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain; whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution, enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. We investigated the hypothesis that CNP is associated with decreased descending pain inhibition along with increased neuronal excitability and that both traits are associated with spinothalamic tract (STT) damage. Chronic spinal cord injury subjects with CNP (n = 27) and without CNP (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 20) underwent the measurement of pain adaptation, conditioned pain modulation (CPM), tonic suprathreshold pain (TSP), and spatial summation of pain above injury level. Central neuropathic pain subjects also underwent at and below-lesion STT evaluation and completed the questionnaires. Central neuropathic pain subjects showed decreased CPM and increased enhancement of TSP compared with controls. Among CNP subjects, the dysfunction of CPM and pain adaptation correlated positively with the number of painful body regions. The magnitude of TSP and spatial summation of pain correlated positively with CNP intensity. STT scores correlated with CNP intensity and with TSP, so that the more affected the STT below injury level, the greater the CNP and TSP magnitude. It seems that CNP is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain, whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution and enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. Thus, top-down processes may determine the spread of CNP, whereas bottom-up processes may determine CNP intensity. It also seems that the mechanisms of CNP may involve STT-induced hyperexcitability. Future, longitudinal studies may investigate the timeline of this scenario. PMID:26894913

  17. Chemokines and the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    White, Fletcher A.; Jung, Hosung; Miller, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are widely expressed by cells of the immune and nervous systems. This review focuses on our current knowledge concerning the role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of chronic pain syndromes. Injury- or disease-induced changes in the expression of diverse chemokines and their receptors have been demonstrated in the neural and nonneural elements of pain pathways. Under these circumstances, chemokines have been shown to modulate the electrical activity of neurons by multiple regulatory pathways including increases in neurotransmitter release through Ca-dependent mechanisms and transactivation of transient receptor channels. Either of these mechanisms alone, or in combination, may contribute to sustained excitability of primary afferent and secondary neurons within spinal pain pathways. Another manner in which chemokines may influence sustained neuronal excitability may be their ability to function as excitatory neurotransmitters within the peripheral and central nervous system. As is the case for traditional neurotransmitters, injury-induced up-regulated chemokines are found within synaptic vesicles. Chemokines released after depolarization of the cell membrane can then act on other chemokine receptor-bearing neurons, glia, or immune cells. Because up-regulation of chemokines and their receptors may be one of the mechanisms that directly or indirectly contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain, these molecules may then represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in chronic pain states. PMID:18083844

  18. NEUROPATHIC PAIN-INDUCED DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIOR AND HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND PLASTICITY ARE DEPENDENT ON TNFR1 SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Anna, Dellarole; Paul, Morton; Roberta, Brambilla; Winston, Walters; Spencer, Summer; Danielle, Bernardes; Mariagrazia, Grilli; R, Bethea John

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: 1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and 2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1−/− mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1−/− mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1. PMID:24938671

  19. Enhanced serotonin and mesolimbic dopamine transmissions in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Aroni, Sonia; De Felice, Marta; Lecca, Salvatore; Luchicchi, Antonio; Melis, Miriam; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Romano, Rosaria; Palazzo, Enza; Guida, Francesca; Maione, Sabatino; Pistis, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In humans, affective consequences of neuropathic pain, ranging from depression to anxiety and anhedonia, severely impair quality of life and are a major disease burden, often requiring specific medications. Depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors have also been observed in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. Dysfunctions in central nervous system monoamine transmission have been hypothesized to underlie depressive and anxiety disorders in neuropathic pain. To assess whether these neurons display early changes in their activity that in the long-term might lead to chronicization, maladaptive plasticity and affective consequences, we carried out in vivo extracellular single unit recordings from serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and from dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Extracellular dopamine levels and the expression of dopamine D1, D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were measured in the nucleus accumbens. We report that, two weeks following peripheral nerve injury, discharge rate of serotonin DRN neurons and burst firing of VTA dopamine cells are enhanced, when compared with sham-operated animals. We also observed higher extracellular dopamine levels and reduced expression of D2, but not D1, receptors and TH in the nucleus accumbens. Our study confirms that peripheral neuropathy induces changes in the serotonin and dopamine systems that might be the early result of chronic maladaptation to persistent pain. The allostatic activation of these neural systems, which mirrors that already described as a consequence of stress, might lead to depression and anxiety previously observed in neuropathic animals but also an attempt to cope positively with the negative experience. PMID:26113399

  20. Mechanisms and pharmacology of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B J; Taylor, B K

    2014-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. These studies not only support the possible effectiveness of anticonvulsants, but also compel further clinical trials with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, or drugs which interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission. Future behavioral studies in EAE models are essential toward a new pharmacotherapy of multiple sclerosis pain. PMID:24590824

  1. Mechanisms and Pharmacology of Neuropathic Pain in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B.J; Taylor, BK

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of MS patients. These studies not only support the possible effectiveness of anticonvulsants, but also compel further clinical trials with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, or drugs which interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission. Future behavioral studies in EAE models are essential towards a new pharmacotherapy of multiple sclerosis pain. PMID:24590824

  2. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Harrison, E. Katherine; Menon, David K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks), and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice. PMID:26676151

  3. Activation of Corticostriatal Circuitry Relieves Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle; Manders, Toby R.; Eberle, Sarah E.; Su, Chen; D'amour, James; Yang, Runtao; Lin, Hau Yueh; Deisseroth, Karl; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits that determine the perception and modulation of pain remain poorly understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) provides top-down control of sensory and affective processes. While animal and human imaging studies have shown that the PFC is involved in pain regulation, its exact role in pain states remains incompletely understood. A key output target for the PFC is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), an important component of the reward circuitry. Interestingly, recent human imaging studies suggest that the projection from the PFC to the NAc is altered in chronic pain. The function of this corticostriatal projection in pain states, however, is not known. Here we show that optogenetic activation of the PFC produces strong antinociceptive effects in a rat model (spared nerve injury model) of persistent neuropathic pain. PFC activation also reduces the affective symptoms of pain. Furthermore, we show that this pain-relieving function of the PFC is likely mediated by projections to the NAc. Thus, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in pain regulation. PMID:25834050

  4. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  5. Capsaicinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review

    PubMed Central

    Pappagallo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is difficult. Oral pharmaceuticals have significant side effects, and treatment efficacy tends to be modest. The use of topical analgesics reduces the potential for systemic side effects and allows direct application of medications to the area of pain. The natural spicy substance, capsaicin, has historically been known for its topical use. Capsaicin, once applied to the skin, causes a brief initial sensitization followed by a prolonged desensitization of the local pain nerves. This occurs through stimulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressing pain nerve fibers. While low-dose capsaicin has not resulted in good efficacy, the larger dose 8% topical capsaicin has had some of the best data currently available in the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neuropathic conditions. This paper discusses the data currently existing for capsaicin 8% in the treatment of PHN. It further reviews data for the low-dose capsaicin products and the current status in the development of other capsaicinoids, e.g. resiniferotoxin, and high-concentration liquid capsaicin. PMID:24409200

  6. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26287242

  7. Sodium Hydrosulfide Relieves Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constriction Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-qing; Luo, Hui-qin; Lin, Cai-zhu; Chen, Jin-zhuan; Lin, Xian-zhong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant neuronal activity in injured peripheral nerves is believed to be an important factor in the development of neuropathic pain (NPP). Channel protein pCREB of that activity has been shown to mitigate the onset of associated molecular events in the nervous system, and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) could inhibit the expression of pCREB. However, whether NaHS could relieve the pain, it needs further experimental research. Furthermore, the clinical potential that NaHS was used to relieve pain was limited so it would be required. To address these issues, the rats of sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) were given intraperitoneal injection of NaHS containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The experimental results showed that NaHS inhibited the reduction of paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL), mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT), and the level of pCREB in CCI rats in a dose-dependent manner and they were greatly decreased in NaHSM group (P < 0.05). NaHS alleviates chronic neuropathic pain by inhibiting expression of pCREB in the spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:25506383

  8. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2015-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26287242

  9. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gustin, S M; Wrigley, P J; Youssef, A M; McIndoe, L; Wilcox, S L; Rae, C D; Edden, R A E; Siddall, P J; Henderson, L A

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry, and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury with 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content, and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  10. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  11. Future directions in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review on various therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Matharasala; Mishra, Ram Kumar; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2014-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by structural lesion leading to functional abnormalities in central and peripheral nervous system. Neuropathic pain in itself is not always a disease, as it arises due to consequences of other diseases like diabetes, spinal cord injury, degenerative neuronal diseases and cancer. Current strategies of neuropathic pain treatment have provided relief to the patients to some extent, but complete cure is still a distant dream. In the future, it is hoped that a combination of new and improved pharmaceutical developments combined with careful clinical trials and increased understanding of neuroplasticity will lead to improved and effective pain management strategies leading to improved quality of life. In this review we have discussed various therapeutic targets of neuropathic pain and their pathophysiological mechanisms. Current status of drugs used for treatment of neuropathic pain have also been discussed in the review. PMID:24152326

  12. Patterns of nerve injury and neuropathic pain in ischemic neuropathy after ligation-reperfusion of femoral artery in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Er; Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Ischemia is an important etiology of painful neuropathies. We generated a mouse system of ischemic neuropathy by ligation-reperfusion of the femoral artery to mimic neuropathic pain and nerve injury patterns observed clinically. Mice exhibited spontaneous neuropathic pain behaviors, which were most obvious after ischemia for 5 h. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed by post-operative day (POD) 7 and persisted through the experimental period up to POD 56. Neuropathic pain behaviors were alleviated with intraperitoneal gabapentin (50 and 100 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. Large-fiber deficit assessed with nerve conduction studies was demonstrated by reduced amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) on POD 7 (48.4% of the control side, p < 0.001). Small-fiber impairment was demonstrated by decreased epidermal nerve density (END) on POD 7 (29.1% of the control side, p < 0.001). Reductions in CMAP amplitudes and ENDs persisted through POD 56. Our system replicated the clinical manifestations of ischemic neuropathy: (1) neuropathic pain with cold and mechanical allodynia and (2) nerve injury to both large and small fibers with pathologic and physiologic evidence. This system produced by a simple procedure provides an opportunity to investigate mechanisms and further treatments of ischemic neuropathy on genetically engineered mice. PMID:22971092

  13. Capsaicin 8% Patch for Central and Peripheral Neuropathic Pain of Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Trbovich, Michelle; Yang, Huiqing

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is common and often refractory to standard treatments. The capsaicin 8% patch is a Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment of neuropathic pain in postherpetic neuralgia and has demonstrated significant efficacy in human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy. The patch defunctionalizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors, impairing cutaneous nociceptors for a prolonged period (i.e., 8-12 wks) with no systemic side effects. A retrospective review was conducted on the effects of the patch in two patients with spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain refractory to standard treatments. Two weeks after application, both patients reported complete pain relief. Average onset of relief of 4 days and average duration of relief of 197 days, requiring only one to four applications per year, paralleled findings reported in postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy trials. Upregulation of capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors after spinal cord injury has been reported. The capsaicin 8% patch is a promising therapeutic agent for neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury. PMID:26035723

  14. Neuropathic pain in aged rats: behavioral responses and astrocytic activation.

    PubMed

    Stuesse, S L; Crisp, T; McBurney, D L; Schechter, J B; Lovell, J A; Cruce, W L

    2001-03-01

    We used the Bennett and Xie (1988) model of chronic neuropathic pain to study the effect of age on thermal and tactile sensitivity and on astrocytic activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord after nerve injury. Fischer 344 FBNF1 hybrid rats in three age groups, 4-6, 14-16, and 24-26 months, were studied. Rats were either unligated (day 0, control) or the left sciatic nerve was loosely ligated to cause a chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI causes a neuropathic pain condition characterized by tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Rats were behaviorally assessed for tactile and thermal sensitivity of their ligated and unligated hind paws up to 35 days postligation. Rats were sacrificed before or at various days postligation, and activated astrocytes were identified at the L4-L5 levels of their spinal cords by use of an antibody to glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). The number of GFAP-ir astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the control, uninjured condition decreased with age (P < or = 0.001) but increased after CCI in all three age groups. After CCI, astrocytic activation in the cord was less robust in aged rats than in younger ones (P < or = 0.01). Not all the CCI rats displayed hyperalgesia to touch and to heat. Rats with an increased sensitivity to heat had increased levels of GFAP-ir in their cords; however, rats with decreased thermal sensitivity also displayed increased GFAP-ir. Thus the presence of activated astrocytes was not correlated with a single behavioral manifestation of neuropathic pain. PMID:11315551

  15. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  16. Pathophysiological implication of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Hwang, Eunjin; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial pathophysiological issue concerning central neuropathic pain is the modification of sensory processing by abnormally increased low-frequency brain rhythms. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for such abnormal rhythmicity and its relation to neuropathic pain syndrome. Toward this aim, we investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological consequences of trigeminal neuropathic pain following infraorbital nerve ligations in CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel knockout and wild-type mice. CaV3.1 knockout mice had decreased mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced low-frequency rhythms in the primary somatosensory cortex and related thalamic nuclei than wild-type mice. Lateral inhibition of gamma rhythm in primary somatosensory cortex layer 4, reflecting intact sensory contrast, was present in knockout mice but severely impaired in wild-type mice. Moreover, cross-frequency coupling between low-frequency and gamma rhythms, which may serve in sensory processing, was pronounced in wild-type mice but not in CaV3.1 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the presence of CaV3.1 channels is a key element in the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:26858455

  17. Expression of LC3 and Beclin 1 in the spinal dorsal horn following spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enji; Yi, Min-Hee; Ko, Youngkwon; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Je Hoon; Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Wonhyung; Kim, Dong Woon

    2013-06-26

    Impaired spinal GABAergic inhibitory function is known to be pivotal in neuropathic pain (NPP). At present, data concerning time-dependent alterations in cell type and cell death in the spinal dorsal horn are highly controversial, likely related to the experimental NPP model used. In this study, we examined the expression of autophagy using a L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain rat model. Following ligation of the spinal nerve, neuropathic pain behavior, such as mechanical allodynia, was induced rapidly and maintained for 14 days. After testing for mechanical allodynia, we assessed the changes in expression of LC3 and Beclin 1 in the spinal cord following SNL. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the levels of LC3 and Beclin 1 protein in the ipsilateral L5 spinal dorsal horn were significantly elevated on day 14 following SNL. Double immunohistochemical analysis further confirmed increases in LC3 and Beclin 1 in mostly neurons and a few astrocytes following SNL. LC3 and Beclin 1 expressions were upregulated in GABAergic interneurons of spinal dorsal horn after SNL, while the loss of GABAergic interneurons did not change significantly. Our results suggest that autophagic disruption in GABAergic interneurons and astrocytes following peripheral nerve injury might be involved in the induction and maintenance of neuropathic pain. PMID:23665054

  18. Inhibition of mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain by TLR5-mediated A-fiber blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kim, Yong Ho; Bang, Sangsu; Zhang, Yi; Berta, Temugin; Wang, Fan; Oh, Seog Bae; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical allodynia, induced by normally innocuous low-threshold mechanical stimulation, represents a cardinal feature of neuropathic pain. Blockade or ablation of high-threshold small-diameter unmyelinated C-fibers has limited effects on mechanical allodynia1–4. While large myelinated A-fibers, in particular Aβ-fibers, have previously been implicated in mechanical allodynia5–7, an A-fiber-selective pharmacological blocker is still lacking. Here we report a new method for targeted silencing of A-fibers in neuropathic pain. We found that Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is co-expressed with neurofilament-200 in large-diameter A-fiber neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Activation of TLR5 with its ligand flagellin results in neuronal entry of the membrane impermeable lidocaine derivative QX-314, leading to TLR5-dependent blockade of sodium currents predominantly in A-fiber neurons of mouse DRGs. Intraplantar co-application of flagellin and QX-314 (flagellin/QX-314) dose-dependently suppressed mechanical allodynia following chemotherapy, nerve injury, and diabetic neuropathy, but this blockade is abrogated in Tlr5-deficient mice. In vivo electrophysiology demonstrated that flagellin/QX-314 co-application selectively suppressed Aβ-fiber conduction in naive and chemotherapy-treated mice. TLR5-mediated Aβ blockade but not capsaicin-mediated C-fiber blockade also reduced chemotherapy-induced ongoing pain without impairing motor function. Finally, flagellin/QX-314 co-application suppressed sodium currents in large-diameter human DRG neurons. Thus, our findings provide a new tool for targeted silencing of Aβ-fibers and neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26479925

  19. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  20. Botulinum toxin for neuropathic pain and spasticity: an overview.

    PubMed

    Brown, E Alexandra; Schütz, Sonja G; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, a large body of data has surfaced reporting the therapeutic benefit of botulinum toxin injection in multiple conditions. The aim of this review is: to summarize the highest quality literature pertaining to clinical application of botulinum toxin in neuropathic pain conditions including postherpetic neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic polyneuropathy, post-traumatic neuralgia, carpal tunnel syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb and stump pain, and occipital neuralgia; to provide an overview of the clinical trials using botulinum toxin in adult spasticity; and to assign levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. In summary, there is level A evidence for established efficacy in postherpetic neuralgia and adult spasticity; level B evidence for probable efficacy in trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia; level B evidence for probable lack of efficacy in carpal tunnel syndrome; level C evidence for possible efficacy in diabetic polyneuropathy; and level U (insufficient) evidence in complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb and stump pain, and occipital neuralgia. PMID:24641437

  1. Cervico-thoracic or lumbar sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Sebastian; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review is an update on ‘Sympathectomy for neuropathic pain’ originally published in Issue 2, 2003. The concept that many neuropathic pain syndromes (traditionally this definition would include complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS)) are “sympathetically maintained pains” has historically led to treatments that interrupt the sympathetic nervous system. Chemical sympathectomies use alcohol or phenol injections to destroy ganglia of the sympathetic chain, while surgical ablation is performed by open removal or electrocoagulation of the sympathetic chain, or minimally invasive procedures using thermal or laser interruption. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of chemical and surgical sympathectomy for neuropathic pain. Sympathectomy could be compared with placebo (sham) or other active treatment. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library to May 2010. We screened references in the retrieved articles and literature reviews, and contacted experts in the field of neuropathic pain. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo or active controlled studies assessing the effects of sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and CRPS. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. No pooled analysis of data was possible. Main results Only one study satisfied our inclusion criteria, comparing percutaneous radiofrequency thermal lumbar sympathectomy with lumbar sympathetic neurolysis using phenol in 20 participants with CRPS. There was no comparison of sympathectomy versus sham or placebo. No dichotomous pain outcomes were reported. Average baseline scores of 8-9/10 on several pain scales fell to about 4/10 initially (1 day) and remained at 3-5/10 over four months. There were no significant differences between groups, except for “unpleasant sensation”, which was higher with

  2. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L H; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S

    2016-08-01

    The redefinition of neuropathic pain as "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system," which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the "definite" level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research. PMID:27115670

  3. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia. PMID:18377664

  4. Calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein upregulation in dorsal spinal cord mediates spinal cord injury induced neuropathic pain states

    PubMed Central

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Zeng, Jun; Sharp, Kelli; Kim, Donghyun; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z. David

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can dramatically impair the quality of life for SCI patients. SCI induced neuropathic pain can be manifested as both tactile allodynia (a painful sensation to a non-noxious stimulus) and or hyperalgesia (an enhanced sensation to a painful stimulus). The mechanisms underlying these pain states are poorly understood. Clinical studies have shown that gabapentin, a drug that binds to the voltage gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ-1) proteins is effective in the management of SCI induced neuropathic pain. Accordingly, we hypothesized that tactile allodynia post SCI is mediated by an upregulation of Cavα2δ-1 in dorsal spinal cord (DSC). To test this hypothesis, we examined if SCI-induced dysregulation of spinal Cavα2δ-1 plays a contributory role in below-level allodynia development in a rat spinal T9 contusion injury model. We found that Cavα2δ-1 expression levels were significantly increased in L4-6 dorsal, but not ventral, spinal cord of SCI rats that correlated with tactile allodynia development in the hindpaw plantar surface. Furthermore, both intrathecal gabapentin treatment and blocking SCI induced Cavα2δ-1 protein upregulation by intrathecal Cavα2δ-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could reverse tactile allodynia in SCI rats. These findings support that SCI induced Cavα2δ-1 upregulation in spinal dorsal horn is a key component in mediating below-level neuropathic pain development and selectively targeting this pathway may provide effective pain relief for SCI patients. PMID:21239111

  5. Cortical astrocytes rewire somatosensory cortical circuits for peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Shibata, Keisuke; Inada, Hiroyuki; Roh, Seung Eon; Kim, Sang Jeong; Moorhouse, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term treatments to ameliorate peripheral neuropathic pain that includes mechanical allodynia are limited. While glial activation and altered nociceptive transmission within the spinal cord are associated with the pathogenesis of mechanical allodynia, changes in cortical circuits also accompany peripheral nerve injury and may represent additional therapeutic targets. Dendritic spine plasticity in the S1 cortex appears within days following nerve injury; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this plasticity and whether it has a causal relationship to allodynia remain unsolved. Furthermore, it is not known whether glial activation occurs within the S1 cortex following injury or whether it contributes to this S1 synaptic plasticity. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging with genetic and pharmacological manipulations of murine models, we have shown that sciatic nerve ligation induces a re-emergence of immature metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) signaling in S1 astroglia, which elicits spontaneous somatic Ca2+ transients, synaptogenic thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) release, and synapse formation. This S1 astrocyte reactivation was evident only during the first week after injury and correlated with the temporal changes in S1 extracellular glutamate levels and dendritic spine turnover. Blocking the astrocytic mGluR5-signaling pathway suppressed mechanical allodynia, while activating this pathway in the absence of any peripheral injury induced long-lasting (>1 month) allodynia. We conclude that reawakened astrocytes are a key trigger for S1 circuit rewiring and that this contributes to neuropathic mechanical allodynia. PMID:27064281

  6. Cortical astrocytes rewire somatosensory cortical circuits for peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Inada, Hiroyuki; Roh, Seung Eon; Kim, Sang Jeong; Lee, Gihyun; Bae, Hyunsu; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Fukazawa, Yugo; Koizumi, Schuichi; Nabekura, Junichi

    2016-05-01

    Long-term treatments to ameliorate peripheral neuropathic pain that includes mechanical allodynia are limited. While glial activation and altered nociceptive transmission within the spinal cord are associated with the pathogenesis of mechanical allodynia, changes in cortical circuits also accompany peripheral nerve injury and may represent additional therapeutic targets. Dendritic spine plasticity in the S1 cortex appears within days following nerve injury; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this plasticity and whether it has a causal relationship to allodynia remain unsolved. Furthermore, it is not known whether glial activation occurs within the S1 cortex following injury or whether it contributes to this S1 synaptic plasticity. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging with genetic and pharmacological manipulations of murine models, we have shown that sciatic nerve ligation induces a re-emergence of immature metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) signaling in S1 astroglia, which elicits spontaneous somatic Ca2+ transients, synaptogenic thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) release, and synapse formation. This S1 astrocyte reactivation was evident only during the first week after injury and correlated with the temporal changes in S1 extracellular glutamate levels and dendritic spine turnover. Blocking the astrocytic mGluR5-signaling pathway suppressed mechanical allodynia, while activating this pathway in the absence of any peripheral injury induced long-lasting (>1 month) allodynia. We conclude that reawakened astrocytes are a key trigger for S1 circuit rewiring and that this contributes to neuropathic mechanical allodynia. PMID:27064281

  7. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  8. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  9. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A.; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  10. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  11. TMEM16F Regulates Spinal Microglial Function in Neuropathic Pain States.

    PubMed

    Batti, Laura; Sundukova, Mayya; Murana, Emanuele; Pimpinella, Sofia; De Castro Reis, Fernanda; Pagani, Francesca; Wang, Hong; Pellegrino, Eloisa; Perlas, Emerald; Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Ragozzino, Davide; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    Neuropathic pain is a widespread chronic pain state that results from injury to the nervous system. Spinal microglia play a causative role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain through secretion of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM16F, a protein that functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent ion channel and a phospholipid scramblase, to microglial activity during neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that mice with a conditional ablation of TMEM16F in microglia do not develop mechanical hypersensitivity upon nerve injury. In the absence of TMEM16F, microglia display deficits in process motility and phagocytosis. Moreover, loss of GABA immunoreactivity upon injury is spared in TMEM16F conditional knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate that TMEM16F is an essential component of the microglial response to injury and suggest the importance of microglial phagocytosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. PMID:27332874

  12. Ulnar nerve entrapment neuropathy at the elbow: relationship between the electrophysiological findings and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Halac, Gulistan; Topaloglu, Pinar; Demir, Saliha; Cıkrıkcıoglu, Mehmet Ali; Karadeli, Hasan Huseyin; Ozcan, Muhammet Emin; Asil, Talip

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Ulnar nerve neuropathies are the second most commonly seen entrapment neuropathies of the upper extremities after carpal tunnel syndrome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate pain among ulnar neuropathy patients by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and determine if it correlated with the severity of electrophysiologicalfindings. [Subjects and Methods] We studied 34 patients with clinical and electrophysiological ulnar nerve neuropathies at the elbow. After diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, all patients underwent the Turkish version of the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. [Results] The ulnar entrapment neuropathy at the elbow was classified as class-2, class-3, class-4, and class-5 (Padua Distal Ulnar Neuropathy classification) for 15, 14, 4, and 1 patient, respectively. No patient included in class-1 was detected. According to Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale, 24 patients scored under 12 points. The number of patients who achieved more than 12 points was 10. Groups were compared by using the χ2 test, and no difference was detected. There was no correlation between the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and electromyographic findings. [Conclusion] We found that the severity of electrophysiologic findings of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow did not differ between neuropathic and non-neuropathic groups as assessed by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. PMID:26311956

  13. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  14. Dental impaction pain model as a potential tool to evaluate drugs with efficacy in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Kotey, Paul; McGratty, Megan; Ramakrishnan, Rohini; Gottesdiener, Keith; Reicin, Alise; Wagner, John A

    2006-08-01

    Intravenous lidocaine, a nonspecific Na-channel blocker, was used to assess the dental impaction model for evaluation of neuropathic pain drugs. Sixty patients, experiencing moderate or severe pain after removal of > or = 2 third molars, were randomized (2:2:1:1) to lidocaine (4 mg/kg; maximal dose 300 mg), oxycodone/acetaminophen (10/650 mg), placebo, and active placebo (diphenhydramine, 50 mg). Lidocaine provided a modest degree of pain relief. Predefined endpoints of total pain relief and sum of pain intensity at 2, 4, and 6 hours showed numerically, not statistically significantly, greater pain relief versus placebo. A significantly greater effect over placebo was observed in peak effect and at shorter time points (30 minutes and 1 hour), consistent with the pharmacokinetic profile (plasma concentration of approximately 2 mug/mL). Oxycodone/acetaminophen provided significantly greater analgesia versus placebo, validating study conduct, and significantly greater pain relief was observed versus lidocaine, which is consistent with a smaller portion of dental extraction pain being of neuropathic origin. PMID:16855076

  15. SCN9A Variants May be Implicated in Neuropathic Pain Associated With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Pain Severity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peter; Favis, Reyna; Wickenden, Alan; Romano, Gary; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have established the role of SCN9A in various pain conditions, including idiopathic small fiber neuropathy. In the present study, we interrogate the relationship between common and rare variants in SCN9A gene and chronic neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Design: Using a cohort of 938 patients of European ancestry with chronic neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy enrolled in 6 clinical studies and 2 controls (POPRES, n=2624 and Coriell, n=1029), we examined the relationship between SCN9A variants and neuropathic pain in a case-control study using a 2-stage design. The exonic regions of SCN9A were sequenced in a subset of 244 patients with neuropathic pain, and the variants discovered were compared with POPRES control (stage 1). The top associated variants were followed up by genotyping in the entire case collection and Coriell controls restricting the analysis to the matching patients from the United States and Canada only (stage 2). Results: Seven variants were found to be associated with neuropathic pain at the sequencing stage. Four variants (Asp1908Gly, Val991Leu/Met932Leu, and an intronic variant rs74449889) were confirmed by genotyping to occur at a higher frequency in cases than controls (odds ratios ∼2.1 to 2.6, P=0.05 to 0.009). Val991Leu/Met932Leu was also associated with the severity of pain as measured by pain score Numeric Rating Scale (NRS-11, P=0.047). Val991Leu/Met932Leu variants were in complete linkage disequilibrium and previously shown to cause hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Conclusions: The association of SCN9A variants with neuropathic pain and pain severity suggests a role of SCN9A in the disease etiology of neuropathic pain. PMID:25585270

  16. Cannabinoids as Pharmacotherapies for Neuropathic Pain: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Elizabeth J.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multiple sclerosis (MS), and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB1/CB2 agonists, CB2-selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e. inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Δ9-THC analogs (e.g. Marinol®, Cesamet®) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Δ9-THC and cannabidiol (e.g. Sativex®, Cannador®) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e. rating scales) and objective (i.e. stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  17. Suppression of microRNA-155 attenuates neuropathic pain by regulating SOCS1 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Yang, Jun; Xiang, Kai; Tan, Qindong; Guo, Qulian

    2015-03-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is an unfavourable pathological pain characterised by allodynia and hyperalgesia which has brought considerable trouble to people's physical and mental health, but effective therapeutics are still lacking. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in the development of neuropathic pain and neuronal inflammation. Among various miRNAs, miR-155 has been widely studied. It is intensively involved in regulating inflammation-associated diseases. However, the role of miR-155 in regulating neuropathic pain development is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether miR-155 is associated with neuropathic pain and delineate the underlying mechanism. Using a neuropathic pain model of chronic constriction injury (CCI), miR-155 expression levels were markedly increased in the spinal cord. Inhibition of miR-155 significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and proinflammatory cytokine expression. We also demonstrated that miR-155 directly bound with the 3'-untranslated region of the suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1). The expression of SOCS1 significantly decreased in the CCI rat model, but this effect could be reversed by miR-155 inhibition. Furthermore, knockdown of SOCS1 abrogated the inhibitory effects of miR-155 inhibition on neuropathic development and neuronal inflammation. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of miR-155 resulted in the suppression of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by mediating SOCS1. Our data demonstrate the critical role of miR-155 in regulating neuropathic pain through SOCS1, and suggest that miR-155 may be an important and potential target in preventing neuropathic pain development. PMID:25488154

  18. Brain anatomy changes associated with persistent neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gustin, S M; Wrigley, P J; Siddall, P J; Henderson, L A

    2010-06-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain commonly occurs following spinal cord injury (SCI). It remains one of the most challenging management problems in this condition. In order to develop more effective treatments, a better understanding of the neural changes associated with neuropathic SCI pain is required. The aim of this investigation was to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine if persistent neuropathic pain following SCI is associated with changes in regional brain anatomy and connectivity. In 23 subjects with complete thoracic SCI, 12 with below-level neuropathic pain and 11 without pain, and 45 healthy control subjects, a series of whole-brain DTI scans were performed. The mean diffusivity (MD) of each voxel was calculated and values compared between groups. This analysis revealed that neuropathic pain following SCI is associated with significant differences in regional brain anatomy. These anatomical changes were located in pain-related regions as well as regions of the classic reward circuitry, that is, the nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and posterior parietal cortices. The right posterior parietal cortex projected to most regions that displayed an anatomical change. Analysis of the fiber tracts connecting areas of MD differences revealed no significance differences in MD values between the SCI pain, SCI no pain, and control groups. PMID:19815621

  19. An inhibitor of neuronal exocytosis (DD04107) displays long-lasting in vivo activity against chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ponsati, Berta; Carreño, Cristina; Curto-Reyes, Verdad; Valenzuela, Belen; Duart, María José; Van den Nest, Wim; Cauli, Omar; Beltran, Beatriz; Fernandez, Jimena; Borsini, Franco; Caprioli, Antonio; Di Serio, Stefano; Veretchy, Mario; Baamonde, Ana; Menendez, Luis; Barros, Francisco; de la Pena, Pilar; Borges, Ricardo; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Small peptides patterned after the N terminus of the synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a member of the protein complex implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent neuronal exocytosis, inhibit in vitro the release of neuromodulators involved in pain signaling, suggesting an in vivo analgesic activity. Here, we report that compound DD04107 (palmitoyl-EEMQRR-NH(2)), a 6-mer palmitoylated peptide that blocks the inflammatory recruitment of ion channels to the plasma membrane of nociceptors and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from primary sensory neurons, displays potent and long-lasting in vivo antihyperalgesia and antiallodynia in chronic models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, such as the complete Freund's adjuvant, osteosarcoma, chemotherapy, and diabetic neuropathic models. Subcutaneous administration of the peptide produced a dose-dependent antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic activity that lasted ≥24 h. The compound showed a systemic distribution, characterized by a bicompartmental pharmacokinetic profile. Safety pharmacology studies indicated that the peptide is largely devoid of side effects and substantiated that the in vivo activity is not caused by locomotor impairment. Therefore, DD04107 is a potent and long-lasting antinociceptive compound that displays a safe pharmacological profile. These findings support the notion that neuronal exocytosis of receptors and neuronal algogens pivotally contribute to chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain and imply a central role of peptidergic nociceptor sensitization to the pathogenesis of pain. PMID:22393248

  20. N-acetyl-cysteine attenuates neuropathic pain by suppressing matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajie; Xu, Lujie; Deng, Xueting; Jiang, Chunyi; Pan, Cailong; Chen, Lu; Han, Yuan; Dai, Wenling; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Guangqin; Cheng, Zhixiang; Liu, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain remains a clinical challenge because of its unclear mechanisms and broad clinical morbidity. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 have previously been described as key components in neuropathic pain because of their facilitation of inflammatory cytokine maturation and induction of neural inflammation. Therefore, the inhibition of MMPs may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of neuropathic pain. In this study, we report that N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which is a broadly used respiratory drug, significantly attenuates neuropathic pain through a unique mechanism of MMP inhibition. Both the in vitro (0.1 mM) and in vivo application of NAC significantly suppressed the activity of MMP-9/2. Orally administered NAC (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) not only postponed the occurrence but also inhibited the maintenance of chronic constrictive injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The administration of NAC blocked the maturation of interleukin-1β, which is a critical substrate of MMPs, and markedly suppressed the neuronal activation induced by CCI, including inhibiting the phosphorylation of protein kinase Cγ, NMDAR1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Finally, NAC significantly inhibited CCI-induced microglia activation but elicited no notable effects on astrocytes. These results demonstrate an effective and safe approach that has been used clinically to alleviate neuropathic pain through the powerful inhibition of the activation of MMPs. PMID:27075430

  1. Nerve Regenerative Effects of GABA-B Ligands in a Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Erica; Pajardi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral somatosensory system. It may be associated with allodynia and increased pain sensitivity. Few studies correlated neuropathic pain with nerve morphology and myelin proteins expression. Our aim was to test if neuropathic pain is related to nerve degeneration, speculating whether the modulation of peripheral GABA-B receptors may promote nerve regeneration and decrease neuropathic pain. We used the partial sciatic ligation- (PSL-) induced neuropathic model. The biochemical, morphological, and behavioural outcomes of sciatic nerve were analysed following GABA-B ligands treatments. Simultaneous 7-days coadministration of baclofen (10 mg/kg) and CGP56433 (3 mg/kg) alters tactile hypersensitivity. Concomitantly, specific changes of peripheral nerve morphology, nerve structure, and myelin proteins (P0 and PMP22) expression were observed. Nerve macrophage recruitment decreased and step coordination was improved. The PSL-induced changes in nociception correlate with altered nerve morphology and myelin protein expression. Peripheral synergic effects, via GABA-B receptor activation, promote nerve regeneration and likely ameliorate neuropathic pain. PMID:25165701

  2. Neuropathic Pain Is Constitutively Suppressed in Early Life by Anti-Inflammatory Neuroimmune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Rebecca; Berta, Temugin; Old, Elizabeth; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can trigger neuropathic pain in adults but not in infants; indeed, for unknown reasons, neuropathic pain is rare before adolescence. We show here that the absence of neuropathic pain response in infant male rats and mice following nerve injury is due to an active, constitutive immune suppression of dorsal horn pain activity. In contrast to adult nerve injury, which triggers a proinflammatory immune response in the spinal dorsal horn, infant nerve injury triggers an anti-inflammatory immune response, characterized by significant increases in IL-4 and IL-10. This immediate anti-inflammatory response can also be evoked by direct C-fiber nerve stimulation in infant, but not adult, mice. Blockade of the anti-inflammatory activity with intrathecal anti-IL10 unmasks neuropathic pain behavior in infant nerve injured mice, showing that pain hypersensitivity in young mice is actively suppressed by a dominant anti-inflammatory neuroimmune response. As infant nerve injured mice reach adolescence (postnatal day 25–30), the dorsal horn immune profile switches from an anti-inflammatory to a proinflammatory response characterized by significant increases in TNF and BDNF, and this is accompanied by a late onset neuropathic pain behavior and increased dorsal horn cell sensitivity to cutaneous mechanical and cold stimuli. These findings show that neuropathic pain following early life nerve injury is not absent but suppressed by neuroimmune activity and that “latent” pain can still emerge at adolescence, when the neuroimmune profile changes. The data may explain why neuropathic pain is rare in young children and also why it can emerge, for no observable reason, in adolescent patients. PMID:25589741

  3. Drug design for neuropathic pain regulation from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Tou, Weng Ieong; Chang, Su-Sen; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2013-01-01

    FAAH-like anandamide transporter (FLAT) regulates anandamide transport for hydrolysis and may be an attractive drug target for pain regulation. We aimed to discover potential FLAT antagonists from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) using virtual screening, ligand-based drug design and molecular dynamics simulation (MD). Guineensine and Retrofractamide A exhibited high Dock Scores in FLAT. Consensus from multiple linear regression (MLR; R(2) = 08973) and support vector machine (SVM; R(2) = 0.7988) showed similar bioactivities for Guineensine and the FAAH-1 inhibitor (9Z)-1-(5-pyridin-2-yl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)octadec-9-en-1-one. Contour of Guineensine to CoMFA and CoMSIA features also imply bioactivity. MD revealed shake or vibration in the secondary structure of FLAT complexed with Guineensine and (9Z)-1-(5-pyridin-2-yl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)octadec-9-en-1-one. Ligand movement might contribute to protein changes leading to vibration patterns. Violent vibrations leading to an overall decrease in FLAT function could be the underlying mechanism for Guineensine. Here we suggest Guineensine as a drug-like compound with potential application in relieving neuropathic pain by inhibiting FLAT. PMID:23378894

  4. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain in Radiotherapy Oncology Units

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana; Monroy, Jose Luis; Ramos, Avelino Alia; Cano, Carmen; Lopez-Gomez, Vanessa; Masramon, Xavier; Perez, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients severely impacts quality of life. Radiotherapy (RT) may cause NP, and at the same time, cancer patients visit RT units for pain relief. NP prevalence at these sites and current analgesic treatment should be assessed to improve management. Methods and Materials: This epidemiological, prospective, multicenter study was undertaken to assess NP prevalence, according to Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions questtionaire (DN4) test results, and analgesic management in cancer pain patients visiting RT oncologic units. Secondary analyses assessed NP etiology and pain intensity (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form) and impact (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study [MOS] for Sleep, and the Health Survey Short Form-12). Results: A total of 1,098 patients with any kind of pain were registered. NP prevalence was 31.1% (95% confidence interval, 28.4%--33.9%); 291 NP patients (mean age, 62.2 {+-}12.5 years and 57.7% men) were eligible for study; 49% of patients were overweight. The most frequent tumors were those of breast and lung, and stage IIIB was the most common cancer stage. The tumors caused 75% of NP cases. Anxiety, sleepiness, and depression were common. At 8 weeks, pain intensity and interference with daily activities decreased significantly for 50.8% of responders. Depression and anxiety (p < 0.0001) scores on the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary measures (p < 0.0001) and all MOS-Sleep subscales, except for snoring, improved significantly. The percentage of satisfied patients increased from 13.8% to 87.4% (p < 0.0001) with the current analgesic treatment, which meant a 1.2- and 6-fold increase (p < 0.0001) in narcotic analgesics and anticonvulsants, respectively, compared to previous treatment. Conclusions: NP is highly prevalent at RT oncology units, with sleepiness, anxiety, and depression as frequent comorbidities. There is a need to improve

  5. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  6. [Neuropathic pain intensity depends on the degree of peripheral nerve injury in the rat].

    PubMed

    Abuduhadeer, Tayier

    2004-12-01

    Partial peripheral nerve injury produces a persistent neuropathic pain which is difficult to relieve. In order to determine whether different degrees of peripheral nerve injury are related with the severity of neuropathic pain, we examined pain-related behaviors, histological changes and NGF in the skin in rats treated with different types of spinal nerve injury: tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, incomplete ligation of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves. In all model rats, the thresholds of paw withdrawal in response to mechanical and heat stimuli began to decrease on the injured side 1 day after the operation, and the decreases in the thresholds persisted for more than 1 month. Incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves caused more severe allodynia and hyperalgesia than tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve on the injured side. In rats treated with incomplete crush, the threshold of withdrawal response to mechanical or heat stimuli was improved on day 32 after the operation as compared with that on day 15. Histological analysis revealed that about 80% of the fibers in the sciatic nerve were injured after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves on day 15, while about 50% of the fibers were damaged by tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve. In accordance with pain-relieving, the sciatic nerve fibers regenerated to about 50% of the number of the intact sciatic nerve fibers on day 32 in the crush model. Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the skin of the hindpaw on the injured side was accumulated after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves, but not tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, on day 15 after the operation, possibly due to impairment of transport via unmyelinated primary afferents. Regeneration of the sciatic nerve alleviated the accumulation of NGF in the injured side hindpaw

  7. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain. PMID:27087602

  8. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain. PMID:25539034

  9. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  10. Botulinum toxin A relieved neuropathic pain in a case of post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsu-Tang; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Kao, Ming-Chang; Hu, Jenkin S

    2006-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) has been widely used in many clinical disorders including migraine, cervical dystonia, etc. The use of BTX-A in neuropathic pain, however, is uncommon, and the application of the anti-nociceptive effect of botulinum toxin is emerging. Here we report a case of an 80-year-old man who suffered from severe pain of post-herpetic neuralgia which was refractory to the usual therapies. However, this neuropathic pain was dramatically relieved by multiple BTX-A injection and the pain relief lasted 52 days. PMID:16533208

  11. Psychometric Validation of the Japanese Version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Sumitani, Masahiko; Oshima, Yasushi; Tonosu, Juichi; Kato, So; Ohya, Junichi; Oichi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Naoki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI-J). Design Cross-sectional study design. Subjects and Methods The original Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) was translated into Japanese according to published guidelines. Subsequently, an observational study of 60 Japanese patients suffering from neuropathic pain was performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the NPSI-J. Results The NPSI-J exhibited a statistically significant correlation with pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale). The Cronbach alpha value for Likert items was 0.86. Using the test–retest analysis method, the intraclass correlation coefficient between the two scores was 0.81. Factor analysis revealed that the main component of NPSI-J comprised three determinative factors. Conclusions The NPSI-J is a reliable and valid pain assessment tool. PMID:26600240

  12. Effectiveness of tizanidine in neuropathic pain: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Semenchuk, M R; Sherman, S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research trial is to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of tizanidine in neuropathic pain. In an open-label study, patients with neuropathic pain received 1 to 4 mg of tizanidine once daily for 7 days, followed by weekly dose escalation of 2 to 8 mg to his/her effective or maximum tolerated dose or a maximum of 36 mg over an 8-week period. Treatment effects were assessed, using average weekly pain scores as well as biweekly scores for patient global assessment of pain relief, the neuropathic pain scale, and wisconsin brief pain inventory. Frequency and severity of adverse events were examined also. Twenty-three patients were enrolled. The mean average weekly pain score at baseline was 6.9, which decreased by 1.7 points at the end of week 8 to 5.2 (p < or =.01). A total of 15 patients (68%) reported that their pain relief was improved or much improved with tizanidine therapy, and 2 of these patients became completely pain-free. The following neuropathic pain qualities were significantly lower at week 8 compared with baseline: intense, sharp, hot, dull, cold, sensitive, unpleasant, and deep pain. There was a significant decline in pain quantity and interference of pain on quality of life from baseline to week 8. The mean effective or maximum tolerated dose was 23 mg/day (range 6 to 36 mg/day). Side effects consisted primarily of dizziness/lightheadedness (52%), drowsiness (48%), fatigue/weakness (43%), dry mouth (39%), gastrointestinal upset (30%), and sleep difficulty (22%). One patient developed significant elevation in liver function tests (LFTS) With symptoms at week 4. Tizanidine therapy was discontinued. LFTS returned to normal in 3 weeks. Tizanidine might be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain, offering an alternative for patients poorly responsive to other medications. A larger, randomized placebo-controlled trial is recommended. In addition, comparative studies with alternative agents should be sought. PMID:14622612

  13. Neuropathic pain: an updated grading system for research and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haroutounian, Simon; Kamerman, Peter; Baron, Ralf; Bennett, David L.H.; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freeman, Roy; Hansson, Per; Nurmikko, Turo; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Serra, Jordi; Smith, Blair H.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Jensen, Troels S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The redefinition of neuropathic pain as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system,” which was suggested by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Special Interest Group on Neuropathic Pain (NeuPSIG) in 2008, has been widely accepted. In contrast, the proposed grading system of possible, probable, and definite neuropathic pain from 2008 has been used to a lesser extent. Here, we report a citation analysis of the original NeuPSIG grading paper of 2008, followed by an analysis of its use by an expert panel and recommendations for an improved grading system. As of February, 2015, 608 eligible articles in Scopus cited the paper, 414 of which cited the neuropathic pain definition. Of 220 clinical studies citing the paper, 56 had used the grading system. The percentage using the grading system increased from 5% in 2009 to 30% in 2014. Obstacles to a wider use of the grading system were identified, including (1) questions about the relative significance of confirmatory tests, (2) the role of screening tools, and (3) uncertainties about what is considered a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution. Here, we present a revised grading system with an adjusted order, better reflecting clinical practice, improvements in the specifications, and a word of caution that even the “definite” level of neuropathic pain does not always indicate causality. In addition, we add a table illustrating the area of pain and sensory abnormalities in common neuropathic pain conditions and propose areas for further research. PMID:27115670

  14. Use of naturally occurring peptides for neuropathic spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by intractable pain as well as loss of motor and visceral control. As part of an overall strategy in patient rehabilitation and improvement in quality of life, pain management is crucial. Interestingly, SCI patients report pain below the level of injury that has characteristics of neuropathic-type pain. Preclinical studies suggest that a key substrate that underlies the symptoms of neuropathic pain such as spontaneous pain and below-level cutaneous hypersensitivity is aberrant activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. While pharmacotherapies for peripheral neuropathic pain exist, these treatments may lead to adverse side effects in SCI patients, such as muscle weakness and constipation, which may exacerbate existing dysfunctions. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies are needed. One way to limit the adverse effects associated with systemically administered drugs is intrathecal delivery. Intrathecal delivery also directs drug to dorsal horn neurons. Another way to reduce the severity of side effects and to potentially enhance drug efficacy is to utilize combination drug therapy. While the conopeptide ziconotide has demonstrated clinical efficacy for severe chronic pain, a limitation of this drug is its potential for significant side effects. Combinations of conopeptides with currently available drugs as well as with other conopeptides could be an effective means of reducing neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:23721309

  15. The painDETECT project - far more than a screening tool on neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas R; Gockel, Ulrich; Baron, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Background and objectives The painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), a simple and reliable screening questionnaire of neuropathic pain, was developed in 2004 in cooperation with the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. The initial aim was to implement quality management and to improve the situation of neuropathic pain (NeP) patients in Germany. The PD-Q proved immediately successful and was translated into and validated in multiple languages. Subsequently a comprehensive electronic system (PD) comprising various validated questionnaires with regard to pain typical comorbidities, such as function, sleep, mood or anxiety, was implemented Germany wide. We aimed to provide a comprehensive overview about the development and validation as well as the application of the PD-Q in various clinical conditions. Methods This overview is based on a literature search on English full-text papers using the term 'painDETECT' in Medline and PubMed covering the time period from 2006 to September 2015, amended with further publications cited in the retrieved publications or provided by the questionnaire developers. Results PD-Q as screening tool for NeP described in patients with lower back pain (8 studies), rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (10), thoracotomy (2 studies), tumor diseases (4 studies), fibromyalgia (4 studies), diverse musculoskeletal conditions (12 studies) and diverse other conditions (10 studies). In addition, the PD-Q was used in 9 studies that investigated the effect of drugs for the treatment of patients with a NeP component. Conclusion To date more than 300,000 patients were assessed, providing the basis for one of the world's largest datasets for chronic pain. Among others the extensive pool of PD-Q data triggered the idea of subgrouping patients on the basis of their individual sensory profiles which might in the future lead to a stratified treatment approach and ultimately to personalized therapy. Started as a healthcare utilization project in Germany

  16. HCN2 ion channels: basic science opens up possibilities for therapeutic intervention in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Mooney, Elizabeth R; McNaughton, Peter A

    2016-09-15

    Nociception - the ability to detect painful stimuli - is an invaluable sense that warns against present or imminent damage. In patients with chronic pain, however, this warning signal persists in the absence of any genuine threat and affects all aspects of everyday life. Neuropathic pain, a form of chronic pain caused by damage to sensory nerves themselves, is dishearteningly refractory to drugs that may work in other types of pain and is a major unmet medical need begging for novel analgesics. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN)-modulated ion channels are best known for their fundamental pacemaker role in the heart; here, we review data demonstrating that the HCN2 isoform acts in an analogous way as a 'pacemaker for pain', in that its activity in nociceptive neurons is critical for the maintenance of electrical activity and for the sensation of chronic pain in pathological pain states. Pharmacological block or genetic deletion of HCN2 in sensory neurons provides robust pain relief in a variety of animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any effect on normal sensation of acute pain. We discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of neuropathic pain pathogenesis, and we outline possible future opportunities for the development of efficacious and safe pharmacotherapies in a range of chronic pain syndromes. PMID:27621481

  17. Pain assessment in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Peter; Cunningham, Emma

    2014-09-01

    Pain may adversely affect cognition through its effects on mood and sleep, and chronic pain has been associated with brain atrophy. Studies suggest that chronic pain is undertreated in cognitively impaired people. Pain assessment should involve direct enquiry with the patient; where this is not possible, a proxy history from a caregiver or nurse should be obtained, and observational scales may also be useful. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 1, Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the Web site: http://www.paineurope.com, at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication. PMID:25166774

  18. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:27512368

  19. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:27512368

  20. Successful use of flupirtine in refractory neuropathic pain due to small fiber neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Seema; Choudhary, Prakash; Joshi, Saurabh; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2013-02-01

    Small fiber neuropathy typically involves the small diameter nerve fibers, is usually idiopathic, and presents with peripheral pain. It can be excruciatingly painful at times despite the best of treatments. We present the case of a 22-year-old postoperative case of right frontoparietal oligodendroglioma who received multiple drugs for his severe neuropathic pain without significant relief. However, the pain almost completely subsided once flupirtine was added and substituted for some of the currently recommended first-line drugs. PMID:22495792

  1. Discovery of tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Deekshith, Vanamala; Semwal, Arvind; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2014-02-01

    A series of tetrahydropyridopyrimidine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for neurotoxicity and peripheral analgesic activity followed by assessment of antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic potential in two peripheral neuropathic pain models, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) and partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). Compounds (4b and 4d) exhibiting promising efficacies in four behavioral assays of allodynia and hyperalgesia (spontaneous pain, tactile allodynia, cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia) were quantified for their ED50 values (15.12-65.10mg/kg). Studies carried out to assess the underlying mechanism revealed that the compounds suppressed the inflammatory component of the neuropathic pain and prevented oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:24368171

  2. Progesterone modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Coronel, María F; Raggio, María C; Adler, Natalia S; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana L

    2016-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), still refractory to conventional treatment. Glial cell activation and cytokine production contribute to the pathology of central neuropathic syndromes. In this study we evaluated the effects of progesterone, a neuroactive steroid, on pain development and the spinal expression of IL-1β, its receptors (IL-1RI and IL-1RII) and antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-6 and TNFα, and NR1 subunit of NMDAR. Our results show that progesterone, by modulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuronal IL-1RI/NR1 colocalization, emerges as a promising agent to prevent chronic pain after SCI. PMID:26943964

  3. Neuroactive steroids, nociception and neuropathic pain: A flashback to go forward.

    PubMed

    Coronel, María F; Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana L

    2016-06-01

    The present review discusses the potential role of neurosteroids/neuroactive steroids in the regulation of nociceptive and neuropathic pain, and recapitulates the current knowledge on the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pain, especially those occurring at the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, a crucial site for nociceptive processing. We will make special focus on progesterone and its derivative allopregnanolone, which have been shown to exert remarkable actions in order to prevent or reverse the maladaptive changes and pain behaviors that arise after nervous system damage in various experimental neuropathic conditions. PMID:27091763

  4. Expression profiling of genes modulated by minocycline in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are constantly being studied to create new opportunities to prevent or alleviate neuropathic pain. The aim of our study was to determine the gene expression changes induced by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) that are modulated by minocycline, which can effectively diminish neuropathic pain in animal studies. The genes associated with minocycline efficacy in neuropathic pain should provide insight into the etiology of neuropathic pain and identify novel therapeutic targets. Results We screened the ipsilateral dorsal part of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat CCI model for differentially expressed genes. Out of 22,500 studied transcripts, the abundance levels of 93 transcripts were altered following sciatic nerve ligation. Percentage analysis revealed that 54 transcripts were not affected by the repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.), but the levels of 39 transcripts were modulated following minocycline treatment. We then selected two gene expression patterns, B1 and B2. The first transcription pattern, B1, consisted of 10 mRNA transcripts that increased in abundance after injury, and minocycline treatment reversed or inhibited the effect of the injury; the B2 transcription pattern consisted of 7 mRNA transcripts whose abundance decreased following sciatic nerve ligation, and minocycline treatment reversed the effect of the injury. Based on the literature, we selected seven genes for further analysis: Cd40, Clec7a, Apobec3b, Slc7a7, and Fam22f from pattern B1 and Rwdd3 and Gimap5 from pattern B2. Additionally, these genes were analyzed using quantitative PCR to determine the transcriptional changes strongly related to the development of neuropathic pain; the ipsilateral DRGs (L4-L6) were also collected and analyzed in these rats using qPCR. Conclusion In this work, we confirmed gene expression alterations previously identified by microarray analysis in the spinal cord and

  5. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries: epidemiological findings, neuropathic pain and quality of life in 158 patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Mondelli, Mauro; Logullo, Francesco; Grimaldi, Serena; Battiston, Bruno; Sard, Arman; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Faccani, Giuliano; Cocito, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) epidemiological analysis of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries; (2) assessment of neuropathic pain and quality of life in patients affected by traumatic neuropathies. All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of traumatic neuropathies from four Italian centres were enrolled. Electromyography confirmed clinical level and site diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. All patients were evaluated by disability scales, pain screening tools, and quality of life tests. 158 consecutive patients for a total of 211 traumatic neuropathies were analysed. The brachial plexus was a frequent site of traumatic injury (36%) and the radial, ulnar, and peroneal were the most commonly involved nerves with 15% of iatrogenic injuries. Seventy-two percent of the traumatic neuropathies were painful. Pain was present in 66% and neuropathic pain in 50% of all patients. Patients had worse quality of life scores than did the healthy Italian population. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between the quality of life and the severity of the pain, particularly neuropathic pain (Short Form-36 [SF-36] p < 0.005; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] p < 0.0001). Traumatic neuropathies were more frequent in young males after road accidents, mainly in the upper limbs. Severe neuropathic pain and not only disability contributed to worsening the quality of life in patients with traumatic neuropathies. PMID:20626775

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  8. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Results Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Conclusions We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. PMID:27030724

  9. Atypical odontalgia--a form of neuropathic pain that emulates dental pain.

    PubMed

    Markman, Stanley; Howard, Jennifer; Quek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    In order for the neuropathic pain associated with AO to occur in the oral or facial area, a deafferentation process must be initiated as previously explained. Deafferentation happens when there is a trauma to tissues including, but not limited to, endodontic therapy, a surgical extraction or even a simple one, a deep scaling, an injurious dental injection, and even the placement of a crown. Thankfully, most patients heal uneventfully. Apparently a small percentage of patients have a genetic predisposition to deafferentation pain. In reviewing articles on this subject, there is often material about the inadvertent dental treatment of patients with AO. Many patients often have undergone numerous invasive procedures in an effort to ameliorate pain. It is not possible to read a research paper about AO without reading about the recurrent theme of either overtreatment or unnecessary treatment. Caution should be exercised when performing endodontic therapy solely for the relief of pain without objective need for such therapy. It is common for the AO patient to undergo many other irreversible dental treatments with no resolution of pain symptoms. When the dentist encounters a patient in pain for which there is no dental connection, he or she should strongly consider referring the patient to a facility or practitioner who has expertise in dealing with the non-dental source of dental pain. PMID:18856179

  10. Simvastatin Attenuates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting the RhoA/LIMK/Cofilin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Chen, W Y; Wang, Z Y; Liu, F; Wei, M; Ma, C; Huang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs due to deleterious changes in the nervous system caused by a lesion or dysfunction. Currently, neuropathic pain management is unsatisfactory and remains a challenge in clinical practice. Studies have suggested that actin cytoskeleton remodeling may be associated with neural plasticity and may involve a nociceptive mechanism. Here, we found that the RhoA/LIM kinase (LIMK)/cofilin pathway, which regulates actin dynamics, was activated after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Treatments that reduced RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activity, including simvastatin, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and the synthetic peptide Tat-S3, attenuated actin filament disruption in the dorsal root ganglion and CCI-induced neuropathic pain. Over-activation of the cytoskeleton caused by RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activation may produce a scaffold for the trafficking of nociceptive signaling factors, leading to chronic neuropathic pain. Here, we found that simvastatin significantly decreased the ratio of membrane/cytosolic RhoA, which was significantly increased after CCI, by inhibiting the RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway. This effect was highly dependent on the function of the cytoskeleton as a scaffold for signal trafficking. We conclude that simvastatin attenuated neuropathic pain in rats subjected to CCI by inhibiting actin-mediated intracellular trafficking to suppress RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activity. PMID:27216618

  11. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  12. Attenuation of neuropathic pain by saikosaponin a in a rat model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Hong; Xu, Dedong; Yin, Qing; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Lei; Song, Shasha; Zhang, Mengyuan

    2014-11-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, the effective treatment of patients suffering from neuropathic pain remains challenging. Saikosaponin a possesses anti-inflammatory activity. However, the role of saikosaponin a in neuropathic pain is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of saikosaponin a on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After CCI, rats were administered saikosaponin a (6.25, 12.50 and 25.00 mg/kg intraperitoneal, once daily) for 14 days. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were assessed before surgery and on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. Our results showed that CCI significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency on days 1, 3, 7 and 14, as compared with sham groups, however, saikosaponin a reversed this effects. In addition, saikosaponin a inhibited CCI-induced the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 in spinal cord. Western blot analysis demonstrated that saikosaponin a reduced the elevated expression of p-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB in the spinal cord induced by CCI. These results suggest that saikosaponin a could effectively attenuate neuropathic pain in CCI rats by inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in spinal cord. PMID:25107300

  13. Neuronal-derived Ccl7 drives neuropathic pain by promoting astrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Bin Chang; Huang, Xia Xiao; Li, Yang; Li, Li Ya; Xu, Qin Xue; Gao, Yan; Liu, Yingju; Luo, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that peripheral nerve injury converts resting spinal cord astroglial cells into an activated state, which is required for the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms of how resting astrocytes are activated after nerve injury remain largely unknown. Astroglial cell proliferation and activation could be affected by endogenous factors including chemokines, growth factors, and neurotropic factor. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (Ccl7) is essential in facilitating the development of neuropathic pain; however, the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we found that Ccl7 promoted astrocyte proliferation and thus contributed toward neuropathic pain. Spinal nerve ligation increased the expression in the spinal cord of neuronal Ccl7. Behavioral analyses showed that knockdown of Ccl7 alleviated spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain. Further in-vitro study showed that neuronal-derived Ccl7 was sufficient for the proliferation and activation of astroglial cells. We found a novel mechanism of Ccl7 stimulating the proliferation and activation of spinal cord astrocytes that contributes toward neuropathic pain. PMID:27295026

  14. Persistent post-surgical pain and neuropathic pain after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I; Triantafilidou, Triantafilia; Ververidis, Athanasios; Agelopoulou, Cristina; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of persistent post-surgical pain (PPSP) and neuropathic pain (NP) after total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published until December 2014 in English language. Published articles were included if they referred to pain that lasts at least 3 mo after primary TKR for knee osteoarthritis, and measured pain with pain specific instruments. Studies that referred to pain caused by septic reasons and implant malalignment were excluded. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included and only 14 studies that match the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. RESULTS: The included studies were characterized by the heterogeneity on the scales used to measure pain and pre-operative factors related to PPSP and NP. The reported prevalence of PPSP and NP seems to be relatively high, but it varies among different studies. There is also evidence that the prevalence of post-surgical pain is related to the scale used for pain measurement. The prevalence of PPSP is ranging at 6 mo from 16% to 39% and at 12 mo from 13.1% to 23% and even 38% of the patients. The prevalence of NP at 6 mo post-operatively is ranging from 5.2% to 13%. Pre-operative factors related to the development of PPSP also differ, including emotional functioning, such as depression and pain catastrophizing, number of comorbidities, pain problems elsewhere and operations in knees with early grade of osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: No firm conclusions can be reached regarding the prevalence of PPSP and NP and the related factors due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26301182

  15. Neuropathic ocular pain: an important yet underevaluated feature of dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Galor, A; Levitt, R C; Felix, E R; Martin, E R; Sarantopoulos, C D

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye has gained recognition as a public health problem given its prevalence, morbidity, and cost implications. Dry eye can have a variety of symptoms including blurred vision, irritation, and ocular pain. Within dry eye-associated ocular pain, some patients report transient pain whereas others complain of chronic pain. In this review, we will summarize the evidence that chronicity is more likely to occur in patients with dysfunction in their ocular sensory apparatus (ie, neuropathic ocular pain). Clinical evidence of dysfunction includes the presence of spontaneous dysesthesias, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and corneal nerve morphologic and functional abnormalities. Both peripheral and central sensitizations likely play a role in generating the noted clinical characteristics. We will further discuss how evaluating for neuropathic ocular pain may affect the treatment of dry eye-associated chronic pain. PMID:25376119

  16. A preliminary report on stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, E Russell; Karsten, Elisabeth; Flood, John; Lilischkis, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown in animal models to attenuate chronic neuropathic pain. This preliminary study investigated if: i) injections of autologous MSCs can reduce human neuropathic pain and ii) evaluate the safety of the procedure. Methods Ten subjects with symptoms of neuropathic trigeminal pain underwent liposuction. The lipoaspirate was digested with collagenase and washed with saline three times. Following centrifugation, the stromal vascular fraction was resuspended in saline, and then transferred to syringes for local injections into the pain fields. Outcome measures at 6 months assessed reduction in: i) pain intensity measured by standard numerical rating scale from 0–10 and ii) daily dosage requirements of antineuropathic pain medication. Results Subjects were all female (mean age 55.3 years ± standard deviation [SD] 14.67; range 27–80 years) with pain symptoms lasting from 4 months to 6 years and 5 months. Lipoaspirate collection ranged from 102–214 g with total cell numbers injected from 33 million to 162 million cells. Cell viability was 62%–91%. There were no systemic or local tissue side effects from the stem cell therapy (n=41 oral and facial injection sites). Clinical pain outcomes showed that at 6 months, 5/9 subjects had reduced both pain intensity scores and use of antineuropathic medication. The mean pain score pre-treatment was 7.5 (SD 1.58) and at 6 months had decreased to 4.3 (SD 3.28), P=0.018, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Antineuropathic pain medication use showed 5/9 subjects reduced their need for medication (gabapentin, P=0.053, Student’s t-test). Conclusion This preliminary open-labeled study showed autologous administration of stem cells for neuropathic trigeminal pain significantly reduced pain intensity at 6 months and is a safe and well tolerated intervention. PMID:24855388

  17. Neuropathic pain: quality-of-life impact, costs and cost effectiveness of therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Alec B

    2009-01-01

    A number of different diseases or injuries can damage the central or peripheral nervous system and produce neuropathic pain (NP), which seems to be more difficult to treat than many other types of chronic pain. As a group, patients with NP have greater medical co-morbidity burden than age- and sex-adjusted controls, which makes determining the humanistic and economic burden attributable to NP challenging. Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is substantially impaired among patients with NP. Patients describe pain-related interference in multiple HR-QOL and functional domains, as well as reduced ability to work and reduced mobility due to their pain. In addition, the spouses of NP patients have been shown to experience adverse social consequences related to NP. In randomized controlled trials, several medications have been shown to improve various measures of HR-QOL. Changes in HR-QOL appear to be tightly linked to pain relief, but not to the development of adverse effects. However, in cross-sectional studies, many patients continue to have moderate or severe pain and markedly impaired HR-QOL, despite taking medications prescribed for NP. The quality of NP treatment appears to be poor, with few patients receiving recommended medications in efficacious dosages. The substantial costs to society of NP derive from direct medical costs, loss of the ability to work, loss of caregivers' ability to work and possibly greater need for institutionalization or other living assistance. No single study has measured all of these costs to society for chronic NP. The cost effectiveness of various interventions for the treatment or prevention of different types of NP has been assessed in several different studies. The most-studied diseases are post-herpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy, for which tricyclic antidepressants (both amitriptyline and desipramine) have been found to be either cost effective or dominant relative to other strategies. Increasing the use of

  18. [Experience in treatment of patients with neuropathic facial pain using ziconotide].

    PubMed

    Lux, E A; Rasche, D

    2011-08-01

    We report on the intrathecal use of ziconotide in three patients with idiopathic facial pain after surgery of the mouth, jaw or face and one patient with neuropathic pain after damage of the lingual nerve. The therapy was successful in three patients but one patient with idiopathic facial pain had pain relief only during the test phase of ziconotide with an external pump and not after implanting the Synchromed® pump. With intrathecal morphine therapy this patient achieved good pain relief. We recommend that patients with neuropathic facial pain should be treated with ziconotide after implementation of guideline-based therapy. In the test phase the ziconotide dose should be increased by 0.6 µg/day per week after an initial dose of 0.6-1.2 µg/day to avoid side-effects. PMID:21818721

  19. [Pathophysiology of neuropathic pain: review of experimental models and proposed mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Magnin, Michel

    2008-02-01

    Neuropathic pain can be conceptualized as the result of an "aberrant learning" process, associated with maladaptive plasticity of the nervous system. A number of modifications of the peripheral nervous system have been described in animal models of neuropathic pain, but their relation with different symptoms in humans is far from fully understood. We note in particular ectopic discharges in damaged myelinated fibers, abnormal activity in undamaged fibers, overexpression of calcium channels increasing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters, and sympathetic sprouting towards the spinal ganglia. Spinal mechanisms involve central sensitization, kindling and potentiation phenomena. Underlying these phenomena may be connectivity changes--still controversial--of non-nociceptive terminals and variations in the sensitivity of postsynaptic receptors. Also contributing to these pathophysiologic modifications are attenuation of spinal inhibition by selective neuronal loss and the development of inflammatory phenomena, including cytokine secretion by macrophages and glial cells. Changes in the dorsal horn modify the activity of projections towards the brainstem and increase spinal hyperactivity still further by feedback loops. These effects are delayed, suggesting that maintenance of spinal sensitization requires the involvement of mechanisms of descending facilitation involving the brainstem. These phenomena induce changes in the activity of thalamocortical networks, which develop autonomous processes that maintain the pain. The cortical representation of body areas change after nervous lesions, and these changes may correlate with the emergence of pain. Neuropathic allodynia and hyperalgesia are supported by cortical modifications that experimental models reproduce very incompletely. Experimental allodynia and neuropathic allodynia share the activation of the cortical pain matrix as well as the bilateralization of insular activity. However, although experimental

  20. Therapeutic Strategies for Neuropathic Pain: Potential Application of Pharmacosynthetics and Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gum Hwa; Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain originating from neuronal damage remains an incurable symptom debilitating patients. Proposed molecular modalities in neuropathic pain include ion channel expressions, immune reactions, and inflammatory substrate diffusions. Recent advances in RNA sequence analysis have discovered specific ion channel expressions in nociceptors such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, voltage-gated potassium, and sodium channels. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) also play an important role in triggering surrounding immune cells. The multiple protein expressions complicate therapeutic development for neuropathic pain. Recent progress in optogenetics and pharmacogenetics may herald the development of novel therapeutics for the incurable pain. Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) facilitate the artificial manipulation of intracellular signaling through excitatory or inhibitory G protein subunits activated by biologically inert synthetic ligands. Expression of excitatory channelrhodopsins and inhibitory halorhodopsins on injured neurons or surrounding cells can attenuate neuropathic pain precisely controlled by light stimulation. To achieve the discrete treatment of injured neurons, we can exploit the transcriptome database obtained by RNA sequence analysis in specific neuropathies. This can recommend the suitable promoter information to target the injury sites circumventing intact neurons. Therefore, novel strategies benefiting from pharmacogenetics, optogenetics, and RNA sequencing might be promising for neuropathic pain treatment in future. PMID:26884648

  1. Incidence of chronic neuropathic pain subsequent to surgical removal of impacted third molars.

    PubMed

    Berge, Trond Inge

    2002-03-01

    To determine the incidence of atypical odontalgia/chronic neuropathic pain subsequent to surgical removal of impacted third molars, a telephone survey and a clinical investigation were carried out. Patients operated on for impacted mandibular third molars during 1994 96 in the Oral Surgery Clinic. School of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, were contacted by telephone. Answers were obtained from 1035 (71%) out of a total of 1458 operated patients. Median observation time was 5 years 9 months, ranging from 4 years 5 months to 6 years 9 months. All except 23 (2.2%) patients stated that they had no long-term symptoms or problems from the surgical site, jaw, or face after the third molar removal. These 23 patients were all examined clinically and radiologically, and symptoms and findings were evaluated. Seventeen patients had TMJ dysfunction: primarily pain of muscular and joint origin. Three patients had a periodontal problem associated with the adjacent second molar, with deep bony pockets and recurrent periodontal infection while two had chronic pulpitis of a second molar. One patient reported a temporary maxillary pain after removal of an ipsilateral mandibular third molar. None of the patients met the criteria for a diagnosis of atypical odontalgia/neuropathic pain. A 95% confidence interval of 0-0.38% of incidence rate of postoperative neuropathic pain was calculated. It is concluded that atypical odontalgia/ chronic neuropathic pain subsequent to surgical third molar removal is rare. PMID:12020113

  2. Therapeutic Strategies for Neuropathic Pain: Potential Application of Pharmacosynthetics and Optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gum Hwa; Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain originating from neuronal damage remains an incurable symptom debilitating patients. Proposed molecular modalities in neuropathic pain include ion channel expressions, immune reactions, and inflammatory substrate diffusions. Recent advances in RNA sequence analysis have discovered specific ion channel expressions in nociceptors such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, voltage-gated potassium, and sodium channels. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) also play an important role in triggering surrounding immune cells. The multiple protein expressions complicate therapeutic development for neuropathic pain. Recent progress in optogenetics and pharmacogenetics may herald the development of novel therapeutics for the incurable pain. Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) facilitate the artificial manipulation of intracellular signaling through excitatory or inhibitory G protein subunits activated by biologically inert synthetic ligands. Expression of excitatory channelrhodopsins and inhibitory halorhodopsins on injured neurons or surrounding cells can attenuate neuropathic pain precisely controlled by light stimulation. To achieve the discrete treatment of injured neurons, we can exploit the transcriptome database obtained by RNA sequence analysis in specific neuropathies. This can recommend the suitable promoter information to target the injury sites circumventing intact neurons. Therefore, novel strategies benefiting from pharmacogenetics, optogenetics, and RNA sequencing might be promising for neuropathic pain treatment in future. PMID:26884648

  3. [Exploration of novel therapeutic targets for neuropathic pain based on the regulation of immune cells].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Saika, Fumihiro; Kishioka, Shiroh

    2015-06-01

    The pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is quite complicated and diverse. Because pre-existing analgesics, such as opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are not sufficient to treat it, it is a serious task to establish a strategy of remedy for neuropathic pain. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that immune cell-mediated neuroinflammation in the nervous system induces central and peripheral sensitization, resulting in chronic pain. Initially, the immune system plays an important role in host defense. Although intravital homeostasis is kept constant by innate and adaptive immunity, the immune system is activated excessively due to infection, stress and tissue injury. Activated immune cells produce and release several kinds of inflammatory mediators, which act directly on sensory neurons and promote a recruitment of immune cells, developing the feedback loop of inflammatory exacerbation. We've focused on the role of crosstalk between immune cells and neurons in peripheral neuroinflammation, and explored a novel candidate for a remedy of neuropathic pain. In this review, we will introduce recent reports and our research work that suggest the functional significance of neuroinflammation in neuropathic pain, and survey possibilities of new strategies for chronic pain from the point of view of basic research. PMID:26281298

  4. Continuous neuropathic pain secondary to endoscopic procedures: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kalladka, Mythili; Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Eliav, Eli; Ananthan, Sowmya; Viswanath, Archana; Heir, Gary

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain encompasses a spectrum of conditions that can arise from a lesion or dysfunction of the central or the peripheral nervous system, and it may develop at variable intervals after nerve injury or inflammation. Nerve injuries arising from surgical procedures commonly occur secondary to the surgical trauma, and in rare instances they are a complication of intubation during general anesthesia or endoscopic procedures. A series of 2 cases of bilateral glossopharyngeal neuropathic pain subsequent to endoscopic procedures is presented with a review of the literature concerning the mechanisms of development of neuropathic pain after these procedures. The purpose of these case reports is to make dentists aware of the occurrence, the mechanisms of nerve injuries, and the treatment of neuropathic pain after endoscopic procedures. In the first case, the patient had relief of pain with a combination therapy of clonazepam 1.0 mg in divided doses twice daily and gabapentin 300 mg in divided doses 3 times daily. In the second case, the patient had significant relief of pain with a monotherapy of gabapentin 1200 mg in divided doses 3 times daily. PMID:27422430

  5. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  6. Trigeminal neuropathic pain as a complication of anterior temporal lobectomy: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Gill, Impreet; Parrent, Andrew G; Steven, David A

    2016-04-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) deficits following anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) are an uncommon but well-recognized complication. The usual CNs implicated in post-ATL complications include the oculomotor, trochlear, and facial nerves. To the authors' knowledge, injury to the trigeminal nerve leading to neuropathic pain has not been previously described in the literature. This paper presents 2 cases of trigeminal neuropathic pain following temporal lobe resections for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed and the microsurgical anatomy of surgically relevant structures is reviewed. PMID:26517768

  7. Procaine Attenuates Pain Behaviors of Neuropathic Pain Model Rats Possibly via Inhibiting JAK2/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghua; Yan, Yurong; Yu, Lingzhi; Duan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NPP) is the main culprit among chronic pains affecting the normal life of patients. Procaine is a frequently-used local anesthesia with multiple efficacies in various diseases. However, its role in modulating NPP has not been reported yet. This study aims at uncovering the role of procaine in NPP. Rats were pretreated with procaine by intrathecal injection. Then NPP rat model was induced by sciatic nerve chronic compression injury (CCI) and behavior tests were performed to analyze the pain behaviors upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations. Spinal expression of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. JAK2 was also overexpressed in procaine treated model rats for behavior tests. Results showed that procaine pretreatment improved the pain behaviors of model rats upon mechanical, thermal and cold stimulations, with the best effect occurring on the 15th day post model construction (p<0.05). Procaine also inhibited JAK2 and STAT3 expression in both mRNA (p<0.05) and protein levels. Overexpression of JAK2 increased STAT3 level and reversed the improvement effects of procaine in pain behaviors (p<0.01). These findings indicate that procaine is capable of attenuating NPP, suggesting procaine is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating NPP. Its role may be associated with the inhibition on JAK2/STAT3 signaling. PMID:27530113

  8. Endogenous CBS-H2S Pathway Contributes to the Development of CCI-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yulong; Li, Aiyuan; Qiu, Bihui; Chen, Feng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Daming; Chen, Shuxian; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Studies showed a complex relationship between hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and neuropathic pain. In this study, the relationship between endogenous CBS-H2S pathway in L4-6 spinal cord and neuropathic pain was explored. A total of 163 adult Kunming mice were used in this study. CBS expression and H2S formation in L4-6 spinal cord were detected in the development of neuropathic pain firstly. Then, effect of AOAA, an CBS inhibitor, on treatment of neuropathic pain by chronic construction injury surgery (CCI) was detected. Pain thresholds and activation of NF-κB(p65), ERK1/2 and CREB were measured as biomarks of neuropathic pain. Results showed that CCI surgery significantly upregulated protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Correlation analysis showed pain thresholds had negative relationships with protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Treatment with AOAA, a CBS inhibitor, inhibited CCI-induced upregulation of CBS expression and H2S formation (P < 0.05). Further, AOAA significantly decreased activation of NF-κB(p65), ERK1/2 and CREB pathway, and reversed CCI-induced allodynia (P < 0.05). This indicated that CBS-H2S pathway promoted the development of neuropathic pain. CBS-H2S pathway could be a promising target for treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26961888

  9. Dynamics of Circadian Thalamocortical Flow of Information during a Peripheral Neuropathic Pain Condition

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sameshima, Koichi; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory–discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep–wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep (SWS) state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and SWS episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus. PMID:22007162

  10. Microglial P2Y12 receptors regulate microglial activation and surveillance during neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Nan; Eyo, Ukpong B; Murugan, Madhuvika; Peng, Jiyun; Matta, Sanjana; Dong, Hailong; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Microglial cells are critical in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and several microglial receptors have been proposed to mediate this process. Of these receptors, the P2Y12 receptor is a unique purinergic receptor that is exclusively expressed by microglia in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we set forth to investigate the role of P2Y12 receptors in microglial electrophysiological and morphological (static and dynamic) activation during spinal nerve transection (SNT)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. First, we found that a genetic deficiency of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12(-/-) mice) ameliorated pain hypersensitivities during the initiation phase of neuropathic pain. Next, we characterised both the electrophysiological and morphological properties of microglia in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn following SNT injury. We show dramatic alterations including a peak at 3days post injury in microglial electrophysiology while high resolution two-photon imaging revealed significant changes of both static and dynamic microglial morphological properties by 7days post injury. Finally, in P2Y12(-/-) mice, these electrophysiological and morphological changes were ameliorated suggesting roles for P2Y12 receptors in SNT-induced microglial activation. Our results therefore indicate that P2Y12 receptors regulate microglial electrophysiological as well as static and dynamic microglial properties after peripheral nerve injury, suggesting that the microglial P2Y12 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26576724

  11. Chloride Homeostasis Critically Regulates Synaptic NMDA Receptor Activity in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyong; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Wen, Lei; Hittelman, Walter N; Xie, Jing-Dun; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-05-17

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition that remains difficult to treat. Diminished synaptic inhibition by GABA and glycine and increased NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activity in the spinal dorsal horn are key mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. However, the reciprocal relationship between synaptic inhibition and excitation in neuropathic pain is unclear. Here, we show that intrathecal delivery of K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-2 (KCC2) using lentiviral vectors produces a complete and long-lasting reversal of pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. KCC2 gene transfer restores Cl(-) homeostasis disrupted by nerve injury in both spinal dorsal horn and primary sensory neurons. Remarkably, restoring Cl(-) homeostasis normalizes both presynaptic and postsynaptic NMDAR activity increased by nerve injury in the spinal dorsal horn. Our findings indicate that nerve injury recruits NMDAR-mediated signaling pathways through the disruption of Cl(-) homeostasis in spinal dorsal horn and primary sensory neurons. Lentiviral vector-mediated KCC2 expression is a promising gene therapy for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:27160909

  12. Intrathecal polymer-based interleukin-10* gene delivery for neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MILLIGAN, ERIN D.; SODERQUIST, RYAN G.; MALONE, STEPHANIE M.; MAHONEY, JOHN H.; HUGHES, TRAVIS S.; LANGER, STEPHEN J.; SLOANE, EVAN M.; MAIER, STEVEN F.; LEINWAND, LESLIE A.; WATKINS, LINDA R.; MAHONEY, MELISSA J.

    2007-01-01

    Research on communication between glia and neurons has increased in the past decade. The onset of neuropathic pain, a major clinical problem that is not resolved by available therapeutics, involves activation of spinal cord glia through the release of proinflammatory cytokines in acute animal models of neuropathic pain. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the spinal action of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in maintaining persistent (2 months) allodynia induced by chronic-constriction injury (CCI). The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 can suppress proinflammatory cytokines and spinal cord glial amplification of pain. Given that IL-1 is a key mediator of neuropathic pain, developing a clinically viable means of long-term delivery of IL-10 to the spinal cord is desirable. High doses of intrathecal IL-10-gene therapy using naked plasmid DNA (free pDNA-IL-10) is effective, but the dose required limits its potential clinical utility. Here we show that intrathecal gene therapy for neuropathic pain is improved sufficiently using two, distinct synthetic polymers, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) and polyethylenimine, that substantially lower doses of pDNA-IL-10 are effective. In conclusion, synthetic polymers used as i.t. gene-delivery systems are well-tolerated and improve the long-duration efficacy of pDNA-IL-10 gene therapy. PMID:18079973

  13. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Rezaee, Ramin; Sazegara, Hasan; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Based on the previous reports, silymarin can suppress nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotrienes, cytokines production, and neutrophils infiltration. Regarding the fact that inflammation plays an important role in neuropathic and formalin-induced pain, it was assumed that silymarin could reduce pain. The present study investigates the analgesic effects of silymarin in chemical nociception and a model of neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: Chemical nociception was produced by injection of 20 µl of formalin (0.5% formaldehyde in saline) into the plantar region of the right hind paw. A sciatic-nerve ligated mouse was applied as the model of neuropathic pain and the antinociceptive response of silymarin was examined 14 days after unilateral nerve-ligation using the hot plate test. Results: The intraperitoneal administration of silymarin (25, 50, and, 100 mg/kg) 2 hr prior to the intraplantar formalin injection suppressed the nociceptive response during the late phase of the formalin test significantly, but it was not in a dose-dependent manner. Different doses of silymarin 14 days after unilateral sciatic nerve ligation in hot plate test did not induce obvious antinociception. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain. PMID:26351564

  14. Therapeutic targets for the management of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of treatment resistant chronic pain and responds poorly to the clinically available therapies. Studies from animal models of neuropathic pain have led to understanding of its pathobiology which includes complex interrelated pathways leading to peripheral and central neuronal sensitization. Advancements in the elucidation of neuropathic pain mechanisms have revealed a number of key targets that have been hypothesized to modulate clinical status. The present review discusses these therapeutic targets including noradrenaline and 5-HT reuptake inhibitors; sodium, calcium and potassium channels; inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters; neuropeptides including bradykinin, tachykinin, cholecystokinin, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and CGRP; pro-inflammatory cytokines; MAP kinases; PPAR γ; Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger; nitric oxide; purinergic receptors; neuronal nicotinic receptors; cation-dependent chloride transporters; oxidative stress; matrix metalloproteinase and plasminogen activators; growth factors; transient receptor potential (TRP) channels; endocannabinoids; histamine receptors; dopamine; sigma receptors, beta adrenergic receptors, endothelins, and D-amino acid oxidase. The exploitation of these targets may provide effective therapeutic agents for the management of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21631400

  15. Intrathecal bone marrow stromal cells inhibit neuropathic pain via TGF-β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a pressing clinical problem. Here, we demonstrate that a local, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) following lumbar puncture alleviates early- and late-phase neuropathic pain symptoms, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia, for several weeks in murine chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury models. Moreover, i.t. BMSCs reduced CCI-induced spontaneous pain and axonal injury of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and inhibited CCI-evoked neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord tissues. BMSCs secreted TGF-β1 into the cerebrospinal fluid, and neutralization of TGF-β1, but not IL-10, reversed the analgesic effect of BMSCs. Conversely, i.t. administration of TGF-β1 potently inhibited neuropathic pain. TGF-β1 acted as a powerful neuromodulator and rapidly (within minutes) suppressed CCI-evoked spinal synaptic plasticity and DRG neuronal hyperexcitability via TGF-β receptor 1–mediated noncanonical signaling. Finally, nerve injury upregulated CXCL12 in lumbar L4–L6 DRGs, and this upregulation caused migration of i.t.-injected BMSCs to DRGs through the CXCL12 receptor CXCR4, which was expressed on BMSCs. BMSCs that migrated from the injection site survived at the border of DRGs for more than 2 months. Our findings support a paracrine mechanism by which i.t. BMSCs target CXCL12-producing DRGs to elicit neuroprotection and sustained neuropathic pain relief via TGF-β1 secretion. PMID:26168219

  16. An approach to identify microRNAs involved in neuropathic pain following a peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Martin Hernandez, Lourdes A.; Zhang, Jin; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury alters the expression of hundreds of proteins in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Targeting some of these proteins has led to successful treatments for acute pain, but not for sustained post-operative neuropathic pain. The latter may require targeting multiple proteins. Since a single microRNA (miR) can affect the expression of multiple proteins, here, we describe an approach to identify chronic neuropathic pain-relevant miRs. We used two variants of the spared nerve injury (SNI): Sural-SNI and Tibial-SNI and found distinct pain phenotypes between the two. Both models induced strong mechanical allodynia, but only Sural-SNI rats maintained strong mechanical and cold allodynia, as previously reported. In contrast, we found that Tibial-SNI rats recovered from mechanical allodynia and never developed cold allodynia. Since both models involve nerve injury, we increased the probability of identifying differentially regulated miRs that correlated with the quality and magnitude of neuropathic pain and decreased the probability of detecting miRs that are solely involved in neuronal regeneration. We found seven such miRs in L3-L5 DRG. The expression of these miRs increased in Tibial-SNI. These miRs displayed a lower level of expression in Sural-SNI, with four having levels lower than those in sham animals. Bioinformatic analysis of how these miRs could affect the expression of some ion channels supports the view that, following a peripheral nerve injury, the increase of the seven miRs may contribute to the recovery from neuropathic pain while the decrease of four of them may contribute to the development of chronic neuropathic pain. The approach used resulted in the identification of a small number of potentially neuropathic pain relevant miRs. Additional studies are required to investigate whether manipulating the expression of the identified miRs in primary sensory neurons can prevent or ameliorate chronic neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve

  17. Use of the painDETECT tool in rheumatoid arthritis suggests neuropathic and sensitization components in pain reporting

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saqa; Magan, Tejal; Vargas, Mario; Harrison, Abiola; Sofat, Nidhi

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory autoimmune condition typified by systemic inflammation targeted toward synovial joints. Inhibition of proinflammatory networks by disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, eg, methotrexate and biologic therapies, including tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, often leads to suppression of disease activity observed at the clinical level. However, despite the era of widespread use of disease-modifying treatments, there remain significant groups of patients who continue to experience pain. Our study formulated a pain assessment tool in the arthritis clinic to assess feasibility of measurements including the visual analog scale (VAS) and painDETECT to assess multimodal features of pain in people with established RA (n=100). Clinical measures of disease activity (Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints [DAS28]) were also recorded. Our data showed that despite the majority of subjects on at least one disease-modifying agent, the majority of patients reported severe pain (54%) by VAS, despite well-controlled clinical disease, with mean DAS28 2.07±0.9. Using the painDETECT questionnaire, 67% of patients had unlikely neuropathic pain. A significant proportion of subjects (28%) had possible neuropathic pain and 5% had features of likely neuropathic pain by painDETECT scoring. We found a positive correlation between VAS and painDETECT (R2=0.757). Of note, the group who had likely or probable neuropathic pain also showed significantly increased pain reporting by VAS (P<0.01). Subjects who were clinically obese (body mass index >30) also had statistically higher proportions of pain reporting (VAS 89.0±0.7 mm) compared with subjects who had a normal body mass index (VAS 45.2±21.8 mm), P<0.05. Our findings suggest that multimodal features of pain perception exist in RA, including neuropathic and sensitization elements, perhaps explaining why a subgroup of people with RA continue to experience ongoing pain, despite their apparent

  18. Nitrous oxide persistently alleviates pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic rats: A dose-dependent effect

    PubMed Central

    Ben Boujema, Meric; Laboureyras, Emilie; Pype, Jan; Bessière, Baptiste; Simonnet, Guy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous pharmacological approaches, there are no common analgesic drugs that produce meaningful relief for the majority of patients with neuropathic pain. Although nitrous oxide (N2O) is a weak analgesic that acts via opioid-dependent mechanisms, it is also an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The NMDAR plays a critical role in the development of pain sensitization induced by nerve injury. OBJECTIVE: Using the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in male rats as a preclinical model of neuropathic pain, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate the lowest N2O concentration and the shortest time of N2O postinjury exposure that would produce persistent relief of neuropathic pain. The second aim was to compare the effects of N2O with gabapentin, a reference drug used in human neuropathic pain relief. METHODS: Changes in the nociceptive threshold were evaluated using the paw pressure vocalization test in rats. RESULTS: Among the various N2O concentrations tested, which ranged from 25% to 50%, only 50% N2O single exposure for 1 h 15 min induced a persistent (minimum of three weeks) and significant (60%) reduction in pain hypersensitivity. A single gabapentin dose (75 mg/kg to 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) induced an acute (1 h to 1 h 30 min) dose-dependent effect, but not a persistent effect such as that observed with N2O. CONCLUSIONS: These preclinical results suggest that N2O is advantageous for long-lasting neuropathic pain relief after sciatic nerve injury compared with other drugs used in humans such as gabapentinoids or NMDAR antagonists. The present preclinical study provides a rationale for developing comparative clinical studies. PMID:26371891

  19. Potential role of allopregnanolone for a safe and effective therapy of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, C; Meyer, L; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G

    2014-02-01

    Because the treatment and management of neuropathic pain are extremely complicated, the characterization of novel analgesics and neuroprotectors with safe toxicological profiles is a crucial need to develop efficient therapies. Several investigations revealed that the natural neurosteroid allopregnanolone (AP) exerts analgesic, neuroprotective, antidepressant and anxiolytic effects. These effects result from AP ability to modulate GABA(A), glycine, L- and T-type calcium channels. It has been shown that AP treatment induced beneficial actions in humans and animal models with no toxic side effects. In particular, a multi-parametric analysis revealed that AP efficiently counteracted chemotherapy-evoked neuropathic pain in rats. It has also been demonstrated that the modulation of AP-producing enzyme, 3α-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3α-HSOR), in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds of peripheral nerve injured neuropathic rats. The painful symptoms were exacerbated by intrathecal injections of provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3α-HSOR) which decreased AP production in the spinal cord. By contrast, the enhancement of AP concentration in the intrathecal space induced analgesia and suppression of neuropathic symptoms. Moreover, in vivo siRNA-knockdown of 3α-HSOR expression in healthy rat dorsal root ganglia increased thermal and mechanical pain perceptions while AP evoked a potent antinociceptive action. In humans, blood levels of AP were inversely associated with low back and chest pain. Furthermore, oral administration of AP analogs induced antinociception. Altogether, these data indicate that AP, which possesses a high therapeutic potential and a good toxicological profile, may be used to develop effective and safe strategies against chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:23948490

  20. Differential regulation of TRP channels in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Susanne; Oerther, Sandra; Lucas, Guilherme; Mattsson, Jan P; Ernfors, Patrik

    2009-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic disease resulting from dysfunction of the nervous system often due to peripheral nerve injury. Hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli (mechanical, thermal or chemical) is a common source of pain in patients and ion channels involved in detecting these stimuli are possible candidates for inducing and/or maintaining the pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels expressed on nociceptors respond to different sensory stimuli and a few of them have been studied previously in the models of neuropathic pain. Using real-time PCR for quantification of all known TRP channels we identified several TRP channels, which have not been associated with nociception or neuropathic pain before, to be expressed in the DRG and to be differentially regulated after spared nerve injury (SNI). Of all TRP channel members, TRPML3 showed the most dramatic change in animals exhibiting neuropathic pain behaviour compared to control animals. In situ hybridisation showed a widespread increase of expression in neurons of small, medium and large cell sizes, indicating expression in multiple subtypes. Co-localisation of TRPML3 with CGRP, NF200 and IB4 staining confirmed a broad subtype distribution. Expression studies during development showed that TRPML3 is an embryonic channel that is induced upon nerve injury in three different nerve injury models investigated. Thus, the current results link for the first time a re-expression of TRPML3 with the development of neuropathic pain conditions. In addition, decreased mRNA levels after SNI were seen for TRPM6, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPC3, TRPC4 and TRPC5. PMID:19446956

  1. Crosstalk between astrocytic CXCL12 and microglial CXCR4 contributes to the development of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Tai, Wai L; Sun, Liting; Pan, Zhiqiang; Xia, Zhengyuan; Chung, Sookja K

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemokine axis chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 12/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCL12/CXCR4) is an emerging pain modulator, but mechanisms for its involvement in neuropathic pain remain unclear. Here, we aimed to study whether CXCL12/CXCR4 axis modulated the development of neuropathic pain via glial mechanisms. In this study, two mouse models of neuropathic pain, namely partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL) model and chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) model, were used. Results In the dorsal horn of L3–L5 segment of spinal cord, CXCL12 and CXCR4 were expressed in both astrocyte and microglia in normal mice. In the pSNL or CPIP model, the expression level of CXCL12 in the ipsilateral L3–L5 segment of mice spinal cord was increased in an astrocyte-dependent manner on post-operative day (POD) 3. Intrathecal administration of CXCL12 with AMD3100 (CXCR4 antagonist) or minocycline (microglia activation inhibitor), but not fluorocitrate (astrocyte activation inhibitor), reversed CXCL12-indued mechanical allodynia in naïve mice. In these models, AMD3100 and AMD3465 (CXCR4 antagonist), administered daily from 1 h before surgery and up to POD 3, attenuated the development of mechanical allodynia. Moreover, AMD3100 administered daily from 1 h before surgery and up to POD 3 downregulated mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1β, and interleukin 6 in the ipsilateral L3–L5 segment of spinal cord in the pSNL and CPIP models on POD 3. Conclusion This study demonstrates the crosstalk between astrocytic CXCL12 and microglial CXCR4 in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain using pSNL and CPIP models. Our results offer insights for the future research on CXCL12/CXCR4 axis and neuropathic pain therapy. PMID:27030717

  2. Establishment and characterization of an optimized mouse model of multiple sclerosis-induced neuropathic pain using behavioral, pharmacologic, histologic and immunohistochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nemat; Woodruff, Trent M; Smith, Maree T

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that causes debilitating central neuropathic pain in many patients. Although mouse models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have provided insight on the pathobiology of MS-induced neuropathic pain, concurrent severe motor impairments confound quantitative assessment of pain behaviors over the disease course. To address this issue, we have established and characterized an optimized EAE-mouse model of MS-induced neuropathic pain. Briefly, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with MOG35-55 (200μg) and adjuvants comprising Quil A (45μg) and pertussis toxin (2×250ng). The traditionally used Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA) was replaced with Quil A, as FCA itself induces CNS neuroinflammation. Herein, EAE-mice exhibited a mild relapsing-remitting clinical disease course with temporal development of mechanical allodynia in the bilateral hindpaws. Mechanical allodynia was fully developed by 28-30days post-immunization (p.i.) and was maintained until study completion (52-60days p.i.), in the absence of confounding motor deficits. Single bolus doses of amitriptyline (1-7mg/kg), gabapentin (10-50mg/kg) and morphine (0.1-2mg/kg) evoked dose-dependent analgesia in the bilateral hindpaws of EAE-mice; the corresponding ED50s were 1.5, 20 and 1mg/kg respectively. At day 39 p.i. in EAE-mice exhibiting mechanical allodynia in the hindpaws, there was marked demyelination and gliosis in the brain and lumbar spinal cord, mirroring these pathobiologic hallmark features of MS in humans. Our optimized EAE-mouse model of MS-associated neuropathic pain will be invaluable for future investigation of the pathobiology of MS-induced neuropathic pain and for efficacy profiling of novel molecules as potential new analgesics for improved relief of this condition. PMID:25223977

  3. Self-medication of a cannabinoid CB2 agonist in an animal model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tannia; Crystal, Jonathon D; Zvonok, Alexander M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2011-09-01

    Drug self-administration methods were used to test the hypothesis that rats would self-medicate with a cannabinoid CB(2) agonist to attenuate a neuropathic pain state. Self-medication of the CB(2) agonist (R,S)-AM1241, but not vehicle, attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity produced by spared nerve injury. Switching rats from (R,S)-AM1241 to vehicle self-administration also decreased lever responding in an extinction paradigm. (R,S)-AM1241 self-administration did not alter paw withdrawal thresholds in sham-operated or naive animals. The percentage of active lever responding was similar in naive groups self-administering vehicle or (R,S)-AM1241. The CB(2) antagonist SR144528 blocked both antiallodynic effects of (R,S)-AM1241 self-medication and the percentage of active lever responding in neuropathic (but not naive) rats. Neuropathic and sham groups exhibited similar percentages of active lever responding for (R,S)-AM1241 on a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule. However, neuropathic animals worked harder than shams to obtain (R,S)-AM1241 when the schedule of reinforcement was increased (to FR6). (R,S)-AM1241 self-medication on FR1, FR3, or FR6 schedules attenuated nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia. (R,S)-AM1241 (900μg intravenously) failed to produce motor ataxia observed after administration of the mixed CB(1)/CB(2) agonist WIN55,212-2 (0.5mg/kg intravenously). Our results suggest that cannabinoid CB(2) agonists may be exploited to treat neuropathic pain with limited drug abuse liability and central nervous system side effects. These studies validate the use of drug self-administration methods for identifying nonpsychotropic analgesics possessing limited abuse potential. These methods offer potential to elucidate novel analgesics that suppress spontaneous neuropathic pain that is not measured by traditional assessments of evoked pain. PMID:21550725

  4. Neuropathic Pain Post Spinal Cord Injury Part 1: Systematic Review of Physical and Behavioral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuropathic pain has various physiologic and psychosocial aspects. Hence, there is a growing use of adjunct nonpharmacological therapy with traditional pharmacotherapy to reduce neuropathic pain post spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published research on nonpharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles addressing nonpharmacological treatment of pain post SCI. Articles were restricted to the English language. Article selection was conducted by 2 independent reviewers with the following inclusion criteria: the subjects participated in a treatment or intervention for neuropathic pain; at least 50% of the subjects had an SCI; at least 3 subjects had an SCI; and a definable intervention was being studied. Data extracted included study design, study type, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample size, outcome measures, and study results. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) assessment scale. Levels of evidence were assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Results: The 16 articles selected for this review fell into 1 of 2 categories of nonpharmacological management of pain after SCI: physical and behavioral treatments. The pooled sample size of all studies included 433 participants. Of the 16 studies included, 7 were level 1, 3 were level 2, and 6 were level 4 studies. Conclusions: Physical interventions demonstrated the strongest evidence based on quality of studies and numbers of RCTs in the nonpharmacological treatment of post-SCI pain. Of these interventions, transcranial electrical stimulation had the strongest evidence of reducing pain. Despite a growing body of literature, there is still a significant lack of research on the use of nonpharmacological therapies for SCI pain

  5. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in the PNS: Novel Therapies for Neuropathic Pain?

    PubMed

    Tibbs, Gareth R; Posson, David J; Goldstein, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathic pain arises from injury to the nervous system. Conditions associated with neuropathic pain are diverse, and lesions and/or pathological changes in the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS) can frequently, but not always, be identified. It is difficult to treat, with patients often on multiple, different classes of medications, all with appreciable adverse side effect profiles. Consequently, there is a pressing need for the development of new medications. The development of such therapeutics is predicated on a clear understanding of the relevant molecular and cellular processes that contribute to the development, and maintenance, of the neuropathic pain state. One proposed mechanism thought to contribute to the ontogeny of neuropathic pain is altered expression, trafficking, and functioning of ion channels expressed by primary sensory neurons. Here, we will focus on three voltage-gated ion channel families, CaV, HCN, and NaV, first reviewing the preclinical data and then the human data where it exists. PMID:27233519

  6. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely. PMID:16553576

  7. Blockade of IL-18 signaling diminished neuropathic pain and enhanced the efficacy of morphine and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Dominika; Piotrowska, Anna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the low efficacy of antinociceptive drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain is a major therapeutic problem. Here, we show the potential role of interleukin (IL)-18 signaling in this phenomenon. IL-18 is an important molecule that performs various crucial functions, including the alteration of nociceptive transmission in response to neuropathic pain. We have studied the changes in the mRNA and protein levels (qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively) of IL-18, IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP) and the IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Our study demonstrated that the spinal levels of IL-18BP were slightly downregulated at days 7 and 14 in the rats subjected to CCI. In contrast, the IL-18 and IL-18R mRNA expression and protein levels were elevated in the ipsilateral spinal cord on days 2, 7 and 14. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of IL-18BP (50 and 100 ng) 7 or 14 days following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesia pursuant to morphine and buprenorphine (0.5 and 2.5 μg) was enhanced. In summary, the restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine via the blockade of IL-18 signaling suggests that increased IL-18 pathway may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids for neuropathic pain. PMID:26763728

  8. Silencing of Id2 Alleviates Chronic Neuropathic Pain Following Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuming; Wu, Qun; Yang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation 2 (Id2) belongs to a helix-loop-helix family of proteins. Recent studies have showed that Id2 plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and neuroprotection. However, under neuropathic pain conditions, the role of Id2 is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Id2 on neuropathic pain in a rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Our results demonstrated that Id2 was upregulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a CCI rat in a time-dependent manner. Intrathecal short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-Id2 attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats, and inhibits the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in the DRG in CCI rats. Furthermore, knockdown of Id2 reduces the expression of NF-κB p65 in the DRG of CCI rats. Taken together, our findings suggest that knockdown of Id2 may alleviate neuropathic pain by inhibiting the NF-κB activation to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Therefore, Id2 may provide an important target of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26768262

  9. Exploring the potential effect of Ocimum sanctum in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced in rats by administration of vincristine sulfate (50 μg/kg i.p.) for 10 consecutive days. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Vincristine administration was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia. Furthermore, vincristine administration was also associated with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated vincristine-induced neuropathic pain along with decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating chemotherapy induced-painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. Furthermore, saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum may be responsible for its noted beneficial effect in neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:20181005

  10. Paeoniflorin and Albiflorin Attenuate Neuropathic Pain via MAPK Pathway in Chronic Constriction Injury Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianyu; Wang, Linyuan; Wang, Jingxia; Wang, Chun; Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Chenglong; Zhu, Yingli; Zhang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains as the most frequent cause of suffering and disability around the world. The isomers paeoniflorin (PF) and albiflorin (AF) are major constituents extracted from the roots of Paeonia (P.) lactiflora Pall. Neuroprotective effect of PF has been demonstrated in animal models of neuropathologies. However, only a few studies are related to the biological activities of AF and no report has been published on analgesic properties of AF about neuropathic pain to date. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of AF and PF against CCI-induced neuropathic pain in rat and explore the underlying mechanism. We had found that both PF and AF could inhibit the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway in spinal microglia and subsequent upregulated proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). AF further displayed remarkable effects on inhibiting the activation of astrocytes, suppressing the overelevated expression of phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) in astrocytes, and decreasing the content of chemokine CXCL1 in the spinal cord. These results suggest that both PF and AF are potential therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain, which merit further investigation. PMID:27429639

  11. Non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation for the study and treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Knotkova, Helena; Cruciani, Ricardo A

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, radiological neuroimaging techniques have enhanced the study of mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Recent findings suggest that neuropathic pain in certain pain syndromes (e.g., complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathic dystrophy, phantom-limb pain) is associated with a functional reorganization and hyperexitability of the somatosensory and motor cortex. Studies showing that the reversal of cortical reorganization in patients with spontaneous or provoked pain is accompanied by pain relief stimulated the search for novel alternatives how to modulate the cortical excitability as a strategy to relieve pain. Recently, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were proposed as suitable methods for modulation of cortical excitability. Both techniques (TMS and tDCS) have been clinically investigated in healthy volunteers as well as in patients with various clinical pathologies and variety of pain syndromes. Although there is less evidence on tDCS as compared with TMS, the findings on tDCS in patients with pain are promising, showing an analgesic effect of tDCS, and observations up to date justify the use of tDCS for the treatment of pain in selected patient populations. tDCS has been shown to be very safe if utilized within the current protocols. In addition, tDCS has been proven to be easy to apply, portable and not expensive, which further enhances great clinical potential of this technique. PMID:20336445

  12. Case studies illustrating the management of trigeminal neuropathic pain using topical 5% lidocaine plasters

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zehra; Renton, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Chronic trigeminal pain, with its severe related functional problems, is difficult to treat. Treatment is often empirically based on medications used for other chronic pain conditions. Systemic sodium channel and calcium channel blocking agents may cause a multitude of complications that are often poorly tolerated by the patient. Aim: The aim of this case report was to assess the efficacy of topical 5% lidocaine plasters in reducing pain and reducing adjuvant medication in patients with orofacial neuropathic pain. Method: Fourteen patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions referred to the oral surgery department were instructed to wear 5% lidocaine plasters for 12 hours each day over the painful area. The conditions included post-surgical neuropathy (n = 10), multiple sclerosis-related pain (n = 1), persistent idiopathic facial pain (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (post-herpetic neuralgia, n = 1) and trigeminal neuralgia (n = 1). Data were collected on patient demographics, pain levels and medication. Results: Pain levels improved in 12 out of 14 patients. Nine patients had a reduction in adjuvant medication, two of whom completely stopped adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: This case series demonstrates that of the use of 5% lidocaine plasters may play a useful role in the management of chronic trigeminal pain. A suggested novel approach for the management of orofacial pain, for clinicians, is presented. Summary points Management of chronic orofacial pain continues to be a major challenge to the clinician. Patients are often placed on a multitude of medications in an attempt to alleviate pain without success. Topical 5% lidocaine plasters, currently used for the management of post-herpetic neuralgia, offer the option of locally targeting trigeminal pain without the multiple side-effects of systemic medication. This case series demonstrates that lidocaine plasters decrease verbal pain scores in extraoral, trigeminal and neuropathic pain, and reduce the use of other

  13. Motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain syndromes: a case series experience.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Darrow, David; Monsivais, Daniel; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Gjini, Klevest

    2014-06-18

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition lacking effective management and responding poorly to standard treatment protocols. Motor cortex stimulation has emerged as a new and promising therapeutic tool with outcomes potentially affected by the specific causes and location. In this study we report a series of eight cases in the neurosurgery practice of one of the authors (R.J.B.), including neuropathic pain syndromes of trigeminal or thalamic origin with or without anesthesia dolorosa. Pain relief was evaluated on the basis of comparison of Visual Analog scores at baseline and at 3 months after surgery. In addition, we assessed differences in pain relief outcomes between cases with trigeminal neuralgia and thalamic stroke, as well as cases with or without anesthesia dolorosa (i.e. pain with numbness of the affected area). Visual Analog Scale scores showed a statistically significant decrease of 4.19 (P=0.002) at 3 months follow-up compared with baseline. Pain relief levels in four of five patients in the subgroup with facial pain were higher than 50%, and none of the patients in the subgroup with thalamic and phantom limb pain showed such a good outcome. Furthermore, we found larger pain relief levels in facial pain conditions with versus without anesthesia dolorosa. These results point to utility of motor cortex stimulation in relieving neuropathic pain, as well as better outcomes for patients with facial pain and anesthesia dolorosa. Future studies should incorporate methods to noninvasively trial those patients who may benefit from surgical implantation to predict the outcomes and maximize their negative predictive value. PMID:24780896

  14. The indirect pathway of the nucleus accumbens shell amplifies neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenjie; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Berger, Sara; Wu, Ying; Na, Xiaodong; Liu, Xianguo; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Apkarian, A Vania; Martina, Marco; Surmeier, D James

    2016-01-01

    We examined adaptations in nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons in mouse and rat peripheral nerve injury models of neuropathic pain. Injury selectively increased excitability of NAc shell indirect pathway spiny projection neurons (iSPNs) and altered their synaptic connectivity. Moreover, injury-induced tactile allodynia was reversed by inhibiting and exacerbated by exciting iSPNs, indicating that they not only participated in the central representation of pain, but gated activity in ascending nociceptive pathways. PMID:26691834

  15. Comparison of central versus peripheral delivery of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although pregabalin therapy is beneficial for neuropathic pain (NeP) by targeting the CaVα2δ-1 subunit, its site of action is uncertain. Direct targeting of the central nervous system may be beneficial for the avoidance of systemic side effects. Results We used intranasal, intrathecal, and near-nerve chamber forms of delivery of varying concentrations of pregabalin or saline delivered over 14 days in rat models of experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy and spinal nerve ligation. As well, radiolabelled pregabalin was administered to determine localization with different deliveries. We evaluated tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at multiple time points, and then analyzed harvested nervous system tissues for molecular and immunohistochemical changes in CaVα2δ-1 protein expression. Both intrathecal and intranasal pregabalin administration at high concentrations relieved NeP behaviors, while near-nerve pregabalin delivery had no effect. NeP was associated with upregulation of CACNA2D1 mRNA and CaVα2δ-1 protein within peripheral nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and dorsal spinal cord, but not brain. Pregabalin's effect was limited to suppression of CaVα2δ-1 protein (but not CACNA2D1 mRNA) expression at the spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. Dorsal root ligation prevented CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking anterograde from the dorsal root ganglia to the dorsal horn after neuropathic pain initiation. Conclusions Either intranasal or intrathecal pregabalin relieves neuropathic pain behaviours, perhaps due to pregabalin's effect upon anterograde CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking from the DRG to the dorsal horn. Intranasal delivery of agents such as pregabalin may be an attractive alternative to systemic therapy for management of neuropathic pain states. PMID:22236461

  16. Increased miR-132-3p expression is associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Leinders, M; Üçeyler, N; Pritchard, R A; Sommer, C; Sorkin, L S

    2016-09-01

    Alterations in the neuro-immune balance play a major role in the pathophysiology of chronic neuropathic pain. MicroRNAs (miRNA) can regulate both immune and neuronal processes and may function as master switches in chronic pain development and maintenance. We set out to analyze the role of miR-132-3p, first in patients with peripheral neuropathies and second in an animal model of neuropathic pain. We initially determined miR-132-3p expression by measuring its levels in white blood cells (WBC) of 30 patients and 30 healthy controls and next in sural nerve biopsies of 81 patients with painful or painless inflammatory or non-inflammatory neuropathies based on clinical diagnosis. We found a 2.6 fold increase in miR-132-3p expression in WBC of neuropathy patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.001). MiR-132-3p expression was also slightly up-regulated in sural nerve biopsies from neuropathy patients suffering from neuropathic pain compared to those without pain (1.2 fold; p<0.001). These promising findings were investigated further in an animal model of neuropathic pain, the spared nerve injury model (SNI). For this purpose miR-132-3p expression levels were measured in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord of rats. Subsequently, miR-132-3p expression was pharmacologically modulated with miRNA antagonists or mimetics, and evoked pain and pain aversion were assessed. Spinal miR-132-3p levels were highest 10days after SNI, a time when persistent allodynia was established (p<0.05). Spinal administration of miR-132-3p antagonists via intrathecal (i.t.) catheters dose dependently reversed mechanical allodyina (p<0.001) and eliminated pain behavior in the place escape avoidance paradigm (p<0.001). Intrathecal administration of miR-132-3p mimetic dose-dependently induced pain behavior in naïve rats (p<0.001). Taken together these results indicate a pro-nociceptive effect of miR-132-3p in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27349406

  17. Primary headaches and trigeminal neuralgia: neuropathic pain yes or not? Evidences from neurophysiological procedures.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Vecchio, Eleonora

    2013-09-01

    Despite the fact that neurophysiological evaluation is not useful for primary headache diagnosis, the nociceptive system exploration through reflexes and evoked potentials procedures may give an aid in understanding the pathophysiological mechanism subtending pain. Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, which is supported by clinical evaluation and instrumental assessment by trigeminal and nociceptive reflexes and laser evoked potentials. The same methods, applied to migraine and cluster headache, together with evidences coming from structural and functional neuroimaging, excluded the neuropathic origin of pain, which is attaining to symptomatic and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but confirmed a complex dysfunction of pain processing. Tension-type headache fits with a model of non-nociceptive and non-neuropathic pain, subtended by a complex interaction of peripheral muscular and central neuronal factors. The presence of altered modulation of pain concurs with migraine and tension-type headache, and should be taken into account for the choice of the best therapeutic approach. PMID:23952254

  18. Prostacyclin mediates neuropathic pain through interleukin 1β-expressing resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Claus Dieter; Pierre, Sandra; Weigert, Andreas; Weichand, Benjamin; Altenrath, Kai; Schreiber, Yannick; Ferreiros, Nerea; Zhang, Dong Dong; Suo, Jing; Treutlein, Elsa-Marie; Henke, Marina; Kunkel, Hana; Grez, Manuel; Nüsing, Rolf; Brüne, Bernhard; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    Prostacyclin is an important mediator of peripheral pain sensation. Here, we investigated its potential participation in mediating neuropathic pain and found that prostacyclin receptor (IP) knockout mice exhibited markedly decreased pain behavior. Application of an IP antagonist to the injury site or selective IP deficiency in myeloid cells mimicked the antinociceptive effect observed in IP knockout mice. At the site of nerve injury, IP was expressed in interleukin (IL) 1β-containing resident macrophages, which were less common in IP knockout mice. Local administration of the IP agonist cicaprost inhibited macrophage migration in vitro and promoted accumulation of IP- and IL1β-expressing cells as well as an increase of IL1β concentrations at the application site in vivo. Fittingly, the IL1-receptor antagonist anakinra (IL-1ra) decreased neuropathic pain behavior in wild-type mice but not in IP knockout mice. Finally, continuous, but not single administration, of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor meloxicam early after nerve injury decreased pain behavior and the number of resident macrophages. Thus, early synthesis of prostacyclin at the site of injury causes accumulation of IL1β-expressing macrophages as a key step in neuropathic pain after traumatic injury. PMID:24333781

  19. [Topical pharmacologic approach with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, L; Lattanzi, S; Chiarlone, R; Fogliardi, A; Intelligente, F; Irace, C; Lanzilotta, M; Palomba, R; Storelli, E; Zampi, M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is a medical challenge. The responsiveness to the different classes of drugs is often unsatisfactory and frequently associated to a wide range of side effects. International guidelines suggest for the "localized" neuropathic pain the topical treatment with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, alone or associated to systemic drugs, as the first choice since its favorable efficacy and tolerability profile. Many clinical experiences support the rationale for using 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in different kinds of localized neuropathic pain, such as postherpetic and trigeminal neuralgia, compressive syndromes, painful diabetic polyneuropathy and pain secondary to trauma or surgical interventions. This paper reports a series of clinical cases whose heterogeneity suggests the wide burden of applicability of the topical 5% lidocaine, either alone and associated to systemic drugs. All the described conditions were characterized by a highly intense pain, not adequately controlled by actual medications, which improved after the use of topical lidocaine. The good response to lidocaine allowed the reduction, of even the withdrawal, of concurrent drugs and improved the patients' quality of life. PMID:25392960

  20. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  1. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt; Férézou, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  2. Adult stem cell as new advanced therapy for experimental neuropathic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Silvia; Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Niada, Stefania; Ferrari, Daniela; Vescovi, Angelo; Brini, Anna Teresa; Panerai, Alberto Emilio; Sacerdote, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a highly invalidating disease resulting as consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. All the pharmacological treatments today in use give a long lasting pain relief only in a limited percentage of patients before pain reappears making NP an incurable disease. New approaches are therefore needed and research is testing stem cell usage. Several papers have been written on experimental neuropathic pain treatment using stem cells of different origin and species to treat experimental NP. The original idea was based on the capacity of stem cell to offer a totipotent cellular source for replacing injured neural cells and for delivering trophic factors to lesion site; soon the researchers agreed that the capacity of stem cells to contrast NP was not dependent upon their regenerative effect but was mostly linked to a bidirectional interaction between the stem cell and damaged microenvironment resident cells. In this paper we review the preclinical studies produced in the last years assessing the effects induced by several stem cells in different models of neuropathic pain. The overall positive results obtained on pain remission by using stem cells that are safe, of easy isolation, and which may allow an autologous transplant in patients may be encouraging for moving from bench to bedside, although there are several issues that still need to be solved. PMID:25197647

  3. Bilateral Sensory Abnormalities in Patients with Unilateral Neuropathic Pain; A Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Study

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M.R.F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    In patients who experience unilateral chronic pain, abnormal sensory perception at the non-painful side has been reported. Contralateral sensory changes in these patients have been given little attention, possibly because they are regarded as clinically irrelevant. Still, bilateral sensory changes in these patients could become clinically relevant if they challenge the correct identification of their sensory dysfunction in terms of hyperalgesia and allodynia. Therefore, we have used the standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) to investigate somatosensory function at the painful side and the corresponding non-painful side in unilateral neuropathic pain patients using gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers as a reference cohort. Sensory abnormalities were observed across all QST parameters at the painful side, but also, to a lesser extent, at the contralateral, non-painful side. Similar relative distributions regarding sensory loss/gain for non-nociceptive and nociceptive stimuli were found for both sides. Once a sensory abnormality for a QST parameter at the affected side was observed, the prevalence of an abnormality for the same parameter at the non-affected side was as high as 57% (for Pressure Pain Threshold). Our results show that bilateral sensory dysfunction in patients with unilateral neuropathic pain is more rule than exception. Therefore, this phenomenon should be taken into account for appropriate diagnostic evaluation in clinical practice. This is particularly true for mechanical stimuli where the 95% Confidence Interval for the prevalence of sensory abnormalities at the non-painful side ranges between 33% and 50%. PMID:22629414

  4. Validity and reliability of the persian (Farsi) version of the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions) questionnaire for differential diagnosis of neuropathic from non-neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Fateh, Hamid R; Forogh, Bijan; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Ahadi, Tannaz; Ghaboussi, Pouya; Bouhassira, Didier; Raissi, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was translation and assessment of validity and reliability of the Persian version of DN4 questionnaire. The goal was to fill the gap caused by the absence of a validated instrument in Persian to facilitate discrimination of neuropathic pain. In this study, the adaptation and validation of the questionnaire was carried out in 4 steps, including translation, retranslation, semantic, and literal assessments, and a pilot study for practicability and potential perception difficulties of the final Persian version on 45 patient samples. The questionnaire validation performed on 175 patients, 112 (64%) females with the mean age of 52.53 (SD = 14.98) ranging from 22 to 87 years of age with neuropathic (N = 86) and non-neuropathic pain (NNP) (N = 89). Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden Index in cut-off point ≥ 4 were 90%, 95%, and 0.85, respectively, which are noteworthy findings among other validation studies. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the whole questionnaire was 0.852. Inter-rater agreement and test-retest reliability were significant intraclass coefficient (ICC = 0.957 and ICC = 0.918, respectively). The Persian version of DN4 questionnaire is a reliable, valid, feasible, and easily administered tool for precise discrimination neuropathic pain from NNP in Farsi. The characteristics of this test can assist practitioner to diagnose neuropathic pain accurately for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:23763722

  5. Effective management of intractable neuropathic pain using an intrathecal morphine pump in a patient with acute transverse myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Der-Cherng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chou, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Transverse myelitis is a rare inflammatory myelopathy characterized by loss of motor and sensory function below the affected level of the spinal cord, and causes neurogenic bowel and bladder. Occasionally, it also causes neuropathic pain with spasticity. Traditional therapies for neuropathic pain are multiple, including multimodal analgesic regimens, antiepileptic or antidepressant medications, opioids, sympathetic blocks, and spinal cord stimulation. Persistent neuropathic pain can cause emotional distress by affecting sleep, work, recreation, and emotional well-being. Here we report the case of a patient suffering from intractable neuropathic pain following acute transverse myelitis that was not relieved by combinations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, antidepressant, and opioid medications, or by acupuncture. Implantation of an intrathecal morphine pump controlled the pain successfully without side effects, and enabled the patient to embark on intensive rehabilitation. The patient’s muscle strength has improved significantly and the patient may soon be able to use a walker with minimal assistance. PMID:23935366

  6. Antinociceptive effects of topical mepivacaine in a rat model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Castellanos, Daniel A; Hama, Aldric T

    2016-01-01

    Background A consequence of HIV infection is sensory neuropathy, a debilitating condition that degrades the quality of life of HIV patients. Furthermore, life-extending antiretroviral treatment may exacerbate HIV sensory neuropathy. Analgesics that relieve other neuropathic pains show little or no efficacy in ameliorating HIV sensory neuropathy. Thus, there is a need for analgesics for people with this particular pain. While lidocaine is used in the management of painful peripheral neuropathies, another local anesthetic mepivacaine, with a potentially improved bioavailability, could be utilized for the management of HIV neuropathic pain. Methods The efficacy of topical anesthetics was evaluated in a preclinical rodent model of painful peripheral neuropathy induced by epineural administration of the HIV envelope protein gp120 delivered using saturated oxidized cellulose implanted around the sciatic nerve. Beginning at 2 weeks following gp120 administration, the effects of local anesthetics topically applied via gauze pads were tested on heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw. Rats were tested using several concentrations of mepivacaine or lidocaine during the following 2 weeks. Results By 2 weeks following epineural gp120 implantation, the ipsilateral hind paw developed significant hypersensitivity to noxious pressure and heat hyperalgesia. A short-lasting, concentration-dependent amelioration of pressure and heat hyperalgesia was observed following topical application of mepivacaine to the ipsilateral plantar hind paw. By contrast, topical lidocaine ameliorated heat hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner but not pressure hyperalgesia. Equipotent concentrations of mepivacaine and lidocaine applied topically to the tail of mice significantly increased tail withdrawal latencies in the tail flick test, demonstrating that both local anesthetics attenuate responding to a brief noxious stimulus. Conclusion These findings showed that mepivacaine, rather

  7. Antidepressants Are Effective in Decreasing Neuropathic Pain After SCI: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Stacey; Lam, Tracey; Teasell, Robert; Loh, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review and assess the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants for neuropathic pain among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases for relevant articles published from 1980 to April 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain with ≥3 individuals and ≥50% of study population with SCI were included. Two independent reviewers selected studies based on inclusion criteria and then extracted data. Pooled analysis using Cohen’s d to calculate standardized mean difference, standard error, and 95% confidence interval for primary (pain) and other secondary outcomes was conducted. Results: Four RCTs met inclusion criteria. Of these, 2 studies assessed amitriptyline, 1 trazadone, and 1 duloxetine among individuals with neuropathic SCI pain. A small effect was seen in the effectiveness of antidepressants in decreasing pain among individuals with SCI (standardized mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.62; P = .02). A number needed to treat of 3.4 for 30% or more pain relief was found by pooling 2 studies. Of these, significantly higher risk of experiencing constipation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09-2.78; P = .02) and dry mouth (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.85; P = .02) was found amongst individuals receiving antidepressant treatment compared to those in the control group. Conclusion: The current meta-analysis demonstrates that antidepressants are effective in reducing neuropathic SCI pain. However, this should be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of studies. Further evaluation of long-term therapeutic options may be required. PMID:26364286

  8. Therapeutic Restoration of Spinal Inhibition via Druggable Enhancement of Potassium-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2–Mediated Chloride Extrusion in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristopher T.; Khanna, Arjun; Clapham, David E.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathic pain, typified by the development of spontaneous pain or pain hypersensitivity following injury to the peripheral nervous system, is common, greatly impairs quality of life, and is inadequately treated with available drugs. Maladaptive changes in chloride homeostasis due to a decrease in the functional expression of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons are a major contributor to the central disinhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor– and glycine receptor–mediated signaling that characterizes neuropathic pain. A compelling novel analgesic strategy is to restore spinal ionotropic inhibition by enhancing KCC2-mediated chloride extrusion. We review the data on which this theory of alternative analgesia is based, discuss recent high-throughput screens that have searched for small-molecule activators of KCC2, and propose other strategies of KCC2 activation based on recent developments in the basic understanding of KCC2’s functional regulation. Exploiting the chloride-dependent functional plasticity of the γ-aminobutyric acid and glycinergic system by targeting KCC2 may be a tenable method of restoring ionotropic inhibition not only in neuropathic pain but also in other “hyperexcitable” diseases of the nervous system such as seizures and spasticity. PMID:24615367

  9. κ-opioid receptors are not necessary for the antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Megat, Salim; Bohren, Yohann; Doridot, Stephane; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tricyclic antidepressants are used clinically as first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Opioid receptors participate in this pain-relieving action, and preclinical studies in receptor-deficient mice have highlighted a critical role for δ-, but not μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated whether κ-opioid (KOP) receptors have a role in the antiallodynic action of tricyclic antidepressants. Experimental Approach We used a model of neuropathic pain induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. In this model, the mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments. Experiments were conducted in C57BL/6J mice, and in KOP receptor-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. The tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (5 mg·kg−1) was delivered twice a day for over 2 weeks. Agonists and antagonists of opioid receptors were used to test the selectivity of the KOP receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) in mice with neuropathic pain. Key Results After 12 days of treatment, nortriptyline relieved neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Surprisingly, acute nor-BNI reversed the effect of nortriptyline in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Further experiments showed that nor-BNI action was selective for KOP receptors at a late time-point after its administration (8 h), but not at an early time-point, when it may also interact with δ-opioid (DOP) receptors. Conclusions and Implications KOP receptors are not necessary for the effect of a tricyclic antidepressant against neuropathic allodynia. These findings together with previous data indicate that the DOP receptor is the only opioid receptor that is necessary for the antiallodynic action of antidepressants. PMID:25297905

  10. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management

    PubMed Central

    Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Key words:Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light. PMID:26535105